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BC Historical Newspapers

The British Columbia Retailer May 31, 1926

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Array Tne British Columbia
Quake*
rinl Qu»«ty BrilUh Ootambu W ^|t)
Sti»wt*rri.. «* Brituh Col-       -* ^y^J^V'
umbU Pur« Cine 8ug»r 2*****mm^ J
■ilRAHBEKRV W
Conditions.
QUAKER
QUALITY
NEVER
VARIES
QUAKER
BRAND
. i« vmir neighborhood to supply
* ^ ""JnT wi h Z. to «"«* *"*■*
your customers wwo •»••"
Th.» wi" »PP«cille your ent,n,ri,e'
Dominion Canners of B.C. Limited
WIDELY
ADVERTISED
THROUGHOUT
THE WEST
VANCOUVER
;:i
< ii r
PAPER BAGS
Standard—Light Kraft-Heavy Kraft
Paper Mills:
Ltchute and St. Jerome, Que.
Manufacturers since 1870
These art* our leading lines ami hii\i* lnvii for year-*
the beat bag value** before thr retail ir»«l«* of Canada
The paper Ufed in th**ir inaitiifnetiiro it uproially
made in our own paper milU and i* actually tougher and
stronger.
If a ln'tter l»aj? trere pi»**til>lf .1. C, Wilson, Limited
wmilil make it   M years In the boalnetM
J. .C WILSON, LIMITED
Manufacturers of
PAPER BAGS.     WRAPPING, TISSUE AND TOILET PIPERS
for   Wholeaaltrs and Retailers.
1068 HOMER STREET, VANOOUVER, B. 0
Phone: Seymour 781
The same price
at every store in
our British
Columbia
Territory.
5
BIG BARS
FOR
25c
PROTECT YOUR PROFITS BY
SELLING A MAINTAINED PRICE
LAUNDRY SOAP
THE ROYAL CROWN SOAPS, LTD
VANCOUVER, B. C. I Ml
THE BRITI8H COLUMBIA RETAILER
NnwtMHTTWOMNWDI
A PURE
SALAD
THC CANABA SfABCN CRUMTIB
Stock It - NOW!
The MAZOLA Season ia  here   and lhat means BIGGER Sales for every live
dealer.
Place your larger order immediately ao aa to be ready
to supply the the increased demand.
MAZOLA
<
The Salad and Cooking Oil
THE CANADA STARCH CO., LIMITED
MONTREAL THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RKTAILER
Mav
COFFEE
Saves you time when customers ask for "Fresh Roasted
Coffee." That's exactly what Nabob is. The vacuum tin
keeps the flavor in—you sell H "fresh from the roaster.
Kelly Douglas & Co. Ltd.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
WILSON BROTHERS
Eetabtiahtd 1890
Our Motto ia " SERVICE "
We cannot offer to sell you goods cheaper than any other firm is in a position to do, but wt CAN
give actual facta to prove that it ia
ECONOMY
to deal with us
IZtUZ WILSON BROTHERS. VICTORIA, B. C
Wholesale Grocers
SHAMROCK BRAND
HAM, BACON, BUTTER, LARD, SAUSAdE, etc.
n«u5ni,Ll?r ifacking hi°UM proc,uc,,, Pttt »P by P- Nurne A Co.,
VO0 CAN  EEOOMMEND SHAMROCK  BtAMD.
P. Burns & Company, Limited
VANOOUVIR
OALOART
EDMONTON I02ti
THE BRITISH OOLUMBIA RKTAILER
ROGERS
1
GOLDEN SYRUP
"The End of a Perfect Day"
Wade from finest flavoured cane sugar, a special grade of which is imported for the
purpose,
IPut up in all sizes of packages to suit your customers' requirements,
n packages designed Ut beautify your store.
lib. Una. 24 to a caae
Mb. Una, 12 to a caae
101b. tins, 6 to a eaaa.
201b. tins, 3 to a case.
Perfect Seal jars, 12 to a case.
The British Golumbia Sugar Refining Co. Ltd.
VANCOUVER, BC. THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Mu
Here it is Again
The only book of its
kind ever published
i—i
*\*)*mmim,.,m0
Forty «<ght MltCttd totOino moi* .,,
prtpartd In tht Itadtng Mehc»i of
Amonta and prmttd in an attractive t •
tftn pagt booh, Thttt tstty yti prat
t aal rofpot furnish ttmptmg %\,;u*%
Mono  tar t-conon-ttc-ftl   mono
A n*ws supply at thcic booh! ,, no*
r«-idy for d-ttribution, AH rtqumt
well bt ftHtd in tht orrttr rtctivfd Wr li
«l ©"Ct IO Iht add'tM bt'©* *»t4t>ng >tow
many fjmil ft you ttrvt. One book for
t*cn family will bt mailed to you ftbM
uttty frtt.
CONNORS BROS. LIMITED
OUch •   Harbour.  N.   B
L ugiit   Sard nt  Pacbtr*  In  the   II' ' ill
Empirt
W9
PAPER
BAGS
r -
Light Kraft
Light Manila
Now that the highest grades of Paper Bags are being
made in B. C. be careful to always specify
'WESTERN" Manilla Quality,
''PACIFIC"—|/lyin Krafi Quality,
"COAST"—ll envy. Kraft Quality,
"HITONE"-\Yhit«. Sulpl.ii,. Quality
Manufactured in British Columbia by
Bartram Paper Products Coltd.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Sole Agents for British Columbia
The Norfolk Paper Co., Ltd.
Phone Seymour 7808 and 7809
,-'
*****
k   '   I
Mo***  Kr*M
jt*
'-'
Broatl   Strip**
Whltf   SulpMtr I'I'
m
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA KKTAILKR
BRITISH COLUMBIA (e
Retailer 4
7
Wlth «hlrh '■ laweentid tho B  C. T&ADB RBVJBW.
published Monthly.
EIGHTEENTH TEAR
OBNEUAl. MNRt IIANM8R
OKU( * Kill KB. PRYQOOD8.
HARDWARK KOOTWKAU,
official onoAN or b c board
RKTAIL MKIICHANTS'
ASSOCIATION OF CANADA,
A MONTHLY JOURNAL published in the interest of Retail Merehan
dmiig nnd the Development of Commerce in Western Canada.
SUBSCRIPTION RATE; On* lv>l!ar Vn Yrar, psyiblo In advnnce.
Adfortlalsg Rsttt os Application
Publithtrt:  PROGRESS PUBLISHING CO. LTD.
Suit* 10t 2 Mtrehanti' Eichangt Building
VANCOUVER. B. C.
TilephOBI $-7  3161 Cable Adiln-ss   Bblpplog—All Codei
EdllOf, J S  Morrison \V  N Code. Iluslnvis Manager
Knlvrrd at Ottawa aa Second clas* matter
\    Will   So 9
r=s£s=ssssrr"-r^:rs£:T seats
VAM'tilVKU |;r. MAY. 1926
The following roprtttnt R. M. A. Bra nch tt
In tht Provlnct of Brltlth Columbia:—
Armstrong a. Smith, Sec.
Cranbrook C. J. Lewis, Sec.
Kamloops A. C. Taylor, Pres.
Kelowna Andrew Fraser, Sec.
Lytton II. Rebsgllstl, Sec.
Nanaimo N. Wright, 8ec.
Nelson E. P. Otgot ,Sec.
New Westminster	
and Fraser Valley...D, Stuart, Sec.
Revelstoke W. A. Sturdy, Sec.
Vancouver W. F. Ing, Sec.
Vancouver, B.C.
"Made in B. C."
Revival of Interest in Local Stile of British Columbia Products.
Kan il ta r i t y brink nuiti'inpt is an uld saying whieh
' Itcrm **i I ruth in it. one gels *q accustomed
ll tng ur n eontHtlon, that one falls tn n-»t> it t,r Its
-'■:■ it .nui- Thus it in thai tin movement now <>n foot
'■■' improve and « xtiiel the markets for H»« indusl Hal
i* «lueta ,,f British Columbia fails !<• achieve it** full
jKiw.? ht reason «»f tin* tendency in our minds lo n ul*
"• lhal although itot s new movement, it is um* which
il'insiids renewed attention »«t«l is worthy of it
ihi« is im "small town stuff." this ery for local
mppurl f,.r home Indtiatries It is -good economies and
kqckI log-i* Tin- British Oovcromcnl, whieh ean hard-
I) '• accused si small lown policies, has fathered sn
■\''i »ivi campaign, the slogan of whieh is "Buy British Uo-mls," n,„j ||H, „!},,.,. countries have ailopletl ^im
|lS' campiiim     Why is this'    What is lhe nml rl\
•H principle! Ii U this The home markel iov n pi -
''"'■ '" "'it lln- nearoil nml moal eoiiveiilent, should be
" ' * »l nympalhetli and should absorb thi* greateal
volun i ,,f output, thus enabling lhe Industry lo estab
,,s-- «m n Round footing and to produce in sufficient \«*1
,l"";!n maintain low coata ami to sill in other markets
'lii'l    Min-ilim
iheli Hurplug,
Moxl countries endeavor to preserve lhe advantages
•l  th, ir I. i.   .     t..   . ./   .....ii...  Inflff*
Vi
■omi countries endeavor to preserve tne ativanim-™
; ,!" it* home markota by means of « protective tariff;
1,1 '•' among them    If the pHnelnlo oi proteelion la
v ""I om., thru mi extension of that principle la
,'!jUn'b round, i.e., tin- endeavor <*f any one section of
""">iry iu facilitate thc sales of Its local manufac
"r" • within iu own borders
. ' M provlneo such ns British Columbia, the pHn*
l||,!' ls far mora sound than it would I"' In some of the
","1   -MeMj populated and longer established euat*
,in parts of this continent, It would, for instance bo
romewhat absurd f«»r New York to start a campaign
"Buy New York Products,11 for the reason that the
products consumed in New York are, in the main, produced by hundreds of factories situated well within
lhe commercial area served by the port of New York,
by its financial Institutions, and by its importing and
exporting houses. Practically every factory in the
iMst.ru half of the United States pays tribute to New
York hi one way or another. But in a young provinee
such as ours, where industries must perforce be on a
small scale, except those which primarily are producing for export, it is really necessary to create a public
icitlimeill in favor of thi'ir products, if they arc to
.•r.>w into anything beyond the "village" stage, for
Iheir market is in many cases a restricted
i it,i, by reason of our geographical situation, and
lhal Ihey therefore must perforce look to their local
markel as their mainstay, until such time as they are
l.iu enough to produce on a large enough scale to sell
abroad, which term includes other parts of Canada.
In any well balanced community, there must be in-
dttatrica of i> varied nature. Agriculture, mining, for-
iij(t products, fisheries-—those arc basic industries, ami
ran subsist even without any population in the centres-in whieh they are carried on except those actually
engaged In those industries, But for a well balanced,
progressive comunity, it is necessary to have varied in-
duatrios .manufacturing products which are required
hy those industries and by the people engaged iu them,
who In turn are consumers of the products of those
basic Industries,
Wc  <lo not   believe it is   necessary to  stress the THK BKiTlSIl COLUMBIA RKTAILM
point; overvouo will admit tli.it il the products ol a
local factory are as good as. ami at hast no dearer
than, similar products produced elsewhere they shoul.
have a tail* chance of success in then* home market, But
have thev? That is a question which meets with 8 varied response, Some do, many do not, There are many
and particular local reasons why it is difficult for the
small manufacturer to horn in on the local market, thus
making it impossible for him to expand; to employ
more hands; to help build up our cities ami province,
Firstly, regarding products consumed in the home,
purchased by the housewife. A large proportion of
our population originates elsewhere; they come here
from Eastern Canada, from the Old Country, from the
Cnited States. They have a natural tendency to Continue to purchase the products they used before tiny
came here, if they can get them. They ask for them
at the stores, the retail merchant responds to Ihe pub
lie demand. He must, Next, there is the question
of extensive advertising' or products made elsewhere,
in the national magazines, principally of American origin, which have a very wide circulation here In a
certain weekly of enormous circulation, advertising in
which costs $7,000 per page, a certain varnish manufacturer anounces a new varnish (probably no better
than the rest, but skilfully advertised), He states that
'it may be obtained in Canada from his Canadian factory. Well and good. Hut what chance has tin British
Columbia manufacturer of varnish, which may In- quite
as gootl ami eVCII Miincwhat lower priced I" jf< '
ul  lhe II   C   public     No need tn sires**! tin,, j,
moment's nllecliun  will enable  the  reader !
numerous similar instances.
Then we have what is a more difficult meni
ilitiou in overcomes the tendency tu imajt'inc tl
ported" product! are the superior «»f those math
people iu our own midst     The writer reuu
manufacture] of high*elass women's blouses in i.,
England, who actually used to ship his produ
Paris, s,. that In- eould sell thnu from there tn IV
for th«  reason lhal English buyers wanted    r
goods     There see,us to In* an actual pnyudicc ill
eases against the local products    There rs no n
wherefore, it is jusi an inexplicable fact,
Tin  retail merehanl in a |»<*>t* ivt factor in ihi-,
ation; In* can do a tremendous amount toward I
a kin«lli«r Sliril toward the products of our lui
dimities     In a short time such a poKcy Would
warded by a recognition on the pari **i the publii
the merchant was working n> lln beat interesl*
community    Hy  display*,  selling  i-ffort   and   I
mendation, the retail merchant can quickly seeui
a widening nf the local market i**r local prodm'■
by bo doing he will at the Mime time widen his .<u
ket by Increasing tIn- number of operative* ■ 1.1
in our local industries
It i> worth the effort
M.*,t
ear
I   A
■•call
"!!■
I!,,
'! ,
Price Maintenance Making Headway
Progress is New Reported in Three Lines of Business
Branded Article and Fair
Price stabilisation is the business question of the
hour in Canada. Attempts to inaugurate an experiment in price maintenance in a number of lines are
coming to a head, Tire manufacturera and distributors have already worked a system for the maintenance of prices to the consumer on standard makes of
tires. Recently the retail ami wholesale grocers, together with a group of food specialty manufacturers,
met in conference and the result was the inauguration,
on a small scale at least, of a price maintenance policy
on some of the Identified (that is. trade marked
branded, or mucha dvertised) lines. As regards the
drug trnde, original promoters of priee ntabiliaption, it
is hoped that the price maintenance campaigning of
the past year will result in the establishment finally of
a proprietary articles association, such ns has function-
ed successfully in fJreat Britain for forty yoars, in pro.
teeting prices on some 2.000 branded lilies of merchandise,
If price maintenance proves feasible and workable
in these Hues, it will undoubtedly be extended to other
fields, such as men's furnishings, some hardware lines,
etc.
The price maintenance campaign is a development
growing out of the troubled conditions of merchandising of the past few years, which have upset to a considerable degree the established conditions in the field
of distribution. Merchandising units have grown up
on a scale previously unheard of; these are the large
department stores, mail order houses and chains of
shops. They have demanded and obtained special consideration in the purchase of goods, and have procH-
-Aim at Stability.   Protection for Manufacturer of I
Profit for Distributors Sought
<ally eliminated the wholesaler from their di#i
tion chain     Hy tin- elimination, too, in some <-,■-. .
the "service,"  function of tin  ordinary retail      v
tiny have go reduced their coats tm to be able I
pries below tin pi.nt? that would afford a living i'*
tit tn the retail men-hant  who was prepare,I *••
• li livery, charge and  full momrtment  services  '
customer!
Development of the new merchandising units i
not have Caused anv real upset in tin  nrdinarv  i    ■
• o I
of distribution had not something like n menh       *
panic hit  the trade     A  veritable avalanche of '   ;
cutting, seen t rebates, quantity iHscnunK din''
from manufacturer to retailer, has fallen upoi
wholesale ami retail trade of Canada
Price Maintenance Offered as Cure
Price Maintenance is now suggested as the rei
that will bring relief to the thousands of Indei
ent retail merchants throughoul Canada, who ar
baek bone of lhe distribution system and who. thr
control of perhaps Wl per cent   of the retail sah
the country are able to make or break any man
turer, aiming at thorough coverage of Canada
whole or any substantial part,
The plan is for the formation of nn aasoei
that will awiist the manufacturer in enforcing -Hi'
adherence by distributors to the wholesale nml rel
prices that he fixes, the penalty for the price pul
on anv line definitely taken under the aaaoclati
wing being stoppage of his supplies Of all Itlenli
lim-s,
Retailors, on the whole, arc enthusiastically l""1 Ifl'jli
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RKTAILER
jil.ii
I)   I
ijixi
ill'')
llfll1
Sol
I HI I
Wholesalers, too, may be put down as strong.
.,i„g it.    These two ftoal links in the chain of
jnution see iii it the living wage for the services
, nder ou the wile of any particular article. Man-
,is have, iu it number of cases, declared them.
, !,,i price maintenance; others are hesitating;
,,,,uinls for deferring their decision nre varied.
question  the   workability of th,»  plan     Others
its legality, although the backers of the cam-
,. im fairly well tn have established that point,
s,e iii I heir Http|Mir! of priee maintenance tin*
.  tom of some of I heir biggest mail order house,
, , nt  store and ehain store accounts,    To this
lion, tin- retailers answer thai the accounts are
<Mh having, lhal liny are here today ami gone
rru-a . moreover the nut step nn the part of the
Sue** will be tbe manufacture by thcmSclvcn of
ie*  tiny  push,  and  thus  tin   discarding of the
icturer whom Ihey seem to In friend today, They
il ihi manufacturer must be prepared tn choose
i the thousands of aggrexsive, stable and per-
. r  independent   retail  merchants of Canada,
.   mn   hand,   whose   gomlvvill   is   iticalculaltli-   in
i the distributors, on the other hand, who givy
i  today but whose business offers neither stab
■■:  assurance  nf j* rmaiM nee    However, pt in*
lonancc   doe*   imt   aim  at   elimination of chain
or mail order btmaeai hut merely al thc fixation
..u pricea on lines where lhe goodwill value is
"i, staples and bulk lines, the chains ma\ con-
• I., as they please
Thi price stabiliaation movemeni »*• making head-
.. sn i greal merchandising experiment To busi*
m in whole, perhaps its chief interest lie., h lhe
let " il it is nn effort 10 promote Usability when -.tab-
lilj is undoubtedly nn important need Siiruifn-aut
•>" h the fact that the movement is a recognition of
bi ii parlance of the retail merchant as tin aejalone
f thi whole arch of suer-essful business
' iu
ANOTHER LOCAL FIRM 8TR0N0 FOR PRICE
MAIHTBHANCB
• ••re baving for lhe  Bast  al  the latter part of
•ipril  .1   T Crowder, president of the Canadian Pair
''"• I.'-ague, received the following letter from the
Dickson Importing Company, Limited, the well-known
local •> i eoffee, and cocoa dealers*:
Vancouver  April 15, ID26.
Prtjiidrni .1 T Crowder,
1 Vi  .linn yn\r Trade I-eagUC
M' i'nitle Building, Vsncouver. B 0.
I'1 ' Sir, We itn> iu favor of Price Maintenance,
'''"•• '' l"se our cheque in the spirit of good faith and
'M'l nation for lhe ultimate establishment of nation-
™ " dr trading,
-i Western Cnnmlian distributors of "Oeorge
•*yi   > Tias." we have always followed the plan oi
prici n ft In to nance .nml have the unqualified support of
""  retail trnde.
n 7 success along these lines prompts us to extend
]° >'    oul utmost in furlheranee of your plans for the
'"' "" hit Trade league
Very truly yours.
DICKSON IMPORTING 00. LTD,
IVr A K, Bstoy,
We Sell It
You Hand It Out
That's what Palmolive Advertising * * *
On Billboards * * * in Magaiinea
• in Newspapers • ■ • Doea for You
We should think you'd like it • • ♦ a product that
move** on and off your shelves automatically. We
should think you'd be glad * * • to be relieved of the
responsibility of personal salesmanship. Fraction.
ally less profit persaie • * • more than made up by
huge sales volume.
Palmolive is a concrete example of quick turnover propaganda preached by modem sales experts.
Not once a year * • • but twelve times a year ♦ • •
that's what you can expect when you make Palm.
olive Soap your leader!
CLEAR CUT SLOW MOVERS
Why give shelf and storage space to nine or four-
tesn brands of slow selling soap when three leaders
do most of the business? You can name them, off
hand * • * you know that of these three Palmolive
is favorite.
The few customers who ask for some slow mover
can easily be switched to one of the popular three.
That's what other merchants who feature popular
brands report.
WHAT YOU DO.
Use Palmolive window displays ♦ * • prominently
♦ * * to tell the world that you, too, keep a popular
brand store.
They're practical * * * easily put up, never space
killers. They're beautiful * * * giving color and life
to your windows, thus attracting attention from
every passerby.
These displays are your tie-up to the hugt volume
of Palmolive publicity which makea Palmolive the
best known product in the world. "That Schoolgirl
Complexion" is a catch phrase which Is understood
and recognised everywhere. Palmolive window displays * ' * and counter displays • • • sre supplied
free, all carrying charges prepaid. They're right up
to date * * ' following the correct billboard and mag-
atine pictures.
You want the latest, of course' * * write todsy
and ask for it. And • ♦ • chick up on your stock of
Palmolive, and if it's low, order from your jobber.
The Palmolive Co. of Canada Ltd.
MONTREAL
TORONTO
WINNIPEG
3'.'16 10
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
M
Chloride of Lime
New Style Waterproof Package
Supplied by all wholesale grocers
In British Columbia
Manufactured by
CANADA COLORS ANO CHEMICALS LIMfTED
Toronto Winnipeg Vancouver
Agents:
STARK St STERLING
VANCOUVER, B. C.
QUALITY HAS CREATED
DEMAND FOR
ROYAL
STANDARD
FLOUR
Be ready to meet your
Customers9 Needs
Milled io Vancouver by
Vancouver Milling and Grain Co.
LIMITED
Head Office and Mills:    VANOOUVER, B. 0.
WARM
WEATHER
ha«* s« i in early ihi* year, erratlng a lo**.'
for lei  I'li-am aiul Suit  DHllkfl     ll*»u  ix \    ?
Ktlpp!*f   nl
Ice Creini Paila
Soda Straw*,
Drinking Cups
Paper Plate*, etc
\\\   nave eoHipIetc  alnckn ami ean fill  vow
mill is pruniptl)
Wi   «ir«* at your aervlet*
Soil, DividsM i Wright, Ud.
MANUFACTURER!   ANO  WHOLIIALC
RAPf R OEALCRt
VANCOUVEI
VICTORIA
When They Ask For
EMPRESS
ORANGE
MARMALADE
Be Sure to Servo EMPRESS
Subtlilutet will not talitfy
EMPRESS MFG. CO.
VANOOUVER I'l'jl
TIIK BRITISH COLUMBIA KKTAILKR
ll
fl
.* •
GROCERIES & PROVISIONS
r
GENERAL CONDITIONS
Vancouver, May l'». 1026
1 •,  • •tail grocery buaineaa eoutlnuea lo ihn** a
ild . inereaae throughoul lhe provinee   Merehan-
„, is moving In greater volume, and collections arc
rv i»',",'l
Wholesale hooaea alao report a large increase in
; j* bunittews, ami proapeeta for summer antl fall ari*
Ii would appear lhal the normal stage
ii>, f »« nol been enidettl in I. (' since tht1 termination
ihi' Ureal War haa once again been reached Th«-r«
i ,:u',*-r. nn Ihhiiu. niul unthintf l»" Im- umluh excil
ii just a general upward movement in iln- busi-
irumelcr
incriea «ri« getting $tarte<l up tin* roast, ami
iperatiotif than have been ilu* ease for lhe pasi
a -f.7s.ii-,' looked for    Indications al presenl point
utoiher year of high laltnon prices   The Rah ean
industry in ll (' is i*iinir.i||i-i| bj four large firms,
uuidr nf tin  keen oont petit ion from American
■'>' '-''i buyers, the "big four" will practically eon*
iml ihi entire B C aalnton paek    Om dollar per 'ase
.   r than last year i* looked f<»r on Boekeye Cohoes
Pink*   c«mt of operation remains high, nnd priee*
i'i foi fresh Bfh have advanced    These faelor* com-
i■••; with the anticipated smaller ealeh will eause
•■*>■ - ■ i itiffen
Prtih Fruits.       Condition*   in   the  Okanagan,
■■■'■''■*• pontes tho major portion nf Ihe fresh snd can*
"i fruit and vegetables, are exceptionally bright
l';i!;-,ji.' i r.»|»H me   looked   f««r   from   Vernon   right
' "■ <:h in Oliver    There has been prnelieall)  no
damage-, ami iili*.*»l growing weather prevail*.
i marked Improvemeni iti marketing conditions,
i>< rotta fall aeetn* assured fur Okanagan grow-
riitl
Will
pr
i r»
Sufur   There haa been no ehange in local quota-
l*"* for tome weeks, lhe prevailing priet al present
1 ►* 18 ir* for granulatetl «|in> il.  Rack*      South
•wriesn sugar in -tUi available at l$M In bulk only
ihi i us maikei in Ne* Vork la, if anything, n lit tic
•finer   Hranulated ahowed an advance on May 12
s    FVanclseo, nnd -Montreal of Ifl renin a hundred
'"< * lhan government recently passed a regtilallmi
''ing the acreage of eanos »•» be planted this year,
"'" ' > to place tin Indualr? Ihere on n wore profil
J""1 ''aai*     This combined with the fact lhal the
!J*VJ f"UHuin|ii*iun moniliH ire lust ahead, would in
olpnti ihnt heavier itocks should lie carried
Evtporatad Fruits- Prunes are n little aaaler In
'j'1"  with present quotation* attractive   Pricea nre
*'','" advance  before  new erop,     Apricots and
"   i,H are Mill nut of night* with a consequent lim*
""■and, and without indications as to fall pricea
!|l,«'d apples are moving well al present low
Dates are tinner, ami wholesalers report lhal
oricex are entirely oul i»f line, ai compared
'placement coata.
'iln!
Kvn
|ui
|u*i -
will
nnother 80 days; pricea will he about 12>/2c. for 3
crown re-cleaned,
Canned Peas and Beans are moving steadily with
amall stocks in si-rlil lo carry ihrough until the new
pack is ready. Fruits are also moving well, with
last year's straws and raspberries just about cleaned
up.   New strawberries should be ready about June
|.*i
Singapore pineapple at the new price of **$5.60 a
case is attractive buying, and is moving out well.
Crashed Hawaiian pineapple has also been reduced
tn II 4ii for ones t'lat.aml $2.3;') for 2s tall.
Salt—Iodised has been reduced to $2.75 per case
for Windsor and $.70 for Leslie's. Iodized salt is
fi cl b ming a popular seller.
Sago and Tapioca.—Slightly higher prices are being quoted for future delivery, although spot stocks
can be purchased for iM.tiO for sago, and $4.S0 for
tapioca,
Shelled Nuts.—Walnuts from Manchuria arc low-
in priee, with white meat dry-cracked halves nt 3.'»c
snd j»ri<i's at 30e. Shelled almonds also show a decline
CONSOLIDATION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA'S
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE CANNING PLANTS
Ki*
* crop Australian currants will be available it*
In the largest consolidation of interests the fruit
and vegetable canning industry of Hritish Columbia
has yet experienced, five large companies operating
throughout the province have merged their holdings
and %% i 11 operate under a new million dollar company,
lhe Western fanners Ltd,, with headquarters in Van-
eouver The eompanie8 participating in the merger
an National fanners, Ltd., Vancouver; Heneh Knkens
To Ltd. Victoria; Kamloops Canneries Ltd.. Kamloops; Pacific Berry Growers, Limited. Haney; and
okanagan Packera, Limited, Kelowna. The new
merger company will control between 35 and
.in per cent, of the fruit and vegetable pack of
British Columbia, Bach ol the five plants will continue
to be operated, and it is stated officially that other
plants may he acquired in time.
The principal advantages of the union of all these
plants lies in the fact that the merger will be able to
turn oul every variety of canned fruit nnd vegetable
required by the market, am' al the same time
take advant'ago of the economy that comes from consolidation ami reduction of overhead costs. Thc amalgamated companies will put their plants on a basis of
Rpecinlixed production and this change will be effected
this year For example, the Victoria holdings will produce nothing but jams and will use Vancouver Island
prodlicta onlv; the Kamloops plant will oroduce canned
lomatoea onlv; the Kelowna plant will specialize on
10 inn toes and vegetables, and Vancouver ami vicinity
plants will produce jams, canned fruit and vegetables.
11 is understood that at Vancouver plans have been
■i   ■
\    ii
*> 12
THE BRITISH COLUMMA ftKTAiLBk
\h
drawn torn new $100,IHK) plant, ami thai a eniilrnel is
about lo he let for its early construction.
Hitherto thc merging plants have heen operating on
a competitive basis, handling mixed and limited lines ol
produce, Sueh conditions made it Impossible to develop any export markets, with the result that tin- whole
industry in British Columbia was cramped ami hamli
capped.
I'nder the amalgamation, the principals hope there
will he economy in operation, iu overhead supervision,
there will he uniformity in sales effort, ami a uniform
ity and volume of production that will warrant cultf-
Nation ol* British and foreign markets
CANADA BISCUIT COMPANY FORMED
Following an announcement whieh appeared in tin-
April issue ni tin* "IV C. Retailer," the merger nf -**ix
huseuit firms has been completed, with the following
houses partieipating. McCormick Manufacturing Co.
Limited. London, Ont.; Montreal Biscuit Co., Limited,
Montreal; Paulin-Chamhers Co.. Limited. Winnipeg;
J, A. Marven Co.. Limited. Moneton; Northwest Biscuit
Co.. Limited, Kdinontoii, ami the Northwest Mill and
Feed Company of Edmonton, This last-named concern
is a subsidiary of tin- Northwest l.isenit Company,
Frank A. McCormick of London, Ont, has been
named president of the company.
It is announced that none ol the factories i»f these
several firms will close down as a result of tin* amalgamation, all heing maintained as branches under tlu-
new scheme. Among them they have more than 2.into
employees on their payrolls, whieh now becomes tin-
payroll of the new eompany with a total in excess of
$3,500,000 annually, according tn officials
Total assets of the merged companies amounl to
over $7,500,000.
Thc capital stock of tin* new eompany will consist
of $2,500,000 first mortgage t»'j per eent, sinking fund,
30 year gold bonds, authorized, with an issue of $|,.
600,000 ami authorization of 50,000 shares of " per cent
cumulative preferred stoek with a par value of |100
THE BORDEN MILK FACTORY AT SUMAS
Newly-equipped Plant Has Now Facilities for Handling 60,000 Pounds of Milk Daily.
Among tin- more important industries of tin- province is the plant of ihe Borden Milk Company at
South Siunas in the Fraser Valley, Originally the
property of the It, c. Milk Condensing Company, this
property has been enlarged and equipped with the
most up-to-date machinery at the expenditure of many
thousand of dollars.
Founded in 1S57 hy Gall Borden, inventor of the
vacuum process for milk evaporation, the company
commenced operations iu Canada in the year IHH7. the
first condensed milk being confined to ihe gweetened
variety under lhe old original "Reindeer Brand"
label. Then followed the "Eagle
Brand," famous the world over,
which has the largest distribution of
nny processed milk.
The plant at South Somas has
facilities for some 110,000 pounds of
milk per day or 600 cases of the fin-
ished product, and is under the man-
a shaii, iIn Immediate kmm- to U- £!,f)|iUi(a)
in hi shares of common stoek, no pur value nui
$87,280of whieh will be issued.
TAINTED MEAT
I low easily an over sesloua reporter ran,
la ting a wrong angle on souic Important ui
cause ihe publication of materia) whii-h f,.-
entirely wrong impression lo the minds ol thi  in
Vancouver eitiaena wire aghast at ih<
that meat Infected With tuberculosis  ami therefi
lit for human consumption, was being offered I •
in tin   retail stores of the eity, nml dcmotldci
mediate investigation as to why such meal n
by In-alili Inspectors instead of being cwutugi
mediately lo thc Incinerator
Since tin provincial governmenl * I ••«- •« I** I *
up all lords inthr Frnw-r Valley  district  ill ord
obviate lhe nccesaitv for a restrieled area  ll
tnrally followed thai a large increase in
from that quarter resulted
The Vancouver puhlie havi been consuming
meat for a itttmht r of years, Inii all eareasm*
h.ui-* passul as fit for human consumption I
subject to tin mlnutesl Imtpeellon, and those \>
any. ahowing lubereular evidence are eondenu
tlestroyed    It is a will known fait that meal
fur sale iu the retail stores of Vancouver ?•*<•
never before been of a higher standard
Thr presenl agitation, based on a isisciu
has Im»-u responsible for mueh Inconvenieuei
retail butchers ef Vaneouvt r
VISITS VANCOUVCS
V    K   Mi l.«an   nut touring  lilneclur ol  thr  NVl"* »
Reflate! i mn (>'*>m nf tiniotlo   Limited   ,**Hl a |»«ri"! * *
lo l|)o  VftBCOttVir oifitr ot th* rnn»|Mt*a>   earl)   Ifl  "'
\ir  Url^tsa *«• mm li Iffipivwsed With Uw iiliha* I'f"
oi Vsocoarer, *itni mreessti laewsstoa ImsJBsw foi
|Mti>  lit (lil-t i.trioirv
I   |IHI
"l/nl
agemenl <»f John D Murray, i man of wide ■ m"
in tin* milk canning buaineaa who has been hi*
Borden ol'mpany for tin* past 2't yearn, moving '
from Quebec in lirj'l
The Borden Company has three large pi
Kasti-m Canada, one al Truro, N s, antl two ii
ford County. Ontario  Tin* choice of the South S
in the Chilliwaek end of the l^raaer Valley wa«
only afler the  most  careful survey oi all  thi
ly territory available in the Wrst
Ui-eogni/.ing   the   heavy   responsibility  "'   '
tailer, the Borden Company have for marly Si
years co-operated with tin  trade, and maintaii
repulalioii for the highest quality of canned mill
duets.   All milk processed is from tested herd*
milk lhat does not  pass thf rigid Inspection <
Company's experts is rejected.
I 'V
I hi'
South Sum*-* Plant of Bordfln Milk Company I'I ll
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
13
Nonsuch News
Ulutd tj. Nontuth UmiUd-TocoMo-Makon ol ill kind, ol PolUhei.
WHAT DO YOU VEIN
"a small
item"?
u m>u eoas&det
. i^'iimrtt.
\I1\\HH "itlM       Ms«!l
-.ti,   |kOIkIi  In
.*, toer* detail,
but U >i>U *»»l»t
IO   I  ■»**   '»*«t'*
-    twisbtisfctag
*    :••;■■.)'*, <»«Mi
(oi nelimi onl)
ntt i« hat Ai'*' ot
merit  roe win
RECOMMEND
NONSUCH
(Liquid)
STOVE POLISH
wh'rh   h«»   aSSB
riifinuitetHlenl  by
Ies4ls| merrlmtiu m
Csaada ■?•»» won**
Mimu   "JO   fStfl
Nonsuch
May 31 to June 5
Nonsuch Polish Week
REMEMBER THE DATE
May 31 to June 5
NON8UCH WEEK
DISPLAY
NONSUCH POLISHES
In \»iir Windows
on > our Coaoieri
or> Vour Shcl-res
Stick   NOQSUCh   Streamers
\  11  V\ Ittitows
snd
T»n\ ibotit Nonsuch
i*oi!ith«v** io Votii (ftwiomerti
PRICE
MAINTENANCE
Nomuch Polishes have been
known In I'anaillan homes as
Ioiir ns then- have been
itovca in polish. For more
Mum ?a> -years Nonsuch has
looped  all  stove  polishes  in
i-oini ol sales—and silil does.
Nonsuch week will Impress
os th*** minds of your eus-
I omen lhe tart that you sell
Nonsuch
Special displays of Nonsuch
Polishes made in your store
dtirtn-e Nonsuch Week will
product results which will be
apparent for many weeks to
follow
NOfttUCh Polishes are pol-
islii*** that VOU CtUl always
maintain prices on. for they
are always repeaters and not
"shelf warmers" They are
s'l-ath ii lllng lines that are
always dependable sellers
because tln*\ Rive satisfaction to your customers.
Nonsuch lines pay the retailer liberal profits and al-
w.ivs sua ran tee repeat sales.
Special weeks create an in
ierest in the stores which par
ticipate in them. They help
to create an element of activity in the stores which feature them and help the sales
of all lines as well as the line
particularly featured.
People prefer to trade in
busy  stores.
They prefer to <!o business
with progressive merchants.
Nonsuch Week will help to
create such an Impression
about you and your store.
.. *   tt.,    public   'hat        [ l
>ou sell touA* that you *re      *^w
proud to recommend   muxi**
•i mi   price )ou ttJi**: '0I       ' *'f«?!m;n!iiiii*5
,        It jm .it sales can only      j
goods thai Rive
• on   N ou On n«»t Inoe       j. . „
to cut prieei lo order m sell      I S*
Nonsuch  Polishes      "When
MHir  CUatOBtera   111   Nonsuch       i
lliioi ihej  coatlnus to buy    j Uj^JHIU
litem'* 	
v onmch Polishes ore adver*
't'd in Puhln alums xvhth
> into homes iu every sect ion
of Canada.
8TARK & STERLING
1150 Hamilton St.
VANCOUVER
Are Sales ARent* for Nonsuch
Polishes In British (olumbia
lit tt-.ii Columbia merchants
will alwa>s obtulu prompter
, service b> plncliiR orders for
1 Nonsuch Polishes direct with
these agents who carrj Non
10Oh lines 'n stock, who are
close at ti.tnd. and anxious to
- rv tee  to Jobbers and
Rata tiers  handling Nonsuch
lines
For Over 30 Years
Nonsuch Liquid Stove Polish
has been
The Largest Selling
Stove Polish in Canada.
NONSUCH STREAMERS
POR YOUR WINDOWS
ThS newest addition to the
Nonsuch Family is proving a
good reposier,
SAVES US, SILVBE
ll Rives a quick and lasting
polish With little rubbing.
|>oes not Injure the hands or
the stiver.
Pays the Retailer a
Liberal Profit
The window streamers
which we are supplying to re-
tall merchants for use during
Nonsuch Week are modest in
slse and attractive In design
and color. They help to advertise goods which pay you
good profits.
They add to the selling
power ol your window Willi
oul obstructing vision.
ft
ORDER aufficicnt NONSUCH Polishes 14
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA ItKTAILKK
\i
Lake of the Woods
Milling Company
LIMITED
Makers af
FIVE ROSES
• FLOUR •
The World's Best
Daily Capacity 14,200 Bbla.
B.O. Offioea and Warehoaaea:
1100 liehardf Stmt 1014 Store Street
VANCOUVER VICTTORU
After Dinner
enjoy lhe pleasure of a long-distance chat with
a distant friend. It is a delightful way to visit.
The lllght rates after 8.30 pin, are specially
low.
BRITISH COLUMBIA
TELEPHONE COMPANY
HOW CAN YOU MISS IT?
JUNE 21st-24th AT ROCHESTER.
The Invisible magnet of better business Is drawing thousands of grocers Kochester-ward. Um
Angeles in '24, Dubuque in '25, Rochester In '26
every convention belter than Ihe last and everyone
full of Important business and events. This >ear
the names on the program alone should make you
pack up and go.
You'll sign for Ihe trip eventually.   Why not now?
FLEISCHMANNS YEAST
The fleischmann Company
SERVICE
"CANADA APPROVED
Thorn-  wards,  "Caaaes  kpumtonsT ea  all perkagi
CLARK'S Prepared foods aoatatataf meed *t*- * j
for >m» ami jfOttl ntniomrr* Th**j StUSS that s-rer*
ol meal which ao«« into I LARK'S Prepared fuost ha
passed h> tin* Oovemoieai» V*terta*r} l«#i**c^-i'-s»r«
You   h«»e   a   doubti-   •••urani'**   •>'   a   satisfied   i
tlusfvk*   to   Ihr  <♦«*■»•■ rcnti-iit I   tiilotonifr
L't the CLARK Kiuhem ,inj their fattnmii
AdtYttinajt help ium to imteaie test  tsltt
ami ttiur profits.
it
W. CLARK Limited. Montreal
Establishment!  tt   Umitssi,   P. q   it. Rem),  p. q   ir4
Harrow. Om.
Paeh.r, ef tht  CsHb-atrd  Cisrhs  Pork  ot*n  BUM
Volume in Sales
tl'a hitter i.tiviioHH making l<*> sale*
with a 10c profit than only 10 sales
with a 30e martin The demand for
IX products creates » bigger roltiroc
oi busines** fur th. retailer and eon-
-•-'ent advertiaing in daily Increasing thia demand
The 1% **.«n i„ yonr window will
""•"" bigger Mill,,,,,, for still bigger
Profit*   Arrange lo feature 4X aer*
vice lit  Vour *!,„■,.
las—BM
SHELLY'S LIMITED
VICTORIA
NANAIMO
VANCOUVER
NORTH VANCOUVER
NEW WESTMINSTER ■ m
Id'ifi
THK KKITISII COLUMBIA RKTAILER
IS
GROCERY PRICES CURRENT
Ths follewieo are prleee quoted for principal lines of Issdlng wholsaals firms.   Prlesa quoted are necessarily
subject to market fluctuations.
C    w    OILLSTT   CO    LTO
li  11    "
»|t—
I t*
11,   , *♦*«-
,   I   i.t   L)*» —
i ,t.,«.   in east
mj9 .  n»«""S P0MmSO*><
. !        1       I     »
s    i  Oat
.      »     t   -Ml
i    i  tbs*
,>. iota
U,a     S  **»»   C»»e  N«k  t —
;u  peekasee)
,i ni  nwri
n c» "M-aata Ot Se-Je—
!   '*     left    t■*■    ***
»*;  "*    t»«ff#l»   p*r   I**!'*!
[ i  t'.
ua* tOj*»m*iol**l~"
■ ., .<*.*  i*.-*■> {(••   tn «***i
■ iroa  drum*
I', r  < 4i »•
SM
I ft
1 »<•
[ #
• • 1
• * >
* Si
II i
i i*>
i i*
: u
M t*
IVr  Il»
ua
(>*f Soa
•>'i*» H^^^^^^
,, ( pot*  tl ise ln iaeaJ    '• •* *
pSfa (i doa m «■••*■*     J *'"
ir.» *•»«!*! stves taiwae tl dos
■ tifi
> m  ., (fl   ,«,\rfn  IJ  it'*   • •*•
i im
i n
I., ni** i «ni*ti>»«,  H  d«i   "*
B 4   t
*■ ,**■ aitttt ••***«
*.~«ui'( pelts
•      |      Ulvr«|    hrf*
lifted   l«*»f»U
MULV. OOLiOLAS A 0     LTO
Nabob Pro****to
'        .    \.»   J   tin* «!«.•
I  ■ •, | nrdei   «* If «»* • 0**»
o  i i  «.i,,   t: ;s* doi
. i '<••!»(  t '..* dos
I Sods   M ks   stsss
1      . Soda. II H*' d"*
a ',•   <!«>•
Wmtm    l'*\)\**X.    till*.    do!
' • <        ■*■•'(     ff!j»*t.   do*
Va*  l» l offee   iitmll tlnn.  «-*«>*<
■   Iti      *«  it,
*'•"••    '.   N«lv,h   Ih
«'•■«•.> ■■!   |*,,»,lrr.   0**0
y«   ••   T*.plwa.   dot    M
r>      *iti  Pudding,   doa
1   S OmTi emu II, il»t
1 '' ' •' -'*•. I ot   tin*. itu«
* a Pepper, > tm*. d»-s
"•<..,*.', doa
If*
H
t;
c
low-trr, 4 oi   |Iim,  >l'i
Crista nt Tsrtar.  I.
Crsaw of Tartar,  t-fcs, Una
Ortam el Tsrtar «4».   ,
(Hater, small, doa
at< • ta, ih ot. dos
BSt     l„, J „(   j,»,	
,;*'>  '<».  I ot   d«S   .
greets, I ot   itoi   ,
fci ids, is oi   dm
-*tSN   until, doa	
iii
« I ■
It I"
I M
*«■
1 t«
If
ll
n
ti
>o
1*
id
. no
i :•>
t •«
S oo
ill
1 JO
i:«
s J!,
5 T*
r.:i
IT 10
111
Nutmeg  Httatl, dot      ill Klondyke (wrapped) Imix of 25  6.10
Paprika  vnaB, doi                             in Klondyke (unwrappedt Injx of 25 r>.»&
i'(i»(r>- Spice, J tins, dos                  .   110 ...               .                                           ,
..   .,    ,             „                 _, Klero Glycerine, box of ltt  5.75
l*iniitr>* l*t*»ain%. BSft, H.'ivory, Thymi-,
Tumeric,   tin**.  «j<.i                  111 ,'i,1,n (unwrapped) liox of ioo  3.85
Iimiii.r nptvo, dos Ko 3            II I'i'iut'i Ammonia, 2 dos. qts, Imix of 24 l.oo
vi,i).v,.m   Mint, r.u«i<y                      l J-j Ulquld Blue, 2 dos. qts. box of 24 4.00
Whi is Peeper, Una, dos                l.so v,   ....   ,„    ,„     ,      . ,.„.           . ..
'                                               . Mechanics Pine Par, box of ioo  a.45
•■ ibIoi  ><!i   ; art,   tint .  . 1 35
— ,,.,.,          .                                     , 9n Mechanic's  I'lne Tar.  liox of 50   2.75
■ actor * mi   l >>t   Ant i m
tv-Miiu j*rtjt»   %*  <t"»                   ■■.   M Olive Caatlle, cakes, bos of-100 I.M
I roil i*«.i<***i. i -a  dos                        l.'i Primroae (wrapped) Ih>x of 25  4.70
i, nfi (hocolttte  Root   Pink, Umon Koynl Crown Lye, bos of 48  5.25
Vaslla, White  Almond. Oraiife) doi    115 pWdrsy*s Powdered Ammonia, box 24   111
JtUy Posrdst   doi                                   .10 Sp-wial pricea on 3. 10, II and 100
Uni"!i*i ,   I'owder,  dot                      • • • •*•* boxes.
Muatard.   Is d»s * 50
M ..„„,    -,.   .|,i                                 4 50 Pondrsy'a W.ter Qlaee, Egg  Preeerver-
Mtwtard    *• dos                           2**° Cases, 24 tins per case  4.10
Muatard   '»  dw                                140 Royal Laundry Hakes. 18%, in bbla.    .13'^
Sulphur,  14s   d.n                                     *5 (Special prlca on contract)
...   Green Ut-l ¥.*• 9*t It-                 M |{(,ya| Crown goap 6s 144,  S.I0
1(>   urtwa Label, b  pei it.                 . ^^ Cf^n 1>oWll(!,.( {)i}X 24 only 650
I     )t>      till*                                                                                     •      ,W -MB
,.,.„..                                           tl Roynl i'i own I'owder 1-lb. Imix of 50 .... 4.00
!•   It   packafi*!  - -    "
S It*   paeSSSSS                          " Itoyal frown Oleunaer, 48 sifter IIhh .... 3.70
i>»   d* I.ju   Altarsoon, 1 lb         *S noytk\ ctown Powdered Ammonia. 1 Ib.   3.11
Tr« dr Uxs   Afternoon St* V** ■*        JJ Wllit,. Wonder, u.x of ioo ...„ 5.35
Tr* de Luae,  m* P** "•■                      ' Nt,w Whj|i> gwEn SiMJ|) m 500
\ ,nrf »f      '"'>l
Whits Swan Naptha, box of ioo 4.90
p.  BUSNS A CO   L ^^^ ^^ WaahlBg I'owder. box of 24 5.50
|h«m'©c*«   Products.
Ayrshire Mled shoulders i-*' lb           :: THI CANADA STARCH CO. LTO.
i,      ..     ahimtmk    <•*   l^r   lb •   •*«'
IU-..-R    SSamrwa. Laundry Starchti-
I, v,i ti .in   mill dreaalnf i**-r >•*       ■
w,,..-   Butter   ahamrwh   «rtons  .40 Canada Uundry Starch, 40-lb. box .01
rC*l *7ii,A,*n (ante ,- lb              » White Close, Lib. pkgs 9%
2         -,   i ,H  iwm  perlb            "H Acme Gloas. 1-lb. pk|s - - **
t-?*^B   ':";!"„ uon No   *  l»*«aaes    I0.00 No. l White. 100-lb. kegs  0V4
iWi.*m>.    »                    w^-aaes  1000 Bdwardaburf Bllvar Qloaa, l*lb, pkfii
footpound   tTsroation, ■><-  • jj^
-Med  Ham. f""^^ '"       \   « iM^t-d^"^^;'^.;^
l^1"^     '   ;•','.'„;,   ,.,  lb   .       <l fancy   tin  canisters.   4Mba IIM
!%,.,.,• ;..n I*ron      ■                  „,          ,41 Kdwardsbuif Silver Gloss, 100-lb.
1    "' 53ij!  LS «nd rolled    24 ke».   -   -*0*4
Domlnloa shoulders,    .^ ^                      of w.pkfl
WW"!         '         ...                     *•   *J,! Per   case)    '0*00
ii,,,,,.   ahammcli   pei       -   - <(J
Hams  boesd aed rolled  per   .              ^ Culinary Starchta—
,,r«.i ch-mae, l*lb <«'"" f*14           ' 1l0 „onwin-8 tlabratad Prepared Cora
JeBled lestesj p« un1-                 n ?5 ^^  ^^^ ptr |b ^ n
Ui t   Ko   I   ;.'i"-                      1JW Canada Corn Starch 10-Ib. boxes, per
Urd  So  '  :•• to                        m ft    »*
Urd   ':"",'"    .Jr*) lbs          :1 Challense Corn Starch I0*tb boaee
Mincemeat.   a«s.  »*                            u (.1)mo pot«to Flour 40-lb. boxes, lb.   .13
\t,.ii Imt  pel "'                                   4(>
•'"'K rf^^STsSf  l0H Mwla 0... is  - y»
looked Bah, klppars, ies, p §| ,..j,«
,„„,-.r.i ash, Mppsred salmon, 10.       ^ ^         (    »        ij(jo
• nd 80S,  P*-i  m          **--                       .If „            .,     I"                      „ 1186
Smoked <*<•<•  10s ^ n*          |Q u 	
(Mtreed fowl, P^rJJ .■J^^Sa   »* Corn ayrups-
Mpc,-h1 chicken pet  ia  |   I
TMS   SOVAL  CROWN   SOAPS  LTO. »         ^ ^     .
va. ouver  PrlOS tlae-F.0.«.  V."ccuv.r, ^ , l0 ,.„     .
"             or  New We.tmlnst.r. ,0,, , t0 case  "J
Terms N««« •• W I-'»V S"' ,4 l0 caM    I 110
• Ma*' ■  * kj; *     lU)  pkttl bos M0 Ma 0 to c«m 	
-jpsr soap nakts, 11      p <40   Knw> N 2410 efcM    .... Ml
v  I..,  IV" •'""' * ""*;,'                        .. I.H 5s. 12 to case               Tf
,„„,  Mottled, bo« »< *'                       uo 10s. I to caw 	
I      *-»i    |'.M    \)»*    Of    '**    	
V" Mi
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA KKTAILKR
Mi
av
Are You Ready for the Ice Cream Season ?
Stipulate
CONTINENTAL
I it t'nam Pails
.M.WAVS
ICE CREAM PAILS WITH BAO POR EACH PAIL
The Continental Paper Products
Limited
OTTAWA
CANADA
Vancouver
Victoria
Also manufacturers of Ice Cream Dishes and the popular Lily Drinking Cap
SMITH, DAVIDSON & WRIGHT, LIMITED
E dm onto *■
Caigsry
Vou can ns easily lell six tins as
one to the average housewife,
Suggest the purchase of moro
than one th. „ll(| „,,, m |m|(i|i
extra turnovi'r-anil profit,
Offices: Vancouver. Condenaary, South Suniaa
Peter Rabbit Peanut Butter
Coete No More But Sells Faster
THE TOV PAIL OELIOMT8 THI CHILDREN
DISPLAY A CASE    IT WILL SELL  ITSELF.
Ke«y Confection Co. ltd.
1100 Mainland Street
VANCOUVER, a. C. ^n
192"
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
I'
ll
ui ni UND & COMPANY OP CANADA, LIMITED,
H* OPERATE W VANCOUVER
, , imt on Palae Creek prepares, packi and distributes product to thc retail trade.
i \ m.-.iiivi r branch »f thc old«eatabMahed A ri-
., ,,( HimIIuihI k Company, Limited, in now
, m tin new building situated at Falac Creek,
\ Company oi Canada, Limited, is practic*
11 Canadian eoneern, the majority «'f stock*
trine Canadian cltiacna,
i,
hinlis
his i
tt|l*.
k,t
Hut  !
lias
\vSl
mm
'ha!
IM
0. E. Rutten
K tittston, formerly salca manager tor Donald
ft Com pany'a Vancouver office h-*l,-iN ** dmi-
m'ii.u ,ii tin- ww plant   where lu-* popularity
,* (h, trade vouchsafe* for him '» full measure <>t
sn iii the new ifnttire
I   Daly, production manager for Messrs Hed*
\ Company, ia in charge of tlo- practical .nl «'t
nl   whan tlw foUowing delicatessen products
in tu meet with success in 11»« local market
• beef nml j-rnw. beef st. .iU and m*?* ,n*at
ind gravy, quiek dinner and sandwich unread
recent vwJt to thc new premises of this firm r*-
the lasi   .vuril  in appointment, convenience,
Hilary equipment, whew the Hedlund Knc oi
ta .'in  prepared, ii.uk*>1 and distributed
THI TEA MARKET
' ■ "I*-«*.*n fir llu- 1 «»!»•; Indian lea output arc nor-
I'tiniiHtie, nlthout-li shortage of labour is cana-
reaaina concern, and buaineaa rontinuca with a
'■• ly Mjfli rate of exchange
i» expected thnt the high standard of manufac*
*"iH !»<> maintained, with no recurrence on the mar*
such teas as were aeen In 1923   Thc f™\™£]
wll whole or part of cropa forward during 19*o
") praelieallv agreed upon by the hoVuui 1«*'»
intlon, nnd the outlook apparently doea not war*
"iiaideratkn of a limitation scheme for tins year,
« regardi labor shortage, it haa been wutMjJ?
"ly a higher wage atandard will obviate tins d.r*
although fhe chairman of the abovcmciitiouet
"'inn contends that lhe main factor at prcacent
\
PRIDE
B
ECAUSE their superiority has been
steadily maintained...
... because they are quality products,
... because they make better foods. *.
pride is taken in making, in selling and
in using Royal Bakittg Powder and Dr.
Price's Cream Baking Powder.
For over a half century they have been
bringing baking success to the housewife
and profits to the dealer.
Both are made in Canada
A Quality Product!
n*\
IronizeD
**""* *t*mm*.a^m
OB* V INC
Whole Wheat
FLOUR
A FAIR FIXED PROFIT
FOR LARGE AND SMALL
IS THE POLICY OF
The Dr. Middleton's Food Products
Company Limited
Vancouver, B, C.
•II
7
■'.1
I I!
i* 18
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Strongest
link
intkChsin
What links your customer t
n you! Every sale
is made up of links: the customer's need the pre*
sencein your stock of the articles required a priee
that represents thrift prompt, courteous service—
neat packages—quality—and, more Important, unquestionable measurement of quantity,
Your scale, which determines how much your
customer gets, is the it-rongeat link—or tin* weakest
link—according to public knowledge of and confld*
once in the accuracy of its measurement.
Everywhere, scales having a national reputation
are today in demand.
M
njr
Toledo Scales are  known .not eeeepted ■
where ns automatically giving honest weighl   Tl
ari built on tin pendulum counterbalance priii
no spring!   automatically weighing the part
and computing the amount ol the sale ewt, fun
equipped with a patented device 11 prevent mi*!
In reading
Protect ymir profit ami good will ll) iwii *
ate weighing equipment.   Writ.* us or call our l<>
offi.-. for interesting information an »it. mosi Imp
tnnt niul most frequent transaction thai lakn pi
in your store.
Canadisn Toledo Scale Co., Limited, Windsor, Ont.
um rooms in^jsmmm ■assJKTMBM«
VANCOUVER OFFICE:  508 8MVTHE  STREET
TOLEDO
NO     S   P   R   i   N
G    5
SCALES
HONE ST   W ■ I G  H T 1926
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RKTAILER
19
|s
i, cession of good inoiiwioiih.   Laborers migrate
1,,1-ly when condition?* iu their home diatrieta
  m. m to seek new outlets for tin-it labor,   Ubor
j ,.'-o. is undoubtedly rcaponsiblo for thc subston*
siu.iller amount of lea now being plucked in the
! nl 1 tn Ita.
111 in values" in the slogan received from Mincing
I,,.ii.loii has been stead) In IncMs Ceykin, while
Hall*
Colombo has ghown a steady tone in spite of deteiiorn-
■"*11 *n quality, .lava teas in London have shown sortie-
wnat oi a reaction,
'PI i * i
ine action ol the Japanese growers in raising their
jiuahty 30 p.-r rent, should result in an advance in tho
low, st glides of Japan teas to a 21 cent a pound basis.
Most drains contlllUo to he only lightly supplied and
replenishment is booh expected to become general.
The Tea Gardens of India
Method   of Cultivation,   Packing,   Marketing   and Blending.-Enormous Increase in Exports of
India Teas to Great Britain.
India has many tea growing districts, and esch of
• . produces tea of distinctive character, There are
the delicate hill i?rown tins from Parjeerllng, the
(irsng*) Pekoes front tin* gardens **t Assam and full-
,.i\\...\   !<as   from  tin    DooafS, 1'nehar.   ami Bvlhet,
Ml thnw un* nn of varying degrees of rirhnetai and
Thi flavour anil character of I'eylou teas vsr\ ne*
reeding to the elevation at which tlo- lea plant is
„:* iwn the low country ti-an \t\\* a, .lurk colored liq-
iter and the high grown tin* have i fine, strong, dis-
liuciiti flavor
Th. high level of effieJene) reached in thi- cultiva*
lion and msnufseture of Indian ami Ceylon teas has
••illy been it tallied nfier yearn nf scientific effort snd
hv lln   utilisation of tin   moat modern methods ami
rhinery
Tin les hush ban a periodical tfrowlh of li nf called
flushes11 or sIiihiu   The bush is said to flush a»hen
growth begins; tin- second flush ia the growth from
the ;i\ii between a loaf and stalk of the firsl flush; the
*hir>l flush Is tdmilnrlv nrodueed from the second and
* i *
tn <»n   There are probably not more than ten or lo
flushes in a year from even the strongest bushes, el*
though a garden ha* to In- plucked about -I" or 85
lime* in tin course of Ike year   Bvery shoot is not
read)  for pluckim; at the Same lime, as all are not
equally vigorous    The plucking i** dom- bj manual
Inhm   nstiailv hv women ami children   the general
practice being to pluck two leaves and a bud,   I'"1
'"''I  ami  the  small   leavis  make  lhe  t»m*st   tea    lh«'
larger the leaf the coarser Ike tea manufactured,
Mer the leaf has boon weighed it la taken into
iht factory tu uiiderao Ihe tlt-st process   withering,
• is ■ i       |       •
M ' af tin objects of withering la to prepare the leal
: the Bubaoqueui proooasos of msnufseture, Were
filing attempted before withering the reaull would
'" n mass „f turn fragments, and the spilling or loss
"! "early all the juice Withering .*• h natural pro
';ss by whieh the leaf is brought to n flaccid state,
T" attain this eondition the leaf is spread thinly oyer
Ralvsfttafj wire trays of sbount :li*» *o**h* hcsslan
'''"!l* ot bamboo travs nre sum ct lines used.   The trays
I.,
■ ••   "iniiiimi im>s urr puiMvuuiv-***. >,-•<■• •
placed in rack* In n large withering house ami al*
A"l to remain In a temperature of TSdcg. P. fo oo
''' ' P for some 18 to gO hours, artificial heat being
h n,,,,«l to during the rainy season Properly with-
'*''"• ''''if retains its green eoknir without any tinge
,,f "*«lness ur other dlsenloratlon The leaf Is ready
';" filing when it has l" >«* absolutely wji JJW|
11 :,",,'d. Without in anv wav being dried up   Wither
ing preserves the fragrance of the tea and avoids thc
possibility of future discoloration.
Tin* next process is rolling. After withering, the
leaf is collected in quantities varying from 250 lb. to
400 lb.. and is placed gradually into the box of the
roll**!', where it is turned ami twisted about to such
an extent that all the juice in the leaves uxudes, and
th. whole is worked up into a pulpy mass. Thc time,
occupied in rolling varies with the season and the
condition of the leaf. (Rolling at first should be
quite light and pressure very gradually brought to
bear on the leaf.) It is then taken out and sifted in
order to separate the coarse from the fine leaf before
hard rolling. The hard rolling process prevents the
juice of the coarse leaves which is expressed from being mixed to some extent with that of the fine leaves
ami imparting a course flavor* to all.
Fermentation, Assortment, Packing.
Fermentation is a purely chemical process by which
certain changes take place in the leaf. In order to
get thc full benefit of all the available oxygen from
the air. the leaf is spread not more than V/>> in thick
on the floor of the fermentation room, and during fermentation the underlying leaf is brought to the sur-
fnee s<t that eaeh is equally oxidized. When the leaf
has fermented sufficiently — generally in from 3l/,»
to four hours it is carefully collected and taken to
to the firing room.
Tin* filial process is tiring, the object of whieh is
to dry the leaf, make it crisp and brittle, and prevent
the possibility of decomposition before it is required
for infusion. Then- are many different machines n
us.- for this purpose, lu some machines thc hot air is
driven through the leaf by a force fan. in others it is
drawn through by an exhaust fan.
The actual manufacture of the tea is now completed and it is sorted by menus of sieves of various mesh-
es into the following gradest—Broken or Flowery
iMange ivkoe. Orange Pekoe, Pekoe, Broken Pekoe,
Pekoe Souchong. Broken Ten or Fanning*, and Dust.
After assortment, the tea undergoes a final firing
to remove the least possible trace of moisture. It is
then bulked and packed into the familiar tea chests
for shipment. Packing is done by machinery. The
lead lined chest is placed on a platform which oscillates at about ll.lHH) movements a minute, and the tea
is slowlv poured into it. settling down and fillin:* it
to tin* utmost capacity. A sheet of lead is then sold-
,,,-,,,1 un the top of the chest and the lid is nailed down
ami bound with hoop-iron,
(Continued on page 35)
* 8 20
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA KKTAILKR
M-
iV
\   \
Pioneers in
Priee Maintenance
Throughout thc past fifty years, this Company has consistently followed the policy of discouraging price-cutting.
We have maintained our principles through thick and thin
and have often been condemned for being too rigid in our
attitude by those who were looking for special favors.
The retailer is entitled to his full profit for the service
rendered in distributing our goods and so is the legitimate
jobber. We have tried to see that, as far as Gillett's Goods
are concerned, no dealer, wholesale or retail, got an unfair
advantage over his competitors through the medium of cut
prices under any sort of disguise.
Gillett's
Are Worth Their Price
Retailers who sell our goods at regular prices are able to make a
good margin of profit, while at the same time giving their customers
the best value for their money.
Every housewife in Canada knows Magic Baking Powder, Gillett's
Lye, Royal Yeast Cakes, etc. They have been made familiar with
them through constant and attractive advertising as well as by the
high standard of quality which distinguishes all Gillett Goods.
There is no need for any dealer to cut the price of Gillett's Goods
other than a desire to get trade away from a competitor at the sacrifice of legitimate profit. Such tactics have never had, and never will
have, any encouragement from us.
We stand where we have always stood for maintained prices
TsUumo gT cach ^ealcr a kKttmate profit and each consumer the
fullest value for his money.
E* W. Gillett Co. Ltd.
Toronto, Coasds
Vtmctmtrw     *snssoSpog     Ottawa     Maatraal     Qm»m
« m
19211
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RKTAILER
21
Arguments Favoring Price Maintenance Bill
Heard in Washington
Committee of Advantage! Derived From  Proponents of Kelly.Capper Measure Tell House
Allowing Price Setting.
is   S||,
III!)*   j
prodti
I
"i th,
GJJOl)
«t
■
makln
•ould
:i
the Rl
;lt   IV v
*"lia|,i
tllOf
Ktorcs nn«l departmeni store* arc forming n
ujps' monopoly which i* menacing lhe amall
rturer and retailer, witnesses (old the House
••*•»,  im Foreign ami Interstate Uommeree nt
., held \ssi week ai  Washington,   Tin- com*
.*.,(•, roii&itlcring tha Kelly tapper price main*
hill, niul im»r»* Ihnti tidy representatives of
: •.-   manufacturer**,   retailers,   wholesalers   ami
,*. <-* organiiations attended the hearings t*>
ii   favor of lln  hill
• |• ■•■. merehanta were described aa thelves prey«
thf mhmII manufacturer l»> W  II Crcighton
•uiiM I for tin- American Pair Trade league,
I \s -. ,|.|h»»!iiij« thi l>ill    "They want to puitch a
the  good* will  1 ji 11 k   **i  th*-  manufacturers nf
\-,:>t\ if U niul drain it Into their own adver
K     h.  said
• in sintr** create .*. fnl*r Impression of vslue Wil
II IM cr r will of If a pie wood, N «l. said, ami »l<« not
tvhoh ♦•••11 thrir products cheaper than the in*
Itial merchant    Mr Ingeraoll ««•* merchandising
■ 7 r «.f thr company which formerly manufactur*
p moll witehea
1,300 Orocery Chains
I    \'< a  York. Philadelphia and tlo* other large
lo* **nn\, "vou cannot set %i»nr goods '»•: >r<
t m • r*
m< nrtltwsyon hair ih« interest «»f two oi Ihret
pi ttystetna   It i* a oen and dang* rous kind
lopoty    There tin- now I 300 systems of chain
* stores io ihr country    1,879 chain drug Mori
i -  and 1,058 ilry gOoda ami mitlim rv chain*
D \» !>ill would enable him to compel hi-* product*)
-*"i<l nt a certain price -ami to hring nn injltne«
RainsI  a  rul   prirr mrrrhaitt       Tlo   producer's
***** •**«»ult| not l>« injur*.I becauac at least •**•* per
ihe merchants favor meh a loll ns this "
rhis is a trade mnrk Issue " lo continued   'There
* in.4iinlt.iii nirninM  lln-   lra<!< mark   Under "in
system      When th«   produeer s,"s -*» trade-
'■•I nrtielc be m»IU more than the physical com-
he wlla his good will    He has helped the
•ell Ihe product becauac :,4* baa created fi
He has a right to insist th.it his trade >h,\\\
■ injured by ent prirr merehanta"
Polnta in Favor of Bill
i'M-ntaiivr Clyde Kelly of Pennaylvanla, who
"ring the hill iu the House, summed up the
' "'.*i|»M| point* 0f relief that would be given the
r driller and eon*umrr an follows
^ fair price in always fixed by the competition
sromk   The hill doea not apply to any mom
Where there «re two <>r more manufacturera
u one pnifluet, the compel It Ion between them
1* a prire fnir tn the consumer
li *>eogubws the principle that the maker of
•I" '** bat! prrpnr.il to fix what t* a fair price
ThU is the cost of production plus n rea
l"*"'ii to tin- manufacturer and lo lhe dial rib
Lessen Distribution Cost.
I It would lessen the distribution cost ,as at presenl a manufacturer cannot control prices except
Ihrough a v.iy costly sales ayciicy or consignment
system.
5, It means greater and not less competition in all
trade-marked gooda .
6. It would prevent the malignant price warfare
in products now customary, and which have caused
some dealers to refuse to handle price cut goods.
<    It would hinder monopolisation Of merchandise.
The general more system is a threat to the public
because tending to monopolise trade,
because cut price stores could not use nationally ad-
Kr-uii a survey of the cotton situation it seems pro-
vcrtised goods as bait to attract to their stores people
t.> whom an effort is made to sell other and often in-
ferior merchandise affording a greater profit to thc
seller,
9. It would stimulate the natural growth of business and enterprise.
RETAIL PROBLEMS DISCUSSED IN THE HOUSE
OF COMMONS.
As .in instance of the increasing attention being
given to problems of the retail trade, Secretary •manager N I. Douglas, of the Dominion Board. Retail Mer-
chants'  Association, has submitted an extract  from
the speech of Mr Kdwards (Waterloo), who, comment*
ing upon the remarks of the senior member for Ottawa
(Mr McClcnagctl) earlier in the session, in connection
with the enormous busines done by the mail order
houses of the Dominion, stated as follows:—"I was
iireatly interested 'in the case whieh he so ably put forward as il applied to our retail merchants, and he con-
vinced m< that the mail order house competition is most
unfair,   The countries of the world are scoured by the
purchasing agenta of these concerns.     To have the
products of foreign sweatshops anil child labour d'is-
11* I hu ted in this country, largely through these mail
order houses, is bad enough', but when we consider that
lhe ordinary retailer throughout the Dominion is fore-
,*l i.i pay n stiff tax in his community, while these
ureal octopuses arc practically free of this lax., it will
he se.*n that he suffers from a handicap that is very
netiotia Indeed.   As a result, the small rural village is
rapidly disappearing, which is to be regretted, as these
centres have assisted in no small degree to make rural
llftt more desirable.    Iu fact. sir. 1 think I would be
instilled iu Raying that one of the chief causes of the
trek from the* farms to the bright lights of the cities
nnd towns is lamely tine to the gradual wiping out of
these small centres!   This condition of affairs. I submit, is largely due to the inroads of the mail order
eom petition under the unfair circumstances I have re-
|;||,..|    | hope the senior member for Ottawa will in-
\m\ • letflsbitloll that will bIvc us an opportunity of
nveatigating the matter further this session,"
:*S
■I 22
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Mi
nv
DOMINION LINOLEUM
Bi
Be Sure to Get Ready for
MID-SUMMER SALES
!i^l:::::i,H:.:::;!;;;::lt:,l::::;;!:;!;::h''i,>'-s ■ k* •
DOMINION LINOLEUM RUGS
DOMINION TABLE OILCLOTH AND
BROCADE COVERS ARE SUMMER
SALES WINNERS
■* ? tt £? taSVo^.S^S ""-b> h f " -"
your local advoitWng.          '""'* '" > ' *<ndowa ind in
At tho nme time you enn «,.n	
i qually roaaonablo prodaot ' '      '"'   '"'"" Table OlleloUi
Check   ovei-   Vour  Kim,!/   ii .
""•-r with v«m    ol 7,2,       ',"' '•' !  " <■■■'■■■
& "^'■XS'.cK's;
DOMINION OILCLOTH & LINOUUM CO, UMITED
MONTREAL t »••"•»
THE BRITISH COLOMBU RETAILER
23
Drygoods and Footwear
The Cotton Outlook
World Eeaervei Ample. With 6,000,000 Carryo ver-Production Rhm.u »«, p„_ j «
[•■ii a survey of ihe cotton situation, it icema pro-
ihei the w<»rld carryover next July will be the
.;, ii 1*4nee tin* abnormally l>ig end-season stock in
vi iner ni 10S1    Unit year American made rv
o, of lintera, but including ejty crop, about 16,300,.
.*. ■ .2i-s   It will probably ipin thi" aeaaoti only about
| t-fjd  !*i»i hale*
ftrii mean* thnt alwust 2,."ksi,«asi balca of hint year's
j»f ittth will Im- left .lui) ;il to become part of next Ma
tupply   Since the etrryover from laal eraaon was
ll  1,000,000, lln* total carryover ,-it the end ol this
vm Mtli Im iboul 6,000,000 balca    Thu trill bo over
twin (hi carryover at the md of the season before last
Significance of Carryover
12< Mgnifieanee »f a 6,000,000 bale carryover from
irkri standpoint mav be easily mbmnderslood if it
in judged simply by comparisons with th< carryovers
recent years    Ii look* extremely largf when eom
! with I hi 3392*000 balsa at 'In end of la**? sea*
with th, 2J254.000 at the end of 192324 mid with
: 17(1,000 at the end of 1922,23    It does n„t seem
- tivrrwhelming againat the 9,944,000 balca at the end
* \''2U 21
Allowance for urrent Rate of Consumption
in eHuutidering whether a given earryover in t.*ik»<
•r -ttnali allowance mnat be made for the eurrcnl rate
' romtumpUon and the prospective conaumptioti dur
mg thi i turning season   Tin- carryover of 9,944,000
— In the mm mer ol I9S1 waa extremel) opprea-
■• '"'''auae in tin* «,• avon then «»>»!m^ th«- world had
iiwtl onlj 10,062,000 balca, and, ns it afterward dcvel*
i"'1 it used only lg,4£8,000 in the next season The
prospective -mmi'm- bales ol carryover nexl summer
•»f alkiui 13.300,000 balea, with no definite indications
"■ -i tt iterial reduction in At ICaaOtl.
^Htf*S>
1CEET
THE UNSHRINKABLE UNDERWEAR
THAT ATTRACTS THE .
HIGH GRADE   TRADE
In other words, the carryover at the end of 1020-
-I wan nearly equal to the full consumption of that
aeaaoii. The probable carryover of «,U00,000 bales
next summer will !„■ equal to only about \'.\ per cent,
ol this season's consumption. The carryover in 1921
proved lo be equal to nine and a hull month's con*
sumption the following season. The prospective
carryover this nummer will probably be equal to no
more than five months' consumption next season at
tli«' most
Carryovers of Past Result of Crop Disasters.
As to the small carryovers in the past three years
theae were highly abnormal. They were the result of
three erop disasters in succession, which forced drastic curtailment of mill operations throughout the
world and raised cotton prices to a point where they
were far out of line with general commodity values.
Tin- abnormality of the situation iu that three-year
p. riod i*-> shown by the fact that eotton at its highest
was nboul 300 per cent, of pre-war, while the average
of commodity prices was only about lf>0 per cenl. of
Ih".   1913 level.
General Economic Situation.
In considering whether a li.000,000 bale carryover
would be bearish or otherwise, it must bo noted wlicth-
er or not the market has probably discounted it and
what is the general economic situation as bearing on
the world's ability to carry this supply together with
the new crop. The fact that cotton is selling 25 to
.1:11.. per eent. less than a year ago, as measured by
the leading futures options, and tho crop ia selling
substantially below i>c average of commodity prices
both in America and Kngland. is important as to
(In first ]iM»iiit. The facl that the money market in the
I S A , where most of the carryover will be held,
is relatively easy and has recently been tending easier,
is nignifilcant ns to the second poitn,
Next Season's Spin May Be About the 8ame.
•||,r fact oi the matter seems to be that a ti.OOO.(HH)
Imle earryover is not likely to be oppressive if the new
nop is of only a moderate size, but i.s very likely t»
prove so if the crop amounts to anything approach-
in., last year's outturn. If the world ahould produce
substantially more lhan it consumes again next seas in,
thereby making next year's earryover even larger
than this vein's, the excess supply would doubtless
lell strongly against prices. Probably the best guess
,s to what'the world may spin next season is about
,ho same as this season, i.e., about 14,000,000 bales and
(>11 thia assumption a 14,000,000 bale crop would bo
Mlll|)|, for the world's requirements at around tins
mice level.
i ■;.
I 7 u
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA KKTAILKR
Mm
For Every Outdoor Sport
LIGHTHOUSE brand
BUCKSKIN cloth
SPORT JACKETS
If you've never worn one of ihene jacket* you
have yet to learn what perfect comfort meant-*. They
move with every move of the body- no blndlm*;. no
KlIffneMH. Kxlra roomineHH and Hie SOftQeSI ol tin*
eloiaio'H like cloth lake care of that It wears like
chamolH and cohIh a koimI deal leas,
Tin-He jacketH do not Hhrink or lose their Hliape In
lhe whhIi.   See them at any good men'*' wear store,
Made in IIrIii or dark grey, chamolH, dark tan and
reindeer brown. AIho In macklnaw cloth check*,
red and black, let luce and blaek, grey and black,
brown and black.
Rock Island Overall Co
ROCK ISLAND. QUE.
Repreeentative:
R. M. FOSTER, 28 Water 8treet, Vancouver, B. C.
i"H
8MUOOL1NO
Tin- committee Investigating the adminbttri
the Customs Department in regard to tmugglii
unearthed some deplorable facts, revealing th
ness of conditions which evidently for some iii
prevailed in (hut department,
It   is   Huffieiciitly   appalling   to   liml   that
manufactured in United States1 priions hai
shipped   wholesale  into  thi*. country,  'nt   win
made known that these same gtftnenta are mm. >
most unsanitary condition*, nml by sufferer* ii
testlble diseases, the germ* ol which may harh
said garment* iiml other commodities maiuif-n
tin* full seriousness of ihe situation become-** mani
These facta have eome to light during Ihi
enquiry    Mud tin* Customs Depsrtmci    been
ieiitly alert, lhe public treasury won hi have I*    i i
shape lo day. nml the retail merchants of tin
would not have been subjected Jo tin* danger n•*•*■
It has been stated in the Rouse «t Ottsws (I
is almost   Impossible to detect   ami  run down  •>■
fling at   certain  poinls  along  the   imiiginnrv
line separating this country from thr I mt«.i si
Imt when smuggled goods ure delivered to
warehouses in Inroad daylight  without check in
ranee, it is up t.» tne government lo Install *
officials who, n.s public servants   will rccogui
respomdbb position towards their employers
The formation of Intermediate companies has
disclosed    These concerns sccepl  prlsommad*
whieh in turn are re shippi d to companies ill I
in order that their origin may !»• ncealed
Smuggled gooda from I'  s   prisons, how*
bul » small percentage of (In- volume of HHcil
thst is going on    Silk has been smuggled lnt«i
ada since 1922 in such volume thai legitImatt !
has hecn curtailed     One hading garment ntm
turer declares, that in order to cope with other
facturcra uiing smuggled silk, he has been ?,,;
do likewise in self protection      Travellers .»r« •
ually reporting tO their lirm* that their prices ai
hieh     These tlrms reply lhat, even when operal
a iio>proltt basis, it is impossible lo meet prices
ed by manufacturera in border towns Wcstcn
ers declare that tiny are unable to manufacture
clothes ami compete with garments which  fron
pHee  tickets,   haVe  oliviottsly   hern   ItnUggh '1   '! '
country,    Kvery effort  is being made in tin   I
States tn keep the prison made articles from helltfi
in that country, snd every means v* resorteil
dump them into Canada    Although tin Connm
Protective   Association  has in wune  ineoHlircs  ell
illicit entry int«» Canada .it* vigilance cannot eop<
tin- smuggling evil, ami the suggestion that thi \*
Canadian Mounted Police should patrol tin  l>
entirely free from poMtlcnl influence, appeals to
many adherent-*.
<j> ,„|
Willing.
(Irorer—"Wlial'a the mailer?"
f!|.-rk—"I have » terrible toothache and want BOmethl
cure ll,"
Grocer —°you don'i Deed any msdlclns  I had » '
sene and when mv loving w'fe kU*ed me and OOOfOled m
pain noon pused away    Why don't you try the aann-
nieni?" .
Clerk—M| think I will,   u your wife at home BOW?" THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Announcing
m
a new
Silken-soft Fabric
for
LINGERIE
AND
DRESSES
WACQfl LKE
TRADE  MARK REG?
ttu as the ftainbotV"
THI-. exquisite beauty the pleasing
Softness the delicate colorings ol
"\Wi»*ilke" will instantly endear it tn
every woman who love* dainty thing* -ami
it» Uftting quslities will *s\*\*e*\\ to her more
practical nature
For "VYacoeilke" Is remarkably dur-
tblt nnd is completely proof against the
deteriorating effects of vmttr. It con
be washes! as often as desired without
loss of Its original lustre. Its beauty
is not even affected by perspiration or
by Immersion In salt wattr—"Waco-
alike" still remains strong, resilient,
keeps Its shape tnd never sags or
pulls.
Thi* beautiful new fabric i* a combine*
tion ot WsImmmi combed yarns and Celanese
Brand Yarn, tbe wonderful chemical fibre
product that ba* already won ttich wide
popularity in many other countries,
Write Your Jobber Now
tm joMWf W,MI»IMf MMpiMaf "WACl-ftll -WJlg
las mim i«o#i tha.lt* T* a**M -fbappotatMat »• ******
mt iooos SIM, wa •„uM »mt*** U»l *»«< ItSSW •'*>•*•
l Hf 4amat*l tt U.un.1 |« lm mmattial* *t**t teig*
Thi Wabaiso Cotton Company, UwiTgo
iMsrn Kiv»a«. I'U
•WACOSILKE" WILL BE NATIONALLY
ADVERTISED
CrUiM* 1* • rfgitterr,! tredt-aark in
CftMda   SegUtrttioo No. IM/JIU4 THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
^t)f Sptin^and Summef Dtade
During the months to conic, when
housewives will be busy with
home dressmaking -~ making
children's and women's dresses,
lingerie, nightwear, etc., you will
do well to take advantage of the
demand for coloured cottons by
featuring thc Wabasso line.
For in Wabasso Coloured
Cottons you find the answer to
each request — they afford a
complete range of materials and
colours suitable to every requirement
Dyed in all the latest delicate
pastel shades, and woven to the
supreme Wabasso standard, you
can offer Wabasso coloured cottons to your trade with complete
confidence of every buyer's en tire
satisfaction first with their
beauty of appearance, and later
with their exceptionally lasting
durability.
BROADCLOTHS        VOILES        CHECK NAINSOOKS
LINGERIE CLOTHS        MERCERISED MULLS
lUasso Lotions
are Canada's beat
* * *"
THE WABASSO COTTON COMPANY, LTD.   .   .  Three Riven, P.Q.
U'i-Ml.i-- ii.. I'i'*!
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RKTAILER
SPRING AND SUMMER FABRICS
27
ine
i ii
■ x,
11
j-f^orgettei and Chiffons to Hold Prominent Position
Prints Oood—Satin Crepes snd Fabrics arc
Named for Pall snd Winter
l      m„- New York and Paris demand* for »eor
I rhiffons,  then  i* evidence tbal  printed
•  eesss to hoUl thi it popularity, onei tho
iiher rtturna
\     , tbe wore notieeable shades in georgettes
,  blue snd blaek, with dsrker ahsdes of iai
• , ni    m good dewand    li b ssld thst them latter
ill to obtain from wholesale houa-f**
\\     tin goods ore looked upon as favorite* far
aitb satin baek etfepe holding s prominent nos
it .  ,*i«iih«»riiy predicts last taffets in lighter
, ill be among tbe leading number., snd n laf
|tr«"w|«n d«'«aifH i*> being shown
|i i, Miir^t-tN-il lh,-ii along with thi  darker ahnde*
• ■ r • ; ts sml tfrorg* tle% there Mil} be ,\ r* m wai of
an «*»t»«*!«*-**    It has, in previous years  I
lhat when ifn-i i» ba* lw«n a popular ihs !
leading color bas been r*"«    Nimilarh
-prominent, Ike different **hndes «»f t»r«tv. -t
trd aa eowpauiow colors iml many brown*   n
f * pwn on fall eolor earns
|i   , ',,j rrepes havi retained their popularih Is-
ui demand by sromen e/ko set ii tht I ibi
v ihejr owa sesrinit, owing to th* ••>•*• sml raj
whieh they fan In* mad* Up
I  I tea lions point t« heavj metallic fsbriea lui i
ml ikb fall    Tkere is no eertslntj wltb r^trnnl
di  whieh had « good run last year alt hot "
mtffully contrasting sksdes in cot velvets ••
-''mm    A heavy «atin haa bern adoplrd us  >
i»tion for tk#si velvets  replacing lb*  georgetii
ore suitable for linings oi rosats ami tlresaes
Iks designs In georgette snd rrejt*  "* thi
mmmer froeks   These an  rowing ',"''i m
pattern ami in crept   and all kinds ami *
uti  akawn    Oeorgettf patterns in ">■*' *
\x* s art* evident rcplseing ike floral desigi
- stent
SUMMER STYLES IN LADIES WEAR
i'"moon froeks ar.- used for fermsl luneheoi   ind
»ti   pngsgementa    tes    weddings    raeen
partita and bridge    tfnleaa em  hss s dinner
ent, tbe afternoon froeii la gmerallj worn for
'••n sad rayon fabrics made in rlreular or sod
est. •*** tsundered if Ike msterisl la laid oi 'I
board with th«* I breads strsigkt snd Iron*
»ight of thr material    The) should I*  knnir
■» ««'np|, af day* after laundering
*untmer the itparsti1 eoat er eape of *
" worn in thr car  for simrt* the b<
»ng   For ihi* eountn it la Mgblj
•veiling, the eolor should be «i"i«t am
The quilted eoat of taffeta er satin is rerj
afternoon    Hora formal eosts ..." Ike prim-ess
'I type may be won in town iii the aftrnnoi
H,« fornal Iv|k- of efenina dress suited to warm
' N UM..1 for sommer  Blaborati beaded froesa
taltti fabrics are wplaeed b> the flowered aim
!<,Olffttfja fhiffoUS and Isee*
w    t>»i
ir.
th
■ rata
r ur
pta
'hll
1 I* fl
\
illlll
hlaii
,.  sports
, ami for
,|, porativi
list
in
mIih-1
*«'<r wedding* arc usually simple. Any after-
"'\mt'k f «» evening dress that can have a sleeve
wen may lie removed later is suitable. The veil is
! 1'" r n,Ii,(    ^ Inee fixes its own length, for it
'« never eut.   Tulle tuny be as long as the dress or the
Irani it then is one,
The summer evening wrap may be a eape, eoat or
snswt. iMs very chic to haw the wrap and frock
!■■■'■■ ',l . " lhal is too extravagant, thev must at least
n.tllnoiii/,*.
t Hathlng-aults are of two types—the simple suits
nn swlmmiiig, the more picture-sque costumes for the
'"■"li On |»riv;it.' beaches swimmers frequently discard stockings, On public beaches stockings are eor-
reel The bathing-sull ensemble with a eape or coat
i" very sinari.
SUMMER HATS ARE LARGER AND MORE
ELABORATE.
Indications so far for summer hats seem to point
!•• the return in some cases of the larger styles. It is
eertain lhat straw or ribbon models have nearly re-
l»l.i«»i! felt models for spring wear although in summer
uport lines the fell is holding its own. Light shades
iu oyster, parchment and yellow are being shown and
an- attracting much interest.
In tin lars.'i* hats, the emphasis is placed on hair
straws, also the bankok lines. Both elaborate and
tailored lines arc being shown and these would seem
to indicate that the large hat is returning onee more.
Part of this return ma\ be dm* lo the campaign put on
In) the American Milliners' Association to feature "hat
eniiseimisness ' The educational effeet that this has
had <>n the American women has been noticed already.
Uj suggesting to the American woman that personality
eould not be encouraged when one's eustume was not a
eomplete ensemble; when one put a hat on in the morn-
nil,' and only changed that hat in the evening. The
aaaoetation pointed out that few women nowadays
u..r. the same clothes on a morning shopping trip as
ihe\ did tn an afternoon reception. It waa bad form
Iheii to wear tin same hat during the morning and
afternoon This idea is gradually impressing the
\n,. ri* .in woman and already a demand for more elaborate hats lias heen noticed.
SILK STOCKING HATS IMPORTED FROM PARIS
Silk stockings for hats, and hat straws for shoes are
one of the oild transpositions of fashion whieh this sea-
mn Has brought t'ortli Hosiery has blossomed into a
n, m field "t- glory, the silk stocking hat.
Mile of heavy silk thread, knit on head-size hos-
i,*r\ machine-, ami treated with a solution whieh gives
lhe nilk the body and flexibility of soft horse hair, their
metallic sheen and brilliant texture make them partieu-
!,irl> suitable for wear, with summer sports costumes
of t'risca and similar fabrics. Their greatest appeal,
however, is one of colour, for they eome in all the
;, west *ilk stocking shades, sueh aa dune, bluette. sun-
hnrn seaapray, Rose Marie and others.
Pastel shades of nude, flesh shades with pale tints
.i jfreen, blue or mauve, froth, eiel. lilac nude, are the
atoeking shades which the smart women choose for the
harmonising note of their costume.
Saftrtenee mav b«» the beat school—bul a lot of mighty
iiuii pupil* attend n. mm
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RKTAILKK
M
iV
^WOOL TEXTILES
Bradford, May 7.
Botany spinners and manufacturers 0 Idlest*, goods ate
busy un orders lor seasonal goods. Tho tact that there Is
yel no absolutely definite decision regarding ii duty on imported dress goods .and the uncertainty in respect of coal,
make the outlook difficult to read. Another series of I.on
don wool sales commenced this week, an additional tea
son for standing out of the market as much un possible For
lhe time being the values of tine crossbred and botan> ma
terlals are well maintained. UioukIi this is in a grea men*
ure due to the continued active bidding for ra wmatertal m
Australia, rather than to any Improvement In the consuming
end of. the trade. There are still buyers willing to pay lull
late rales for ra wmaierial in the Commonwealth, but this
fact is not unduly impressing spinners and manufacturers
They adhere to the policy they have pursued for some
months of being guided mainly by the demand for fully man
ufactured goods, and of not speculating on the strength of
predictions of higher prices later in the yen rma&* b> those
who are now dealing with Importanl purchases ol rSW material at the centres of production.
DRAPERY ANO CLOTHING.
Manchester, May 19,
Retail trade has improved a lit11 ^ during the week, but
the period of greatest seasonal pressure tuts vet to come
Given suitable weather, sale totals will leap upward before
Whllsun. Though there is rather more activity In the whole*
sale, business generally is slack for the lime o fyear.
Some wholesale sections are doing well, but others com
plain of a lack of oruVrs. Most of the business received in
of a ■'flelliug-up'* character. Instead of carrying a reasoo<
able amount of merchandise, retailers regard the warehouses
as simply reserve stockrooms .from which thev ran draw
twelfths of a line dally, as required. This addes consider
ably to the coat of merchandising, with resultant higher
pricea t<4 consumers, and more profit ami less r|sk for the
retailers.
More than 7.500.000 articles of headgear were Imported in
the first three months o fthis year,   The number mentioned
a an Increase of over 3.500.000 on the corresponding miar
ter of last year, and nearly three times the imports in j„„
uary   o March, 1924.   Hosiery Is a second example   appro*
Imalely 10.000.000 pairs of stockings and those en. rl g   he
country In three months. K
Suggestions that British manufacturers of wearlne  an-
pare are alow to cultivate the United States market »« ,,.
taken seriously by the trade.   Unless shippers confine ,,.
attention to houses of unquestioned Integrity in America or
L^V^  ?lVe  bUy,n* omce8  ■■  °ndoi,  «hey  incur  «
S^Ld?..,0f r,"k,   frgfl "Um* ,WVP bp™ •*>' through'   led
States buyers refusing to accept delivery of ntcrchandi     or
calming substantial rebates on the plea lha. goodJ   re „
P to sample.   A number of British firms have cease"rat r
Ing or the American market .«„ ,he risk of not, p.vme.Tor
short payment Is considered loo high. wmetil or
COTTON.
The immediate future of tho onl inn  »»..,i    .
clear.   The fact that the fUSuffft SS&ft "2
1Ta« TakB & "tr°nK ™»'">m»datl„n to S,'!
nlng American yarns to close down for ImS   , '
[hat the situation Is nol satisfiedor>There TLlT*
52TO |"»J " »P»nners will on|y ft,   | "ir bick   n, n "
wall and Inalst on more profitable t»ricesa hm, ° ,l"'
would aoon be experienced. '     beM<T {U'n""ul
Merchants and dealers abroad are tired nf i.,..i«
and finding that, when thev come £ be m rk,.e. >! * W0,,H
less serious loss has to be faced „ JEffiX?'' ?0M ,°r
marketing of goods extremely dlfflcul E . r'k"H thfl
one doubtful factor, and that* is hi futuro ofVi'XitT™.'
lies, It seems certain that America Is go ng „ 1 ?' °" X*
big acreage.   In any event, It ,„ not   ft',1^^
hi  a Kerloua reduction    Kallmalei  up lu lhe present ,,
from   I   Ul 3 p'l   rent,  whieh  Would  he a  in, i,   t», t,,||
lull)   In  view  of  ihe faci  lhai. during  the cuitem  «, ,'
there has been sn increased utiiitNiion ot ferUliaen    i
is, undoubtedly, need for confidence, sml this esttnot V<
brought about as long as spinner* are over producing    \
S result ot  the Federation  derision  (hern is alread)   .»
faning or spinners   quotations, but  stocks are loo hen
hring ahou* uniformity,
NEW  FABRIC  "WACOSILKE"  ATTRACTS  ATTENTION
Ctlaneae Dried Varn in Cembination With Wabasso Comt,«d
Varna.
Wholesalers and retailers throughout I anad* aie di v ,,., t
coaslderablo attention i» the new fabric )usi Introduced
the Canadian market i>> the Wabasso Ooitoe Compan-,  i,.
lied, of Three Elvers, l* g
The  new   textile.  Uteiwn  „*  * W«ro»llke "  „*, a  „fl|(,„ ,
blnatlon of  the (lne«l  Wabasso CombSd Cotum  Varus   «,t,|
Ulaneee itraiiti tfsrn, the famous chemical tibt** which   ,.'
created such o marked sensation during the p;,*. r,.m ,,.,,,'',
Ktirope and  Ihe  Cnited State*
'•.lanes,. Brand \arn in an artlfirUI mik fibre whlrh ,,.,,•
bines an e\u.inriiitiarih high iettslte strength with remark
able elasticity, and is therefore readllj adaptable i„ M mimm
imiimited number m usage* m knitted ami woven mat*ri«i-
ellher hy Itself, or in combination wiih other >arn« ,, In ».
case of Wacosllke Celmicse Is differenl from 'mi. oihi
BrtlOclal *Hk. possessing unique qualities 01 pajti.uU, in,
portsnei Is the fart thai It Is eiiflrel) ui»afferte,| I,-, BOlSlur.
In aft) form I'ten imuo rslm, In »aI« se* water Uil« lo .'•
terlorsia Cetaoese In ar,> «My    in spite oi repealed »-,„'»
Ulg, or per-.pl. ation. the fibre mill remains strong an.| ret I
lent, with all Its original b.aut>  ot  h|*lre sod iSSlnff     I
dyed, [elauese, is % b.*aunrui soowj white whirl, never »*i
OWS  with sgt or  wear    To 1* colored, the fibre mint  !>■•
treated win, special dyes, o* ordtnsrj d>««s win not «m-.- .
at d at ihe same time, these ,|>,.» win tm r„umr u„„,r ftbrl,,
•on this feci makes possihi,. man) beautiful eross-dye -'
wnen i elanese is D»ed in eombiasttoa with other tnrot
to*  tow   f„brlr   Waro.llke   emb«Kllr.   ml   the   et,e,.,    V
-mantles of this remarkable >arn. and I. reriain to m»k. ■ !•
emeu impression on th.. consumer public    it i« ideail-, -1
"hie for Ihe making of lingerie  dresses. nlghlWINU  ind othet
feminine apparel    in rich  luflrouc b*.«ut> of Isfluw   n "
delicate coloring nt is b«-mg produce*! m -mi the mosl mod
era pastel shades), will instantly app.>al to even  womai
love of ihr etqulsila .and at the same time. it. esceptio
dnr.btlliv and nuxlerate rosi will u** (uiiy ipproclated fmn
» prsetlesl vlewpomt   Offering, u it, ,**>***. the eppeai.*..-
and wearing miallilM of pure .iik at less man half (he i    •
wacostnte Is bound 'o become an egceedlBgly ,K»pulm lln.
verj short time   An extensive national sdvertlslng campa t
i" m-ing run In connection with the introduction of Ihr pn    h
Wd dealeri can COOfidetly look forwanl in a tm-tnt*   .nl     I
Sltntlsl demand in Iho v.rv near future
THE COTTON CRO^.
New York. Ma) '"
pOttoa Is up to go good Standi over most ot the soulhen
'"If of Alabama. OMrgtS ami Mouth Carolina and Chopping
muiming iu some Inatancei   Rstlsfsetori stsads sre  >
report,.,!, |„ ,„„,.,, of LosJaJtm nild southern  Arkansas   foi
ion is also beginnme ,„ ^^ U|l ,„ mlM,sslppl, Ark.
ana Tennessee, though germination has been somewhat d<
IS e.l by unseasonable  temperatures    The  same  Is  tin.
much or Nor,,, ferollne    The crop In aslretno  soulhwr
leaas is progressing very favorably and stands are reported
"jar Berth as San Antonio    Althoueh ptanilug is ven ba< *
•T...H.I . "0",h,r" *'"' *imh r,,,,,r»» TSSSS, there seems lu he
c  npiete absenre of pessimism among planting Interest* i
rousii or the excellent supply of surface and subsoil melstun
m JJpWBg contrast with the drouth rood Hon of a year '
inai erop is undoubtediv two to thrsa weeks 1st" ovi
Sll of the southern half of Te^as with the CXCIDllon oMh.
» O (.ramie Vallev    |. |M pr »babtv (wo weeks late III south'
miixiSSippi nml l^iulslnna.   It Is doubt ful. however   If II
mor.> ihnn „ fow (fl v„ ,„,,, M ,,„,„„„„,, w„h ,,or.,n, lr< ,t|1
. naliider of the boll,   There Is a plentiful supply of molslim
•^r\where nod will, muisonnble temperatures   germliwU'
•on ii oe rapid ami stands should be quite satisfactory Th«
Jiii" '   ,"n ,,"0",r,' p,»'"- asespt In the lower Missis**11>I
vaney and the aouthweat, to Interfere with early eulUvalloi 1926 THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RKTAILER
Footwear Styles for Summer and Fall
RC^hlXdfti^ Northwestern Shoe Retailers Association, Recently
Published, Will Be Reflected to Some Extent in Western Canadian Consumer Demand    '
29
11   following if* -i summary ni the Styles Commit*
• ,,', . port
Women's 8hoea — Keep white footwear well to the
ffoui for May and June selling Some demand is ex«
•„ ,-.*i inr eolored cloth shoes At present the three
favored ahadt-o oi eolored kid appear lo he Ivory, peach
.jn,| *\< \. with no preferenee of ihcmi shadea named,
Colors arc regarded aa partteularlj good fur vou no
• ) ***
,t women, lm iii view ni lhe high shades featured this
Msnh in dress fabric*, colors should Ih? selected can
liotialy, as then- may develop sn unusual demand for
pa tent and tan call footwear
The getters) tendency i* towards the higher heela,
ml Hied toe**, more shapely ahocn and plain type pat«
icrius embellished with inlays, appliques and overlays
,: riiher blending or hamtonlsing colors
Msa'l Shoaa, Oxfords art regarded as being prae*
lieall) 100 per cent tellers in all k'r.«ii<H There is a
iireng lendcttey t*» make lummer footwear more distinctive h\ liuhi weight «"ff*, i<, af clow stitching snd
il! perforations In tht popular priee* lines inch*
is s tendency toward Blueher effects, while iti the
Mraighl laee oxfords whole (|uarti rs ar« Is ing replaced
l»j quarters of several pieces    Later in the seaaoti a
ami is« xpeeled lu develop lor liuhi blond ami sail-
term ■ If skin oxfofda most I j in solid colom, though
■ m i ill trimmings may have some call    Leather soles
1 * ii!
Then i-* a!-*,, a tendency lo make sumtuer*welght
ii**fimls more distinctive     Stvle features musl be re*
*
* -I in this type ,*f shoe as plain fitted light-weight
»xf«i*m)e have no) proven suecessful
sten'i Sport Type Shoaa.—Lighl .colored calf nnd
•Ik leathers nn«l leather eolea In tin* popular price
range there will be eome liwht «-lk with darker Ian
call 1 rimming, while for better grades solid color call
«r elk leathers with either rubber or leather soles Kill
I* included Blueher patterns to predominate in this
,M" "i footwear, with multiple stitching and small per*
m rations
•For Street and Business Wear. — In the popular
priced Hnea materials arc I tan calf, 90 per cenl.
•aith it tendency toward the lighter golden shades ol
!*'•'   *  blaeg ealf In bright, shiny finish and a modb
'"mI balloon last     It is to lie noted that all calf skill
wine* si,,,w „ tondonoy towards a vi ry high finish.
Custom Oradsa.Mati rials in ortler listed Tan salt'.
"•'■ per eeni. Mid, ||„, gulden shades of tan and ealf
"•," • K into favor Black ealf Brown and blaek kid,
tvitli nn change in Inst*    It is also recommended thai
•wNtanta *ort in some light-weight edge sola oxfords
'" simulate Haha of extra  pairs  for warm  Weather
Wear
Evening Wear. — di Black ealf In Kght-welghl
!',i,i: '"••. laead oxford* (21 Patent leather, plain toe,
ll|ee.|
%»' and Youtha* 8hoes will follow tin* same ten
:is Ih Indicated f«ir young men's shoes,
Women's 8port Type 8hoes.~l.iifM smoked elk ox*
l",M with eontrnatlng trim, popular shades of tan or
H,,,,,1  1 ealf,   Leather or crepe -aolea,
Women's Novelty Shoes.—(I) Strapless types such
as •.'ores, buckle and tongue effects mid colonials; (2)
straps; (3) Fancy cut oxfords, With the advance of
thi vason. lighter shoes will grow in popularity, Materials—(1) Colored kid and light-weight colored ealf;
J Patents; (3) Blaek satins. Heels—Spike, 16/8 to
IH K; (2) Cuban, 12 to 15 8. Laatfr-Modifled round
tne, vamps 3 to .'J'-j inch, with 411 taken as standard.
Evening Wear.—Opera or strip pumps in (7) silver
"!* gold kid; (2) White satins tinted to match grown or
hosiery; (3) Black satin; (4) Wh-lte kid. Heels-
Spike, 15 8 to 20 H, in lasts similar lo above.
Women's Utility Weir.—Straps in (1) Black Idd;
J Patent; (3) Tan call* and kid. lighter shades. Pat-
lerna -Oxfords in ordei* named, tan calf, black calf,
colored kid Tongue effects— (1) Black kid and ealf;
(2) Patent; (3) ightor shades tan leather. Heels—Military ami Cuban, I"-'-* to 14 s medium toe lasts.
•Growing Girls' Shces — 1) Pateerns and materials
iu orders named ■ Oxfords and 3-eyeleta, tics, front gore
effects in lighter shades of tan calf and elk or patent
leather Patent straps, Shnes for growing girls will
follott the same general tendency as in women's shoes
for afternoon year save that heels will range from 8/8
to 12 8, I'or dress wear, girls' shoe styles will follow
women's dress styles closely except in the case nf heels,
which will be mainly l»ox and junior types.
Misses' and Children's Shoes.—Patterns and materials as its order named: 11) Straps and front gore; (2)
Blueher oxfords, soft toe effects in (1) tan calf nnd
elk, lighter shades, (2) patent leather, (3) blaek calf.
For shoes 2 to 8 selected patterns are : (1) Straps;
(2 Oxfords with patent leather as tirst choice, and
lighter shades of tan calf or elk following.
SILK TRADE.
Raw silk remains nominally unchanged, with the
market dull and waiting for further developments.
Small lots arc taken Ity manufacturers to till in needs
where spot stocks are being made, but generally the
mills are not interested in raw materials because ihey
,uk to move accumulated goods. .Fall lines are being
mown, bul results are not yet material and the mills
an likely to wait for better indicni'loiis before nnliei*
patiti*,' any raw silk requirements beyond Immediate
Heeds
ENGLISH FOOTWEAR IN CANADA
Importations Into Canada of leather boots and shoos
from thc Cnited Kingdom have dropped off sharply
during recent months, while imports from the Cnited
Slates have been showing an Upward I rend Ltli'gO
oiiantities of Knglish felt footwear are slill coming
iu. although the Canadian manufacturers are offering n wide range of attraelive lines.
A Happy Ending.
-Look here," said the theatrical director to the corpse,
• wii\ (ini von laugh when you were main In the last act"
'•Well. With lhe nalary I aet. lo die Ih a pleasure, 30
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
M
IV
,, sellin/ paint is
fishin*
1 here are two ways to fish a trout
stream; sit on the bank,smoke and
pray for a bite, or wade in and
whip the old river 'til the jerk on
your rod and a singing reel tell the
happy story, fl Paint and Varnish
fight for their share of the con*
sinner's dollar and need your help
to get that share. Trade comes
to the lure of good window display and advertising. The Save
the Surface Campaign is busy tying
flies for you to cast upon the waters
of sales opportunity. Let's fill the
basket this spring!
Save thc Surface and You Save All"
SAVI THE SURFACE CAMPAIGN
'•Ol Kirlrr HoiMing    ■     .    Mcnin.il !02fi
n
THE British Columbia rotailer
ui
HARDWARE, OIL anj PAINTS
HARDWARE MARKET8 AT A 0LANCE
Wire Cloth.— Then- has been a •.*!•, neiWe demand
;,,r mti  ch»tli in tin   Vancouver mai kel     !'m*n !,;.\.-
,,,,,;, ,..| lirm      The Improvement in weather has
liripnl  tile Hiib' oi th'lH  lille  10 the  ciihsilllii Is
Buttery Sales Then* i**. a good demand for dry
.,|j iteriea for motor boat engine** ami fm radio tiae,
is . ot It batteries eonlinnea to Im- verj? good
I'n. i * sre unchanged
Builden' Material Active.—I Hit rttiu tors and deal*
.',.' building mateti.iN report a verj aetivi demand
Ittlihling programmes are  lairly  heavy,      Prietis are
!hn»ur-*hout this section,
Qiiden Toola.—Garthn u*n\s have begun to wtove
il | reel) truin retail atoeka Prices on garden tool*
*■ reported an lirm and unchanged,
Steel Wcol.—Thite hi aomelhittg doing in steel
W'H.l all the lime When Hh painting season really
upeu* up the ih mnnd for wool Mill iltere|tee
Suple Lines are Active— Pric** Continue Firm —
\ uti ing demand continues t»»r I»«*11*» and nuls Serewa
itn    *<•• aetling acHvel)     Pclee* arc unehanged Van
count stock* nt\  adequate    No priee reviaioiut are
emit deflated,
Roller Skate*   Jobbers and retailcra both report
i ;•«.!  substantial  demand   fur  roller  *kate*.Htocks
pparcntly ample i**r current |oeal needs I'riet,*
■' itiuhanged
Roofing and Paper—Orders are being plaeed in a
vep **atiafacU>ry volume    Pricea arc lirm
Lawn Mowers — Sales are good, due tu the fine
*eath« r in thi* diatricl
•Sash Pulleys— The demand is good and priees arc
'rt.
8iuh Cord.—Prieei aw unchanged and sales arc
active
Rope—There in « good demand and prices arc unchanged
Swi 8heet* —Order* are being pla * In good
-mllinu ami prices sre firm
Solder and Babbit Metal—Prleea are verj sleady
,{Ui* ' • demand active
Wire Goods -Pn.,. are unchanged and n fair vol-
UIIM   ' Imslneaa in being placed
Wtcnchea.—Prioea ahow on change and aales nre
imrii   !
Hinges,—There it* n good demand and prices are
Itriii
Jtv Cream Freeaers — Prleea are firm and sales nre
1111 ' 'her backward,
Tool Handle*.—Prieei ate strong and ordera sdmw
" fan volumt,
Olaai and Putty. — Sales arc fairly good with
s,,"i   well tilled; prleea have not changed.
,   Pli,'»*  -Salon nre fair with stocks well filled, Prleea
lwv'   'tl changed.
Field Pence.— Demand is showing some increase
With posalbility of good sales. Stocks are well tilled
and prices arc unchanged.
Water Glass. — Many people realizing that egg
prices are ahout as low as they will be this year nre
putting down stock for next winter. The demand for
water glass is good.
Corrugated Roofing.—This is now moving in fair
volume,   There has heen no recent price change.
Garden Hose. — Reports from manufacturers
indicate lhal there will probably be no further price
reduction this season,   Buying is pretty well over,
NEW GOODS.
THE 2PURPOSE RAIN  KING
Ih s pistol term adjustable hose nozzle ami stationary gar-
i"i hi spray A patented article different, from anything on
lhe market    When used as a hose nozzle, can be adjusted
m a long, solid stream, down to finest spray desired.
With hose connection parallel to sprinkler the 2-purpose
Is ii sit for use as o hose nozzle. Loosen wing nut, give
hoie connection one quarter turn, stick peg in the ground,
turn on witter which gives a stationary garden spray cover-
(ng a (Irele 25 to 1» feet in diameter.
THE GROWTH OP CANADA'S RUBBER
INDUSTRY
Tin Canadian rubber industry continues to prosper,
ami a tint her substantia] growth was reeorded in 1925.
The tonnage of output by the Canadian rubber factories in that year was by far the heaviest in history, according to the manager and secretary of the Rubber As-
soeiatiou of Canada, and he predicts a further increase
in production of lit per eent. during 1926. Trade fig
urea show that despite increasing domestic consupm-
tion Canada is steadily becoming leas dependent on
manufactured rubber imports whilst nt the same time
sh. is expanding her export market at a very gratifying rate.
More than three million automobile tires were manufactured iu 1925 as against two millions in the previous year This increase was required to take care of
the enlarged demand for Canadian tires both at home
ami abroad. In Canada ear registrations in the year
showed an increase of some 75,000 automative vehicles,
the total Canadian car rigistration now being over 725,-
000, Canadian production of passenger automobiles
amounted to almost 40.0(H) ears ami. in addition, more
than 2'2.tHM) trueks, both figures being substantially
above those of previous years. These were all supplied
with tires by Canadian manufacturers, there being
only 30,000 pneumatic tiros imported during the year,
,„• half those nf -924.
Tire exports during 1925 increased to over a mil* 32
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Mn
lion from a little more than half a million -in 1924, Thc
export distribution of Canadian tires is very widespread, more than fifty different countries buying this
product, The export value of Canadian tires ami tubes
for the year reached a total of $11,500,000, being an
increase of about 100 per cenl. over the previous year.
Tennis Shoes Widely Distributed.
The favor of Canadian rubber lout wear 'is inerens
ing abroad, the total value of these exports being •*!.•
135,310, Three ami a quarter million pairs of Canadian tennis shoes were exported, and practically eery
country in the world was to some extent a customer of
the Canadian rubber shoe manufacturer, The largest
rubber belts in the world, both conveyor ami transinis-
-'ion. are now made in Canada, ami the export value ot'
this type of manufacture in 1925 was *f»»i."».r»is, Alto*
gether the net value of rubber goods exported from
Canada was about $17,000,000, as againal $10,000,000
in 1924.
TRAVELERS WE HAVE MET
And when you meet our old friend "Jiinmie" Weir,
you won't forget him for many reasons ,»iie of whieh
is that he stands 6ft, 2* jtn. high and Weighs 212 Ihs
Horn in Wick, Scotland, he came to Canada eighteen years ago—was for a short time in Toronto tried
it out iu Los Angeles, but didn't find any improvement
over Scotland—until he arrived in Vancouver, where
he has remained ever since.
^M'inimie" has been sixteen years with  Marshall
js IV (!. Ltd,—selling their general line of hard-
w le plays tennis, and that name of his youth called
golf. He likes to go Ashing, when opportunity offers
and it is said that he throws a "wicked line."
Vou may not be able to tell by his picture- but—
.Jiniinie is married and has one daughter, He is a
nroinincut Mason and an active, enthusiastic and regular attendant at all V. C. T meetings,
If you want to meet a fine big, good nature.!, good
hearted chap, just get acquainted with Bro, Jimmie
Weir, of Vancouver Council No, 284, United Cummer.
eial Travelers.
Cumberland—
Head  A*   0»l>oriie    I.   QseOrtlO   reported   »ol,|   luteresi
Head i*'<  8.)
Wilcox Brothers   Reported bought oul A Q Rlsughlei h
Courtenn)  (metis)
Duncan*—
liuteiiei, Claud   Creditors aieottni bold (km i
Fsrnle—
Short house. John vv   Sold onl (confy),
Glen Valley—
Morrison, VV, Q    Reported -old out («• 8 )
Grand  Fork»—
McKimioi. Ac Htvertj   ReLporled dissolved p*rtaer*)il|i
Havert) rtllrtaa sad ttyle changed t« l» h MrKlw i
K   CO    tl'   «i )
K.imloop*—
Mei she, J I    Reported miM oul t«» vv It !•*»«t» (tis i
Ktrrltdsle—■
Henry, VV t   Commenced (groeer)-.
Ladyimith—
Waiter* a, Akenhead   Reported sold out (oQeneral Won
hottii   ih  Q  Se.)
McKa*/-
Mnrtoii f \i   Reported nold oul (Coot) I
Nanaimo—
Ross, J   VV  -Reported — -• i*t out an«i reeonuneneed (li
Af   S ,  * • I
New Weitmi niter—
People'g Providers Ud    Discontinuing business (Gro)
Mult. »:    Reported told om  (filling station)
Mercer, N    Reported sold oul titro
North Vancouver—
young, J a     onttnenclng <*•»« station)
Terrace™
Powers, drorge   Reported  wid out  to  It   vv   risyton
(baker))
Vernon —
M« Mullen  Ac   Hank*    < otnnn in ei!  (tiro   ete )
Vancouver—
Dismay, r c   Reported sold out to Cl V Pastmorf intni
(togros l!n>*    Reported «niil om (Coal) . Ae i
Johnson, K it   Reported Incorporated ns Bpeedwsj Vum
Bappl)  * n   I.d|
Kelly, Joseph vv   Incorporated as J vv Kelt) Ptsno r«
i.m
Mi LailKhlln,  VV   J     Stoek  BOd ftStttfCl   <ol<l   l>v   «     '     VI
t a under powei of ttiorno) ih <; I
pit luie.ui Pros   sunk reported Mid ihrougli C i   VI
T   V   io Sulii ii;ri» t
Ross Pisco House -leeorporstod as Roas Piano Co   i
sun lion i'r<> en - Hniiiff <* »nie sdvertlsed (Qro.)
Wsrd Piano Honso—Incorporated »* Want Ptans Co t.,,!
Chapman's   Dissolved partnership! C it Hitchcock m»«
Mile  owner
Vi'.ir, v s   Reported sold oul (mro i
Herman's Ltd   Assigned; <• B Wlnier, custodian (W.W
Klegsbur)  Pooliresr Co  Lid    Application made lo n
iters nams lo raglsier
National < nffee *  Spice  Mill i  l.til    lieillloiH  claim
tie nie,i before Ma) 10
Siilin k  IIdiIiIiuI    A|ipl>ltiK for clinnse of name to  A
HsCilid Lid  (Milk, hosiery, etc >
Sun Malil ItaUIn Grower* of Canada I,ail     Name clumS' '
m Bonland Bales Association nf Canada Ltd
Vancouver Trading tv Lid   C.C.M.T.A. reported live"
power ol attorney
Karwaker, Wm    Huccecileil h> Taylor * Cookslej (i'>,» ■
Osbourne, I-cons rd.—Commenced rt> 0.)
si'oe  rati Limited -Reported sold out (H & B.)
Vinlorh—
I-' It, Rogi'iHon'H Palm Store   MorlKiiKce |-,.|m»iit'll III I'■•
lesslon (paints nml wallpaper)
Plcksnl * Turk, Lid.   Btock purchased by David Bpeii
cer Mil   (IMS. tiv).
Rllnsons Limited -Sold stoek and Allures ami dlaeonlln
ued business (gro., iiriiKM. Ac)
m-ei j, n.~-p. wollaston appointed trustee (Ore recti
Al,) ■ il
192G
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
33
HARDWARE PRICES CURRENT
Ths following srs prices quoltd for principal lines of leading wholesale firms.   Prices quoted are nscesaarlly
subject *o market fluctuations.
AMMUNITION.
i„*<s*<i Shot Shells.
p •}•*,*. •■   ti
Ctrttx *
,    .'    %   l»»   «»»
t   ;,   %   IS   *■*
imp*' 1*1
,  tt t  P* ' h
»
amt'.t*"-
.*   \   I -1   60
HORiK  SHOES   |r„n.  No*   0 to  1,  $1.7*5 .VISKS -O'Lsary Solid  BOX, 60 Iba,
per lH-lbs,; iron. Not   2 snd larger, $9.50 each; 7" lbs, $1100 saob; 100 iba. $22
M          ^fniftlP^iri    muuau   ,.       ,aa   ** PAINTS ANO OILS.
iXo*     a !£??!**          •* ■     ,MV   N .l,r.  Vt ^" Brandram-HenStreon
146 to    « n>» sod over He   I, 4  nmt i iti*  (Se p*»r
4'-   '    ,JI*9N,.2A,*H  '."r ! ^--^-In   **?<-•    B*H "EntHsh" ordinary colors	
IU',n $40S;   l-ln   KM It.H   "Knullah"   white
ITW       [ROM .BLACK SHEET   par lOOIbs.- II U*H Bxtertor Oil ahinsio'auin-
Sf io       «■»»««•    Iii"     1*4    S'laSf    t« 1",    1H-2-J    KUURC, m-lihi-v   ttnltwa    in   '   ml    <i,n«  	
$12.00
eaeh.
s||... <*lul> i: "J » J* * IU • ••   '** ';
H.-flt
■in
...» »d 1 ."* * It* tb
, ',,  , I
Metallic Ammunition
id K
i «4 *o\ ii .»*',  i in   ii '"i
[RON,   BLACK   SHEET   per  tOOths.—   16
g<l*S«    ti i't.    14    It'iaRi'    I'i 10.    18-20    fUSfSi
|< IS; II fuagl 1< M
IRON. GALVANIZED BURET   I'er IM !»>
,*» k . ik'.    \ii;,".<.»fi ..i   Kngtlsh   t" lo   ;
taut*    I". ■• ■    If. „•>■ gaug*. $« "i
KNOBS    IttM   IHMIR
SOI
* m   •
ipanned, I** '.'j per
I i
«• It
Dominion
■    h„ ..krlrM
■ • fc    •.(,:.«k«,l***
• ,,    (,!j,.,i|iflr.«»
U.'!«*   LMfMh
am*rir*n.
■   „ ■    n'v.„mr',t**»
.. »
i    (   >»•,'.., i, «• ;* •»
' ,    *»■(,.*<",- it
j     '   f      | .4-*MSJ k
ANVIU    •'•«•"*'   «Vf,fhi.  »v!t«i   !«»  ?J* «■•»
SOI
I,AMI*   CHIMNEYS—A,   p«r   cam   *   dm,
|!}3 poc .5..i . A, t'«*r fjof   l! I". B   I"*!- caw
i Soa t\ to pot it.-1 n. per doi li fs
,   > *J***f*t*Ja      <,...,,    ..»     i.,„„    »|.,I...      nlnln
«r    lung   globe,    pl.iin,
I. 1MU doi
LA VI! 'RNS   Short
|SI ||   -«•.»      Japai
LAWN Ueis\ ERS
i,.; ,.. \t%i 7o\>   Hi •"   11 x *"• I lade,
1 » *■     tix'  V...4-*  $iS 10;  ISxS blade, $15.76;
,rrAm is Ra lit* f« t*,M
IMi W»<1*. $|f
STAR    5. tn    «tif.^|.    3    knlv,.*,    earh.    12-ln
»».*    ti "in  I* 13   ***. -nt   I**"-1   i knives, tl*
•   i-'      '»■■-,   f*.. ''    16-111 . $1! oo
t\M   <,,»»  a »*•»<#. i<t nn  i,^ ... ,...^        MATTOCKS   Pick,    1?^   it"*,    Cutter,
IU j   •, i    htttitor-a •%*•   iu is doi • '-e'* Mi!.''   vs uci;   u.t»**  tj.ss f.o.b  Vancou*
t ",' »***•   «,r.! j»M.ti#-.i. lu io i<« lit *> ii i vet; *.*'it, bane 1" i'"* fob Vaocou-rar
BAltS   '''"»   Ill-Si pif  ISS tl-s J'li'KJ*   Chy  t.' Xt»  I* 4ft <t«>s
in      ;s<;    I*,**   »»*Is1»*a . ioo   tl If    eot IINF. TAR    '.  |Sl   $1.10 e*'*b.  S  R»l   35c
f«*    j »i M iv t*" I'M1 f**« rtJktTER Of PARIS   It'1'1 per 160 n>i
laU.TS    CARRtAOR   nn   fxlt   tv#,**»i»«">i RIVBT8 AND IU?RR8   Rlack cawtafe. 50)
S »"i HnaBaf up lo l*ia  ****%  **** J? I - tsort* %"<•   No   » issorted coppered rivet*
■ff Set   <***t *s !•   '«S *0 •■*'   So*.* tso* Ko   I   ll-* n> ; »»«,ift-i>-t mppfr rivet* and
itfti   til   <«.|'i.i   :#m jo off Hot   Noi# «»*»> "                J   '""""
»* \>  ci in #tff#«'i
B«h.TS MACH1KS    S strf amoUos- up to
I   n   '. S|     '«•»•   ll   tit   ll*< .   t*t*t    I in     to**
"     nt     S   I'S   •»«!   S   t«oio«   M Of(   !'»'
N *•■ •',• • »t (*ri*f.« in offset
iv.t rs  BToVi Lroas *- "ft s*a
ttnl/tn    TlltK    t.aaa   t-\   a\,\    5<»"»    «**>n   *!»
belli lot beoltafi porkatoa
aoARn  n<-\\«.   f*ni |,iss i«> $,om f**!
»****!. I u-M   RAKORI   n-1* e»5«   IIIVI «acb
1      ' ilN«l   PAfKW   Taj««.a   Mi   to  II ""
pe*  r a   ae .ring   I.   .j ,»;.i>.   pUiM   TJc   li
t!,-   r^r  «• :   Copoered  rt-fsU  I**   *•*'  "*
Copt**** *•>"* r'<' x"r *     ,     , «.i . •
lt.tfi; RABK   Hut'i»»i  tiHinii.i   I'.i--*.  .17'.
^aifSwn asrrs -The new
•v. ..., . ..  M*  US! m i«« ,( "'!,""L
.     ,■   t    ,-,.  .,   ,'*.-.   TFI   I-i'**""   *2* ''
' ,]'.    ul ;,;,,.,.n. I"'. *I#«M »■••: Trsns
«;'"   '    ,-•,»:« « i.S: Premier Rnaam.
f»*   '.,-•■»
.*, Gallon
■ > .,    un*...,," ordinary colors Mil
B*H "Enfllah" white 4,10
ii-ii Exterior Oil .siitnKie stain—
Ordinary rn|i»r-*. in t gni. cana  Ill'
Oreens and Qreys, in 4 gal. cans I.M
I: II Anchor Shlnictc Stain—
Ordlnsry color*, In 4 gal csns   I.S*
(Jinn* iiii,i Greys, In 4 gul. cans  Ill
PAINTS
Gallon
Ordinary colors, in 1 gal, cana  14.40
Martin   Senour  porch paint   4.40
Martin Senour Neutone white 3.75
Martin  Bsnour  Neutone color   S.7i
Martin  Senour  Hour paint   4.15
Sherwin  Wllllans,  white   4.75
Sherwln  Williams,  color   4.4'J
Sherwin Williams, porch  , 4.40
Sherwin Williams, floor 4,16
PITT*'— I'ei   1IW  Iba,
nulk. barrels lOOttos. , $«.60
luiik, irons ioo lbs ,   7,71
Hulk, Irons K !t>»    1.10
Tims, o It.*,  per Iti    I***!
Tins,   lib , , 12%
UNSFKH I'll,— Gallon
Raw, l ti» :•* barrels  ft 26
Boiled, l i" I barrels ... i,2!>
LEAD. WHITE IN OIL— Per 100 tbs.
1,000 Ibn.   to  1  ton  $1«.25
Lean     17.25
Brandram's Usnulns  -    11.11
Gallon
.   barrel   U»t«    $1.80
VARNISH ES— Gallon
Klantic, No.  1  1 IM
Elastic,   No.  2 „    7.40
iv Linoleum     no
IV  Marine   Spar  7.10
IV  Furniture  Ml
IV Palo Hani Oil   4.11
Li'«a 33 1-3 per cent,
nuc.r.us mn siiiNii LACJURR, i gat'
W   t1*"   tnll ,
invrs   n*i-«t, lit. antia*!-* f**vt**t  stw
bran fntah IS  ■ *S   t*r l**if   ,,r .     %
I*!**,  Ml  Mir  |T<-    IS  ■   'S V"  t*'1'  * ..,
IMTtH    Wm,if*ht  »«erl    N«    •'''4    J-S**''*
i! ii pee loi   >s « >S U H «M'r **   **■ *
4S   tl V> pat  do* 	
•M'.IKT  FRLT   t« i^e   W«lb  $* f*  r*"n  .
CATCtllta PUrilOAllfl Mt<1 r.<i>r>*r SIM
■Suit  *-*•»»« Ot\iah   Itlll I****'   ltHHMH»a
CHAIN Toll 14 elctwirir »eM I-I* J1**"
r»r:*A-r4»    \\, |tl 4» r*er  IW tb*   0*\*   %.***
t*t -v. n>« .   .
chain t.*««ti»*« t n ■ i* W(* ""■'  N
I 14   M Tl *a,h ... ,.
fit' it-Fits FiwiO   Cnlversal wo ** ii. •
<-Vi I'ni-rtraal Ko t 1ST ll <t"* Uotvarasi
V" : UU M <1»l Cnlter**! No * $«3 *' ''' [
"'-»    Sn    (ki    fS SO   os, h     ii-inia.   No    **■
II *t »»*-h
ntfitNs, tunnRt, No  a. n« '* *****
v«  I  III IS #arh   No I. Ill io steni Hi  *.
"ITI   **h
'   ■   '«  MALLRARLR   Pii lb   **\r  „
'"' ritFH lim: WIKR  '>r *»,h •• f
ItiHil'iivn   mn .ini.'"   ,,.,..,.._...     ■   K»-•
•manr.    »>«    • *-  I9J5;   li   ptl.,   15.11!   S   K«l..   $2.,I;   S   Ki»I..
' '   V,  T-rlrnv   Oone type Jewell, IM     $} is. *M«tlt 0*1* lie; l*8lnd sal c
Ut{ ,,  -I '*v»^'-,'v.!„i,t,l,Sl,„U,!.  console,        Utm W per cent.
!?->• in* »« "^ .V;' JS ;'!ch no tit,      Automotive Price Lwt
BATTRniBi    No  •K' »■ {   '*""   * •   -    - -
H|\UdPI**ONs«        !trrtn.lr Sut'.n.T,  IT
.,,    m ,r on   $1 leas  •"
r***   **  t*':."*.'     ■.:'*2... . xtXtm   111
AB80RBBJR8 SHOCK-Float A Ford No,
t at 121 *>'V
ACCELERATORS   FOOT-Wireless   Fori
^^^^^^^^^^^^ -jn 13c each; Cap
c .i,|.«u n, exi ttii hi-.iit Tft n> ofl serawi ase earn, on avivni 30c each; Ma-
«* ,sl -. " ' , , ".. • ,» ,,/f u.i llr,,H^ chine arew 76c each; Machine nut 71c each.
"   '   *''      " ' .:,.:" L,„* round head       BATTERIES-Hot Shot |2,H each.
.........t.     ^>i.«  J.Ik     tl 9K   i»«rh.
"'; '   v.,,,.    Marronl  $• leaa so     , ACCBLERATOR8   ruiu-
,u,lr Ides 111 M -I••«. DtsatoM No  I H« *° AssoitTMKNTS-Cot«er pi
Happy ioe« J8o      h; s ,     .    „
%f1U5W8    "f «M  f1rt'    h.*?d#i nl chine a*rew 7ftc each; Machli
111
t'
Hat   hiIght rnunn nenti >..  .  .
rial in-n-t M ll "ff list; brats round hea'i
*ft f> off imt
>■ *r.i\\  «• \i*s   •.•■ ..if list
s-*t:r,\\ .s   SI T   60 off  li»i
SHOVELS   AM»   SPAfiKS   Olds   or   Fom,
111 U t*cr dos  S Jones or Bulldog $19 70 per
ins
Mi*«Mirs   M,^'*c No   i i\f)*)'' it"* : No  fi.
$17 V*. doi    No   I, $1100 dos ! No   16, ItsM
All above m hlsrli Bnlsh
SOLDER   S *-* '*,   cass lots, We  per lb;
1,*.*•> $|c pp- \».
srtKts   PRKaSED   Ptr too ths - S Inch,
|i tn    ',  *(  fn |0    um   I** ^*^
*i\ vfi.t's   Oslranlsed fence, t* ?s per ioo
n.m   i„ (hill Wr*«   gslVSnliiM) Poultry netting,
'••   full  k,-K»
line itpw  I,.,. «-«.....,	
BATTER1E8—Hot Shot $2,!>« each.
BOOTS Tire 4-in. $1 25 each.
BUMPERS—Hoover Twinbar, 110.10 each
CAPS—Radiator, ll.oo each,
I'AltnoniNi'U'M   Valvo grinding l-os   $4
OAltniFS   Luggage, collapalble f2 26 each
CEMENT—Radiator, S lb Wonder Work*
er 16 40 dos.
CHAINS -Weed 3"xSS |6 35 each; S!x3S
17 00 each; 3U4 $7.70 each; 33x4 $120 each;
S4x4 1900 each     Leaa 30rV
RID 0 SKID—MxHl 1375 pair; 32x3S
lift pair; 34x3'.. $4.lo pair; 30x4 $3 95 pair;
33x4 14 50 pair, Leaa 30*^.
CLEANER8, WINDSHIELD—Presto 11.71
each;  ltnln-K*Day. |1 50 each.
ful I.S Spark alngle $5 66 each; Spark
double $11 00 each.
DEFLECTORS—Wind     sdjuatable    $1510
pair.
ENAM&L—U P». •'••t t.i»c |f. 00 dos ; 6-os
-••    .    .  •. «n  .i,..   Martin  Senour 34
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA KKTAILKR
Muv
JOBBERS' LABELS FAVORED BY HEAD OF
AMERICAN WHOLE8ALE GROCERS.
President McLaurin Declares That Day Haa Passed
When Manufacturers' Label Possessed Value to
Wholeaaler.
President J, II. McLaurin of thc American Wholesale Grocers' Association has eomo oul flat •loot.-1 in
favor of private Iain-Is, and in a reeenl bulletin to the
membcra of hia association declares that the private
lalit'l idea is gaining strength throughout tin* country
among wholesale grocers, Discua^ng the queatioti ox
lln' wholesale grocer having his own brands, ho saya*
"During tho past few months an unuiual number of
letters has come to this office discussing the dcairabil*
ity of the use of private labels by the wholesale grocer,
Because many of them requested an opinion regarding
the advisability of the use of private lagela by the
wholesale grocer, I feel this bulletin is timely."
Stating that inasmuch as the American association
had never recorded its views on this question, President MeLiurin said that lie wanted it understood thai
in speaking at tIris time he was not speaking t->r the
organisation as a whole, but only attempting to express
his views, based upon his observations ami conclusions
whieh had been reached as a result of those abserva*
tions.
Formerly Had Value.
"There was a time." Mr. McLaurin declared, "when
1 viewed this entire question differently. In the vial's
gone by, a manufacturer's label on baking powder,
milk. soap, matches, cereals, canned vegetables and
fruits, eoffee, tea. extracts, tobaeeo and other staples
ami nationally advertised commodities possessed some
real tangible value to the wholesale grocer. That day
has passed. When a wholesale grocer handles the average manufacturer's brand today, he does so knowing
that he is pushing a brand of goods that is being hauled
and foot hulled around the country by almost any man
who can raise the money to buy 'it. and that in stock*
illg these brands, he is doing so with a chance of hav-
in*.' to sell these articles without a profit, or not sell
them at all.
"Frankly speaking, wherein is the real value today
lo the average wholesale grocer of a manufacturer's
brand? The large proportion of food manufacturers
of the country entertain no respect or concern for their
own brands, and on what 1 minis should they expect the
wholesale grocer to nspeet these brands? A manufacturer recently stated to me lhat if the use of private brands by wholesale grocers increased to any
vppreeiable extent, he would be compelled to market
goods direct to the retail trade.
i'Thc fact of the matter is that the gentleman was
Inly doing that very thing by one method or nn-
fer, and 1 took occasion to remind him of the fact.
The Cream of Wheat Company ami a few others are
outstanding examples of manufacturers who respect
their product, and who by their Bolf-clcotod policies of
marketing their products have gained the merited confidence and respect of their patrons. 1 have never
heard anyone suggest that he would like to handle
a Oenm of Wheat article under a private label. It
isn't necessary, nor is this statement to boost for
Cream of Wheat -it doesn't need it .
T.
Private Labels Growing.
Thai the   private   label   idea i*   gaining   sti,    •(
throughoul this country among wholesale grocer*, i.
not surprising ami is very natural.   Self*pre#erviitj
js the first law of nature."
AMENDMENTS TO THE FOOO ANO DRUGS AC
The follow in* regulations bave beta established in oi |.
m Council, nml follow iiutiH'-jisitH) after Section 13 oi
rogUlatlOBS under the KimhI andl'i   uk»  Ait
IS.    II CSpoaed for Sale, Offered for lilt or sold to (h, ...
SttflftlOl   I'uhlit   In   paikaireH   |*nI   uj.  by   it  manufartuiii
DJOStS, ni'iii food pnt-duii!-.. lard, ftliorh-nlitit and shnllsi    ib
stsaeesi processed fruits and vegetables and their prod i
nil an named in tlti Refutations under ihs Meat sad iv >
(floods Ac', shall b** Itbelltd lo indicate *he name and tdrfn
ol the manufacturer or of the person or the arm for  ehorn
tlo*, srs manufactured   Tbs nei weight ol ooalenis must l»
conspkrtioQsl) and correct!) Mated oa eech package *-."\-
tin provided lo subsection <*"> Section i* oi lbs food sod Iirui
Art.
An> (btcHpllrs tenon appear! of on these labels tnnti b*
eonslsteni with th<' definition*, of such terms ss estshibti
In Order In COttOCll under the authnrlt) of •!■,.* M< .,• and
IH'd Poods  Art
II All putwOSas Of container* »urh »s bottle! )■•! - n
num containing maple syrup ospoood for sale, offered *
salt or sold to the consuming public, *haii be labelled to     »
plalnl) and dlSllQCllj
(s)   Th»* name of ibe article
(b)    The iiatne and the nAA;* "" of an Individual ot  fl
aiMiltnlliK responstbtllt)   for the (tarkasins
(r)   a declsrstloa ol net contents m items oi roluon
RUCh S| plots, quart*. KaIlon« or fraction* IbefOOl   •»» lltr*m *
fiartioiiit ih« !•«•    of  In  terinjt of  ne*  wii«ht  Mich  .»*> <m • •
or  pounds  it  supplemeoted  b>   'he following  tiatemn
"One Kailon of  iii.ipl.- syrUp weigh**  13 pOUndl  3 OUO«m
Thin regulation ibaJI aw-.lv  to «i*n*\n |i«<*,ii!ng Ihrouih Ihi
ordltisn channels of trade but not' tn package* *ben tm I
lo   tin*   farmer   or  other   Ilk*-   producer   who   make*   lt)*| '■
products from maple •»«!>
ADVOCATE   PRICE   MAINTENANCE
The  manufacturer* of * Non-orb"  SlOVfl  iMdinh.  shoe  f
Isbes and silver cream ha-»<' become Identified with ihe < •*
adlan Par Trade l.aguc    For thirt*  -tear* the product!
the Nonsuch Manufacturing Go   in!. Toroato, one* i-'
Hold with satisfaction b> Canada's leading merchaoti   »
nual h;»I«\h running into million* of bottle**      Non»nnh" sllvi
JhiIIhIi. their tii-w.-m line i« ranUllv  making *, name for I'-«
with distributors it u psched in a eonvenieat coataiaer n ■■
in guaranteed sersicbless sntbno a<niH trhatever are used ii
itn mstitifftctuif
WINNIPEG   MAN   ACQUIRES   LOCAL   MUSIC   STORE
ttn)
The roll-established baslaeai oi Walter t  Bvani i'11
Pd, Oranvftle Street, ban beta taken over by J   W   KHIl
or Wlnalpoi   Mr  Kelly, a former prtsldeat Oi the It''i
Mercbaots1 Assoeistioa wan head of tbe musical bouif "
.1 J ll McLesn, Wtonipc^i, one of the lanceM anisic housi
ill   I'annilii    ;.t..l   haa   mmmtAmA   In   ,l...   vf.-t   hi   it...   ,.**i   llilttt
Teacher: "Ih lln- world round or flat?"
Tommy: *ilouinl."
Teacher: "How do you know?"
Tommy: "Flat thin. I don't waul lo Marl nn aiKUinenl."
"Ko I lobl the yoUDg imm 10 linlorso lhe cheek bin fnml^
Kent him."
"IMil be do li?"
"Vch.   Ho  wrote  on   ths  baek,  'I   heiiilllv   IndorSO  H«i!
check.'" IM 'll
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
35
I'll
THE TEA OARDEN8 OF INDIA
(Continued from pace 19)
Ih,. chief [Mirts of dispatch in Northern India arc
, Nuita. Chlttagong ami Bombay, and in Southern
I  ni. Madras, Calicut, Cochin, Telliaherry, Tuticorin,
1 Alleppey.   Ceylon tea is shipped from Colomrabo
nl (ialle.    London is tin litre of the tea trade of
.  world, and practically all the tea Imported into
i,!,.it Britain is Bent to the premier port,
Disposal of Crop
The hulk of the Northern Indian erop is shipped
•w.eti the moiitliH of July and January, whereas
•... crops from Ceylon and Southern India 'where the
plucking li continuous ■■ are exported all the year
round Tea i* a particularly valuable cargo, much
Miughl after by shipowners To avoid any risk of
I'ouiamination during the voyage the tea is carried
tueeli decks and imt  placed in the lower holds re
served for rough cargo,
I'i lure   dispatch   from  tlo    garden,   samples   or
musters"   oi the various lean included In tin* ship-
il Jin- often forwarded to tin* |<ondon agents in or*
thai valuations of the tea to eome forward may he
«!••     Many   teas  are   purchased   tor  tin   American
mKi t on these valuations
Tin hulk of the teas, however, on arrival are taken
'" "lie of the bonded warehouses where they ate Wl ii.'h
..| and inspected by  II    M   Customs      Most  nf tlie  tea
in offered for wile in tin puhlie auctions in Mincing
i in. although a certain proportion i-* purchased hy
i hi large distributors by private eontrael Por the
purpose o fnclllng by miction there are rceogniacd sell-
inu brokers to whom the owner of tin* lea, or his agent,
gives Instructions for dhtpoaal The broker Includes
ihe leas fur sab* in his catalogue, copies of which arc
irculaled to the trade.
The conditions of sale are printed in each rata*
lojitie, with the names of the companies or i-dates for
which the various invoice* are being sold The num
her of chests of eaeh grade of lea and the approximate weigh! in pounds of eaeh invoice is also given.
The teas are then pul "on show " at the various ware*
houses some days before  the sale and arrangements
r< made by the warehouses for representative nam-
pics to be available fi r sampling purposes, Prosper-
tivi purchases ean draw small samples of any teas in
which they may be In t crest wl and, in this way, they
nre able to taetc and Ih their limits for tin* ceas which
Ihey may wish to secure at tin* forthcoming auction.
Bruises        Sores
Rheumatism
Seethe the sere muiclss er ligaments by rubbing in Minard's Liniment, it penetratss, rellevss and
heals. II eases Inflammation and
restores ths injured part to health.
Splendid  for  cuts  and  sorts.    It
sterilises and heals quickly.
In the tasting of tea, a quantity equal to the weight
o\ a sixpenny piece is dropped into a small pot and
about im eighth of a pint of boiling water is poured
oil to it. It is nllowc dto stand for live or six minutes
and the liquid is then poured into a small china bowl.
The taster then examines the tea, first tasting the
liquor, secondly .induing the scent or brightness of
lhe infused leaf, and thirdly noting the appearance
of the dry leal* of the sample.
Sales of Indian tea take place on Monday and
Wednesday in each week. Ceylon teas being offered
on Tuesday, and .lava ami Sumatra teas on Tuesday.
Tin teas ar.* sold at so much per lb., the lowest advance allowed being one-eighth of a penny. Buyers
pay to the nclling brokers a deposit nf £1 per package,
the balance being payable on or before three months
from the date of purchase unless thc tea is taken from
the bonded warehouse prior to the prompt day when
the balance must he paid.
Care in Blending.
1st recent years the distributing trade has fallen
more and more into the hands of thc large tea packet
blenders to the detriment of the old-fashioned grocer
who used to purchase his supplies ill bulk (chests)
from th«' wholesale dealers. With their tremendous
resources the former are able to carry large slocks
and much time and trouble is given to the blending of
teas to suit thc water of thc district in which they
are offered lor sale.
The popularity of Indian and Ceylon teas continues to grow from year to year, and is shown by the
steadily Increasing demand from all tea-drinking countries. In 1852 the exports of tea from India were under 3511,000 lb., whereas in 1924 they had reached the
enormous figure of 348,476,011 lb.
It was n< t until the failure of the coffee plantations that tea growing was sediously undertaken in
Ceylon, hut it is now the most important agricultural
industry of the island Exports in 1H76 were about
30,000 lb., as compared with 209.49:t.5:i6 lb. in 1925.
While Great Britain takes thc bulk of the exports
of Indian and Ceylon tea, trade within the Empire is
making steady progress. Outside the United Kingdom, tin principal consuming countries within thc Empire are Australia and Canada. The quantities of
Empire-grown teas taken by these Dominions are
given in the following table:
1923 lbs.        1924 lbs.        1925 lbs.
Australia
Canada
22.092.212      25,817,926      29,559.191
34,518,000      32,847,886     31,168,282
J. A. TEPOORTEN
LIMITED
WHOLESALE DRUGS
PATENT MEDICINES DRUGISTS' SUNDRIES
PHARMACEUTICAL PREPARATIONS
308 Water St.
Vancouver, B.C. :iti
THE BRITISH (OLUMBIA RETAILER
-May
WESTERN GLASS Meant
-PRICES RIGHT
-SERVICE  FAST A
-QUALITY	
POLISHED PLATE GLASS
MIRRORS    ::    WINDOW GLASS
Western Glass
Co., Ltd.
158 Cordova Steret West
Vancouver, B. C.
Phone Sey. 8687
WATCHES,   CLOCKS,   JEWELRY
Western Wholesale Jewelers
Cordova and Cambie Sts.
Phone: Sey. 2765
B. C. Distributors of
Messrs. T. H. Prosser 4 Sons Ltd.
London.
Manufacturers  of   Prossers'   Celebrated Line of TENNIS and
CRICKET Supplies.
Associated Agencies
LTD.
615 Psnder St. W.        Vancouver.
Phone: Sey. 131
SPRING ANNOUNCEMENT
Fancy Silk Hose for Men at
the 'Right Price* *
Write for samples.
I BEAR
R. A. S1ME, B.C. Distributer
TNI BLACK  MANUfACTURINC*  CO.
318 Homer St.       Vancouver, B.C.
WRITE YOUR OWN
Show Cards
8HOWCARD WRITING is a book
of 196 pages elegantly bound in
battleship grey cloth, with over 200
illustrations.. Send for it today.
Price $2.00.. .Money refunded if not
satisfactory
Progress Pabliskiag Co., Ltd.
101-2 Merchants' Exchange Bldg.
Vancouver, B. C.
T. D. STARK
F. W. STERLING
Telephone
Sey. 6195
8TARK <fc STERLING
MANUFACTURERS
' AGENTS
1043 Hamilton
VANCOUVER,
Street.
B. C.
Phone:   High. 9889
IDEAL CONE COMPANY
Manufacturers of
ICE   CREAM  CONES
Purest  Made     Cost Less
335 PRINCESS AVE.
Vancouver.
n«.ii«R,i
Penmans  Ltd.,  Parte, om   j   j
Thompson, 616 Hum tits* Wesi   so)
■■.■
i iiipimiii Hdiion KnKUng in  i.m
Hamilton, Oat   B, ll   Welsh a Co.
I.nl.  111 h  Homer  -S<r«-«'t    .**•*..•>    n •;
GROCERIES.
Canada Starch to  Ltd., Montreal
B  ll   Rowntreo, 101 Hasilng* \\
s<->  r>'.>
Addressing
M«llln«LUu     Mu,tlSr*ehtnS
Faeaiaule Letters Main*. •««•
Direct Mail Csmpal|ns
Hai dM KJtkttnily
Writer Dimtirics, Iii
ih ii Mil ne* s*        aot wi*
Scales, Sllcers, Cutters and Cabin.
ets—New, Rebuilt and Second Hand.
Cash or Terms.
THE  SCALE  SHOP  LTD
Sey. 2881
365 Cordova St. W., facing Homer.
SERVICE   TO   OUT   OF   TOWN
SUBSCRIBERS,
The British Columbia Retailer will
be pleased to furnish subscribers
the names and addresses ef repre-
sentativee er agents ef eastern
manufacturers in Vancouver. We
will also sdvise where their com-
modifies can be purchased.
nHinsK rn of Canada Lid., Loudon,
Oil!      I.    I*    M.ihou   4    in,   :,!<•   || ,
lug* Wesl     ,"*«•), %W%,
Canadian Postern Cereal Co   Ltd,
i'<» .int»     Mr.S'i'i'l) 'a    |.ii|.   Iff   J|,4i..
i»s« Weal    Sej   9337
Pa I mo is to Companj ol Canada Ltd
Toronto, Ont    Deta Armstrong   is i
Lurch Streel    Ita-i   SOIL
Canada Cotew end Chemical* i. i
Toronto HurK k Sterllnf, NOS Ham
IHon Streel    Be)   6188,
Uhs nl ifee Wood* Mililnic •«. i\
wised Ki»h«r«i# Streel     Sej  :-.<
\v ci«rk Hit. Montreal <i>i< V.
p stark, in HsmlHou Bt   Se) t*i*
Borden Milk Co  Ud        Moi
Que   Local Office, 332 \v«t«r Kirn
Se)  6831
McCormick M's  <«»  i.-ii. i,<> |o
Ual,   Local office, n*»" Hamllion s*
Si«>    3112
I) W OHtett Mi*«. in. \AA I
MrKarlnno. !iiH) in-ati**,  SI   Sej   I *'»"
Manufacturers' Agents     »T0"E equipment 4 supplies
(Vancouver, unless otherwise stated).
(Insertloni under thll heading nt**
charged si tbe rate <»f ll 20 a line,
for nix months, payable ia sdvsnce),
DRYGOODS
Monarch Knlttlni Co, Ud. sin
Homer Streel- s i» Btewarl k Co,
l.nt   Phons Sey, T638.
Hm-k island Overall Co., Hook i»-
land, Que,   it M Foster, 2s Water BL
The liliu-k MfK. Co, Seattle,—H. A.
Blrae, :ns Homer Street,  Boy. 1533.
Aiiantii' linderwear Ltd., Monetoa,
Nl»    B.   H   Welch  A   CO,  Lid, 31*
Homer Slreet,   Bey, 8687,
The Cull Knitting To. Ud., (Jail.
Ont,—J. J. Mai Kay, 804 Howor lllits.
Hi-y. 8091,
C, Turnbiill Co. Ltd., (Jnlt. Ont.-
S. li. Slewsrl A Co, Llil, MX Honor
SI reel,  Sey, 7526.
InM'rtiAtiiittAl liijitfi" ••- Mschln''*"
i"o 1,nt, Toronto,*—Local office, *>,is
Seymour Si    Sej   2»>3
Canadian Toledo Scales   0 Ltd
Wladnor, Onl   B  8  Chambers  v H
Smythe 8 tree I   Sey, n» 11.
Continental  Paper  Products,  1
Ottawa.   Onl   smith.   Daeldson   A
WiiKin.   Se)   8166.
j c Wilaon, I.m. Uchute, Qu<
Ural Office,  1060 Uonn-i   Bt     B«'5
7SI.	
Bartram Paper Products Co,, 1
i2Hn Homer Street,   Norfolk P*i>*
its. Ltd., us Water SlreeL  Bey, TUB"
and 7*69.
SPORTING GOODS.
Prosser, T 11 ft 8001 Ltd,, Lend""
Kns.   Aaaoelaled Agendas, 6ir> i',!
der BL W.   Bey, 191. A Saving in Selling Talk
When You Stock
Interlake
Itvterlak
issue
I     ^***m^***M.r**at****»*m     I
iJfitefl^^'^^^M^al
iftfM Bl
12 ■m^pH jj
Dealers all over Uauada have the Ha.,,.* experience, [iiterlake Toilet Tissue is widely known. It
MtUfltfM the demands of the moat exacting. Vour customers simply say "Interlake" and selling talk
is ai a minimum
Interlake Tnilel Tissue ia made entirely from new stock - ('anadian spruce,     Xo old material
. iticra into ita manufacture    It comes in a big 700 sheet roll, ami can be sold at a priee all can afford
There i***. a profil for you in every roil of Interlake timt goes over your counter.
Tin- name »• Interlake" ou n paper product is an assurance of painstaking manufacture,
Western Agents: PROVINCIAL PAPER SALES LTD.,
WINNIPEG CALOARY EDMONTON
Interlake Tissue Mills Co.
limited
Head Office: 54 University Avenue, Toronto
1
**W*\*-'**0'
**+****■
,u**
WL I-'
.».
'■•m**J  *(
itit
tt
SWIFT'S "PREMIUM
SUMMER SPECIALTIES
For the Picnic Bosket
ax *
Now is the Season to stock a good full line of
our Summer Cooked Meat Specialties, including our "Premium'' Cooked Hams, both round
and flat style. Your trade will find any of
our Summer Specialties ideal for Sandwiches
and other Picnic purposes. Ready to serve.
Absolutely delicious and satisfying. You will
And these products a winner with your trade,
and a profit maker for yourself.
ALL OUR PRODUCT8 ARE GOVERNMENT
IN8PECTED.
SWIFT CANADIAN COMPANY LIMITED toisrcffto.
"TITTLE DAISY" Stockings need no introduction to
JL# Canadian mothers. They are well and favorably
known as stockings of exceptional quality and value.
Keep them displayed prominently on your counter so
that mothers can feel the soft, warmth-giving properties
of the fine Australian lambs' wool from which " Little
Daisy" Stockings are made. You'll get many an extra
sale in this way.
" Little Daisy" Stockings are made for children of all
ages. A wide range of dainty colors—and black. All
have reinforced toes and heels. From your wholesaler.
Chipman-Holton Knitting Company, Limited,
Hamilton. Ont.
Mills *tt Hamilton and Wetland
MeansYear-Rou/u)
PROFIT!
*-* «^\\
LITTLE DAISY
Hosiery for In fants& Children

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