BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

The British Columbia Retailer Jul 31, 1926

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcret-1.0344910.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcret-1.0344910.json
JSON-LD: bcret-1.0344910-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcret-1.0344910-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcret-1.0344910-rdf.json
Turtle: bcret-1.0344910-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcret-1.0344910-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcret-1.0344910-source.json
Full Text
bcret-1.0344910-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcret-1.0344910.ris

Full Text

Array Thc British Columbia
Vancouver, B.C. II11 V   1Q9C
VOL. XVIII, No It       JULY, I3Z0
10c per copy; $1.00 per year.
Eighteenth Year.
THE TOLEDO SCRE-READING DEVICE
na)
*P
r<-5&
0*V**e~-—
*#
I
wwcmZCi  VISION
<#
***** Y**
^1+oV S I G H TI N
'.**+ I   IMP
*
P.r.on. Of different heights, ****'*« f^y Th!
.am. height, may read the SSmi VSlUM JHJJJ"^ TJJ
nearsighted man It.n, forward, lowerIflQ hie MM. SBS
ths far sighted man lean, backward. rSlelS| <Mi Wjjj »J
mult being Ihe eame a. II the Srit vesrs ihort and
other tall.
Everyone know, that there mutt be ™*W^W*
Just s7th iflht on a «un sesbiei.tomtome tJ
draw an eiact bead on the  mark, to tfOSS WO ***
t ght.no list *orrt the eye to the correct po. I tion for
.ng the weights and valuet on TOLEDO BCALta.
A taalt to son tiny p******* *«i M« ™<y »'»   M f" dtltHt'
LINE
READING
LINE    |
Note the results: ■   .
(1) Old problem of the "tall clerk and short clerk" solved
(2) Eye brought to an absolutely correct level with the
chart in every case.
(3) Operator warned, and compelled to read the weight
and money value* correctly.
(4) Money losses due to misreading stopped.
(5) Quicker reading, because operator is never confused
or doubtful.
(0) Sealer, in testing the scale, reads the chart from the
same correct level as the merchant and his clerks.
Although the scale may be WEIGHING correctly, the
"reading test" may reveal surprising losses.
•MM orttt lo Jit ***'** **•'**     "-»* A
rANADIAN TOLEDO SCALE CO.. LIMITED. Wrndwr. Ont.
aNA  ^.mit'"^ I*) nMlc -MM for *-» ■**' *
s„     :   - ***** "'•"<"-" *? D°m""°B*
TOLEDO
m
N  C
r>
i   rj
SCALES!
"BUYERS
TmEK" NUMBER-Speciol Distribution in Alberta iF
Buyers' Week, Aug. 7-14 UA Welcome always awaits our visiting gy§J$^er$n
PAPER BAGS
One of the things that help to make up good store
_^^^^^^^ sen ice is the strength and appearance of paper bags
"STANDARD"   "MANILLA"
"BUCKSKIN"    "LIGHT  KRAFT"
"HEAVY KRAFT"
Paper Mills:
Lachute A St. Jerome.
Que.
Manufacturers  since  1870
"BUILT UP TO A STANDARD-ALWAYS"
J. C. WILSON, LIMITED
Manufacturer! of
PAPER BA08.     WRAPPING, TISSUE AND TOILET PAPERS
for   Wholesalers snd Retailers.
1068 HOMER STREET, VANOOUVER, B. C
Phone: Seymour 781
The same price
at every store in
our British
Columbia
Territory.
5
BIG BARS
FOR
25c
PROTECT YOUR PROFITS BY
SELLING A MAINTAINED PRICE
LAUNDRY SOAP
THE ROYAL CROWN SOAPS, LTD.
VANCOUVER, B. C. THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
HHMHKJKn
x2 V!'m'-
•<>d
fl
jF
,1!
- RELIABLE
- PROFITABLE
RELIABLE because of the integrity of the name
behind them.
PROFITABLE because they are reliable and because they enjoy a big Summer demand, and
steady sales at all Seasons.
ORDER YOUR SUPPLY OF
BENSON'S
PREPARED CORN
.AND -
SILVER GLOSS
LAUNDRY STARCH
TheCANADA STARCH CO. UMITED ■ MONTREAL
 l.,i.lt,.m(M.iuiitu!nHini.tii.iiuiiiHiHimii!iu!mmiililiiliil!li;ii!lr',!;' 1!i :!,i!.1!!:!liiillliliiillliS!
l.iBilMillBillWWIIW""1****1"*****'"   —
IM THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Uy
***££&*
COFFEE
Saves you time when customers ask for "Prssh Roasted
Coffee." That's exactly what Nabob is. The vacuum tin
keeps the flavor in—you sell it "fresh from the roaster.
Kelly Douglas & Co. Ltd.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
NABOB
jjlii HUAND
'>rr:
I
D*.  ur.i as a(
"'NlOlKl1"1
WILSON BROTHERS
Established 1890
Our Motto i. " SERVICE "
Ws oannot offer to sell you roods cheaper than any other firm is in a position to do, but we CAN
five actual facts to prove that it is
ECONOMY
to dial with us
StfAR WILSON BROTHERS, VICTORIA, B. C.
Wkolcssle Grocers
SHAMROCK RRAND
^™^^*™^aa™^^r^Bm^K^s^=^^"™""aa"""""""       m  sw **\ -****-——aa
HAM, BACON, BUTTER, LARD, SAUSAGE, etc.
First Quality pseking house products put up by P. Burns A Co.,
Limited, which means they are the highest grsde, slwsys reliable,
and without equsl on this msrket.
YOU CAN RECOMMEND SHAMROCK BRAND.
P. Burns & Company, Limited
▼ANOOOTTBB
OALOART
EDMONTON '■T.tft
I'r'h
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
■"W""""
ROGERS'
GOLDEN SYRUP
v;. I
r
1
il
i<
Th« End of « ?*tt*t\ D»y
„.,„« a soccial grade of which is imported
1M.de from fln«t flavoured cane sugar, a spec... gra
for th. purpose. ^
|Put up in all sizes of packages to suit you
lln package, designed to beautify your .tore.
J4b. Uns, 24 to a case.
Mb. tins, 12 to t case
10*lb. tins, 6 to a cast.
20-lb. tins, 3 to » cass.
Perfect Seal jsrs, 12 to a case.
The British Columbia Sugar Refining Co. Ltd
VAHOOUVBR, B.0 THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RKTAILER
Juh
HOT WEATHER MEALS
Don t ((rumble about tbe beat—sell Quaker Brand
on tbe phone—no need for a customer to come out
in daytime.   Tbe quality never varies in
UAKER
BRAND CANNED
Fruits and Vegetables
Use your pbone and Quaker Brand for Profit
DOMINION CANNERS B.C. LIMITED
VANCOUVER
Light Kraft
Light Manila
AN 100% B. C. PRODUCT.
Now that the Highest Grades of Paper Bags are being msde in B. C.
be careful to always specify the B. C. Brands.
"WESTERN" Manilla Quality.
"PAOIPIC"~LJKht Kraft Quality.
"COAST"—Heavy Kraft Quality. *j... _
"HITONE"-Whitp Sulphite Quality.
Manufactured in British Columbia i»y
Bartram Paper Products Co. Ltd.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Solo Agents for British Columbis:
The Norfolk Paper Co., Ltd.
136 WATER STREET VANOOUVER, B. 0.
Phone Seymour 7868 and 7869
HtJ-vy Kr.fl
■road etrlpt
Whiit Sulphltf Il"ll
iW*
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
BRJTISH COLUMBIA
Retailer ^
With which la Incorporated tht B  C. TRADE REVIBW.
Published Mcnthly.
EIGHTEENTH YEAR
official oroan or b c. board
RETAIL IIERCHANT8*
ASSOCIATION OF CANADA.
OBNBIUL IIBRCMANDI8B
OHOCERIES. DRYOOOD8.
HARDWARE. rOOTWBAR. 	
.____^_mf^amaaaaaammammmimmm—im^———	
7 MONTHLY JOURNAL published in the interest of Retail Merehan*
oi.1,} lid th. Development st%mmm. *** *«** G™«*'
SUBSCRIPTION RATE: On. Dollar Per Year, payable In advanct.
Advtrtlal.8 Ret«* •■ Application
Publishers; progress publishing co. ltd.
Suite 101*2 Mdrchanla* Eaehangt Bu.ldmg
VANCOUVER. B. C. _
Cable Addresi -Shipping-All Code!
Telephone Sey. Wl w N Code nuelneM Manager
Editor. I 8. »■■*» §i o|uwi M Secondclt„ roitter
Vol Will. No. 11
Tht following rtpreeewt W. M. A. Sranchat
In tha Province of Britiah Columbia;—
Armstrong H. S. Armstrong.
Sec.-Treas.
Cranbrook C. J. Lewis, Sec.
F«»rnle   Norman Suddaby,
Pres.
Kamloops A. C. Taylor, Pres.
Kelowna Andrew Fraser, Sec.
Lytton D. Rebagllatl, Sec.
Nanaimo N. Wright, Sec.
Nelson -E. F. Gigot ,Sec.
New Westminster	
and Fraser Valley.D. Stuart, Sec.
Revelstoke W. A. Sturdy, Sec.
Vsncouver W. F. Ing, Sec.
VANCOUVER, B.C., JULYJW
Vancouver, B.C.
Sunny Alberta-A Record of Progressive
Activity
•n„,Mim..H..ni..*I.r.,vi„,.,..fAI,1.r U .nd Brig
(■••lumbU sit »> -I l>* Interwoven that . '« »'    ''
*,i, roull rehant. of both ptovl-w* »"'        ,',
*r tr-lghl Into U ^fl^ffS^
other twritory, ..ml torn, of the foUOWUiB  ';„ ,,„.,,,,
,i,, prograM mad. by our .toter prov «JI!-*«*»
\m\ ttatomrt to our reader*   I  won »
 lu.. -.tr.-t.-h it taa«toalloti... j.r..|.l..^-    «<  '» '
,n.Uing win >f *™,) from Alb,,." I-wtaf   ^ »«•■
.h« port ..f Vanoouver will, i" »' ""V" , m    ,   I
,,„.,   I., augmented with .hlpmont. ot ... iml•<
„r,„iu,,H from Induitrtal -4*«W«g5 ..„,-
ramln-j f...'tor» <>f ImporUnee m tl"* dcvciopm.
r„L,s,ly. th. pt*du«(a at *'^t$o&
ml., lhe lUherlo. »nd th. "'■■•■*V \ ! ? >.„,l in ml
■n tlu-lbm .... to.rM.tai mark.t In AlbwU. and man
hutlni ttr. for both B.O. and Mb.rt. pwdneu im
ported fr,.,„ th, Orient »-..} r..... Euro*»nd •£*
oxport for th.- produet. of both »•- • "'''■
■ra of Proiperity.
eessful vers in her history, *»<} !f   ^Se al-
ditfon. boar out through harvest Umc      l'«i e
ready visible. 192fi will ayaln XlfflrK when-
similar nature.   Kven in the south,in fl* »     •,
droughts, hnve in the pant, created no      >« ^ ^
union, lhe advent of the tugar ^J^KJ ho possi*
newly settled irrigation areas add law
blKtloi of thai section.
Available Area.
Alberto has nn area of some 260,000 square miles,
or twice tin* area ol the British Isles.  The last census
gave I lie population as 1)00,000 souls, a population
whieh had its origin in the ranchers of the early days,
when the entire provinee was given over to horse, cattle, and later sheep, ranching.   Territories comprising
vast tracts of grasing lands have been parcelled out
into homesteads, embracing rich and prosperous areas,
where farmers engage in a wide range of agricultural
activity,    In 1925 the value of her agricultural pro-
duets netted Alberta nearly $260,000,000,   and the re*
eent transfer of lands within the province to provincial control allows for vast expansion.
It is claimed that only one-fifth of 72.000,000 acres
lit for the plough have been brought under cultivation,
and there are at present 15,000,000 acres of fertile
lands in the province open for homestead entry or
lease.
Coal Deposits.
Alberta holds the proud position of being fust
among the provinces of Canada in her coal resources,
which constitute 14% of thc coal reserve of the entire
world. 72% of the British Empire, and 8H of tho
Dominion of Canada.
OU Development.
The most spectacular activity prevails in the newly
discovered  oil  fields.    Valuable petroleum  deposits
have been discovered, and production is nnd ,-r way
near Calgary.    It is claimed that  there are SO.OOO
;;'!
■a: 8
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RKTAILER
Jiilv
square miles of territory having petroleum possibilities.
More than one hundred (til wells have been drilled,
and over 7f>,000 barrels of petroleum ex tract oil during
eli.intalile limber, niul, in addition, deposits u| ,|,v
and shale, salt. bentonJtQ and building stone,
The foregoing summary of Alberta's wealth is mure
remarkable owing to the fact that she was the l,is   „f
•>"'. ■*'.*-;>. S-*•*>••*,
the past ten years.   Oil rednorlcs have been establish*
ed near Calagry, Lethbiidgc and Edmonton,
the Dominion provinces to receive attention fr«in> th,
federal government, and is io be congratulated upon
her rapid advancement.
^r~^       •     tl|4'
*»•»«.        I
*^»JtS   '   f4 2
' - m
Medical College, University of Alberta.
Natural Oas.
To June 30, 1925, approximately five billion eubie
feet of natural gas had been produced in Alberta Thin
is now serving homes and industrial plants in four of
her largest cities.
Timber.
It must not be forgotten in llritish Columbia where
lumber is the leading industry that our sister province
has an area of more than 1)0,(100 square miles of mer
ely Hell, Calgary.
80ME ALBERTA BUILDIN08—EDMONTON
1—North Wtst Biscuit Company.       3,_8t John', em.!^       ,    !!: N
r   r*       4.   St. John • College.      4.-Marshall.Wells Limited.       5.-Y. W. C. A. THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
44 Buyers' Week" in Vancouver
Vancouver Wholessler. Estend Cordial Welcome to Alberta Merchant Owners, snd Department Manager.
9
The co-operation of leading wholesale houses in
Vancouver, listed below, has enabled the Board of
I'nide !<» extend "Buyers' Week" tn Alberta,
lit past years this popular event has been taken advantage of by a large number of B. C. merchants, who
\. appreciated the liberal rebate of travelling ex*
pcuse   allowed   when   purchases   tip   t•» a   stipulated
ii mount an* made,
This year Alberta merchants are invited to visit
our -ity. and a proportionately liberal rebate is tu be
accorded those attending from lhe sister provinee,
llu- "British ('olumbia Retailer" has endorsed
lids movemeni of the Vancouver Board of Trade, ami
ins in lhe welcome assured to visiting Alberta nor
i! ants In addition to tlie lisl of firms who have
made this movement possible, a programme, worthy
ol  the occasion is also printed herewith
How the Rebate on Fsre Applies
-liberie merchants, owners and department man
alters, visiting Vsncouver during "Buyers' Week"
and placing orders with the firms mentioned hereunder, amount ine lo not less than $1,000 will have
tin if railway fare refunded on the basis of excursion
rn\m applying at lhat time In other words faro re-
i nnd will be made lit bona -fide merehants whose combined purchases from the houses mentioned amount to
til hast $1,000, Those who visit this eity in their
own ears will receive a refund equivalent to e\eur-
-inn railway fare.
I'irms who have made the extension of this move-
un nl possible in Alberta
Drygoods and Jewelcry.
C. H. Sttr 4 Co.. glo«ee. handkerchiefs, neckwear.
Canad-an Eaport 4 Import Co., Ltd, Art and Fancy Goods.
Contoitdated Garments. Ltd.. Cloaks and Suits for Women.
The Davis White Co., Toys and Fancy Goods.
The Ford Oriental Co., Ltd.. Oriental Goods.
G R. Gregg 4 Co.. Vancouver, Ltd.. Plain. Printed and Fancy
auks. etc.
r   E. Harr son. Hosiery. Neckwear, Men's Wear.
Hudson, Burns 4 flay. Wholesale Ory Goods, Cotton. Piece
Goods, etc.
Jantien Knitting Mills of Canada Ltd., Swimming Suit..
Ud.es Dainty Wear, Silk Underwear, Dressing Gowns, etc.
Mackay  Smith, Blair 4 Co., Ltd., General Dry Goods, Men's
Underwear.
Marshall's Vancouver, Ltd.. Wholesale Millinery, Silks and
Ribbons.
Milne 4  Middleton,  Ltd.,  Drygoods,  Infants Wear,  Fancy
Goods, etc.
Pr de of the West Knitting Mills, Sweaters, Bathing Suits,
Hosiery.
W. J. Taaffe 4 Son, Ltd., Raincoats, Sports Wear.
Jas. Thomson 4 Sons, Ltd., Wholesale Dry Goods, Men's
Furnishings, etc.
Un versal Knitting Co., Knitted Suits, Coats and Sweaters,
etc.
Western Wholesale Jewelers, Jewelry, Watches, Diamonds,
Silverwear, etc.
HARDWARE. FURNITURE, TRUNKS AND SUIT CASE8.
British America Paint Co., Ltd., "Bapco" Pure Paint.
B. C. Leather 4 Findings Co., Ltd., Golf Bags, Clubs and
Accessories.
Canada Roof Products Ltd., Roofing Materials.
Canada Western Cooperage.
Cassidy's Ltd., Wholesale Crockery.
T. McAvity 4 Sons Ltd., Mill Supplies, Plumber Supplies-
Alexander Murray 4 Co., Ltd., Floor Covering, Roofing Ma*
ter.al. Building Paper, etc.
Outings Mfg Co. Ltd., Waterrepellant Clothing, etc.
Renwick 4 Cunliffe, Ltd., Glassware, etc.
Restmore Mfg Co.. Furniture. Steel Beds, etc.
Simpson, Balkwill Co., Ltd-, Ship Chandlery.
Story 4 Campbell. Ltd.. Trunks, Bags and Suit Cases.
Charles S. Thompson  Sons, Ltd., Cutlery, Silverware.
GROCERIES, 4c.
Braid, Tuck 4 Co., Ltd., Wholesale Teas and Coffee.
Dickson Importing Co. Ltd., Teas and Coffee.
Ormonds' Limited, Wholesale Biscuits
Shelly's Limited, Bread and Cakes.
Kelly Confectionery Co. Ltd., Mfrs. of Confectionery.
FOOTWEAR.
Damer, Lumsden Company. Boots, Shoes, Rubber Footwear.
F. 4 F. Henderson, Boots Shoes, and Rubber Footwear.
Fred Henderson 4 Son, Boots Shoes, 4c*
J, Leckie Company Limited, Boots, Shoss, 4c
PAPER AND STATIONERY
Smith, Oavidson 4 Wright, Wholesale Stationery, etc.
Gehrke's Limited, Stationery, Christmas Cards, etc.
Entertainment during Vancouver " Buyers' Week"
This annual event takes place during the Vancouv.
Visitors will be among the guests of honour visiting
The following programme has been nrrangedi
TUESDAY. AUGUST 10th.
12.2a noon ~Tiu< Rotary Club will bs hosts at s lunch*
eon nt the Hotel Vnnrouver.
0,10 p.m—Vancouver Wholesalers sod Manufacturers
will welcome vlsltln* merehSOtS to Vancouver
Nt a banquet si the Hotel Vanoouver,
I p.m.—Mammoth Fsshlon Displsy, festurlng latest
sl>les In Bathing Suits. Knltt.tl Garments,
Dresses, Honks, sad Purs on living models,
Hotel Vancouver Ballroom,
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 11th.
The Vancouver Exhibition sjeoelstlon have extended «»
invitation lo visitors te their lair.
r Kxhihition. whieh is the second largest in Canada.
and enjoying its many attractions.
THURSDAY, AUGUST 12th.
I2,ir> noon—Luncheon given by the Vancouver Klwanls
riub.
s p.m.—Moonlight Excursion. A palatial steamer has
been reserved lor this event. Dancing, music,
and an all round Rood lime on board.
ANY T1MBK—Guests wishing to play roK will be adequately taken care of.   Vancouver has seven
Kolf courses.   UKING YOUR CLUBS.
Sight-seeing trips and visits to Industrial plants
will be arranged -taring the period
■
wo
; Al
■A.l
Wt
$n
1 |«
' ti 10
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA KKTAILKK
The Tea Gardens of Ceylon
By William H, Ukers, Bdltor   "Tea and Coffee Journal."
til v
The great tea industry of Ceylon, like that of India,
has a romantic history. Tea. however, is not indigen*
ous to Ceylon as it is to India, and though plants were
first introduced 80 years ago from China and Assam,
the cultivation was not seriously undertaken till the
great coffee industry of Ceylon collapsed in the '70s
under the onslaught of plant disease.
Enterprise directed by necessity, speedily wrought
a wonderful economic transformation, and tea cultivation is now the most Important agricultural industry
of thc colony.
The Planters of Ceylon were first to realize that dementi now runs largely to good tea, and they have
adopted a policy of finer plucking and most cartful
manufacture, with the result that high quality teas are
being turned out by nearly all estates in Ceylon. Owing to its fine flavor. Ceylon tea is extensively used for
blending with other teas, to meet the demand of a large
section of consumers.
Care in Cultivation.
The excellence of cultural methods is sufficiently
attested by yields ranging from 300 to 12(H) pounds of
made tea per acre, depending upon altitude, soil, weed
ing and treatment. The life of a tea mush, whieh
yields three lo seven years after the seed has been
planted, is not known, but there are fields in Ceylon
still looking remarkably well after <r>0 years, and pro
during 400 to 500 pounds of tea an acre, without manure.
Little or no land is available for further planting,
but even if there was any. the cost of opening up. to-
get her with labor difficulties would preclude mueh extension.
Climstic Variations.
While tea is grown in Ceylon from almost seabvel
to 7.000 feet the great part of the area under cultivation lies at an elevation of aboul 8,000 feet. There is.
of course, a marked difference in the quality of the
erop at various elevations; low-country teas are strong
and lack distinctive flavor, a greater yield compensating for lack of quality and lower selling prices, while
high-grown teas are much in demand for their gootl
quality and flavor.
The climate of lea-producing districts differs with
the elevation and geographical position; also, tin*
mountains of Ceylon afford considerable protect ion
to eertain districts during the southwest or northwest
monsoon. The average rainfall varies from 80 to 250
inches while the mean temperatures range from 65'
to 80'P, or higher.
The effect of climate on the flavor of tea is very
marked; colder less tropical conditions in the hills tending to check the rate of growth, while promoting flavour. During the more active growing months, namely March to May and again to a less extent in October
and November—quality decreases even in the highest
estates, returning again when the growth is not so
rapid. On the grassy downs of the ITvs District of
southwest Ceylon, a few days of dry windy weather
will completely change the character of the erop. pro-
ducing a flavor that immediately enhances the value of
the tea.
Tin same effect is produced at high elevations
ing January ami February, when bright days sml .,,.,[
nights are often accompanied by liwht frosts
Improved Labor Conditions.
Labor, on a majority of estates in Ceylon ami on
all those up-country, is provided by Tamils from south'
cm India. Some 500,000 Tamils are so cm ploy esl The
average rate of pay may be said to vary from I'i In ",",
Ceylon cents I I .'I to 24 cents Canada | a day, women
being generally employed on the lighter work, suefi
as plucking while the non attend to the pruning, drain
ing. etc.
A tea estate is in charge of the superintendeiiS who
is responsible for the ebor force, attends to the esfau*
accounts, supervises (he working of the property snd
manufacture *>i the tea.
Methods of Cultivation
The object oi tea cultivation is to secure n maxim
nm quantity of the best ijuahty leaf    I'or this pui
pose the bushes are pruned periodically, so no lo insure regular, frequent ami plentiful "flushes" »r
young tembr shoots on the tope of the bushes, I
buds at the top of the new shoot, and two or ihrei
leaves below them are plnelod by hand, general I) h)
the women and ehiblren of the Isb-df- force, In Ceylon
plneking is repeated wiry seven to fourteen days,
throughout the year    April and May are generally !
ii*
Visiting Merchants—Welcome
PICKED IN
CETLON
NICE
■IIIMINED
"A STANDASD OF QUALITY"
Wboleulc Diitributon:
DICKSON IMPORTING CO., LTD.
Established 1807
317321 Columbia Ave Vancouver, B.C 1926
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
11
heaviest months for the pluckers, October and Novem-
l„■• often show heavy flushing, but this is somewhat unci rtaltv
\ yield «»f tea is greatly improved by manuring
•with green manure plants grown between the rows of
i, a These are buried when mature, with the object of
improving the humus content of the soil Methods
base greatly improved in recent years, ami more attention is given to the application of manures Chan
weeding is thc rule, so there is much solt-eroslon, and
manuring must be heavy to make up for the plant food
lost by wash.
Manufscturing Process.
Manufacture in Ceylon differs in important details
from that of India, due principally to variation in at*
inosphcric moisture. l'i»on removal to the factory,
Ceylon tea leaf is spread out to wither for l* to 24
hours on "tats" or racks in a withering loft, above
tin- factory, where heat from tin- firing room may be
us.«1 to control the wither if the outside air carries an
* \ci ss of humidity, in* if often does .especially in the
more elevated areas.   The outside withering houses
common to India, are not used in Ceylon, although Coy*
Ion withering lofts are generously provided with windows for natural withering in fine weather.
After withering the leaf is passed through rolling
mschlnea from three to eight times ami is then dropped
OUl, appearing as lumps of twisted green leaves. These
musses are broken up by the roll breaker and the coarse
leaf is separated by a sifter; rolling and sifting being
periled on alternately for about two hours,   The leaf
is m vt spread on glass, tile or cement tables, or mats,
with free access of cool air, to ferment or oxidise.   In
altMiit two hours it assumes a copper color and develops
n peculiar aroma    At a certain point, determined by
experience, the fermentation is arrested by a single
fifing process, in (ho firing or drying machines,     Due
In a different moisture content about 54 per cent, after
withering, Ceylon lea requires but one firing to finish,
ss Against two firings given to India tea. with ft moisture content of 65 per cent    Firing provides a hot air
draft to convert the damp fermented leaf into the familiar dry and brittle black tea    This black tea is sifted into grades ami samples arc sent to Colombo for
lasting by the brokers' and agents' experts and for
Rsscsslng of value    The grades are bulked separately.
pneked in lead lined tea chests of about 100 pounds
ench, soldered up. labelled with the name of the estate
nnd dispatched to Colombo for shipment.   The grades
of black tea usually prepared in Ceylon are. Broken
Orange Pekoe, M per cent -. Broken Pckoc, 40 per cent -.
Orange Pekoe, 2fi per cent *, Pekoe, Souchong, Dust and
Winnings, 4 per eent,
Green tea, made from the same bush as black ten.
i» prepared by steaming the leaf, instead of withering.
M before described, and by omitting the fermenting
process, It is graded as Young Hyson, Hyson 1 nnd 2,
Gunpowder and Dust.
Yields and Values.
Fields vary greatly with the soil jat, (varietyV ele-
vntion. cultivation, manuring, etc., nnd may range
from ttQO to 1200 pounds of made tea an acre; 600 to
TOO pounds being considered a good ailround yield.
The cost of production muy be put al 85 to 45 Ceylon
santi (about 11 to 14 eents Canada).
(Continued on page 37)
Why Palmolive
is the World's
Greatest "Repeater "
in the Soap Line
U
Popularity cannot be bought—it mutt be built up,
over a period of yeart—in the heart* of the people.
People in every land Know Palmolive, prefer It—
insist on It.
And to you, Mr. Dealer, that meant one very Impor.
tant thing.
That means low investment on Palmolive — high
turnover.
Other products may take low investment * *» * but If
they do not "repeat"—if your capital is FROZEN
there—your profit not only it gone, but your interest
on your money!
Substitutes Are Costly Folly
And tubttitutet of Palmolive do not pay you for many
reatont.
Your customers resent your trying to sell a substitute for what they know and want And they al.
wayt want Palmolive because it it MADE right,
and it it ADVERTISED right. Everything It ALL
SET for you, Mr. Dealer.
Your part in Palmolive profitt It to LOCALIZE the
tale. To bring the chickens of profit, home to roott
in your store. This you can do with window advertising.
Palmolive national advertising sells the public-
keeps them sold. It tells them WHY to buy Palmolive.
By your window, by counter displays—you tell them
WHERE to buy it. You wrap tht package for the
cuttomert we make—and collect your bit.
If you need new window material we will gradly tend
It on requett.
THE PALMOLIVE COMPANY Of CANADA, LTD.
WINNIPEG
H
■7
3318 THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Jtily
Chloride of Lime
New Style Waterproof Package
Supplied by all wholesale grocers
In British Columbia
Manufactured by
CANADA COLORS AND CHEMICALS LIMITED
Toronto Winnipeg
Agents:
STARK A STERLING
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Vsncouvsr
WARM
WEATHER
has set in early this year, creating a log sale
for lee Cream ami Soft Drinks. How is yonr
supply of
Ice Cream Pails
Soda Straws,
Drinking Gups
Paper Plates, etc.
We have complete stocks ami ean fill yonr
orders promptly.
We are at your service.
Soft DnJdsM I lift Ltd.
MANUFACTURER! ANO WHOLESALE
PAPER DEALERS
VANOOUVSB
VICTORIA
A B. C. Quality Producl
ROYAL
STANDARD
FLOUR
A Product from the
Finest Wheat
Milled in Vancouver by
Vancouver Milling and Grain Co. |
LOOTED
Rod Offlc* ud Mill*     VANCOUVKB, B C
One For Every Taste
There «r.- four dr-in-iou** *afi«-ii*»   se tseorU&eni
voice win -mit um u*!,.-, 0f «n yonr ettsiontrii
ORANGE    Thi*   boo  enough  blUerneti*  to  BASS  i*
»l»l»«-iiil»K with Hut "more" lusts* about ll
SEVILLE   ORANGE   —   Madi* entirely   from   Bitter
Orangac, retaining ail the floor of ths old f«-*ii
toned product
GRAPEFRUIT—All lln* flavor of thin bmikfMf dr
IICSC) Is retained In Oil* murmalad*'    It i* a Kmtt
rewrite wiiti most people who ones trj ll
PINEARLLE—In thi* Vs only ■.*-.. *|>,-| Moots" I'ln-
Sppli wiih n„ Inn,. flMjr)ir M pottjbls,
lnck«d in (.pound llihoKrwpheil lever-lop UM, lib
Sorew*tOp seiih.ru, Miulie ox. cylinder rInss Jars with
Anchor top*,
order nn essoriment from your whoU-saie grocer
MlliAV   Ihej're pure. wholesome nnd detlolOUS.
MRS. MINE, LTO. • VANCOUVER, I.C. ■>»;
1921
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
13
1
tai
Grocery Market Report
Vancouver, July 12, 1926.
Hetail grocers had one ot the best mouth's bust*
itesii in June that tiny have experienced for soma
lime, notwithstanding the general slacking oil of bus*
iness usual during the o|>cuitig summer months, Col"
lections also have been on a better basis than fur
Mime time pant Vancouver and iio province is enjoy*
ing a general increase in population «»f a permanent
nature Coast points are very busy with thc Ashing
season at its height. The Okanagan Valley is enjoy*
ing a bumper crop in practically all kinds of fruit Van
eouver bland point* are not so bright, The coal in
ilustry has been in a slump for the past year, some
mines only working one or two shifts per week, in
Nanaimo it is reported lhat there arc over two bun-
'In tl empty homcH, a eondition never heard of before.
8ttgar.—On Saturday. July :ird. local prices were
inlvaneed 10c to a ha-vi* of ty*\.'M) for granulated in 100
ll> sacks. The market is firm with n big demand owing to heavy preserving requirements
Corn Flakes— Tin Kellogg Cereal Co. are introdue*
iltg a new size in Kellogu Corn Flakes, 21 13 ozs. pkgs.
nl 13.80 per ease. This is in addition to thc standard
■♦■ s ot pkg.   Com Flakes arc in big demand now,
Streitmana Cheese is another now line just Intro*
dueed on thin market, and is taking exceedingly well
Packed 24 fit 2 oz. pku*s, at £1 per dosen,
Hedlund's Canned Meats—Tin- manufacturers of the
new product* are exceedingly well pleased with distribution received. Medium! meats an- packed in \ an-
'onver, in a new. modem, up-to-date plant, equipped
with every sanitary convenience The products are
nist a little different from the ordinary run of canned
"teats, and are meeting with popular favor.
Fruit Jan and freaerving Accessories.---These arc
"loving out well, and arc iu big demand, Fresh fruil
la in abundance nt very reasonable prices, and sugar
•dsois low, with the consequence that the housewife is
preserving her normal winter needs,
Derby Soap Chips are being introduced by thc Proc,
ler & (Iambic Co, Thev are packed in 1<H1 lb. barrels
«1 He per tb, whieh is somewhat lower than other hulk
s"»ap chips.
Olark'i Meata.-July 8th. W. Clark & Co, anuouno*
ed advsneed priees on several of their products, Corn*
ed, and roast beef in No. I size is advanced to $4.25 per
dozen, and oilier lines in proportion. Other maiiufac*
turcrs have as yet not made any changes in their lists.
Dried Fruit,—Opening prices have been named
on California Evaporated Apricots and Peaches. Stand-
ard quality in these lines will eost the retailer in the
neighborhood of 17c for peaches, and 31c for apricots,
with other grades in proportion higher. Some packers
have also announced opening priees on raisins, which
are on ahout the same basis as last year's opening
price. The Sunmaid Association have not as yet nam-
ed their prices on 1928 pack.
Currants.—Australian currants are being quoted at
very atractlve prices, namely 9V«jc per lb. for 56 lb.
ittilk boxes. Shipments in transit, however, will be
11 oi' per lh. higher.
Prunes.—Oregon prunes will be available again this
fall at very attractive prices. Last year the Oregon
prune crop was very short, and no supplies were shipped to this market, California priees have not yet been
named, Opening price on California figs has been given, being on the same basis as last year's opening price.
Canned Goods.—Local canners have completed their
packs of raspberries and strawberries, with prices
ahout r»'jc, higher than the 1925 paek, owing to the
higher prices paid for fresh fruit. The cherry pack is
also well under way, but prices have not yet been nam-
od. 1926 price on peas will be out during the next few
days. It is assumed they will be about the same as
last year. Tomato prices are expected to be on a low
basis again this year, depending on the Ontario crop,
which is reported to be rather backward.
THE TEA MARKET.
News from Shanghai to the effect that thc Hoochow
market is practically exhausted, consequent upon
heavy buying for the account of North African points,
is of interest to the trade. It is quite unusual for the
Hoochow stocks to be closed so early in the season.
A decidedly heavier volume of business has recently
been transacted in Formosa teas for the account of distributors. The floating supply of Government standard Formosas has been pretty well clennedup, with thc
result that the spot priee has advanced to thc basis of
25c,
There has not been much activity in fermented teas
on account of declines in Calcutta.
The London market reports an irregular tone in
•lava tins, and a price reduction amounting to i/Jd. re*
ccutly occurred in common to medium, while the better
grades have shown an advance of Vid a pound. June
sales in Londop indicated a decline in all grades of India
Ccylons. excepting good. Tn the case of Indian teas
there has been a decline of Ufi, a pound on all grades,
excepting Dorjeeling for which there has heen a good
demand.
There are now large quantities of Ceylon teas, of
excellent quality available, whieh fact has resulted in a
reducton of from %& to Id. a pound, and this not- 14
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
July
withstanding   that Orange   Pekoe   Ceylons  are the
strongest feature of thc market.
Deterioration of quality at Colombo, Ceylon, has
reached very positive proportions, but there is a possibility of improvement with thc setting in of dry weath-
cr.
The temporary weakness shown in the Colombo ami
Calcutta markets in the ease of common and broken
leas has not affected the general outlook in the mar
ket. which is that good quality leaf teas will be wanted
at a priee as early in July and August as such qualities
become available. There has been but little doing in
Congou teas so far this season. To date Russian buyers have been indifferent. The entire course of values
for Congou teas depends on what Russian buyers do
this year. So nearly as ean be ascertained, Russian potential demands are .great, but with Russia it is largely
a case of financing and until Chinese growers have definite assurances of being able lo realize on a gold basis
from the Soviets it seems doubtful that any large vol*
time of business ean be placed.
Javas have shown no pronounced weakness, as producers there arc financially strong, having sold their
production ahead.
The Indian Tea Association estimates that the yield
to the end of May, 1926, was 37.750,000 pounds, compared with 37.500,000 pounds for the same period 1925,
and 29,000,000 pounds for 1924. The weather and erop
report for May indicates that the outturn was about
normal, and immediate prospects fair in all districts except Parceling, where blight is generally severe,
COFFEE FUTURE*
According to one authority, the present Santos erop
will probably turn out to be 9% million bags, and the
world's visible supply on July* 1st was approximate,
ly about the same as last year, or 5.000,000 bags. The
1926-27 Sao Paulo crop is estimated at 9U to 10 million
bags. The coming Rio erop is estimated at 21', to 3
million bags, about 1 to V/2 million less than the present. Most of the mild coffee crops are estimated as
from 25 to 40 per cent, less lhan normal, tine to nniis*
mil dry weather. Owing to Ihe heavy rains in Braail,
Ihe 1927-28 Brazil crop should be large, the effecf of
thc rains being to strengthen the trees.
CALIFORNIA RAISINS IN CANADA
The commercial treaty between Canada and Aus-
ralia, which increased the duty on California raisins
to 3 eents per pound and admitted Australian raisins
duty free, has now been in effect for about eight
months. Accordingly an investigation was made to as-
certain the effect on the California raisin trade, states
American VicclConsul W. J. Linthicun. Sherbrooke,
Quebec, in a renort to the Foodstuffs Division of the
Department of Commerce. If was found that notwithstanding the preferential treaty between Canada and
Australia, that California raisins still control the mar-
ket and there is a larger demand for them than for thc
Australian product. California raisins are sold loose
at from 13 to 14 cents a pound at wholesale and con*
sumers arc willing to pay correspondingly more for
them owing to their superior quality, better packing
and Iwenuse they keep longer than the Australian rais-
ins. Thc Australian raisins arc selling fn the Quebec
consular district for 10 cents a pound until recently
a ROYAL YEAST CAKES
MAKE PERFECT BREAD
m i*)
Protect.tyourself
against .variation in
quality. Stick to the
products whose quality is uniformly high
grade* with never a
bad lot to injur©
your store's
reputation,
a\\um af|^ i°** y°ur
customers.
[   w   m n i f t
Mf'ANv   u M ITT D
QUAKER
Puffed Rice
Puffed Wheat
Yonr customers will appreciate
your suggesting these easily
'Ngcsted, nourishing cereals
Toasly grains that appeal t<>
every member of the family
This is Ihe time lo diaplaj
Puffed Rice and Puffed Wheat
in your windows and counter^
T^ Quaker Qttts Company
Saskatoon Peterborough 1926
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
15
11 wholesale merchants having a large supply on
! and fearing that they might spoil with approach
weather, are now offering them for 8 cents
warm
pound.
leforo the consummation of the treaty between Canned Australia, almost all of the raisins consumed
up Quebec Consular district were thc California pro.
t. and 90 to 95 per cent, of them were loose raisins
iped in boxes, It is estimated that California still
i:.... e....... 7() t„ 75 pt,r (,(.„t   t||C balance being pur-
nun
il! til
dm
shipj
supplies from .   .   .
chased from Australia.
GROCERS' PICNIC
PROQRAMME
The nineteenth annual lla»kt*t I'lnm- <>: the GrOOQW
•'! Greater Vancouver win bv held nt Bowee Island,
WEDNESDAY, JULY 21th, 1926.
PICNIC OFFICERS
Cblttf Picnic Officer
Anststant Picnic Officer
Chlel Hporls Officer
Genera) 8ecretary
K. H. McTHSRart
 T. White
, J. F. Merllccg
, Walter F. lag
Committtti*.
licneral Executive- Messrs.  E. R   McTaggart  (chairman); J. Harkness, J. F Merilees, W. Allison, C.
Clarke. J. 8. McKay. R  Orr, T. Carry, T. F. Me
Howell. T II. White. W. O. Robin*. M. B. Braile, E.
Hickman. II Morrow.
Transportation— Messrs II. Morrow (chairman) , T.
White. A. McDonald. E Hickman.
Finance—Messrs. C. Clarke (chairman). J. Ilarrinon, E
R  McTaggart.
Sports—Messrs, J P. Merilees (chairman); P. Hlggln
son.
Anounrcrs and Starters—Messrs. P Qlfftasoo, w. D.
Tullldfe, J. A. Anderson. 0. Lincoln, J. K. St in son.
Jack Wark, Austin Kwart. A MestOO.
Judges—Mcssra T. H. Whlte( chairman), and Represent*
atlves of Wholesale House*.
i".roundsmen -Messrs. It. Hayworth (chairman), J. 8-
Mackay. 8am Pritchard.
Kntertatnment.—Moaars. W. O. Robin*. R Orr. ,
PrUes.—Messrs W. Howie (chairman) and committee.
Equipment.— Messrs. J 8. McKay (chairman) and Committee.
Caterlng.-Measrs. W. Alllnon. 8. Swann, A. Vlgers, F.
Walford.
Advertlalnf.-Meaart. K It. MeTaggart, T, F. McDowell.
Tickets-Mr. C. Dallas.
Tim* Table.
Roals leave Union 8. 8. Dock at 9 a.m. and 2 p.m.
Returning at 6 p-m. and 11 p.m.
Music on board.
FREE-Ice Crown for the Children, Tea, Coffee, Cream
and Sugar free, of charge lo all members of the picnic
parly.
Why no other raisins
can please customers
like Sun-Maid
WHENyousenda
customer Sun-
Maid raisins, you
know she is going to
be satisfied. Sun-
Maid raisins are the
kind practically all
women now prefer.
Extra plump, richer
in flavor, especially clean, uniform, Sun-
Maid raisins are unlike all other kinds.
Sun-Maid alone is equipped to produce
raisins of such quality.
For instance, only selected raisins, the
fruit moat perfect for home cookery, go
into your Sun-Maid cartons. Other raisins that meet the needs of bakeries and
other markets go into commercial packs.
The rest Sun-Maid turns Into valuable
by-products in great conversion plants.
Thus Sun-Maid maintains the highest
quality in each of its packs. No other
packer has facilities to do this.
To be sure you please customers who
buy raisins, supply Sun-Maids—always.
And to build a larger raisin volume, keep
Sun-Maid raisins displayed — continuously* It pays!
n,  •%$%** €OtW9fm
•ton unit whoeo
Sun-ltiaiS
motes m-**w*
Sttett af rottino
It ovotn't paaO
Sun-Maip froducts
Distributed Ity
SUNLAND   SALES   COOfSRATIVE   ASSOCIATION
Offim throughout tht Worts
M 16
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Juh
Lake of the Woods
Milling Company
LIMITED
MtkNiot
FIVE ROSES
• FLOUR •
The World's Best
•Oatty Capacity K.200 Bble.
B.C. Offioes and Warehousee:
1100 liohards Street 1614 Itore Street
▼ANOOUV1B VKTTOEIA
Worth Safeguarding
Telephone trade is worth safeguarding by
means of courteous, intelligent answering of
I lie telephone
BRITISH COLUMBIA
TELEPHONE COMPANY
TNI iMMmicmr FlEIICHMAMM'i vratT
TO THE IjOOIg
1. It enables a grocer to render a service to his cutftonifr*.
2. It makes regular and frequent customers.
3. It makes healthy customers who buy
more goods.
"No wonder we grocer* are such boosters for
Fleischmann'h Ves/it."—Mr, W. Harry Knox, Pough-
keep-sic, N. V.
FLEISCHMANNS YEAST
The Fleuchmann Company
SERVICE
We're Making Selling
Easier For You—
Year after yoor tar fifty lUri
we've spent thousands of doiuri to
bring you customtrs for C'trk'%
Prepared Foods .
Vou can only got your thtrt of
thts trade by displaying Dark Pro
ducta, Clark's Hav* betn io long
and SO porsisttntly Jidvfft i*d
and their ouahty so coftitjntty
maintained that thty »«n st *.*■'.
A good show in your utnJou ot on
Ihe eounler mil help lhe Clark ol
oeritsing to tneteose yout saltt arid
your pto/iti
W. CLARK Limited, Montreal
Establishments   at   Montreal.   P. Q,   St. Rami,   P. Q.   jr,d
Harrow, Ont.
Watch 4X Advertising
sin-ily s advertfxing keeps paee
with seasons and anticipate* the pnl»
lie needs.
Kvery efficient medium i-* uiod
and eaeh advertisement planned t"
create demand ami develop your IX
sales in some particular line,
Watch tlo- IX advertisements* feature the products mentioned in your
•tore, ami benefit by the Increased
business thin efficient advertising is
Mure to bring
SHELLY'S LIMITED
VICTORIA
NANAIMO
VANCOUVER
NORTH VANCOUVER
NEW WESTMINSTER 1926
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
17
GROCERY PRICES CURRENT
Tht follo-eilns
■rt price, quoted for principal llnaa of loading wholesale flrma.   Prices quoted art nociMarlly
aubjoct to market fluctuations.
a. vv.
„ Hi ysiit—
ttos  pk*»
OILtSTT CO.  LTO.
in caaa
per * oao
2 30
Pure Flske Lye—
* A..S   in cane 	
i a»e» . .
io i \aatt * '•"» in *>**«        	
MsflK  ashing Powder—
i  .-s   4 il<»*
•        M| (      (hi*
s os   t doa ...
It Ol    I  <l"i
'. vttat* hit*.
M»gic Sods. Css« No. 1—
:  . IM  it*.  -Ib.  package*)
l> ..,».•» ur  nun*
Ui Ca-bonstt of Soda—
*.'I Ri   Vat*.  \*at   keg
400 Iti   Uriel*. p«r barrel
CsutUs Sods (Orsnulsttdl—
io lb   Cantm-er il**Q lbs, In cornel
)i«i iu*   icon drum*	
Cream of Tertsc—
11)    paper   pis*    (4   dot    in   ,tta**l
IK
JUS
h to
. 9 25
1150
5 50
6 40
Nutmeg, nfiuill, dos  LU
Paprika.  MUttl. dot     135
Pantry  BplOS.  3 tins, dot    110
Poultry I)re»nlng. Sage, Savory, Thyme,
Tumeric,   tins,   dos >
Pickling Hpire, dos. No. 3	
Mar'atom,   Mint.   Parsley  	
White Popper, tins, d<<a	
Caalor oil. 2 os.  do*. ...	
Caalor <hi. i at, dot	
i'p»->m H.iitu, >4h. do*    ........
I'niit  Colon,  2 <•*   dot •     ■.  ...... 1.W
1.1utn* Chocolate, Row, pink, Lemon
Vonlltt. White. Almond, Orange) dos.   1.15
Jelly   Powder,   do*
116
.ti
1.16
1.10
1.35
2 20
.60
Klondyke (wrapped) box of 25  «-10
Klondyke (unwrupped( box of 26 ... *****
Kiero aiyoarlnt, box of H4 ...- 5*76
Linen (unwrapped) box of 100  3.16
Liquid Ammonia. 2 dos. qts. box of 24 400
Liquid Blue. 2 dos. qts. box of 24 i 4.00
Mechanic's Pine Tar. box of 100 ..- 5.46
Mechanic's Pine Tar. box of 30  2-76
i dive Castile, cokes, box of 200
Prlmroae (wrapped) box of 25
Itoyal Crown Lye. box of 48 ..
4.66
4.70
6.25
III
Hi
Per Ib
_    1&4
m    -l*"1***
. Ih   paper l******   (4 dos   In <■»»**»
•, Ib  itstia with (»*cr#w covert (I dot
In  eft**) ......
I IV  <*<»h» screw cover* (J d<»*
CftH*       ...».«.,,,...    ■
'   lb   »<piare can Intern,   •*  dos
c»»e)                         ...
lo |b   wooden rases    ..
»'  Ib   wooden pelts  ...
IM Ib   lined Sets
JI" lb   lined barrels	
p*r dos.
. 115
... s «o
III
In
3 to
6 25
.51-i
.40
.40
3»<»
Lemonare  P<iwder.  do*	
Mustard, is Son    - -
Muatard* S».  do*
Mustard, -A* -tut
Mustard. 4 do*   .
Sulphur. %*\ do*	
r«n. Orcen Ubel, 4*- v*'r
TlM  arson Ubel, tc per lb
.1 |b   tlnn      -	
1«. tb. packages ....     	
5 U>   package*    ••	
Ten. de Luxe. Afternoon. 1 lb
Ten de Luxe.  Afternoon  -a* P*r
Te» de Luie.  Vi* P*T lb	
Vinegar, do*	
p.  SUHNS A CO. LTD.
ghemrock  Products.
kyr»lU« rolled shoulders, per »'
BHemreok, ••« i"'1 *° -
dressing  t,«*1 ■•■
80
2.23
S.50
4.50
2.40
1.40
.65
.71
.69
.69
66
66
Pendray's Powdered Ammonia, box 24
Special prices on 5, 10. 21 and 100
boxes.
Psndrsy's Wster Glass. Ise Preserver—
Cases, 24 tins per case 	
Itoyal Ijiundry Flakes, 88%, In bbls.
(Special price on contract)
Royal Crown Soap 6s 144s  	
Royal Crown Powder, box 24 only...-.
Itoyal Crown Powder 1-lb. box of 60
Itoyal Crown Cleanser, 48 sitter tins
4.10
134
15     Royal Orown Powdered Ammonia. 1 lb.
lb.
.87
99
2 40
White Wonder, box of 100
New White Swan Soap. 100
White Swan Naptha, box of 100
KSLLV. OOUOL-SS A O.
Nabob Products.
Allipice, No.  I, tins dos
Making Powder. 41 11 os. dos
Unking Powder. 11 »4». ****
Making Powder. * 6s. doS.
Unking  Sods. 60  IS.  c«e»
Making 8od».  14  4»<  doa
Borax, •*.*. Ont	
Hlsck   Pepper,   tins,   dos
OWy  Hftlt. glass,  dos
Nabob Coffee* hbbII tins, each
I'offee.   lit  lb. ******
('oflee,  6s  Nabob lb
Cuetsrd  Powder,  dos	
Quick   Tsploca.   dos    ....	
Chocolate Pudding,  dos   —
Chill Powder, smell, dos.
Cinnamon. I os. Una. dos  «
i
LTO.
Damn
ihiki-d Ham, «,•■,
.   i iwtv i'lit- i tb cartons
Shamrock Handj i bw
,•„„,.•,,.   Canadtftn. »"'«'■• P" ,0
Canadian, twin. i«''* i»
rtmarton. No, 5, IS cases
,- , ,d  mn-tl  He I J*-
Shamrock, per '''
Ham-    lt*W  ll"'
Uu, per lb.
i "heem'.
Comp iuimI,
i-arn.ill"".
Ctwked Ham.
liomlnion
pollnton llacon
g.io
100
145
S30
15 10
6 30
SO
. .">*
.. l io
. 95
". .63
61
*    90
.. 90
mm     .90
I 60
... 1 to
110
40
200
5 15
166
130
110
- ::;':;.,::';.!::.::.••«
Shamrock, p--'
Hams
||an»*   I**""*'' "'", '
R-d ,-heese. 6*tb UM
per  to
tb,
,.ii.-.i. per lb.
each	
leUied Tongui
.     v       '.     I'1   to   I'ii**'
\.m*l   No   «'•  i*
urd, no i. -«":,:lir
Urd, wrlons, \i »*
.  ,i   \*o  I, cortoM. »'
,    im,    25-lb.   net.
Mlin'eiiieat.   kh«.   «"
Meal Isost, i"'1  »
ple«.  P" (,<'"
carton*. »« ",H
per
tb
Porg
■ith drowtlttfi
per lb
»	
10ft
.il
.50
.61
,41
,21 Mi
24
19.00
19 25
*>0
.38
t.t
.42
.29
.124
.40
43
55
2.00
.11U
.234
.21
.24
.124
19
.40
.48
.104
6.46
.5.60
4.00
3.70
111
5.36
6.00
w^^mtm^ 4.90
White Swan Washing Powder, box of 24 6.60
THK CANADA STARCH CO. LTD.
Laundry Starches—
Canada Uundry Starch, 40-lb. box .01
White aioss. Mb. pkgs     .9%
Acme Gloss, 1-lb. pkgs    .••"A
No. 1 White, 100-lb. kegs  t*k
Kdwardftburg Silver Gloss, 1-lb. pkgs.
40-lb UU
Kdwardsburg Sliver Gloss 8/6*
fancy  tin canisters,   41-lbs.   ....
P.dwardsburg Silver Gloss, 100-lb.
kegs   „.—«,........
Celluloid Stnn-h (boxes of 45-pkf*
per  case)   	
•1IV4
.1014
•4.11
Cullnsry Starches—
Itenwin's Celebrated Prepared Corn
40-lb. boxes, per lb	
Canada Corn Starch 40-lb. boxes, per
lb	
Challenge Corn Btarch 40-lb boxea
per lb	
Casco Potato Flour 40-lb. boxes, lb.
'nyenne Pepper, 8 tins, wos, 	
I'loven.   email,   *H»8 -	
Curry Powder, 4 oa  llass. dos	
Cream of Tartar, 1	
Cream of Tartar, ***, He** 	
Cream of Tartar %*, 	
Ginger, small, dos .j&
Bxtracts, 14 os., dos -	
Rstrarts. t os. dos. »	
F.itrsets. 4 oo. doa	
R|tracts. I 08. dos  "
Extracts. II oa   dos
Usee, amall, doa	
rreSh
ih  fresh frotsn
14
.11
.26
37
176
6 26
960
1760
186
Smoked Cod.  30. l>cr tb
Elected fowt, i'«" ,b
Belocted chicken, per
TU.  R0VAL CPOWN  SOAPS LTD.
THi ROVAU Vsncouver,
V-ntwet^
Term. Nett IS D.y^
Msiola OH—
Masola   Oil,
Is
2a
•i           «
4s
it           ••
8s
.11
•14
.814
.13
.7.93
.7.45
.1340
.1286
Apex
Soap
Flakes. 12 Mb. P^. *>*
"Apex**  rnmi- .	
La FTSnoSln CaHtlle. box of 25   4,40
•  •   »— .,f 20 8.31
4.10
Ww ^^ Tl t Za 7H*
Crowd Oatmeal. 24 6h box
Corn Syrups-
Crown 2s, 24 to case  „....|l.*il
6s, 12 to case  * 4.10
10s I to case „ 1.70
20a, 3 to case 8.11
Lily 2s. 24 to case  I4.0I
6e, 12 to case  4.W
10s, I to case  4.16
Karo, 2s 14 to case  SSI
6s, 18 to case 4.11
10s, I to case  I.TI
•;*ft
H 18
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA KKTAILKR
•Inii
CI TD |7 You sell good goods at
BUT
reasonable prices
What kind of bags deliver
the goods ?
A Bag can make or break a sale
CONTINENTAL 100% PURE ATLAS KRAFT
BAGS will guarantee safe delivery of your goods
and are the standard of comparison everywhere.
The Continental Paper Products
LlMITSO
OTTAWA CAHADA
SMITH, DAVIDSON & WRIGHT, LIMITED
VANCOUVER, VICTORIA,  EDMONTON. CALGARY,
"Using a 'Continental Bag1 it Bag Insurance"
***a^^*Z*tir<'^ -**"
EAGLE BRAND
Since 1857 the Safe infant food.  Salee
greater than all othera combined.
Offlceg: Vancouver. Condon tor y, South Sumas
Peter Rabbit Peanut Batter
Casts No More But Sells Fatter
THI TOV PAIL OCLIOHTt THI CHILDRIN
OIIPLAV A CAM.   IT WILL (ILL ITUL*.
Kefey Confection fa U
1100 Mainland Street
VANCOUVfR, •• C. W THE BRITI8H COLUMBIA RETAILER 19
Eastern Grocery Merger to Increase
Wholesale Efficiency
Address Delivered by Alvtr H. 8tmpson, National Orooers Company, Ltd., Toronto, at the National Wholesale Orocers' Convention at Rochester.
i i
I
ih. company whom I represent esteems it a great
honor to be aiked to address ihis very representative
bmly itf United Slates wholesale grocers, The manner
in which large problems, both social and economic, have
i.m n grappled with since the war, is a great tributo to
American resourcefulness, cooperation ami organize
lion.
Our own grocery problem in Ontario must be sur-
\i\ai\ in the light ot a wide distributing area spread
over l»iH) miles Kast to West and 5§Q miles North to
Sutlt, a population of under 3,UU0,UU0 people, a limit-
cd number ot manufacturers and no private brand do-
velopmcnt to speak of, economic conditions brought
about bv the expansion of local jobber distribution and
the rapid growth of sales in chain stores compelled
wholesalers supplying independent retailers to bring
together Ihcir resources for the purposes of adjusting
their businesses to thc needs of time.
In this connection thc speaker carried on for over a
year a detcrmine«l effort to interest the wholesale groc-
• rs of Ontario in forming a merger, whieh would com-
prise sufficient of the wholesalers to cover thoroughly
tho whole Province with a complete distributing sys-
t* ni of branch warehouses, and in this work he had tlie
•insistence of **. Prank Grimes of Chicago,
Without Mr. Grimes, I ean truthfully say, the big
'anadian merger eould not have been created. Some ot
tlu largest and oldest wholesale grocery houses, some
ot them in operation for close to a eentury, went into
tho merger. The merger represented thirty seven dis-
lil'Uting plants combined in one company under the
leadership of A. Foster, who was formerly the president
"i the National Grocers' Company, Ltd., one ol the
moal successful grocery organisations in Canada, com-
priaing seven house* in northern Ontario, operating in
■> young ami growing section of lhe country, where
»ining ami lumbering predominated.
The undertaking, os you can visuali/.o. has been a
Heavy task for Mr. Foster and his confreres to eo-ordin-
ulc and organise on company policies, ihis large number
nf units, we feel graitified Indeed that so much has been
neeompuahsd in the few months that WS have been op*
■ "ding. Our distributing and accounting departments
are giving excellent service and internal organisation
's on a very efficient basis. Thc purchasing depart-
'•"•nls have, by concentrating on certain products, been
ablo to bring advantages of very greot import, both to
"iir customers and to our branches, and have been a de-
oldod influence in securing a change in numerous instances of policies of manufacturers which were dotrr
»'iental to thc wholesale and retail Irade to one of proper protection for the both Internets which we represent.
Altlmugh great economies of operation have been
performed in the servicing, accounting, financing and
onr internal departments, none have been so oulstand*
'"■« on the tremendous reduction in selling expense
brought about by the sales department by zoning terri-
tories and allotting salesmen. Out of a staff of 224
salesmen, over sixty men have been eliminated with a
saving of over $180,000 per annum in expense and the
sales volume is being well maintained.
In addition, some eight houses were closed up where
duplication of effort occurred, with a consequent saving in operation, as compared to thc individual companies, of a very large amount per annum. Savings of
import have been mode in branch management expense
and our ship of State is, wc confidently believe, now
well trimmed, decks cleared and we feci able to do battle creditably and profitably in thc great field of activity, the distribution of thc peoples' food.
The retailer, too, is a most important partner in our
plans. Wc hove inaugurated a department called "Retail Service," or a resale division of the sales department and under thc leadership of the speaker meetings
have been held from one end of Ontario to the other, at
which many thousands of retailers have been present.
At these meetings we arc building good-will for our
company, convincing the retailer of our sincerity in
working to assist him to better his display and sales.
We have already received signed contracts from between two to three thousand retailers in Ontario, who
have agreed through window display, promote sales and
i;et behind products which wc feature co-operatively
from week to week.
These products arc backed by advertising in local
papers covering our branch areas.
This wonderful service wc are placing at the dis-
posalof the manufacturer of quality products, bearing
high reputation with thc consumer. Wc aro attempt'
ing a campaign similar to a National Sunkist Orange
Week, on well know products. The promotion is all
handled by our company at small expense to the manufacturer. No other organisation could give such a
valuable sales promotion service with all factors, dealers, windows, clerks, advertising, jubbcrs, salesmen,
sample distribution, all co-ordinated and functioning
at one time all over thc country.
Dealers arc enthusiastic over thc project; we believe by this plan we shall direct the attention of the
consumer to thc independent retailer, get thc reailers
interested in constructive merchandising, bring sales to
his store, and give the manufacturer results formerly
impossible. Thc day of demoralised merchandising as
applied to nationally advertised goods will be replaced
by o constructive scientific distributing system, passing
the products of the reputable manufacturer on to the
final sale for consumption, by thc cheapest and most
efficient, complete marketing method.
These arc day8 of advancement. We sec it on all
hands. If we have been a party in thc past to antiquated methods and inefficiency, it is our duty to work together to bring about a state of progress that will bear
the stamp of public approval and the close co-operation
of retailer and manufacturer toward that end. 20
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA KKTAILKR
Julv
(Eajrtatn Vatiamwr
rejirraritttag "Wafer £trrrt," imiitra gou to attrttft Iljr
tttytrft Annual Imjpra Mrrk
August r Is 14.1920
Sir, % un&rrmrnMonrb uiljolrsalrra nf Jruitfi attd {Irodltrr. &f.
arr at pur srroirr
CHESS BROS. LTD.
Wholesale
Fruit and
Vegetables
Quality and Service
Our Motto.
Vanoouver, B. C. and
Prince Rupert, B.O.
USE
-PACIFIC"  Light  Kraft  B.,-.
ars-i
OCEAN   FAILS   Kraft   P-tptr
mtson
DELIVERING   VOUR   FRUITS
ANO  VEGETABLES
Thii   Will   Enaure   SatufAclio-v
Said by
NORFOLK PAPER CO. LTD
ISS WATER STREET
Oscar Brown & Co.
LIMITED
Wholesale Fruits
175 WATER STREET
VANCOUVER
Your Welcome Will be Just ss Great at
ONE BLOCK EAST OF WATER 8TREET at
Vancouver Creamery Go. Ltd.
23 Alexander Street
'VANCOUVER CREAMERY BUTTER 18 OOOD
The Clark Fruit ud Produce Co.
Wt Sptculiit tn Shipping Buainaaa
Our Motto:
OUALITV ANO SERVICE
155 WATER STREET VANCOUVER. B C.
OPPENHEIMER BROS.
Fruit on J Produce (Brokers
MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS
Cor. WATER 4 ABBOTT STS.   VANCOUVER, B. C
C. H. JONES & SONS
Tents, Awnings and Canvas Goods of all kinds
Will be pleated to welcome visiting Merchants when calling on Water Street
VANCOUVER, B. 0
28 WATER STREET
SS 10*26
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
21
OUTLOOK FAVORS LARGE 8UOAR DISTRIBUTION.
Sugar Production Figures New a Known Quantity-
Distribution Remains an Element of Uncertainty With
Important Bearing Upon Values.
Distribution remains the element of uncertainty
in the sugar markel which will have an im*
jwrtanl bearing on values, li has frequently
Im-vu mentioned that  production lakes place dur-
niv   a few   months   in   the   year,     Tin*   .lava.   Aus-
ii.tlian. Natal ami Doincrara crops are tho only ones
commencing in Mav Tin* balance <>f cam- sugar is
practically all made between January and May. re*
presenting the bulk of world production. Beet production in Europe ami the United Stales begins around
September, During the lirst five months of tho year,
world sugar stocks are «i their highest, weighing hcav*
iiy mi the markel for the time being, particularly so
ii production him been plentiful which makes it diffi*
rub i«> gauge reasonably the distribution during tin1
balance of tin- year.
li in usually ai this tim«* thai estimates of a large
earryover are in evidence, bul frequently when the end
nt iln- year arrives most of thi;* surplus, which caused
sn much anxiety, has disappeared. Future production
slso begins I*' exerciao tbe imagination, This, however,
ahould not he allowed to enter to any greal extent into
ealeulatioiiM as the dominating point ot' interest remains distribution, unless the prospects of short crops
ahead are markedly in evidence, such as the possibility
of repeated erop limitation in Cuba in 1926*2T, The
summer months are those of heaviest consumption and
that season is now with u-
ll in lhe developments in the United States. Culm
ami Europe thai are the criterion for priees South
America and tbe Par Baal will nol have mueh of an
exportable surplus but might he interesting as buyers
of Amerienn ami European refined or Cuban raws.
'Imugh nol to a large extent lu the United States
the situation ean be designated as normal, Tho fear
that Cubs might produce a crop ill OXCCSR of last year's
record output haa been removed by legislative limitation. The faet lhal Stocks in the Island have aeeumu-
lated al tho ports ami in the interior to the extent of
360,000 tons over Issl year is nol an unnatural condition
in view of the reduced exports to Europe. The de
mand from thai source may be expected to again become OVidcill nol long heme
PortO Rico ami lhe Philippines have smaller hai*
anees of export left, whieh will result in an Increased
demand for Cubas.
"The larger stocks In Europe might appear ns a
menace,   The Increase In stocks in tlie six principal
Kuropean Countries, were as follows:
1926 over 1024
(HI0.000
600,000
400,000
270,000
140.000
60.000
1926 over 1925,
650,000
770.IHH1
825,000
850,000
January 1
I'Vbruary I
Mareh 1  	
April l
May 1
Juno l
This was due partly to larger production and furthermore to earleir purchases and reeeipts of Cuba as
well as imports of Australian. Mauritius and Natal sug-
a'Ti in the United Kingdom.     This exeess in Europe
PRIDE
B
ECAUSE their superiority has been
steadily maintained...
... because they are quality products,
... because they make better foods...
pride is taken in making, in selling and
in using Royal Baking Powder and Dr.
Price's Cream Baking Powder.
For over a half century they have been
bringing baking success to the housewife
and profits to the dealer.
Both are made in Canada
i   ■
A Quality Product!
IDrMtekRoton's  T|^
RONIZEjJ
tmm mam mmnma       WmmSW
OCNUINC
Whole Wheat
FLOUR
A PAIR FIXED PROFIT
FOR LARGE AND SMALL
IS THE POLICY OF
The Dr. MiddleUm's food Products
Company Limited
Vancouver, B. C. 9<>
THIS BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
might appear serious, but many of I lie European conn-
tries, exeept perhaps Germany and ('scrim-Slovakia,
have consumed and exported most of their production
and will require imports, notably Italy, the Baltic and
Balkan countries. Therefore, a rapid dwindling of
those supplies may be confidently predicted. But is is
of paramount importance lo consider that with the
same consumption in thc United States as last year,
Cuba and that country will have available for export
400,000 to 500,000 tons less to foreign destination after
May 1 in the shape of raws and refined. Nor is it likely that anywhere near the same quantity of .lava will
be exported to Europe, and these sugars will be readily consumed in thc Far East. For all these reasons,
the outlook is reassuring.
As regards the more distant future, a safeguard is
established in the fact that President Maehado has the
power to curtail thc next Cuban crop ami that grinding
will not commence before January 1, 1927. European
beet sowings this year have been barely larger than
in 1925 and production should be about the same. The
present Java crop is reported as possibly turning out
at least 300,000 Ions less than the previous one ami in
Australia there is also an estimated shortage. The
trade, therefore, can look to the future with confidence.
(a) The name of I lie article
(In The name ami address of any individual or : .
assuming responsibility for the packing.
(a) Volume and net weight of contents."
It is therefore assumed that unless all maple syrup
for sale is plainly marked with the name of those n*.
sponsible for the contents, lhe purveyor to the puhlie
must assume responsibility iu ease the contents an not
Up to standard.
BUTCHERS SECTION, R M. A
Announcement has Wen made that the butcher** of
Greater Vancouver Section, Retail Merehanl*' Ass.Mii
lion will hold a banquet at Canyon Viev Hotel, Capi!
i>no, on Wednesday evening. Autrust 4th at 6,30 a.m
Tickets may be obtained from Executive Committer
members, or from the local branch office of the Ass,
eiation.
MAPLE SYRUP REGULATIONS.
A recent regulation issued by Order in Council in
reference to the sale of maple syruj is as follows: "All
packages, or containers, such as bottles, jars, cans, containing maple syrup exposed for sale, offered for sale,
or sold lo the consuming public, shall be labelled to
show distinctly and plainly:
GROWTH OF CHAIN STORE SYSTEM
Ten thousand ehain store systems, with a total of
approximately 100,000 retail outlets, represent the
•growth of this method of selling in the United States
This is the estimate given by Paul II Nystmm. in i
revised slndy of ehain stores published by the domes
tie distribution department of the Chamber of Cum
meres of the Cnited Stat***.
Seventy-live ehain grocery ori*fani*ations operate
about 60,000 stores. The total volume of all ehain or
galuxations, it is estimated, must be considerably in
excess of $:|.(MNI.(MS1.000
Del Monte
YEU0W CUNG PEACHES
California '$ leading canned fruit
—and its fastest-selling brand
Yellow Cling Peaches arc sueh an important part of any canned fruit business
that your sales deserve the full support
you can give them.
No brand does this better than DEL
MONTE! Not only is the whole line
known and preferred by millions of consumers—but Peaches themselves have
been illustrated and featured in almost all
DEL MONTE advertising for years.
With the new canned fruit season just
ahead, why not decide now to concentrate
your peach business under this popular
brand! You,ll find it the sure road to
quicker, better sales. M
1926
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Inside Stuff in Office Management
23
' * 1
'l
By H. R. Simpson
Here are a group of office efficiency ideas picked
up lore and there. They touch sueh far removed subjects ns type of desk a man Uses, ami tho number of
words a stenographer types in a day, No attempt to
give comprehensive treatment to the subject, which
:, a large one of many phases is made
The science of office management has developed,
naturally, in large concerns employing scores of office
workers, thc very sue of the office permitting employment of an expert office manager. The need for full
office management is no less great, though thfl scale
be less, in the amall office. In small offices, development of methods and routines, largely ts accidental
Uood judgmenl may be mueh in evidence, but serious
deficiencies arc usually easy to locate.
The dual lest of office management is accomplishment in work handled and thc cost. Some of thc
plans here put down are concerned with increases of
individual output, and others with methods of measuring efficiency.
One. A desk instruction eard. For extra help,
and for new employees, the desk instruction card saves
much time in supervision. It is placed in an Upright
frame. It schedules the day, and tells the new or extra worker what to do when various tasks are completed—including the parties to whom they nre to report.
Two. Accuracy standards due hundred per eent.
accuracy in office work is possible of attainment. At
the same time, some standard of accuracy beside which
the work of the entire office or of any individual employee can be cheeked, is very valuable, Sueh standards arc beat expressed as ratios, as one mistake to
»me hundred and twenty-five orders.
Three. Desks should be adapted to the Individual
worker. A great many men are sticking to old-time
roll tops, because they feel Ihey are pretentious and
dignified, when a flat top desk would be far more
suited to their work. Many men need more lhan one
de»k. Thc most common way of using the second
■leak is to place the worker in swivel chair between
the two. He whirls from one desk to the other, A
second method is to place a long table at right angles
to thc flat top desk.
The quantity of paper material -shapes nnd sizes
"-determine how mueh desk space a worker needs. A
groat many men now feeling themselves "baffled" at
one desk which overflows, would quickly get efficiency
by adding a deak or table for their personal equipment.
*W. Work standards. In large offices, work
standards become established for every operation. Such
things as filing, opening mail, typing, billing, crediting
omittances, and many others, become associated with
bigh, average, and poor standards of performance .
Tests frequently are made to cheek on the effie-
wicy of an entire office force and of Individuals. Fg*
nres covering groups of typista, some on dictating ma-
rhino, others on copy, are before the writer. As a
»nit of meaaurement. one thousand words was taken.
Dictating machine performance ran from sixty-four
<me hundredths units, to one and three-tenths hun
dreds units. Typists on copy produced from fifty-six
one hundred units to one and one-tenth units.
Five. \\>ry efficient offices set this commendable
standard for replies to letters received. Letters arriving one forenoon arc answered the afternoon of the
same day; letters arriving in the afternoon arc answered the forenoon of thc next day. It is seldom
possible to register one hundred percent, on such a
schedule, but getting within a few points of one hundred is absolutely practicable.
Six. Efficiency can be greatly increased through
proper selection of equipment. There is an anomalous situation here. An astonishing number of offices
are featured, on the one hand, by office equipment,
bought oftentimes at considerable expense not now iu
use, and, ou the other by lack of equipment which
would effect economies. Bookkeeping machines and
dictating machines arc two types of equipment, in thc
use of whieh there is due increase.
Seven. Whose time is taken by office visitors!
There may be good reasons why the owner and manager of a business should represent the point of contact, at thc office, with thc general public. Some consider it desirable thus to meet everyone.
A great many others, however, cannot afford to
meet office callers. There is too much other and essential work to be done. Changing thc position of the
proprietor's or manager's desk from an office entrance
position to a position in the rear may mean saving
hours a day of time. This is essentially true if tho
office worker given the "information" desk position,
is tactful and intelligent, and knows how to serve thc
public while protecting his employer. The same general principal applies to the telephone.
Eight. Work tests for applicants. Most new office
employees eome either from employment agencies or
business colleges, and though the employer may interview several, the final test is the new workers' demonstration of ability when put to work.   Large offices
;\vU;  ,   | 11 fessw mo-see V^ 24
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
are more and more nsiiiR so-called work tests, -The.
applicant is given an examination. Thus a stenographer has special tests in typing and shorthand, plus
tests given all applicants iu arithmetic, spelling, hearing ability to reason. Probably many employers with
small offices would use sueh tests if they fell capable
of getting themtip. This need be no obstacle, as every
community has its teachers and many its professors
and Instructors, among whom one competent to create
work tests eould be found.
Nine. Of course, basic requirements for different
office workers are readily reached. Standard require
ments for distilling machine operators; for example,
are a high school education, touch typewriting, efficiency in spelling, and grammar, and accuracy. It
is further considered that a dictating machine operator should be an observant person with imagination.
Ten. The clean desk "doctrine" has been attacked
of late years by efficiency engineers of standing. The
importance of orderliness is conceded, but thc assertion put forward that plenty of work on a desk stimulates Ihe worker and is itself demonstration that tlo*
desk and the worker both are needed. When clear
desks are found in an office, through the day, the efficiency engineer is likely to fear the office force is too
large for the work to be done,
Efficiency men further point out that the clear
desk which are attained by passing to hastily on a
mailer, as i.s frequently the ease, may be an expensive
hobby. A greal many matters eome to nn executive's
desk which he can not decide off-hand. Those things
must be around awhile before he is able to give Ins
decisions.
Most men building businesses are far more interest
ed in buying and selling, win re Ihey seem to make
their money, than in details.
DRIED FRUIT MARKETS.
Washington, July 12th
There is a .very 11 mi i.m I carryover In lhe dried fruit mar
ket (his season, and stocks, with the except on or raisins and
prunes, are practically bare. Although the 8 price I market
has been stripped, tin* famine, now that new crop Ih in head,
is over. The few odd* and ends that are left are being ab
Morbed, and the outlets which have been short of many grade*
are absorbing Ihe flrsl ears. This BCCOUOts for the high
prices which packers have been able to get for June July
shipment.
There are very few peaches left and the new crop will
come on a practically bare market Ah there In » big crop in
California, the tendency is to go slow for later wants, but cor
talnly there is no carry over to worry about
The prune tonnage in the Northwestern Slates has been
reduced to a few million pounds, and as the present erop will
grade out but few 30s. old packs are held with firmness, and
packers will nol commit themselves to heavy percentages of
30i in assortments .
The California carryover 's in few hands, and has been
held more flrmly al the Coast than corresponding packs have
been at seaboard markets. There is a big crop In sight in
California, but carryover prunes are not as heavy as In fit her
recent years.
Raisins are decidedly short In a number of Imported packs,
such aa seeded and bleached, Hulk and package Thompsons
are moving right along to the consumer, and the favorable
posit on or the market Is shown In the constant (oast pur
chases. The coming crop Is estimated al 200,000 tons, which
is normal. It promises lo be of good quality and is early In
maturity.
Nut Marktt.
An unbelievable change has occurred in walnuts since tho
flrsl of the year. First hands al that lime had a considerable
block or shelled and unshelle.l domestic nuts Now nothing
Is reported to be left at the source. Eastern d slribulers who
had been idlers of rorelgn and domestic nuts have reversed
then positions, ttral l»u> Iiik distress parcels at low \,...,
and later S| full prices prevailing 00 the open market. .\,,w
that quotations are tinner there Is loss bui.ng in a bis «»}
but there Is more demand throughout the local and km ,,',
trade for nesrb) uses Foreign nuts have Improved u much
its domestic The shelled walnut market has taken mon ol
a bracer than UOSttelled and a series ot advances ha*- occurreij
which Ins not been checked Other nuts (woe participate*-*)
In ihe general!) better market Almonds hate l>..i* *ii,r,,:
mote active and sought
FREE GOODS NOT FAVOREO BV THIS FIRM
Royal Baling Powder Co. Refueee Manufacturers' Pie., tor
Goods to Give Away Frt« With Kttchtn Cabmtu
a striking evidence ol lhe nerve ol some taaaafsctu
of kitchen cabinets in solicit tm free good* from food manufai
Mirers t>> give ntitt with their cabinets Is evidence,! In •;,.
repl) to one of these concerns that had applied to tln> Hoyal
lt.tk.itiK Powder Compan) for some of Its product* Vin*
President Prank l» llrlttle), in refusing the request of the
kitchen cabinet manufacturer, placed hi* compan) on r<-<   |
si not being iti lympath) with ihe method ol merchandh-im
Replylas to the compel))  making the request. Vice  h.
Idenl Bristle) wrote
* We have for acknowledgment >our letter of tlo- I7lh insi
and would state thnt this compan* Is In no »»-. In lytnps
with the advertising scheme >oil propose
"While we real t, that >ou aim to give considerable i<lib
licit) lo the product* that are donated, we do not belie-., thai
it Is good merchandising In Otbef words. We do BOI kOOl
wh) we should •**:••<■ our products aw«) free in order to Mp
-•■II kitchen cabinets gas range* and refrigerators am won
than   the   manufacturers   of   these   products   should   fuwU
ibem Ire* io u* to iw given »»») with lhe sale ol our pro
duct
t*0 Groctriti With 1*0 Cabinet.
"I have known instances when- hrm* have fold foi owe
dollar down on the Insialment (dan a ISO cabinet and gin*
awa* with tlo* purchas ■ tiearl) fj> worth nt merchandise don
Sled b*> manufacturer* of food and grocer) products
"It Is SI) opinion that Kttfh method* cheapen ra'her (bar
add to the Willie of the product* di*po*rd of In Mieh ttintoi-
but whether thatls the c«*e or not the principle Involved li
wiong.   It Is not fair lo the manufacturer or his wholesale
and ret-ill d stributors "
T"E  5 on-*  tO GROCERY.
Beaton H»o Ntw Style Grocery -Tht Nickel and 0*nt Sto"
Boston. Mass. has a new «t)le of groc«H> store thai ba*
leaped Into fame in tht- past few Weeks, and has esueed a
vast deal of talk in the grocer) trade It is the % and I" "
grocer), and was recently opened at 22* Massarhusett* an
BoslOB, Mass Tlo- proprietor of this new departure In lh*
grocer) line is Arthur Smith, and he la said 10 be well pirns
ed wit It hi* tow venture
The store Is of the self serve plan and everything I* 'I'"'
up In 6 and 10 lent  packages, mostly l«»  A total Of "•'," |,,n
are can led In stock   Mutter Is done up In I" cent print*   I*1
BlSO In Similar packages   tags are sold three for I" cents Si
m> on down the line    Hale on Satin dais are said to aiet ftl*
MOO,
LIKE VANILLA ONLY NICER
VANART
FOP FLAVORING
CAKES CUSTARDS* -
LIHL VA Hill A ONLYNICER
-AT    YOUHCBOCUIS
W. A. JAMESON COFFEE CO.
VICTORIA VANCOUVER '. ■'
K
1921
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
25
Drygoods and Clothing
Colorful Fabrics for Men's Wear Forecast
for 1927
Claim U Mid. that Mill. Hav, Not Mad, Thorough Study of Cou.um,r Domand.
111,1
ihi
IHI
Nil
pong belief ar-Jong some clothing manu*
ight colors will predominate again to a
in fabrlea ior spring of 1927, and that
high'1 colors viill !'•■ featured, Tins
ever, is made with certain reservations.
the fabrics miM not only be eolorful,
from lhe standpolnl of the ultimate eom
retailer who will sell tiiem
The idea that  eolorful effects
„„,| smart patterns will find im
waning demand is based largely
on ,|„. dominating influence ol
tod«y   in   all  -ns of  apparel,
,„,.„%.   Rnd   '"•>>•   an   well   as
women's   and   children*   wear.
I.on.1 necktie*, fancy hosiery and
hat bands, gay patterns and colors
|n   shirts,   pajamas,   underwear,
,.,,.   i„ Whieh color fairly runs
n,.i   a.*.- taking men away from
their traditional conservatism in
Cl0,hing   end   today  they   look
with  favor upon fabrics which
WOUld have caused then a shock
n few years ago.
Styling is Criticised.
tin.*   manufacturer   expressed
the view thai, mo* domestic woo
^ l,n concerns who eomp ai   Wtiu*
Iv of depression in lh«r tadwtiy
„-,. miss*;,,, ,n, important opportunity    ^J/ ^
fnil      fulI   to appWciatc lhe -J-     ;   ;,! ()li it hy
«tyie factor in men's apparel, an i to ™»
bating a wider variety of appealing pall  i»
-Never have 1  u a more ^^\%^
of fabrics from the standpoint ofo i  par        ^^
ness than that of this fall aeason,   i«ian fti
fnettirer, who epcclallaea n dot ling       •     .     ^
Because he was unable to And what ntvaan iu,
he was obliged to go abroad and maw e* fc
ehaaes from milla In England that wcr willing
with him in the creation of novel and striking
such an he roquiretl .   iup| \m been
Thc demand for eolor aiuVstylc "in Wm ^   lt as.
ries failed to hold their colors and the extrmely light
tints soiled very easily.
Must Appeal to Wearer.
This fact undoubtedly had a good deal io do with
the reaction in favor of dark blue clothing, which nlso
came in as a natural counterbalance to the extremely
light colors whieh were not suitable for many occasions.
In creating colors for the coming spring, clothing
men say. the woollen manufacturers would do well to
hear iii mind that the average Canadian does not observe the fine distinctions as to dress that the Englishman and sonic other Europeans do.
A fabric designed primarily for outing and sports
wear may he subjected to more or less general use, with
the result that it fails to give satisfaction, It may also
prove unsuitable for the complexions of a large proportion of the buying public and when a color of this
kind is offered, retailers and manufacturers will hesitate to buy it.
The experience of the present season, when the public refused to accept dark blues, especially in topcoats,
to the extent that retailers and manufacturers had anticipated, but insisted on light colors, is another indication that the spring of next year should be a light color
season, For fall, the buying of finer grades of apparel
centres more and more around reddish brown shades,
but blues and grays are said to be selling very well.
LARGE WORLD SUPPLY OF AMERICAN COTTON
Present prospects are that the world supply of
American cotton for the coming season will be the
largest in many years. With a probable earryover of
about 6,250,000 bales and eity crop. Mexican imports
and other sundry supply totalling perhaps 250,000 bales, a crop of 14,000,000 would make a total supply of
approximately 20,500,000 a crop of 15,000,000 would
make n total supply of 21.500,000, and a crop of Ifv
i ii ti i.OOO would make a total supply of 22,500,000, exclusive of iinters.
Last year the earryover was about :l,600,000 and
the ginned crop, city erop and Mexican imports totalled 16,300,000, making a total supply of 19.800,000
Two years ago the earryover was about 2.750.000 and
the ginned crop and other supply totalled 14.000,000
making the total supply 16,750,000, Three years ago the
carryover was about 8,400,000 and ginned crop and
other supply was 10,300,000, making a total supply of
13.700,000, .
This supply should not bo compared simply with consumption and the difference be considered as excess 26
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Uilv
supply. The portion of the supply which is required
for a reasonable carryover into next season is not an
excess.
As to how much of the supply for the coining season
will be required for actual consumption during the
season, and whether the amount remaining at the end
of the season will eonstitute a normal or an abnormal
earryover, no positive statements can be made.
Facts of Consumption.
With regard to consumption it may be noted that
the world has used about 18,700,000 bales during the
past season, and if it should use the same amount next
season the carryover at the end of the season would
be about 6.800,000; if the crop were 14.000,000, it would
be 7,800,000 and if the crop were 15,000.000. it would
be 8,800,000.
Price Relation.
To determine thc significance of these figures with
relation to thc future price of cotton, one must obviously consider other factors entering into the situation. It
is a question how and to what extent this large prospective supply has been discontinued by the decline of
six or eight cents, or 25 to Z0% in the eotton market
during the past year.
It is a question how low the price must be to induce
speculative buying and carrying of excess supply
through thc season if the supply should be excessive.
a contrasting color placed on the hips This m\\ is
sewn to thc dress at the top mid is loose at the bottom
finished off at thc back in a large flat butterfly !.,,«•'
"      As Seeim By
Jcamieftttc
Practically every collection of the Paris style houses this year finds emphasis placed on pleats, panels,
shaped movements and other details whieh characterise
the present "kinetic" mood of fashion. On this side
thc vogue is similar in this regard, and all indications
pont to a season in whieh grace and movement arc of
great import.
"The new silhouette presented by Parisian couturiers is of much straight cr lines," says Henri Creange,
fashion authority for Cheney Bros, in Paris, "although
skirts retain their fullness." As forscen no godcts appear, bnt still some shaped movements in dressier models only. Thc newest means of obtaining fullness are
gathers and pleats of all kinds, ami plisses; also many
flounces and tucks. Bodices are often blousant at the
back or all around.
Fabrics and Colors Used.
There are also boleros and bolero effeets and the
waistline is moderately high, while some tunics and
many aprons are worn. Materials most employed are
georgette, chiffon, crepe de Chine, toile de sole, shantung tussor, silk rep. faille and serge dcsole. Taffetas
are more or less used in all houses and more printed
chiffons appear than crepe, with georgette a stronir
factor."
Confirming the mode for supple, clinging effects for
evening gowns. T am informed that the dress most
frequently seen consists of a straight moire or satin
fourreaii trimmed only with an eighth-inch wide sash of
which has no hanging ends Tin* favorite color schemes
for these dresses nre blue on pink, canary on ehflrt
reuse and a pale blue on a deeper one.
The tendency in Paris this summer is toward boh ro
and Moused effects. In I-elong's collection the even
ing dresses, like lhe more habille afternoon frocks, havi
bodices which blouse a very Kttle nt the back where
this effect is sometimes simulated by a small bolero,
which is seen at the back only. Thc skirts arc generally widened by gathers and often thc dresses are trim
mod with n bow. This is also noticeable in the presentation of Premet, where in evening frocks as wcl
as in day dresses the bodices are often blniisant, and
there are several draped sashes. r.'j'*
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
27
Dance and Evening Frocks.
While tbe fluffy and dinphonous dance frock „f
i-liil'fuu or tulle has become a "staple" in the world of
fashion, because of its youthful lines and soft rippling
,,■••, there will always be a number of women who re-
ih loyal to the more sophisticated type of evening
Kowil.
Metal cloths are particularly effective for costume
blouses and golden lame ami chiffon are effectively
combined, the chiffon being so disposed over the lame
,,, to form a round yoke in front and a fashionable
pnint in back, This tunic blouse is interesting also in its
adoption of lhe dowdy buttoned high neck and its utilization of the sash which ties in front of the blouaant
bodice, • • * I
iim evening gown accents a new lustrous crepe BStin
culled Starktepc, in yellow-green chartreuse, The dress
conforms to the princes* line, the fullness being obtain*
ed by a slightly flared overskirt which is skilfully
drsped at the back. A golden galloon edges the under-
skut, outlines the Y-shaped decolletagc. and forms a
rounded neckband in front, caught by the dress which
rises iu a point to meet it.
l^effl
RETURN OF THE CORBET PREDICTED FROM
Manufacturtra Evolve Mew Girdle Model-Canadian
Buyers Interested.
According to French dressmakers, commissionaires
dealing with Canadian department stores, and manufac.
tuprerg of corsets, the corset is coming baek into popularity. French manufacturers who a year ago found
business dull in the corset line are now busy designing
new models.
Charles Du Hois, represenling Blgnon & Co., at 30
Hue des .leunneiirs, a firm whieh has been making corsets for tnxty years, said that styles in corsets were
changing so rapidly lhat he did not dare manufacture
corsets now to be shown six months from today,
The fashionable French dressmakers were the first
lo predict the return of the corset.    At several oi these
branch dressmaking establishments Canadian women
have been turned away because they did not wear corsets At Molyneaux, Poiret's and Roger Bernard's, all
well known dressmaking establishments, the return of
the corset is predicted.
Canadian Type Differs.
The French demand a corset which laces. The Canadian, provided she is reasonably slender, regards the
laced back as too much trouble. She wants tho girdle
or the step-in. A French woman's figure, is sueh that
she seeks the corset whieh curves in, slightly, at the
waist line. The Canadian woman is in search of the
straight line.   She wants no curves.
The corset is really no longer a corset. Instead it
is a hip girdle, without the numerous whalebones and
the stiffness which made a cage of the corset of prewar days.
The hip girdle manufactured today by French concerns dealing with Canadian department stores, however, is slightly higher than the girdle of last year. Also, it is longer in the baek.
Rayon Used for Strength.
Rayon has entered into the manufacture of the 1926
corset. Artificial silk has been woven through the
rubber, or the fabric of which thc corset is made, so as
to give the corset added strength. Damask, rubberised
silk and brocaded silks arc some of the materials of
whieh corsets are made today. Though the silken fab-
tics of some of the more recently designed corsets, tho
jacquard design is woven, while others have thc chine
effect. French women still demand thnt their corsets,
or girdles, lace in the baek.
An inspection of French corset factories reveals cor.
sets of all kinds. Corsets of all descriptions, far more
elaborate than the simple girdle shown in Canadian department stores, may be found at thc Louvre and at the
Galleries LaFayette, thc two largest department stores
in Paris. !
Canadians Seek More Goaty Styles.
The corset in which thc Canadian buyer is interested is the more expensive tyne of corset. But thc
corset which interests French. English and Swiss department stores ranges in price, wholesale, from 10
francs up. The corset whieh is manufactured today—
the hip girdle- is 50 per eent. lower in price than was
the corset of pre-war days.
"The corse! is bound to return," says Madame Ber-
Canadian Export & Import Co., Limited
1
"TORII" LINE OF GIFT AND ART GOODS
CANADIAN NOVELTIES AND TOYS
SEAS OF 408 CORDOVA STREET WEST
VANCOUVER. B.C. 28
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
July
nard, head of Roger Bernard el cie, modistes. "Worn*
en are losing their figures and they are tired of dieting
and being compelled to exercise.
Not only the return of the corset, but the return of
the figure is predicted by thc way some of the corsets
being bought by Canadian buyers are designed, Corsets whieh consist of both girdle and brassiere show
brassieres so designed that there is a tendency to raise
the figure instead of to produce the flat-chested effect,
GLOVES.
Washable swede pull-on gloves are scheduled for
popularity this fall, following the ever-increasing vogue
for sports wear. For formal occasions short cuffed
gloves of soft kid are noticed, the cults being delicately
embroidered velvet ribbon or a cutout pattern in the
kid itself. Heavy washable swede gloves, some approaching gauntlet style are also correct for sports
wear. Deep Iricge and soft grey tones are the more
popular colors.
NEW HOSIERY COLOR CHART.
A new hosiery chart has recently been issued by
the Circle-Bar Knitting Co., Kincardine, ami is now being distributed to the trade. The chart is in the form
of a small combined catalogue and price list, illustrating and describing the firm's leading lines of hosiery
for men. women and children.
An unusual feature of this attractive folder is the
method of presenting thc hading shades There are
shown by means of a loop of knitted fabric, instead of
a printed eolor slip, as is often used to show a color
range. It is thus possible to reproduce the exact shade.
whieh in these days, when there is slight difference be*
tween eertain tones, is essential to the merchant placing his order.
Thc fabric loops in the color chart are arrange 1 in
series showing the different tone values of a color, for
•instance, the silver shades range from moonlight getting darker until they reach cannon,
U. S. DISPLACES BRITAIN AS LEADING EX*
PORTER OF TEXTILES TO CANADA.
While Canada was increasing her textile imports
more than s|i 10.01 KM HMI to a total of $184,762,000 during
the fiscal year ended with March, the Cnited States displaced the Cnited Kingdom as chief seller of these
products to Canada.
That country, the !'. S. Commerce Department am
nouneed recently supplied 42.8 per cent, of the Canadian imports of textile libers ami manufactured pro-
duets, as compared with 'Ml per cent, for the same per.
iod last year, while the Cnited Kingdom dropped from
43.fi per cent, to '18 per cent.
MARRIAGE ANNOUNCED OF DOMINION
SECRETARY, R. M. A.
Norman B. Douglas, secretary-manager of the Dominion Board, Retail Merchants' Assoeiation, has recently joined the benedicts, the announcement of his marriage ha villi? been received from the east this month.
The "Itiilisli Columbia Retailer" extends the best of ali
good wishes to the bride ami groom in their venture
upon the sea of matrimony.
For Every Outdoor Sport
'Hill lllOlJhlli BRAND
BUCKSKIN cloth
SPORT JACKETS
if you've bsvcf worn one of Uiese Jackets you
havs yel to learn whal perfect comfort means, Thej
move with every move of tin- body* ao btndina, no
ittffness,   K»tr» roomlaees ami the softness ol the
cIiioiioIm like clot It ink** enn- of thnt It weiun llk<*
etUUQOlS um! ennin ii good il.'Hl b-nii
These Jacket* <|<> not Hhrltik or lose their Shape In
tlo* iraSB.   See them nt any icooil men's wi-nr store,
Miole In light or dark grey, clmmol*. ilnrk tun SMl
reindeer brown. ai*o in mnckinnw cloth checks,
red sod black, lettuce sod blaek, srey andi black,
brown nml black.
Reck Island Overall Co,
ROCK laLANO. QUE.
Representative:
R. M. F08TER, 2a Water atreet, Vancouver, B. C. 192i
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RKTAILER
29
THE WORSTED INDU8TRY.
COTTON.
Manchester, Jui> j, i-.cji;,
riioufb tin* standard qualit)  ol Afflcrtcat) cotton Is now
,,■.. ,   *-,i  u pound, bavins fallen •*«!  during ihr isst nine
itu, trsde continue* to in* depressed,  The books oi spin
M,    .tint manufacturer* prove that durini the last fne or six
year* the coosumpUoo of cotton doth ha* suffered curtail-
<•> ,\ serious nml unexpected extent .
Wholesale dealers lo piece goods for e*port sre nol thc
., M. salesmen that they oiee were, because they ire afraid
i« mn the rink of giving further credit, UnquwUonab!) a
1 ,»*■  iinmmi of business i* deferred oo tbti account  Whal
. i-ih-ii to sive business * mueh seeded span is prompter
i < n-nt of nccounl* Absence of ready money, StOSg wltti
•:. nnsatlftfariory romlltlon of International exchanges, sc«
• mnis lor a Inrue part of the depression thnt prevails Kveii
■ ere wen' abundance of roni there would no? be many more
'   mi running than there are now.
ftrbemee for Improvius trading ooadlUooi sre mulUplytng
In Addition lo one for fltlng basic price* for yarn Which has
l> < n ipUB from American cotton, (bore Ik soother for eitab-
Ing » > am selling company whose object will b** t«> restore
afldence and lo encourage baying on iOBg contrscli In-
cl nt the hand toniouth buying which haft been 'lit- rule
lhe lani sts year*   Tin- members will be required to pro
mi. ihe capital which I* Beef-led .and to disclose to ihe dlrec-
ton lhe cost of production, ol sates sad el deliver)     1 i«*>n
in tnlormsllon the company will prepare « standard price
IUI, n* In the custom In tfu- printing and other subsidiary In
itustrlei and any member ol tlo* companj who li fount! iell«
tu- helot the reeofotsed scale wttt subject htmieU lo heavy
i' [tallies .
WE EXTEND A COROIAL INVITATION TO VISIT-
INO MERCHANTS TO CALL AT OUR SAMPLE
ROOMS TO INSPECT OUR
Staapd ******* **i Art Heealewerk Novelties
■■ .i i ,i uttO ■"■
(Mfktt hige if "Ut" ari "WIIDSPUR" Itads
Duncan Carmichael
Mn urnnwtt lAJMKIWttt
Imperial Block, 440 Seymour St..     Vancouver. B.C.
Rhone Sey. 4153
llrandford, July 2nd, 1926.
Tlie condition of the worsted industry of this district continues very unsatisfactory, and. unfortunately, the prospect
li not encouraging. It is hoped that when the mining dispute Ih over further orders for piece goods will produce great-
er activity in all departments, but even the most sanguine do
nol look for anything like good trade because of the loss of
purchasing power In the country generally. Al the moment
there Is sufficient coal available to run what machinery Is
necessary to deal with the orders in hand.
Manufacturers of dross fabrics and of light weight materials for youth's and men's wear are more than ever convinced
that their only hope of finding employment for their operatives and machinery is in the imposition of a duty on Imported
woods. What Is causing more apprehension is the fact that,
betide*-* the French, other Continental manufacturers are now
In the field nnd are more formidable competitors than at any
lime lines the war. They too are assisted by their depreciated
currenctei and lower costs of conversion, and their competition is felt not only in this country but also in the Dominions.
Some important spinners and manufacturers who adopted a neutral attitude when the application for a duty waa
made towards the end of the year have now realized the nec-
<*ssity to, a duty, and are nt present more In evidence than
any one in urging the need for another appeal to the govern-
ment .
BOOTS ANO SHOES.
Northampton, July 4, 1926.
There lias been no material change in the boot and shoe
Industry during tlie last seven days. A few centres report
some improvement, hut few firms are really busy and everywhere a great amount of short time prevails Orders are arriving very slowly, and in one of the most important boot
manufacturing towns in the country it Is estimated that the
output for the time being is only two-thirds of the normal for
this period of the year.
A few useful orders in light goods have been handled, but
ilie trade In heavy goods is weak. In a few cases factories
that could work longer hours are In short time because of the
restriction of power supplies, and the coal stoppage has lasted
so long that even in centres where the power supply Is up to
the present normal there Is a danger that curtailment may
not be far off. At Northampton the gas company has sufficient coal in hand to give anormal supply to all consumers for
another month, and the electric light company is on very
much the same position, so that here, at any rate, the power
problem is not likely to became acute for some time.
There is a fair inquiry in the export branch of the trade,
and some orders have been placed recently from Canada, the
United States. New Zealand and Australia.
Damaned Enough Already.
Lawyer (helping pedestrian up)—Come with me. my man.
You can get damages,
IVdestrian (groggy)—H'vens, num. 1 got all tb* damages
I want.   Get me some repairs.
We are participating in VANCOUVER BUYERS' WEEK,
August 7-14, and will be pleased to welcome visiting merchants
THE DAVIS-WHITE COMPANY
FANCY GOODS
XMAS TOYS OUR SPECIALTY
324 WATER STREET
NOVELTIES
M
I 30
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILKK
WELCOME
YOU ARK CORDIALLY  INVITED TO VISIT OUR   FACTOR*,
WHILE IN VANCOUVER, EXHIBITION WEEK
PHONE FAIRMONT 3988
AND WE WILL HAVE OUR CAR CALL FOR YOU
"Here it your opportunity to tee how good Gloves are made"
JOHN WATSON LIMITED
GLOVE MANUFACTURERS
127, 2nd AVENUE EAST
VANCOUVER, B.C.
WASHINGTON  WATCHES
OUR SALES OM WASHINOTON WATCHES ABE INCREASING STEADILY   NEW MODELS AND
DESIGNS FOE FALL BUSINESS NOW ON DISPLAY.
WESTERN WHOLESALE JEWELERS
301 CORDOVA STREET, VANCOUVER, B. C.
Be sure and call when visiting Vancouver, August 7-14, during Buyes* and Exhibition Week W THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RKTAILER 31
Among the Retailers of British Columbia and Alberta
BRITI8H COLUMBIA
Chilliwaek*-"
w.iui V   Commenced (Rest, ami Coal)
•vJllbori Company,   Reported added grocer) departmeni
ID i'i )
cuffude—
in!). N w   Bold out '« 0 h Owen (coal, &< I
Count-way—
Muni   Kwari. Lid   Reported commenced (meats).
Galliano Island—
-,»i»ri. Chas   Commenced ( 0. S), successor to J J,
Harford,
K>mloops—
David Bpeoccr (Vancouver) Limited   Hold creamer) lo
Pal Hums a- Co i.m
Kimbirley—
Mmin-ii. James  * emmenciei (garage and sates),
•Ukl Cowichan—
tiordon Uteres Limited   Opening branch si Youbou (G.S.)
tike Windermere—
!,ik*< Windermere Co-operstlve  Creamery  Aaaoc alien.
Incorporated
L.i«giey Pra'rle—
r. .m   ii   a   Reported s*equlrlng business al j Jonei
(grocer)
Woodward, C  D   Reported sold ou< *o Praaer Motors
Limited
Nikuip—
Nakusp Co-opereltvi Societ) Limited   Reported offering
compromise ot •SOe oa the dollar
Nj"aimo—
Ross J \v   At»*i*n*-d i   C M T v Ltd  appointed tru*
I**- (0  S )
Natal —
Altomore ami i*nic«rt>    -Vltemor* Iskea ever bsker) and
t'liKurn control* grocer) (bakers sud grocers),
****** Wflrtnnotor—
tiamon, J Q   Tendei advori aed for purchase ol anteta,
M.M'km. J K   Reported sold out (grocer*)
Krown, j k it m   Reported dlaeontlnued (etc)
Osllow&y-, J   Comraeneed (moale)
North Vancouver—
McVlckem, Pred    -Assigned C   C   M   T   A   appointed
costodisB
P^Herton—
I'niii. Chas Commenced (grocer)
Reveietoke—
Gelllearno, d Reported laeorpoftted si Qalllcarnoi Lid
(tt s ami Bakery)
RobtMt Creek—
Thorn peon, Richard   Reported setd oul lo Q C Hogg
(0 s)
Vancouver—
CuiumitiH Produce Company   Commenced
Hlggtnbotham, J V Ltd   Discontinued (Jewelry)
Locomoblc Bales Lid   Apply for chenge o( nsme to A
E Dell l.ul
Patrick   Rac   Bailiffs isle sdvert'sed (mlllln.)
Gavin & Leigh, Ltd   Applj for chsnse of name to i elgh
a Co i.m
t-acey, e   Reported sold slock si auction (D.G.)
Rearles, J«an.   commenced (restsursnt).
R C Rxcelslor Company- H  E Ounn end ••  •• w,il
lell business io Restmore Mfg Co Ltd
Wonderpbove Limited   Receiving order in bankruptcy
reported granted     C C M T  A trusteei,
Ansell, George—Reported sold out "West Point Hardware
Ferguson, ll. A.   Reported in financial difficulties (drugs)
Kiiwi»ii Garments — laeoprorsted,
Le Hon Compsny Ltd   Meeting of creditors held (auto
body builder*)
Newbro Electric Company,  Reported sold oul to i regressive Electric Compsny,
Vernon—
Qaven, R,—Reported sold out to Csroaso Ores, (meats),
Victoria—
Kairbalrn. Robert—Business offered for sale (eonf, &e.)
EouIiIm. M    Business offered for sale (DO  Notions)
•Johnson * Salisbury   Commenced (who)   retail bakers)
Kulak. John,  Commenced (Douglas Cafe),
MarKiiy, joim,  Commenced (produce).
Moyae, James.  Commenced (grocer).
Vallance,   Added fruit department (ret. florist).
Maccy Abell Co. Ltd.—Reported offering compromise (rta-
tloni'ry ami office supplies).
Hlbbert, Mrs, Win-   Discontinuing business (I). G„ &c.)
Watson, Robert W,  Commenced (men's furn.)
Levy, bulls J. Stock sold by auction and business discontinued (phonoKiaph records, Jewelry, &c).
David Spencer, Ltd., takes over lhe stock of Pickard &
Tuck, Yates St.
ALBERTA.
Alliance-
Jones, J  B,   Discontinued (harness, etc).
Aspen Beach—
Woelmer Bros,  Commenced (gro.)
Beiseker—
Cordon Noah, successor to E, Alsantat (G  S.)
Belln-
Kew General store (dissolved),
Calgary—
Calgary Knitting Company. Succeeded by Calgary Knit-
tins Co, Ltd. (Mfra.)
Lambert's t't»stairs clothes Shop.   Discontinued branch
here,
MacDonaid, l>. A.   Commenced (gro.)
Calgary   Millinery   Store.   Opened  branch   at  214—8th
Ave   West.
Kay's Silks.Reported sold out,
Monkman, Victor.   Reported commencing  (gro,)
TiBther, Victor.   Reported commencing (gro),
Drumheller—
Ciuterson,  Win.      Purchased  hardware  stock of  J.  W.
Teeple (painter and decorator)
Duhamel—
Miller, R. K.   Sold out to S, Westwk-k (0- S.)
Edmonton-
Cornfield, S, R.   Sold out (gro.)
Baatman, A E.  Succeeded by a. V. Swain (gro.)
Hulberts' Grocery.   Sold out
Vandeveer Limited,   Assets advertised for sale (whol teas
Kox Shoe Store.   Commenced  (H. A S.)
Tin- Drapery House,   Stock sold to Hudsons' Hay Com-
pany (house furnishings.)
Aitkins.J. M.   Moved to 8239 104th Street (Gro,)
Frog take—
Litchfield. N. J.   Discontinued (0. S)
Lethbridse—
Shirley. T, G. jr,   Opening branch store 1260—3rd Ave.
South (gro.)
Feinste n.  it    Closed  "Great  West  Store".   Continuing
"Palace Clothing Store."
McKlllop. II. A. C    Commenced branch as "Bungalow
C.rocerteria."
Leduc—
Grleadorfs,   Commenced (Drygoods).
Medicine Hat—
Clay, F   Discontinued (Gro.)
Jamleson, E    Discontinued (Shoe rep.)
Lytlleon *.<• Porter.   Commenced (G. S.)
McNallys1. Reported selling oul (Tailor)
Prasow, James,   Commenced branch as "Bridge Street
Grocer)"
Minburn—
Hods •*< Harris   Opened branch at Edmonton (G. B.)
Macleod—
Macleod Auto Sales.   Sold out (Autos).
New Norway—
Hewson. Dr. R. D.   Discontinued here (Drugs and Slaty.)
Picture Butte—
Pollock, James N.   Commenced (G. *S.)
Raymond— ,     .        ,
Nobbs  Culled Cash &  Carry  Stores Limited,   Opened
branch at Cardslon (groc),
Rosedale—
Krlll. P.   Erecting slore premises (gro. and drygoods).
Rylev— _
Brown, E. W,  Organising E. W, Brown Limited (c. s.
and Implements).
(Contmuecl on pago '\b) 32
i   i
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
IIIIV
$25029
f.o.b. Walker-
villc, complete
and ready to
install in your
present ice box.
*:
«
Ice-O'Matic refrigeration opens the door of every
electrically equipped home in Canada to Icc-O-
Matic dealers.
What is your share of this market.'
Electrical refrigeration is the nextcoming industry
—get in on the ground floor with Ice-0*Matic—
manufactured in Canada by a Canadian company, owned and operated by Canadians for
Canada, the British Empire, and the export field.
Ice-O-Matic has many exclusive features, both
in its product and merchandising line-up.   Get
in touch with us at once relative to territory-
it is a money maker.
ICEO-MATIC REFRIGERATION CO., LIMITED
WALKERVIUE ~ .. ONTARIO
Tlili unit •.*•*»> Input
In tht htMtntnt tt*
any nut of thr ma*
pst**, 19
i&
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
33
HARDWARE, OL and PAINTS
HARDWARE MARKET REPORT.
ivn.nln of MtiiiitM-r hhU in iill wanted lines am
,hnWin. en Increase over \ss\ season, with, reqinidlei
,',r ,,unp and vacation um moving out well   Among
I |ines camp Btove* ami outing baskets are holding
»promlnsnit pU**> with good reports tot sll aportiug
"   .unMMU.-nt  Upon thr promise ol 8  bumper M\
v|l.,,l i„ this province, uten*!.es of preserving require*
' ,„t*4 an heavy setlefa, with preserving kettles, |ars-
„, „r ringt, jar stand*, crock* and wooden spoons in
'KTh"building programme, whieh thM year point* to
i ,,,„,! of eon*!ruction. Is keeping dealers busj sup
plying heavy hardware and roofing materials
With the Hale of screen door* considered good to
,,■„. and with wanner weather probable which .wl
hrin lo move any surplus itocka on hand, tbe sale o
■rrren door hardware has boon wtisfactory, and  til
promise* a *n* of adding considerably to - aeh da)
ioial buatneas, »f th** I*"'* !UV prominently displayed
:i! ihis timi'. .       , ....
KoraomttJ pa*t there have been persistent    •
innrs of declines in the price* on both BMtanwi i   •■
„r goods and rubber Urea, and it U expecediim   ne
,„, pHee* will be announced about.the »Wdle or ne
,«mingweek,   That the ehange will be in thejiature
,, „ deeUne aeoma almost a certainty, and there is n
lloubl but that the very low price on crude ro Warn
ihr present time i* reapomdble to s degree   or  m.
rhnnge anticipated,    Tlo- priee changes may Uitiuci
lower quotations on rubber hoae,
Reports from Canada's steel mills show active eon.
ditions,  with  an onesuraftng outlook for  tne i*u
""'iVoliablv the result of intense foreign «wPfl,,J?hn'
n. * rope priee* for July Augusl show s decline
ihric market siill showa weakness. .
ReMgorator sales nn- satisfactory, wi h nm» >•■
.ontiiiuallv entering the field, The latest-of th«e to
the lea-O-MaUo Rafrigalor of the l w en - ■ ■
which with a Canadian eharter, ih operating ai "»
Iee04bti« Refrigeration Company, limited, NUtn
up.to.dati plant situated In Walkervill*. ™\aT'..
A shortage in anticipated In Rngllah Ml sh"«.
iml as yot Eastern dJatributors have not aiiercu
'"'ihi prions are holding form, despite the wldlm^
. this induetry in Ureal Britain. Sales arc « «
 I. and authorities elaim that world production
keeping pace with consumption, i
The increasing number of automobiles,   t     ■
I nicks in this province ropreaents a muei my,
"f olla and gasoline, and there la m stW«J« "   '
adi of the possibility of any price ^flW*bPicflUnJ
ehnnga ahould occur, the tendancy or a j
"lis and grcasos, coal oil and gasoline is in        i
HARDWARE MARKETS AT A GLANCE.
Carpet Sweepers—('all is fair with stocks well fli-
1''<I.   Prices have not changed,
Churns.—Sales show some improvement with the
increase of dairying operations. Stoeks are well filled.
PHees have not changed.
Field Pence.—('all is normal i'or this season of the
year.   Stocks have kept at a good point.   Prices tin-
changed,
Chain.—Tlure is no change in prices, and the demand remains steady.
*
Agricultural Tool Handles.—The demand is holding
Up exceptionally well.   Prices are unchanged.
Milk Cans,—Call is increasing with the advance of
the season, Stocks are heing kept well filled, with no
change in prices.
Lanterns.—('all is fair, with stocks ample. Prices
have not changed.
Lawn Mowers.—Volume of business keeps up.
Slocks an- well tilled, with prices holding firm.
Conductor Pipe.—A fair demand is reported. Prices
nre unchanged,
Builders' Hardware.—Prices decline as the demand
remains brisk.
Copper Rivets and Burrs.—There is a good volume
of orders heing received.   Priees unchanged.
Glass and Putty.-Prices are firm ami sales are reasonably good.
Fishing Tackle—With the fishing season on, a good
demand is assured through vacation period.
Bolts and Nuts.—There is a good steady demand
with no change in prices.
Files.—Sales are normally good nnd prices firm.
Automobile Tires, and Tubes.—A moderate demand
continues.   Retailers are ordering sparingly and apparently only for replacement of tires and tubes sold
from their stocks,   Prices are unchanged.
Automobile Accessories.—Sales are very satisfactory and prices firm.
Awning Hardware.—Awning hardware moves well.
Local jobbers state prices are unchanged.
Barrows.—A fair demand exists for wheelbarrows
of various types.
Electric Irons. — Prices on electric irons are unchanged and demand is fair.
Batteries.—With coming of summer months a falling off in the demand for radio batteries is usually
expected, but the demand has kept up fairly well this
year.   Prices arc unchanged.
Brads.—Sales are somewhat slower than had been
expected.   Stocks nre full with no price change.
Galvanised Ware.—Tall is very good for pails and
tubs. Garbage utensils are beginning to move. No
change in priee list. 34
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
IlllV
it
Hammers and Hatchets.—Sales of small lonls arc
running to a good total. Stocks nre well filled with
prices holding steady,
Wire Cloth continues actively in demand with prices
showing no tendency toward weakness; adequate
stocks are reported.
Wire Nail Prices Steady.—Wire nails are still quot*
ed at |8.85 and the demand continues brisk.
Screen Doors and Windows.—No noticeable let down
is yet observed in the demand for these lines.
Painting Supplies. Prices are holding. Business is
good as weather conditions arc very favorable for
painting.
ICE-O-MATIC COMPANY FORM
The Ice O-Matie Company of the United States has
entered thc Canadian field, and the company, with a
Canadian charter, known as the Ice-O Mafic Refrigcra*
tion Company. Limited, has been formed, operating under the patents of the American company, The Canadian company will handle both domestic and export
trade for practically the entire world.
Present plans will call for the location of their factory at Walkerville, when- a desirable building has
been secured, and it is the intention of the company
to commence marketing their ice machines at once
NEW GOODS.
THE  STANDARD  RAIN  KING  SPRINKLER
1h sturdy, simple of construction, yet adjustable to meet every
requirement. It is a combination revolving or Stationary
sprinkler, Sited with two of the f&l&Ottl it a In KIdk SOSSleS,
each adjustable for any spray, direction or volume; It can be
made to give a gentle mist or drenching down-pour over any
desired area up to a circle of CO feet in diameter, Hearing* sre
machined lo precis on standards Finished in green enamel
wilh bright brass fittings; weight eaeh, 3 th*
BRITISH 8TEEL CO TO LOCATE IN B.C,
An iron and steel industry in Britiah Oolumbin
moderate scale, financed hy British capital, is p
• ally assured of establishment in thc not dixtntii
ture, reports K A llaguan, mining engineer, ui,.
relumed to Vancouver from a visit to England
Continental Bll rope, The manager <>f tin poinpui
<m his way to the coast. Mr Maggcn has informc*
It C Chamber of Mhos, and will conclude nn
un-nts for the advent of Bll iron nnd steel plant
I'll.
Ill
Having Fresh Fruit
& Vegetables all Winter!
Beauty
In offering to your cuttomera Haiti Alias E Z Pre
serving 'art, an<j Jell-/ Qlaseee. you comb-nt BEAUTY
SAFETY ana SERVICE.
For IS years to id Oy CH* Wholetelf and Rctml
trade In B C.
AGENTS:
Campbell Brokerage Co.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
The Man with the Umbrella
is hoping to shake you
by the hand during the
VANCOUVER BUYERS' WEEK
Do Not Disappoint Him.
CANADA ROOF PRODUCTS, LTD.
' * The Best of Everything for a Roof.' ■
New Address: 2827 ARBUTUS STREET VANCOUVER, B C
Bawiew 6010 Ifl'2(i
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
35
HARDWARE PRICES CURRENT
The following are prlcee quoted for principal lines of leading wholesale firms.   Prices quoted are necessarily
subject to market fluctuations,
M
141.00
46 00
ST W
. i» 40
AMMUNITION.
lot*** Shot Shells.
pernio left I
|J i i  \  it, x  t '•»  ll>
U i;  i tt *■ 114 '"•'   • «
imparial,
il u s ll s t-tt eh   .
,.- i .« i l^ «i»
|   si -■   Nllni Club HUlSim ell   at n
) ,'.. - HiKli Hull .•. *•',
',*,■<■ Mruw it <;»:*» is • ii       -tn
j .  .   i  I'remler J>» --
Metallic Ammunition.
Dominion
. k SwoSoleeti . S>TS
ti l,   it,Ji« Sinoltsleee " W
.. i,  iwn« LeamoS **o
AnttflCSA,
JJ   HI   »M   MtiiokeicM *» 10
.;   ! ..*,*«   !<t|.t,l,.!,*M l.6ti
.*;'.   Klfle   SlB0kel4SS I   "
.:  i    Kim  l.*eiiiok* * "*
ANVIL*   Meter  Wright,  loft*   to  111 ll-a
axis   n.,)»  aim. IS Tbe S»X «o to til to
dot     double  bit   •»••.   unhandled.   Ill 10  tu
Hill    iOt      teil.lrie  iSOa,   |UOO  dot ,   tiKSlc
noi lit*,  unhandled. 11« So to III 00 doi
BABS   •'row.  Ill OO i-er  100 H.a
BELTING    l-arp. rawhide aide*.  IMS. cut
II at II l% \***r too feel.  S at IS 10 pet HH*
'<-*•    ■* al to,t*tt \trr IOO feet
BOLTS,   ca lilt I AGE   lln   full   i***< *•**>**
S ind inialler  up lo * in   long   tees SS  I S
<>ff Hit, OVtr tS  in   US off tut   Sole SO*
karftf   Vi length*, leu 10 off liat   Note ne*
llll prioee In »ffe<»
BOLTS, MACHINE   S end smaller up to
l in   ' ng    !•••   t'   off   Uati   over   l-ln    le»»
Ji off Hii.   S   ITS  and   \  leaa.  10 off IIM
Not**, nam !!•!  pric** In  -effect
IM>l.TH.   RTOVEr   Uae   I*  off   liSl
BOLTS   TtHE   Lea*   10   a«M   10%   on  all
bolt I for broii en package*
l-Mtl».   Met vet    I'er   1.000   to   1.000   f*»t.
Iii M per 1.000 feet
Ib'II.KIU*    IUNOE4- SO «al«    111 \0  earh
I" H.I.INii   PAPWR    Tarred.   SSfl   tO   |LM
!>**r r -II,  ar, or ding  to qualit)*.   plain  Tic to
**"V -jv-Ar roll
IM'lTS —Plated. III. antique copper an-1
dull l-raao flnlah IS i IS t***r pair 14c; V%
'i'i r>er pair 17c; IS a IS P*r pair He
m'TTH -Wrought eteel   Ko   |6|   1*H«1S
II II per d«t ; SS I IS II IS per dot    IS «
04   14 00 per Sot
• Ult'ET FELT-IS ns   W th  |1 ti mil
•'ATOllEK,   CUPBOARD   OM   roppor   and
doll hraaa nnlah. Ill 00 per thousand
C1IA1N-CWI «. eleotrlr weld. Ml,  W*rt
P»r 1*0 ?ha; S. Ill 10 por 100 lha   III. IU &»
Nf *e*<0 the
oitAIN-f.Atgtn-f. | 11 , h. IIM each;  S
1 Ll'.Uffljeell
i i«   w t» earn ... ,.
fllOPPWUI food  Universal Ho I 111*'
doi    t'nlveraal No   1. II? 00 doe: fnlveran
Ho 1. |.tl 10 Sot • I'nlvertal No   S. |4l II dM
time.  No   It,   IIM  each;   Home.   No   15
ll •* r-erh
HIlTRNa  BARRlCT,-No   I.   IIO 70  each:
No t in ts saehi No I. m ie ••«•>» **° '•
Itlll ea«-h
LEVIS   MALLEABLE  -I'er th   UV
1 I "TIIKS LINK.  Wilt 16-Tee* earh. 10 ft .
11 11 dot.) IM ft   Mil.
I'UtLLS-lllt    etorb     11 I    nff  "'W  »«'
^'h Vamtth S-ln  IItl off new llat
r\VKTUf»KiH...r*r   IM  feet. »• In    » ••
I"    »«M: llln. |7M „,   .
I'U.KS   Oreat Waatem. 11% «ff «»t: Olarh
I'  ioA *r,*t nm Ha|
HABnUN   HORSV*ln   M ft   knatha. »•"•
• -ipleS- Terminal Pity. H-ln, i I P'r. 1" 6"
-in  i 1 ply, IU00; Wire bound. S-l" ■ *
!     in«; \.in  t i ply. I11M; iwTMSjjtjHt.
m   i S ply. IBM,  Sin   s I P'V   »,RSl*
< :» ** 1 Ply. 117 m.
, ' ol'njNflR    ATACIIB-0-H-n .    H-m.
• in   Sir a aot
.»MR TRAI»»-Vlftnr. per doa. No "•
H/Oil, UM; IU 14 10; I. SS.4S: •• »'w,u
, " 4 N-ana/No I. UN: V W0«; IH.
■ >tt', I, HOM;  I.  11440 ..    ,.M,  ,
'omp_No  1. par dos  Mil; IH. M-M. »•
H tn- i isia
invn-KH—r«#r dos nalra-Heow ■tr"»-.*
" U.M| l-ln 1170: l-ln WM: l-ln Mj*
, ' OBRftOATIBb TW«—ree doe-n P"'r*-,
I In WM; i.tn i: so; |.m |Sno: U-ln III.W
HOR 115 BHOBS—Iron, Nos n (., i, 1**70
jH-r 100-B<a ; Iron, Non 2 and larfST, |l.60
l>*r 10'j B,a
IRONS,  hai>.  COMMON—far  ion tha--
t t!,»   arid OVSf Wc; 3, 4, nnd I lha, 2.1c
IRON   BAND   l>r   lW*ftS.* lH*ln,   11.00;
IS-ln |t'*rt, 1-in   |l oo.
iiu»N,  BLACK  BHKET—per lOOIbs.— 16
K-A*t« n M; ii mm* t*' io; ia-ao *\i.***'.
|4 10, 16 ii.il" M 60.
IRON, <iAI.VANI/.KI» 8HBET-Per loo lt>n
M gauae American or EnatUh, IT.IO; 21
laus*. laM; 11*10 snuse, M-70,
KNOBH. HIM InjoK Jnpunned, |3.2i per
do*
LAMP CHIMNEYS—A, p«r caae I doe.,
It 10 per d«>i ; A. per do* 11 40; H par ease
4 dn«   |, 40 |><t do* .  II, per do*. I) "'
I.ANTKBN*** Hliort or Ions Rlolu-. plain,
11(10   dot.!   Ja|»a->h«»'l,   |il ''.J   WO*
LAWN MOWBR8 ,  .,  ,
Kmpwu ItxS blade, Ill.TO; 14 x 6 bifida,
4H1& lf.\- I'liMle. 11410; Itotl I*!'*'1'*. |l*."li
;o x . blad-fl ll€M. .      ,, .
st Mt l-ln wbael, * knlm seen, ls-in
um H-m 4*3:. lS*ln., W.SO; 4 knlVM, lain WT*   H-ln. H0.M: 16-ln, H1.00,
MATT«'('KH lttk. M.IO -I"* I CUltST,
is (,<) do*
N\!t««  wibk  tin**' MM fob  Vancou*
trr. ('it. bnae |7 Jo fob   Vancouver
I*|CKH   r'*y, «•: tbi 11.48 de*-       ,   -,.
l'lNI', TAll 1 Sftl »l 10 MChi '« l»l **>c
»wh*   'k   *aT   iJf*  each
■LASTKI OF PARIS II 60 per ioo n**
r vffiI AND BURRS >Blsch earriaaja. Ift
iJrn lie* No » sssorted wppored rivets
so V lie n.: aaJenad copper rivets aad
bumi SM We • MMrted ooppared burrs
fSS hurr. lie por ih No. I W* W
ITe t>"* »• !  copP*Jr**d rlvsU 26c p" «■
••S?,Si? nnS manila, boss, MHCi
TB^M^TJW srrrs - The ne*
lh#  New  Thomu-u *..>.* TM.J»l    3'Trnlll,
KKft: iiSnSi fffliWSi few*-
'^.rn^-i^Kiis  CSme tree Jewett, IM
H'fr,dff*s,fttt
(MM 5rt por eon) . Mar ;"'• ♦,       ,,6 5n do*
to  10 off liat
sniaw cAr*s m *>h ,l!',
. mteti'-a    BtCT    10  off   list.
* nh     * Vvn BPADBS-nids or  F«"«-
8HOVRUI  ANDJ*™\m*ms *"">« *>r
$U SO per il*****  » •"'nA
"S&n-r «-'-
n',n « ll H.MS, •*•'," .,,,.h,„.,, U.I0PW1M
TArkn  Carpet 7« png,   CetneaUd)
TRNNliR gAM*Jh'li,,,,,,*. II! Hetail
.VISES—O'Leary Solid Box, 50 Iba.. |U.OO
eachi To 1I»m. 115 DO each; 100 Ibe. |22 each.
PAINTS AND OILS.
Brendram-Hendereon
_ „ Per Oalloa
nil "English" ordinary colora  |4.U
H-H "l-inglleh" white  4.10
XII Exterior Oil Shlnfle Stain—
ordinary colora, in 4 fai. cana  Ill'
Or«ene and Greys, In 4 gal. cans I.M
Mil Anchor Shingle Stain—
ordinary colore, In 4 gal cans  «... l.W
Grrens and Greya, In 4 gal. oana  Ml
PAINTS
Gallon
ordinary colore, in 1 gal. cans  14.40
Martin  Senour porch pa'int   4.40
Martin Senour Neutone white 1.71
Martin Senour Neutone color  *.* 1.74
Martin Senour floor paint   4.16
Sherwln  wmuns,  white  4.76
Sherwln  Wllllame,  color  4.40
Sherwln   Willlama,   porch  4.40
Sherwin Williams, floor  , 4.11
I't'TTV— Per 100 lbs.
Hulk,  barrels SOOBjs MM
Bulk,  irons 100 Bis    7.71
Bulk. Irons 25 B.s    I.M
TIPS, 5 B>a; per Ih    IH
Tlna.   lib 11%
UNSRBD Oil/- Gallon
Haw. l to I barrels  ILM
Moiled, 1 to 2 barrels   1,29
LBAD, WHITE IN OIL- Per 100 lbs.
1,000 lbs. to 1 ton  111.25
Leaa  17.25
Unindram's Genuine  -    HIS
TI'BPHNTINB—                                 Gallon
t barrel lots  - St.ao
VAHNI8HK8—                                       Gallon
Klaatlc. No. 1   1 I.M
7.41
I.M
711
III
411
Kill..
i»er  uo»vm    »• - •
»" 2°        ...„,,trn -rer roll—4 point, rattle.
WtRm BAHBBD-Fjrjron
•■iiiu^F^-ftS**'T
anir «jk »•■" ^ *'"■
|1<MtR0 dos .,   Trlmo, less 50 off list,
"fTRlONVlinP PH K Tiimo.       oft m
flgulne ?,V'*?H   Autnf stock. Vsnooum.
WlhO«£T,A-. oalvanlefd out of stock.
*%&**% M^fflffvfl'oa water pow*
WASItlNH MA( »HNJS ,7« 00 esch;
Klaatlc.  No. 1 	
IV  Linoleum   	
IV  Marine  8par  	
IV Furniture 	
IV Pale Hard Oil 	
Lewi IS l-S per cent,
ROGBRS  BRUSHING LACJUER.—1
ins:,;  4 rhI.. 15.18:  H gal.. 12.71;  -A gal.,
$i 48; i-i«tii gal, 87c; i-asnd gal., Wo,
l.«>aa 40 per cent.
Automotive Price List
ABSOBBEBS SHOOK -Float A Ford No
1 at 111.50.
ACCELERATORS FOOT-Wlrelesa Ford
at |1 75 each.
ASBOBTMENTS—Cotter pin llo eaeh; Cap
acrews 38c each; Set acrewa 10c each; Machine wrew 7&c each; Machine nut 71c each.
BATTEBIES-Hot 8hot ||.M each.
HOOTS—Tire 4-ln. |t 25 each.
BUMPERS—Hoover Twlnbar, 110 40 oach
OAP8—Bndiator. |1.00 each.
OABBOBUNCLUM-Valva grinding l-os. |4
dos.
CABBIES—Luggage, collspelbls 11 24 saeh.
OEMENT-Badlator, V.X* Wonder Worker 1540 dos.
OHAINS-W'eed Mxltt M15 each; llilH
1700 each; 11x4 17.70 each; 18x4 11.80 each;
-14x4 M 00 each.   Leaa 10%,
HID O SKII>-80xlH M75 pair; ItxIH
%*.% pair: 14xlH M10 pair; 80x4 |115 pair;
S.tx4 14.50 pnlr. Leaa 10%.
OLBANEB8. WINDSIIlELD-PrestO |1.7i
ench; Baln-E-Day, |1.60 each.
ooiLS -Spark   single   |5.M   each;   Spark
double 111 00 each.
OEFLBCTOBS-WInd    adjustable   115.10
pair.
ENAMEL-H pt, Jet Ijic |« 00 dos.; l-os
Wonder Worker 14.80 dos.; Msrtln Senour
Quick Drying, 1/14 llo each; 1/88 lie each;
I'll lie each; U Sic each; *& Mc each; V4
|1 70 each.
HORNS—Kleetrle 16.75 each.
.1ACK8-NO.  100 18.00 each;  No.  4 |1 M
each; No. 41 M.OO each. ....
LOCK3.    MOTOMETEB-No.    Ill    fill
each: No. Ml 11.00 each; No. Ill |7.I0 each.
MIRRORS—Bear view II.00 each.
oil^-Monamoblle. light 11.55 gsl.; medium
tl 10 gal.: heavy 11,70 gal.   	
PATCHBB  BLOW  OUT-Locktlte.  No.  I
M 00 dos: No. 114.00 dos: No. 6. M 00 dos.
PLATES—Step Sf.ee esch _
PLUG8—Bpsrk Champion Mc ssch; A. C,
Titan lie each; Hel-FI, Me each
2
il 3u
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA EETAILER
.lull
SHOE COLORS FOR THE FALL OF 1926
Rose Biege—A soft beige shade tinged with rose, A smart eolor that probably will repeal in the Tall
the success of parchment this spring.
Sauterne—llclil over from spring colors, beeause of its harmonising ami blending qualities
Msuvette—Also held over from thc spring colors Uocs well with the gray costume with green, tan nml
biUOS, as well as the mw castor shades in coslumcM.
Plaza Gray The autumn version of Opal Gray, s crisp, snappy shade thai nol only harmonises with
the new gray for costumes, but combines well with the blues and greens
Hampstead Brown—A brown with an English tang, moal appropriate for the sturdy type of outdoor
shoes.   Combines well with the tans, browns ami mw greens in costume*.
Marsala—A new brown with a rosy tint somewhat similar to Bob de Rose    Harmonises with the sarin
shinies as Sauterne ami Hois il<  Hose.
Stroller Tan—A new substitute for Rugby Tan. a lighl brown, gold flecked, especially adaptable t" ihi
walking shoi- for both men ami women,
•*
VACATION CALL.
By Vernon Varney.
Figures «n are jumping, leaping,
Cutting capers till about
Wonder why they act ho funny—
Goth! I thought tiny sll *«*r<* trout 1
Try to rend, aud Unas no wav'rlng.
Like Hi*' tenth-ills on a fine:
All I see'l a brook a mirroring
in Us ripples fishing line,
Lazy bee comes throuKh th«- window
Humming, bumming round Lite slore;
Finds me dreaming o'er the counter
Llst'nlng lo tin* dull creek's roar
Food has lost its tang and llavor,
Can't find an'tliltiK tit to est;
Want to smetl (lie camp Arc nmoking,
Havi- an out-door fried-Ash treat.
Don't eare if tin- lions docs Junk no*,
Don't eare it I live or die:
Just as soon ko kick the bucket.
What's the use of—what's thai    I?
Want to lake two week's vacation?
Let it start tonight at Ave?
Say. ain't life just worth the living?
Gee! I'm glad that I'm alive!
(All rights reserved).
RESULTS OF NESTLE'S WINOOW DISPLAY COM.
PETITION.
It was with considerable difficulty that the judge* were
able lo arrive at a decision In awarding the prizes donated bv
Ihe Nestle's Milk Company of Canada for tho best display or
their product* In retail grocery stores of Greater Vancoueer.
This competition was arranged by the local branch of (he
Retail Merchants' Association, and again proved Ihe pulling
power of "Display Weeks." which from time to time are held
In this province. The following Is a list of the fortunate
grocers, who raptured (he main prizes:
Prlae No. 1.—-Open to all grocers in suburban Vancouver.
New Westminster and North Van*ouvcr.~A flveday sight
seeing tour lo 8eallle and return—Pearres Grocery, Hth and
St. George, North Vancouver.
Prlie No. 2—Open to all grocers in the buslncse district
—A three dny tour io Victoria and return—F. W. Watford,
SSO Granville Streel, Vancouver, H. ('.
AMONG THE RETAILERB OF B C AND ALBERTA
(Continued from page ill >
S'bbald-
iiak a, Roeeow   Sueeeeded b> Hale & iui< to h
SMf—
iiuidn-k. J i:    \d»« rti* ng buaineaa (or »»u* ta >
Travers—
Clark"-,   Htanle>        Tobacco,   tkr .  adding   t*ior«(i>
hardware
\t*nrona***
Mi'Conoell, k  0   Reported sold eai le v\   p  i*.
(i   S.)
Vcgreviiie—
Kllmov*ky.  Abraham    Applying tut change ni n.»r* •
\bi.iiu6iu Kllnmff (Rrmi-n
Carstaira—
Hei-kio-r a Mtiktnaid   Reported purchased a***H« o i
t»tair* I ni't.i Farmer* \<*<*n, -taiion  {Q   S >
Craigmyle—
Hnn* tt  Itubln     Di*M»lved partner*ltlp (G   tf )
Enchart— \
Mart tt   . Wm    Reported moving lo Turin (G   S I
The following Anna have been awarded One Caae Of N<
He's Tall* (or the nasi bent windows In tlolr particulai
trirtH    other Prttee;
A. J   Porter, North Vancouver
F T. Greene, New Westminster
W  C   Hell. ( ommerrlal Drive. Vancouver
Wm   Allison. 2300 Columbia Vancouver
Morrow A Deane, 2IM Fourth Ave  W. Vancouver
Orr A Allan, 2<>«7 Yew Street Vancouver
^t***j
XEETH
THE UNSHRINKABLE UNDERWEAR
THAT ATTRACTS THE ,
HIGH GRADE   TRADE
^-^s
SJw-*&^r% 1926
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
37
ItVi
in
i
THE TEA OABDEN8 0 FCEYLON
(Continued from page 11 )
, apitul eost of opening land for tea varies great*
,   ,„ay bo put at §50 to tilHl rupees ($112 to $1!*2
\   per acre,   The waiting period, before any
is received on the investment may be four to
,i v   A goo dtoa estate in full bearing will range
lUC frOW l»'K> In  l|500 mpees, say $12 to $480,
ida) per aere.
iiisiderablo bnaineas is done by eertain Ceylon es*
in supplying need to others, thc importation of
from India being prohibited! owing to the danger
m r Illicit.   The selling price for a maund (about
inula) of ten seed is hi* to 100 rupees (25 to |32
Prosperous Ceylon.
i   ■   world demand  for tea is put at 740,000,000
j,  ,   ,v snd thi total supply from (Vylon, Java. India.
\fries, l'«r>*ia, Sumatra, China. Japan   etc . is estim-
... ni 870,000,000 pounds.   There arc 418,000 acres
■<;t iii Ceylon, eotnprtidng 1,230 estates     The
yi-ai 1924 wan one of unparalleled prosperity for the
tea industry, tnaintsining higher prices than prevailed
durtig 1923, Tin* island's exports in 1924 amounted to
jo; !,mmi|;i |Miuuds as against 183,501,928 pounds ex-
(Mtrted iu the preceding year.
Roughly speaking, two-third of Ceylon's export of
m ,, end groan tea goes to the United Kingdom,
Aint-riea (United States and Canada) ranks second—-
though n long way liehind   and Australia third,   Cp
tn I'Mti Ku-osia was Ceylon's second best eustomer, hut
1   ' 'nub* has fallen away, although the 1924 season
indicated Russia's return an a buyer in the Calcutta
irkel
A   Sew   CARBONIZING   MACHINE   INSTALLED  FOR
MANUFACTURING COUNTER SALES BOOKS.
I.
1m,
v m-a machine with rapanu for carbonising large roil*
\ *\*t at the rate ot 2«H) to 100 fee| per minute has 1h»oii
italla-d n» the plant of tlo- Western Sales Hook Company
tailed In Winnipeg, The large demand In Western Canada
; carbonised sale* {***** bu crested ihe necessity of In-
llltH| a carhonlilng machine thai will carbon!**' paper
per cent to 75 |N>r cent, taster than the machine formerly
Ot* The new machine Is the only one of Its kind In Can-
t After a careful wuncv of all the carbonising machines
"1 both In Canada and the Culled State*, this machine has
ea designed and built with lhe latest attachments for car-
tilting paper bv ihe most scientific and economical process.
J. A. TEPOORTEN
LIMITED
WHOLESALE DRUGS
PATENT MEDICINES DRUGISTS* SUNDRIES
PHARMACEUTICAL PREPARATIONS
308 Water St.
Vancouver, B.C.
REFUND OF LUXURY TAX ON MOTOR CARS.
Tin- B, C. noard, Hetail Merchants' Association has received the following wire from the Dominion Oftict In Ottawa, together with further information foil-wing the receipt ot
the telegram,
"Luxury Tax ou passenger automobiles repealed on
cars valued at not more than twelve hundred dollars.
Provision made for refund on automobile* on which
Excise Tax paid ln possession of dealers or agent ou
eighth of June. Details required to prove claim «\re
being prepared by Department. Will advise of Mine
as *oon as they have been completed. Bill must first
PSSI Senate before effective."
The repeal of this Luxury Tav applies on automobiles of the
value set out in the telegram but Imported into Canada belore the 1st of April, 1927, from any country enjoying the
Brltlih Preferential Tarlfr, when at least 40 per cent of the
finished automobile is made in Canada, and on automobiles
imported under similar conditions subsequent to the 1st of
April, 1927, when 50 per cent, is made in Canada. It also
applies to automobiles from countries enjoying a most favoured nation treatment although foreign, which would mean
that a special preferential tariff was established, when Imported before the 1st day of April, 1927, when 40 per cent, of
ihe finished automobile Is made in Canada, and when import*
ed under similar conditions subsequent to the first of April,
1987, 60 per cent, of the finished car must be made in thia
country,
The repeal of the Luxury Tax applies to cars, besides those
here mentioned, to all automobiles made in Canada under the
valuation mentioned, and provision has been made to refund
tn the automobile dealer an amount equal to the excise tax
actually paid by the dealer on such automobiles new, unused
and unsold In the possession of the dealer on the 11th of June,,
19215.
This amendment to the War Revenue Act passed the
House of Commons on the 11th of June, 1926, and will become law as soon as It has passed the Senate, and has received Hoyal assent.
The Ket ail Merchants' Association has been actively pressing this matter for a very considerable time. The department
at the present time are preparing the details ot the Information which will be required in order to prove the claim of any
dealer for a refund of the Excise Tax. As soon as these
have been approved and prepared this Association will be
supplied by the government with sufficient copies for all
auto dealers affected by this revision of taxation.
Home, Sweet Home.
They've taken Johnny's pants to make a skirt for Sister Aua.
Hut John could spare a yard or even three.
Now Johnny's pants are wide enough and Annie's skirt Is long
Enough to almost cover up her knee.
Bruises        Sores
Rheumatism
Soothe the sore muscles er Ilea*
menta by rubbing In Minard'a Linl*
ment. It penatratee, relieves and
heals. It eaaea inflammation oui
reatores the injured part to health.
Splendid for euta and sores.   It
ateriliaes and heals quickly. 38
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETA1LKK
WESTERN CLASS Meant
-PRICES RIGHT
-SERVICE FAST A
-QUALITY	
POLISHED PLATE GLASS
MIRRORS    ::    WINDOW OLASS
Western Glass
Co., Ltd.
ISS Cordova Steret West
Vancouver, B. C.
Phone Sey. 8S87
B. C. Oietributora of
Misers. T. H. Proaaer 4 Sons Ltd.
London.
Manufacturers  of  Prosaere'  Celebrated Line of TENNIS and
CRICKET Suppllea.
Associated Agencies
LTD.   *
S15 Pender St. W.        Vancouver.
Phone: Sey. 131
SPRING ANNOUNCEMENT
Fancy Silk Hose for Men at
the "Right Price."
Write for samples.
sue*
i BEAR
R. A. SIME, BC. Distributer
TUB  BLACK  MANUfaCTUftINO  CO.
318 Homer St.      Vancouver, B.C.
Pominion Sales Company
433 RICHAROS ST, VANCOUVER
Distributors for:
Fairy Dyes Ltd (Fairy Dye)
Creatona Ltd  (Meat Pastee)
Plaistowe 4 Co     (Confectionery)
OPee-Chee 4 Co.
(Popcorn 4 Wintiee)
Robert Watson .(Confectionery)
National Chicle Co. (Count lines)
Hunts Ltd. (Funny Faees)
Martha Jane Products  (Bare)
Nicholsons Ltd.
(Blueing and Polishes)
Phone Sey. 7121
VANCOUVER
T. D. STARK Telephone
P. W. STERLING Sey. S1SS
STABK A STERLING
MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS
1043 Hamilton Street.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Phone:  High.
IDEAL CONE COMPANY
Manufacturera ef
ICE  CREAM  CONES
Purest Made     Cost Leaa
335 PRINCESS AVE.
Vancouver.
D**,taO*t
Scales, Sllcera, Cutters and Cabin-
eta—New, Rebuilt and Second Hand.
Caeh or Terms.
THE  SCALE   SHOP  LTO
Sey. 2SS1
365 Cordova St. W., facing Homer.
SERVICE   TO   OUT   OF   TOWN
SUBSCRIBERS.
The British Columbia Retailer will
be pleaaed to furnlah subscribers
the namee and eddreseee of repre*
eentativee or agente ef eastern
manufacturera in Vancouver. We
will alee adviee where their com-
medltlee can be purchaeed.
Manufacturers9 Agents
(Vancouver, unless otherwise stated).
(Insertions under thin headline am
charged at the rate of II 20 a Use.
for six months, paysblS In advance)
ORVGOODS
Monarrh   KnlMln*    Co.    Lid.    SIS
Homer Street--H, n. Stewart * Co.
Ltd    Phone Hey, 752!**.
Rock inland Overall Co., Rock Island, QOS,—R, M  roster, 28 Water 8f.
The Black Mfjt  Co.. Seattle.—R, A.
Sim**. 318 Homer Street.   Sey. 1633,
Atlantic Underwear Ltd., Moncton.
N.B-E. II. Welch * Co. Ltd., 31S
Homer Street.   Bey. 8587.
The Oall Knitting Co. Ltd.. Oall.
Ont.-J. J. MacKay, 804 Dower Mils.
Bey. 30S1.
Penman*   Md.   Paris.   <••
Thompson, 615 (tastings w.
****
tot 11
< hlpman Holton   Knitting
Hamilioii. Ont    K.  II   Was
Lid. 31*  Homer BtreeL   Si
-Inly
I   J
its'.
..   iu.
C. Turnbull Co. Ltd.. Oalt. Onl-
B. I). Rtewart 6 Co. Ltd., 318 Homer
8treet.   Bey. 7525.
GROCERIES.
i anada  Starrh  Co   Ltd.,   M      ,,,:
K  ll. Rowstree, 2o: nasi  .   w
Sey. t>9
tvellogs Co of Canada Lid  u   ton,
om   l. p Uasoa I so, ;
itiUii Went    H«*>   2»o«*
Canadian   1'ontum   Cereal I ".
I'o-oi lo    IfcNeely's   Ltd.,  * .**    laat,
in** West   Sey   933T
Palmolhr i tampan J of Cai *7 :. -..
Toron 10, out    l>ran Armstrong    « i
Lareh Street.   iia>   10)L
Canada Colors nnd Chemi i • '
Toronto  Btarl * Sterling, It
IHoti Street     Bt)   6i'».'<
1.4k. ot the Woods Mlltlni    » !
I3im> lllr-hard* Streel       %*)   7
w   Clark  Ltd. Montreal   .
I* Stark, it! Hamilton Bl     ** *
Borden mhk <«»  Ltd       M
<*ui-     Uatl   Uffkr.   33:   W M
Sev   6|fJ
McCormick Mtn  Co  Ltd
tint     Uiral Office,  115" lit,
Bft)   3112
i:    W    Oltl-Stl    M'K .   I "
McFarlane  itM' lleatt) St   Se*
STORE   EQUIPMENT  4  SUPPU-SS.
International     Munlm-M     M *
Co   Lid.  Toronto     Local  Ol
Seymour Bl    S«»    |S1
i anadian  Toledo  Sialen
Wlnikaur.  Onl     K.   S   «hamb-M
Smyths street   Bey, 3911
Continental   Paper   I'rodu ' •
Ottawa.    Ottl   -Mmlili.    I»atld**'*-
Wright    Sey. 966r.
i   C   Wilson. Ltd. Larhnt"   *i">''
Ixical office.   InSO  Homer Si       -•■
7*1. _______
llartram  Paper Products I 0    Ltd
1280   Homer   Street—Norfolk   Pap*
Co, Lid, 136 Water Street.   Sif *86*
and 7869. 	
•PORTING GOODS.
Prosser, T. H. & Sons Lid Uoodoi
Eng.-Associated Ageneles, 618 Pen
der Bt. W.   Bey. 131. ■ ■ ■ ■
I ■ ■.
■ ■ ■
■ ■ ■
li%tes*lak*g
For QUALlTYand PROFIT
Stock Int-ertake
■ ■ ■
|t\t£flake
issue
-'"I 7, Ii%%im MiU-('
t^yHERE is profit for you and quality for your
customer in every roll of Interlake Toilet Tissue.
Quicker profits, too, because bstazrUskc enjoys
the confidence of the consumer. Sales are made easily
and quickly with a minimum of counter talk. Sold
in most stores at 10c per roll.
Order itsigrtaleW from your wholesaler.
Iiaterloke Tissue Mills <b.
Limited
54 56 University Avenue, Toronto 2, Canada
Mills at Mcrriton, Ont.
■ ■   B
■   ■   ■   ■
■ ■   B   "
B   ■   ■
<
'
■   ■   ■
*.
ill
■   ■   ■ J
QddTunio\^Cerfaiii
These Famous Stocking
a*
YOU'LL never find Buster Brown
Stockings for boys among the
"slow-movers". These famous stockings have a tremendous sale throughout Canada because thousands of
mothers have found them the most
satisfactory boys' stocking they can
obtain. That's why they're such great
"repeaters". Knitted with two-ply legs
and three-ply toes and heels for maximum durability.
Let these stockings make money for
you. Your wholesaler has a complete
range of sizes in stock*
Chipman-Holton Knitting Company, Limited,
Hamilton, Ont.
Mills at Hamilton and Wellaml
OfBVSTTR BROWN
Suetar Bnwtt'a ttialar't Stocking* era toil from o
tuo-thrted, mrrrrrittd ttal* end or* apatmUo amitad
lor gtrtt. t'ott roooo of t**Ura. Modarot* in prite.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcret.1-0344910/manifest

Comment

Related Items