BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

The October Retailer Oct 31, 1926

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcret-1.0344902.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcret-1.0344902.json
JSON-LD: bcret-1.0344902-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcret-1.0344902-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcret-1.0344902-rdf.json
Turtle: bcret-1.0344902-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcret-1.0344902-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcret-1.0344902-source.json
Full Text
bcret-1.0344902-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcret-1.0344902.ris

Full Text

Array THE OCTOBER
VOL. XIX., No. 2
BRITISH COLUMBIA. ALBERTA, YUKON
VANCOUVER, B.C. - j* «       OCTOBER, 1926
.j t   f
,   *.., « ,^
*  **
-   >    •    lew   |  ,   (I
Foods
?s«h *** '*■ • ■»      * *>•*.■■*.*.
,-
November 10-20
• »      r  i ,
a *■    ' "   *
..   I
»   «
I
t*   r
r   *
....    ,-....«.»•   -
Nineteenth Ysmr.
10c per copy; $1.00 per ystr WE MANUFACTURE AND SELL THE FOLLOWING
PAPER BAGS
"STANDARD"   "MANILLA"
"BUCKSKIN"    "UGHT KRAFT"
"HEAVY KRAFT"
THEY ARE
Actually Stronger, Tougher
More Pliable, Most Economical
Most Satisfactory
Be Sure to Use the Best—They Cost No More
Paper Mills:
Lachutt 4 St. Jerome,
Que.
Manufacturers  sines  1S70
J. C. WILSON, LIMITED
Muralscturers of
PAPER BAGS.     WRAPPING, TISSUE AND TOILET PAPERS
for   Wholesalers tnd RoUilers.
1068 HOMER STREET, VANOOUVER. B. 0
Phone: Seymour 781
The same price
at every store in
our British
Columbia
Territory,
5
BIG BARS
FOR
25c
PROTECT YOUR PROFITS BY
SELLING A MAINTAINED PRICE
LAUNDRY SOAP
THE ROYAL CROWN SOAPS, LTD.
VANCOUVER. B. C.
tat 1028
THE   KKTAILKR
MltlTIHII COLUMBIA-  ALBBRTA-YUKON
l!
I
***'
M
Ntt
;**tit
;••
REAL VALUE!
PURE wKolesome and delicious Corn Syrup
that is rich in food value.
CROWN BRAND ' tha most popular Syrup in Canada, tke
»oat wiJaly .JvertiKJ, ooi it i. Ymm *t *m fac* tha
jealm appreciate it. value a. a ****** P~ftt.Ua U to have
always in stock.
EDWARDSBURG
CROWN BRAND
CORN SYRUP
Manufactured by
U* CANADA STARCH CO.. LIMITED
MONTREAL THE    RETAILKR
IIRITISH 0OWr»CIIIA~AUltP4.TA-TOTCON
Del   ..•!•
JL c
E DAYTON Porcelain Scale is thc aristocrat of weighing machines.
It is ACCURATE. This accuracy is ensured
by DAYTON principles of construction, proven
reliable over a period of 35 years of actual use.
It is strictly SANITARY. All working parts
are enclosed. The special porcelain finish-
smooth, non-corrosive, non-stuinablc -makes it
easy to keep clean and sweet.
It is DURABLE Without sacrificing accuracy,
its mechanism has a practical sturdincss that
bears long years of daily use without troublesome adjustments or repairs.
And lustly it is BEAUTIFUL Its rouncicvl
surfaces of spotless white, its bright nickel
fittings, clear-vision chart-glass and bevelled
end-mirrors, give it an air of clean efficients
which attracts and impresses the customer
Only thc resources of a vast organization manufacturing for a world-market, could bring this
Anstrocrai of Scales ■* ithin thc price-range ol
ordinary scales
DAYTON Porcelain Scales, either low or high counter type,
are sold on easy terms. Generous alUmance on your old .uale.
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CO. LIMITED
Factory and It tad Office. Wut Toronto, Ontario
INTERNATIONAL
aaaiami
•nan
svaarat* rma awr-uet
mm aaa-MMM
fa
Sertitt and Salts Offices tn alt Principal CitlOt
OAVTON
IN CANADA   mZ*mm
not Ma ants
SMsaaa ovrrooo IfllMi
T II E    R E T A I L K R
BRITISH COLUMBIA--ALBBK'i A—YUKON
6
uick
Quaker
The Profit Booster
Your profit on any article is determined
by the public demand for it, or tbe
effort necessary to sell, more often tban
by your selling margin alone.
Tbe demand for Quick Quaker is
enormous, fostered by our consistent
and extensive advertising. Turnover is
therefore quick and profitable.
Your co-operation in displaying Quick
Quaker will make it even more
profitable.
Packed with or without chinaware and aluminum
premiums.  Also contains regular premium coupons
'Jhe Quaker ()ats CompaDy
, PETERBOROUGH
SASKATOON ft
THK   RETA ILEB
IMHTI8II  O'l.rMHI.N  ■Al.HKUTA    YUKON
"h,|t.r
&***,*
Saves you Urns when easterners ask for "Fresh Roasted
Ooffse," That's exactly what Nabob is. The vacuum tin
keeps ths flavor in—yon sell ii "fresh from the roaster.
Kelly Douglas & Co. Ltd.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Nabob
Hilt HMANh
WILSON BROTHERS
Brrtabtiih.4 IIM
Our Motto ie "SERVICE
0%
Ws cannot offer to sell yon foods cheaper than any other firm is in a position to do, boi we CAN
give actual facts to provs that it Is
ECONOMY
to deal with us
Sn &R WILSON BROTHERS, VICTORIA, B. C.
Wholesale Groeers
!
oomwomwmot*
SHAMROCK RRAND
HAM, BACON, BUTTER, LARD, SAUSAOE, etc.
First Quality packing house products put up by P. Burns A Co.,
Limited, whieh mesns they sre the highest grade, always reliable,
snd without equal on this market.
YOU  OaiN  RECOMMEND  SHAMROCK   BRAND.
P. Burns & Company, Limited
▼Avooura
OALOARY
1DMOMTON 1926
TH K    BETA ILER
BRITISH COLUMBIA -ALBERTA—YUKON
9L*-
Retaillr i*W
With whlrh It Incorporated the B  C. TRADE REVIEW.
Published Monthly.
NINETEENTH YEAR
UBNBRAL MBRCHANDI8I
0ROCERIK8. DRYOOODS.
HARDWARE. F00TW1AR.
OFFICIAL ORGAN OF B C. BOARD
RETAIL MERCHANTS'
ASSOCIATION OF CANADA.
A MONTHLY JOURNAL published in the interest of Retail Merchandising snd ths Development of Commerce in Western Csnsda.
SUBSCRIPTION RATE: Ons Dollar Per Year, payable In advance.
Advertising Rafts oa Application
Publishers: PROGRESS PUBLISHING CO. LTD.
Suits 101-2 Msrehsnts' Exchangs Building
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Ttlsphont 8*7 SMI Cable Address   Shipping-All Codes
Editor. J. 8. Morrison W. N. Code. Business Msnafsr
Entered st Ottawa as Second claw matter
Ths following repratent B. M. A. Brswshss
in the Province sf Srltlnh Columbiat—
Armstrong H. S. Armstrong,
Sec. Trews.
Cranbrook..... C. J. Lewis, Sec.
Fernle  - Norman Suddaby,
Pres.
Kamloops A. C. Taylor, Pres.
Kelowna  Andrew Fraser, See.
Lytton R. Rebagllatl, See.
Nanaimo..... N. Wright, Sec.
Nelson ...I. F. Gigot ,Sec.
New Westminster	
and Fraser V alley...D. Stuart, Sec.
Revelstoke W. A. Sturdy, See.
Vsncouvsr W. F. Ing, Sec.
Vol.  XIX. No. 3
VANCOUVER, B.C.
OCTOBER, 1926
Federal Department of Labor Investigates
*»->»,     o.     rri     A
P. A. T. A.
Oov.nun.ot SO*. S*. OUt New Oa******fftS ^ ™* *" "^ * ^
Tlu- recently published reporl of K A. MeOregor,
Registrar of ths Combines Investigation Act, has pro*
i.al.lv been resd by every retail druggist in < annua
The Osnada Fair Trade League, based on identical
principle with the Proprietary Articles Prsdes Assueis-
ion, !o whirl. Mr. McGregors reportalludes has,
sinee Its Inception, boon regarded by this publ a on
as,, body eroated to protect tho retail mere haul agaliurt
unfair eo.npet.tinn. more particularly ha occaMoned
by ruthless slashing of prices, nml to ellminate, aaft
ns possible, dlasention imong all factors ol distumi
lion, iiml tin* consumers. , ,    „■„.,...
We have boon Inclined to favor ll as such, • >ndoav
ourlng to influence the retail trade lo give it uigein
nttontlon, and tho launching ol the I. a.
boon watched with unusual Interest.        nl,„11*11(,,,iv
When tho Registrar's report appeared, pron men
displayed in the daily newspapers, wo  mm,
tooj Li to ^«7« ^flidlrAC  wtl imp^-
with nn executive of tho I.   Vi   n., ,
sio.iH wo give to those Interested in the novemont.
It Appears that several months ago tfcj^«M
Price Maintenance was very freely dis uss<    I     ■ J
Registrar's department, ami the Jnstlgato« of t.m
A, T. A, from every possible angle,  nd all     a mil
plied upon whieh tho movement was to bs.di wo.
The opinion at that time was tJW^/Sg Al.t,
association would not contravene the uommm*
What then, it may be asked, has occurred to cause the
issuance of a report denouncing the movement as a
combine, and likely to Operate to the detriment of the
public!"
Influence, hostile to the principle of Price Mainten-
ancc, and under the guise of consumer protection very
palpably permeates through this report.
The government's chief interest is in the consumer,
whom it primarily seeks to protect, whereas the P. A.
T, A. is desirous of creating a favorable and equitable
working basis for the Drug Trade in all its branches,
nnd at the same time keeping priees to thc consumer at
reasonable level. It would thus seem that the numerous exceptions taken at the report are entirely justi-
flable from the druggist's point of view.
Even if chain store magnates and departmental
houses .unfavorable to this plan of merchandising, have
supplied material, which may have influenced the
investigators, l\ A. T. A. executives declare that they
will not be stampeded, since no breach of faith with the
consumer (as suggested) can be held against their or-
gnnixation.
It is upon the test case, which, we understand is
scheduled for hearing directly all writs have been
served, that the success of Price Maintenance depends.
This case will, in all probability, be heard in thc
spring, and it is distinctly understood that, whether 8
THE    BETA I IKB
BRITISH i*»»l.l Mill \    Ai.HKItTV    YUKON
It,
plaintiff or defendant be victorious, an appeal will be
carried to the highest tribunal in the Empire, iu order
that the issue be definitely ratified.
According to officials of the l\ A. T A . their only
disappointment lies in delay, for the publication of the
Registrar's report will enforce redoubled effort to pre*
vent a weakening of morale among those merchants
who are unaware **f the more technical
esse and they further declaim (ha! *bou
governing their organisation !>«• &ns\\\
constituting s combine, sueh regulation.,
mediately adjusted, whereby anv douhi
would be eliminated, lo lhe sslUfjriiui
cxsctlng
iiuim
lUlij l
•il • ;,
tt tl.,
Prospect of Rapid Expansion of Beet Sugar
Production in Alberta
Sugar manufactured In Western Canada from beets
grown in this territory, is now on tin market, and the
whole of the Prairie Provinces is elated over the sue*
cessful launeh'ig of the first SUpr factory at Raymond,
Alberta. There is general enthusiasm over lhe pro*
peel opening out of beet sugar production in Western
Canada on a very substantial scab-, for it is confidently fell that this is but tin- initial step in a gnat eom*
bined agricultural nnd industrial movement the fir-: of
a ehain of factories which will eome to dot southern
Alberta from the main line of the Canadian Pacific
Railway to the interational boundary, and Spread east-
ward into sections of the sister provinces of the
prairie.
There is every reason for this optimistic attitude,
The pioneer eompany which has been responsible f«*r
this first Alberta enterprise has declared its wHiingess
and desire to expand throne!) the erection nf other factories in thc Southern Alberta ana. and all conditions
are sueh as to induce them to carry out this programme
of expansion. It is known that there an- oihl r --urn-
panics axious to establish sugar factories in othter districts of thc Canadian West, and circumstances and
conditions are combining to bring them tu the decision
to take this step. That "well begttil is half done"
offers every indication of briny extremely applicable
to the production of sugar beets and beet sugar iu
Western Canada.
Prospects Are Bright.
Prospects are bright for development in Southern
Alberta. Despite the unfavotirabicneas of the 1025
season, production was 42,000 tons from 5,"isi seres.
Some fields yielding nineteen tons to the acre, one ;;•»
tons, and the general average which was expected to
be from twelve to fifteen tons was pulled down into
thle neighborhood of eight tons by small yields on badly prepnred land. The sugar content was as high as
22 per cent., the average being aboul 15 per cent,
whieh is higher than that achieved in most beet growing sections of the American continent.
By-products of the sugar factory at Raymond, it is
stated, will make that part of Southern Alberta a
great  livestock  feeding ground.   These  by-products
include pulp and molasses which*, with the alfalfa and
grain   the   area   produces extensively, constitute nn
ideal feedintr combination for cattle and other liw.
stock.   According to report, negotiations are in progress between the sugar company and a big packing
concern for the experimental feeding of a large bunch
of steers near the factory.   From the tonage of beets
sliced at the plant in the fall, an amount whieh will be
materially increased this year, there are about two
thousand tons of syrup and a large quantity of pulp
available for stockmen this winter.
Tin- required scraa-gc lor ihe openis ■     ,.
substantially es d«d in IW6, tn,r,- <,      ,t(
mstely 0,800 acre, of In eta under cnltlvaH   Y,!.
dm farmers contributed setaage end *-.- j*
hood o( Southern Alberts growers doubling i ,
1938  A <i«»uli|ing «.f thr sausage trould i    u ••*,
ability of the om fartorj to harnlh ih« mtmU ot
snd with this poaslbiUtj In vi,* il b umleniood u
two nowihb   silca f.,r an additional faelon
ana bnw !*,,» jnaperted by offlrial* ot •
already in thr Md    Th** are Ihotissmls
a-Jmiwr irrigabli land fn Bout hrm Alberta i iit« I • •
Kroums- of sugar beeta, and it i% dlffleuli i
th. limit*, n( «.|j,nllvi„|,
Beet Sugar Industry in B C
Katablkhment of ft *,Ul!nr f„,.t jn,|,Mn ,.  **,...
^Ittmbis will be undertaken it fhe Pmvin      -
ernmenl will nnUidi^ ihi pt-miuetU of sugai si il
rate of rniiNiti,, Vi.nr ftrr,ir,|ill|f ,,, ,hr h„,,| , .    \
eouver symlieats mho im approached Ihe govmii
•h- proposal calls for a factory si Heu \\W,\ -
»° cost ahout 11,250,000, capable oi hsndling •■    i
wnd tons of beets per «lay  The mitxddi ask. i     i
govcmmettl would amount U» one-half a rrnl
oa ail sugar produced up Ut ,(ll mflifon pound* V
auvernmeora earneai eoiudderatloa of the matter I
1 ii promised
Th.- possible adoption of sugar beei attliivatioi
a large seal,, In Western Canada, apart from lu -
mistrial importance .has n most slgtrffleant beari
»»• general agricultural situation oi ihe an..   '•
Mat.tmlly inereaaes Ihs smploymcni of fsm
wiiien is not yet mn position to secure lis owi
"ahments,   It win mnn mn \mwAn nem\
"•••"as. d n,r«| population  In addition to being
PronjaWs farm industry in lUclf  lhe light of
icveiopmenj in ihe United stair, shows thai
"»« nveetock industry is capable of development
unction with it. and for this phase th,* situm
western i anada is peculiarly advantageous
— *   *        **V i w     ■!■■ im,, „ iwmii.  .
TRAVELERS WE HAVE MET
On arriving j„ Vancouver straight from Hi
°[ ''is birth, Mr  II   U.dlis took a position in «.
K'oeery Htore. Six months later he started for hi
«' nuir out to gQ on the road for |),e Western li:
, i h" iama.r Hn,,,, " nm* '•"* blmaelf that ho ai
m )S0 Mention of tho Dominion Canners B, C I
, JO prove that their judgment was good, wi
;«v*to atatc thai Itro, Mollis has been with the.
ii.*).    w '■'    ,H now W,,,'M manager for Western
mn    Ho is one of ths best known and most po]
Mial
ii.
ri
' tini
fail
,,ll.
■ TV
,*•!•
|
nly
fur
in*
lar 1926
*i*
THK   RETAILER
BRITISH COLUMBIA—ALBBnVTA—YUKOK
ruvelers In the West, covering as he docs from Winnipeg to the Coast, alum! six times a year.
Two vciirs ago, ho made a trip to Knghiud as a
... cial envoy for his linn, visiting London, Liverpool,
lll(| Manchester.
In addition to being a keen business executive,
||, rb is ciithusiaslie in Ihe line of sport, ami has been
H. Hollis
known io indulge in golf, cricket, football, hunting
and fishing. .     .
Il.-rl. i... prominent W»*m, »«d11anN"ot^7Illv."ei
ued  ml..*r „l V».,.-....v.r Cot.nell No. W  Unite
Commercial Tr.vH.-w of America, ami th. Cominei
rial Trenton Aeeoetotion •>'' anada.
If v«m don't like b*J picture, meet Herb hlm e
n„d ikon yon will know and like a real dependable IIm
wire.
OLD TMMUJ m THB TEA B08WB88
Sew pan ..tier th- toorpowtion of Wlnnipos
|„« -h.-r,. Uld h.v total I « »"•'•'■'■>■ lnoroMln"
volume «.f wile, itaoo thai .I.i'*    .
-1,1m.- Ribbon" »««« became » h0Wf°1lW0,*1
Ik, prairie province* and lhe Hrm. .coring he d ^
.„„,,„. „f v., ivor.op.ne raneh factory her.
"T!i-*m, of -Ma- >»"•" ^mts
planta lo.-ai.-d «t Winnipeg, Edmonton     lg»y.
Vancouver, am kepi b«">- Packing and dlrirlbnting thia
well know., brand. ,„„,. ,„„.„
Pot a mimlM-r of year* Cl- **• ■ *' .   . „
..UN -HI...- Wbbon" CoMoe, and the rocont taJJJ
Hon rf u,m.m.»i, aafbi ******* I--*****■ «*£,
h. nnila, la renderta. th- « £**«        ^
.lir.-et from the waiter i« retailer, oven mer. i t
ilmn heretofore. . „. W08tcrn
Th.- Arm pron.lly relet* Art I*     ' •
in «.v,-rv .Wall, and one hundred pel
What a difference!
See It
Plumper! Mora
tender! filled
with the nectar of
ripened trapes.
Such an improvement over theold
seedless raisins
Smell It
Tha frotrance
of fresh tropes
in Sun-Maid
Nectara. No
othor seedless
roisins havs it
Taste It
The real traps tarts
captured in Sun-
Maid Nectars. For
thefirstthneinseea*
Inst roisins
Use it to boost your
carton seedless sales
Watch how bit Sun-Maid
Nectars go over this fall!
Women are bound to use a lot
more of these new seedless
raisins that give the real flavor
and fragrance of the fresh
grapes to their cooking.
Once tried, no other kind of
carton seedless will satisfy
your customers. That means
you need to carry Just one
brand.
•Maid
Difjtibukd by
*       .*****.   BALKS   COOflAATlVI   ASSOCIATION
|WNtANi>  »^V*5**K tht World 10
THK   ftETA ILER
1MITIHII COLUMBIA    AI.UKUT.X    YUKON
<> !,,|
iff
:
i   !
The Wholesale Grocer of the Future—
What Will He Be?
Eevolutionary Changes in Focd Industry Have Obliterated Old Established Precedent! and Custom*
THERE is si.II a tendency on the pari of many interested in the subject of food di.strihutinn to consider pre-war standards as ii Imsis for comparison
nnd conditions prior to the World War as heing "normal."
Yet the whole universe has reacted to revolutionary
changes, nnd the food indusl ry iu particular has biok-
en completely away from old-established precedents
and familiar customs.
Por many years the wholesaler functioning as a chief
source of supply and credit for the retailer, held a posi*
lion of tirst importance in food distribution. Tin- t\**i
element, perhaps, to break into this "combination"
was the chain store groeer. The independent has
changed.
Old Line Jobber Vanishes.
Apparently, the ehain stiwc groeer. regard,-! in the
beginning as being highly experimental ami now conceded by all as being here lo stay, was tin* "fix in the
ointment," to whom may be traced the greatest single
contributing causa of a "splitting lip," and the virion*,
drifts distribution has taken in recent years.
Por instance, the "old line" jobber in almost a thine
of the past, and we now have the manufacturing whole*
Mile groeer, the wholesaler owning and opera*ing retail
chains, the "cash and carry' wholesaler, tin* whele
saler with a growing number of "branch" wholesale
houses, the exclusive cash mail order houses, t!e buying exchanges .desk jobbers and so-called 'scrict '
corporations.
(In top of all a "new Richmond if the held" is in the
offing—the branch house expansion of t!<   bit* mail
order corpora4 ion*
These various new forms of wholesaler distribution,
coupled with the rapid spread and growth of the ehain
stores, may he an evolutionary process due to the trend
of the times. It may be the inevitable result of widely
differing opinions as to meeting with greatly changed
conditions and buying habits of the public, demanding
short cuts and improvements.
In all events the fact remains that distribution as
a whole is vastly disturbed and unsettled, This being
true, a period of adjustment must eventually ensue, in
which the food manufacturer and food grower are not
only concerned but involved. Ami even ho national
Ivertisers will eome in for eertain departures in hookup "campaigns" with the newer factors entering
lo the distribution of advertised food products,
New Fields for Jobbers.
One development of the ftttUM U the p. ssibility
that some day the wholesale groeer H-lili ample capital,
property organized and managed, may fl down lo
"brass tacks" and through sound merchandising principles become a "distributor" instead of u "jobber."
It is the funelion of one to preserve an even flow of
carefully selected food commodities from first hands to
the ultimate consumer, through the retailer. It is ili,<
function of the "jobber" to consider only the salabtl-
Ity «>f "job lois" to tin* retailer at a profit, sml w,\\\
no eoneern as to consumer preferences, ami th. *,
sale features entering into tin- relations between   „
retail dealer and his customers
The greatest encouragement offered along tin, Hue
is lhe fact that ill lhe last year or so then* ha- heei
conspicuous absence of opportunities for specula! hi
profits    Up until this time such "buying gain**" <>  *.
id a most important pari ,n averaging "Up" a higher
poreenlnge of profits on sab** of heavy staple* inmaii)
distributed on a bas'* of narrow margin*
Splitting Up the Volume.
Nol only has there Ih-cii little or ihi Opportunity lo
exercise "good judgment' in buying with refcrenei *..
market advances, but volume has been divided snd
Rttbdlvided Merchandise is turning fasti r when n\
erage stocks have been lowered, and buying haa <<*:
confined to hand-to-mouth quantities Thin \<r> pro
bably.  has had  much  to do  with   hob line  priee* ta
tower levels than otherwiae, as under such conditions
"llrst hands' musl bear the brum of holding lhe bam
ami for this reason mav be more inclined lo "free *'U
a
im; Instead of the Invisible supply luing ns Urg si
formerly, ami iu the wholesalers ware rooms, *'i She
retailers' reserve stocks
Probably total sabs *»f food commodities sre gn I
er than during tin   lir-sl len months of ltd, bill lie!
profits ah- much Issa by the same comparisons.
High Cost of Belling
Aside from o-verhend increases, tin* wholesale! i*
compelled lo stand a heavy cost in making sail *   ii
is becoming yearly inon* important to secure lhe -■*
vices of more capable traveling non at higher elarie*
ami Increased traveling expenses   The range ol -hi*
total cost is from a minimum of 2* * to :p.. prr eeni
and n maximum of t« . to .%•-. imt cent  on sub-* nml
as at    *
gross margins, if anything, have been reduced
Labor cost has not been lii'iiidatcd in tin  IcBSl   Tin
chain store grocer has none of these disadvantage* m
selling eosts, but it is becoming noticeable thai his
volume is being secured at higher costs all down llu*
line, and the same applies to the independent, rapei
hilly, as tin-re is a pronounced demand  for iinprev**
ment in the character of services rendered upon wl
so mueh stress is laid in competing with chains
Overdoing the Merger.
The constantly mounting costs of selling, incn.
overhead, additional taxes, advancing Insurance ■
and a gradual creeping up of all operating expel
call for greater gross profits than now are general
Keener competition and a desire for greater rob
"at any priee" cannot In* controlled by consolldal
and mergers on the part of either the wholesale ]i
era or the chain stores, It is very possible thai un
come attention and "unfriendly legislation" mav h
an end to this tendency.
i ii
      ' <rib
, THE   RETAILER
immsn COLUMBIA-
ALBEUTA-YUKON
11
i i !
tin*
Bettor Understanding Needed.
Indoublcdly  food distribution will flow through
, iwiis specialized trade channels iu the future. Willi-
H question competition is narrowing gross earning
piteity.    Expenses continue to "rise and shim-" and
profits are seen mostly ihrough the wrong end of
opera  glasses   farther apart  ami mueh smaller,
what, then, offers ii sound solution to the problem ol
, ileqiintc comprehension if the laborer be worthy of
Ins hircf
Whnt of the Future?
Will trade associations finally function toward a
better understanding resulting in much needed re*
Minis?    Do consolidations offer the best means of a
proper "regulation' of contending factors! Will the
-wholesaler go iu for more manufacturing! In return,
will the manufacturers go direct to the dealer in see.
tions where the chains dominate, which will require
many local warehouses at distributing centres and
increase the need of greater strength financially!
Will "food legislation" onee more attempt control?
These questions are angles to a much tangled up situation They offer serious food for thought. Aiv wc at
llu- threshold of important changes where the ine mi-
petenls will be weeded out ami tin* deserving reward*
ed! The subject cannot be dismissed with thoughts
«>f a survival tit the fittest.
Pood production, transportation ami distribution are
the three greatest elements in the life of the nation.
The producer may be guided by th.* law of supply and
demand. The manufacturer may reduce production
emits and increase consumer demand through advertising newer uses for his products.
The railroads, notwithstanding the automobile
truck, have ironed OUt many kinks Hut the distributor
»s yet has found no way out" of his recently devel-
oped difficulties Competition may he the life of
trad.-."    If so. then the proverbial cat has nothing Oil
"competition1' as far as the distribution of foods is
concerned.
CANNED P00D8 WEEK
I'Vom November 10 to '-'tl retail grocers will
have an unusual opportunity to feature canned
foods at attractive priees and in complete variety,
No time should be lost In preparing for it.
Devise a display and advertising scheme to put
over the idea with greatest advantage.
If you want canned foods week to be a big
thing in your store, you musl make plans now.
It will be useless loplacc a lot of cans in the
Window, and expeel the public to realize the
advantage of stocking up in advance,
The "Uelailer" is endeavoring il assist by
•upplying si reamers to help you put the movement over, but vou musl have n display plan
ready to bo carried out when the time comes.
fxist time will result in failure to profit by the
ftntiun! movement.
Sell
nationally known
PALMOLIVE
Rapid Turnovers
bear high interest
Sow moving brands are the bane of the grocer's
existence. Shelves clutter up with stock that turns
over seldom—money Is tied up that could be used to
advantage.
Not so Palmoliv . This nationally advertised brand
will turn over many times while little-known brands
are turning over once. The tinkle of your cash
register as Palmolive passes from your shelves to
>our customers will be pleasing music to your ears.
It is not hard to o II Palmolive. In fact we have
done most of it for you. Large advertisements have
told our story to millions through magaiines, newspapers, billboards ,etc. Millions have read—and
bought. The attractive green, gold and black wrapper is a familiar sight to them.
Place a box of Palmoliu where it can be seen. Watch
in amasement how fast it disappears.
OUR NEW DISPLAYS
ARE READY
If you have not been cashing in on Palmolive popularity, now Is the time to start. Delays will cost
you money. Write for attractive display material.
Make Palmolive advertising work for you.
THE PA1M0UW COMPANY OF CANADA,
MONTREAL
LIMITED
TORONTO
WINNIPEG
3320 12
THK   RETAILER
BRITISH COLUMBIA -ALBBRTA- YUKON
(i,
*iln*r
DEL MONTE TO SPECIALIZE IN VEGETABLE
ADVERTISING
First National Campaign Ever Ron on a Complete
Vegetable Line.
The California Packing Corporation has made an
announcement of great importance to grocers in the
Canadian market. Del Monte vegetables, as a complete vegetable Hue, are to be featured in an advertising drive entirely distinct from regular advertising on
Del Monte fruits.
This is the first general campaign ever run in Cnited States magaxines on canned vegetables. Considering the large coverage of theae publications among
Canadian housewives, it marks a notable step in tin
merchandising of these products. Cor lhe firsl lime, a
representative packer is going directly to the consumer
in a determined effort to establish a buying guide for
the housewife seeking to purchase canned vegetables
intelligently. Naturally enough, lhe keynote of this
new campaign is the slogan "Huy Vegetables As You
Buy Fruits," in this way capitalizing the present con*
lidenee in thc whole Del Monte line.
Remembering the Del Monte fruit advertising of
some nine years ago, it is also interesting to note that
this new campaign on vegetables starts off on a considerably larger scale than the early advertising mi
Del Monte fruits. It consists, fur the most part, of
eolor pages running in the regular Del Monte list of
nationally circulated women's magaxines ami the "Sat-
urady Evening Post." In Canada, alone, during the
next few months, over four ami one-half million separ
ate advertising messages on Del Monte vegetal]
be delivered. Kveu iu this day of large advei
schedules, this reprcsenls a remarkably stum.
gramme.
The first of these new advertisement* will appi
an early date and the campaign will ooutinue du
the winter ami spring months, timed for tin
when canned vegetables have their biggest call
fresh products are most difficult to obtain tip
emphasis wilt be put behind Del Monte Peas, <
'lomatoes, Spinach and Asparagus.
Canned vegetables as a class have always mad
a large part of every grocer's volume, but up I..
lime few brands have full* realised the poaaihi
of this part of the business. There certainly it im
soi.' that canned vegetables, as a distinct line, *--
m»t soon hold the enviable pocMon of processed fi
will
King
iirn
f a I
ring
lMi||
Uld
cinl
"in,
up
thin
itim
ould
nils
READERS PLEASE NOTE
Owing to oreeanre on our space occasioned
by soecial "Canned Foods" section. Grocer)
and Hardware orioe list* are omitted in this
issue.
•UOAR PROM SAWDUST
At fI**- iui.«ti'«a ol iIi-j ml<-**•><t held In l/mdnn rtCKBlt' la
W II ornuiiMl> told lha* roiurrrw (Im* o fkrcKMM ut •* .*.*,■•
imc luimr (rum •-.•duat ii.»a Im-.-h Su***'t*s\**\ iu o "«.»«;•• tbtr*.
It In lliutiKhl let tt** o eiimilorrUl iwiliiittaUt-,     l» IMM • ".'-"•
meal M poanfti ot *.it*ot wm* ohi»inrt| ft&u* 100 pooodi •>
dry aiwduai
PAPER
BAGS
Light Kraft
AN 100% B. C. PRODUCT.
Now that the Highest Oradea of Paper Baga art being made in B. 0.
be careful to always specify the B. 0. Brands
"WESTERN" Manilla Quality.
"PACIFIO"~ldght Kraft Quality.
"COaiST"—Heavy Kraft Quality.
"HITGHB"-White Sulphite Quality
Manufactured in llritish Columbia by
Bartram Paper Products Co. Ltd.
VaiNCOUVRR, B. 0.
u»i
Hoosif Kr«M
Sola AgenU for Britiah Columbia:
Light Manila
The Norfolk Paper Co., Ltd.
136 WATER STREET VANCOUVER, B. 0.
Hwaa fcjnmrar 7868 and 7869
e
^*&y
BraaS atrip*
Whlta aulphlta IH26
THE   BETAILBB
BRITISH COLUMBIA—ALBERT A—YUKON
13
Grocery Market Report
Vancouver, October 15, l!)2t».
General.—IndieatioiiM point to exceedingly good fall
husincaa for the retail grocer, Vancouver and llritish
Columbia have just passed through the best summer in
history, from a business point nf view, Optimism
cornea from all lines of industry, from tin- farmer nn
ihe uiie hand, right through the commercial field tn the
professions. Our cities are growing fast, ami tho up*
tu*date merchant it proapciing In accordance. Retail
Kroecri cannot help but benefit by the general trend of
t vpansimi, although conditions in the retail grocery
field may change with the limes, as is evidenced by the
i spansion of the ehain store system of merchandising
in Haste rn Canada. Announcement has been made that
a local organisation is entering the field here. They
nre starling at onee with live store* in different parts
■t the eily, and will increase in number if their sue-
cess is established. They will be known as the Acme
Slnres Ltd.
Sugar.—laical sugar prleea recently advanced 10c
per 100 pounds, to a basis of $6 40 for granulated in
MHi pound sacks. The raw market continues very firm,
iml informal ion from reliable sources would lead one
to look for still further advances during the fall
mouths.
Canned Vegetables    Canners have advanced their
tentative opening priee on tomatoes, which were named
ll August 15th, a further 15 eents per dozen, to a basis
f *1.50 for Xo. 2Ci cans, f.o.b. Kelowna. This will re-
•  « i     e 41 id rtor dn/ell
ul fl .*> lor .M>. i*r> euws. ******   ,
present a eost to Vancouver jobbers of $1 .4. |h r «i /
It ean be readily seen that any tomatoes W^oHerw
to the retail trsde at H.60 per ^*jM§s
sen.s attractive buying.   The crop In On arm and   ho
Kastcrn States has been exceedingly sn.alL      u       .
largo consignment of It. C, tomatoes has a n ad> own
sen. to Kastem Canada via the Panama < MlL   'g
are sleady at the nrigit.nl opening ^* J^VS
except No. 2 Wive, which have been JwriJ P°
dozen.   The owning price on Outano 00.oust yet
beei named.   A late season, and cold WOainer,
result in the paek being below normal. Ud W
considerably higher than last year, o   prev mm years
Attractive pricea are being quoted on < i - i
The paek haa been large, with a very fine « uali > • »
Hritish Columbia eanners have dm.,     ^etcd
their paek. and priees are at a health) 1.     •        -^
frosls curtailed the tomato paek to some ei■      ;     ^
although considered »»«il'^KS clrcttttv
year's paek by a large margin,   un er
stances there ean be no cheap offering.*™ ^ bo
are of the Opinion thai  the present mai an
more than sustained by the constant buying by whole-
sale houses and others who have not covered their requirements. All canned food staples are in a strong
position, and it would appear that present prices hold
advantages for the buyer, which may not eventually
appear so favorable.
Canned Pish.—Lobster, which has been a short commodity for several months, is again available. The
first consignment of 1926 pack reached Vancouver October 5th. The priee is $2.H0 per dozen for V48 and
$5.1(1 per dozen for */2n. Norwegian sardines have advanced during the month from $11.25 to $11.75 per
ease of 1IMI l, tins. Attractive prices are being quoted
ou IV C. pack pilchards.
Tea and Coffee.—Brands sold by local wholesalers
have been reduced to 62c per lb. for tea, and 57c per
lb. of coffee, as against former prices of 69c and 63c
respectively. The reduction is accounted for partly by
local competition and reduced costs.
Maltomilk Biscuit.—A new Hne manufactured by
the Street man Biscuit Co., of Cincinnati, who are manufacturers of the new popular Cheese Snax. Maltomilk biscuits are very healthful, and nourishing for
growing children. The price is $3 per dozen 10 oz.
packages.
Dried Pruita.—Currants nre a little higher in price
owing to the fact that all 1925 stock has been disposed
of. The quality of the 1926 crop now being offered is
exceedingly fine.
Australian Sultanas are also available in limited
quantities. 1 crown nt 15^c per lb. and 3 crown at
171-0' per lb. This raisin will be very popular just as
soon as Australia can produce sufficient to take eare
of the export demand.
New California seeded and seedless raisins are also
available. Bulk Thompsons at 11*4° per lb. Package
Thompsons at 12»l»c to U%e per package. Package
seeded at 14Vi»c to 15c per package. New Prunes from
California are duo to arrive about October 20th. Prices
are about the same as last year. California Black
Pigs arc easier. Choice quality being quoted nt 12c
per lb., whereas the original opening price on 1926
crop of this grade wns 15c per lb. Hallowi bulk dates
are higher .good quality dates bringing 9c per lb No
lower prices are in sight until February or March.
Matches.—Reductions have taken place in several
lines. Popular brands now being quoted ns follows:
World 144/400s, at $11 per case; Red Bird 144/400s,
at $11.60 per ease; Blue Ribbon 114/400s. at $11.60 per
case.   The reduction only effects the 400 size.
Catsup.—Blue label advanced October 8th 20c per
doaen to $3.90 for the large size. u
TII E    11 E T A 1 L K it
UUITIHII COLUMBIA--AlallKUTA-YUKON
Ofl |-
CEYLON'S TEA INDUSTRY
Growing Popularity of the Black Variety
Kalutara. September 12, 1986,
Between January 1 and July 23 of the current year
131,039.074 lbs. of black tea were exported from Cey-
Ion, against 127,688,760 ,,,s- m t,h' s,,,m' l),,^':M, of "*•
last year. The increase is due to the purchases of the
Cnited Kingdom. Belgium. Franeo, Denmark. Italy,
Norway. Malta. Africa. Straits Settlements. China, the
Philippine Island, and Japan. Tho United Kingdom's
import has grown by about 7,000,000 lb., that of Africa
and China by about lW.IMNl Ib. Australian and Amcr-
lean imports have fallen off very heavily, possibly due
to the intensive Indian ami Dutch Kast Indian lea
campaigns carried on in those countries.
With the Indian Tea Ceaa Committee working ear
neatly to "push" Indian tea all over the world, it will
not he long before countries now buying Ceylon tea
are exploited for the benefit of the Indian grower .
Clearly, the time has come for Ceylon tea growers
to advertise their wares.
The tolal green tea export for the year ended on
July 23 is 727.780 lb., against 913.475 lb. in the same
period of Ihe preceding year. Thc decrease is due to
the slack buying of seven importing centres, ineludinir
the Cnited States. Canada, ami Newfoundland, which
are reported to be rapidly abandoning green ten in
favour of high-class Indian blaek tea. There is an improvement of about 224.000 lb. in the Hussian import.
It is stated lhat in the course of the next IH mouths
over 20.000 acres will be devoted to tea cultivation,
chiefly in lhe Cva Province and in the Morawakn Knr-
ale. In future, the securing of land in the chief planting centres of Ceylon will be difficult, as all native
national associations are strongly opposed to tin* free
exploitation of land bv foreign capitalists, regardless
of the rights of the smallholder, composed chiefly of the
permanent population of the country
The Kalutara National Association has just asked
the government to stop the sale or leasing of bl-tcks
of Crown Land above ten acres in extent until a de-
finite land policy is framed, as the territory now OCCU*
pied by the natives is twice as thicklv populated as
the most th*cklv populated parts of Kuropc. and as
more than 70,000 acres have been sold in tin* la*! 25
yerrs. almost whollv to Kuronean capitalists.
The tea research scheme is making headway. Tin-
nccessarv staff, including a bio-eh-miist, are being engaged through London agents. An estate 200.300
acres in extent will be purchased soon. The pnssihil.
il'cs of the manufacture of brick tea out of green and
black tea to meet the requirements of countries like
China. Russia. Persia, and the interior parts of Africa
will be investigated.
DRIED PRUITS.
The drift of the market is favorable as confidence
in goods in primary markels is increasing, values at
the source are hardening gradually and sellers are not
Keeking new business at concessions, In jobbing ecu-
tres thc turnover is on the increase, due to eooler
weather, while merchants are not heavily stocked with
goods in hand. A noticeable improyement has occurred in California prunes on an f.o.b. basis, in peaches
and anricots and in some extent iu raisins.
California prunes have been sought and the com
petition for new chip has brought the market back
almost opening prices.    The popular and large ni,
show more strength than smaller counts,
Spot supplies of peaches ami apricots are not h.
since the trade did not overbuy earlier in the genu
ami what goods they have represent Irigh initial en
Kaisius show a healthy turnover on the spot.   M
facturei-s are giving constant buying support and
able to use liirg«- quantities of raisins, as ihey arc
low cost basis,
in
I'K
y,
•H,
-Is
llll
AMERICAN MEASURES IN CANADA
The oltowlliK  »a«tta»r lift* bem  W«'lni|  b)   lln-  li.-ii.l of(1 .
or the Hcuii Merehanta1 Aiamarimion m oiuwa from m*
Weiiclit* mitt Measure* iBtptciloa Service, Depart men i „•
Trade and Commerce-
Ottawa.   mvU\ms***Ut   11,   !''.'•>
N. li iKMKin*. K**i, Secratarjr,
Retail Merchant*'  A**oelatlon,
ottnao. Ontario
l»ear Sir A* >o» an- aw»r«\ theft) I* « (r.-al dial ..{ , ,,i,
miner nrodurt parked in tto InUrd Stale* offered '*•; tab
In Canada A lar** proportion of fluid ronfci»Mllttea on- -.■.ua\
nl In botitt-ti In lulled Mate* Wine Measure, whkh nosier*
a* son know. I* ili«*.»l In Canada
Juat nt prwac-nt what I Havi* rapr<ull> in mind i« | \>w
iluri railed "Mi*«lon Ornn*r," which l« In.nut o(frr«-<l »<■ nil
tin- leading xrnrergi In Ottawa. an,| no doubt In otln-r parti ol
Canada Tin- bottle* STS labelled "I qua it 32 oi." thai ii
I quart Win** M«»*ure .nn lllrffftl imaaur* In • *nada Ibai
|daiii>« every merchant offcrln* tbi* produrt an marked »ul>
Hi to |>rocerdlnir* under the Welaht* ami MtHRtrH Acl
II thi* Infraction continue* ih*  \**\*.*tusi*m will bow nn
o|illon but to prow-rule (he Individual merchant*    Saiura)!**-
I want to »*o|,| thia drnailr art Ion. but ihla »*!• b> Affifritli
Wlni' Measure ntu*t Mop, ami I havr been ihallrn«>d non
lhan one*-* (o *toj» it
I thought you ml«h! rlrrulale the m<-i -hai it» 0( ('anad.) ' I
be on their guard again*! aHlin-a* Ann1 than product* market!
In Wine Mc*»ur*- Th«< i|uantit> marked ahould b«< rU-mina'"!
that la thi- word* "plnl*. quart* Ar ." ami th«* content* marl
eat In ounrr* tn*tead Thi* I ba-lln*». tSOOtt Ho requlreim nt**
of ibo Vtmat An. ami at the name time will avoid InfTtcUofl <>'
the Weight a and Mra»ure Art
Your* truly,
(Signed!   I   tl   WAV
IHrector oi Weights and Meaanrei
ROWNTRCtS  tUV  COWAN  COMPANY
■ruiah Cocoa anS Chocolate Maktra lo t*%***0 Product o-   n
Canada.
Announcement I* madi- by Mr Arthur Nelson, BianftSlftg
director of How nt rrr a Co. (Canada). Limited thai OS Uatt
ary 1 lhe eompany will take ovrr ihr i owan OotOpSS) l.un
Itcd whlrh ha* br«n a nrnnliient ( anadian inanufactui*- i 0(
iimimi and rhoi-olatr for ovrr fori)  >eai*
Twelve im nth* ami. Mr N'elaon w«* n|i|Milnti'd msnMlni
dlrrrtor of llowntin* In Canada after twrniv t\\** >'«i "'
••■*|H.rlrnn- In the « anadian ronfiftk>n-»r> tnialnr** Hl» *l'
polatmeat -»an Imturnl by a il.-.li, ou the |»art ol Ihi '"■••
pany lo leal thr* I anadian market for thfl aceeptanw Ol lloatl
treo nrodurl*. and ao universal ha* been the dentsnd M•■' "
ban beeornn neea»aa«ry to uianufaiiun- llowntrw produeta
with Canadian workman and ttader Cnnadlan inaim*»tii'  '
A PRIZE  PACKAGE
An unusual ami va* madi* Ihr oihrr day bv a pain
Wear's gmrrry In lln aha|»e of a jiearl In a <»»» 0l *■«• !
If any body ever found a nearl In a aardlue before, tin* i
would like lo know about ll    The |warl waa esamlind <«
Lanallle. ihr Jew< |tr, and prommnrrd  real, all rlfh'
thoush nol very larae In Rood enouRh to prove onum
In a pleOO of jewelry.   The ran of sardlnea In which H
fouml wa* put up by Connors tiro*. Illaek* Harboi
hui It 1* nol likely ihey make a prarllr-  of such prlS*
ase*    Annu|Mill* Rpflciotor.
ol
ibllo
\!i
(Mil
ml
;\ A*
,  II.
ipk 1928
THE   RETAILER
,mm8' LUMBIA-ALBBRTA-YUKO!
8 ROYAL YEAST CARES
MAKE PERFECT bREAD
Protect yourself
Against variation in
quality. Stick to the
products whose quality is uniformly high
grade* with never a
bad lot to in|ure
your store's
reputation*
rolMM   an^ I**8* y°ur
customers.
OMPANY  LIMITED
15
For the
Customer:
Quality and Satisfaction
Because of their steadily main*
tained superiority Royal Baking
Powder and Dr. Price's Cream
Baking Powder have been stand*
for over a half century* Both are
made in Canada*
For the
Dealer:
Prompt sSaleand Fair Profit
f
i
WHY YOU SHOULD SELL
Rowntrefs Cocoa
"A Taste of Old Englandft
t.-Bocautt of iti outstanding quality— Cuttomtrt
coma baek 1*r user*.
2.—Btcautr of it* trtmtnd-
out world-wide talt it
can b* told at POPULAR
PRICES
1-Btcaiiat It i* tht only
Prict Maintalntd Cocoa
—Rowntraat Cocoa it
VOUR Cocoa.
The combination of Quality.
Price and Policy (Price Main
tained) I* worthy of JfOUr full
support,
DISPLAY IT PROMINENTLY.
ROWNTREE & C0.(Canada) LIMITED
40 Wellington St. E.
Toronto, Can.
A Quality Product!
IroniIeD
m*ffMf fiMa mm aaaamaaa       tWtSW
OEM-JINK
Whole Wheat
FLOUR
A PAIR FIXED PROFIT
FOR LARGE AND SMALL
IS THE POLICY OF
The Dr. Middklon's food Products
Company Limited
Vancouver, B. C. 16
TH K    KKTAILER
mtlTISII 0»IJJ-IIIUA-AI.BMIlTA-a*UKON
Oel
'lllllpf
Lake of the Woods
Milling Company
LIMITED
Makm at
FIVE ROSES
• FLOUR •
The World's Best
Dally Capacity 14,200 Bbla.
1.0. Off iota and Warahouaaa:
1M0 lloharda Strati 1614 Stort Strttt
VANCOUVER VICTORIA
Chloride of Lime
New Style Waterproof Package
Supplied by all wholesale grocers
In British Columbia
Manufactured by
CANADA COLORS AND CHBNICA1S UNITED
Toronto
Winnipeg
Agents:
•TARN ft STERLING
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Vsncouvsr
0* m%
*v* *->
M^r^
The OM Reliables
FAVORITES IN
WESTERN
CANADA
POR
NEARLY HALF A
CENTURY
PAYINO
HIOHER PRICES
WILL NOT OET
YOU BETTER
QUALITY
G. F. A, J. GALT LIMITED
Importers and Manufacturers
TEAS, COFFEt   ANO  BAKING  POWDER
VANCOUVER. B.C.
CO-OPERATION
Tin- linaia ..full **tt<*'T*wftil bilMtiit *»-*
If en o|m ration Co-operation in lhe
plant produce* p. rf. rii.ni in quality.
cooperation in wile* l»rtnif* l»i*rir« r
mid l»»'itrr liuainc**
Shelly's arc atrivitiK in every jw»*-
nilili- way to develop your 4-X aalc*.
If you cooperate l»y featuring ihe
product* ndvcrti«cd  you  will  reap
Ihe full bene tit  from thia iuleuaive
ami efficient mlviiti-iiitf in rou*tniit
ly inercntfiiiK *ale«.
Wnteh Shelly'a advert lain*! and
cooperate for l»iirar«*r biiaine**
I     I
SHELLY'S LIMITED
A COMPLETE BAKERY SERVICE
VANCOUVER
VICTORIA NORTH VANCOUVER
NANAIMO NEW WE6TMINBTER 1926
THE   RETAILER
ITI8H roUMBlA-AhBERTA-YUKON
nitiTiKii
IT
Canned Foods Week, Nov. 10*20
salesmen will tell you
THE
Good News
i
The manufacturers represented here ask the
co-operation of Grocers
and General Storekeepers
to order an adequate
supply well in advance
to fill the demand.      K*
TO SELL CANNED FOODS
Once thought impossible-now done every minute, every day
\, 18
THE    RETAILER
BRITISH COLUMBIA-AlaBBRTA-TUKON
Octoboi
With the Choice of Canada's Bountiful Crop
Seven Kinds 2 for 25c     Chicken 20c
Tomato
Vegetable
Consomme
Celery    -
RETAILS AT
2 cans for 25c
2 cans for 25c
2 cans for 25c
2 cans for 25c
Green Pea
Oxtail -
Asparagus
Chicken -
RETAILS AT
2 cans for 25c
2 cans for 25c
2 cans for 25c
- - 20c each
QUAKER
BRAND  CANNED   SOUPS
Let no one suggest that Vegetables or Meats have better flavor
when produced elsewhere!
Inform customers that Quaker on the can, means no duty paid,
and all the moneys worth in the can.
DOMINION CANNERS B. C. LIMITED - VANCOUVER
(fraker Canned Foods an n***da hor* and hat*** tha world's fittest ingredients
K i26
,THE   KKTAILKR
11
British Columbia's Canned Foods Rank High
in World Markets
p^RITLSH Coliiinbiu ia perhaps -tho moat admirably
r*\ situated of the proviiicc* of the Dominion for
the catabhahment of canning  plants, ami the
numerous factories processing different commodities
arc making almoat spectacular progress in the in.lus.
trial aniiala of the provinee.
Not only ia the elimnte ideal for the cultivation niul
growth of fruit ami vegetables, but the position which
Vancouver haa attained aa a world port simplifies the
disposal of exportable material.
It haa often been anid that the products of any
given centre do not reach the height of their popularity
until Ihey reach diatant market*, Thia may be consequent upon in a uu fact u re ra, who arc apt to concentrate
too heavily upon diatant field*, not giving sufficient
attention to the home market, and letting it take care
of itself. Naturally an a plant grows, it follows that
ita product uiuat have n Wider distribution, Imt it ban
been stiggeatcd that the home trade should receive
mora than pnaaing attention.
Thia argument, however, docs not hold good as regards the output of British Columbia'a canning plants,
which are quality gooda of the first order. Then, too,
the housewives of II. <\ reali/.c that the fruit vegetables and other commodities which coma to them in
the ean are grown under ideal conditions, and processed under the skilled and sanitary methods of present
day operative*
What haa Wen said of fruit and vegetables applies
also to other commodities such as canned meats canned
milk and fish, and the retail merchant can do more
than any other agency to stimulate the demand for
theae'B. C. products, where sales volume will reflect
in the prosperity of the entire province.
It la not long ainee the bulk of the fruit and vegetable fanning industry of the province was carried on
Tomato picking on
V.ctoria island, Britiah Columbia
by numerous small processing plants scattered throughout this territory. These have now bceomc amalgam^
ated with the larger concerns, where the elimination ol
high overhead, and distribution under one management have produced a satisfactory working basis foe
this line of industry. i
A similar situation holds good with the salmon
canning industry, where a number of small canning
plants have been absorbed by larger interests, who are
keeping the products of B. C. waters prominently bet
fore the markets of the world, where they have gained
a reputition for quality and appearance.
A late addition to Vancouver's industrial life is the
establishment of a modem electrical meat processing
kitchen and cannery where a new departure ia aeen ini'
the preparation of ready-to-eat dishes. A secret process enables Ihe purchaser to obtain complete meat
courses, handily packed and served at a moment's
notice.
No commodity handled by the retail grocer can bo
more easily handled and displayed than canned foods,
and when discussing thc winter's preserves supply with
his customers, can, with profit to himself, impress the
fact that modern methods of processing canned foods,
not only guarantee a perfect can content, but eliminate
the bother and mess of home preserving. ..
Present day existence offers an immense opportunity for the sale of a convenient, rapidly prepared
meal, and since thc arrival of the motor vehicle the
sale of canned foods has assumed very large propor-
t ions.
With the object of making "CANNED POODS
WEEK" more than a passing incident to the minds of
the retail trade, this publication urgea the fulle8t,
friendly co-operation between manufacturer, jobber
aud retail merchant, in order that this particular Belling opportunity may become an
annual event that really meana
something to the retail trade of
the province and Canada.
There are previous instances where British Columbia haa
been accredited with "starting
something." Sometimes this
term has been applied sarcastically, and sometimes in a
spirit of admiration, and although we do not lay claim tb
be the originators of "Canned
Foods week," let us be sufficiently awake to the fillip which
it must give to trade during the
pro-Christmas period. Let's all
pull togteher for an honcst-to-
goodness Canadian Canned
Foods Week.
PONT FORGET THR DATE,
NOVEMBER 10-20. 20
THE    RETAILER
1UUTI8II OOLUMBlA-^LBBRTA-TlfKON
(I.
UiT
PARTICULAR PEOPLE
DEMAND
THE   FINEST     GRADE   OP   FRUITS   AND   VB0ETARLE8   FROM
SELECTED DISTRICTS OF BRITISH COLUMBIA FOR THEIR TABLE
THE WESTERN
At
Vancouver
Victoria
Haney
Kamloopa
Ktlowna
in the premier Fruit and Vegetable districts of our coast province, where toil and sun
aid science and industry in producing our world-famous
CANNED FRUITS AND VEGETABLES
GLACE AND FOUNTAIN FRUIT8
PURE CONCENTRATED 8YRUP8
MINCEMEATS, CAT8UP8, -ftc.
"By Oar Fooda Are Ws Known."
WESTERN PACKING CORPORATION, LTD,
HEAD OFFICE: VANGOUVEB
PpVALf,Ty
^        II
•f'lil x V
ROYAL CITY BRAND
Canned Fruits & Vegetables :: Jams & Jellies
<RPYAL CITY (BRAND
will satisfy your Customers
Only tht very finest go under
ToOYAL CITY (BRAND
QUALITY GUARANTEED    ::    ASK FOR PRICE LIST
Ifaal City Gold Labels makje attractive display
BRODER CANNING CO., LTD.
NEW WESTMINSTER, BO. 926
THE   RETAILER
BNTWH COLUITOlA-AiairmTAivijKON
21
The Canadian Canning Industry
The art of hermetically scaling food product*—o
method of preaerving certain foods without deprlv*
inn them of iht-ir natural qualities—led to the foundation of Ihe canning industry, a relatively important
branch of manufacture in the Dominion of Canada.
The honour of diacovcry Moiura to M. Nicolas Appert,
ii Krcnohnaan, who in the reign of tht* third Napoleon
md between the yenra 1H40 and 1845, was awarded a
pension of 12,0011 franca ami the title of Chevalier,
which hit* male descendants hear lo thin day. He died
neglected nt the aire of 91 year*, and wa* buried in
here la Chits*,"
The principal eommoditiea canu-d in tin* Dominion
nre (1) Hah, including aalmon, lobsters and sardines;
(2) fruita and vegetable-* of many kinds, (8) meats;
and (4) milk producta. The canneries are of great importance aa an aid to aeveral other industries, notably
the I in ean iiuluatry. whieh supplies millioiiH of cans
annually, to the IuoiIm r industry for packing caaea, and
to the paper ami printing industries fur labels. The
development of the canned foods trade has effected
ureal change* in the relation of foods to seasons.
Kruita and vcgetablca of all kinds an- now lo be had at
all times of Ihe year. The producers in the country
arc provided with an enormously extended market and
the coiwiimer in both eity and country with cheap and
wholeaome food in great variety. The consumer is afforded protection by frequent inspection under the
Meat ami Canned Foods Act. 1907. and subsequent
amendment* adminiatcrcd by the Health of Animals
Itranrh of the Federal Departmeni of Agriculture.
Importa of canned foods in the calendar year 1924
amounted to aM.92H.2K9. mostly of fruiis and vegetables
nol grown in Canada by reason of climatic conditions.
Kxporta of canned foods thc produce of Canada during 1924 amounted in value to 130,486,792, oi which
canned fifth totalled 118,858,901 and condensed milk
♦6,819,364
Lobater Canning
Neat to the aalmon canneries of the Pacific coast,
cornea the lobster canning indusl ry of Nova Scotia,
New Brunswick, Prince Kdward Island, and Quebec,
The imluatry datea from 1870. when the province of
Nova Scotia produced 80,000 cans and New Brunswick
20,000 cana. In the following year a factors was start-
ed in IMnee Kdward Island with an initial pack of
«.711 cana. The growth of the Industry In over fifty
yean iu indicated by the output oi the 602 factories
operating iu Canada iu 1924 Prince Kdward Island
with 145 faetoriea produced 2i».Hl4 cases valued at
♦K8I.575, Nova iHcotia with 142 factories and 40,831
<aae* valued at $1,095,269, New Brunswick with 14.
factories and 23,548 caaea valued at 1690,400, and Que*
»M-e with 73 faetoriea ami 10,925 cases valued at Kil-
886, or a total paek in 1924 oi 102.1 IH cases worth f»,-
K42.0H5. In 1925 the value of lobsiers imported whs
♦6,437, while exporta totalled $2,879,149 in value.
Sardine Canning.
Thia industry la confined almost wholly to the province of New Brunswick, although one cannery is PC
ported on the banks of thc St   Lawrence    The name
of sardine na applied to the ('anadian fish is not Un
true one, as the fish used in the canneries of New
Brunswick are young of Ihe herring. The first men-
t'on of a sardine industry in Canada, so far as is known,
dates hack to some time in the late sixties. Although
but three canneries were reported in 1924 with, a total
paek of 282,806 cases, with a value of "1810,574, the
true significance of its importance to New Brunswick
is explained when account is taken of the fact that the
Maine factories, about fifty in number, depend almost
wholly on the supplies of fish obtained from Canadian
waters. The imports of sardines in 1924 amounted to
1665,810 and came principally from Norway. No exports are separately reported. The season for taking
this fish extends from April 1 to December 31.
Clam and Other Canneries.
There is a considerable paek of canned fish of other
varieties, the principal being:—(1) clams and
quahaugs with 32,447 cases of the value of $843,011;
(2) pilchards, 14,898 eases worth $60,180 -haddock 4,383
cases worth $33,006; herring, 1,137 cases worth $7,401;
cod, 975 cases worth $7,800; crab, 200 cases worth $4,-
905; halibut, 142 cases worth $1,420; scalops, 224 cases
worth $2,657; trout, 65 cases worth $455; and mackerel. 5 cases worth $50. There is also a large export of
certain of the above-named varieties, the principal
with their value, being: herring ($235,565), clams
$170.7:12). and pilchards ($87,168). There was too an
import of canned herring amounting of $52,199.
Fruit and Vegetable Canning.
The canning of fruits and vegetables is carried on
most extensively in the provinces of Ontario, British
('olumbia and Quebec, where climatic conditions are
favorable for the growing of fruits and vegetables.
The principal fruits canned in Ontario are apples,
pears, plums, peaches, cherries, currants, gooseberries,
blueberries, raspberries and strawberries. In addition
British Columbia has the apricot and loganberry. The
vegetables canned include tomatoes, peas ,corn, beana,
beets, carrots, pumpkin, squash, spinach, and asparagus. Thc canning season begins in June and continues through the summer and autumn until October, being at its height in July, August and September. During this period employment is furnished in the canneries to about 5.500 persons, of whom approximately
2,800 are males and 3,200 females, with a payroll of
almost a million dollars.
Meat Canning.
The canning of meats is a branch of the great meatpacking industry and is not as extensively carried on
in Canada as are other sections of the canned foods
group of industries, being more in the nature of a sideline of the main industry. The total value of canned
meats manufactured in Canada during the calendar year
1925 was close to $1,000,000. Imports of canned meats
poultry, and game during the same period amounted to
$300,182, whilst exports of Canadian product totalled
$122,925. Closely allied to the canned meat industry is
that of canned fioups, the manufacture of which in the
vear mentioned totalled $490,171, whilst imports were
valued at $1,120,511. No separate figures for exports
are available as the commodity is not specified in the
export classification. 22
THK   RKTAILER
niUTISlI tSOWT-mUA-AlaHBllTA-TMKON
Octol
«r
SEMIS OF PHOTOGRAPHS SHOWING FISH CANNING MOCISS IN •RITISH COLUMSIA
£b?V*""£ iHl!9,"9 "•"• tnd canning factory.   In the centre-Cargo ef flsh arriving at (tannery and undoing treat****
■eiow—on* ot tne machines used la the eannlng proeeea known ae tho Mlron ehlnhfM and tho Snlehod product ready far iWp
moat 1926
r
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
1
23
We a %outiht
to the Salt jou*%l\jL/
Windsor Salt is PURE salt. It, therefore,
is naturally a best seller.
It is the only salt nationally advertised in
color in the magazines.
For thirty years Windsor Brands of salt
have consistently maintained friendliest relations with those who sell and those who
buy salt. This is but the natural result of
the highest standards of quality being consistently maintained.
Our October advertisement appears on the
next page. We believe it will help you sell
more Windsor Salt. But to sell Windsor
Salt you should have a generous stock of
Windsor Salt to meet the big demand.
So, when you order salt, always specify
WINDSOR SALT
Ve * NADJAN .SALT*JJ»ANY UM.T..D
El
WINDSOR
' 24
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA KKTAILKR
Qetobe
u*
3
0
>*
8-
SO
~z
fc-l
c
es —
J s
a ba
C   3
3   O
s.s
s.s
8 S
3   E
o —
^3
u    •
.-«
£   O
s 1926
Tm* BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
H  li
8
J  (fl
r 3
m
i i i
a1!
8 8
1
1
US
£SS l  !ff]S
*s
U  la.
s   *
1/5
a J
ill
Ul
.'*. •
Purest Commercial
Salt ever offered
the Housewife
Salt of 99.9'; purity may be nothing new,
—-     h      but until about two years ago it was seldom
|||     ■      obtained except by chemists in the labora-
™     tory.   They called this "chemical purity.*'
From time to time salt makers have doubtless reached this remarkable degree of
refinement, but never could salt of such
purity  be  continuously  produced  in  a
commercial way.
It was certainly a triumph for Canadian
Industry when, about two years ago, the
Canadian Salt Company announced
WINDSOR
<1 Socially Purified S*-*t
a wonderful new salt guaranteed to be
99.9'; pure. This is the highest guarantee
ever offered with a commercial salt and its
purity is constantly maintained by the
careful supervision of our own staff of
chemists.
Far from being something new, this long-
I tt% A I *°uaht product comes to the grocer's
Vi 0 I shelves with a record of uctual achievement
behind it. Butter and cheese makers,
packers and bakers have put their products
on a higher plane of purity, tlavor and
favor by the use of Windsor Specially
Purified Salt. Now it is available for the
home.
This remarkable salt will be warmly
welcomed by the housewife. It typifies
the high standards of purity in all Windsor
Salt Brands that have made them favorites
for over 30 years. Our advertising has
educated her to the tremendous significance
of purity in salt. Even the smallest amount
of bitter impurities found in ordinary salt
will hide the flavors in her cooking. Being
free from these bitter impurities, Windsor
III fl Salt brings out and puts new life into her
™ cakes, pies all her cooking I If she lives on
the farm she is eager to use it for her
butter, cheese and bread.
Windsor Specially Purified Salt, like all
Windsor Brands, favorites for over JO years,
will rapidly become one of the grocer's best
tellers; its market includes both town and
farm buyers; our national advertising in
full colors is making it familiar everywhere;
above all, it is the purest commercial salt
ever offered.
Introduce Windsor Specially Purified
Salt to your customers I Write us for quotations. 26
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Octobci
r
si
°son
Windsor Table Salt
112—2'■ lb. Cotton Bags
140—    2 lb. Cotton Bags
WINDSOR SALT
IN BAGS
Old
Favorites!
0:,ms\w .
!"i**v o
u-A2yiv2vy^
'Vr, o   ■■
sA   ^«fe*fe
Windsor Table Salt
40      7  Ib.  Cotton  Bagt
20    14  Ib.   Cotton  Bags
!S
*uo*>
, !'LG\L;
: .salt :.
Regal Table Salt
Free Running
24 Cartona in Caae
New
Homestead
FLY Salt
te ua for inform-
on and quotations
WRITE FOR
QUOTATIONS
There's a favorite brand of
WINDSOR
SALT
for every class of trade
For over 30 years Windsor Salt has been
a household word.
It is good salt widely advertised, backed
by service and a reputation for fair
dealing.
Order Windsor Salt; insist on getting it.
WINDSOR
ROX BRAND
SALT
Fine   Salt    (Windsor    Quality)   compressed
into even grains, size V*\ and ''.  inch mesh.
For your Farm Trade
Salt for Cattle
50 Ib. pressed Blocks
Compressed Fine Salt
Iodised
Windsor Iodized
Salt
14 Carton* In ('***
New
Windsor
Specially Purified
Salt
99.9% Pure
WRITE FOR
QUOTATIONS 1926
THE   RETAILER
27
Condanaad and Ivaporatad Milk.
In I'anada the condensed milk in-
, hist ry dates from 188JI, when llu*
ot factory waa established at
Truro, Nova Scotia, by ih** Reindeer
Cundoiiaod Milk Company. Later in
thf i-itfliti-'H anil j: train in lhe nineties
m'vara] new plants were eraatad i»y
■his company and tin* Si. Charles
Company of lngin»oll. most of which
were later absorbed by tin* Borden
Condensed Milk Company, winch
now operates pl.mta located in the
bos\ dairy district* of tin* Dominion
ns follow*; Ingrnudl, Norwich nml
Tilmtiilmrg. Ontario; Huiitindmi,
Quebec;  TrUID,   Nova Scotia;  and
SartUa, IM'.   Thi* Carnation Milk
Company with plant* at Aylmcraml
Springfield, Ontario; thc Canadian
Milk Product* Company with plant*
at Jtrowusvillc,  Ik-lmout,  Iturf »r«l.
(I Ian Worth, ami lliekson, Ontario, who specialize in tho
manufacture of milk powder*, besides a number of in*
dividual companies operating plant*, some of whieh
arc connected with ice cream and confectionery estab*
lUhmcnta, ami which are loeated at St. George, Brock*
ville. Itcachvilli-, Woodstock, I'icton, ami Sydenham iu
Ontario j Oonrtanay and Ladner in Britiah Columbia
and Charlottctowti in I'rince Ktlward [aland, complete
lhe lint of condensed milk factories in the Dominion.
The value of condensed milk produced in Canada as
firm reported in the decennial census of 189J was W,\,-
000, Iii 1901 the value had Increased to 1269,520 ami
in 1906 to |HTi5.40». Thc value of production in recent
year* aa liehw show* lhe wonderful advancement made
by thia industry
Number of
Value of
Year
Factories
Products
1917
80
IS.097.217
1918
00
•am
12,413,818
1919
24
15,880,033
1920
38
20,519,835
1921
27
14,270,591
192*2
83
9,501.346
192.1
86
13,714,978
1924
24
13,215,173
1885
24
13,453,472
BRITISH COLUMBIA FRUIT AND VEGETABLE
PACE, 1026.
The B.C. Ilraneh. Canadian Manufacturers Association has aiipplied the following figures representing the
1886 paek i
Fruits, all kinds
Vegetable*
dams
Total
Mot 'Waat Young Man.'
Said the Hoekcyc—'if I net canned iWa
go Bait Iu
Gathtring Strawberries, one of British Columbia's  most abundant crops.
SOME PACT8 A MERCHANT 8HOULD KNOW
REOARDINO Ca\NNED FOODS
Successful canning depends on thc simple principle
of sterilization by heat.
• o     o
All canning processes of food must be subjected to
a temperature that kills genus. Not only muat food
be made sterile, but it must be kept in the condition.
This is effected by hermetically sealing containers.
• •     o
*
No material that is not absolutely sound must be
used.   Fruit that has commenced to show bruises or
specks, has already been attacked by bacteria.
• •     •
The use of sugar in preserving, when used in strong
solution, prevents the growtti of bacteria. Fruit pre*
served in rich syrup keeps for a longer period in unsealed jars or crooks,
• •    •
Somefruits are more easily and quickly sterilized
lhan others, for the reason that the antiseptic action
of acid in some fruits is increased in high temperature.
Such fruits as strawberries, cherries, currants, pineapples and tomatoes are among this number.
• •     •
The addition of aeid to the brine*, will overcome thc
difficulty found in preserving vegetables which have
n lack of aeid content. Corn is an example of the more
difficult specimens.
too
Some extremely aeid fruits, such aa green gooseberries, green grapes, and rhubarb can be canned without processing,
aaa
One of the outstanding advantages of fruit and
vegetables canned in metal containers is the elimination of damage to contents through being exposed to
tho light. This is why the housewife must store always
in n dark place if the color is to be retained.
a      •     •
It has not vet been definitely determined whether
or not food l«'ft in a tin after being opened, becomes
contaminated. Always advice the pouring of contents
into n covered glass or earthenware dish.
520,833
232,910
224,160
977.893
ill 1 shall lilllTIMll COLOMBIA—ALBERT*   YUKON
Oclobff
NOW
For
MINCE MW
Peter Rabbit Peanut Butter
Cotta No More But Sells Footer
THB TOV PAIL DCUOHTI THB CHILOAIN
DISPLAY A CAaa.   IT WILL »tLL ITaiLP.
KHIy Confection Co. Ltd.
1100 Mainland Otrttt
VANCOUVIR. 0. C.
Clark'* Mlnrr Pie will make ru*iom*r« (or *>«u    It, «.-nr»
quality Is appreciated and eneotiraae* repeal order*
Order an *««orintent, rart we. fla** Jar* and palla
ll I* onl) on i of ihe man) Clark Prepared FiwMia which
will help son to laraer oalet and more proOt*
W. CLARK Liaited, Moatreal
Establishments   at   Mtntraal.   P. Q.   OL Html.   P. Q.   •"«
Harrew. OnL
A Best Seller
Groceri! Here's a combination hard to
beat. The lowest priced Sardines on the
market with the highest rate of turnover.
The big margin on Brusnwick Brand will
add to your profits.
The demand is there.   Can you meet it!
'ftititM®
BRUNSWICK
_        BRAND
SARDINES
Packaih
CONNORS BROS. LIMITED, Black'* Harbaw. N.B "26                                          THE   KKTAILKR 29
BRITISH OOUIMBU-AL   ..ITA-YUKON
Canned Salmon—A Valuable British
Columbia Industry
is lbs. to the cam'), ami has steadily increased until "j?1^ vm('ls lt,an' Vancouver with consign*
ludal «ver a million ami a half eases are parked an- ",,'?,H,(,f B' C' Ma,mon- destined for world markets,
nually, anl<l ,h/' ,,x,1'nt Oi the export business is shown 'in the
mi            it          •.»/..,.... following figures:
There are live varieties of lisb in It. C. waters, each «a»»w«
variety laing known by name as follows: Shipmentsof CannedSalmon from Vanoouver
Soekeye or bltiebaek (Oneorhyuehua Nerka), Ti»tal for 1925       1571004
Thc   Tyee,   or   Spring   salmon   (Oncorhynetaw      To,«l to* 1924  ..1,525,542
Tsehawytcha). Total for 1923  929,289
Cohoc    or    Silverside    Salmon    (Oneorhynchus       l°,a! (°r }m   794.344
KiMitch). Tu,al for 1921   939,823
Humpback (Orcorhyncbus Gorbusoa), and the Dog Destinations of B. C. Salmon Pack During 1025
Salmon or Chum (Oneorhynchus Keia), Australasia                                           255470
The Soekeye is a small fish ranging from 4 t» 12 Belgium                                                      42403
lbs. flesh linn, ami intensely red in color. British India  IZZTZ1   5,215
The Tyee or Spring Salmon, averages about 22 lbs.       ('. and S. America    27,651
in wi-*i|tht. but is often much heavier, from pale pink       Canada Atlantic Coast    82,485
lo deep pink in color, ami rich in flavor. Ceylon      125
The Cohoe. or Silverside .averages about li lbs. iu       China    6,671
weight, fleah firm, much paler in color than the sock-       Denmark    -  ** - -        447
)V,. Dutch East Indies    7,980
The Humpback averages about 4 lbs., and its flesh       JfjfP1 ,JJg
,       i     » i       .     #. riji  -  lt..9tsv
is pale pink and soft. ^ 74;176
The Chum average* 8 lbs. and is yellowish in color       Germany     2,362
with, fair flavor. Greece   3,827
Britiah   Columbia's   salmon   run   began   first   in       Holland 83,425
northern water*, lhe fish entering the various inlets      Italy  - 58,566
and rivera. eventually reaching the Fraser River, Philippines 23,177
Canneries are situated ou the Naas, Skcena Kiv*       Samoa      360
era, Rivers ami Knight Inlets. Alert Hay and other       siam      400
points on the eoaat, hut in previous years the business South Africa                                       -          33,464
haa centred on the Fraser River, where numerous can-       Straits Settlement 22.763
neriea are in operation. Sweden   350
A noticeable falling off has heen witnessed on the Cnited Kingdom                                           489,938
Kroner during the past few seasons, bul there is every       U, S, Atlantic I oast       *»■
indication of an immediate revival in thia water if W.es   Africa                                                    !£*>»
reports to the effect that aalmon are coming in around       VNest Indies  -we*ti
Queen Charlotte Sound, are confirmed    This will put
an entirely cHfforent  complexion upon the present total   Mii,wt
situation, and the operations of American fishermen 	
outaide the Straits of Juan de Fuca will no longer "CANADA APPROVED."
affect British Columbia's catch on the Fraser River. 	
Spring aalmon are plentiful on the coast from Nov- »i«_.|. LnnWrnA t* Tnimw Bound
ember to April. Soekeye making .heir appearance In Meat Inspection Rigorously Applied to *^*ms Bound,
•Inly ami August, ami the Cohoes In September Wholeaome Canned Gooda.
The hulk of the flsh used for canning are the sock* N| (j|| jns|)0(.tjoll \n Canada is maintained under the
*t% and it ia during its run. usually In prodigious aU,tho,.ltv 0f tno Meat and Canned Foods Aet of 1907.
numhera at the height, that the paek is made up. \s ^ subsequent amendnHenta thereto.   Space will not
many aa 2.000 boats have been seen at the mouth ol ^ fl ^0t*ailocl description of the different provi*
the Fraser at one time, and in big run years these ^ ^ q* ^ A(,t    1(H aim.t Mention is to see that
Imnta irill average from UM) to r>00 fish eaeh In one ^ a|u] m<>a( foml proctucts for human consumption
ulght.   Utterly, mbirt* attention has been given to the ^ m^ w|,0j(,80llu, niui flt for human food by pre-
necking nf other grades of salmon, and a profitable vontjng diseased or otherwise dangerous meats from
buaineaa ia Wing built up, swelling the Bitmial toltW pntor|ng consuming channels; to see that thieir hond-
of caaea ahipped from this province. ym im\ preparation is in accordance with modern sail-
BUUmant nt W Q Salmon Pack to Oetober 6,1926 itaiy science, to prevent the use of harmful dyes, pre*
matomont of B. O. Baimon raca w «« wr/gtIveo and chemicals, and to insist that the pro-
Soekeve.   355.469:   Spring.   22.503;   BUlc   BaCKS, <|urt ,M> truiv nm| honestly labelled.   In fact, its aim
2.181; Steelheada. 1.904; Cohoe. 98,589; PtnKs, ■»--.».• ^     protwt flfo health and rights of the consumer.
r»72; Chums, 974,887—total, 1,373,635, bO
T11 K    R E rP A 1 L E R
lUMTItfll OiMMIUA-AI.BKUTA--YUKON
Sept ember
Please Customers with
EMPRESS
PURE JELLIES
BUCK CURRANT, RED CURRANT
BRAMBLE. CRABAPPLE At LOGANBERRY
In Glass, Tumbler or 44b, Tin
A Superfine Quality
pleasing to all tastes
EMPRESS MFG. CO. LTD
VAHOOUVBR
HIGH-GRADE
TIN CAN
CONTAINERS
MANUFACTURED BY
American Can Co. Ltd.
VANCOUVER. Canada
Del Monte
ASPARAGUS
California's supreme vegetable delicacy
backed by special DEL MONTE
in national magazines
The eolor page reproduction
shown here is just one of our special
advertisements on OKI* MONTH Asparagus Tips appearing in the "Saturday
Kveiiing Post" and leading Cnited
States women's magazines— reaching
hundreds of thousands of Canadian
homes.
DHL MONTH Asparagus advertising is distinctly apart from our advertising on DHL MONTH Fruits and
other items. Coupled with the quality
of DEL MONTH Asparagus, it offers
every dealer a particularly good opportunity for new Asparagus volume. THE    RE
BRITISH OOLUafBlA-
TAILER
-ALBKUTA-YUKON
31
or
Thia Act specially controls cxporis from Canada, v.
imports thereto. No meat or meat foods products may
leave the Dominion unless they have complied fully
with the requirementa of the Act and Regulations. The
Hegulationa are clear, concise and emphatic, and are
rigidly enforced. Establishments whieh come within
llu- operations of this Act are those which are engaged
iu shipping meats into export trade
Thc first requirement before Inspection will be
granted to sueh; establishments, is that the plant must
meet the requirements of sanitation in regard to construction, equipment and maintenance.
By this method a complete and continuous check
is kept upon the minutest detail, with the result that
Canada's export* may enter into trade channels guaranteed by the (lovernmcnt of ihe Dominion as being
absolutely wholesome and iu every way lit for human
food.
The yards, pens, stables, iu fact the entirep remises,
no matter how large, or for what US€ tiny may be put,
are continually and entirely under the control of the de*
pertinent's officers. No operations of the plant whatever, whether day or night, are permitted except under
Mi|H-rvision.
PRAIRIE TRADE alND CONDITIONS OP CANNED
FRUIT MARKET
Mr. Russell Whiielaw, president of the Western
Coking Corporation Limited, operating live canner-
ies in British Columbia ami a sixth iu St. John, N.B..
when interviewed by lhe "Retailer," on the general
• anning outlook for Western Canada, expressed his
gratification at the remarkable recovery of credit conditions in the Prairie Province*, with its consequent
heightening of confidence in the grocery trade.
lie slated that canned goods were rapidly ae.juir-
ing a more important place in the daily menu of the
average lions-hold due to (I) the infinite eare in grading under government supervision; and (2) eo-oper*
ation of lhe grower to achieve the best; (3) the evolution of canning mei hods to their present high plane of
hygienic efficiency; (4^ g-Hnl transportation; and (5)
n prosperous people.
The B, C, erop was average in M* opinion, apples.
rasps and plums being plentiful while strawberriea were,
a disappointing crop with high prices prevailing. Vegetables were normal with exception of tomatoes which
crop was limited by an early frost, and Mr. Whitelaw
predicts higher prices to prevail in the near future.
B. C. apricots and peaches will be a factor in the Canadian market within thc next two years, making our
markets independent of the imported fruit from the
south.
Regarding the present low prices in effect, Mr.
Whitelaw refused to comment beyond the statement
that buyers were reaping the benefits from thc keen
competition amongst packers, and while export business is on the increase, the most encouraging aspect of
the situation iu his opinion, is noted in the increasing
Western demand for British Columbia packed goods
whieh after all is not surprising in view of the unity
of thought and close association of all the Western
Provinces.
He regards thc recent amalgamation of the independent packers of British Columbia into thc Western
Packing Corporation as a forward movement in line
with the advancing demand from the Prairies for western paeked food stuffs, whereby a larger service can
be more economically effected by a unit organization
from the producer right down to thc ultimate consumer.
PRUIT AND VEOETARLE GatNNERIES DT BRITISH
COLUMBIA.
Ashcroft Canners Limited, plant at Ashcroft.
Broder Canning Company, Ltd.—Plants at New Westminster, Causton and Washington.
Dominion Canners B. C. Limited.--(Second largest in
Canada). Plants at Vancouver, Kelowna, Kere-
meos. Oliver and Penticton. ■
Farmers' Canning Company.—Plant at Mission (under
management of Ashcroft Canners Ltd).
Occidental Fruit Company, Ltd.—(A. MocDonald Company. Ltd),   Plant at Kelowna.
Rowcliffe, George.—Plant ot Kelowna.
Western Packing Corporation, Ltd.—Plants at Vancouver. Victoria. Haney. Kamloops and Kelowna.
SILL BY THE DOZEN
Canned Foods Week (November 10th to 20th. 1926)
 BUT "
FOR SATISFIED CUSTOMERS. THE BRAND MUST BE
ta-OOSMX LOT SALES WILL INCREASE YOUR VOLUME. 32
THE    RETAILER
BRITISH OOLUMBIA-ALBERTA-YUKON
Octob
cr
"Sel More BI Canned Salmon"
MODERN   METHODS
and
MODERN PLANTS
ARE great factors in thc production of the
high-gradi* sea food packed by the Fish
Canning industry of British Columbia. This industry
has a distribution of $8,336,438 yearly in wage*, all
put into circulation in British Columbia.
GROCERS will do well to stock up with B. C. Salmon. Push it every time iu preference to other imported sea food. It pays dividends both ways, directly and indireetly. There is sure to lie a good
demand for B. C. Salmon during
Canned Foods Week
November 10-20*
SALMON PACKERS OF BRITI8H COLUMBIA
Contributed by
ANGLO B. C. PACKING CO.,   LTD.
B. 0. FISHING 0 PACKING 00., LTD. 1126
i i; i
WmOBMWBU   *LW.TA-VuKON
\
i mkerfllle Gro*. beaftord. Clifford BsaksrvUle win
,„„■ nun «i Baaawrilla, «md bin partner ran rawed to
U   K«a, B. C.
i>Pitr riHii'no. or Btairnora .han opened -a branch general
itore si Hoyl i •
\lhln AI tn tt I rum. of Print .ion. u reported to hav. moved
in   \lt«-tib>
\ drug itore ha* b««'ii opened bj w i: Almas, Vancouver,
ih.- arorct) niore of Mm J  It  Atkins, Vancouver, li n-
.,i( .1 io bare -beea sold.
\ fane) foods wore ban beta opened t>> Mn m i: .-um-
ii Vaneoorer.
A  K  llooth han comim-nnnl a belcher business In Van-
i <ill-.iT
Ihr liu-oiithn S«iilinr>  IUik«r>. VnncottVt'i", h reported lo
...  Ih- ii aoiil to I!  On«n.
John   Putimon,  of  Arlington.   U   report! i   lo  hu\.*  inn
• tned » groeery ntorr
ll Haredeo, eMfbettoaery, jii Caasid* la succeeded l*> T.
s Proet-
\  -,.Atti*m.a Hii.t alio    buntio *o*> lm* Ix. n i untitivtu-i <l bj  T
\\    IhoiuiiMtti). KHownn
Maavatl a Hori«< ha»«» eotaatenced ths •it) Electric Co.,
ll   V-.li.ti um
K   Valentine in aucrr«il«*-(l l.\  J   DevIIO  at Trail (boot and
ihoe ntore)
Mr** IIIM* And rnoit, I'nluii Bar. !|-»*H taken ovei thi con
'■"•!|otnn   Altai  tobacco More of  Isabel 0   M*lla<
Tin. II (', p«a Shop nn* roiiim.-m -mic builm II n Van*
<<»«•» f-r
C C, M T A. I.ld. are -appoint..! trusted I i 'it.- dry-
aoodi store of T J Krr, Vancouver
Tut Brooer? bunlnraa of G«*o I. M-lnni*. Vancouver, Ea
reported io have b#rn n«ld to o Wilson
Mr Snitt|«non han pun h»n«-«t ins grtwer) business ol D
i'o»ni\ Yfthrouvcr
Th Mock of 0. S, Wools) St < o Ud.. <in goods Vancou
rer, i» reported to have been sold I" imstsea on behall ol
«i'"diiorn ,
J tYltkena «af Wane, ta atteeeedUut J f Maanell as grocei
Cndacott Trading Co. In BAY known SI McDonald and
<Vailaee, Aldergrov*.
<i1**l>» I. Ibbetnon In reported to hsvi bought the grow)
bUilnees of G«*o. \U* urd>   ni Led DPI
H \v Waltar, dry foods merchant al Unflej PraJi '•■ I*
i''ported io hav. nold out to W J  Duckiwth,
A general More ts reported lo bo\i been opened al Needles,
I It  Uckett.
P   J. Lettotr has commenced • grocer)   "u"" ilt  lw'
II may
Nuatla Mm Donald In commencing a grocer) alow al Port
11 >"*n.
Hie Went of England l>r> Goods Co have been elo* d oul
■•■ i'ii»ce Rupert,
*» boot nnd nhoe mid clothing »•<>••' l»W ,n'"  """ ,MI
""i by lira. B, White, at Trnll
'Tie urocer) hunlnenn of Blaalej ntsrsh, VnncouN r, la
I"   "d to liMve heen nold.
!; Pearson hnn nold hh aroeerj bunlnea* in Vaijpouvi'r.
''be branch «r the Vancouver Dmi Co lb\ " -• "m ink"
''    T W.nt, has been cloned,
Frost & Frost, Victoria, are adverting closing oOt their
clothing and man's furnishing buaineaa.
Credllori mseUng ia reported to have been called for the
Uur l Canners, Ltd., in victoria.
Tendera Invited for purohaae of aiock of drugs and statlon-
'ly. and flxlurce of the Thomas Drug Co.. Ud., Vlctorls.
Th" Qensnal Store of A. J, McCarthy, loco, is reported
burm out.
1 'vstal & Duncan, tailors, Penticton, are reported to have
dissolved partnership,
Tha Smith Mercantile Co. are reported to have sold out
at Port Hammond,
A ni. at store la to be opened about October 15th In Vancouver, by Percy IJurch.
The California Grocery, No. 2, Vancouver, Is reported soldi
Frank Ilartin la commencing a grocery business In Van-
couver,
The Robson Street Store of Held Bros, is reported to have
been sold
A grocery Btore ia commencing in Vancouver by Ceo. 0.
Shaw.
The grooerj Btore of Shore & Co., Vancouver, is reported
to have been aold,
• has. p, Smith, Vancouver, la opening a grocery and con-
fpctionery buaineaa.
ALBERTA TRADE NOTES
\V. S. KeeleY is reported to have succeeded E. Richards &
Son, as grocer at Banff.
The Marlborough Confectionery at Calgary Is reported to
have changed ownership.
W S. Keeley ia b ing succeeded by Henry Langston at
dart-ahold, as grocer.
The Just Kite Grocery haa changed ownership In Edmonton.
iv a. Wadlelght ia reported to have bought the general
itoro ot L. 0. Crockett, at Mayerthorpe.
Mrs. (has. Robh. Calgary, has purchased the grocery business of the North Star.
The assets of the Syndicate Grocery, Edmonton, sre adr
unised for sale.
li is n ported that Kmll Wankel has retired Trom the Weot-
.in Hardware Scona Ltd., In Edmonton.
i . Woodward to. Ltd., are operating a department store
at  K.lnionton,
M. L.vlson. general store, Calgary, haa assign d.
Mrs Nell Little, Calgary, haa sold out her grocery store.
The assets of Cheapllde, Ltd., general store tn Edmonton,
hnve I"' » Mid
The assets of Mitchell Hardware Co Lid., Medicine Hat,
have be-ti transferred to Marshall Wells Co. Ltd., Winnipeg.
t\ c M T. A Ltd., appointed Interim recdver or Emll
Dubas, general store. Railway Centre.
The general store or John D. Kavanagh, Spring Like, sustained (Ire loss recently.
BUSINESS CHANOES-A CORRECTION
In the S ptember Issue or this publication s note was lu*
•tTtod to the effect that one, 0. 0. Grankhamel, tailor, or
Klmberley. WI,S t'sported lo have rettretl from business. A
rommun|(,1iloii from this gent I "man assures us that such la
n„, ,*„, cnao, and we mueh regret publishing this Incorrect
report
MtUWi4«M)«mW» 34
THK    |{ ETA I LER
UlllTlHIl COLUMBIA-AI.HKUT \   VCKoN
Oct,
hip*
CANn\DAMADE WOOLLEN AMD KNIT 000D8
Hy DOUGLAS HAM-AM
Secretary, Canadian Woollen and Knit  Hoods
Manufacturers' Association.
Kvery couniry manufacturing textiles from -wool
must produce a wide range of qualities to serve nil
purposes and meet all priees. The wool textile Industry in Canada is no exception to this rule. Woollen
goods ore produced in Canada equal in quality for the
various purposes to be served lo those Imported from
any other country in Ihe world.
ll is unfortunate that the word "imported" has
been uaed for yearn in Canada by retailers to mean
"of line quality," and used indiscriminately for both
Canadian made and imported cloth. Because " import
ed" docs not mean "tine quality." Actually there la
more shoddy eloth and poor grade eloth imported into
Canada lhan Ihe fine qualities of cloth. In 1025 the
average value of a yard of tweed imported into Can*
ada from flreat Britain was 91e per yard, and the average value of n vard of worsted or serge so imported
wns $1.29.
Paying for Excluaiveneaa.
There is a comparatively small quantity of high
priced eloth imported into Canada, hut the coal of tlas-**
cloth is not due to the wool used, (hi* weaving, or the
finishing, il is due to the "fashion value." These -specialty cloths are produced in small mills in small quantities and are distributed throughout the world go that
nol more than one or two auit lengths are to be found
in each eity. In paying for this cloth it is the "ax«
elusiveness' which is being paid for. Such eloth eould
be produced in Canada, but owing to the small market,
not an n commercial basis.
Just aa Oood in Canada.
It is making a conservative statement to say thai
90 per cent, of the imported woven and knitted goods
eonstimed in Canada could be produced of an equal
or heller quality in Canada and al reasonable prleea
There are no climatic, physical or technical reasons
why till classes of textiles should not he produced in
Canada. Those who talk of unfavorable spinning atmosphere, unsuitable water, ami lhe mysterious ability
for textile work possessed by people in other countries,
but nol by Canadians, are living iu the past.
In thia connection it is interesting to see what n disinterested authority. Mr. Alfred A. Barker, Professor
of Textile Industries in Leeds University, Kngland.
who mode a tour of inspection through the mills in
Canada and the Cnited Stales in 1919, said in his report:
"Upon the whole, the Canadian wool mill* come
up to thc lies! Yorkshire mills—some few Yorkshire
mills are better, many are very much worse.
"Quite n considerable purl of Canada is so fortunate in climatic conditions that even in spinning and
weaving no special arrangements, other than those
made iu Yorkshire, for example, nre adopted.   Iii facl
there may In- a greater difference between the valleys
and hilltops in Yorkshire, *o fnr as spinning alum*
pherc is concerned, than there i* between many York-
(•shire and Canadian mills "
"Hosiery mills." he says, and he la lining »!« v,.,,!
"hosiery" in its technical sense, whieh covers knitted
underwear, etc, "are iu evidence in every textile -lis
triet of the Dominion, ami the equipment of these mil|n
leaves little  to  Im-  desired     The  hosiery  mills of th.
Cnited States are possibly behind the hosiery m-iiU t.f
Canada   in fact, some of the Canadian hosiery imlU
cannot Im- beaten*"
PA8HI0N H0U8E8 OP THE WORLD DI8CL03E
THE WINTER MODES
At last the mode is set iu this season of pared ixen
Never before haa the sport Influence held sueh iwsj
and yet despite this, clothes were never before no
feminine Then* is marked evideio*. «»f the otll*of '!<>*>r
influence, antl >ct withal tlo hi is marked Kovelij is
more careless than ever before, but this new careless
ncaa in lhai of a sophisticated, w*ll*orroomed women
who feminises every fashion, no matter bow mannish it
may have heen in its inspiration
Cahries play a most Important part in ihe innovations on ihe mode, and although elothes ate designed
/
FALL STYLES IN SILHOUtTTE
Ths titrctd Hurt for afternoon and tvenlng wtnr. F    "<c<*
aomotlmss give the refuires movement.
i    -' i*r'l*"V:t^tflliaQI 1926
THE   BETA I LEE
ItltlTIKll CX5LUMB1A~ALBIBBTA—YUKON
35
SASK.-MAN
All Over the Country
Helps lo lhe Dealer
Attractive cuts for use in
your local advertiaing will
ba sent you FREE on request. Window cards, shop
signs in colora and other
literature. Everything to help
you sell "CEETEE." Ask
us about our dealers' helps.
From Halifax to Vancouver the advantages
ami superiority of "CEETEE" underwear are
broadcasted by means of large size advertisements, to the Imying puhlie. Your customers
read these advertisements in their favorite
paper or magazine. A publicity campaign sueh
as ♦'CEETEE" enjoys plus its well-earned reputation for high quality make a selling combination that can't he beaten.
How's yonr stoek of "CEETEE" just now ?
Made in Canada by
THE C. TURNBULL CO. OF GALT, LTD.
ussm}t*\ABLE mE**\y**m TII K   BETA! LER
liltlTIHII COLUMBIA—ALBBnTA—TUKON
October
\taamg*%**m*M^^
Men
like the Fit,
Wear and
Contort of
ATLANTIC
Wl UNDlft WIAft
THAT OVIft WIAJU
ATLANTIC UNDERWEAR
limited
MONCTON, N.R
B. ML WALSH *% COMPANY
MOMTBIAL Mtal TOmONTO
Snffla|'4|«*aii/WQw*«r.Oa40H*
aaa wttutts Kraauaeet
for winter, silk is an much in evidence tin wool Broadcloth will hold nwiiy nt night, ami lame eomea Into the
daylight. The new broadcloth in of Ktnooth texture,
while lame han taken tm woollen weaves. Combination*
of fabrics whieh prevlouajy were never ihnuirht of are
well everywhere.
Not\fillintamlint*- that this prominen to he tin- innst
eolorful ne a non for many years, blaek in the popular
eolor, both for day and night attire Not only alone,
but in eonibination with white ami with colors does
blaek appear Navy blue holtht a very forceful |h.si
lion in the new offering*.
Among the fur* whieh are lined abundantly, th<
classical fur in lhe novelty, no prevalent an* the new
nkilin, new version* of obi oiien, new eolor* ami in vs
surfaces. It in whinpered thnt the humble eat and the
tcuttKng rabbit are camouflaged «sceedingly
The keynote of fanhiou in divcr-aity, aud never b*
fore were fanhionn more varied.    Hut there i* m> poll-
fusion.   There in always I hat intangible "something"
whieh makes eaeh eonlume dintinetly of this Reason,
j.ml no other Tlo* couturiers ar* ntarehing In ilep,
and order oul «»f tlo- ehaotlc collections icen in August
has   been   their   premier   oeeomplUhment.      Tasti ful
idea* are more important than the eccentric, and lln
blending together of the many fanhiom-.. making n <•>
ordinated mode, shows the present day needs of the
woman «»f fanhiou. and proven that  the mode is the
luteal expreadon of modern life, tittid to the aetlv-
itien, the innie, and personality «f the modern woman
If you want the Best,
Wear"Pride of the West."
MANUFACTURERS
SHIRTS
CANTS
aACKWAWS
OVEIALLS
Water* Repellent Clothing
"RAIN-TTTE"
MAND
Mackay Smith, Blair & Co., Limited
VANCOUVEI, IX
SEND FOR CATALOGUE 9*211
'nn*:   UK
BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEMAND POR MORE ACCURATE ESTIMATES
OF WOOL STATISTICS
Tlu- question of providing mon mpletc and rail.
I,|,. Hlalinlien of world wool production and COlWMmp.
lion in again receiving atten.'ion, and definite sdepa
live been taken, whieh, il in hope!, will in eoume nf
:niii' enable thoae interested to form more accurate
intimates 'ban ban hitherto In en possihlc The 'inter*
national Institute of Agriculture in Home has decided to
n i tempt the tank of collect ing fro mall countries atat*
ixtiea of wool production and consumption.
There nhotild nol be mueh dif.ietilty, given willing.
nesa on the part of those engaged in the srool textile
industry, in collecting niaiisi ea as to t;»- quantity of
^on) produced ami tin- quality actually paused ihrough
machinery. The grvale*t difficulty will !».- in lecur-
ng returns of ihe quantity of raw mete rial ur nf partially or fully manufactured wool mat. rials held in
aloes throughout ihe world It i considered <i--.ii--
nble that nome idea should he given of th*- quantity
of raw wool held in ntoek, and of. say, tops, yarn*, and
j-H.ssilily of piece gooda in the hands of merchants,
Many, however, doubt ihe possibility <»f carrying the
xtalislies no far Mut if only reliable statistics could
Im* given of the wool grown and passed through maehin-
7\ in lhe i-oiirm- of any year the information would
ii. \i-ry un-'ful iu cheeking manipulation of Ihe wool
markel by speculator*    From inch figures general de-
• iuetioun eould be made whieh would prevent tin- r«-
••arreiiee of nucli  a  boom  and  slump aa occurred 111
1923*84 with grave financial losses, mainly to wool
• •iiver* antl thoae engaged iu the processes of manufacture. Thai grave miscalculation was made because it
waa avsumid i lut wool sold at gales hy auction had
gone Into eonsuinption, whereas much of it hsd Iteen
b night lo replaei- stoeks which had been depleted during the war Had there been available statistics showing the quantity of wool poised through machinery
Kiich a grave mincalciilatiou could nol have been made,
<ir if it had it would have been easil) exposed If,
tht-re fore, qullo apart from stoeks, the Institute ol
Vgrieulttire eould gel together more or let* reliable
statistics of the world's annual consumption of wool
•i great service would be rendered tO ?hos.- engag..I iu
(he wool textile Industry.
LOW COTTON PRICR8 UNWARANTED ACCORD
DfO TO STATISTICS
There in nothing in the presenl ttlstbtlieal posllion
of cotton lo juniify the lost point to which Ihe price
of eotton has fallen We arc Informed lhal For th-*
paal live yeam (1988 to 1926) on lhe flrsl of Atirusi
'lure han hern a very close relation between the pros-
peetive supply if eotton ami the price offered for *'"■•
'"ii. As one has gone up lhe other has gone down, nnd
^i«'e versa,'in fair proportion.
Thc prospective nitpply is made up of 11"' amount
•>f eotton carried over from tin previous year on lhe
r""*l Of Augusl plus the eurreu! erop as forecasted by
lhe governmenl crop reporting service. The following
'•gurea nhow the prospective supply in millions ol bales
'Md ihe pri if eotton at the farm on August In for
lhe years ImHcatcd.
T A I L E R
AL.BI3RTA-YOKON
Year-
1922
192.1
1924
1925
I92(i
37
Supply Price
IH" 20.9
14.3 23.8
 ~      18.9 27.8
15.2 28.4
19.2 16.1
The prices quoted arc the average of all sales on
August !.*> for the entire cotton belt and include sll
grades offered. It will be noted that the relation between the prospective supply on August 1 this year
and the average price is only slightly out of line with
that ni l!>24. lu that year the supply was 15 per cent,
below the average, wh.lc the price was 24 per eent.
above. This year the supply is 18 per cent, above the
average and the priee is 28 per cent, below. The lower
priee on August I this year might be accounted for by
the fact that the first cotton offered this year was not
ol the best grades, whereas thc lirst cotton is usually
the best.
In the previous four years, however, on September
15th the priee offered followed thc trend of prospective supply, as is shown by the following figures:
Year— Supply Priee
1922 17.8 20.6
192.3 18.1i 25.6
1924
1925
14.8
15.8
22.2
22.5
This year, on September 1, the Government fore-
fast plus the earryover was down to 18.7, but in September 15 the farm price had fallen to around 15c on
Alabama markets, and that notwithstanding grades
were better than a month previous.
hooking for a reason for this adverse turn in the
mil!ket. the records ol* exports and domestic consumption during August were examined. It was somewhat
surprising to find that instead of a good reason being
FALL 8TLYE8 IN SILHOUETTE
Th. ihort pepium flivw a boufant hip Mat.  The blouieS baek
The mon P e      • ^ uK|VII| htm Mn«. 38
THK   RETAILER
BRITISH COLUMBIA   Al.liKUTA   TUKON
Oetobe
LIGHTHOUSE
BRAND
OVERALLS
tt
Always on the job."
Huskiest fabrics; roomy cut; triple
stitched, rip-proof, pucker-proof seams;
and ample reinforcement at points of
greatest wear, — that's Lighthouse
Brand—the Overall that's as strong as
the man who wears it.
No wonder men who have onee worn
Lighthouse Brand come back for the
second pair.
ROCK ISLAND OVERALL
COMPANY
Rock Island, P.Q.
.-A»-M
\
KtprtMnUtive:
R. A. SIME,
318 Homer Bt.
Vanoouver,
B.C.
I'ouml there it wan found lhat exports plus spinm-is
takings during August, l!»2li, were about Iti prr cent
above (he lant four year average 'Old 41 per cent above
August of ljrj'i    Thin fact should have stimulated thr
priee Instead of depressing it.
MEN 8 WEAR.
Hats.
The big feature of the 1927 summer season is i v
peeled to be the popularity of U»dy hatn. Increased
•populaiily wan predicted for these lints during the past
Season .and this prediction proved true For 1927 hat
men are quite confident lhal lhe popularity nf this.
hatn will l>e greatly Increased, ami this is borne out )>->
early orders that have been received for summer head
wear All over America big preparations are being
made to supply increased quantities of body hats for
192", Toyos, Panamas ami [-cghoms are being pr*.
videtl for on a scale hitherto unheard of
• •    •
Olovts.
Al the present time there is a decided ahortago »>t
first quality jug skin, ami this has h.l to nn effort In
|mpulari/.e other leathers, and it is hcHeved that chain-
ois gloves may again become |»opular as they wen
some few years ago They are. of course, a Ughl eolor*
ed glove ami they can be sold al a substantially lower
figure lhan the pig skins The reindeer glove is a Inn
nu excellent glove; the priee is very close lo that of tin
pig skin, but it is a mOfc dressy glove    It is produ I
in natural colors, and with lhe exception of the dis
tinetive markings on the pig skin it very closely ;ij»
proximatcs the latter in eolor, it also is a splendid
wearing glove
• •     •
Neckwear.
Oold, sliver and bronae green are very mueh in
evidence, and it has been observed that quite a I"' id
red i.s also Used ill the fall linen
Silk and woo) is represented hv a fine range m
new patterns and these are jusi about the only print
ed goods being shown.    Neek wear men report, haw
ever, lhal silk and wools continue to sell just about
an well as ever and thai while new and attractive pit
terns continue to be produced, they expeel that it
will hold its own
lu addition to the nilk ami wool, new pattern* ■'"
shown in the silk and tweed fabric one very lin< line
having what might he termed large over cluck- in
attractive colors    'Jjuilc a number of printed warp*
arc also seen.
• •     •
Underwear.
Wool underwear han not  lhe Style attraeliou nl
neckwear,  nhirln.  hala,  etc.,  but   il   nevertheless  re
spomln   lo   the  stimulus  of   good   window   dlsplav
It in not an cany to trim an inlercnHng undent'
window  an it   in of some   other  merchandise,   bu'
it   in   quite   portnihlc   to   put   ill   displays   lhat   wil
attract a lot of attention.     I'mlerwear lends llacl
to   "topical*   displays;   trims   wherein   SOUIC   *-••".*
in   told   or   some   idea   In   connection   with   ''
underwear   in   told.      Displays   (hat   emphasise   >
fact thai the underwear in pure wool, lhal it Is >
Hhr'.nkable, the warmth it given, that it In of some w< 102
fei
Tn ,<:   RETAILER
BWTISH COLUMBIA   ALBBRTA-YUKON
39
lit
VI
was brand, always attract attention, and the beat
nn- in connection with sueh displays is that they
practically always given full window spa.-,.
Poo frequently fall underwear displays are eon*
! m a small section ot a window or to a few m\f.
u placed among a display of dints    This mtikrs
little Impression    They  do  nut   reginter  with
' iusc who see them and it in not to be wondered at
that such displays do not pull worth-while results. But
merehanta who have been displaying underwear in
this manner make a mistake in assuming that this
merchandise is not worth while giving full space dis-
play. It dues sell when ho displayed and underwear
customers are particularly valuable to have.
Fall Styles and
Vancouver
Vancouver merchants have commenced t.» dress their
windows in the newsl materials for autumn wear, and
fthih it la lo be a season 01 «s»h»r lhe impression one
oi ts irom initial color Influences is that somewhere in
I'aria, ««r wherever they originate eolor schemes that
,ir> always "the latest," there Bit artists who go »»ut
into the folds and gardens and gel their inspiration
(tutu nature's pnint brush
Wallflower Shades
There nre lhe waif lower color*., in Roftcst thick pil-
>.l fabrieSji with warm glowing depths and tin* rich
tones of darkest mahogany with a dint of gold in it;
dull reds thai glow to umber The wallflower colors
that spill like wine beside the paths in April, shade to
richest orange, ami hen- is where thr nasturtium shad*
is begin
IVom these nch, satisfying colorings so warm and
comfortable looking against gray autumn skies, fashion turns to the raisin shades, rich colorings that glean
their names from the raisin after .1 is red within the
clip All the wineUm shades nre shown ill 'I"'*'*
raisin tints., sherry, Bordeaux, burgundy, port and
channel red. which hints at the braised purplish tint of
i rushed berry pulp
New Blue Tints
Blue shades are shown In new tints, departures from
the powder blue of yesterday being the pompadour
hltie, French  blue, Cleopatra and   Aater,  Hie  latter a
leading sell* r
N'ymphia is a semi orchid color
There are no harsh, Irritating colors, and materials
nre thick-piled and rich I Hiking, designed to sel ofl
'heir beautiful colorings
lllaek is a favorite, as always, and velvet will he
worn this winter in combination with flat crepes and
L'curgeltes thai yestcrdav our wore akuie
• •
Metallic Embroidery
Metallic embroidery, bright dashes nf color and un-
•xpeelcd achievements with tiny buttons nre used in
lecvea that are long nnd slashed with color
Itonffaiil frocks of tnfetta for evening wear, with
i-mint ruchingn. rufflings. ribbon bows and slight hoop
'ffoetS at the hip line arc shown for slender women.
•^ilc sophisticated froeks of dlnphonons malena,ia,
nughl at hem or shoulder with a half concealed nowei
•«• intriguing for older women    One gown of layers
'" black chiffon edged with brilliants, it pink gar-
''•na at lhe waist line bring its only trimming.
Irregular Hem Line.
Irregular hem linen on sleeves and moderate rtceol-
'age are features of the formal evening gown,
Fabrics Seen in
Windows
Spanish shawls, brilliant as to color and embroidery will be worn as theatre wraps this winter, under
heavy coats. When the coat is removed the shawl will
he retained, worn loosely around the shoulders.
(oats arc shown in lich dark colorings of thc flower
shades shown in hats and frocks.
The wrappy coats for afternoon wear, deeply collared iu fur. show deep arm holes and a tendency to
blouse at the baek.
'   Top Coat Passes.
Supplanting the top coat of a year ago, are the
mw campus or travelling coats, chiefly of heavy
tweeds ami worsteds, in handsome plaid effects, with
collars and cuffs of fur which make them snug and
warm looking.
As for hats, the newer the hat the higher the
crown. The tarn effect, so becoming because of its irregular draping, shows its influence in the model* fash-
X*XK KXXM>tW<IX)*^^
IT PAYS
To Light Your Store!
People turn from tht alocm of tho Wintry street to tho
cheery lighted interior of a store Just ao motho turn to a
flame. People like to shop in a well lighted ■tore—it looks
proiperoue and up to-date and inviting.
STORE LIGHTING FIXTURES
We shall be glad to advise you on tho purchase of now
lighting fixtures and to assist in rearranging your wiring,
Caeh in on the profit that results from bettor lighting, Just
as toon ae you have tho lights installed.
Call Seymour 5CO0 and wo will bo glad to give you full
details for larger profits through bettor lighting. No obli.
gation, whatever.
xxxx*
i 40
THK    RETAILER
UUITISH rol.l'MIU.V-  AI.HKHTA -YUKON
Oct
Mil.
P
ioncd after the head dresses of African women in jungle villages. These sensational hats are close fitting.
very high, and singularly becoming to those who can
wear them.
WMm*mWmm%m%m**t*J*^^
TfEANETTE
** k PARIS
Paris. October :t. 1026.
"Are the French women so beautifully dressed as
wo have always heard f" So am I asked in no less
lhan three letters in my morning mail.
This public answer is respectfully submitted.
It all depends. Depends on where you sit and
where you look.
On the downtown streets, along Ihe lovely Champs
Klysees. at the races, strolling down the Rue do lo \'iu\,
one sees the most gorgeous feminine things the world
can hold—slim, vivacious things in gracefully short
skirts, high heels on shoes of reptile, brocade, or metal
eloth, nnd earrings ami necklets and anklets of jade
and gold tinkling in the breeze.
Never is one of theae fashion plates without her
boutonuiere of a fresh flower upon her lefl shoulder.
The flower ia wound in gold or silver foil It is generally a fragile petalled orchid; sometimes a cluster of
nasturtiums, gay poppies, or a yellow or pink rose,
In the brilliant boxes of the opera or the Folhcs
llergere one again sees gleaming jewels and white
shoulders wrapped in crmim-trimmed brocaded mantles, worth a fortune.
Hut the French woman, as one sees her iu tin- masses, cannot hold a candle to the other girl and woman
in general.
The proverbial thrift of France garbs her woman
hood in cotton hose while their bank books grow fat
and juiey.
Cotton hose are much more commonly seen than
ailk on trains and on those streets which are not the
recognized fashionable.
Hut low heels never. No matter how cheap the
hose, high heeled shoes are with them- -generally Hut
one sees, too, any number of women slouching about
in plain bedroom slippers of hljic ami red felt, alternating with thc high heels which torture them.
In the cathedrals n modish frock or coat or a gay-
hat is a rarity, ('lothes of black in the form of obi,
shabby, shiny, out-of-date suits blacken the cloisters
Hlsclc is the French woman's color—that of thc
woman of fashion and of the thrifty woman who puts
her husband's money in the bank.
Mourning is worn ot the slightest excuse -for husband'a third cousin's niece, for dog or bird, for step-
niece nnd grandfather's sister-in-law thrice removed.
Thc thrifty French woman goes to market. One
day we rose with the nun to visit a sunrise market.
Here came hundreds of women to get the largest freshest berries, the plumpest peas.
You housewives might bo interested in the prices.
Strawberries as big as plums or small peaches, sold
for about 5 cents a quart, gorgeous blaek and red
cherries, about 8 cents a quart; good roasts of beef
a dime; lettuce, 2 cents ft head; butler. Ill edits n
pound.
4***&t£
STYLE KKOWLEDOE 8PELLS 8UCCE88 POR
THE 8H0E MERCHANT
Tin* style trend of women's footwear compels th.
merchant to stink a wider selection than ever lief oh
and it is hard to pick any om thing that is ou tat a ml
ing.     There seems to be a demand for a Httle ..i
everything, and so many things arc good that 2 h
unsafe to drop any of them
Among tin- -wirious materials that are good nn
seen brown, fawn and blaek galushat, brown and
black alligator; four shades of li/utd. two shades »l
snake, gobbn brown, coco, ivory ami black kid. blaek
satin; velvet, patent ami gold ami silver brocades;
gold ami silver kid; gold ami silver embossed kid
With regard to patterns, there are teen tin* pump
plain  opera,  and  small  tongue,   frequently   with   lh<
d'Oraay cut; high heeled Oxfords, ami one strap-
The Oxfords, which show every evidence ot being
a feature of Fall selling, carry -spike heels Tin* pump**
carry spike heels and junior Spanish, while th*   on.
straps are shown with heels of several varieties, Cuba it
being a strong feature
Bast em houses report a Midden demand for sen
dais, which Sold so freely some years ago without
shanks ami inset strap
It in every day more evident that shoes ar« chosen
that will harmonise with wearing apparel, ami most
patterns will nell if the shoes fit and arc suitable foi
Use with tin* prevailing mode in gowns
Such conditions make  it  difficult   for the  retail
shoe man lo pick a leader, and since he cannot  gel
along  without   variety, a  great  number of patten
must be given a trial before il becomes apparent what
volume will consist in.
It has never been so Importanl that the slim  mm
give particular attention to wearing apparel, ami tin
high style shoe busim ss can be aueccssftlly run with
out  him  being something of an  all round  sty lis*   I'
is  almOSt   impossible   to  veil   the   Well   dressed   WOW
without a knew ledge of the costume she is going '
wear
Thc shoe merehanl must  be ou his toes and kei i
his business in mind all lhe  lime    Whether at  th<
club or golf course, | heal re or social event, he mn
keep Irs eyes and ears open, even more pftrtiflttlnrl.--
so lhan when he is in his slore, if be is lo auceessln
pfay the style game today.
Decorated forepart* ara tho newest fashion notoe in «■*«■
feminine footwear. 1921
,THB    RETAILER
»WTISH COLUMBIA   ALBERTA  -YUKON
41
Guest Sale,a New Stunt for the Shoe Merchant
KltK is something new in ,i *,d. id. a ,\» h*asi
we have never beard of it tH*ing us. d by any
merchant It is called a M-Quest Sale" and
means that the shoe man who um s i< becomes for ma
da\ the host of certain customers at luncheon and af.
-,  noil matinee
This is the working plan Bupixising lhat Tuesday
\m . dull day and that Tuesday morning is especially
p, ..r You want to Increase sales on |hat day and to
induce more buying iu tin* forenoon Suppose, again,
yuii have certain shoes that need a rwmI, hard shove,
Vim do nol want to carry them over for the clearance
s.th
I* you offered them at a reduced prici you would
nn doubt take off about one dollar perhaps more Or
il \..u put I'M on tbem you would tnaki it sl»out fifty
cents .or a dollar This mw plan will meat! lhat you
take n loss of a dollar on your profit, or, invest a dol«
Iai In selling the stickers, or. you bti) n dollar's w >rth
of friendship and good sdll,
Offi r tb<* people In sn sdvertisei ent or in n Bpeclal leller or circular, an invitation to come down town
ivc luneii.
ll
early Tuesday morning, buy n pair < (shi es h
eon with your eompllments and after thnl (fo io ine
n Am*;- at a popul.tr picture ihos <»r vaudeville theatre
It sounds radical nt first do.s !' nott But, think
it our a moment and it begins to grow on you. V'*i
begin t" sci bow it will Attract lh< people's altenlioii
lieeause of its unususl ehsrscter It will offer food,
fr»*e snd a good movie, free    ""i <u will havi mud n lot
hoes that might stick oil Vour
lOSt   !   MiV
!Sines the cost of your Investment in hospitality, lu
lhe end you will have made n loi of ■ < w hi. nds for thi
store as well ns cementing the friendships ol old ens
lomcrs It is a fact thai breaking bread with people
is i line way of getting real clom to their hearts
lb-re is i suggestion for the advi rtiscnu nt, circular,
'•r letter, whichever you decide to use:
QUEST SALE!
Will you have lunch with us and go to the
movie in the afternoon? Be our guest for
Tueadsy at noon and at the matinee
Tuesday is a dull day Then Is not much
doing at bono or In thr stores We want to
liven things up fl lot To do this we nre going
to pul on a very utuisuo) sale from nine n i Iocs
Tuesdav morning to twelve o clock ti ►on
Rvery person who buys •*> v-'y ,,! s'""s 1M
this aale will receive a ticket for n llfl.v edit
luncheon at the So and Co Cafe, and n •""' ''''' '
ticket to the Sound So Thealrc! Absolutely
free of eost and no strings to the Invitation.
You will be OU* guest '
The shoes wc offer RN ns follows   IVserlp
tion ami priceV
(Signature
Be sure to make it plain that these are m»od shoe*.
"•*• and desirable,   Detail the sises nnd widths, 'n.
'loiH, leathers, lasts, beck and all tltejdher
''oil make it plain and understandable
toi the people eome In lo be dlaappo
.-I
•,nii ii
> i ii musl in
\ kIiou!
!;'":;; |*ff^d wither or not they may find shoes
to tn. or to suit. them.
"'•. purchasing a block of tickets at the theatre you
may get a good, liberal reduction, Also the Cafe man
my appreciate the ad, enough to give you a nice cut
111 the price oi the meal tickets.
Is it worth trial? Do not condemn the idea without thinking it over,
You nod not cut thep rice on the shoes—decidedly.
II you have. say. certain lines that have not cleaned
"P* or that seem to be moving slowly, and which you
have he,,, gelling at $10 or $12 mark them at $9.85 or
■tli.90. It may be that you will want to include -several numbers at various prices. Equalize the sales
priees so that you will not be actually cutting deeply.
It should not appeal- to the public that you are actually cutting prices, but simply making a special offer
just to boost the "Ouest Idea."
Would it not be a good plan to clean up some of
those slow moving shoes at once rather than to carry
them on and on hoping to sell them later? Is it not
better to take a small hiss quickly rather than a big one
later I Why not get out of the habit of annual or simi-
anuunl clearance sales?
Th-* public is "Salcd to Death." It is fed up on
special sales and annual events. It has very little
faith In sales any more Do something out of the ordinary.   Stir things up! ("Jet out and be noticed!
The "Oueat" sale idea may prove to be the biggest
cvenl you have evi r pulled off. Think it over and try
it .
1027 SHOE COLORS SELECTED
Seven shoe colors have been selected by the Joint
styles committee for the spring season of 1927. They
will be known by the following names:
Pastel Parchment (pale parchment of a decided
rosy tint),
Stone fa shade of the "Sand" group).
Rore Blush (a biege with decided rose tone).
Shell Grey (a light, char pearl grey, warm in tone)
Stroller Tan (retained from Fall. 1926, card).
Hampstead Brown I retained from Fall. 1926, card)
Spanish Raisin (a dark wine shade, with a mauve
hase).
l! is predicted that rosy tones of beiges nnd greys
will predominate, beige being the more popular of the
two, Neither of these two colors has been used long
enough to outrun its natural style course. A new
tendency is the so-called "Spanish Raisin" shades of
i ,vhid. mauve and dull violet wine tones. For bright-
,.,. )(1|,e, orange and turquoise will be used. Although
nt lent ion will be paid to tho ensemble style idea of
blending of colors .there will probably be a tendency
toward Introducing a mure striking note in small de-
Inils of dress   which will include shoes.
POPULAR WITH VANCOUVER 8H0EMEN.
"Xlnnet-s" the pdlmlar cloth footwear or the Can ad I aa
Oooflorlch Company, Is being favorably commented upon by
Vioicouvrr'a lead-ltR footwear dealers and the local branch
I ,,,„ ponuMuiy. 34H Iloice,. strict, reports >* very satlsfac-
',' ., '.,*,.■ voiitii** for tilts well-known member of thfl "HI-
,',. , m\\* This linn recently placed tlidr 1927 canvas
, Liu-onr for tennli on the market under the family name
;,','■■■/■pr-" which is slso being well received by the trade. THB    RETA ILER
IWITlMl COLUMBlA-AttBiOTA^-TOKON
Octob
i v
aunt
this
»
Rural Reasoning
WHEN the farmer drives into town today it's usually
behind horse power and not horses. You know by
the purr of his six cylinder sedan that here comes a
business man with his eyes open to opportunity. To sell
him paint and varnish is to give him the advantage in a
mutually profitable deal. tJHis farm implements are
ready for winter storage when painted; his barns are
burdened with a valuable harvest that must be safe*
guarded from wind and storm; his home must be kept
snug and warm. Paint saves even the wood he burns—
because a well painted house best holds the heat He
will listen to you when you back your products with
sound reasons to " paint this fall."
SAVE THE SUSrACS CAMPAIGN
•el Kmlir nulkllng    •   •    Minor**.!
Subac-fUMd to bv Pnini. VarnteS
m«i Allied lm.rem 19211
THE    KKTAILKR
IUUTWH IXJU'MUIA    u.HKltT,   TUKON
43
n
HARDWARE, OIL and PAINTS
„,.| pucks   DoeptU thr withdrawal of professions!
»oekey, busines* fn.ni amateur circles hiII Seep sales
While the cool, net, apell bit* Interfered somewhat
trith xi tail bnslncsiin general lines, there hss been good
,i, ,n,i for hoUse*wsnnini equipment, nnd short stocks
„. s,„ i, lines ari- bow replstiished
The growing popularity ot the electric rsngi has oc*
, ,.;),m-tt n demand for kitchen spanning apparatua, snd
Hlxcable mfSss nn< reported in garbs*? bonier*, snd
drum healer*.
ludio bu»iiu*» »* particularly hri*k, and this jour*
m\ pmHctl n rveonl volume ni isles fur the season.
There have been eery torn !>«■«» bsngi s locally, with
i m\ lines M-llinii evenlv. St steady prices All Kail
line* inch is p«i"t* sttd vsrnJshea, smmuniUon, and
hunters' equipment, and iporting goodi are enjoying
brisk retail sab*, and ««rlv enquiries sn nported for
winter sportl equipment, weh as skate-,, hockey slicks
s
I   	
t.. the average . ,
The situation in the iron an.l steel industry is >er)
s.-.sf.eiorv, aud production eontim.es to show I grail-
un! Improvement month by month Th. entire Dominion Is now in line trlth the new sheet ba- and thKen n-
isls M-hedulc adopted by the United States September
I ,„,| ,he trade a, a «hob- an- showing no hostUitj
to tin* measure.
Wholesale houses sre geoersllj pleased with col*
leetlons tnd sre for?etsting buaj months ahead foi tn
retail trade.
ElMtticaludbdioMerch.odu-.-N" price*»tanjj
..   DeDMRd lne»«ln-|, mimlt* begin lo HocK
fall trade.
Copper RivsU sad Bum.-TIn dmij * ■«* ^
ter than during the summer months   meea .
• -hanged.
rUta-Keporu show i wtWl*lory volume of. bus*
incss nnd priees arc linn.
lee SkttOS.~S„|es arc g I and on about same basis
ns at thin lime tnsl year.
i '.    fnirlv  l'ooiI.  In-
Sandpaper   Call for ssndnspcr Is Wriy g
side finishhTg in being followed up by ^^X sre
weather conditions prevent outside wora
well tilled wiihp rieos steady,
Rope.   Sales fair.    Stocks* are  nm#<  for ""'    e*
mand with price?* unchanged
tm o«. tMr-^aii .t ^»£
dealers ready for the demand,   i new
Pym Or.fi*- Sal- •» ^.^UMbA
an cnnlnr weather approaches. ,
Milk 0MB.~O.ll 1. ««o»dy with MoekH well HllcU.
Prices show no ehange.
Field Fence.-Salos arc steady with stocks well
niiiii. ami prices unchanged,
Batteries.—Radio batteries arc in heavy demand at
••"•. moment, .lubbers report that the call has been so
insistent that tiny have been forced to ask for rush
shipments from factories.
Screws.- The screw market is firm with good de-
mand.   Stocks are generally adequate,
Automobile Accessories.~-Orders for fall are com*
ing in at a fair rate,   Prices have been well sustained
in all lines.
Bale Ties.— Demand is steady. Stocks are ample
for the present call, with no change in priee.
Carpet Sweepers.—Demand is even with stocks well
assorted for the trade Priees all steady and mini*
tered,
Coal Hods.—Retail call is still light. Dealers have
tlnir stocks at hand ready to supply the demand.
Prices show no change.
Sash and Cord Market Active.—Sash cord continues in demand in the wholesale market. Prices are reported as lirm.
Lanterns.—Shortening days and longer nights are
finding reflection in a stronger demand for lanterns.
Galvanised Ware.— Condition in this commodity
are considered satisfactory.
Lamps.—1'alls for this item are coming in to local
jobbers.   Prices are steady.
Oarage Sets.—Uarage lets and door holders are
continuing to move well according to local wholesal*
ers,   Prices are firm and stocks generally sufficient.
Snow Shovels.—Advance orders on snow shovels
nre continuing to accumulate in satisfactory volume in
the wholesale market.   Stocks arc snfficent and pricea
firm,
Weatherstrip.— Weatherstrip is among the active
items in the Vancouver market at the present time.
Stocks are sufficient.
Raw snd Boiled Oil.—A decline of three eents is
now rceored on linseed oil.
Steel Sheets.—Oall is steady with no particular demand in any branch of the business. Stocks are well
tilled and priees firm.
Nails.—Demand is steady and fairly good, although
building operations have been delayed by the weather.
Prices are unchanged.
Builders' Hardwire. — While weather conditions
have retarded building to some extent, there is a fair
demand for finishing hardware. 44
TU K   BETA ILER
BRITISH COLUMBIA    .M.HKUTA    YI'KoN
Octobi
Bruises        Sores
Sooth* the lore muscles or ligaments by rubbing in Mmard's Linl*
ment. It penetrates, relieves and
heals. It eases inflammation and
restores the injured part to health.
Splendid   for  cuts  and   sores.    It
stcriliies and heals quicsly.
%v\ AM AIR n«ff mWl JWPIHWJWPl IWPlniff A-P:
I    CHRISTMAS    §
I
s
I
1
I
WRAPPING PAPERS
HELP YOUR 8ALE8
For Samples and Prices Write or Phone
^J Vfax Paper Specialist *J
IOSO HAMILTON  STNCer
VANCOMVIM   •  c
\tvtt (or ComclHl-kl-fd S»I»1 Svx>fc o.*i Wm P*pot Co   lid
Phone Seymour 3112
wtswwimwimwwwtwor.
YOU CAN TELEPHONE
TO KAMLOOPS
NOW!
BRITISH COLUMBIA
TELEPHONE COMPANY
tml'ar*
**Z Tmi
J. A. TEPOORTEN
LIMITED
WHOLESALE DRUGS
PATENT MEDICINES DRUCISTS* SUNDRIES
PHARMACEUTICAL PREPARATIONS
308 Water St.
Vsncouver, B.C.
L
V-TOU should be as careful in buying your hags, as in the selection of
*     the products you sell.    Unless the gooda sold ovrr your counter
reach the home in perfect condition, there is not complete satisfaction lo
your customer.
CONTINENTAL
ATLAS & STAG Kraft Bags
are made of good quality Kraft, tough as leather, full slse, full count, and meet every need sa a ssfo
container. A TRlAL mhL C0NVINCE Y0U,
Manufactured by
The Continental Paper Products
a^a*,* LlMITED
OTTAWA CANADA
Also Manufacturers of
Paper Specialties of every description; Fancy Embossed, Lined Tea and Coffee Bags (7 colors); Ice
Cream Pails and Oyster Pails.
Representatives:
SMITH, DAVIDSON & WRIGHT, LIMITED
VANCOUVER,  VICTORIA,   EDMONTON, CALOARV,
"Using a 'Continental Bag1 it Bag Insurance" 19*.'.
THE   RE
BRITISH COLUlfBIA-
T A I L E R
•ALBERTA •-YI'KON
45
RADIO SITS SHOW OREAT IMPROVEMENT
\\y ISRAEL KLEIN,
.'III!
.'i
sin
dvnl I
!
•lio bas changed in the lael yesr ns much as thu
ttblle lid in tm
lildiug I receiver, Hki- building your own csr is
,iv sltsoft paasc.   Only the amateur snd real
11.the*wool fiuij*   those who lik« to tinker with
Uii'* .iinl Mich    will build fli* it muh sits
r,(? ii doesn't pay,   Nowadays the radio fsn <;m
i.iiv ti receiver of any kind for much |c*g than it would
 t iii buy jujii the part* Tin- time snd trouble in
iiml-lms the wt, and lln* question whether it will work
id'hi-n finished, ntv additional
\.t noi building Isn't nil thai »h retegsted to the
earlier 'lay** «»f radio — sit bough we're "'till in the
i-»rl> ^I'sii''**.
Tin msnufaettired producl it-*<-U W quite g revels*
ii.»n Kvni iho reeelver of I«h? Fall i** sncienl eom<
nan >■ to thai of t«» day,
No Wiring Shown.
Wires sre bainf e-overed up   Even tin tubes, r<m.
clt-iiKer* and Other ajiparalu-H in llo- reccicer an* Mug
arranged snd boxed in shields of copper sltnost as
mueh f<»r api*f-aimtee «** for greater efficiency. The
receiver within U n clean, finlabed product, as oppos*
ed lo ih<* jumbles of wirr Mill in um through tin* eoun*
it)
Outside Ihs set, leading in th«* batteries, the charg-
er, tin* serial nnd the ground win •» msde a mess <»f s
p-reiiv living room eoroer.   They still do to-day lu
* • " a *
many homes   lint that's passing also
I tut trad we're eondng lo loop receivers, eliminating
th- unsightly outside aerial snd ground connections
Man) loop ssti ar»» coming oul this Pall, sets ranging
from si\ io right nml nine Itibes, much more "powerful
an<l effective than ever
One Line to Batteries
Tin unsightly Ktnrn^-i* battery snd dry bsltcries too,
an cither inking boxed Into eowpsct snd attractive
form, «>r <ir«» being eliminated Onl) one trunk line,
!>"v**, is r.quired io lend from the receiver to the •><>*.
that holds charger, A battery snd B battery all In
one,   Ami there** another line from th-s bos to the
electric lighl plug,    Thai's all
Bven here, elimination of one of these iwo lines is
Mug sought in the design of a receiver getting its A
ONE GROCER SAYS-
<>«,. ototor who *•» irouw.**! with coosiIpstion
ssd -.loroiich xnsubbt tor*    "ll«»»n* s iwcry More,
a eustomsr mid m.< ot H>-« help b** not rrora ssuns
nettchmsao-S ITssst, >*■ * w* " *nd (,M'1 wr
recotomsod H io nit"—A V, Cotltas
ttecommsad n to >»ur customers too U will «*»
'"•in hiHilthy better easterners Ami eslling aiuo
for their supply of renal will til**' m sb opponunu)
10 Ml oilier urocr-rlfn too.
FLEISCHMANN'S YEAST
The Fleiichmann Company
SERVICE
and 11 battery power direct from the electric light line.
This immense improvement has not been perfected.
The set itself, when finished, is an attractive piece
of furniture, far superior to the ugly-disled apparatus
that ih now on the decline. Leading cabinet makers
are making the boxes and consoles for the receivers,
so that tiny may he kept on a par with other furni*
tun- in a room.
That is only for appearance's sake, Besides, there
are many innovations to make the set foolproof and
dialer to operate — one dial control, freedom from
squeals and howls, greater selectivity even at thc low
wavelengths, elimination of tube nnd other noises,
greater volume with less distortion of sound.
Altogether, tho modern receiver, although far from
perfect, is a decided improvement over that produced
only a year ago.
Still the Best
We are keeping abreast of the times. Our
products are made to meet existing require*
ments and just a little above thc regular standard of quality.
This explains why our well-known
KEYSTONE BRAND
I'Aetvise Hooks. Scribblers, Note Hooks, etc.,
are enjoying the contidence of the trade and
the patronage of the students.
Keep plenty on your shelves.   They will be
asked tor.
Made by
Snitli, Davidson a Wright, Ui
MANUFACTURERS AND WHOLESALE
PAPER DEALERS
VANCOUVER VICTORIA
Counter Check Books
BEST QUALITY-
RIOHT PRICES-
QUICK SERVICE.
Let Us Quote on Your Next Order
B.C. Sales Book Co., Ltd.
1150 Hamilton Street Vancouver, B.C.
Phont Seymour 1244 46
Um WESTERN GLASS
For SERVICE
YOU CAN GET IT
PHONE 8EY. SSS7
or wrltt to
ISS Cordova St. Woot. Vancouver
For POLISHED PLATE CLASS
MIRRORS   It    WINDOW OLASS
Western Glass
Co*! Ltd*
B. C. Dittributoro of
Motors. T. H. Proooor 4 Sent Ltd.
London.
Manufacturers  of   Pressors'  Colo-
bratod Lino of TENNIS and
CRICKET Supplies.
Associated Agencies
LTD.
78  Areado   Bldg.. Vancouver.
Phono: Sey. 131
Fancy Silk Hose for Man at
tba "Right Pries."
Write for samples.
R. A. SIME, B.C. Distributer
TNI BLACK MAMUPACTVRNM CO.
31S Homer St.      Vancouver, B.C.
433 RICHARDS ST, VANCOUVER
Distributors for:
Fairy Dyes Ltd (Fairy Dye)
Harry Peck 4 Co. Ltd
(Moat Pastss)
Crestona Ltd (Lemon Curd)
Plaietows 4 Co ....(Confectionery)
O'Pee-Chss 4 Co.
(Popcorn 4 Wlntees)
Robert Watson ....(Confectionery)
National Chicle Co. (Count linos)
Hunts Ltd (Funny Faces)
Martha Jane Products  (tars)
Nicholsons Ltd.
(Blusing and Polishes)
Phons Ssy. 7121
VANCOUVER
T. D. STARK
F. W. STERLINO
Telephone
Soy. IIM
8TA1K * STEELING
MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS
1043 Hamilton Street
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Scales, Sllcere, Cutters and Cabin*
sta—New, Rebuilt and Second Hand.
Cash oe Terms.
THE SCALE SHOP LTD.
Ssy. tStl
SIS Cordova St W„ faelng Homer.
THK    RKTAILER
liltlTIKII tX1Ll*MIMA-AI.HHUTA~Yi;KON
0.-I..L
Phono:  High.
IDEAL CONE COMPANY
Manufacturer of
ICE CREAM CONES
Purest Made     Cost Leee
33ft PRINCESS AVE.
Vancouver.
Addressing
Mailing  Lists Multlgrsphlng
DIRECT MAIL CAMPAIGNS
Handled Efficiently
Wri-glay Dimtrlu, LM.
ISS Hastings W. Soy. 1008
SERVICE   TO  OUT   OF  TOWN
SUBSCRIBERS.
"Tho Retailor" will bo pleased to
furnish subscribers the names and
sddresses >f representatives or
agents of Eastern manufacturers in
Vancouver. Wo will also advise
where the r commodities can be
purchased.
Manufacturers9 Agents
(Vsncouvsr, unless otherwise stated).
(Insertions under this heading are
charged at the rate of 11.20 a line,
for sli months, payable In advance).
DRVOOOOS
Atlantic Underwear Ltd.. Monclon.
N.II.-B. II Welch 4 Co Lid. 318
Homer Street.   Rey. 8587.
The Illack Mfg. Co, Seattle.~R. A.
Slme, 318 Homer Street.   Bey. 1513
rhlpman-llolton Knitting Co. Ltd..
Hamilton. Ont -K. II. Walsh 4 Co.
Ltd., 318 Homer Street.   Sty   8587.
The Ualt Knitting Co Ltd. Oall.
Ont.-J. J. MacKay. 804 flower Dldg.
Sey. 3081.
Monarch Knitting Co. Lid.. 318
Homer Street—S. D. Rtewart 4 Co.
Ltd.   Phone Sey, 7525.
Penmans Ltd.. Paris. Ont—J. J.
Thompson. 815 Hsstlngs Wsst. Soy.
7377.
Rock Island Overall Co.. Rock Is-
land*. Que.—R. A. Slme. 318 Homer St.
C. Turnbull Co. Ltd., Gslt. Ont.—
S. I). Btewsrt A Co. Ltd.. 811 Homer
fli reel.   Sey. 7525.
GROCERIES.
Borden Milk Co. Ud. — Montreal
Q0».—Local Office. 333 Water s ,.
Hey. SS23.   J. W. Nunn. Manage
Canada Colors and ChemUtali Lid,
Toronto—Stark A Sterling, 140| Htn
llton Street.   Sey. SI35.
Canada Starch Co. Ltd. Mosiretj
-E. H. Rowntree, 207 HaiUtiK* \\
Sey   58.
Canadian Postum Cereal Co Ud.
Tororto MrNeety's Ltd., 738 Hill
Ings West.   Sey   9337.
W. Clark Lid.. Montreal. Qat.~C
P. Stark. 423 Hamilton St.   Soy, :* v
K. W. Olllell Mfg. Co. \jtl I
MrFarlane. &O0 lleaily St   ge>   UM
i fiutnn Co oi • m.m\* Ltd., Loi Ioi
Out -L P. Mason A to. M» Hssi
Ings WOOX    Sey   2»08,
Uke of the Wood** Milling I 0   !.*!
— 1300 Richards Sireet.     Se)   M3I
W   II   VAtry. Jr.  manag-r
Canada Meruit Co. Lid. Loodoi
Ont. Ia*€o\ office. I ISO Hamll :. Bt
Sey   3113    C   II   Kenny. Man«g-
1'almolhe Company ol Canada Lid
Toronto, Ont <*-*DOSS Armitronit   1131
Urch Street    llay   teiL
The Quaker Oal* Compan) - '< *\
office, &2i. &|0 Hastings West < tt
Thompeon. Sales Manager.
Itowntree A Co (Canada) Ll -'■    I w
onto.     W. R. Ileal!) A Co   Ltd
Howe BtfSOJt Vancouver.
STORE  EQUIPMENT 4 SUPPUFS
liariram  Paper Products CO    !•'*'
1280   Homer   Street -"Norfolk   I'M*'
Co, Ltd. 131 Water Sireet.   Se)   IIM
and 78<l
Canadian Toledo Scales "o   Ltd
Windsor. Ont   -K   S.  Chamber*.  Wl
Smylhe Street    Sey. 3811.
Continental   Paper   Product ■•>   I"
otiawa.    Onl.-Umlth.   Dsvldton   *
Wright    Sey   8&S5
Ueo. McRae. - Waied Paper      !
rounter Sales llooks.   1069 Ham
SI reel    Sey. 3112.
Internallonal    Husiness    Marin
Co. Lid. Toronlo—Local office   "s
Seymour SI.   Sey. 283.
J. C. Wilson, Lid. Lachute. Que
Ucal office, 1080 Homer St >•
781.    W. T. Rao. Manager
SPORTINO OOODI.
Prosser, T. H A Sons Ltd., !^"'
Una—Associated  Agencies   S-•> GETTING CLOSE TO
YOUR CUSTOMERS/
l«UBWK
fl
flrtoftttk   ol*r*tt   i*
Keilatft   ******   **•*'•
noiwi  marttl*  ****pt"
The Kellogg Company is doing much to establish a
bond of friendship and goodwill between dealers in breakfast foods and their customers, that results in sales, not only
for Kellogg's cereals but for other staples as well.
Right now daily papers, weekly papers and magazines are
telling your customers of the wonderful properties of
Kellogg's All-Bran
Lidding physicians and dietitians, in all parts of the
world, arc recommending Kellogg's ALL-BRAN as the
most effective relief for constipation.
Thc public ure learning to help themselves to health with
Kellogg's products. Vou will add many permanent customers by displaying ALL-BRAN prominently, and suggesting lhat ihey lake home a package and use it along with their
other cereals.
i&tbft*
ALL-BRAN
KBLLOCG COMPANY OF CANADA. LIMITED, LONDON, CANADA
vhi ^s^******-***"^
Swiff $ "BROOKFIELD" Brand Pim Poi* Sausage
.     _ M „„.rinnkinff a mnd opportunity to boost
A. a Dealer, you are overlooking; a-gjd jggpS^nf
your 8al«and profitsttjtataff *j*gJ» Brand wpre.
Brand Pure Pork *«*■#*"£■ JJL obtainable-easily
aenta a Pork Sauaage of ***W* «uamy
prepared  Delicious and satisfying.
SWIlV CANADIAN COMPANY LIMITED High-GradeSilk
Lisle Hosiery,
Vith Stead
Profitable Safes
"OILKOLINE" is a line of
^ high-grade, moderate-
priced silk lisle hosiery for
women which brings steady,
profitable sales year after year
to many dealers who know its
desirable features.
Here are some of its features
buyers especially appreciate:
It retains its lustre and softness throughout repeated
washings. It is knitted with
high spliced heel and double
sole, reinforced at heel and
toes. It is made in black, white
and popular colors.
Order "Silkoline" now—from
your wholesaler.
Chipman-Holton Knitting Co., Ltd*
•Hamilton, Ont.
Mills st Hsmilton snd Well and
"Silkoline" half host for men it matU
of the tame material* and me*t* with
popular approval.  Stoek a select ion.
rami

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcret.1-0344902/manifest

Comment

Related Items