BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

Annual Fall Number Retailer Sep 30, 1926

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcret-1.0344901.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcret-1.0344901.json
JSON-LD: bcret-1.0344901-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcret-1.0344901-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcret-1.0344901-rdf.json
Turtle: bcret-1.0344901-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcret-1.0344901-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcret-1.0344901-source.json
Full Text
bcret-1.0344901-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcret-1.0344901.ris

Full Text

Array ANNUAL FALL NUMBER
BRITISH COLUMBIA, ALBERTA, YUKON
VOL. XIX. N* 1
VANCOUVER, B.C.
SEPTEMBER, 1926
What link** your lUHtoni'-i lo ><>u
Rverj sale is mide up ol hm*» ""'
customer's nMI lhe presence In yonr
.tuck or ihf articles leiju reil a price
lhal represents ihrlfi -prompi, cour-
leoui lervlW neal packages  qualit)
ami. moil im pottum. unquesllonnoie
measurement ol qusntlti
Vour sen 11
Mhii'h determines how
l»*lll       pis  " SS  .       "  4
much your customer **"*• >" *"'
itronaeftl link oi tht weakest* linK~
Recording to public knowledge o aim
confidence In <!>• secursc) ol ita
measurement
Strongest
w//w Chain
K,»-r> wlu-re. sniles having a national reputatlorl are today In demand,
Toled» Scales are known and ae-
cepiod everywhere as automatically
g\vlng honest weight. They are built
om the pendulum counterbalance prim
clple — no springs — automatically
weighing the purchase and computing
Ihe amount of the sale ami, further,
equipped with a patent-fed device to
prevent mistakes in reading."
Protect your profit and goodwill by
Using accurate weighing equipment.
Write us .or call our local office for
interesting information ou the most
important and most frequent trim Snellen that takes place In your store,
rANADIAN TOLEDO SCALE CO.. LIMITED. Wmdeor, Ont
CAN       *" ™m7^oi Aulolt'e smlm for Every tm***.
uS     ****** -rtjjg I*********** DomlnlOB*
10c per copy; $100 per year
Nineteenth Year. PAPER BAGS
Papa*' Mills:
Lachuts 4 St. Jtrsmt.
Que.
Manufacturers since 1870
Popularity antl goodwill is increased by a standard of
excellence in store service detail. Strong and good-
looking paper bags assist this merchandising principle
"STANDARD"   "MANILLA"
"BUCKSKIN"    "UGHT KRAFT'
"HEAVY KRAFT"
"Built for Strength antl Appearance—A I.WANS"
J. C. WILSON, LIMITED
Maa-afa-eturora of
PAPER BAGS      WRAPPDfO, TUSUI AND TOILET PAPER1
for   WbolaMlen and BoUflan.
1068 HOMER STREET, VANOOUVER. B C
Phone: Sejmonr 781
The same price
at every store in
our British
Columbia
Territory.
5
BIG BARS
FOR
25c
PROTECT YOUR PROFITS BY
SELLING A MAINTAINED PRICE
LAUNDRY SOAP
THE ROYAL CROWN SOAPS, LTD.
VANCOUVER, B. C. 1926
THE   RETiILER
mtlTIMH COLUMBIA-ALBEJRTA-YUKON
The Standard of Quality
I
T is the steady demand for this popular
Syrup that appeals to every Dealer.
The delicious flavour combined with its
remarkably high nutritive value makes it
the favorite Corn Syrup in so many homes.
Keep satisfied Customers with
EDWARDSBURG
CROWN BRAND
CORN SYRUP
%* CANADA STARCH CO., LIMITED
MONTREAL THE    BETA ILER
MUTISM OIl.tMIUA-.M.HKUTA-YUKON
Sept
Pill |c»f
THE BARNES SCALE
Some
B.C. Users
J. P. HOBSON
CRTS. SLATER
FRIZZELL 8 LTD.
RUPERT TABLE SUPPLY
SPENCER 8
W. DREW
A. FRAZIER
TRAIL MERCANTILE
JACKSON BR08
WM. OOLDER
KIRKHAM 8
B. & K. Grocery
C. B. MAINS
SMITH & ST0KE8
And
What They Say
"Cleanest
Pine
Sattff acton
"Beat; Ever
"No Trouble
•0   K
"Satiifled
We Like Them
There is Nothing Better
"All Right
"Oood."
Want More
"I'm Satisfied
"The Only 8cale
Wo have a lot of Used 8oales like illustration below taken in exchange and re built   Ouaranteed to be
aa good aa they ever were for weighing, and all look good.   Will clear at a cheap price.
I
The Scale
365 CORDOVA STREET WE8T
sa-rJti
Shop, Ltd.
VANOOUVER, B.C
Phono Seymour 2881 192*1
THK    RETA ILER
BRITISH COLUMBIA   Al.llKKiA    YI*K«»N
5
IN DEMAND
JANUARY l« DECEMBER
WAXWRAPPC0
Quaker
w
CornFlakes
The Qnker OeTo Co»puy
enteaeeouen   saaMreoN
m
**.
Twelve months ol the year you can
sell Quaker Corn Flakes- the corn
flakes with the unequalled flavor.
There is nothing more substantial in
cereal history than the rise to fame of
Quaker Corn Flakes. Their quality
and flavor have established them
solidly in the public taste.
You have only to display them to
maintain their good sales record the
year through.
Quaker
Corn Flakes
Toasted and wax wrapped to preserve
their guaranteed flavor.
(See the guarantee seal on every package)
'TKe Quaker Qats (]ompany
SASKATOON
PETERBOROUGH 6
til M    It KTA I LER
imiTISH COLUMBIA    ALBBItTA    YUKON
S*'pti'ii*li**i<
x^^j*
COFFEE
Saves you time when customers ask for "Freeh Roasted
Coffee." That's exactly what Nabob is. The vacuum tin
keeps the flavor in—you sell H "fresh from the roaster.
Kelly Douglas & Co. Ltd.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
NABOB
ttlt HUANh
"r"T7:
I
Dt  U( i a*. *(*
•AN( OU •• I p "
WILSON BROTHERS
Established 1890
Our Motto is "SERVICE"
We cannot offer to sell you goods cheaper than any other firm is in a position to do, but we CAN
five actual facta to prove that it is
ECONOMY
„   to deal with us
SSf£.;°" WILSON BROTHERS, VICTORIA, B. C.
Wholesale Grocers
SHAMROCK RRAND
HAM, BACON, BUTTER, LARD, SAUSAGE, etc.
First Quality packing house products put up by V, Burns A Co.,
Limited, which means they are the highest grade, slwsys reliable,
snd without equal on this market.
YOU CAN RECOMMEND SHAMROCK BRAND.
P. Burns & Company, Limited
VANOOUVER
OALOA1V
EDMONTON
tjsssssssssssssm 1926
Til K    R ET A I LER
HKITIBII  COLUMBIA    Al.llKltTA -YUKON
ROGERS'
GOLDEN SYRUP
The End of a Perfect Day"
111* from finest flavoured eane sugar, a speeia. grade of whieh is imported
for the purpose.
IM up in all sizes of packages to suit your customers' requirements.
fin packages designed to beautify your store.
104b. tins, 6 to a case.
201b. tins, 3 to a caae.
2.1b. Una, 24 to a case.
Mb. tins, 12 to a case
Perfect Seal jars, 12 to a case.
The British Columbia Sugar Refining Go. Ltd.
VANOOUVER, B.C. *
THK    ft ETAILER
nmriSH IXiLimWA    VLBKRTA   YHKON
Sent*
■n-r
Selected for Flavor from
the choice of B.C.'s Bountiful Crop
Fall days are busy daya (or all concerned.    Your customer
will appreciate the suggestion,  How good our linea are!
QUAKER
DH| BRAND  CANNED    |^HHH
Fruits and Vegetables
You can build steady customer* with Quaker Brand.
DOMINION CANNERS B.C. LIMITED      .      *      VANCOUVER
f      m. —*—*i
*****
fi
€      "*SKi^S :«.* IW*^;^; st, j**** JE,, ^-p.
«■***• mwrn        _  mda^mm*m ■ -»"■*""■■— ———
A Best Seller
Grocer*! Here's a combination hard to
beat. The lowest priced Sardines on the
market with the highest rate of turnover.
The big margin on Brunswick Brand will
add to your profits.
The demand is there.    Can you meet it I
'Conns*4'@
BRUNSWICK
BRAND
SARDINES
Pocked by
CONNORS BROS. LIMITED, Black'a Harbour, N.B Mi
8ft
TH K    BETA ILER
HIUTIsll COLUMBIA* ALBERTA—YUKON
Retailer ^
With which la Incorporated tha B  C. TRADE REVIEW.
9
Published Monthly.
NINETEENTH YEAR
OFFICIAL ORGAN OF B.C. BOARD
RETAIL MERCHANTS'
ASSOCIATION OF CANADA.
GENERAL MBRCHANDISE
0R0CERIE8. DRYGOODS.
HARDWARE. FOOTWEAR.
* 	
A MONTHLY -JOURNAL published in the interest of Retail Merchandising end the Development of Commerce in Western Canada.
SUBSCRIPTION RATE: On« Dollar Per Year, payable in advance.
Advertising Rates on Application.
Publishers: -PROGRESS PUBLISHING CO. LTO.
Suits 101-2 Merchants' Exchange Building
VANCOUVER. B. C.
Telephone Sey 3181 Cable Address-Shipping—All Codes
Editor. J 8. Morrison W. N. Code. Business Manager
Entered at Ottawa as Second class matter
The following raprasant R. M. A. Branchaa
In tha Province of Britiah Columbia:—
Armstrong H. S. Armstrong,
Sec.-Treas.
Cranbrook C. J. Lewis, Sec.
Fernle   Norman Suddaby,
Pres.
Kamloops A. C. Taylor, Pres.
Kelowna Andrew Fraser, Sec.
Lytton B. Rebagllati, Sec.
Nanaimo N. Wright, Sec.
I Nelson E. F. Gigot ,8ec.
New Westminster	
and Fraser Valley...D. Stuart, Sec.
Revelstoke W. A. Sturdy, Sec.
Vancouver W. F. Ing, Sec.
SEPTEMBER, 1926
VOL XIX. No, 1
The Turnover, or Gross Income Tax
1 11C     * W* "v T **   S PropoMd Hew M*JMure».
PrcvineU. Oov.mm.nt m******* Attitude ef Taxpayer. » **»* to Prepo
rre . ,_..■.. .ut»tnali iii many cases his business is
Taxation i  ot tho* MM*? ***      '    ^,
Ml plMUMOt tn .•nnl.-.ni.lal-. '••■} * *** JjJf"?"K
mm t i king to fulfill ,ll,".;ul  „    , "
Lim eommunity with. more oqu table.form •      •
„„on „,„„ th. IWnal Property lax. » h        '
i„, tho m«M attained therefrom, ll 1  up to
,,„,,!!, to givo tho (|oe.t*on their MM ""        st< „(
l-.v.-r Am Iti taeoptlon, the Mow tatoNr* o
,1,1, pmvin.-, hav, eon.pl.lned bitterly^ I        <*«
Property Tax. and more o«l Mb ha» rt"    '■»? ^
.-.,.,.! tf among .he retail mere-tat-*, bmum wWwt
,,, • regard to th. amount of bu.lne» '* ■;,'',,
.„; tj l.as,.l upon ih, value of ******* "   '   " ,i -
is thu. oaSy mn rt"" l» *"""" ln8,S i   i,"    •
l.ilitv of tho merehanta Iwimm m "', r I- -
ere.it*, for they hav more ao-eal ed prom prop" -
|„ ,h. am *[xmM .toe;» the^™^'*
S...„o merohanU, moroover are i"1 ,     ,„
ar and more oompl.te .took, than oltoj '     . i|v
Ih, same ainnunt of business    A ••"•'■'.     "ss „ ,|,,
.taneo. may quite poadbly do a. m* • <*«■££,
yoar aa n j»wo lor, and ih, no re ml ot I '<
may bo about tho tn , bul the tax.blo v m «
s..»k triad i  »f«H proper ion.  Th mm wt
nppllea a, regard. « meal marKot vo™ ^
or ,, groeary  verm, a h»rdw«™ '»"-,,   „, (or.
of locality enters rtrongly In the argnm       i ^^
ward against the Personal Property!av
in th, rural distriets innst of nOOOMtty*        «     *
"took lhan the .ity  r.hanl. rilW. 0»  »« '^ ,„,
plonWt his slo,k from wholcalc a • , ,
pi ro lorgor poMonal property ItnbtMj on tne
dealer. altli«ui|sh in many cases his business is smaller.
Also, a large volume of business is diverted from legitimate channels owing to thc operation of numerous
small stores mostly operated by foreigners, who from
their methods of merchandising, are not adequately
covered by the Personal Property Tax.
With the intention of meeting the wishes of the
majority, the Minister of Finance has under consideration a form of taxation based upon gross income or
business turnover. This is now being placed before the
public in order that they may express their views, before it is finally put into effect.
The finance Minister has emphasized thc fact that
the net income tax is insufficient to contribute toward
the support of services rendered by the government,
which are primarily of a personal nature. If only net
profits were taxed there would be no revenue when
business wns depressed. Revenue must of necessity
be eertain and constant.
Eqitable Distribution.
**"   •
The proposed Turnover Tax is based solely upon
the volume of business done without any deduction
whatsoever, and is designed to operate as thc base
minimum tax. and accordingly is fixed at a very low
rate, 1/1 Ot li of one per cent, on receipts from all commodities. K of one per cent, on professional fees, and
brokers' commissions, and Vi of one per cent, on transportation, towing and cartage business. The minimum
lax is placed at $1.00 per month, collections to be made
monthly.   There will be no elaborate monthly return 10
THE    HE
BRITISH t'ol.I'MIU \
TAILER
Al.HKItTV    YI'K*>N
Scpti ml),.,.
necessary, merely a declaration "1' gross income, accompanied by a remittance covering the tax. A return
of net income would be required at the end of uaeh
year as at present, ami whatever profit wns shown.
would be subject lo tax on net income, all monthly
payments made, being applied on account.
It is proposed to license every business in tin pro*
vince. large and small, without any charge. Ko business will be permitted to operate without obtaining a
license. Such a regulation is made iti order that every
business would be recorded, and monthly rel urns
checked with such record. It is apparently a question
in the mind of the Minister of Finance as to whether
the returns from such a tax would approximate those
received from the present form ot' taxation. A thorough investigation reveals that those now bearing the
brunt of the Personal Property Tax would l» cuisld*
erably relieved, and if the proposed new tax was ap
plied"only to those subject to the Personal Property
Tax a loss of revenue of some jMIMMNH) would It,- ell*
countered. This deficiency, however, would be made
up because the new form of taxation is devised to <m
brace all those not now paying. No form of taxation
can be devised that will prove entirely equitable, bul
the action on the part of the government appears to
reduce the inequalities to a minimum,
Favourable Factors.
There are many points in favor of the new tax upon
gross income.   The monthly payment is an a mmo-
dation that will relieve the merchant of mueh Jncon
venience. for lie will pay it in the same manner as he
iloes his light or phone bill. The tax will apply to all
alike, those doing the largest business paying the
heaviest tax. If business is poor, the tax is insiuni*
(leant The tax on net income takes eare of any prodigious profits by more prosperous enterprises, and. as
applied both taxes work out well together.
The question of legality has entered into the discus
sion of tin* proposed new form of taxation, as t<> whuth*
er it constitute!" indirect taxation, which is prohibited
An Indirect tax is defined as one, which in ordinary
commercial practice, is Intended lo be passed on null
the taxing powers oi the province are confined t,,, |!t(.;
taxation.    A direct lax, on the other hand is   t|la,
is demanded from the person who it is Intended should
pay it, ami it is very evident that this is the ens, m ||1(
proposed tax A merchant eould hardly pass kucIi q
tax on to his customer, because even if he did $1U0,Q(XJ
annual turnover, the tax would only be #l<si hi\ I it
would b«- Impracticable to distribute this amount over
the thousands Of sabs whieh comprise this f|(NiiMi
Although tlo* principle Involved in applying llu
turnover tax BS the has.- minimum tax is is* u   thue
form of taxation \t already being mu mfutly applied
in Prance, Japan, Phllllplnc Islands and Mexico -and
lias many strong advocates, toil in all these Instances is
treated as a main tax at a rate of dim- per cent or over
The attitude of tl>e retail irude in thi* province Rppejtni
to favor the tax on gross income, aud it is up to the
business eommunity lo decide whether such n las
should replace the presenl Personal Proper!) Tns nnd
advise the Kinaiuv Department of iln- Provincial '•*>•,
•rnment.
Minimum Wage Act
ir
t
i n
Another matter whieh will have an Important
lug upon thr retail trade of ihis province is flu* ei
forcemeat of the Aet already passed, apply ini,*' i
minimum wage for male employees Store elerk** hsvt?
in tin- past he. n persistent Iti urging this measure and
is is right ami proper that the employee should t.
reive adequate emolument from nervfeet rendered The
new regulation when pui into effect will gi\e the male
employee, who has nerved apprenticeship in his purlieu
lar line of endeavor, the right to demand a ••nam
Axed wage, and the importance of this question will be
more clearly brought home to the retail trade when
the wage schedule is  finally decided upon
Identical Problems Exist in Business Interests
of British Columbia and Alberta
8. B. Woods, K.C., of Edmonton, Chief Counsel for the Proince of Alberto in the Freight Rates Cue,
Addresses the Vancouver Rotary Club
Npeiiking ou the identity of business interests existing between this province and Alberta. Mr. Woods, who
for the past twenty years has watched the changes that
have taken place in the economic strata of the west, in
hi* preliminary statement declared that it was not his
intention to even imply that there was. or should be,
any antagonism between the business interests of these
two provinces, but that, on the contrary it was the duty
of every good Canadian to stimulate intercourse and
eommunity spirit between all the provinces of the Dominion, east and west, lie emphasised very sirongly that
there is a special community of outlook existing between British Columbia and Alberta, because of the g.-o
graphical position of these two provinces, ami also by
reason of the opening of the Panama Canal,
The settlement of Canada, the speaker declared,
had proceeded from east to west, ami until the opening
of the Panama Canal practically all settlers' requii
menis were supplied by Kastern manufacturers
With the opening of the canal, however, ami !
Increase in the fabrication of articles in the coast eil
it had become possible to look forward to the Wipp
Into Alberta coming from lhe Wesl rather than fro
the  Knst    thus saving a  haul  of half the distal
through water transport
The speaker emphasi/.ed that lhe main problem co
Heeled with the settlement and development of th- I'
tile lands in Alberta was one of transportation. •
pointed out that so far as the cost of transport a ti<
was concerned certain elements in it such as Wttgi
coal. etc. were not within the control of the btivii
ami Helling public in these two provinces, but that the
was one element that entered into transportation co*
that was well within thfl control of these provinces, ill
ii \ 1926
THE    RE
I'.ltlTISII COLUMBIA
ni
r AIL tt It
.M.IIKUTA- -YUKON
11
nd element was the amount of the eost of transport*
i,,11 that  was represented by  th,. empty ear move*
n't
nt.
Empty Cars Are Costly Luxury.
In computations of railway costs this clement was in-
eluded, Increasing the cost by about to per eent. In
view of tho paramount importance of cheapening transportation by the shortest haul to tidewater to ihe farm*
i is of Alberta, it was clear, said the speaker, that :my
policy, governmental oi- regulative, that conduced towards balancing tonnage between these two provinces
nnd to the equalizing of the load factor on the haul between tlieui wns economically sound and must prevail.
and that the prosperity of these two provinces as well
as .if Canada a« a whole was dependent, lo a large ex-
Inii on this being done.
This balancing of tonnage, which really meant reduction of the empty movement, would unquestionably
be reflected in cheaper freight rates, and any movement looking to this result was not only in the interests of these two provinces, but was to a large extent,
the solution of Canada's railway problem
Mr. Woods pointed *>ut that though this fact might
appear axiomatic, ils truth hail not always been recognised, The cause of ihis was because of the low trans-
e intimntal rates on a very large number of commodities that had and do still prevail between eastern shipping points and the Pacific Coast ports. These low trans-
continental rates bad been the reason of the fear of
the Invasion of the territory properly belonging to
the Alberta distributor by the distributor of tin Coast
cities,
Work Hand in Hand to Cheapen Transport.
The manufacture of a large variety of articles of
commerce in Vancouver and Victoria has gone a long
way to bring about -in identity of interests in this respect. Mr Woods pointed out th*-t tho number and
variety of articles fabricated in Vancouver was really
amazing ami was very mueh larger than was supposed
by Alberta people The evidence recently produced at
the sitting* of the railway board bureau of the Hoard
of Trade had shown that there was 1216,000,000 invest-
eel in manufacturing Industries In Vancouver alone. The
invasion, therefore, of this territory by eastern manufacturers of the same <»r similar iroods because of the
low transcontinental rates was not regarded with the
same amount of favor today by the Investors of this
••$21 fi ,000,000 ns it was twenty years ago, when hardly
anything was produced In Vancouver and everything
thai was worn, eaten or used, except lumber, had to
eome from outside.
The result of this changed attitude on the part of
the business enmmunitv of the Coast cities has been
that we found for the first time Alberta and British
Columbia working hand in hand for the elimination of
the mountain scale between British Columbia and Alberta and the Boat, and for the cheapening of transp .rt
between then' two provinces,
Assembling Plants Coming to Coast.
The speaker stated that he was confident that a
good deal could be done bv Vancouver business men to
Stimulate tho balancing of tonnage between Alberta
»ntl British Columbia bv bringing to ihe attention ol
the trade ami the users in Alberta the facts in conuee-
Hon with the amount and variety of goods fabricated in
Vancouver. He also emphasized that in tho eourse 01
(Continued on page 46)
Windows
tell the World
about your store
ATTRACTIVE DISPLAY8 OF POPULAR
PRODUCT 18 WHAT 8TOP8 THE
PA88ERBY * * * INVITE8 THEM IN
* MAKES CU8TOMER8 * * * USE
PALMOLIVE 8HAVINO CREAM TO
ATTRACT AND INTEREST FREE-
BUYING MEN.
Men haven't ao many -wants at women, but the onee
they have are important. That's why Palmolive
Shaving Cream is so popular.
That's why Palmolive Shaving Cream window dis*
plays are all important to the trade. They're what
ties up with the selling publicity which has put Palm,
olive Shaving Cream over so big.
The magaiines and newspapers your townspeople
read are telling them about Palmolive Shaving
Cream. These advertisements state irresistibly convincing facts • • * then back up each statement
with a free ten-shave tube.
This free offer is standard in all Palmolive Shav-
Ing Cream advertising * * ■*"•* has been for several
years. Yet coupon returns haven't fallen off. That's
•ure sign of continued interest.
Once tried * * * this free trial tube makes a
permanent Palmolive customer for some wide-awake
druggist. The tie up? Palmolive Shaving Cream window dispalys!
Another all-important point ♦ * * lots of men
won't take the trouble to mail a coupon. They go
straight to the nearest store and buy the full aize
tube. They're the men who look • * * perhaps
unconsciously * * * for Palmolive display as
their guide. If there's one in your window the busi*
ness is yours.
ALL DISPLAYS FREE.
All you have to do to secure the latest display*
materail * * * fresh, up-to-date, tieing up with
the current Palmolive Shaving Cream advertising
•   *   •   is write a line and say "send it."
We ship promptly, all charges prepaid. Each dis.
play is compact, economical of space, easily installed.
It's intended to help make your window attractive
as well as attract trade.
And remember ****-* this last item is very important. Pretty windows, bright and cheerful, are
the promise of a bright, cheerful, hospitable store
within.
Featuring one wanted, asked-for specialty Is announcement that you supply popular lines. That's
what's wtntt-d nowadays * * • what people know
about * * * what the manufacturer has told them
is qood.
Every advertisement the manufacturer uses to
popularise his product, promises quality. If such
auality isn't there to make permanent users, he's
throwing money away.   This the public knows.
That's why advertising is your guarantee of a
satisfied loyal trade. 'WRITE TODAY FOR THE
LATEST PALMOLIVE SHAVING CREAM WINDOW
DISPLAY.
IR PALMOLIVE COMPANY OF CANADA,
WINNIPEG
LIMITED
TORONTO
MONTREAL
3232
\ 12
THM    KttTAILER
unman **«»i.t.Mm\ -aukhrta -tukon
Soptetiibej-
!
Chloride of Lime
New Style Waterproof Package
Supplied by all wholesale grocers
In British Columbia
Manufactured by
CANADA COLORS AND CHEMICALS UMITEO
Toronto Winnipeg Vancouver
Agenta:
STARK A STERLING
VANCOUVER, B. C.
A Leading B.C. Product
ROYAL
STANDARD
FLOUR
Known For Dependable
Quality
Milled In Vancouver by
Vancouver Milling and Grain Co.
LIMITED
Head Office and Mills:    VANCOUVEI, B C
mmmaatmsmmwmmmm^mmmm^mmammaammmm^assma^ammmtmmi   i v i
PAPER
BAGS
Light Kraft
AN 100'; B. 0. PRODUCT.
Now that the Highest Grade* of Paper Bagt art being made in B. C.
be careful to always specify the B. 0 Brands.
"WESTERN" .Manilla Quality.
"PACIFIC"-Light Kraft Quality.
"COAST"—Heavy Kraft Quality
"HITONE —White Sulphite Quality.
Manufactured in British Columbia hy
Bartram Paper Products Co. Ltd.
VANCOUVER, B. 0
Heavy Kraft
Light Manila
Sole Agents for British Columbia:
The Norfolk Paper Co., Ltd.
136 WATER STREET VANCOUVER, B. C.
Phone Seymour 7868 and 7869
A
/
Ur*** Oiri**
wntte tuipMu 72b
TIIK    KKTAILKR
MUTISM COLUMBIA   ALBBJRTA-YUKON
13
Grocery Market Report
Vanoouver, Sept. 15, 1926.
The ratal! grocers have enjoyed exceedingly good
business during tin* pact thirty .lavs This applies to
the couniry ami city merehanta alike, Crop conditions
in thc Okanagan and the fraser V alley have done much
to permeate a very pronounced spirit .»i optimism in
these section*. The gnceral increase in population and
t\ period of continued building activity makes for the
same condition in Vancouver asid surrounding towns.
Retailent arc watching with keen interest the success
oi the l\ A. T. A. plan of Price Maintenance, as inaugurated by the Druggist Section, to become effective
on September l»t. as the success of this movement rests
with the retniler* themselves, and it is to he hoped the
druggist will dud the movement work smoothly and
uithout friction. The K. W. (Jillett Co. Ltd.. manu-
faelurers of Itoyal Yen*!. Mimic Baking Powder, etc.
have just inaugurated a set of maintained prices on all
i-i their products    Thc system of handling it is such
that their agreement eanol be broken, If a retailer
wishes to continue to handle their products,
Sugar. Market steady with no immediate changes
in sight.   Local refined remains unchanged at $6.3Q
San f>anclsCO,    Declined 10c on September 14th, but
moved back I he hiiiiic amount the following dny.
Jams.—I'riees are reduced from 50e to 75c per case
on all varieties. This is accounted for by keen competition amongst local manufacturers Market slightly
easier. Local jobbers now qttotlng 13.65 for choice
Kotenashi,
Rye Crisp- The original, now a very popular line,
has been reduced to $3,90 dozen, formerly $4,80.
Soup—New pack Tomato SOUP will be ready early
in October at a low price of $1.26 for Campbells, and
$Ufi forClarks.
Quaker Oats.—The manufacturers are offering for
one month a bonus on live case orders of the China
Premium Package, of 25c case to country merchants,
and 20o per case to eily merchants.
Fruit Jars.-Jars of all kinds and sizes have been
very short fur the past thirty days, seriously curtail*
Ing the home pnek of preserve fruits, and vegetables,
Lack nf interest on the part of retailers in not booking
their supplies early, and the consequent smaller orders
placed With manufacturers by the wholesaler, i* *M
reason for lhe present situation.
Flour. -Down 50c on September 13th account new
wheat.
Salmon--Insufficient supplies have advanced Sock-
eye ami Cohoc grades 50c to $18.50 nnd $19.50 for Sock-
eve, and $14 and $15 for Cohoc, ones and halves respee-
lively.
New California Table Figs arrived September 11th,
"»row. 101b. box, $1.35; 4 row 10 lb. box, $1.45'24/8 oz.
package at $1.90 box.
Honey (New Crop).—Eastern honey will be 1 cent
per lb. higher than last year, and quality not as good.
Nuts.—New lira/.ils are in at 18y2e lb. for large
washed. Shelled walnuts very (inn. Almond shelled
•aider at 54e.
Soap.- Crystal White reduced to $4.95 case.
Canned Peas.—Opening prices on Canned Peas just
named. Choice quality as follows: No. 3 sieve, $1.95;
No. 4. $1.60; No. 5. $1,521/,; and tomatoes 2s, $1.20;
L'-„s, $1.40 to $1.45.
THE TEA MARKET.
Despite the firmness shown nt all leading primary
market points the local tea market is only a narrow
affair at the moment, with distributors inclined to go
slow. Private cables from Amsterdam, Holland, say
that low priced teas there are practically cleaned up
nnd that few, if any, Java pekoes are obtainable. The
strength which has been shown in India, Ceylon, teas in
the primary markets and in London ia based on the
fact that quality is now about nt the senson's height.
This also holds true of Java teas. The activity which
had been witnessed earlier in thc season in Formosa
and green teas has petered out to some extent and there
is now a disposition to anticipate lower prices, especially for greens. The recent weakness of thc franc
has been nn interesting development in connection with
country green teas, since it has resulted in the withdrawal of North African or Mohammedan buyers from
the Shanghai market as the tens cost them twice as
much as ihey did earlier in the year. According to Shanghai advices, the Hussian Government haa shown no
signs of taking its full requirements of China teas and
stoeks are now steadily accumulating. In China blaek
teas it is said that the quality ia considerably above
average with the richest heavy liquoring cup seen in
ten years past, Thc full erop of black teas does not
exceed 80,000 packages, of whieh 43,000 packages have
been settled. Husiness in Hankow teas has only been
on a small scale and stocks are now considerable. It
Is reliably reported that the second erop will be curtailed owing to a blight that has set in and also as a
result of an unusualy dry summer, which is responsible for a shortage in second pickings. 14
THK   BETA ILKfi
llltlTIHII COLUMBIX    AI.HI'UTA    Yt'Kn.N
Septei Ih»
DROP IN 1926 27 SUGAR OUTPUT F0R8EEN
Estimated Decreases for Principal Producing Countries
Is One Million Tons.
A fairly accurate estimate of next season's sugar
production may now be forecast, Harvesling time
for growing beet crops is nt hand, ami they nre rapidly
coming into their full development. The cutting of
thc cane is still about three months off, since grinding
in most of lhe enne growing countries docs not commence until December or January, the only exceptions
being Java, Australia, the Argentine. Natal and Dem-
cram, whieh commence iu May and June; Mauritius in
August, and a few South American countries iu October.
The weather naturally plays quite a prominent part
in crop prospects, but present preliminary estimates
should not be widely influenced by cither sunshine or
rain. European beet crops have suffered from an excess of rains and floods, nnd considerable damage is
reported from Java, Australia aud Mauritius by reason
of drouth. Also the United States bed and Iiousiana
cane estimates show a falling off. as docs that of
Hawaii.
Excellent conditions prevail in Cuba, but the restric
tion by president al decree is still hanging fire, and it
must not be forgotten that prices do not so much depend
upon the figure of total world production, aj on the
exportable supplies available in some individual countries, and the import requirements in others.
The following figures show thc estimated decreases
for 1926-27 in principal sugar producing countries;
Est.mot**
1S2S 27
Europfl (about 5',i  lam.)  7.150.OOD
U.  8,  beei     772.1*0(1
Java    1.800,000
Australia    460,000
MauritlUK      200,000
Hawaii       600.000
■l^rrr^*
1M.1-2*
iNTn*****'
7.47S.2SO
320,000
N0I.429
32,000
2,27K,»00
375.000
522.344
72.0OO
241,220
41,000
•SMS*
I0.OUO
Totals 11.072.000     12,016,449       140,600
Cuba alone could probably wipe out a large portion
of this decrease if permitted to grind fully. The Phil
lipines had an unusually poor season Inst year, and pro.
dueed only 250,000 tons, and it is not unlikely that
100,000 will be added in 1926-27, British Indian and
South American crops will have but little influence up
on world markets.
In round figures the decrease in the world sugar
production for the 1926-27 season, might be placed at
one million tons, cxeludiiig Cuba, and if Cuba curlails
her crop to 4,500,000 ton:, then lhe total reduction
would amount to 1,400,000 tons.
Thc question here arises as to lhe effect of auch a
deficiency on distribution. As will be seen by the figures, thc shortage is mostly in the Far East, Cuba has
gained considerably in that market this yenr, owing to
thc fact that Mauritius sugars were all diverted to the
United Kingdom, by reason of preference, as wns the
Australian exportable surplus.
This will again be the case in 1926*27, and with a
short crop in Java, it is not at all unlikely that the dc
mand from the Orient for Cubes tuny be good next
year, especially as it has been claimed that consumption requirements have increased there. This country
and Europe arc not likely to need less Cuban, but Cuba
GILLEJTS LYE
EATS DIRT
Profit is only profit
after you sell the
merchandise* A
large margin does
not put a dollar in
your pocket if the
goods set on your
shelves until they
are bespecked and
unsalable.
II ai
E    W   GIL-LETT  COMPANY   LIMIT ID
T ( > Mi* ■<N T . . AN *t   A
•^W^-""
A Quality Product!
I
ronizeD
*aam mama mtamam        €km*W
•CM V 1MB
Whole Wheat
FLOUR
A FAIR KIXKI) PROFIT
POR LARGE AND.s.MAI,I,
IS THK POLICY OF
The Dr. Middletm's food Products
Company Limited
Vancouver, B. C. !T'U
Til K    UMTA I LER
UllITIStl COLUMBIA—ALBHRTA   YUKON
15
i ,iin
while.
• lrn\\u> that tO sell to these latter markets at the
" ms priees of the last two years is not worth her
The Cuban producer needs to recuperate, mid unless
coming erop is restricted, sueh recuperation will
retarded.   If Cuba aannoi command a recuperative
',.*,,(■ for her sugar In the world markets, then a great
Li of harm is done to the industry, and the islands
,", Hare, the only remedy for which is an adequate cur.
iniltnenl of production,
SUNLAND" PRODUCT8 HEAVY 8ELLER8 TN
WESTERN CANADA.
A steadily increasing tonnage of Sunland products
into western territory is reported hy ('. .1 Binney,
western manager for the Sunland Sales Assoeiation ni
Canada. The salisfaetory condition of business is attributable lo thc personality and keen Insight into the
requirements ami pns-sihiKties of the western markets
poteteased by Mr. Hiuiu-y. who has reached a high position among the younger business men of the provinee.
C. J. ilm-ey
Pwlm to Uio formation"' th*C nadi«*■«*
ol .hi... tho largest concern of It- kind li Arworld. wu
Hi„„,.v wm osssakswl »il\ll"V:'    1     ffi
waa appointed manager In eharirc ol all term. .
ipp
..I' lhe (In-nl l.aK<'«.
I rode.
The Nectar ratata han a dlftcrei. »PIkw»■»"*J.
ordinary ralai... keeps longer '"■•• ^CaTwA
flavor, raUlnlnR Ita Ml ** «•' " *"** '1,tl\Xm
*u„ u....i i a.lu Aaaodotlon arc ( anadian *w,»*
Bigger sales ahead
mow profit-on misins
ThwSunhtidhas
assured that for you
You know how Sun-Maid Puffed aold
last year—because they were finer
seeded raisins. Expect a bitter de*
mand for them this year, when still
more women will learn about them
through Sun-Maid advertiaing.
And expect more sales of carton
seedless if you have Sun-Maid Nectara. More women will uae thia new
kind with the flavor and fragrance
of fresh grapes- Everyone will know
about them.
IHrect helps
for you
There'a juat one
thing left for you to
do — to reap the
Rrofit from Sun-
laid'a work. Feature Sun-Maid
raisins.
Sunland haa produced a corking
window trim (counter stand, too),
that features the use of these rai-
aina and other
products in salads.
Ask the Sunland
service man to put
these up for you.
And he has other
good ideas that
you can use to Increase your sates.
Maid
*M«   SALES   C00PBRAT1VE   ASIOCIATIO.
,0NLAND   IJIJiW^, thl  mlm
the entire west. 16
TH B    K MTA I LEB
ititnisii COLUMBIA   M.HKUTA   YUKON
•s* }•*« niIhr
mmamm^m
Lake of the Woods
Milling Company
LIMITED
Mtk-mof
FIVE ROSES
• FLOUR •
The World's Best
Daily Capacity 1<S00 Bbls.
B.C. Offioas and Warehouses:
1800 liohards Strttt 1614 Store Strttt
VANOOUVER VICTORIA
CLARK'S
MADI IN CAUAOA
*m 0**t%at tmt OoUai Mmu
A Vancouver Grocer
II) illi*|»lii) ItiK A coill|iie(e Aittwirlllletll ol I'Utk'*' I'f.jufi-.'
Kin nl h si> « I'roinlfO'ijt platt Incresaod the litre*! taSm m
many lln<■-*
CttSlOBIifS <**»» thi< <H*|**1**>. knew from ••\jwrl.in. !im
itimm! MNttf of <'l«rk * l'n'(»arft| K«nmU w*utO lad dtetd-H lo m
OiatrS, t»«» t?»u variotl* othor t»rM« !•« a* well
Kori) five years' eoaUaaoai sdverllstai h»*t mtda »lart'i
Pro pari il Kikm1« an w.-ll known lit tVff) dt), 'o»H .»»■! IninU
In Catada. thai alt that i* n»«M*.«l to Induce rutiono-r* lo bu*.
It o n-thli-.N-r In th«- form ol either * *ton< or win«l«>» •! i| It)
Sad the reputation of Clark'** Prepared KimhI* «lll bring fOS
••»!»«> added **\v*.
W. CLARK Limited, Montreal
f««jhii«hm«oti   at    Montreal.   P. Q    St. Html.   P. Q    *»*
Harrow. Onl.
WHY YOU SHOULD SELL
RowNTRErs Cocoa
"A Taste of OU England99
1.—Became ef lit outstanding quality— Cuetomara
come back for mere.
2.—Becauae ef ita tremend-
oua worldwide sale it
can be aold at POPULAR
PRICES.
3.—Becauae it ia the only
Price Maintained Cocoa
—Rowntree'a Cocoa ia
YOUR Cocoa.
Tin* combination of Qu-ili'.y.
Print and Policy (Priee Maintained) In worthy of you*- full
rapport.
DISPLAY IT PROMINENTLY.
ROWNTREE & C0.(Canada) UMfTED
40 Wellington St. E.
Toronto, Oan.
CO-OPERATION
Thr biiftin of all KiiiMi'Msfiil bu*dn« •*<
is eo-o|H*riilion Co-opt*rat ion in tin
ftlnnt prmluri-H perfection in ijiinlit\ .
ro o|h -ration in w\v« hrinir* bik'lfi
mnl better bintim'**
Shelly's nrt< (striving in ovary possible way to develop yonr 4-X Hah*
If you echopernta l»y rmturinir Ut-s
prodaeta advertised yon will reap
iIh< full iiiMii-iit from ihit Intensive
ami effleienl advertising in instant
ly frioreajlng isles,
Watch Shilly'h advertiaing nnd
<-o o|»cniti- for hiifirrr business,
SHELLY'S LIMITED
A COMPLETE BAKERY SERVICE
VANCOUVER
VICTORIA NORTH VANCOUVER
NANAIMO NEW WESTMINSTER 1026
THE    RETAILER
BRITISH »' tl.I'MBIA- AI.HKKTA— YUKON
17
GROCERY PRICES CURRENT
The following ore prleea quetad for principal linea of leading wholeeale flrme.   Pricea quoted are neceaaarily
aubject to market fluctuationa.
I.  W.  OILLSTT  CO.  LTD.
n.ydi Vtaet—
a doi  pkga
In  *!****
I
'cr «a*e
. 2 30
, |.95
:.»:.
. i SO
•tt>
IS 50
Pun Flake Lye—
» ana, m oseo 	
s  cost*
io 1*.». *  i One* in cane
M«gie  Baking Powger—
4  <>i   4  dot
•; os   ( dox
|  ox   4  dot	
*:  *>r    4  d«» . .
'.'*r   1   I'MMC   lot*.
Mjg-c tods. Cat* No. 1 —
1  -aw  (CO  -It)   par knee ft)
t> ma** or more ...
Di Carbonate of tods—
!IS tt>   keg-*, per keg
400 Tt*. barrel*, per barrel      .    .
Caustic Seta (Granulated)—
)«) lt>   Canlatvr (100 Iba. in Mat)
100 lbs.  Iron drunte
Crtam of Tartar—
*, ib. im™ mm it «>«'« »" ,a,M,)
>i lb |«i|»«r pkga  <' «l»* »n caae)
i, Ib cana with Sore* -»»«« ,4 <,°" ,t0
In  c-aae)   - • J
1 Ib  rana »<r«w covera <3 dOI   >•'
raao    --
^ lb   square canlaters.  4 doi. In
case)      ......-..-
I a lb   wooden <•»•»»
H lb   wooden P*U»
\i*Q Ib   lined k#g»
j«0 lb. lined barrela   ...
Nutmeg, amall, dot  MS
Paprika, unall, doi iss
Pastry Sploe,  3 linn, dox    1.10
Poultry Dreaaittfi Sage, Savory. Thyme,
Tumerlr,   tlnn,   do«    Ml
Pickling Bplea, dox. No. 3  _ „  .95
Mar'arom.   Mint,  Parsley   „  1.16
While Pepper, Una. dox   l.io
Caalor Oil, 2 ox. dox „ 1.36
i "'tutor Oil,  4 ox. dox 2.20
l'|t«<>tii   Knit*,   »4h.   dox    .00
t'nnt Colon, 2 ox. dox 1.T6
Irlngi Chocolate, Hone, Pink, Lemon
Klondyke (wrapped) box of 25   6.10
Klondyke (unwrapped' box of 25  .5,95
Klero Oiycerlne, box of 144  5.76
Linen (unwrapped) box of 100  3.85
Liquid Ammonia, 2 doi. qta. box of 21 4.00
Liquid Blue, 2 doi. qts. box of 21 4.00
Mechanic's Pine Tar, box of 100  5.46
Mechanic's Pine Tar, box of 50  2.75
Olive Castile, cakes, box of 200 4.65
Primrose (wrapped) box ot 25  4.70
Hoyal Crown Lye, box of 48  5.25
ic. Almond, orange) dox.   MS     pendray's Powdered Ammonia, box 24   Lie
.10
J so
S40
. : ss
jj:o
Per lb
..„    56*4
„.   .1*1 ■•
per dox.
... Ui
.... 1 to
Vanila, \vi»
lelly   i'owder.   doi.
Lemnnare  Powder,  dox 2.25
Muatard, i» dox.  8.60
Muatard,   '-j**,  dox 4.50
Muatard, •** dox   „ „..-... 2.40
Muatard.  •* dox.
Sulphur,   '•*,-".  dox	
tea.  Oreen  I-abel,   tyt, per lb 71
Tea.  Oreen   Isabel,   lc per  lb
.1 tb   tlriM	
is, Ib. paekngea 	
1.40
65
Special prices on 5, 10, 25 and 100
boxes.
Pendray's Water Glass, Egg  Preserver-
Cases, 24 tins per case  4.80
10
Hoyal laundry Flakes, 88%, In bbls.
(Special price on contract)
Hoyal Crown Soap 6a 144s	
Hoyal Crown Powder, box 24 only	
Hoyal Crown Powder 1-lb. box of 50
& 19   pacKnava   Hoyal Crown Cleanser, 48 sifter tins .... 8.70
lea. de Luxe   Afternoon. I Ib         85     ^ysj} 0w)Wn Powdwe(! Amm0nla. I lb.   8.81
* mm
5 H>   packages
69
69
Cl
66
5.45
..5.50
4.00
6»
.40
.40
>7
KSLLV. DOUGLAS A O.
Nabob PreOu-cte.
LTO.
Tea de Luxe,  Afternoon %n per lb,
Tea  de Luxe,   »,» per lb	
Vinegar, dox ,   	
P. eUftNt A CO. LTD.
Shamrock Products.
Vyrthire rolled shoulders, per lb
iu.-**-!! Bhamrock, 6-s per lb	
|t.ik.,t Hum, with ilrcmlng, per Ih.
Shamrock Handy Pat*, l u>. cartons
cheese. Canadian, large, per ib..
Cheese. Canadian* twin, per lb
Compound, Carnalloni Ko, -a, 12 «•
Compound, CJarnatlon, No, 3, 30 c
Cooked Ham, Shamrock, iw lb
Dominion  Hum-*.  12-1* llw* ....
.87
.91
2.40
12 cases
ages
S-lo Ibn, per lb.
lb.
Allspice, Ko. 3. Uttt doa  ...
link In* Powder. 48 12 ol-. «!»*•
linking Powder.  12 IV. **<>*•
linking Powder. 6 5s. doi.
linking Soda. «0 to. case
Raking Hoda. 24 Hs( do*	
Itotax,   *o* .  doi   ** -
Mack  Pepper.  Una.  doi
Celery  Halt,  glaaa.  doi.   •■
Nabob Coffee, small tin*.
I'offee.   la  Ib.   ,	
Oof fee.  6s  Nabob lb.
Ouatard  Powder,  doa.
gulck  Taplocn.  doi
Ohocotato   Pudding,   doi
»'hill Powder, amall, doa     £jj
......
eai*b
. 1 00
. 2 66
. 1.30
15.10
. 6 30
. 60
. .76
.. MO
. .»5
.. ss
.    M
.   ci
,.   -90
...    90
..   ,M
160
Dominion Paeon.
Dominion Bacon, 10-12 n>«. per
Dominion ihouldora, boned and rolled
Dripping, beef, 4-Ib. bricks	
iiiimn. Shamrock, per lb	
Heme, boned and rolled, per ih    	
Head Cheeae, 5«lb tine each	
.lellieil  Tongue,   per  lb	
l^nd,  No   5,  12 to cam* 	
Lard, Mo, *t. 10 u* case 	
|<ard, cartona, i>*> Ibe
SO ii>^        „
per
lb
-,'Us,  pel* lb
Imon, 10h and
,M
,50
;>:i
.*!'.♦
MM
.Wa
181-"
.52
.39
.♦»
.42
,28
.14...
.40
.44
.55
2.00
,22-M
,8-J-ri
21
.21
.ISH
10
.40
.»:i
10 Vi
White Wonder, box of 100 5.35
New White Swan Soap, 100 .,.- 5.00
White Swan Naptha, box of 100  4.90
White Swan Washing Powder, box of 24 S.M
THE CANAOA STARCH CO. LTD.
Laundry Starches-
Panada Laundry Starch, 40-lb. box .09
White Gloss. Mb. pkgs.      .9%
Acme Gloss, 1-lb. pkgs — 9%,
No. 1 White, 100-lb. kegs  9*
Kdwurdsburg Silver Gloss, 1-lb. pkgs,
40-lb	
l-'ilwardsburg Silver Gloss 8/6-
fancy  tin  canisters,   48-lbs    .1314
l-'.dwai-dsburg Silver Gloss, 100-lb.
kegs  	
Celluloid Stanh (boxes of 45-pkgs
per   case)   	
.1114
•10V4
4.10
Culinary Starchee—
Benson's Celebrated Prepared Corn
40-lb. boxes, per lb "
Canada Corn Starch 40-lb. boxes, per
lb.
114
Cinnamon, t oi. tins, doi
Cayenne Pepper, 3 tins, <k»i
cloves,  email, doa	
Curry Powdtr. 4 01. g»«»". rto"
Cream of Tartar, 1     -
Cream of Tartar. Hi. Wm
Cream of Tartar •*•	
Olnger, small, doa	
rratracta. \*i oa.. doa, ....«	
Ratracte, t oi. doi	
P.itracta. 4 oe  doa	
Rltractg, I 01. doi ..
Kxtrsets.   II 01   doi	
Mace, amall, dm	
d  ID
lb
.. 14»
.. 200
.. 5 15
... 2 56
.. I so
.. 120
. 8 35
... 171
. on
... » 50
. 17 W
. I.H
Urd, No. 1 cartom,
,1    mix    2Mb.   tltii
Mincemeat,  huh.  *..
MC0t   Lonf.   I"*''   ll'
Pork pies, p*** ««. ,»—•«—;;;Ui
port, roast b*KH wiii> di.HsniK.
gtuoked fl«h, klppen.
Bmokei «•*>». Wpporei
Kta, per lb<
1 .1 i-ihI   80a per
ROYAL CROWN  SOAPS LTD.
price L..I-F.O.B. Vancouver.
or New Westmlniter.
Terme Nett IS O.ye.
Kf,t-noflP H..M-4J^ ^
Challenge Corn Starch 40-lb boxea
per lb	
Onsro Potato Flour 40-lb. boxes, Ib.   .13
914
Maxola Oil—
7.95
Masola  Oil.   Is      ' .
.a a-      *•**
.'.6
2A>
.21
37
Is
4s
Is
.13.60
.12.16
83.51
THE
Vancouver
'Apex"  Soap Phikea, 12  lib.  pkts, dox <.vr
\  l.n l-'ian iilxf Oasllle, box of 25   4,40
Blue   Mottled,  box  of  2» 6.31
- '*'   4.90
III
Crown Oatm
cai. 24 Ch box of 144
Corn Syrups-
Crown 2s, 24 to case  ,_.._
6s, 12 to case  4.11
10s I to caae  I.W
20s, 3 to case  8.11
Lily 2s. 24 to case  $4.01
&s, 12 to case  4.60
10s. I to case  4.10
Karo. 2a 24 to case  S.M
Bs, 18 to case  4.10
10s, 6 to caae  3.70 18
THK    KETA[LER
mtlTIHII OH.PMIIIA--AI.HKKTA    TOKON
Septi
Del Monte
sliced peaches
Continuously advertised!
—constantly increasing in popularity
DBf- MONTR Sliced Peaehea aw beeombR
mors popular every day I
Their widr adaptability of uae their simplicity of serviee give them i disHnetivc place
ihnt in* other product ran till
In addition to thia, wo an* running special
advertisements In Icsdiug rnuadiaii anil t'niii-1
States magaxines lo make them even lienor
known
This consistent KUppoii, coupled with ihr use.
fulness uf ih«* product itself, offers every <h* iter
nn excellent opportunity for m* canned fruit
volume,
Traditional Leaders
EMPRESS
FINE, FULL-FLAVORED
JAMS and
MARMALADES
tltocal Products with a
National Reputation
EMPRESS MFG. CO. LTD
VANOOUVER
I
Peter Rabbit Peanut Butter
Costs No More But Soils Fatter
THC TOV PAIL DELIOHTt THC CHILDREN
DICPLAY A CAIC.   IT WILL ECLL ITtCLF.
KeHy Confection Co. ltd.
1100 Mainland Street
VANCOUVtR, I. C 926
T II E
If
n E T A I L E R
BRITISH OOLUMBIA-ALBBJRTA-YUKON
OLIVE OIL.
I'l-iinary markets remain Htm,   Greece remains om*
l.argoed while Italy Iuih a Kiuall exportable balance and
mi;
itfti is the et'iii iv .»f world Inquiries as mocks arc iv-
iiively more plentiful there than elsewhere.  Quota*
ions alimail an* rather out **f lin»- with those on the
pot, which minimises buying for import.
KELLOOO 8 ENLARGE PLANT.
Kellopg Co. «>f Canada, Ltd., London, have found it
lu't'easary to enlarge their plant and are now creeling
ui addition, three storeys and basement, 100 ft, long
!>•*, soft depth. It i* being built of red hrick with lime*
Ktoiic foundation, steel sash and 250 Hi floor, and is bo*
ing faced along with their presenl building, It is ox*
pocted that it will he fully completed within three
months at an estimated «m*»*i of around $100,000,
B C JAM MOVING IN LARGE VOLUME TO
PRAIRIE PROVINCES
Three carloads of assorted jams of this year's local
production, containing -.7<mi casts m all. were recently
Gripped from a local factory to pralrio points. Thr
liint, whieh consisted «»f strawberry, raapberry, our*
rants, gooseberry, cherry, apple and otlier small fruits.
was shipped to Saskatoon, Moose Jaw and Edmonton.
Kight carloads of thin year's Jams have already been
»hlppcd out oi Nelson,
PRIDE
B
ECAUSE their superiority has been
steadily maintained...
... because they are quality products,
... because they make better foods...
pride is taken in making, in selling and
in using Royal Baking Powder and Dt*
Price's Cream Baking Powder.
For over a half century they have been
bringing baking success to the housewife
and profits to the dealer.
Both are made in Canada
19
i
*
e
GROCERY PRICE LIST CURRENT—Continued from page 17.
TMt W.  M.  MALKIN CO. LTO.
"MslMn's   Best"   Products.
Arrowrool «st  Vincent*]
11 i **t  t«>n» pet Ao*
13 * .<* pei dog
i it-iiiR Powdei 'i*i»i«- Phoepheit)
it t: iu
l3/3»*,»
13 '••>
I In kins  S.mI i
12 t ts* elns
13 I ut   ■.■tii*
I'lH-nn i purt | mi, in
ti/» no
lAtstto* (Veetiutn i*«»w»
I  Id   tins
Cream of Tiittrti W-% pure]
i*.' I os tint"
12/8 os CUM
13/ts. tins
Cuslerd Powder,
t OS. till"
H os.   ft lis.   .
it os. Hon
Drug Sundries.
Doreolo, il/4 os.
FtOttlX,   IS/4  os
Kpsotn suits. 13 I t'lnn.
Sulphur,  13/4 os, rl ns.
*'hh|oi* oil, 'J os
Castor dii, 4 os.
Hull Pelre, • or
Tartaric Acid. 12/lot.
)i« I    iluH
[>vl     «ll«»
pi-1      tl"*
\>,\     (lilt
pet     ll   *
\i, I     l|i>*
per Hv
pOI   tin*
ittT dot
pel*   ili'K
not iii>«
per a***
per doi
i iii
| ....
i ..ii
11 S3
II
cm
■i «ii
.1.3
pel
ililX
i u
pel
l|n«
|,4Q
pel
• In*
:. rn"
!til
1  60
I B0
1.0«>
,ir.
.ir.
M
IX,
1.80
1,00
a    " *
1,70
I*'.Ml m 1*
12   »>-,  OS.
II I   ..I 	
11 t oe,
I   OS,
111  lit
Ift Qt. ...
t;iu imIiuv
12/3 us. Mn
12 3   os   .bts.
Ilniiey.
li/8 •'*. jew
34/1*1  <>S   im**
14 2m   tlni*
12  |S   litIP
,),.|)y |Hiwili s (ell fl«vore)
12'I   <>T
I.etllOllilde   I'nWili'i
ii/i i *  i1""
Munlnlil
IJ/SS    tilt*
uy8i os. tins
•l  Is   tin*
12 .'•   lln"
Spice* tool Si'ilHililliK**
Atlaptca vi ai tin*
cinnamon. l>/8 Una
CI..V.-8.     It/8    til»H
puny I'owder, li/8 Unit
(Itlll   I'OWlll'l*
tllngor. ta/8 Uns
Minn  i2/;t tins
2.:i:>
•i
por dot.
.per dot.
(MM*    (lot.
per dot.
per  dos. 1'. .50
|HM- dot   2H.00
iu
-5.18
0.50
|H'I'   (lot.
pel*     dOS.
1.511
2.i<i
per dot. 1.90
per dot. 2.40
per dos. 1.80
par 'lot. s.75
per dos.
por   tint    225
Miit-jot-niii. 12/3 tins  per dos.
Mint 18/3 tins -  per dos.
Nutmeg, 12/3 tins  - per dos.
Paprika. 12/3 tins  per dos.
Pumley.  12/3 tins per dos.
Pastry, mixed, 12/3 tins  per dos.
Pepper, black,  12/3 tins per dos.
Pepper, cayenne 12/3 tins   per dos.
Pepper, white, 12/3 tins per dos.
Pickling Spice. 12/3 per dos.
Poultry Dressing 12/5 tins   per dos.
Sage, ground. 12/ tins per dos.
Sage, rubbed 12/3 tins per dos.
Savory.  12/3 tins  per dos.
Thyme. 12/ tins  per dos.
Tumeric. 12/3 tins  per dos.
Whole Cinnamon, 12 ctns iter dos.
Whole Nutmegs, 12 ctns.  iter dos.
Whole Pickling, 12 ctns.        per dos
Celery  Salt,   taper bots.  per  dot.
Curry Powder, taper bots per dos.
Ten.
100/lH per lb.
100   V   per lb.
Is and  *^s assorted per lb.
ll/5e per Ib.
1.15
1.15
1.50
1.35
1.16
1.10
1.10
1.20
1.30
1.15
1.15
1.15
1.15
1.15
1.15
1.05
.90
.00
.90
1.50
1.75
,60
.711
.70
.72
per
dot.
1,50
i**,*	
 per  lb.
...ti
pel*
dos.
4.50
per
(lot.
8.50
V1 iii-gar
ps
•   lb.
.53
24 qts	
Marmalade.
2.40
12/4 litho. tins 	
..per dos.
6.2)
Hel
dos.
1,00
per
dos.
1.20
.lams.
per
dot.
1.40
Assorted 12/4 tins 	
.per dos.
7.78
.per
dot.
1,90
Apricot. 12/4 tins
per dos.
7.85
per
dos,
1.60
iiluck Currant, 12/4 tins
per dos.
9.00
por
dot.
1.20
loganberry,  12/4 tins
par dos.
7.85
per
dos.
I.M
Hnspberry, 12/4 tins
per dos.
7.85 20
THK   BETA ILEB
BHJT18H  COLUMBIA    AI.HKUTA    VUKQN
Scpii
I'd
TIPS FOR LIVE CLERK8
A Oood Voice for Selling.
There are eertain hobbles of a retail salesman
whieh will help him a good deal in developing a good
"selling" voice—which means, first of all. an easily
understood voice.
Staging is om* i) fthese.   Lessons under i choir
director, or, for that  matter, any teacher of vocal
music, indirectly are fount! to influence the "selling"
voice favorably.   Membership in a club quartette
or a store quartette is excellent.
PllbHc speaking will also greatly benefit the clerk,
This docs not mean he must become a platform lecturer, or »M»litical agitator. Whal it means is that he
makes himself active iu organizations logically Accessible to him. and get accustomed to addressing bodies
of people. As he progresses as a public speaker, his
"selling" voice i.s hound to improve.
What is involved, first of all. in a good "selling"
voice is clear enunciation, This is a country which
for many years has been given to httstli*. to attention
to the hig things of a husiness. and hick of attention to
some of thc smaller things. It is very easy to grow
up with poor habits of enunciation. Tin* speaker only
partly sounds some of his syllables; he slides completely over some others.   In his .conversation, he slides
to ait astonishing extent that is. runs words together
A humorous person said recently that what he termed
"vocalosis"—meairing slovenly and incomplete enunciation—was much more of a national selling problem
lhan halitosis, or unpleasant breath
And. like unpleasant breath, the violator is seldom
uc
ck
mi
directly told of his .short comings by the tactful n
around him
However, without the aid of friends, you can •
upon yourself.   How well do people understand
over the telephone;    llow often arc you asked |
peat things?    Do you have customers who hsvi
cult) getting your meaning ?
One of the  most  interesting  tests which ea
luaile    not  always  feasible,  but  often so   is t,,
for a fcwmintitcs into a dictatiui* machine, tlun i
In your own voice, and linally to mv what tin  «,*,,,
grapher gets from it.
Kxci pt a person has voesl defects, the principal
thing to iio to develop clear enunciation is ?.. !.,
stautly careful i»f your speech. Kxatnhn it    Hind w\ . '
syllables   you   are    given    to   sliding   over,   or   ill
adequately pronouncing     Tin n. as you talk, delibel
ately gi\c attention to them    Sec that you Bound rvi rv
syllable of every word     Some piop),- hsvt a halnt n(
dropping certain letters    Kvamihe youi speech to hh
if y.ni do, and if so. eorreel yourself
Study tin- enunciation of them  \* (i   business nt
piofis.sion ntakes them unusually good al enuueistii
The radio broadcasters sre excellent models; sun. .*
tliein    carry   clear   enunciation   to   the   nth   .!• *."•■
Most ministers bsve carefully developed tlnir prumu
eiation     Lawyers usually have,
Compare your own speech with lhe speech of tho«
men who have I rained tlnir voices, then begin to I rsil
your own.
I'ast speech is ihe handicap »f some clerks     The)
talk so fast that not only has lhe customer difficulty
in hearing all they say. Imt In- has a problem to '-
dcrstand
SOMETHING NEW
8 DAY TAMBOUR MANTEL CLOCK
STRIKING HOUR AND HALF HOUR
LIST PRICE $17.20 EACH
Only a limited number available
RAISED FIGURED DIAI
WESTERN WHOLESALE JEWELERS
301 CORDOVA STREET WEST
Horns of Washington Watches
VANCOUVER, B. C.
J 26
THE   RETAILEE
IIK1TISII COLUMBIA -ALBERTA— YUKON
21
Drygoods and Footwear
Artistic Development in Cotton Goods
Rayon Mixtures Being Shown Liberally in Several Mew Lines.—Markets on Staples Quiet, and
Affected by Cotton Uncertainty.
The wash goods season of 1^7 is now beginning to
develop in diflnite lines, as some of the large printers,
ponvertew ami selling agendas have their initial col-
lections ready for display and will -non have their men
un the mad with new goods, Speaking generally, the
showings seen thus far by large buyers indicate to
them that there has Wen an abandonment of extreme
reaching for style novelty and a return to more eon-
scrvntive styling of a more highly artistic character
In cotton goods alone lhe styling advance indicated
for lhe new season is strikingly good, while many or
the rayons offered are decidedly better in quality han
those of a year ago. They are not only prettier to ,ook
upon, but they convey the idea of utility and sen co-
ability in a greater degree than many offerings of last
season.
Tht market, on ataplea are M MU) Uld *t* l«J<*
,,| hy cotton uneertalnty More \mmm » P«***»«
,„,»• ,,„ apeelaltiea .ml hi-****, in f'jrtS
demand for flniahed good. Ii iMidy, »ltl.««irh moder-
nl,. quantlliea are mn»t ftnqosntly WWrtM.
Th.- prourcM reported in dresa goodl market.hi of
« in.oi.ting eharae.er.   Uuyera are taken «       1
HOW offering, of lighl wiltl" **>«*«--■ ","1 *'™. J
********** m* ot r.y«n u. mixture or» dwraUj.
fea.nre. The f»ney men*, tui I******* «• "J
talking of th. utility of new line. wM. WOO ta »•
in more notiee.We quantitie* 0" *« *h™,^
good, market, .re making III lirgl jlta" "< " ,
--native merehanl. anlieipaled. ml there*! «
hopeful apirit ahn.».l eoneemine lhe p»l«l*M, ™
..fhnainei. ahead. Of profit-merehanls a> UM W*
Mid Ihe hotter, for the time being '<< I"*'1"
The baiDMI W«lg doll, in « *•*•** «»■■» « g"
goodl opened for iprfog, and ... ...any « i   •'    M
wontodi in Ml wear haa heen running tato I<«W
llal volume iu apeeifie !..».». I   Son.   "     ' ,,„
ready Mld ahead for ao... nth <"' "J**™5
II in.Ian evlde.,1 from Ike "'"''^'"V k
t» ...ill. that themuoh Ii ihowlng in- -<,» »'•< *J«
and promiae, to he quite aa good M the Im*Ud  tO«
in the COMtry*. retail and do thing MNd-«*■«■
aeemed to warrant when the yen-, opening, beg™.
A heHof i. Wing expreaaed MN ■*«& *»' JJJ
end .ilk good, .re nol going to sell I. W<>«* ' *• «•
iiiK .pring.   They are being afteele,! DJ-Hi«      .
liquidation of Ihia ae.aon and bj he ■"J****"' °*0".
Irnelive rayon, ailk and eotton ■«*«^,-S^tain on the n arkela and lhat give heller a. n  e l<»nUl
ferlnr ailk..   The raw ailk market  '*;''     " , v "„f
with prieo. little .Wed from 11.0 lower lOVOll 01
preceding weeks.
FALL WOOLLEN FABRICS SHOW WIDE VARIETY
  m	
Taking into consideration the fact that wheress for
Slimmer wear there is a choice in fabrics of wash goods
or silk and cotton, and that for Winter there are all
these types of fabrics with thc addition of the large
range of wollcn goods there is apt to be a much wider
range in the fashions and colors of the fabrics for the
Winter season.   Of course, Summer is not a period in
whieh there are no woollen goods used; flannels and
tweeds have an all year round popularity.    At least
they have had that for some time.   Many people claim
at the present time that these flannels have been temporarily replaced by knitted woollen goods.     Good
flannels arc still selling well, although the bordered
lines seem to be in the background at present.    The
difficulty with the flannels business as in many other
Hues is that after their first step into the limelight they
were introduced in so many lines and at such reasonable priees that everyone had a flannel dress. As usual,
this strengthened the demand for the cheaper line but
weakened the demand for the more expensive type.
This was the condition of the flannel trade last summer,
and it is just now recovering. Por this reason there is
a great deal of uncertainty in this business but there
has heen a steady demand for flannels in certain lines
of Summer wear, although not as great as a year ago.
Ottoman Replaces Heavy Flannel
In the better lines of woollen goods it is expected
that Ottoman will replace flannel this Pall. Ottoman
is a double cord poplin fabric and this return of the
Ottoman to favor may also indicate that poplin and
gabardine fabrics will be good.   In the dark shades of
navy and black. Poiret twill will of course hold some
of the buyers' interest.   Charmeens, particularly in
pastel tones, are holding a definite place in the leading fabrics for Pall.   They are of course not as steady
as some of thc other fabrics, but they have a peculiar
charm which has made them very popular for light
weight coats, dresses, suits and ensembles.   Vandyke
tweed, the novelty tweeds that have been so good this
ioa8on-4n the heavier grades will also get some support this Fall.   The possibilities in the realm of these
fabrics are so many, especially since a softer finish has
heen obtained, that their continued popularity is assured.
Pelanes are by no means a new or nevelty fabric.
They have been used lor a great many years and they
have been used with the printed designs also for a
great number of years. Por the past few years they
have heen rather in the background, although it has
been interesting to note their growth and popularity 22
THE   BETA 1LER
IIILITISII t**-)I.I*MIU.\~ AI.HKItTA—YUKON
Sepi
ner
recently.   Some two or three years ago a very interesting group of Paisley designs appeared on the Can
adian market whieh were taken up very promptly.
These retailed at about $1.25 or $1.50 a yard,   This
soft fabric is reasonably priced, but of course it must
he remembered that delains are a 30-inch or 7-inch
material.
XW-KiHWWKXKfcKX^^
-UK
UNSOLICITED MERCHANDISE
Announcement comes from Norman It. Douglas,
Dominion secretary R. If, A. that the Post Office
authorities have refused to pay insurance upon unsolicited articles forwarded through lhe mails of Canada,
nor will they undertake to make any enquiry when
hisses of sueh merchandise are reported to them. This
is another indication of what the Assoeiation can do to
comhat a growing public nuisance, and further the opportunity of thi1 retail merchant.
POR MEN. WOMEN AND
CHILDREN
Special no. 810—12 Thread
Purs SUkPointed Heel $12
dos.
8peeial No. 900-Chiffon. All
HcSoV newest shsdes, $9.25 dos.
PEERLESS UNDERWEAR POR SORTING
Spknd'd ranna in Artificial Silk Lints for FALL and
XMAS  Trada-OROER   THESE   NOW
TIGER BRAND UNDERWEAR far MEN sad BOYS
Ordtrt filled by rttiirn.
J. J. MACKAY
1-4 ROWER BUILDING VANCOUVtn   S. C
If <you want the Best,
Weat"Pride of the West."
MANUFACTURERS
SHIRTS
PANTS
MACKINAWS
OVEIAUS
Clothing
IN-TITE
■RAND
Baday Smith, Hair & Co., Ur
VANCOUVER, B.C.
SEND FOR CATALOGUE
ATLANTIC *»  IT    LASTS
O WEAR Atlantic
Underwear is like
transferring the warm,
woolly coat of the Mart*
time sheep to the back
of the purchaser.
That's why it is such a
Sod repeater.   It makes
ends and keeps them.
ATLANTIC UNDERWEAR
limited
MONCTON. N.B.
B. H. WALSH 4k COMPANY
MONIR1AL mJ TORONTO
mtUimg Agtmh fat Osjohtt. Omtmiio
ami Wtutrm hotisutt
UNSHRTNKABtf
XXMXKKK-XHXXX KtKlJflf UN W K »f K KiKKt)niK)fM)t)(MHM)i»«"
.11 192(1
BRITISH C0LUMB1A-ALB-EIRTA-YUK0N
23
Review of Wholesale Drygoods Conditions
Hy .1. IV THOMSON, President, James Thomson & Sons. Lid.
Tho wholesale drygoods trade ns compared with
Lisl year, has shown a considerable -improvemeni dur.
ing th*1 last few months. This has been caused from
tin- fact that our good friends the retail merchants
have on the whol** enjoyed better business than thev
did  Ins!  year,  as  people  have   had  mole  money  lo
upend.
In our own eity then- has heen a ureal deal of eon-
st met ion work goini* ou, and people have been very
well employed. In as far BS the hinterland is eon-
i-i-t-ned, our l»asi«' industries sueh as lumber ami mining have been busy.    Foreign markets have heen tak*
ing the production and a constancy of work has been
J ■ THOMSON
the result. As far as our farming communities are
concerned, particularly In the Okanagan Valley and
the fruit growing disiVieis, ihey have enjoyed a very
good prop, and tho report just to hand through the
delegates of the Vaneouvor Board of Trade is that a
spirit of optimism prevails throughout the tppor
Country. The fishing indusl ry has been blessed with
an average enteh. ami has received a hotter price Cor
their commodity than last year,
Our Uuvors' Week, whieh  was held during the
Vancouver Kxhlbitipn, was a greater success than
ever before, particularly owing bi Ihe fact that we
wore able tt. interest merchants outside of our own
provinee, antl it certainly was gratifying to the
wholesale trade of Vanoouvor to bo hosts to our re
tail friends from Alberta, particularly so when we
louild thai they could purchase our merchandise here
in fair competition with the Kast or imports from
other countries. Wc had some very complimentary
remarks passed to us hy some of the Alberta mer-
chants who vis'ited us during this week, and they all
fool that next year will see a greater interest taken
by lhe Alberta tratio in this annual merchandising
event.
In as far as the outlook for Fall trade is concerned, it is rather early to forecast how trade might
Ite, particularly so in our own province from the fact
that so much depends upon cKinatic conditions. If
wo have a severe winter, business will be good in all
heavy lines. On the other hand, if we enjoy a tine
winter like we did last year, heavier goods will not
move as freely.
The present situation as regards markets would
indicate that there should not be a great deal of priee
change. While it is true that thc latest reports on
lhe eotton market show that the '.'rop will be a fairly
laruo one, somewhere between 15 and 16 million bales,
still the carry-over at the present time is not abnormally large, only being approximately 3% milKon
hales. The manufacturers both in Canada and in
foreign countries have been watching this very carefully and have been casing on prices throughout the
year so that it is not likely wc will sec any further
drastic reductions, particularly so as thc latest reports are that mill stocks are low and have been reduced almost to a vanishing point. The wholesale dis-
ttihiitor ami the retail distributor are not carrying
excessive stocks when one takes into consideration
the fact that when we have prosperous times, with indications of a prosperous Fall season the consumption of cotton goods is much greater because not only
in the ease of prosperity is wearing apparel effected,
hut requirements of the home are given attention
to iu a period of prosperity that are not so obvious
when times are dull. Again, higher priced goods are
bought when times are prosperous, and that is quickly shown because the distribution of eotton goods in
the United States have shown that thc volume of Ons*
iness in 25c to $1.00 lines have very rapidly increased during the past few years. The question of Rayon
having come into tho market so strongly for wearing
apparel tends to the sale of higher priced merchandise.
Fahtics that Rayons nre being used in now, such ns
in the composition of organdies, voiles, batistes, dimities, eharmeuse, crepe, etc., are very strong, particu*
Inrly when one considers that those fabrics have not
lhe durability of thc old longcloth cottons, and re-
<|iiiro more frequent replacement.
Tho Wool situation does not show any indication
of a reduction in price. In fact, thc latest Bradford
news would indicate that prices were more inclined
to he firm. The Scottish tweed mills are very busy
with spring orders for 1927. The carpet trade according to reports is enjoying an improvement in condi*
tions. The hosiery trade throughout the Leicester
district are not as busy as they were owing to a reduction of demand in the home market, but their ex-
port business has inerensed very considerably.
There is a very interesting statement made in the 24
IIIUTIKII COLUMBIA    AMIKUT.V   YUKON
Mill
DOMINION
Inlaid Linoleum
Jsspe Linoleum
•Granite Linoleum
Printed Linoleum
Battleship Linoleum
Linoleum Bugs
Passage Linoleum
Floor Oilcloth
Oilcloth Bugs
Stair Oilcloth
Cork Bath Mats
Fsltol
Table Oilcloth
Shelf Oilcloth
Enamelled Oilcloth
Brocade Covers
Sanitils
Decorative Wall
Burlap
DOMINION
LINOLEUM
PRODUCTS
. FOR.
BIG FALL
BUSINESS
Get ready for the rush of Fall tratio that always follows when vacation days finish and folks prepare
to settle for the winter. Hume* must be brightened
up. Xew floor* are in demand particularly bright,
cheerful Dominion Floors that add beauty to every
room they are laid in.
Kvery home in your neighborhood is a prospect for
one or more of the Dominion Products listed on the
left. Make this business Vol H husiness by going
after it with a definitely planned campaign.
First, check over your stoek, ami send an order to
your jobber. Then look to your floor and window
displays and map out your local advertising. Tell
people you have the goods they want, and your
sales will junt naturally mount.
Doimnion Oilcloth & Limrfeum
Company Limited
MONTREAL
Makers of Floor Coverings tor Over 60 Years.
Free
Dominion
Dealer Helps
Dominion mudou* arid floor
displot material Is xjautt for
the asking, FREE of all
charge. There tt out special
panel, attltlk those cote's,
posters, lantern slides, pal
terns reproduced on poptt
for making up Mo dummy
edit, steatches, elt. ailtocl
Ih fuldert In cohutt foi
mulling Is your customer,
newspaper electron in doubt*
and tingle column for ad
eetllslng, and many othei
helps.    Make full use of
this FREE service.  Check
user tjsur peetonl tuppb
then suite today foe what
you need. 1926
THE   RETAILEB
IIIUTIHH OOLUMBIA    AI.HI'UT.V-YUKON
25
Argus" of August 25th showing the average per*
.-outage of increase in priee over July, 1914. We arc
still a long way above pre-war conditions.
Increase
Men's suits ami overcoats              . 90%
Woollen material for women's outer garments 180%
Woollen underclothing ami  hosiery 140%
Cotton materials for women's outer garments 200%
Cotton  underclothing material and  hosiery 140%
Hoots . ...".... 100%
It is not likely, however, that there will be Bay
drastic ehange during the balance of this year iu prices.
The demand from a world standpoint for manufactured goods is too strong to allow this.
PROMINENCE OF SILK BBOCHE MATERIAL*
Too mueh cannot be said ahout the position that the
brocaded materials will have this Fall, thnt is silk
11 roe he The de*ign* seen on these (roods for this Fall
nre both conventional and floral. Palmetto green nnd
ctabapple have been very popular so fnr. While there
is every indication in the lighter shades for evening
wear, the floral desiuns both large nml small will he
iu mueh demand. In this connection navy and black
will hold the foreground.   The blaek has been good so
fnr for coats aud so fnr there has boon a great deal ol
interest shown in this black heavy corded material or
sarin for street wear in the Fall.
Metallic brocades in varied combinations arc promised for the late Winter SOUSOU, when formal dinner
gowns and evening dresses are being planned.
Increased Demand for Plain Fabrics.
Plain fabrics will be in greater demand than ever
ftetailcre report that already there has been n dccidu
tendency especially In Summer frocks, to use a piain
fabric in pastel tones.   Extra gootl cmnlWsi to BV
crepe and soft silks have been very popular so far. For
Fall, along with these fabrics, satin, back crepe and
erepe satin will he wanted steadily. Taffeta will be
popular not only in the dark shades, in which they
have had a very steady run this Spring and Summer,
but in varied shades for evening wear next Winter.
'I ho colors in demand seem to centre around green
blue, that is soft shades of the powder blue type, and
navy blue. (In the fall color cord there is a blue called
"sailor blue" which is a rather light navy. This blue
has heen asked for constantly and seems to be outplacing the navy in the popular demand.
Heavy Material for Coats.
For coats, needlepoint, a very fine edition of the
marvella type of fabric, has already been seen as the
popular fabric. Needlepoint is a single weave, as marvella wns a double weave. Suedine cloth also promises to be good, while heavy soft velours will, of
course, be used extensively.
While there have heen noticed certain definite tendencies in the types of fabrics shown and ordered for
Fall, there is still a greater uncertainty in the colors
which are wanted. The color cards arc out, but as
yet these only give thc range, but do not indicate which
nre the most popular lines. Navy blues have come
hack into their own once more while there is a continued run on the reddish brown tones such as wood rose,
bois de rose and Circassian brown. Most of the darker
shades of brown nre entirely forgotten while the lighter
tones such ns sand nnd beige arc asked for constantly.
Palmetto green, a soft dark tone of that color, seemed
popular all this season nnd seems to have found a very
decided piece for itself iu the realm of fabrics. Other
shades of green on the deep sea shade have also been
good. There is a tendency, too, to ask for deep tones
of rose, red, nnd some violet.
RAYON VELVETS ATTBAOTINO ATTENTION OF
CANADIAN BUYERS.
Paris, August 31.
Canadian dress manufacturers and buyers at present in France are commenting upon the beautiful effects which French manufacturers have obtained in
their stylish fabrics by the use of artificial silk, especially in the weaving of velvets. Among the large vel
vet manufacturers showing these rayon velours with
llieir lustrous silvery sheen, are Bianchina, Fcricr, and
also the house of Redmond.
French manufacturers jealously guard the secret
process of rayon velvet construction, whieh is described by Canadian buyers as less expensive and more
henutiful than real velvet, and that the sheen of the
rayon texture makes real velvet look lifeless in comparison.
French manufacturers call thc artificial silk velvet
"Volour Sylpii'ide," and it is usually strengthened by
the use of a real silk back, so thinly woven that it resembles a chiffon, nnd so soft that it does not add
stiffness to the rnyon product. Rayon velours nre
quoted about W to $8 a yard wholesale less duty demanded by Canadian customs. Tho fnncy weave velvets nre more expensive, ranging from $2 to $11 more a
yard.
Extensive Use of Rayon in New Season's Goods.
Both men's nnd women's wear fabrics In woollens
and worsteds for the new light weight senson show the 26
T UK    U K
liltlTIHH -*oi.t'Mni.v
T AIL K L1
AI.IIKUTA    VUKUN
S.-|»t,
careful use of rayon yarns, oil her as decoration or
Iwisted with WOol and eotton fibers in tho cloth. A
number of men's wear factors who previously spoke
only of "silk decorations" now say lhal rayon has
been extensively used for that purpose, giving tt bright,
eolorful pattern, especially in novelty materials adaptable to tho knicker ami cap trades. Authorities believe, however, that rayon will never play as import
ant a part in men's wear as it does in dress guods .
Dress goods now being shown for spring sponsor
skilfully handled rayon mixtures in wool ami worsted
fabrics, both in popular-priced nnd higher grade lines.
It is evident that artificial silk is being used more extensively in these lines than over before, notwithstanding the recent reports that the fibre is somewhat unsatisfactory in this type of merchandise. The most successful users of rayon in woollens and worstedl arc
those mills which know how to adapt the yarn to their
purpose, and most important, whieh know how to finish and dye such fabrics.
Twisted and Blended.
Both thc long staple fibre ami the rayon waste of
short lengths are being successfully utilised in the
fancy sweaters whieh are iu vogue iu sports costumes.
It is obvious that the rayon decorations in this knit
•.'arment, as in jerseys, are the real incentive to the
broad market for them. One report indieates the use
of fine filament rayon in tons blended .tod twisted with
three-eighths worsted tops, particularly m certain dress
goods. Three-eighths yarns are also popular in worsted mixtures of rayon and cotton twisted to secure exceptional Color blends.
SHOWING OF SPBINO SILKS IN PARIS
Announcement has been received from Paris of the
initial showing of spring silks despite the faet that tho
winter season is still on for manufacturer* of textiles,
(loddc liodin. of Rue de la Paix, showed samples of
his first productions for the coming spring tin August
17 last, and also samples of fabrics for I'alm Reach
wear for the 1927 Florida season.
Printed silk will always be a staple with the French
manufacturer. In recent years manufacturers in this
country have impeded the sale of printed silk by overproduction of a few popular designs, and have thus
been forced to sell at low cost to dispose of them,
whereas in Paris manufacturers offer sueh a variety
of designs that printed silks will remain staple for
some considerable time.
Small Motif Designs for Spring.
The printed silks for the spring of the year 1927
will have small motifs, according to the firm of Goddo
Hedin. These printed silks will come in many designs,
among whieh will be the diamond shape design Hut.
"jor the silks, Ooddc Bedin will stick to thc small figure
his print.
Printed silks will eome in combinations of numerous colors, such as green and white, blue and white, vol*
low and white, and in the other colors.
Printed chiffons which have been manufactured by
(loddc Hedin for next spring differ from the silks iu
the fact that the printed chiffons have large figures in
them. Samples of the printed chiffons which CJodde
Pedin is already showing are designed with large flowers, as they were this year. But the flower design dif.
fcrs from this year's pattern because eaeh flower doea
LIGHTHOUSE
BRAND
OVERALLS
tt
Always on the job.''
Huskiest fabrics; roomy cut; triple
stitched, rip-proof, pucker-proof Beauts;
and ample reinforcement at points of
greatest wear, —• that V Light In >ii<--
Brand,—-tlie Overall that's a* strong ji*
the man who wears it.
No w out It-1- men who have onee worn
Lighthouse Itiand eome baek for the
second pair.
ROCK ISLAND OVERALL
COMPANY
Rock Island, P.Q.
R-tprAMntattvt:
R. A. SIMEf
318 Homer 81
Vsncouvsr,
It. 0. IH26
THK    RETAILER
BRITISH t'Ml.CMitiA-ALBERTA—YUKON
27
not stand out so distinctively in the material as they
did. Tho molifs are more blurred and Mend in fl sub.
diied fashion with other lines and designs printed in
the chiffon. Printed chiffons come in forty two colors,
il was declared. As far as can be judged now, printetl
silks and printed chiffons for next spring will not eost
more than did tin* silks and chiffons of the last, spring
and summer, it was said,
Crepe fantasias are offered to manufacturers
by the Goddc Hedin Company for sports clothes for
1027, Thejs crepes are of pure silk and arc made iu
two weaves, olio whieh resembles the plain crepe tie
chine weave, and tho other in what is known as the
end to-eml weave, in whieh a white thread is occasionally woven with tho colored threads
Some of tho crepes for sports wear, made by the
Oodde Hedin Company, have borders woven through
them, either of deeper shades of the same color as the
rest of the material or of other colors.
Shawl or Oold or Silver Cloth.
The new shawl of -/old and silver cloth, which Oodde
I'm din manufactures, has heen sold In many buyers, As
everyone knOWS, the Spanish shawl is passe. Hut the
grace which the Spanish shawl gave to the figure still
holds an appeal for womanhood. Therefore thc silver
ami (fold metal eloth shawl is taking its place and
many orders have been hooked by the l-Joddo Hedin
Company.
POPULARITY OF LUMBER JACK 8P0RT SHIRT.
One of the most popular fashions for men today is
the Lumber .lack Sport Shirt. Coming as a rather
startling innovation in men's wear, it has Increasingly
gained favor until now marly every lad and young mail
iu the country sporls a Lumber .lack Shirt.
This natty garment, extending jnst below the waist
is confined on the hips by a sweater-knit band which
gives the shirt a very stylish blouse effect, Tin- sport
collar with continuous tape) may be buttoned to the
neek or loft open at will. Two pockets with buttoned
flaps relieve the plain fronls.
This shirt is not limited to a season or a class, but
is acceptable on the golf course, the tennis court, tor
yachting, for sport of all kinds, street wear and lahor.
by the small lad at play ami the man in the woods, eom*
hilling as it does, unusual stylo and utility.
Those shirts are wrought In materials suitable tor
their service, ami are being featured by Mnekny, Bntttn,
Blair, & Co. Ltd., in very attractive woven cotton
plaids at #21 a dosen; in several lines ol pure wool
Sports flannel in distinctive cheeks and plaids in beautifully blended popular shades at $48 per foam "»aj
arc also showing them in pure wool heavy plaid mac-
kinaws at *«0, nnd in Lumber Jack sport shirts, wheth*
or for work, play or comfort they have them, and their
slogan is "If you want the BEST, buy PRIDE OF THE
WEST."
FALL STYLE8 IN MENS CLOTHING.
The new styles in fall fabrics, the browns and other
new colorings are expected to prove a stimulus to retail
activity, It is admitted by the manufacturers that
from past experience brown is regarded as a color that
needs to be handled carefully, as many men show a
natural disinclination to beown clothing. However,
the demand for style is so great at thc present time
that the consumer is easily interested in color effects
that are ne wand distinctive, so it is being freely predicted that the coming fall will bo the biggest brown
seasan the trade has ever experienced, this being said
without prejudice to the grays and blues which are
also counted upon to sell in volume.
The fall and winter overcoat business is said to be
particularly gratifying. Blue overcoats are said to be
especially favored in the heavier weights, but there is
also a large demand for the lighter colors. Camel's hair
antl fine oashmores have sold well in the finer grades.
Clothing workers are generally employed at the
present time and the prospects are brighter for a long
period of manufacturing activity, which in the case of
a number of the larger concerns will keep them busy
right up to the openings of the spring lines. Preparations art? already under way for the spring season and
fabrics are being purchased, but the market is mainly
occupied with the problems of fall selling and fall production.
FALL WOOLLEN COLORS.
The Textile Color Card Association has announced
a separate color card for the woollen industry. It
will show fifty new colors expressly for fall woollens,
and has been endorsed by the American Association of
Woollen and Worsted Manufacturers.
The colors particularly recommended for fall in-
cludo the red wine shades, greens, rosy tans, brown
tones and frosty blues. Among the shades which are
regarded ns heing particularly successful arc Bordeaux
ami Peony Red. Chimney Red and Ember. Included
with the green shades, Oardenia, Robinhood green and
Forest green are favored. New frosty blues, including
shades called (llacier Blue, Radio Blue and a rich, dark
one called Sinbad nre especially good, while tans and
browns. Including Codnrbark, Rose Oak. Tokay, Mauve-
wood. Syrun. Winter Leaf nnd Thrush are particularly
beautiful.
AUSTRALIA'S RECORD WOOL CROP
Sydney, September 1. 1926.
The 1926 Australian wool selling season opened on Monday. The wool to be dliwxw-U of bates all Australian records, amounl Ins to 2,600,000 bales, or approximately 500,000
tons Tlie proceeds are estimated at about $250,000,000, which
•notnprUes the most Important factor of Australia's export
trade. ..     .
liny ors sre present representing every nation, bidding in a
hi.bei of tongues. The American representatives were no-
lleesbly Inactive, compared with the activity of the British
and Japane*** representatives.
Prices generally ranged 6 per cent, above the June closing
rales. 28
TH K    BETA!LEB
imiTISH niMTMKIA—AhBRRT-A—TVION
Septi
,,,,.
A New Family Name for
Goodrich Canvas Footwear
For the 1927 canvas footwear market
(loodrich will feature its tennis line under
the family name of "Zipps." It is our in-
ten tion to make "Zipps" an attractive,
reliable, outstanding line of footwear comparable in the canvas field with Hi-Press in
the heavy field, and Zip** rs in Ihe eloth field.
Il is our plan to popularize "Zipps" so that
the name shall become a household word,
ami carry with it unusual resale possibilities.
By this move, (loodrich places its canvas
footwear in a position of outstanding prominence, and makes it a true rompanion line
to the rest of the Hi-Press family.
Don't fail to sec this line.
It possesses unusually striking merchandising features.   The introduction of "Zipps"
constitute* a real event in the footwear fold
Watch for them.
MADE IN CANADA BY
CANADIAN GOODRICH
COMPAN1
LIMITED
KITCHENER
ONTARIO
Vancouver Branch: 349 Homer Street I'-'JIi
THE   KKTAILKR
UH1TI8H COLUMBIA—A]      .ITA—YUKON
29
Assistance Wanted in the Men's Shoe Business
By PAUL JONES
Member of Special Committee Appointed by the Directors of the National Boot and Shoe Manufacturers
Association to Condnct Organisstion Work for the Forthcoming Campaign S*Ti*^
ot Mens Shoes. *
•To those of uh who have been thrust into the Important work of Studying the country.wide need for
.timulating the men's shoe business, nnd oi helping to
natc the menus of doing it, the facts are very plain,
nnd lhe proper course of action very clear.    It ean
safely be stated that the quickest and most effective
.say to get the needed aet ion is for all who are directly eoiici rned I mean the manufacturers and retail dis.
iributors of men's toot wear to look tin* real facts in
lhe face and be prepared to co-operate fully with tho
general programme that has been approved,
Then- s*ems to be no particular mystery about lhe
reasons for the falling off in the consumption of men's
dioos the past ten or twelve years. In our report to
the general committee of men's manufacturers and to
lhe National Association, we assigned several specific
reasons. Thev were justified by out* analysis -also by
common sense. There is no question that factors such
is the improved quality and durability of today's shoes
for men. the vastly Increased use of the automobile,
the rise of the Oxford and the decline of the high shoe
in the winter, lhe Improvement in -hoe repair service
and the Increased demand upon men's incomes for
women's footwear have ail served to reduce the family
budget apportionment for men's shoes.   Almost every*
body seems to agree on this.
Attention Not Focussed on Male Footwear.
Bul there is another important and very significant
thing to be thought of, in this connection,   During
the years that the melt's shoe business has been going
along without any really special emphasis, other than
the routine advertising of individual manufacturers
ami individual retailers in the interests of the shoes
they sell, about every other kind of wearing apparel
for men has had broad and unusually effective propaganda spread far and wide, Men's suits, hats, neckwear and underwear have been exploited effectively
in an Institutional way   nol alone in co operative, paw
for advertising but ill editorial and news treatment Ol
tile most subtle sort
More than that, many other kinds of merchandise
attractive to men automobiles, radios, special edibles
>lld  Special   household  articles-     all   have  had   'heir
clever broadcasting on a large scale, nnd the result is,
unquestionably, that men have had their attention
forced more and more away Irom the attractions ot
neat, worthwhile footwear See ,\hat the straw lint
I pie have done; see what   the  fancy  necktie and
fancy hosiery people have accomplished. Intelligent
propaganda, backed lip by the cleverest kind of retail
dealer cooperation, is responsible for the widoly-in-
••ceased manufacture and sale of all these articles to the
men of the country.
Our COlrtmittce have spent a long time in examining
•liese thing*, and reducing them In their fundamentals
Wo have been conservative. I believe, in deciding that
the surest, quickest and least expensive way for he
makeTS ami sellers of men's shoes to put the industry
••nek where it belongs is to engage in the national CO-
Operative campaign of advertising and  retail dealer
sales assistance that wc have recommended. Some of
the shrewdest men in the industry have studied the
plan with great care, and fully endorsed it.
The project calls, in the lirst place, tor a full three-
years continuance. Its persistence is largely its
strength. It calls for the expenditure of about half
a million dollars each year—to he used for national advertising and general news propaganda of the most
skilful kind, and for the most complete system of cooperative dealer helps that has been employed in any
industry. In other words, it is a campaign in which
the manufacturers of men's shoes and of everything
used in building them will grip hands with the country's retailers of men's shoes and wage a groat joint
war to make men realize how important and desirable
it is, in their own interests, to wear neat, appropriate
shoes all day. all evening, every day and every season.
It is til'interest to know that the influential representatives of industries associated with men's shoe
manufacture—the leather ami findings manufacturers
and the shoe machinery producers—are keenly interested iu the national campaign project and have already signified their co-operation with it. They see
iu it the best ami most practicable opportunity to put
the men's shoo business of the country on its feet, and
they particularly like its primary feature of assisting
retail dealers to get a materially increased business
locally in men's shoes.
Our work of organization is now under way. It is
a sizable job, but the prospects for the success of the
enterprise arc so good, and the need for re-arousing
men's appraciation of neat footwear is so great, that
the amount of work involved is of course secondary."
SHOE JOTTINGS.
The rumour of a possibility of higher heels for men's
footwear is not considered seriously, at present. One
authority whose opinion is highly regarded is responsible for the following! "While it is quite possible and
even probable that at some future date we shall see a
return to the high heel and high toe in men's shoes, at
the same time in our opinion we are not confronted with
this situation just yet either in Canada or the United
States.
•    •    ♦
A well known designer of women's shoes recently
returned from Europe is responsible for the statement
that "there is no outstanding style in Paris at present.
Patterns are mainly along the lines of step-ins, one
straps and three eyelet Oxfords. Suede with kid trimming is rather popular nnd reptile leathers are freely
used, Evening slippers are mainly made from fine brocades in sandal typo with many appliques and embroideries.     The 17 to 18/8 heels are the most popular
heights at present."
•     •     •
A statician in the rubber heel industry states that
the annual production of rubber heels for the last
two years has averaged approximately 272,308000
pairs." This is the total unclassified amount for men's
women's and children's shoes,
■I- oO
Til E3    BETA I LER
BRITISH COLUMBIA    .W.BKttTA    Vt'Kn.N
Se
Hr
nor
Rural Reasoning
WHEN the farmer drives into town to-day it's usually
behind horse power and not horses. You know by
the purr of his six cylinder sedan that here comes a
business man with his eyes open to opportunity. To sell
him paint and varnish is to give him the advantage in a
mutually profitable deal. <JHis farm implements are
ready for winter storage when painted; his barns are
burdened with a valuable harvest that must be safe*
guarded from wind and storm; his home must be kept
snug and warm. Paint saves even the wood he burns—
because a well painted house best holds the heat. He
will listen to you when you back your products with
sound reasons to " paint this fall."
 I 926
THE    RETAILER
ItniTl.SM COLUMBIA ••auu-uta rUKON
ai
HARDWARE, OIL w PAINTS
Indioailvc of a holier trade sentiment, it is noted
that among the iff,000,000increase iu Imports into Canada during the month, the largest increase wns in iron
mid Its products.
Vancouver's demand for all buidilug requirements
has heen stimulated by the enounccment of n $5,000,-
000 hotel huilding for the Canadian National Railway.
Plana are being prepared and Ihe transfer of property
has  hecn  effected.      The  hotel  will  have  o<MI guest
rooms, with individual hath, representing ti large volume of work for hardware ami plumbing interest-.
During reeenl mouths Vancouver has attained second place in value of buildings aettialy under way. ou
the Pacific Coast, and wiih a total of over (QO.Ooii.OOO
will break all previous records,
Radio.
Increased business is noticed in this field.   With the
renewal Of dry batteries and thfl demand created
through lhe political situation for new sets, coming
after tho summer slackness has stimulated a business
which has shown a remarkable growth during the past
few years. The outlook for Fall business is considered
Keller than in previous seasons
Increased Electrical Sales
Showings at the annual exhibition of heavy hardware and heating apparatus resulted in good husiness
for dealers. Kleetrical equipment for the home is be*
coming more and more popular among housewives of
Vancouver, ami a very large business is reported in
electric range* and WSter heaters     1'urehasers of the
ever-Increasing number of new houses, appear to show
a preference for electrical equipment, both for heating
nnd cooking purposes, owing doubtless to its cleanlt-
lies* and simplicity of operation
HARDWARE MARKETS AT A GLANCE
Automobile Accessories,
Sales have been model ate 111 Volume nnd prospects
are favorable for an active Fall trade Jobbers arc
beginning to offer many items suilnble for early winter
use. Retailers ah- carrying small stocks, but the si/e o!
their orders is gradualy Increasing. Priees are
stable,
8kid Chains Hooked orders for skid chains are
now being shipped out at advance tinting. No change
in price.
Roofing Psper. Competitive grades are selling well.
Prices are firm.
Traps.—Fall buying has not Started as yet. Prices
are the same as lasi year
AxS8.-S..les are normal, with stocks In good condition.    Prices have not changed.
8teel Sheets.   Fall for sheets is fair, with imllca-
tions of a boiler trade later in Ihe fall.    Stocks an
well filled, with priees firm.
Sash Cord and Weights.—In this line, also, sales are
increasing. Stocks are well tilled. Priees arc steady
as last quoted,
Paints and White Lead,—Indications are for a very
good painting season this Fall. Stocks arc assorted
with prices steady.
Hose.—Demand is slackening with the advance of
the season. Stocks are being cleaned out for the winter.   Prices have not changed.
Builders' Hardware.—Huilding is on the increase
in this territory, and the demand is excellent. Small
home huilding in the suburbs still shows the greatest
activity.
Wrenches.—there is fair demand i'or wrenches of all
kinds.   Stocks are in good condition with priees firm.
Pyrex Ovenware.—Demand begins to show improvement with stocks being well filled up for Fall business.
Prices have not changed.
Solder.—Demand is fair with signs of improvement.
Slocks are kept well filled with priees holding firm.
Rope.—Call is fair with stocks well filled. Priees
have not changed.
Registers.—Sales are beginning to improve with activities in furnace installation. Prices have not changed.
Galvanised Wire.— Sales arc fair with stocks in
good condition,   Prices are steady as last quoted.
Pumps. Demand in this line is steady and fairly
good. Stocks arc kept in good condition. Priees have
not changed,
Garage Sets.—Garage sets and garage door holders
ate among thc active items iu wholesale market at thc
present time.   Prices are firm and stoeks sufficient.
Butts.—At the present time a fairly heavy demand
for hulls is reported by wholesale dealers.   Priees are
unchanged.
Wire Nails are now quoted in the Vancouver wholesale market at $8.85,   The demand is generally good.
Bolts— lloll prices iu the wholesale market con-
tinue uniform, with demand consistent. Stoeks are
generally sufficient.
Linseed Oil,—Quiet demand continues, with prices
holding firmly. The flaxseed market shows some advances.
Turpentine prices are steady with trading fair.
Resin.—The market shows an upward trend, with
daily prleea firm.
Shellac.—Huy ing has been restricted to current requirements.   Stocks are not heavy.
m
I'll .12
r II E    BETA I LER
t        11   i*
l.liI"'SII COLUMBIA
A  I   li
AI.HKHTA-
YUKON
Septet iH,r
FINISH OUT A SUCCESSFUL YEAR BY CONCEN
TRATDfO ON "PAINT THI8 FALL   CAMPAIGN
There is no denying the fact that 1926 will go down
as one of the most successful "hardware" years in re
cent history, and there is still a chance of further pro
fit for the wideawake dealer who carries a full line of
paints and varnishes by concentrating his effort* < n
selling his surrounding district paint ami varnish pro-
tcetion.
Always have something new to interest your ells*
tome is and keep drawing their attention to the paint
department, There are many ways of doing this,
through demonstrations, window ami store displays
ami stunts of various kinds. There is siwsys something now in paint ami varnish selling, and "••taller*
who are making a success ot pushing this trad* arc
those who always treat thc matter in this light Those
who regard it as an uninteresting, humdrum proposition of just so many cans c mtainiug painl are the ones
who cannot inspire others to enthusiasm and paint profits go right past their door. Fortunately this type of
retailor is becoming scarce. In order to arouse inter
est in his customer the retailer must himself be en
thusiastie and reflect his enthusiasm in the manner in
whieh ho puts forward his proposition.
This fall conditions tire very favorable for the development of a good volume of paint husiness Interest
in painting is running high, there is a greater degree of
prosperity evident than for some years past ami much
of tho regular spring painting was postponed ami has
not yet boon done. Kvery thing points to •plendltl
possibilities for a record year. The last four months
of the year is a period when painting may be done with
greater comfort than in the heat of midsummer ami
various surfaces to be painted are in better eondition to
absorb Ihe paint. Then, too. the approach-tag winter
brings many hardships to exterior uirfaees as well as to
interior floors, ami unless there is adequate protection
by a film of paint or varnish, valuable property is apt
io suffer.    .
The mtCCCSS of the "Paint This Fall Campaign" this
year will depend almost entirely upon the amount of
enthusiasm whieh is thrown into it by the retailers of
paint and varnish. Hetail window displays local publicity and aggressive selling effort behind th counter
will accomplish more than any other element iu building up an active fall business. Every retail hardware,
man needs a good fall paint trade lo help round out a
record year's business.
A big fall paint business awaits every merchant
who will go right after it ami link up definitely with
the "Paint This Fall Campaign." whieh is now sweeping Ihe country Kvery individual merchant by doing
his part can keep lhe paint selling machinery working
al top Speed and wlon the year end reckoning eotm-n
ho will probably find that the year 1936 will stand otti
as the banm-r year to date in his volume of pain; and
varnish business
A large amount of building will i>< proceeded with
this autumn, owing to the improved financial eondition
of the Country, din- to lhe more fnvoraldc wealht r sml
consequent improvement in the crop situation in ever)
province in Canada .This increased buying power will
put more money into circulation, and paint doa lent
have a splendid **\*\** rtuuil) to make this rom i mi
"Paint This Fall" campaign the mosl successful rel
held.
Humours of lower crude oil prices which have been
reported in different sections of lhe eonntrj en erith
out  foundation   according to h*a«Kng  refiners      Cm-
sumption of gasoline and lubricating oils is n«»w at lis
highest peak, which militates against tin* idea ef lower
prices, in their opinion In fact, lhe genera! imp-res'
sion is thai the possibility *>( a drop in prices befort
the Fall is extremely unlikely
XXXKXXXXXKXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXKXKXXXX
LIKE MOTHS TO A FLAME
evening si rollers ore attracted lo the sto-
with well lighted windows    The elect tie sign
overhead informs them (without actually SB)
ing mm that this shop is up to date and pro
grcsslve    Glowing window lights make it essj
to see the merchandise and also make tin  met
chandise appear to best advantage,
Tonight's Strollers are Tomorrows
Customers—Light up for them
Consult us without obligation on any phase ot
store and window lighting It costs no more to
get the help of experts
Phone Seymour 5000 for call from one of our
lighting sdvisers.
\\\\m*vx^
mmmtmStm-wtw 1326
, JHB   RETA1LEB
IlItlTIBH COLUMBIA
U.Ul'itTA -YUKON
34
A DEADLY PARALLEL.
Independent Versus Chain Dealers.
The Independent Merchant has been the
agency through whose legal service the manufacturer of specialties has placed his products
on lhe table of tin- consumer,
Tho independent merchant distributes these
specialties, not only in cities ami towns, but
also carries them into cross country districts
where tbe chain store cannot possibly go,
The independent merchant gives credit and
complete delivery Eervice, thus reselling the
entire consuming puhlie
Tho independent earnest I) tries lo serve the
manufacturer hy distributing Ids specialties
tor a meagre eottipcnsati til, fixed hy the manufacturer, and is therefore n faithful employe,
The independent not chant wants to 1)0 a distributor and not a manufacturer, ami therefore
is the natural ally of the manufacturer of
specialties
The vast majority of Independent Merchants
have neither the capital nor the inclination to
msnufseture the merchandise they distribute,
and
Therefore the Independent Merchant most
sincerely wishes to bo loyal to the manufacturer.
RUYRR8 WEEK AN UNQUALIFIED 3UC0E8S.
Members «»f the Wholesale Itureau of Vancouver
Board of Trade are emphatic in stating that the third
annual "Buyers' Week" staged .luring August, was,
from every punt of view, an entire success
T S. Dixon, chairman of lhe "week" stated in his
report lhal, while the total sales this year were slightly under last year's figures owing to the non participation of wholesale grocers, the average sales were higher, aggregating $1,850 against 1925 In the preceding
year.
The fashion display staged in the Hold Vancouver
ballroom proved an immense Attraction, and wo have
received manv complimentary n marks ahout this event
directed bv A, C, Cohen, manager of the Universal
Kniiiing Company, It was the first of its kind to be
held in Vanoouver ,.
One hundred and sixty merchants from distan
point* in Britiah Columbia and Alberta attended, snd
the filial cheek-up shows lhat total sales aniotinte t to
1120000
"\Vhile the financial aspect proved satisfactory, the
principal idea behind this movement is to create a
friendly co-operation between merchants in the inter tot
Of Hrltish Columbia nnd Alberta, and the coast City,
Slid in addition to advertise Vancouver, the import ami
export centre of the ('anadian Pflelflc Coast.
The Chain Store waits until this service has
been performed, and then appropriates the
fruit of this expensive labor, and uses it as an
advertisement to sell its own "private label"
merchandise.
The Chain Store operates only in thc fertile
spots in cities and towns, and does not, ami
will not. operate in the vast sparsely settletl
rural distriets.
The Chain Store sells only tor Cash and
Carry, thus reaching only a limited portion of
the population.
The Chain Store earnestly strives to destroy
that faithful employe by quoting those specialties at what the independent merchant paid for
them; and also tries to destrop the manufactured hy substituting his own private brands
tor the manufacturer's advertised brands.
The Chain Store is becoming the largest
"private label" concern in the country, and is
therefore the natural and most formidable competitor of the independent manufacturer.
The ambition of the Chain Store is to manufacture under their own private label everything they distribute.
And the Chain Store's loyalty is measured
in eohl-hlooded dollars and cents.
MAKE PEPARATIONS FOR NATIONAL CANNED
FOODS WEEK.
Canned Poods Week will take place this year November 10 to 20, and it is not too early to make plans
now for this popular event.
Hundreds of cities have for the past few yaers ben
capitalizing on Canned Foods Week, and retailers and
wholesalers have materially increased their sales during that week on canned goods, Ihe effect of publicity
given lasting for many weeks afterwards
Vanoouver retailers can likewise capitalize on canned foods week iii a big way. and it is to be hoped that
they will do so this year tin a much broader basis than
in the past. Committees should get into action NOW
to make plans ami lo get the full support of every retailer, jobber, broker and manufacturer in the city.
POSITION WANTED
Appllonnt has been 26 years la general store bual-
ihsh. and (luring the past Ave- years held Ihe position
of manager, First class accountant, capable of re-
organising, and placing any business on aa effee'eni
basis. If you can use a really first-class all-round
man please address communication lo "Manager,"
■180 Pacific Building, Vancouver. U. C. 34
Til B    R ETA I LBB
IIUITISII  «*iil,t*Mi:i \     \I.Hi:itT\    Vt'Kt'N
Sept.
TRAVELERS WE HAVE MET
Among the "old-timers" making Vancouver their
home port, probably no traveller is better known or
more highly respected, than our old friend V. I*.
"Pierce   Watson.
i >
!
F. P. Watson
Pierce arrived in British Columbia in lH",f». at the
tender age of—well we'd better not say    hut he was
tender then.
l*'or fifteen years, -,ftcr ho grow up. he was iu the
rela'il grocery business iu Victoria, selling out and com.
ing to Vancouver in 1909 to sell at wholesale fur I' |{
Stewart & Co.. fruit and produce merchants II is
>till with this progressive Ann and for the pn*i im.
vears has Imm ii sales manager.
The same year thai he came io Vancouver he j* n>**|
Vancouver Council No, 2K4, I   C, T, ami has     ,„
prominently associated with their activities cvei     .
Serving his third year now tm tbe executive conn ci
He is a well known Mason*, and an associate m< nil. of
the Native Sons of It C
While always faithful lo Ins business duties I'i >..
has had time occasionally to indulge in Ashing mil
hunting, and is said to know all the best spots on \ ,
eouver Island and the lower mainland for real sporl
Pierce i* a proud grandfather as he says, "cm m,
daughter's side of thc house." and if you can claim I im
as a friend, you can count on one genuine dependable,
worth-while friend, at least
As an active worker in the I    C  T  h<  back** up
everything  that  is for the good of the city  ami i*M
vinee in which he lives, and in business he biing«
hear great sympathy ami understanding of ih«- pmli
bins of bis customers, ihrough his IH years of expel
leocc lii-hiiul the counter, in his own retail stoh
l-'or sterling worth and dependability in "lovi
war" we take our hat off to Pierce,
Mrlmnald   Ilakrr Oe., *H Mb ktO   Wr#i. Calf an   '
«ol«l out ilo*ir bu*ini<(«* of paint« and oil*
The   M-tUhk!   I Hi li<!i Kg   KtUt-i-s   HUltots   »t   PSdStOftlOA
tn io-,| flre \o«*
Tlo- National Fruit *o. I.i«l (•#Iw>I«**aI«') ot** »>»•<, mm
10 Vntort,i Nntlotial Fruit Co   l.nl. nt ivdmontmi
■   ■   ■
■   ■   ■
■   ■   ■
■   ■   ■
Crepe Paper and Profits
Decorations and fancy costumes can best be made
with Interlake Superfine Crepe—there's a field tor
business for you! Cheek up your sioek of thirty-
seven Interlake shades and order what you lack today.   This Crepe is made in Canada for you.
Remember, you'll need plenty of orange and blaek
for Hallowe'en. You ought to be doing a nice, pro
fitable business with Interlake Superfine Crepes right
now.     Would yon hike a counter display standi
Write lis,
r Mtte-  ^ ■
SUPERFINE CREPE
For Social Decorations
snlcrfefce Tissue Mills C6.
Lis-mli**-*
Head Office: 54 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario
Mills st Merriton, Ont.
■ ■ ■ ■
■ ■ ■
a ■
t ■
\
i I
; ■ ■
■ i
■ ■ I , *HK   BBTAl L K II
milTIHH  tt»|.MMHI.\    M.UKUTA    YUKON
35
The Importance of the Cash Customer
Students of retail merchandising have frequently
, lamented Upon tbe tendency of merchant** to extend
, fi reiilial treatment to the charge account customer, *
. ,il,  in many Instances, mote especially those of *,c\.
iHttncnt, the cash customer receives bul indifferent
Hi iilioil.
tine of lhe most interesting cliff• t--im-,- between
1.1,iii ami wholesale methods of doing business is thu
difference in tbe treatment of the cash customers,
In the wholesale market, tin- cash buyer, more par*
licitlarly if be ia of any importance, gets the best the
M'lliug bouse affords in tbe way of merchandise
jiiie.s and deliveries.    Tbe retail cash buyer, oil tin-
nihcr hand, is frequently given the impression that iii,
in her custom is not altogether welcome, ami tin big.
a* r the store, the more does this impression obtain,
Naturally sueh a eondition docs not apply tu those
stores which do a strictly cash business, hut concea*
si-His to charge aceounl customers in stores which sell
f»r cash and on credit are very frequently marked.
There may be psychological reasons why Miis
should be so, but danger lies in it becoming too apparent.
Store employees should be impressed with the fact
that the early patronage of all stores commenced oil
n cash basis Also that there arc many cash custom*
■ r*> who desire charge accounts, ami through their
financial standing are entitled to them, yet they arc
uncertain of ihe process necessary to obtain them,
thinking a visil to the credit of fl .institutes a kind
of third degree,
The cash customer is very likelv to develop into a
■ i it
charge CUStOQier if she is properly handled during the
time she buys for cash Hut if she is not given the
type Of service whieh she sees afforded to a charge
account customer, she is likely to quit buying at that
More on anv ha«*is.
This means that the store has not only lost her
husiness, hut also her goodwill, which in the long run
may prove the more costly, for there is no tolling how
much business she may lose for the store by "knock*
ing" it to her friends.
Adjustment Problems.
Methods adpotcd in adjustment sections of retail
establishments are interesting to follow. In probably
no ft her department of modern store service do methods of handling customers vary more than in the adjustment sections, ami it is here that the deferential
treatment of charge account customers is particularly
noticeable,
An incident which surprised the writer occurred
recently iu a certain store. A cash customer desired
a refund on an article which she bad bought. After
a hug period of waiting, during which time the customer came perilously near to being insulted by one
employee, the refund was made. The fact that the
customer did not make matters easier than she might
have done, did not warrant the treatment she received.
After the refund, the employee was asked if a
charge account customer would have had as much
difficulty iu getting a credit slip for merchandise returned. The reply to this was, "Of course not; our
charge account customers are our regular customers,
and we take good care of them."
To look upon a charge account customer as a regular patron, and a cash buyer as a transient, is indeed
a poor husiness policy.
It seems never tt) occur to merchants that the
charge customer may have accounts at a dozen other
stores, and may use them all.
Surely a woman who buys in a dozen different
places on credit, is no loss a transient than she who
buys in the same number of places for cash.
The proportion of cash to charge sales must not
■   :
' 1
; i
' j
i
i
HOW THEY DIE
It is u peculiar to\ true facl thai nol
holla   know   where   wild  PlephauU
lbs pre* ol Ivor) would be lower,
into the msrkets of lhe world.
IlUt  It   Ih  vetv ilillri. nt   with dofun
annually,   As m their deathi full In
public   And u ihould make vital res
in-   nititutioii wilt outtl e hint and
An InvestlsaUon oi  1.810 bu»lnos«
that onlv 1*1 per cent, ever live lo he
buying, lack oi capital, taWnu* ,0 om
local ons
Retail more*. In particular, die much raster than thi"
SR per cenl. for more* Rolling dry ICOdS, books am «*i»
The rale for drug, hardware, clothing, furniture and jewel
had anywhere near an even chance 10 celebrate their thir
Theae are unfortunate fads rot* bin* ness, and for tho
in money and In effort.   Per lhai reason .very buainew.
Ha own |»ut«e regularly, and auk Itself If W <>' tae A"
even the natives In the jungle countries of Africa and
•lie or whal becomes or their bodies.   If that were known
The tusks of those dead elephants would And their way
ct  businesses, of which there Is aa enormous number
formation lias been brought lo light, graphed and made
ding lor tho business proprietor of today who hopes that
perpetuate his name lo-morrow.
concerns, including factories, jobbers and retailers, shows
thirty years old.   The rest die of theae diseases: Over-
ploy Improved methods, Inadequate bookkeeping and poor
nvcrage, the death rate during thirty years being about
(lottery, paints and wall paper, groceries, boots and shoes.
ry stores is fully 55 per cent. Not one ot these businesses
lleUt anniversary.
country.   Kvery failure represents a vital economic loss
and particularly every relall business, will do well to take
dread business diseases named Is coming upon it . at;
Til E    U ETA I LER
"?.i riMi <'O.ruui \    \i.io:ut\   vi ws
Se,
I., |
he overlooked, even ill stores thai do a large credit
business.
One of lhe best known specialty stores in the conn
try, not in the ultra -exclusive class, but appealing to
a very high typo of patronage, does fully 35 per cent,
of its gross business in cash. In the majority of department stores, having charge accounts in addition,
the cash sales make up fully half of the total business done; in fact the eash business of the big department stores in the couniry run up to 60 per cent, or
more of thc annua) sales.
Cash Custom All-Important.
This being so. is there any reason why the cash
customer should receive less consideration in the way
of service! The question is the more pertinent for
the reason that the intake from sales to cash customers meets the major part of the daily overhead of Huston*. At least sixty days is required to get a complete turnover of accounts receivable; in the mean
time there musl be a sle.nly llow oi mom-, I,, |,,,,.,,
things going. Cash sales make up a very largi pan
of that inflow.
With competition as it is these days, the loss ■,**
even a small percentage of its cash custom will ni*uvi*
serious to au> store, and it seems si range thai ,,lt
executives should not lay stress on extending more
considerate treatment to their cash customers
Charge customers do not always buy on credit
There are many reasons why women do m**   .,,
their monthly hills to run beyond a certain flgun    < >
consequently  do some  of their  shopping   wiili  . m
Lack of consideration for them when buying for    .2
by employees to whom tiny are not known might <   >ih
.start  trouble and  lo** of business
Inconsiderate treatment to litem as such customer**
would be all the more noticeable by contrast wilh th,
deference shown them when buying oil credit, and i"
would not In  long for injurious results to beeonu    p
parent,
Learning Strange Things About Advertising
Results
By II  R SIMPSON
Some women readers of this will have imt iced, iu
their advertising mail, a large increase in the number of circulars antl booklets ou India-colored stock
There's a reason.
A queer   fact in   advertising   response has   been
learned. Thc same type, the same words, the some pic
lures, on India stock will pull noticeably more busi
ness from a list of women than will eome if white
stock is used.   One company carrying out very eare
fill and exact tests found returns twenty-five per cent,
better with the India paper.
News of tlijis fact has spread about. Among
those advertisers using it for retail selling is one whose
monthly mailing frequently counts up to 75.(SK). This
eompany. too, has found from experience thnt India
paper is mueh the most sueeesful for advertising to
women.
Another thing known with certainty is that typography in advertising matter for women should be
especially adapted to the sex. Delicate, light-faced
type is the thing. In borders ami ornaments, angles
should be avoided, ('urves are the thing, when re-
spouse from women is desired
How ought the sales letter and accompanying matter in a mailing to be folded? When you receive a
letter with all matter within folded with the printed
side exposed—directly contrary to the practice of
years, do you assume a mistake has been made? What
is your reaction to this kind of folding' Does it annoy you!
Whatever your personal reaction, the advertiser
using the fold undoubtedly know what ho was about.
Hundreds and hundreds of direct mail advertisers nre now folding letters and other matter with the
printed side out. Repented tests have demonstrated
Ihe superior results over the old fold. A folded piece
of paper showing only blank side, does not, iu that
form,  tell  anything     If th«   printed  side  is exposed
however, lhe recipient may | -e a heading or senlcnct
which arouses disinterest    Again, while the pri uhI
matter is about his desk, nndestroyed, the expo*'
advertising matter forces itself on him from (inn  t--
timc     Folded with (be blank side out. If will nol
Experience the Beat Teacher
The  advertiser of  extensive  experience,   who  bnt
watched returns closely, has found many Strang) sml
valuable features concerning response   A lmowJedg<
of these, and due regard for them, has much lo oo
with his success
Learning bow  direct  returns come iu from idvel
tisiug is usually a very enlightening experience for sn
advertiser.   Suppose his advertisement has been In
Sunday   newspaper,    lie  has  used  the  maga/im   tee
tion
15   liViin Sumner, a mail order advertising expert,
gives figures in a recent issue of "AUverUsinu
Selling Fortnightly " Approximately eighty per
of all returns will bo received wilhiu Ion days
sue, ami approximately ninety live  per cent   S*ii
thirty days   A rule followed by some mail ordei
vert ise rs, on Sunday advertising, is lo double rein
received up to and including Wednesday.   That wil
give, roughly, the total of returns whieh will b
eelvod,
In a general weekly, however, during the flrsl
days after publication,  the same advertisement   wil
pull only approximately forty-five per eent of the loi
returns,   In a llotioii weekly, approximately twei
three imt cent   will eome in the first ten days    I    '
general monthly, the first ton days will bring ■■* '
approximately ten per cent, of results.
Of the mediums used by retail merehants. the s
day magazine section most closely approximates 1920
THE   RETAILER
BRITISH COMJMHM   ALBBRTA
YUKON
37
x,„ mm- conditions, Ordinarily, thc great bulk of re-
lunm will eome in during tb-e next three days, unless
• i,i,   is some special iiidividtm'i circumstance,
It a newspaper advertisement is going to pull new
| hi hi ness in any quantty, the facl  will bo apparent
\,i\ soon after its publication. If returns do not come
s.,11, the chances are a thousand to om*
ihi v will not eome at all.
'SS
should test one idea and another, various articles alone
i,,1,il •■■ combination, the same article at different
points in the window, and so on, until he has definitely determined how to get direct worth-while results.
Advertising response is a deep subject, well repaying stud v.
J*
The Articles Which Advertising Sells
The thing about advertising response
which '» "-tailor pretty mueh has to learn
i.\ himself i* the articles or lines he can
advertise and gel traceable, satisfactory
- .ults What a store in one town can
advertise with excellent results, a store in
it not her town may be absolutely unable to
advertise successfully. Why, perhaps nobody knows. Competitive conditions m.iv
have something to tb* with it The inipor
taut fact is that practically every store
has things whieh it can advertise with
profit,      Some   experimenting   may   be
i ssarv to find these, but tlu-v can be
found,
Scsn the advertising of old, experienced retsllers. From month to month and
year to year, their advertising may neetn
(o be different, but. actually, there are
pieces of it whieh are repented over and
over again These are based on what
the slore baa learned in advertising about
rt sjMinse.
Some stores can only advertise profit
nbly nt certain seasons   Some must find
the just-right day of the week for their
advertising.
Then  there  is  the  subject  of  >it.*   of
Kpaee.    Will it pay a store to run scat
teted but very large insertions, or ought
it to run frequent insertions, of small si/e?
Queer Things in Window Display Advertising.    *V)
A merchant whose sales of a certain Item of fl personal nature, sold extensively to women, arc surprisingly large, owes his success to his persistent testing
ss to window display position, In theory, that point
"i his windows which came to the attention of thc
greatest number of people would sell the greatesl
quantity of items. In practice, placed In Mich poai-
linn, lhe window sold nexl lo none of it The position eventually found, which sells a '.Meat deal, 'h 111
' secluded point
Some merehants charge twenty per cent ol lhe
"mount paid for rent to display windows. Others
barge even more Windows are as truly atl tulvor*
•Wng medium aa are the columns of newspapers. No
merchant should be satisfied with windows which do
"nt, as advertising, pay out on the basis of their cost.
Hit or mlsg use of windows, no other fundamental
"f displays than "pretty" effects, will not produce
satisfactory  results.    The  merchants  should   proceed
"" the assumption that bis windows can produce results directly ami traceablv, in real numbers, I hen lie
MWAM
M A 9TUDPNT
IWlNGrtOpuTMmf
1M&JGM fltLBSC SGllING
fHtff tOv/RY MAHD-PAIN1H)
MACATION —-1 NffiP
#(,o To PAY row My
Charleston tKSCNS
AMD A GOUPLA*
Atew Suits
/
The old time sympathy and chariity extended to the college student
peddler n on the wane. Their number was augmented by previous
succetiet to a point which led to the killing of the goose that laid the
golden egg*. Wise housewives are no longer prone to welcome with
open arms the struggling youth -who required only a few more dollars
to obtain funds for educational purposes, and the door is generally
shut ni the face of all peddler nuisances.
PULP AND PAPER TO BE MANUFACTURED
FROM STRAW.
Prominent Edmonton Merchant Heads New Company
.lames Ramsay, head of one of Edmonton's largest
department stores, has been elected to d'ireet a company which has been incorporated to engage in the
manufacture of pulp and paper from straw. Tbe name
of the company is the Western Canada Straw Pulp and
Paper Company, with headquarters in Edmonton, and
ii plant will be erected this Fall In order that the 1926
crop of straw can be made into a saleable commodity,
and different wades of paper will be manufactured
under the Basho-Wlgg patents, which already have
i'ecu arranged for.
Farmers Interested.
Heretofore thousands of tons of straw have Von
burned by Alberta grain growers and countless thousands of tons have heen wasted because there was no
market other than the light one for baled straw to be
Used ill stables.
That the farmers are interested in the new industry
is evidenced by the fact that of the ,r>0 representatives
nf shareholders present at a reeenl meeting, many were
from rural districts.
On the temporary directorship with Mr. Ktimsiv,
2 38
Til E    BETA I LEB
IIUITISII  'lU.l'MlU.V.-AI.IIKHTA    VUKON
•pt.
ii,.|*
S. Swanson. V. Herbert. D, M. Duggsn and 11. I\
MeKcc were appointed and A. S. Matheson of Milner.
Matheson. Carr &. I la foe. was selected legal representative for the lirm to proceed with tho organization ;nd
arrange for the sale of the balance of stock.
ARCADE BUILDING IN VANCOUVER
i«
New Multiple Store System Offered to Retail Dealers
in City.
Pcoof oi the tremendous growth of trade in Vancouver and the faith of leading business men in the
continuation of this expansion lies in the adoption of
an approved idea for retail merchandising, as promoted by Itrig.-Ceii. II. I\ McDonald, C.\|<i.. D.S.O,
ami other prominent citizens.
The Arcade building. 138*142 Hastings West , for
a long time the home of one of Vancouver's newspapers, has been remodelled to contain 20 stores and
70 off iocs.
Kach store is independently operated by a pro.
gresslve business man. All represent special linen of
business, but together will comprise a eomposium of
Stores containing practically every kind of merehan*
disc with the exception of foodstuffs,
Many leading merchants iu the downtown district
have taken space in ihe building, which they consider
to occupy one of the strategic locations iu the shopping
district.
The rent Includes services which only the largest
enterprises can afford to maintain, such as expert
advertising agents, window trimmer, accountant  and
special show eard writer, and Includes SS Well n,(
light, heat, power, water and other services that go \**
maintaining a lirsl class modern store.
Operating then under a minimum overhead <    ,t
fi rat-class location, the merchants iu the Arcadi 1
ing will give Vancouver buyers an Opportunity I
come acquainted with  this most  recent  develop
in tin- retail ti* Id
In cities like Chicago, l*os Angeles. San Fram-is*-,,
ami Kasteru Canadian towns this system has Won lhe
lav or of the public and contributed to lhe retail Irade
an organisation of which every merchant has sp< k< n
in tin* highest terms
A novelty iu shop windows is featured with I)uk
new Arcade Huilding The entire frontage, ".'• feel
long and .'to feet deep, has heen embellished with mug.
nlicent exterior windows and island show ease*
"The remarkable growth of Vancouver," m\i\ II
.1 Halfotir. managing din-dor Pacific Itealiv (Airpor
ation, Ltd , the owner** of the property, "has ronvini
ed us that the time is ripe for this revolutionary movi
ment in the retail world here In other larw rt—
the idea has produced unusual results "
Vice president ef Canada S*tcu-t Company Visits Vancouver
Mr   Hard?)  St>*»    late |»r»*»»t>*mi of tht* NorUi Wdil la-
run Company, ami sow vtee-preetSesi el the t'snact* llt-traii
«'orn|iaii\ with heml quar'*'?* »t K«lmon'«»n wi»* a r»»«*i»Bl t ti
tor to Vancouver an hu«ln«-*« CeflSOtetl "Sftlti tlo- local brmirh
of Ibf MrCorntlrk lUwiult Compan) Thi* hu*ln«'ins I* ii<>*
I fee  Can suits   In** ui*   t onif-rtn-. •>   Vaioouii-r  o?!lr«-
L
^OV should be as careful in buying your bags, as in the selection of
1    the products you sell.   Unless the goods sold over your counter
reach the home in perfect condition, there is not complete satisfaction to
your customer.
CONTINENTAL
ATLAS & STAG Kraft Bags
are made of good quality Kraft, tough ss leather, full sixe, full count, and meet every need ss s safe
conUiner. A TEIAL ^ C0NVlNCE you,
Manufactured by
The ContinentalPaper Products
Also Manufacturer-* of
Paper Specialties of every description; Fancy Emboised, Lined Tes snd Ooffse Bsgs (7 colon); Ice
Cresm Psils snd Oyster Pails.
Representatives:
SMITH, DAVIDSON & WKIGHT, LIMITED
VANCOUVER,  VICTORIA,  EDMONTON, CALOARY,
"Using a 'Continental Bag1 it Bag Insurance" »6
TU K    Li ETA I LEB
UKIT1BH COLUMBIA- AI-UKUTA- VI'Ko.N
39
it.ui
ALBERTA MERCHANTS APPRECIATIVE OF
VANCOUVER  ' BUYERS WEEK
\ prominent local wholesaler has directed "in alien.
to a three-column advertisement which nppenred
,.,,,-,. rcceiilly  In mi  Alberta  paper
The writer nf ibis copy tinder the heading "Buyers'
\\.ek in Vanetiuver," in type of no small magnitude,
follows with a description of thc "iimgiiilicciii fashion
p.uadc of ladies arrayed in the products of Vancouver's
clothing manufacturers."
After a minute description of costumes exhibited, n
prominent position being given t<» bathing beauties, this
uidcawake merchant proceeds to lell his customers
lhat thc purchases which he made in Vancouver of lad-
i, K■ costumes are worthy of the famed Krcneli centre of
fashion, snd any of lln- coot* and soils mentioned In
his announcement "enn he secured ill twelve days' time,
made 10 yOUr order, al very reasonable pries
Such eoo|>« ration by merchants of Alberta is din ct-
h iu line with the efforts of this publication lo bring
together the merchants and manufacturers of these
:uo provinces iu tin closest hsmtoii)
ALBERTA TRADE NOTES
ciirrhiu Cash Bterc »» adwtlswl for sni<> ut CherhHI
(gancrtJ store).
Central tlrorerv. Kilmonton. nre changing their earns lo
Centra) Store,
r li Grocery i* reported lo hsve changed ownership si
Kdmonton.
Midway Grocery, retail, nd-wiis-wl toi *n\* si Edmonton.
The Itivrnlaie Grocer) i»o> changed ownership >*■ Bdmen
ion
Stewart's Wholennle Orocarj House <u- commencing a
retail grorrr> store st Bdmonlon
T It lilalne. Into ol iw»v« Islsiid, i»«»» si Iron Springs, Is
reported to hsvi oommenced s drug *tor«
WrstiorK Trsd'ng Co bti commenced ;» seneral itore al
Wesiloek,
Meetlnf ot crsdiiori ol VV V Kioto* & Co., Cardston, hold
VuruM 2Sth
c. Young bu eoramencwl ■ grocer} »,or« ttl ,:<l,1,,,,,",n
n is reported lhal Rundlei Oroeerj sre commencini a
grocer} Here at Edmonton
Rgrsmoftl Trsdlni Co sre reporied lhe iucce»*ors ol J,
v  Paquln. general stew ««i Bgremotu
Comsi Phsrmaoj Ltd„ Medlctn* Hsi. coi opernitni under
Hie name ot Bouch * Cosens
T Little ti reported lo have sold oui his drug store si
NhiUoh.
II ll. Bdwsrdl i" wins succeeded bj M Brodj Co.. gen-
•nil store at PnOOkS. .    ,.._»_
i.    ..,iu na   till'   sale   llieir
Ve-trevllle Farmers Blors sre sdvcrtls RR ioi
seneral store at Vefrevllle,
An*lo<'anadlan Importing * Drug Hpoclslt) Co Ltd., arc
reported to have discontinued business ni Calgary,
Chas. Tompkins of Calgsry. "M l0,(l oul ,,is 9T°m) ' °l°'
it Is reported that thc general Hor-? ol Mrs K. An er »>
(Rlt.) has been sold at CherhlU
i  it  tri.|w-nil  SIOI'C  lo
Donalds Trading Co, has commenced s s«n
Donalds,
A change a ownership has been reported at the Uowen
Block Grocery, Edmonton,
G. A. Holben'i drug store was burnt out at Galahad.
The general store oi H. \v. Panrucker, at Mirror, has been
sold oul .
H. li. Edwards has sold his general store io M. Brody &
Co., Ponoka,
.1. I.iind il lias commenced a men's clothing store ai Hovvley.
The general and drug store or C. H. Law-ford & Co., sua-
lalned iHghl fire loss at Smoky Lake recently.
It is reported thai tin* general store of George llupinsh,
Two Mills, lias been sold,
1.0, Gibbons lias opened a branch slore at Y colore!.
The grocery store of L. M. May bee has been sold at Calgary.
11 is reported thai Jacks Confectionery uai discontinued
husiness ai Drumhcller,
Change in ownership at Johnson's Grocery and Confec-
t ontry at Kdmonton is reported!
The Regal Meat and Grocery have opened a retail store In
Edmonton,
A general store and meat market lias been opened by John
Tweedte at Freedom.
The gent ral store of F. II. Jaynes, Kavanagh, Is reported
to have d srontlnuetl.
James Young lias opened a dry goods store, etc., at
MacLeod,
It is reported that a general slore has been commenced
In H. J Jardine nt Marwayne,
Mrs K Bablfl at Minnlhlk is reported to have sold out her
general store,
The general store of K. C. Broderson al Benalto, has been
purchased by O, C, Hanson, of Orion.
The drug and stationery store or E, C. Hogarth, Veteran,
is reported sold out.
Still the Best
Wc nre keeping abreast of the times, Our
products are made to meet existing requirements nnd just a little above the regular standard of quality.
This explains why our well-known
KEYSTONE BRAND
Rxerelsc Rooks, Scribblers, Note Hooks, etc.,
arc enjoying the confidence of the trade and
the patronage of the students.
Keep plenty ou your shelves. They will be
asked for.
Made by
Smith, Davidson ft Wright, Ul
MANUFACTURERS AND WHOLESALE
PAPER DEALERS
VANCOUVER VICTORIA
ill
1 181
tt
i
11 40
TH E    BETA ILER
I1IUTI81I COLUMBIA-   vi.MKUT.v   YUKON
Sept
I'M
THE "ROMANCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA" DEPICTED IN
EXTENSIVE ADVERTISING CAMPAIGN BY SHELLY'S
LIMITED.
The following article prepared by Fleischmann's Hals Pro
motion Department, New York, emphases ihe power of im
usual advertising.
Shelly's Limited, one of Canada's biggest bakers, and 008
Of the largest and most con sl*s tent advertisers, has scored another scoop in Its advertising.
This baker has taken about sixty episodes (rum British
Columbia h story and Is running an advertisement about each
one. Shelly's 4 X Bread) Is simply mentioned in a corner of
each advertisement. An illustration picturing the Incident ts
described in every OS,
Before starting this un que campaign, Shelly'a (Mini sample
advertisements to a number of prominent people -mayors,
etc., asking for their comments. Some of the answer.n« let
tars were reproduced in the first advertisement, which oec-u*
pied a full page in the magazine section of the Sunday tows
papers, February 18th. In keeping with the splr'.l of this
first advertisement, Shelly'a included a letter from themselves
explaining the campaign and Its purpose, Pari of this letter reads: "For many months there has heen a steadily
-.wakening interest in the romance of our province since the
Spanish Don Juan Peres first sighted the Queen Charlotte
Islands In 1771. We, therefore, have pleasure In Introducing
with this Issue a new illustrated aeries which has hen epre
pared for Shelly's called 'The Romance of British Columbia "
An advertisement was run addressed "T.» the Teaching
Profession of British Columbia." calling teach rs' attention
to Ihe campaign and suggesting that it be used In class work
Then came Ihe smaller three^-olutnn advertisements, duly
numbered. The copy Is very brief and Just g ves the main
details of the incident with names, places and dates.
This campaign brings up again the idd i|uestlon of whether
or not such publicity, which has little specific reference to
the bread, pays. Doea it Increase bread sales If Shelly's
was a new bakery and its name and bread were unknown,
this campa gn would probably fall flat Hut Inasmuch as
everybody in this section of Canada knows Shelly'a IX Broad,
all credit for this "Romance of British Columbia' adwrtislng
is given to Shelly by the reader and the baker's reputation for
being big, broad minded and patriotic is enhanced There Is
no doubt that all this helps make Shelly's bread better known
and puts It In greater demand.
This campaign is significant for yet another reason. It
seems that bakers are striking out for new things to say In
their advertising. The old cut and dried superlatives about
the bread, "beller." "best." finest,' etc, are giving way to dlf
fercnt types ol advertising, Not many of these new adver
Using Ideas are as radical as Shelly's campaign Most of
them deal more directly with bread. Hut there are adver
tlsements giving recipes for bread, dishes, selling the var ety
Idea, etc.
Sound advertising isn't always that advertising which simply tells of lhe merits of Ihe product. Tlie indirect method,
such as selling the uses lo which the bread can be put In
making oilier dishes, the advantages of serving a wide variety of breads, etc., Is often more effective, In other words,
■'selling people an idea about your bread Is better than lira*
smply telling them the plain, unadorned facts about the loaf
Itself.
The Shelly campaign, though far from the bread subject,
Is selling Shelly's 4 X Bread as a loaf made by a baker who
takes pride In Ihe pari of the country he lives in, and therefore   probably   lakes   equal   pride   In   turning  out   (he  best
bread he can bake lo leed lhat part ol the Country,
The Shelly campa gn. because ol Its difference and
execution, win no down In the annals .-f bakery ad-.**-
us one of the most unique campaigns a baker has run
The Princeton Department store is opening a bram   m
Allenby, Il  C,
It is reported thai J  H  C-awctil, grocer, ol Ken \v< *
minster  in selling out to J   I.  Charles
li  s  Bennett has commenced a clothing store m \,,
eouver
C. <*. Davis has taken premise* in tlo* new (building  ro
of Grant n«» nnd Hastings, and will short!} open a co  ..
I toner)  and restaurant
A   W   Wot has rommetued a men's (umlthlBga  "'" ■   in
Vancouver
Tha confectioner) buatneas of S   and ,\  Qoddard   *
mover, is reported ioW out
Gordon 8  White ban sold 081 bll confectioner) bu  n<
in Vancouver
It is understood that  Herbert  Pis  l* negotiating ;•'.
sale of his groren   busines* lit V i (orl*
QeorgO Powell *  BOAS havr sold their hardware Set-
Iii Victoria lo Unit Brothers of Terrace
John A   Vatlance .florist, fruiterer, Ac. hai *<dd Ms v
toria business to Dallnntyne Brother*
The following firm* ar« reported to have t'**(lr«*d from bu i
ness in Klmberley    A   Blnuiu. furn ture,  i has   Wing   11
' afe, (> i, Qfiakhamei, unor.
It  Allen is commencing » pats  flfoecr*) btteioefw in ■
confer,
tieorge   Campbell   I*   re-poMMl   lo   li.Hi'   wold   out   hi*
bttStneaS In Vancouver
J N i «<»son has opened a linen store in Vsncocvei
fJlllesple and Auit have opened a new  1S*M*t clolhlag
00 Hasting! Btreel WOSt, Vancouver
Lester Bcoll   s operating a new  }ewelo  itore In V-
i Oliver
a new la-dies wear sloes hiss conwnenced Imslneai li ■> '■
eouver   under   Stvle   ' Swe-t   SI*, teen."   I.ld
"The Kali" Is the name of the men'-* furnishings and
and shoe store which recent!) opened on Hayings 81 v
Vsncouver
Fled Cunlllfe who operates a drug bUSlneSI  10  ''"'
Avitiue. North Vancouver, has Incorporated *»in> a capl'-*1
tion of 160,000
ll I. Hodgson of MeLeod and Hodgson, Md. Orand f
is reported to have sold his Interest to Kdgar Balle\
The Cresoeni Meat Market has dissolved busiceai J«
Cowling will continue as a butcher at Niina'tno
The National Krull Co. I.ld,  (wholesale)  an* lUCCf
or lhe llerrlnglon Krull to   Ltd. at Nelson
Mrs C, Throup Is succeeded by Kllchlng   Hard**. Si **•'
City lash C.rocery, J, NV   Brognts. has removed lo K<
dale
Mlss .1,  l-'msllc has i pem-d a dry   goods brain h "'
Dunbar Street, Vancouver. •I'
THE    \l
tlUITlMH 1'il.lMi:
ETAtLER
*•    M.nivlITA    Vt'Ku.N
41
Ml
I
'v..
I
1
I
I
I
CHRISTMAS
WRAPPING PAPERS
HELP YOUR SALES
For Samples and Prices Write or Phone
(lEQlTRfl&v
V-J ****** toper Specialist *J
IOSO Hamilton srnrer
VANCOUVtM  ■ c.
Ag«ivt lot Comolideied SaIo Rook and W» P«p*f Co   Ltd
Phone Seymour 3112
J. A. TEPOORTEN
LIMITED
WHOLESALE DRUGS
PATENT MEDCINES DRUGISTS SUNDRIES
PHARMACEUTICAL PREPARATIONS
308 Water St.
Vancouver, B. C.
i '    •  i -*
Bruises        Sores
Rheumatism
Soothe the sore muscles or ligaments by rubbing in Mmard'i Llni-
ment. It penetrates, relieves and
heals. It eases inflammation and
restores the injured part to health.
Splendid for cuts and sores. It
•teriliies and heals quickly.
ALL LINES TESTED EVERY
MORNING
All longiliHtniuv telephone lines in the B.C.
Telephone Company *h system are tested ever)
morning t.» bs sure they are ready for tno uaj s
luminous.  This is another servi.'.' safeguard.
BRITISH COLUMBIA
TELEPHONE COMPANY
The liranville Kruil Markel are eonmieneing a fruil and
vegetable market.
A new grocery and confectionery slcre has heen opened
under tin management oi W. Hart.
li Is reported that the Kerrisdale Dry (ioods haa been
sold to Leonard Osborne,
Mis, Minnie Martin has Bold out her grocery and confectionery business.
Mrs. B. Richardson Is reported to have commenced a ton.
lectloncry store.
V\*. T. and S. M. Styles are reported to have sold out at
Un* Molly Lodge Grocery.
Mortgagee reported in possess on of the Thomas Drug Co.
Lid. at Victoria.
DAYS ASSIGNED TO THE WEEKLY  HALF-HOLIDAY  IN
ALBERTA AND BRITISH COLUMBIA
For a number of years it has been the practice of this pub-
lical on to li.si tlie weekly halt-holiday ruling in the more
populous towns and cities of the two Western Provinces, Alberta and British Columbia.
Such a list is particularly valuable to the travelling Irat-
ernlly, who. these days, must so arrange their itineries, that
as little time as possible be lost when eall.ng upon the trade.
A luck ot knowledge of those days which are given over to
the weekly half-holiday, tends to accumulate expenses in a
manner which makes anything but pleasant reading for their
executives.
The trade has been circularized in an effort to have complete information, and those retail merchants whose location Is
ont tied, wilt be doing their traveler friends a favor by sending
ihe necessary information to the officers of this publication:
101 Met chants' Exchange Huilding, Vancouver.
British Columbia—Mainland.
North Vancouver, Wednesday
Pentieton      Thursday
Princeton   Thursday
Powell Itlver   Saturday
Port Hanry   Thursday
Port Alberni Wednesday
Revelstoke  ,  Wednesday
Kossland     Wednesday
Salmon Arm   Wednesday
Su-nmerland      Thursday
8-n'lhers   Wednesday
■*■'••* I'       Wednesday
Vernon  Thursday
v-nr-puver   Wednesday
Island.
Alberni       Wednesday
Chemainus   Saturday
r-i *o-:   Wednesday
flOUrtftPtV      Wednesday
umb* rhuul      Wednesday
         Thursday
i -o|vsm»th   Thursday
"'•nnlmo     Wednesday
Bldney   Wednesday
Victor's  Wednesday
Ashcroft 	
..  Wednesday
Armstrong
   Thursday
Bums Lake ....
.... Thursday
Cranbrook 	
... Wednesday
chase	
Wednesday-
Creston   	
Wednesday
Chilliwaek
... Wednesday
Cloverdale 	
.   Wednesday
Coquitlam
. Wednesday
Knderbj
  Thursday
l-Yrn'e
.   Wednesday
Grand  Forks
Wednesday
Green wood
... Wednesday
Golden
Wednesday
Kamloops
Wednesday
Kills.*.
Wednesday
Kerrisdale   Wednesday
Klmberley Wednesday
   Thursday
No half holiday
,.,., Wednesday
  Thursday
  Wednesday
M,,, pole    Wednesday
Nelson  Wednesday
New Westminster Wednesday
Kelowna
K-retneos
Morr il
Mission  City
Michel
Alberta.
llashaw
llellev He
Brant
Calgary
Cardsion
Chstivln
Pellfl
Wednesday,
. Wednesday
Wednesday
Wednesday
Wednesday
Wednesday
May/Auguat
. Wednesday
:
■   4 42
Til R    RET A I LEB
IIUITISII   •'.il.lVIIII V     M.ltCltTV     VI'h.'N'
Sej.t
ei,.lie|'
Kdmonton	
\\'edliesda>
Mav  August
Kdson 	
Wednesday, Mav September
Port Saskatchewan .
N«
i half holiday
Hardlsty
Wednesday,
Mav   August
High River	
Wed lesilux.
June AUgUSl
Innisfail ...
Thuradn)
. May Augusl
Islay 	
Wednesday,
May  August
Kitscoty	
Wednesda)
. Mav   August
Lament 	
Saturday
Lethbridge	
Wednesda)
MacLeod
Wedntsdaj
Mannville
Wed need A)
Ma) August
Medicine Hat 	
Wednesday
New  Dayton  	
. Wednesday.
Mav  August
Nobleford 	
Wednesday
Mav  August
North Kdmonton 	
...  Wednesday.
Mav   August
Olds 	
Thursday,
June  August
okoioks	
Wednesdav,
Thursday,
June August
Potioka 	
Jun« August
Hedtlill    	
Wednesda)
Nohall *hoiidav
Stettler	
Wednesday*,
June August
Stony Plain 	
Wednesday,
June August
Hockvford	
N
Wadnesd
o half holidii)
Sedgwick 	
i\. June Jul>
Stavelv 	
Wednesda)
Wednetday,
Ma*.   August
Three   11 Us   	
M.i\   AUfttSt
wssm
RECORO PRODUCTION OF SALT IN CANADA  IN  1925.
In 1925 the production of salt in Canada exceeded ail
previous records, according (0 final statistics Just issued b>
ihe Mining litanch or the Dominion Bureau ol Statistics at
Ottawa. Shipments during the year totalled '.,:5;t,Tl«'i ton as
tomparcd with 207.97!*) ions produced in 1124, There was
a considerable decline In value during the vear. tin* aver
age price for all grades being ffi.ol pet ton. as against |fi.6l
in 1924.
The production in Ontario amounted to 22*6.315 Ions or
9? per cent, of the total; Nova Scotia and Alberta eontrl
but eil the remainder. The year's shipment of v'S'l tons (root
Alberta came irom the Fort MrMurray d strict, where de
velopment work in the salt indusl ry has been carried on
for a considerable time. Nova Scotia's production consist
ed of salt mined at Malagas!*.
Imports Into Canada of salt, all grades, were equal to VI
per cent of the total Canadian production Customs records
show that 193.K32 tons, worth $1,077,321. were brought Into
Canada during 1925. Exports of Canadian salt totalled 2.321
tons, while In tho preceding year onl) 965 tons were shipped
from Canada.
ONE GROCER SAYS-
One grocer who was troubled with constipation
and stomach troubles says; "Having a grocery store,
a customer told me of the help he got from eating
Fleischmann's Veast, ao I tried It and feel sale to
recommend It lo all."—A. V, Collins.
Recommend It to your customers loo. It will make
them healthy—belter customers, And calling da ly
for their supply of yeast will give you an Opportunity
to sell other groceries too.
FLEISCHMANNS YEAST
The FleUchmaon Company
SERVICE
/
vy Put Pep
into your own sales!
livery week in tlie year hundreds
of thousand* of Canadians read
the VliV advertising telling them
the story of this wonderful peppy
bran food!
Grocers who take full advantage
of this advertising, backing it up
with window and counter displays,
arc building up a good, all-year-
round business yielding them
quick turnover and
steady profits.
Selling PEP peps
up your profits,
makes money and
makes friends—and
customers who
come again.
Kellogg (Company of
Canada, Limited.
London    •   Canada
0****
PEP
the peppy bran food 19.
ISLJJTAILER
UUITIHH POLUMHIA    ALBWIITA
YUKON
4:1
.• -o,
GROCERIES of PROVISIONS
(Continued)
n
Package Tea-A Profitable Item
Address by Edwin W Wilson, at
(Jroeers have always looked upon lea as an item
lhal naturally ami legitimately should benr s wide mar
Mn of prolil nnd for lluil reason you have always )ia<l
lln feeling thai ten wns profitable, You have looked
askance ai the diminishing margin* 011 lea with thf
-feeling lhal you were making less money now. on lea,
ait in the old day* of a 50 Ui tio per cenl markup.
An analysis of ihe sit tin lion. past ami present, will
prove to you withoul doubt that your lea department
i*» inori profitable to dny than eVel before. Tea used
in i»e mueh like spleen are toda) It your spices cost
yoti absolutely nothing, if ever) dime you took in for
spires ivepe eleitr prolil, it would make inightly little
difference iii yotir total profits at tin- end ot tin- year,
lor Ihe spiee sales represent such an unimportant part
ol your total husiness
lint  as  ten  hecn n we s a  more  ami  more  important
Maples it more nearly approaches lhe status of other
Naples like coffee and flour I: naturally earns a
smaller margin. Imt its margin of profit has nol tie-
creased marly so fust a<s ita volume of sales lias -inn-raxed, so ten is n very profit A hi*  artiele to sell.
Package tea on the average will pay a margin of 2n
|K 1 eeni Io 'J.'i per eent prr lutnovei. ami lhe average
tine ean get live or xi\ lumovers a year The re lore.
while lea is nol .1 large part of lln- sales of any store,
■is \i rv satisfactory margin warrants a brief discussion
ul lea ami ihe merchandising of tea.
The flrsl change has been from buying ten ill bulk
t«'« buying len in packages This trend has been no-
liveable in all lines, but particularly in tea, This ehnngo
haa resulted iu gome remarkable advsntages to both
I'onsumer and grocer
When lea wii.h -sold iu bulk, lhe leaf with "style"
•<"|i| more readily, though the style has nothing to do
with the cup quality, Tight rolled leaf of |M>or flavor
"i body brought higher prices lhan homely leaf rich
in fragrance and strength Package ten blended for
•lUflllty nol appearance, has result..1 in better tea at
lower priees.
Hulk lea wns subject to shrinkage, deterioration
'"•I contamination In the -store. The hcooo broke 11
certain amount of it into unsaleable dust This was lost
l""lit nml lias been eliminated by the package.
The most importanl change from the grocers' stand-
Hut has been the elimination of many tea flavors and
"■■•eniratinn mi Orange Pekoe for black and on Japan
" green.   This ban come about through the splendid
u o
ptratiou of advertising grocers
with the packer:
advertised brands, iu advertising and pushing only
'••ge Pekoe or Japan flavor in the variotlf
The term "Orange Pekoe" Is ap
brands
plit-abic only to
"* grown in India, t'evlon or Java and refers only to
Pacific Coast Grocers' Convention.
a style of leaf—a small leaf with tips.   The name has
nothing to do with cup quality.
That is all lhe name means. I repeat, it does not
refer to flavor or cup quality. Often a Pekoe leaf (a
larger leaf without tips) has better cup quality than
nil Orange Pekoe. A blend made for cup quality regardless of the shape of leaf makes the most satisfactory cup nl' |t:a.
However. Orange Pekoe is a nice name, easily remembered, catches the popular fancy, and definitely
limits the blaek tea purchases to the best producing
< mint lies. Its use simplifies buying and selling and
should be encouraged,
Japan produces the linest green tea. Seventy-live
per cent (TiV, ) of the green tea used in the United
Slates comes from Japan. (Jteen lea from China and
India does not sell as well to American tea drinkers.
The tii-iii "Japan," therefore, has eome to mean "gootl
green tea,' and consumers usually ask for Japan when
they want green tea.
The advertising campaign of the Japan Tea Association has been a big aid in establishing the name Japan
as a synonym for good green tea.
Thus we lim! that to the consumer Orange Pekoe
means good black tea and Japan means good green
lea, and you can greatly simplify your ten department by confining your stocks to those two flavors.
As I travel about aud visit some of thc splendid
stores operated by grocers whom I see here today, I
I'm id that most of you already recognize the growing
importance oi the lea business in this country and
have built np very line departments. I have been
struck by the simplicity and attractiveness of the shelf
display, find by the absence of many flavors once
thought essential to a well rounded stoek of tea. There
has been a general movement toward simplicity of
names, simplicity of flavors, simplicity in buying and
selling.
Most of you have found that for the tea department to make money it must be stripped of all its outgrown, antiquated methods and mysteries and put on
lhe same basis as other departments of the store.
How is the tea department to be put in proper
order for increased profits? The first thing to do is
to ligme up how much tea you sold during the last
year It should have been one pound per capita,
based oil the number of people in the families you
serve. If it was less, someone else got the business.
Suppose it was -500 lbs.   1 venture to say that 90 per
»PI
cent, of
il could have been sold under the two names
Orange Pekoe," and "Japan.
The seeom
two flavors.
I thing to do is to get rid of all but those
Then clear out all tea older than nine
'■    1 41
Til E    K KT A I LER
IIKITIKII  r«i|,l'Mtilv     M.ni.UTV    YUKON
Sept.; 2m\
mouths or n year. Tea has n deilnlle term of Hfe like
all other organic substances,
When this cleaning up process is finished only
Ilicii-   vou are ready to buy tea.
When contracting for your year's supply of tea.
keep uppermost in mind, tho thought of stock-turn,
l-'igure up how much tea you used la**t year and
then plan carefuly how much of each flavor you
want delivered to you eoch mouth, of this year. Con*
tract for its delivery at specified dates    Do not buy
a two years' supply thinking that you will make
money on the lower priees. Remember you are try*
illg to simplify your tea department, and you can't
do it by loading it up with stock that will become old.
Another matter of prime Importance to stock-turn,
•is the amount of margin you ask. The first to break
away from the old time, long margin tradition, were
the special tea and coffee stores. Ity reducing the
margin they greatly Increased sab's and slock turn and
out of the -increased volume came greater profits Then
the peddclr applied the same principle and made further inroads on the grocers' ton business,
Only in very recent years hav.* grocers generally
begun to treat tea like any other article of merehan
disc, marking up a  reasonable  margin and  winning
back to the grocery store the business rightfuly be
longing to it.
A further step toward simplicity can be made by
concentrating on a few advertised brands In each
community two or three brands v. ill satisfy 00 per
cenl. of your customers. Make your shelf display on
these few* brands and feature them in yuiir advertising
The more you can concentrate your sales on these
nf
way
will
day
brands, and Ihe smaller you keep your Ullseellnueutui
slock, the greater your average rale of stock*turn
of eouine, eveiltualy the increased eousumpti
tea and the gradual return to the tea business
Irom the peddler and baek to th" grocery stor<
make it ihe target for price .cutters.   The trend i    „.,
is, however, toward itaudardlied prices, ami b\ thi
lime our volume of leu consumption makes tea an ileui
of gnat Importance, the principle of itttuUrdiieil
prices will be well enough established to fully proleel
groeers' lea prolil*
liricfly, then let us simplify «mr tea busiuem
Simplify the lutine* we use Simplify pure ha* -, bj
stocking few brands aud few flavor-*, concentrating
on Japan and Orange Pekoe.
Simplify wiles by featuring brands which ar. iuv
sold by advertising
Simplify ;mr present stoeks by cleaning oul sll ihr
old tea and all Ihe slow seller* Speed up stock tttrn
by taking frequent deliveries in smaller quantities
There is protit in lea IjoI*! gel il oul of lea and into
the cash register
TURNOVER TAX ADOPTED IN FRANCE
The turnover tat problem whirls It a* •been umler cosfthtef
ation in Frame for name Utne. ha* now been m>Iv«s|. nwoni
ing «o a recent ilenpatrh Irom Purl* \ 'urn-over uv made
uniform at 2 per rent «0I he levied on all bunlm-M oi Ibi
*»le (or e*.|sort of automotive vehlrlen and arre«*»orle* *,.••»
elrv. or an> other minor article* from whlrh the r»t<* ol 1&*
ta*. I* a veil »t I 3 |>er rent
The Kr.Mtch government hat* been r ven power t» t?haaf«
b) decree, ihe rate* of *|iii> on article* imported m Pfanre
BACKING THE
MERCHANT UP
Kvery week large bright advertisements
keep your customers informed of the
quality of O.K. Apples. This makes it
easy for you to get every sale possible in
the shortest time.
Sell O.K. Apples
Associated Growers of British Cdumbia
VERNON
LIMITED
B.C. •fit
THK    1{
BRITISH COLUMB
IDENTICAL PROBLEMS
(Continued from page n,
ETAILER
lA~ALHKnTA-Yl*KuX
45
I'.v
• ll"»
lativefo ahort time he um confident that a not In.
iderable quantity of goods mnnufaeturi-d in part**
n Kostern Canada and the Cnited States would be
ransported by water to Pacific Const port* here to be
mde up in assembling plants for the use and consumo*
lion of the market in British Columbia. Alberta snd
Western Saskatchewan, lie thought it would not be
long before the manufacturers of agricultural Imple*
iin-nls in the Kant would recognise the advantages and
i lie-npncsj of this method of doing business.
The speaker closed hy expressing confidence ia the
future of Vancouver as a large and growing shipping
mid manufacturing centre and confidence in the future
nf the couniry generally by reason „f the prosperity
thai would lu- induced by cheaper transport and the
wttlemeni ol its rich agricultural land.
ELECTED WESTERN MANAGER OF C F. T. L.
•lames Harkncas, provincial president of the Hetail
Merchants' Association, has heen appointed manager
James Martinets
for Western Canada from Winlpeg to the coast, of thc
I'unadinn Fair Trade League, Mr, Harkness was re-
•••'titly in Vernon conferring with the Associated Grow*
era of British Columbia, ami collecting data for his
work, whieh will include an intensive effort t«* popular*
ISC the 0, K Brand on the prairie market.
PROHIBITION CENSORSHIP CARRIED TO LIMIT IN U.S.
It I* SUrely a new type of censorship which ha* recently
heen evolved by the Uw managers of the United States who
nre disposed to bar from the mulls or from admission into
>h»t country an Knaltwli nmaatine which dairies an advertisement or cherry brandy.
The New York Journal of Commerce In agreeing with the
"hove sentiment mate* that "Mich aoaioaSfl sreatly intensl
ft*4" lhe positive loathing which Ih felt by foreigners for the
hypocracv which control* our whole prohibition management-
An thing* aland, prohibition and tt* flelltlous enforcement
n>*e doing more to discredit American!* and their country
"broad than all or the errors that we have committed In in-
ternational politic* for the pasl («••> years."
«.«,C*N *V.ATO«orT«A„ 0r K08 m FKT
»a iiZrz.i'iZ"™ r,;f? r"™
Pllahed in test*  Nvn,, i\. J/g w w*8 the feit accom-
«ec In ..I*,lhr S? rT,atlon *** crate." fe used, pro-
SrtSo^lhI?1?ie,bel,l« *™*»"*™ with the .tan*
*ru cup Hats which are inserted between the layer, of eu.
Kr^ss.:^^ -wJ b>* sk* at
chute without the delay Incident to UKfSfi  fZ
ti«S ware made and the landing force of the cri" a. th^y
truck the ground was stated by aviation expert m approx-
mately etqaaJ to a straight drop of about 80 feet One crSe
supped while the plant was about 40 feet up and hit the earth
rhu im, iT °fKab0Ut 125 mUe8 *n hour Yet evert under
thb impact less than nine doten of the 30 dosen egg. In the
crate were damaged, and not even more than four dosen were
so badly cracked as to be commercially unsalable. The American U:lway Association claims that improved methods of
packing eggs by the use of cup flats have brought about a
decrease 0f 37 2 per cent, in damage claim, for breakage dur
ms the first quarter of 1926.
BUYS FLEISCHMANN STOCK.
J. P. Morgan C. Co., Obtain Interest in Yeast Company
J P. Morgan & Co., announced recently that they had pur*
chased an Interest In the Fleischmann Company, manufacturers of yeast, at a private sale from certain member, of tho
rleischmaan family. The number of .hares covered by the
arrangement, it was said, represented only a small percentage
of the company's outstanding stock. A large majority of the
stock will still be held by the Fleischmann familv, who will
continue in full control of ita management.
The bankers explained that their purchase of the shares
was lor investment purposes and that they were not acting
for other interests which might be seeking control. It wa.
reported on Wall Street that more than 400,0000 shares, part
of the holdings ol Max Fleischmann, chairman of the board,
had been turned over to the bankers for a consideration of
between $16,000,000 and $20,000,000. The company has 4,-
500,000 common shares outstanding, in addition to a small
amount of preferred.
FORD PROFIT IN SEVEN YEARS, $S2S,441,S51
Net profits of the Ford Motor Company for the seven
years from 1917 to 1924 were 1526,441,951 and the gross profits were IS76.176.230. Herbert L. Leister, chief auditor of
the company, testified in the United States District Court
si Detroit.
The figures were brought out In a suit of the Parker Rustproof Company for royalties approximating $1,000,000 from
the Ford Company for alleged Infringement of a patent in the
use of a rust proofing process.
The most popular biscuit for many years
Tha Flavor is suparb
RAMSAY BROS. fr CO. LTD. 46
Use WESTERN GLASS
For SERVICE
YOU  CAN GET IT
PHONE SEY. 8SS7
or wrltt to
158 Cordova St. West, Vancouvir
For POLISHED PLATE GLASS
MIRRORS    ::    WINDOW GLASS
Western Glass
Co., Ltd.
B. C. Distributors of
Messrs. T. H. Prosser 4 Sons Ltd.
London.
Manufactursrs  of   Prosstrs'   Celebrated Lint of TENNIS and
CRICKET Supplies.
LTD.
Agencies
78 Arcade Bldg.,   Vancouver.
Phons: Sty. 131
Fancy Silk Hose for Men st
the "Right Price."
Writt for samples.
R. A. SIME, B.C. Distributer
TNI BLACK  MANUFACTURING  CO.
318 Homtr St.      Vaneouvtr, B.C.
Dominion Sales Company
433 RICHARDS ST, VANCOUVER
Distributors for:
Fairy Dyts Ltd (Fairy Dyt)
Harry Ptck 4 Co. Ltd
(Mtat Psstts)
Crtstona Ltd (Lemon Curd)
Plaistowe 4 Co     (Confectionery)
O-Pee-Chee 4 Co.
(Popcorn 4 Wintets)
Robert Watson (Confectionery)
National Chicle Co. (Count lints)
Hunts Ltd (Funny Faett)
Martha Jant Productt  (Bart)
Nicholtont Ltd.
(Blueing and Polishes)
Phone Sey. 7121
VANCOUVER
T. D. STARK
F. W. STERLING
Ttltphont
^^^^ Sty. SltS
STARK A STERLING
MANUFACTURERS'  AQENTB
1048 Hamilton Street
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Scsles, Siictrt, Cutters and Cabin*
ttt—Ntw, Rebuilt and Bteend Hand,
Cash or Ttrmt.
THE SCALE SHOP LTD,
Soy. 2S81
365 Cordova St. W., facing Homtr.
THK    RETA ILER
BRITISH iMLl'MKIA   ai.hi'HTa   TUKON
S.
•K   iber
Phont:  High.
IDEAL CONE COMPANY
Msnufacturtrt ot
ICE  CREAM  CONES
Purtst Madt     Cttt Lttt
335 PRINCESS AVE.
Vaneouvtr.
Da***a
201   MtrcantHt Bide . Vancowvtr,  OC
Phont Sojowour  til)
Wa«   Figur**-**"**.   Oapiajr   Modoli
Flitur** in Wood and Matai
Clothing Mangtra. Valanoa. til*-** Piw»h
Artificial   Fiomara.  C**st*a  t*»t**r
Show Card lupplita.
J. S. MAXWELL A CO.
fttpr-f tini ing
CLATWORJHY 6 SOX.LTD
Toronto. Ont
iviiytnkk is turn At sumits
Manufacturers' Agents
(Vaneouvtr, unlets othenwiee stated).
(JaserlioDS under thi*  heading are
chanced  at  tho rate of f I 20 a linn,
fnr nit month*  |>a>abte In advanr-e).
DRYGOODS
Atlantic t'nderwear Ltd. Monrlon.
Nll-K II Welch * Co Ltd. SIS
Homer street   8ey ssst.
The lllark Mfa Co. SeattleR. A.
Sim--. 31* Homer Street.   8e>   1533.
Chlpman llolton Knitting Co. Ltd.
Hamilton. Ont K If. Walah k Oo,
Ltd. 318 Homer Slrtet,   Sey.  MIT.
The Gait Knitting CO. Lid. Oalt,
Ont J J. MarKay. S04 llower Bldg
Sey. 3091.
Monarch Knitting Co. Lid. 3IS
Homer Streel—6. D. Stewart A Co.
Lid.    Phone Sey. 7525.
Penmans Lid., pari*. Ont.—J. j.
Thompson, 615 Haatinga Weal. Soy.
7377.
Rock Island Overall Co, Rock  Is
land. Que—R. A. 81me. 318 Homer 81
C. Turnbull Co. Lid. Oall. Onl —
8 It Stewart A Co. Ltd. 318 Homer
Street.   Sey. 7525.
GROCERIES.
llorden  Milk CO,  Ltd
,\!
*.il
Que.—Local Oftles, 332 Wat**    r,,
Be)   sh23    J  w  Nunn. M,,,,,,
Canada Colora and Chemical * Lid
Toronto Stark *\ Sterling, li :i,.|.
Ilton Street    H« >   6185.
Canada  Starch  m   Ltd,   M     mt
y.  t:  Rownirot. :mt Hssii .   *,v
S.*>   U9
Canadian  PottUffl  Cereal  I a   Lid
roronto   m«n«-«i»'$ i.dj   fn ijH.
tng*  Went     &*}    BSST.
w  ci«rk Ud. Montreal, Qu«   <
P   "Stark. I23 Hamilton Bl     & ,.   | t
K    W.   Ollleil   Mfg.,   1 ii.   !, !    !,
MePsrlsne, -MSB it<«t!> $1 it)   . ,*•**,
11 on   in al * snsda Lid   1 •   loo,
oui    1.  P  Mason **    «». :     ;<:,.*
l»g» Well      BO)    *$/0w
lMk>* of tho Woods Killing    > 1 .id
-1300 Kirhardn BtlStl     Bt)   Htt
w   11   ii*.*\rr*». jr. manafei
Canada   l»»». u--   10     l.'.t     I      In
(>nt    I^M-al office, 1IS0 Ham.'.-.-. s*
**-e>  Mil   C  ll  Kettsj   Mat is
I'almoin ir* 1[Company ol Canada Ltd.
Toronto, Onl   .Dean Aftntiro 1   * ti
l.areh Stre«-(     IU*   J»«ll»
The   tju-ik- :   Hoi*  I ojnj'i ■   1
office, 5,3.',. Sin HaaUng* U<
Thompson, Rales Man«««-i
Retrntrte 1 Co (Canada] 1      -Tot
onto       W   It   lln*?«-,  **.  i<*    t
llown Btreot, Vanconrpi
STORE  EQUIPMENT A  SUPPLES
llartram  Paper  PfOdSelS  Co    Md.
12*«» Renter street Norfolk i «;*'
Co L'd. I3ti Waltr Street. B< ",w
and 7K6S
Canadian Toledo BeslOS
Windsor, Onl R 8 Cnsmber* MN
Smythe Street    Sey. 3911.
Conitnontsl  Psper Product!
tuiawa. Onl Smith. I'mll11 ■
Wright    S.-v   MU,
(Uh*   McRsi       Wasad Pa**       ;
• ou titer Bsles Hook*    lOSS Hai
Street     8e>    3112
International   Business   Mai
Co   Lid.  Toronto    LOCSl  Offh N
Seymour Si    Sey   213
J. C. Wilson, Ltd. UelWte W
Ural  office,   1060 Homer  Si
fit    W  T  Hae. Manager
SPORTING GOODS.
Proaaer, T. II  A Sona Ltd, I•'  ' '
Knf.    Aaaorlaled  Asenrlea.  115  '
der 81   W.   Sey   ML ORANGE
■IMHALAj
£off££
! **m
i
%
loisrvvto.
7
}•;  DAISY" S
nt .'ices   wniili   r
1 IK'M
\ • t' <     \«.
lnltn
Mix
I AM    ' «'
" LITTLE. DAI SY
r Hosiery for In (a tits ami Children

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcret.1-0344901/manifest

Comment

Related Items