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The British Columbia Retailer Apr 30, 1926

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Full Text

 THe British Columbia
Vancouver, B C.
VOL XVIII, No 8
A PPII    1Q9C 10c Per C0Py. $100 per year.
AriUL,  ISW0 Eighteenth Year.
»A
WALTHAM  WATCHES
We specialize in Waltham Watches in all grades, sizes and styles
We have Ladies' Ribbon and Bracelet Watches, and Men's
Pocket and Strap Watches in large varieties
WESTERN WHOLESALE JEWELERS
Comer Cordova and Cambie Streets
Vancouver, B.C.
WK8TKRN CANADA WALTHAM AGENTS,
KEEP TIME WITH THE NEW MOVEMENT-CANADIAN PAIR TRADE LEAGUE. *u I    -"
WE MANUFACTURE AND SELL THE FOLLOWING
PAPER  BAGS
Paper Mills:
Lachute 4 St. Jerome
Que.
Manufacturers  since   1870
"STANDARD"   "MANILLA"
"BUCKSKIN"    "LIGHT  KRAFT"
"HEAVY KRAFT"
THEY ARE
Actually Sir-anger, Tougher
Mora Pliable, Mori Economical
Molt Satisfactory
Be Sure to Ute the Beit   They Coil No More
J. .C WILSON, LIMITED
Manufacturers of
PAPER BAGS      WRAPPING, TISSUE AND TOILET PAPERS
for   Wnoleaaien and Retailers
10S8 HOMER STREET, VANCOUVER. R  C
Phone  Seymour 781
The same price
at every store in
our British
Columbia
Territory.
5
BIG BARS
FOR
25c
PROTECT YOUR PROFITS BY
SELLING A MAINTAINED PRICE
LAUNDRY SOAP
THE ROYAL CROWN SOAPS, LIU
VANCOUVER, B. C 1926
THE BRITI8H COLUMBIA RETAILER
The CREPE PAPER that is Easy
to SeB and Easy to Work With
\ Bunertiue Crepe Paper has a selling attraction that la
difficult t«> resist. You can make store decorations from Interlake
which in turn will sell it to vour customers.
has a lustre and texture all its own. It stretches its
own length, It comes in :17 distinct shades, whieh makes it desirable for
anv deeorative scheme,
Kaeli shade of IsstcHafcc   comes in an attractive packet, On the hack of each
packet are suggestions for use and also measuring rules.
.Vk your wholesaler or write direct for free eolor eard.
Tin- name
llfaetlllT.
on a paper product is an assurance of painstaking man*
Interlake Tissue Mills Co.
Limit**
Head Office: 54 UNIVERSITY AVENUE. TORONTO, ONTARIO
PROFITS FOR YOU
Your success depends on selling goods at a profit, and your sales depend on isomer demand, Brunswick Sardines offer an excellent
opportunity for quick turn-over. Nothing in your store will sell with
less effort or a bigger percentage of protit. The quality and priee
appeal to rvery taste. Three out of every four tins of sardines sold
iu Canada are packed hy Connors Bros, Feature them in your window and on vour counter,
I!Wr j*.,   Jmm*UUwU
JUTLAND
**>APDINIS
Also Jutland and UlaeierBrauds.
Seleeted, meaty tisll of the tinest
quality in key-opening tins. Sell
them by  the dosen and half
dozen.
C0NNGR8 BR08. MUTED, Blsek'a Harbour, N. B.
3
•2 ■m
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
•|>nl
2
COFFEE
8aves you time when cuatomen ask for "Freeh Rosated
Coffee." That's exactly what Nabob is. The vacuum tin
keeps the flavor in—you leU vt   fresh from the router
Kelly Douglas & Co. Ltd.
VANCOUVER. B. C.
"m"^
WILSON BROTHERS
BitebHilMd UM
Our Motto is " SERVICE "
W. mam attm to M m a*smt*mam mm », .«*.« talll, ftmu „ „„ „„, w, u||
five sctual facta to prove thst It ia
ECONOMY
to deal with u
m^mmTZ WILSON BROTHERS, VICTORIA, B. C.
Wholesale Grocers
SHAMROCK RRAND
HAM. BACON. BUTTER, LARD. SAUSAGE.
. SsttStt SMtts rup*'•• rn* * m
•nd -without «q«.l o„ .Krl.' *"**'" Br"'e* •l"'*" '*******.
etc.
Y0B 0AH MOOMOMD SHAWWOK
BEAMD.
VAHOOOTBB
P. Burn* & Company, Limited
OALOAJtY
BDMONTON Ifl
H26
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
h"V
ROGERS
1
GOLDEN SYRUP
If*
1
v
ir
.  ,
•t
i 1
v
i
••The Bnd of a Perfect Day"
IMadc from finest flavoured cane sugar, a special grade of which is imported for the
purpose. .
IPut up in til sizes of packages to suit your customers requirements.
|In packages designed to beautify your store.
Sib. Una, 14 to a cass
Mb. tins. IS to s esse
101b. tins, 6 to a caaa
104b. tint, 3 to a cass.
Perfect Seal jsre, 11 to s cass.
The British Columbia Sugar Refining Co. Ltd.
VANCOUVER, BC THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
»ni
A Quality Product!
IDrWSUlotoni   1\
ronizeIJ
*mm mam mtmnmm        UUUW
OKNUINB
Whole Wheat
FLOUR
A FAIK FIXED PROFIT
FOR LARGE AND SMALL
IS THE POLICY OF
The Dr. Middleton's food Products
Company Limited
Vancouver, B. C.
Peter Rabbit Pcanot Butter
Costs No More But Soils Faster
TMt TOV PAIL OILIOHTt TMI OHILMIN
OI»»lAY A  CAM.    IT  Will  Mil  ITHII-
KeHy Confection Co. lid.
I
HOO MnitiianS Sitae*
vancouvih. a c
=1
PAPER
BAGS
/
Light Kraft
Light Manila
made in B. C. be careful to alwayTs-Mcify
••WB8TBEK- ji,,,,*,!,, QMUty
HITOHE —Whit. 8-alphlto Qiuliiy,
M„„„f„,„,r,,| iu |t|.|iH|| (,i|||||||iji( ^
BariramPai)erProdiicbCo.Ud.
VAHCOUVKt, B. 0.
1 he Norfolk Paper Co Ltd
136 WATER STREET ^ V#> t,W»
PhoM8.,m,«r7868aild7(iA,'00"V«.B.C.
Htavjr Krafl
/
■road atrip*
White  St'l|»»'H# <V>fi
THK MUTISM COLUMBIA RKTAILER
* Staler >*
Y
With which la Incorporated tha B  C, TRADE RKVIEW.
Published Monthly.
EIGHTEENTH YBAB
OBNBRAL MERCHANDISE
OROCCRIRS. DRYOOOM.
MARIiWARB. rOOTWlAR.
OFFICIAL ORGAN OP B.C. BOARD
RXTA1L MERCHANTS'
ASSOCIATION OP CANADA
A MONTHLY JOURNAL published in the interest of Retsil Merehan
dmiif snd ths Development of Commerce in Western Canada.
SUBSCRIPTION RATE: Oo« Dollar Per Year, payable In advance.
Adrertlelog Hatee oa Application
PvSltehert: PROOfttSS PUBLISHING CO. LTO.
Suite 101-2 Merehanta' Exchange Building
VANCOUVER, B. C.
TtlipbOOl Sey, SMI Cab!* Address-Shlpplng-AII Codes
Editor. J 8 Morrttoo W N Code. Business Manager
Entered «t Ottawa as Second claas matter
Vol XVIII. No 8
VANCOUVER, li. IV APRIL 1926
The following repreaant W. M. A. Branches
In tha Province of erltlah Columbia;—
Armstrong A. Smith, Sec.
Cranbrook C. J. Lewla, Sec.
Kamloops A. C. Taylor, Pres.
Kelowna Andrew Fraser, Sec.
ItfttOB H. Rebagllatl, Sec.
Nanaimo N. Wright, Sec.
Nelaoa E. P. Oigot ,8ec.
New Westminster	
a "id Fraser V alley. D. Stuart, Sec.
Revelstoke W. A. Sturdy, Sec.
Vancouver W. P. Ing, Sec.
Vancouver, B.C.
Canadian Fair Trade League
Joa. T Crowder, Dominion Fresident of Ur Retsil Merehanta' Association of Canada, Inc., Tells
Vsncouver Grocers Progress Msde in Price Maintenance Movemeni in Canaan.
Anv doubt* there mnv hsvc been in 1 !»•   inin«U oi
a *,
vhuleasle or r**tnil Kr«»«-i of ltriii-h Columbia re*
.•unling PriMilriii Crowder's attempt to pr«»t«*»*T the
Irad* against unfair .huliuy w«-r mplctely not aside
when nu April 14. in iln* auditorium of Ibe Vancouver
ward of Trade, he outlined the results <»f his labors
iu .in niHiinhly e»f mine 4"0 merchants Mr Crowder
han fully covered five provinces oi ih<* Dominion, vis-
"•ng tin- larger ettlee snd towns, explaining the oh*
j"N of thll campaign f.ir Prii-r Maintenance which
i* viutf carried on under the auspices «»f ih«' Canada
• '•«!'• Trade League, nn<l of which Mr  Crowder fa
1" MtleBl nml iiiati-is/e*r pro lew
Msetinf Enthusisstic
Throughoul Canada, well attended meetings of
tntfaelurers,   wholesslers,   nml   relall  merehanta
lln
III.
ui|
Ih
M
Ih,
III
I'i
l><
lln
•'""iiirns,     niiii|i'Hii|in>.     ami     renin    mv.
• resulted in a »trong cooperation wllh thc move*
•ill and from .Mr  Crowder's remarks, it appears
' lhe preliminary HtnicrM have thus far proved thor-
'l>ly successful
»n introducing the speaker. Chairman James Hark
provincial presidenl of the H M  A. voiced tho
••uii-ntH of vsncouvsr poeera when In* declared
'' ••«» i nn ii could havo been chosen for this partie*
1 work morr able to bring result a than Joseph T.
wder, with whom ho had the pleaaure of being .«
1 ial contact for many yrar?*. and he called for
" cheers from tin* assembly for Mr Crowder'a ap-
liranee on his return from Wis campaign, which ho
!'mpd an unqualified success.
In opening his address, Mr. Crowder deprecated
thr eulogy of his introduction hy thc chairman, do*
daring that so far as hi' was concerned, the term sue-
eeaa waa hardly applicable at this stage of thc Fair
Trade beaguo'a efforts, ami stressed the point that
danger lay in too great a haste in applying thc principle of price maintenance. It was, however, he declared, necessary to "go while the going was good/'
and his actions during the past seven months leave
im question as to the vast territory covered in his effort
to spread thc principle of the campaign over ('anada.
Mr. Crowder gave a list ol names of those firms
who have given the movement their unqualified sup-
port, and it is gratifying to learn that some of the
largest concerns iu the country are behind it.
During the conference at Toronto the wholesalers
passed the following resolution: "That wc arc in favor
of the manufacturera setting the price at which wholesalers should sell Identified, advertised or trade-marked
goods to retailers." aud have appointed the following
committee as their representatives upon thc National
Council:
Britiah Columbia—W, H. Malkin. The W. H. Malkin
Co.. Idd., Vancouver.
Alberta—John llnrne. Campbell. Wilson & Home,
Idd., Calgary.
Saskatchewan — H. (J. Smith. II. (J. Smith Co.
K. cina
Manitoba   S. C.  Hichards. Western Oncers Idd.,
Winnipeg. 8
THE BIHTISH COLUMBIA ItKTAlLKK
\ .ni
Ontario   A.   Foster,   National   linuri>,   Uu.   bid.,
Toronto. ,..,„
Ontario-F, T. Smye, Balfour, Smye A; Co. Ham-
* I e
1   Ontaria-J. W. Younge, Klliott. Marr a Co., Um*
01 Quebec--Zeph. Hsbsrt, Hudon, Heberl & Cie., Hon*
trcal. . .    .,
Quebec—Jos Laporte, Laportc, Martin A: (io, won*
1 New Brunswick W. I> Cross, Hall & Pairwcathi-r,
St. John.
Nova Scotia and Prince Edward  Island —  Mr.
Heatherington, J. Tobin & Son. Halifax.
Wholesalers present were as follows:
Alph. E. Provost. Provost & Allard, Ottawa; 0. h
McMurdy. MaeDonald Co. Ud., Winnipeg, Man • S
G. Richards. Western (Jroeers Ltd.. Winnipeg, Man.;
Fred T, Smye, Balfour. Smye & Co., Hamilton; A. M
Dillon.  C.  M.  Smith  &  Co.,   London; J.   Watson
Younge, Elliott, Marr & Co.. Ud., London; S. K. P.
Ellis, Revillon Wholesale Ltd., Edmonton. Alts,; Arthur Chcvier, Chevier Bros.. Cornwall; IV R. Parm-ll.
1). W. Banner Co. Ltd., St. Catharines*. H. E Gttppy,
H. E. Guppv & Co. Ltd.. Windsor; A. II. BoultOu, The
A. H. Boulton. Co. Ltd., Windsor.Ont.; W. A. Dilworth,
York Trading Co., Toronto;  L. K. Walmslcy, J.  K.
Walmslcy Co., Ltd., Belleville; P. 11. Brown, Parsons,
Brown & Co., Toronto; 11. S. Colliver, H. S. Colliver
& Son, Picton; F. M. Sloan. John Sloan & Co., Toronto;
John Home,  Campbell.   Wilson  &  Home.  Calgary,
Alta.; J. H. Lumbers. Jas. Lumbers & Co., Toronto;
Iloss F. Humphrey, F. W. Humphrey Co, Ltd, Toronto; T. Ii Kinnear. National Grocers, Toronto; 11. L.
McNally. National (Jroeers, Toronto; II. N. Robinson,
Geo. Robertson & Sons, Kingston.
The Deak Broker.
The following resolution was submitted by tin
Wholesale Grocers of Canada ,to the Retailers' meet-
ing:
"That owing to thc unfair com pet ion of desk bmk-
ers, who do not perform full duties of distributors for
manufacturers' lines, be it resolved that thc Wholesale Grocery Trade entirely disapprove of this moth
od of merchandising, ami that the manufacturers be
urged to discontinue the unfair practice of marketing
their products through the desk broker, so long as
they desire the Wholesale Grocers to distribute for
them."
Retailers' Responsible Position.
Mr. Crowder was very careful to point out that thc
success of this campaign rested entirely upon the attitude of the retail trade. If the merchants express a
desire for fair treatment by handling manufacturers'
lines which are price protected, and advising manufacturers whose products are not so protected to fall
in line with the principle of the Fair Trade League,
much will be added to the success of the movement.
Referring to a wire he had just received from headquarters in Toronto. Mr. Crowder intimated that when
he returned east, he expected to find three thousand
retail merchants lined up with the movement.
Manufacturer! Reticent.
As far ns thc manufacturers of Canada were con-
earned, Mr. Crowder pointed out that they were mov*
(ug \uth caution, although many of lhe large*!  ..,-.,.
n.in> in tin country have already adopted the •>■   ,\
J. C. CfOwStr. DewOmen  PrttirJt-M.  *.  M.  A.
Who hai OOVertd (Si  prlnrlpat rrtctirr* ot th*  IwminiM   to
lacertala <Ih< eUitaSa ot mot\*toti*tvt*. wholesalers *{"t
retsUen uwsrSs Price M»mtrnanrr
At the Toronto conference the following manufac
Hirers were presenl
W   Mcn/ie* and W. C   Uckie, g   W   Gillett Co
Ltd.   Toronto,   Sherman   UrSOgeT,   Kraft    M»l..tr« it
Cheese Co  Ltd, Montreal; J, MeMsmtk, Csasdian
Salt Co, Windsor, S F Lawrnson. The S F. Uwra-
Son Co., bunion. A J Ruekert, PhocnU Cheese Co,
Montreal. A. Gray. Bee Ki*t Honey, Toronto; N A
Lea.h, Western Sail Co, Courtnght, 0* IV King. Th«
Coco Cola Co, Toronto; M K. Herman, steUrciw
Ltd., Hamilton; J G. Griffith, International Busincsi
Machines Ltd . Toronto; A S iKntglaa, The Jell n Co
of Canada, Bridgeburg; F. It. Allan. Thc Nonsuch
Mfg. Co. Ltd. Toronto, J C Creighton, The Palmolive Co, Toronto. It S. Ut, The Swift Canadian •
Toronto; C Allen, M Allen k Co, Toronto; Ben Mil*
lesdon, Dsy & Martin. Toronto, Chas   Cliff. Toronto
Salt Works. Toronto; J   II   Howard. IU hams Pilli
Co  Ltd.. Montreal. V   M, Thomas, Venn'* UfhtninU
Syrup, Montreal; I) Gavin. IngCTSoll Packing Co., '
ucrsoll. F. J,  McLaughlin, Canadian  Milk  Produ.
Lid. Toronto; C  II  Grainger. C, 11  Grainger A ('•'
Toronto; C   C   Martin, Interlake Tisane  Mills. Idd
m. . tt,       •      ..... . . •• ... « i     »     %l'l...fil
loroiuo; \ \ .Martin, iniensse Tissue aw*) "
Toronto; W J Wilcox. Canadian Shredded Wh
*\i„ Toronto. J. T. Owen. Procter & Gamble, Toron
IV Ellison. Nestles Food Co, Montreal; Chas. Posh
M..I   ....     1.1        It Ml »        •        «■     -    *. t       tit      I.I
■ oroiuo; F S Edmonds, Wm. Paterson Ltd, Toron
to; C S. Auger, II J. Heing Co , Toronto; M. 8. Snj
der, Waterloo Broom & Brush Co, Waterloo; Ruthv
(Continued on pave Hi) ir'l
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
9
PRICE PROTECTION MOVEMENT IN ENGLAND.
(From n Correspondent)
London, Eng, April 7. 1926,
Considerable progress is being made in the move.
, nt to protect the prices of, and profits on. propria*
mry foodstuffs.    At a meeting of the central commit-
,,   ,.f the Grocers' Proprietary  Articles Association,
ft-ltieh has charge of this work, it was stated that there
is an increasing demand for the price maintenance list,
ni whieh 16,000 copies were sent out last month.
Up to date 8,800 members of the retsil sections have
,ii enrolled, representing about l»,tSS) shops; 'i'M
ivludessle and IH manufacturing firms have also joined
I hi movemeni, ami five other manufacturers are about
:•> place their goods on the protested list. District
.oiiiinittee* have been set up in various parts of the
country, Snd others are being formed, whose business
it i« to enroll members and to detect price culling The
preparation of a "black list" is going on, but for the
lime being there will be no publication of it, Members
of Mime of thc retail trad-* organisations nre devoting
window-displays entirely to the goods which are protected
CANADIAN IMPORTS
Dtprtdstsd Ourrtney Legislstion
Several Canadian industries will benefit from the
.tion of thc Department of Customs and Excise in
tiling that all currencies which are depreciated by
mora than 50 per cent, are ••substantially (lepradat*
•-! " The effect of such decision is to bring into force
the legislation of l!**JM. requiring im|»orts from countries with "substantially depreciated" currencies to
be appraised by the Canadian Customs officers, tor
duly purposes, «t the value* which Would be placed
uj**>u  like  goods  produced  in  thc  Cnited  Kingdom
nml exported to Canada Considerable additional
protection will be provided in ibis way for ecrtsiu
'anadian industries, including the woollen and silk
manufacturing industries, which have been complain-
ing of increasing imports from France; the iron and
"•teel industry which bas had keen competition from
France ami Belgium; and the Canadian glass products
industry.
The depreciated currency measure of 1989 was a
makeshift safeguard against so called "exchange
lumping" and was   hurriedly  devised by  tho King
government In response to widespread agitation after
'he depreciated currency legislation 01 Sir Henry
1,1 <>ton had been repealed. Heretofoic thia men*
um** has been applied only to Imports from Germany.
Uiatrta, Hungary, Chechoslovakia. Yugoslavia and
Russia,   Germany was held to he exempt  after thfl
'"•reney of that country was placed on a gold basis
rate of the Austrian schilling (gold), as eompar-
With the standard dollar of Canada, has been of*
iallv  proclaimed  at   14.0"  cents,   and  instructions
ive been issued recently to Canadian collectors 01
•'■tatoms lhat the standard currency of Austria is not
"* Guarded as substantially depreciated and that
h'' depreciated eurrenev legislation no longer is ap*
"Heable to Austrian products, but that the latter shall
"' valued for duty al the fair market value of similar
M,ds as made anil sold for home consumption in Vus-
' Va.
ue
i'*
There's No Selling
Problem Involved
When You Handle
Palmolive
That's because you simply hand it out * * * wt do
the selling,
Billboards * * * magazines * * • newspaper advertisements • • • make Palmolive the best known moat
popular toilet soap in the world.
Palmolive window displays, following thia brilliant
and spectacular publicity, make your store recognized Palmolive headquarters.
More than that ' * * they establish you aa a popular brand dealer.   If Palmolive la your soap loader
* • • the natural inference is that you specialite In
other asked for-and wanted products.
Good businesa? That'a what modern merchandising eiptrtt say. It's the concrete example of quick
turnover represented in immediate ani many mult)*
plied proSts.
i
Palmolive keeps going on and off your shelves
* * * in an endless chain. All you need is an ado.
quate stock and a good aupply of wrapping psper.
Wrap them up and hand thorn out.
□
Display
FREE
Just write us for tho latest * * * wo ahlp immed.
lately, charges prepaid. Follow the latest Palmolive
billboard and magazine advertising » • .* keep your
windows up to date. All you have to do la * * *
ask us.   Hadn't you better write today?
The Palmolive Co. of Canada Ltd.
MONTREAL TORONTO WINNIPEG
Copy 3215
. ii
i ill
'-.   I     *
it
II
H 10
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA KKTAILKR
Chloride of Lime
New Style Waterproof Package
Supplied by all wholesale grocers
In British Columbia
Manufactured by
CANADA COLORS AND CHHIICALS LIMITCD
Toronto
Winnipeg
Agents:
STARK A STERLING
VANCOUVER, S. C.
Vancouver
Sell B.C. Products
WILD ROSE
PASTRY
FLOUR
Higher in Quality and
Always Dependable
Milled in Vsncouver by
Vancouver Milling and Grain Co.
LIMITED
Head Offlee snd Mills:    VANCOUVER, B. 0.
-J
ROYAL YEAST CAUSE
MAKE PERFECT bREAD
Protectjyourself
against variation in
quality. Stick to the
produces*whose quality is uniformly high
grade, with never #a
bad loMorin|ure
your* store's
reputation*
customers.
Sell More
EMPRESS
JAMS and
MARMALADES
Your Customers will appreciate
their fine Flavor
EMPRESS MFG. CO
VANOOUVER T
|*i,V
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
11
CHA08 IN THE OROOERY FIELD
By I. K MfKBNEIR
Conditions in the Canadian grocery trade sre rap
i.li\ becoming more «*hn«*i•«**. and in the wild scramble
■ ni predominates, trsde ethics appear to have been
 tt-n t«i the wind*
Manufacturera nn  selling deportment and ehsln
stort't direet, and to *»tli«-r retsllers through jobbers
** v ■ glvj «»|mM'iiil pricea to these larger stores in the
*, ,\ oi advertising allowances, bonuses, free gooda and
■m cotieeMdona In order lo gniu the favor oi their
*. m that tloir products iimy be featured In iheir
,i-l\< ilining, niul in their hrnioh ftorefi
Mum  nauo  tosnufscturetn withhold Much favor*
in the Independent retailer who buya from a jobber,
•urapping both jobber snd rclsller.   Thin, despite
fad that every utsnulseturer must r«alii« thai his
ultitiiati isfel) Ilea In perpetuating the independent
lit-"-r rather thsn tlo department store, becsuse of the
latter'* dietsloris) policy io drive sharp bsrgsina at
llu < \p«iisr,,(th«- manufacturer's products, and to pro.
in •!• private brsnda
Tin trholesslc grocery btudncas is also In n niorc
• le** unsettled stale due lo tlo* Invssion of the ehain
\\7,;i>. \\\v formsHon of cooperative buying compan
!<■•> nmaiin retailers, with Ihe resultsnl decline in isle*'
Vii-h* to say nothing oi th. lessened profits which
<•>{> ii a condition forces,
li has Im4<ii contended thnt there nre too many
wholesale grocers dividing the existing volume Tula
lurslly tends lo Utercsse the d»*««l overhead on ware*
hm»w\ capital Invested, executive mlary expense, and
iicitiK *»f ihai character which remain, whether there
i* «uffici' m volume *»r no!
Tin r. iai) groecra nre not ust tatted with the WSJ they
!* Im iiig I hated hv SOISC wholcsslcrs who favor large
buyer* ai materially lower prices than they themselves
••■• given, nor are ihey ptessed with the msnnc. In
whieh they nr%> oftentimes dtserinilnstsd against by
mnnufneturttn who toady to chain stores,
"here should be no fsvoiithun «•* between the two
•■l.iss. s ,.f retsllers,   The retsil grocer himself doe* not
tny*. endeavor to thoroughly master Ms own bus!
Naturally he cannot hope to render service and
'he name lime* meet chain store prices, but he ean
s|"'** lhat his acrvicc HaveH the customer supplying i*
In Mho can feature chain store bsrgsina and »■» ''*a'
*ny hold his patrons
• 'he department nnd chain atorea nre not In an im*
•"' unable position They have th«*ir troubles and weak-
**'**% and if tlu* unfslr advsnt »i«,*» (exactions may be
11" ""• term), nre tikon from them, and they nre pise*
"! " a ntraiifht competitive bant*, tie Intelligent In*
'"M^mdenl retsil grooer can more tlinn hold hi* own
' '"ftainlv the grocery business la undergoing a
!'" ' '•'   Th,. wholesale grocer •-( lhe future will be
'   'ly • gnlssble, while «.he Independent grow •'
lhl "Wtt five year* will be an different ** lltoht fw»
i •
day, He la learning rapidly how to protect himself
and operate alongside the larger stove. There in no-
liceable a gradual development in the retail grocers'
calibre, which, if we read the signs aright, will result
in their becoming a thoroughly efficient body. Winn
that day arrives, chain stores or any other competition
will look alike to them, but one thin*** is su c- they will
not submit to discriminations which are now holding
many of them down.
THE TEA MARKET.
Tu| t«:i market is quiet, and movement of stocks in
iliatrlbutor channels is decidedly meagre.
India teas are steady and unchanged iu London,
while Ceylon is ruling firm both in oiuton and Colombo,
The prevailing high priees in the llatavian market,
are causing buyers, who looked for a downward readjustment, to take hut little interest in Java teas. Best
liquoring broken ami common Java were firmly held
at last account, although medium grades were shaded
tn the extent of t> per pound.
s.i far as immediate crop outlook is concerned,
large production may be expected from Ceylon nnd
India for the near future. It will, however, be difficult to get any true line (tn the mnrkct until June, when
the auction sales open in Calcutta, although the size
of the crop to that time should be a governing factor.
Those looking for some reduction iu prices for fermented leas were recently disappointed, when cables
Indicated n higher market in Ceylon tens, nnd steadily
maintained prices for Indian.
Tin* dominating consideration in the ten market
is I'.ritish control, which wns nil powerful during the
past season in effecting a large shortage in India teas.
Other classes have shown little activity, CVmgoua
an perhaps the most favorably placed from the standpoint of price, ami nre being considerably taken by
blenders. Japanese nnd Kormosns nre only meeting
with moderate interest.
While buying at wholesale, and retail is still showing a alight upward trend in comparison with recent
cxperlenel, there appears to be no departure from the
haml-lo-moulh principle
li is possible that the change in seasons will help
tu stimulate buying to some extent. Thc much expected reaction in tea values has thus far not mater-
ialiicd. and those distributors whose stocks arc low
will undoubtedly have to pny prevailing prices.
Tes Exports.
The following figures reflect thc trend of conditions
in the ten mnrkct: Kxports: Northern India to all
parts February, 192l>. 10,595.147 pounds $ same period
1925, I2.fi" 1,078 pounds. Total April, 1925. to Febru*
nrv 28, 1986, 292.4:18.219 pounds; same period 1924-25,
$12881,244 pounds. Calcutta and Chittagoing to United Kingdom, first half March, 192(1, 870,000 pounds;
f
;
$r
w 12
THK HUT! ISH COLtJMSU KKTAILKK
\i>iii
The Habits of a
Nation Change—
INSISTENT
PERSISTENT
CONSISTENT
ADVERTISING
by KELLOGG COMPANY has changed the
breakfast table habits ot' millions of people.
Kellogg's crunchy-erisp Corn Flakes have won
, the favor of people in all parts of the w »rhl
hy their incomparable flavor.
There is no off-season for Kellogg's ALL-BRAN
and there is no substitute. It must be 100$
Bran to give 100$ satisfaction,
PEP is a real food for children; keeps them in
romping health. Pep is wonderfully firm for
everybody. Contains Bran, therefore mildly
laxative. Ask your customers to try it- they'll
love it.   It will pep tin in up.
Mr. Grocers Are you "cashing iii" on thc won.
derful new series of Kellogg advertisements
whieh are appearing in the Daily Papers,
Weekly Papers, Kami Papers, and Magazines
in all parts of Canada?
HELP YOURSELF TO HEALTH AND
PROFIT.
This year's window trims, counter displays,
and selling helps nre more attractive than ever.
Ask your Kellogg representative for them, or
send direct to
KELLOGG COMPANY of CANADA LTD.
LONDON, ONTARIO.
"CANADA APPROVED
Tbo««' VOrOl < «»t>Att* Ai>j»ro•»•*«■»' oa *!t ptefcagi
i I.AHKU Pre|Mtr«*«l Kutxl* ionUI(iln« tn***tt ot* o pm*
tnr >ou um! u»ur ru»»om«*rt Thi*) ttxean that **«n .
nt no-at «hi«h *0<-« into « I.AHK H l*r*<tM»r*4 I*«kh1* I,-**
ptaaed bj ih** OovtrmMnt'i wirrinarj tospeeton
Yea Ssvs » timibir sssttisMe «' * Mtisfl«*«t r««-
thank* lo ih»- tiotrrnmrttt t}u»c»f»ie«*
L't the CLAHK Kilt heat omt their Nalittml
.[Jwrtntng help you le laitetise  true  tski
ssttteor fruftts.
M
W. CLARK Limited, Montreal
EtUblithmtnt*   at    Montreal.   P. Q    tl. Rami.   P. Q    ft
tt at tarn. Ont.
Pachtra ol tht Caitbrate* Clarh'a Perb *r*0 •■»*'»
mmtm^mmmmmmmmoommmmmmmmmmmmsmmommmmmmmmwmxommxmwwmm
Lake of the Woods
Milling Company
LIMITED
tUsanat
FIVE ROSES
• FLOUR •
The World's Beat
Ditty OopsMstf 1000 Bbla.
B.O. Offiott and Wtrtkovsat:
1100 Uahtrdi lire* 1614 flora Hrf*
▼AMOOUV11 VK7TOBIA 4
192.5                              THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER 13
.H,rfod UtiB, 690,000 pounds.   Total April 1,1025, u^
,. Miir,|, 15, mis, 242,418,1*10 pounds; same period Kiii-iiim-                                                            -BKL
IH24-25, 'Jlili,UH),(KHl iH.unds      Southern India to all        United States             rfr'nnn
„   ,.s .Innuiiry,!  1986, 8,448,850 |N.umlsi same period        Canada        Inonn
i :v 4«Mr»,2(M pound*.  - ™>™
Kxporta from Ceylon to Cnited Kingdom; March Total beet                                 8227000
I i, 1928, 5,750,000 pounds; March 1*18, 1925, 6,778,*	
•*tn ponnds; total January, 1-Mnreh 15, 1926, 26,036,* Thc total production of cane and beet augarTogeth-
141 poundsj January 1-March I*. 1925, 25,418,975 Ihs cr is then fore 24,305,951 tons, giving an estimated in-
— J  ******* "••' wold production of 762,481 tons over thc prc-
-„-..« ,,,,,in« season,   The total production of beet sugar
ouw** •" "Peat Britain is given nt 52,000 tons, in compari-
\iu..ng European countries, according io a trade re- wn ^1^23,780 tons in the previous campaign.
.„.!: (i.rmany ami (Velio-Slovakia are expected to re* *
dun their acreage* devoted to sugar heels   Slight in- RICE.
,   um* are expected in Prance and Russia, while a eon* Southern markets are developing a stronger under*
udcrsble Increase i* expected in Italy.   In that conn- tone because of a withdrawal of stocks at former prices
in contracts between growers and factories have al si,,,.,, millers think that priee quotations will advance
na<l) bean agreed Upon, before long   Growing conditions have been unfavor-
\. vt year'* sugar acreage in Poland i* likely !o be able and with moderate to light supplies of carryover,
rvdueed as a rvauli of |*H.r priee* received for export sentiment is completely changing.   The spot market
• r according to reports current has nol altered, but remains dull.   Offerings are light.
, Foreign rice is also without change.
In the Netherlands, report* m a trade paper stale
ii   -.jut.  of n reduction Ol nearly Mi per cent in the
pric of sng-»r beets, do decrease in sew age is expected. biscuit firms to be amalgamated
Austria eapeeta an IneretSO in SUgSr beet  acreage Several Large Companies Art Included in Preeant Negotia-
I iImu! 60 per cent. nn previously reported, tn Greal tioni,
liritnitl the acreage nlrca.lv under eonlrsel for lUgar Negotlaitons are now under way for the merging of a
'     . ,    9]L . ,,   '   .       .   i    .  Hk *JU,     . aumber Ot biscuit manufacturm* concerns In Canada within
Win in 1826 Ul officially estimated nt  li»,0W sera*, ,hl„ y,.ar   T|)|, Mr(orn,|ck Manufacturing Company of Lon.
nt*   nn,pared wtlh 54,750 acre* in 1985 don. Oal. ind It. A Marvin Limited,of Moncton, N.B., togeth.
.....                    , a      ,          ,,        ,   ii.        ,,,, er with other eoneerai located In Edmonton, Winnipeg, and
I he l«r.'l, |H«el crop Of Bwaden Will probably reaUlt Montreal, ar„ concluding plans for a merger at an early date.
in uu underproduction because of a dissgrecmenl be* iccording to recent Information.
\\\>a n growers and   manufacturers  ns tn BUgar  beet The proposed merger is distinct from (Hat of Upper Can-
price*    Oovcmment   intervention  mav  become   nccCS* .♦•!.**■. baklnt* firms which look place last year.   The name of
i » .      .. ; i         *i.... .»%..ri......   .( I,...ts   ni thfl new eorporaUoo haa not been decided upon as yet, It Is
wiry in order to avoid a wrloua shortage of beet*, as ^itowiood. but the head office will be In Montreal; accord-
ihr farmer! threatened not to sow their beet seed unless (| r |o prMenl iAsim
ihr local sugar company complies with their de-mends. ....——	
Se*  estimate* of the sugar crops of tin   world ill BILL REQUIRES DATE ON ALL CANNED QOOD8
llu  wtmn I2.V26. have ium been receive! from t!»e 	
liito  v ..   v *b   mt*t\Ltl**A«*Ao     Tl.,  Inlnla  are  as -■ Passed Packers Would Mava to Mark Data on Cana at
paling New   Urk ita list lei ana     Ho   totals an Time ef ••allng-Weuld ■Ravolutlenlss Canning In-iostry
follows
— V drastic measure has been Introduced In tho U. 8. Con-
VM»e. nr.ns requiring the dating of all foods hermetically sealed,
Vmrrleaa (Ineludlng Cuba)                         9,168,214 which ita-* caused a wave of niarm to sweep over the eouutrv
i j                                                                         5750,9(10 amons Uie canners, wholesale grocers and retailers.   This
s '*                                                                  '   V.\..)-* QUI. I' passed, will vitally affeel the packing of canned goods
ofries                                                                    OOl   •*' H(Uj (,u, lrH(||l (}l (,,arfM| „f •,„ ,,ff,,ct upon the sale of all
Australia nml Polynesia                                o09,«P canned goods.
Kurone -   Spain '                                              **m] Tb© messure Is known ss H. R. 1QB0I, sod was introduced
' ■      -, il..                              16 1689^1 l»> Congreisman Hammer of North Carolina, and referred lo
Thousinds of Testimonials stand as proof of the remarkable curative powers oi Moorlte in cases of Rheumatism
and all Stomach Disorders.   Every home needs    -    -
Preparo tor
MOORITE WEEK
May 3rd •- 8th
YOUR DRUGGIST SELLS ITI
I.M
1
4 14
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Un House CoininiHee on Agriculture, The Hill Is aa un***
ment to the Pure Food and Drugs Act, and mpUrfli all cari
and containers of food products, hermeilc.il) StjUsdj la bj
conspicuously marked With the date Ol NtUlft-lfl other
words, the date of packing
COFFEE BI^NDDfCririlioFESSION WHICH
REQUIEB8 SKILL, KNOWLEDGE AND
EXPERIENCE.
The days of a hit and miss policy in coffee hlend-
ing and roasting arc a thing of the pant. Osttts
blending has become a profession that demands skill,
knowledge and experience.
To be able to hold its own against competition it
is highly important that a coffee roaster be able to
make and maintain first class blends, therefore s
knowledge of blending is vitally necessary, and this
knowledge is often acquired by dearly bought experience and is recognised as among the valuable, Itttangb
hie assets of a coffee firm,
Kach lot of raw coffee has its own chemical com*
position, and a blender's job is rendered more difficult by the fact that coffee types do not represent
fixed varieties and are subject to variations in taste
and aroma, even when obtained from the same source
of supply. No two shipments are the same even though
grown on the same plantation, for they are subject to
variations from one season to another according to
weather conditions. Therefore every new lot of coffee must be carefully tested to see whether its taste
differs from that of previous deliveries to dctcrmim
whether its use will alter the standard flavor. If
such is the ease the blender must seek other coffees to
make up thc character lacking,
TELEPHONE
AHEAD
When travelling in the busy season, it is
wise to telephone ahead for reservations.
BRITISH COLUMBIA
TELEPHONE COMPANY
NOT A BIT TOO EARLY
11 is awfully easy to delay making reservations for
your convention-remembering that It does not occur
until June, Hut It Is not a bit too early to write vour
local chairman now,
Sit down  and send him that Inter, "Count me In for
lh' nt' «AVR' ° C'on?<,n,,on' Jane 21.24, Rochester."
You II And new business luVas and recreative fun
when you go.
FLEISCHMANNS YEAST
The FleUchmaon Company
SERVICE
lishetl
D i*«ili
'*  ""I'..
habit*
Ureal
• |»-1.1|
* v|*r
V
**•:
April
This might mho V0fJ rimy, but as a matt, < *,| ,   .
maintaining the uniform   quality   of an   cat
blend is om* of the hardest tests n roaster has
,.,,* wnii    After all, iu matters of taste it is
sunn r who rules supreme, and  h.s fasten .,■
are the fundamental basis of tbe coffee I nub
The operation of  masting  eoffee is also  i
Importance, for tin quality of nuy blend Mill
to a large extent upon the skill, judgment am.
lenee of the operator    In the operation of max!ini
eoffee the U-ails swell   md open nt  the  furrow   distill
ing tin   volatile material within     The Weigh I decresj
is, losing from I- per eent   lo hi per cent    with ia
average Iom of nl»out 14 p«*r eeni for aged snd sppII
seasoned COlfceS
tin the otior hand, the toluuie Increases ***> thai i'»
Volumes Of raw eoffee yield 1 r»S> to IbO Volunos of f»u,v
ed   eoffee.   t|Mi   U-ing   infllleneed   in   proportion   I,,  (hi
extent to whieh the roast is carried
The   roasting   of   eoffee   nlsui   tends   to   llnlk'
more soluble in iNtiling water About *'* pet • - ttl
of raw eoffee can be dissolved in water while |n j„
eent    of   roasted  eoffi*r   is   wdubb       (IffOU   coff !.
tains from *» \s* r eent   lo H jut cenl   of sugar   withe roasting process converts the •*ug«r t»i • •>■*
The sugar content of roasted coffee tony hi SS V     ■•
I |*r eent  or lests
Not only the  strength   flavor and *t)l«-   but -ih
the   eommercli]    value  Of  eoffee.    depends    0|»oii   ll
correct decision of the operator in regard to pi
roasting    The  fla\or ami  aroma  ean be h»s?  ri\i\t
ly from insufficient as well as txeessjve roasting '•'
(Continued on page n
Make Your Fan Profit
The advantage of handling a popti
lar.  well.known  product  is that  ll
sells for its full priee without ptt*l»
ing.  and  your   volume   of  sabs  la
greater      Price  reductions are Bit
necessary to Immhi |X *ah-* Clean
••nt advertising and first elass good**1
have built a eustoiner confidence h*
hind  the   name  of  Shelly**   wbi«'
justili, h your asking a fair pri"
SHELLY'S LIMITED
VICTORIA
NANAIMO
VANCOUVtn
NOHTM VANCOUVtn
NtW WtSTMINSTEW IIO-
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
15
Ths
GROCERY PRICES CURRENT
following art prlsss sustsd for principal Unas tf leading wholesale firms.   Prless quoted are nscssaarlly
subject ts market fluctuations.
8. W   OILLSTT CO. LTO.
Noyll   YeSSt —
1 dm  phi*)  in eaaa
ourt ruse Lye—
t 4 1   In rooo
I   run .
10 <•••••. t dos  la raw
w«l c ••klAf Pomeor**
«  r I    ♦  nt*t      a ■■- m   ■
I »•   « Soa    ... .
I os  t Soa  —***
*.l oi  t dos
1% . tooo Wo
Mi|ii tads. Caaa Ha.  *****
!   rasa  OU>  I It*    parkas**)
'.    ****  ,.t   mora
I Ceioiti at Bade—
"I !*     **§•   p*t   keg
»■' n>   harrtte, »>*t  l«an»i
Ciw«*n« SaSs (Orenwletedi—
tl t»>   re roster OM lbs la i
IN  Its   iron   drums
Per fas
no
in
110
Ml
III
iM
l««
21 :♦
Per H»
JIM
(mm af Tana- »'" *•
His Hp«»bs* Miss isosso) »»
* is sjopot am* <• *•* ,B eM#) '
* is <••» wns •«•• ssvers <• Iss
in eaee)
t is eaem sees* as-fsts «• **a in
 Jl
I is  square eanlsterck H Soa
•aaa)   »     -
S» !».  woden rasas
K It   wooden sail*
m n* na«4 Sag•
l«s n>  lined Serrate     -.«. --
KBLLV, DOUOLAB A CO.
NsSaS e»fad«e«s
Allaire    Nn    I.   tlM   SOS
Peking Powder. «• II «•. SoS
asking Powder. II IV. dos
Itah<* Powder. I la. SoS
itaking Soda. IS la. cms
ivoir* Soda. M Uj*. d«a
tttttstt H«. doa  _
Meek IVppf-r.  tine.   dSS
1   «n tun. glass das
Nsbob Coffee, small Una. ••rh
■"■■fTee. ts tb
I      ■'.'),■        '.•       NrtlN.I,      III
•"'•r<l   Powder,   dos
'w ji«V   Tapioca.   Soa
fhocolals  Pudding,  doa
Cbltl rawdar. small, dos
< Hinnmnn. I os   tins, A**»
• »v»n!K» Pepper. I Uns. dos   .
Oatis, small, doa   ...
rA-.iy Powder. « »i   g!•••». dos
Otssi of Tartar. I. ...
r<**\m of Tartar.  H". tins 	
CriSBi of Tartar M*.	
OlnfWi   small,   tos
1   "»<ts. IH os, doa
1 ni nets. I os.  dos	
1 * tracts, i os iios
1 I tracts, l os dos
' (tracts, i< os   doi
ia
LTO.
Nutmeg email, dot      „	
I'M)"*-**   smsll. dot   .       m ~.»
I'aetry   Hpl****,   I Un*.   iO*	
Poultry Dressing, Hag*. Savory. Thyme.
Tumeric,   tin*.   dOS  -
Pickling Spiee. dos   No  S 	
Marjoram.  Mint.  Psraley 	
White Pepper, Uns, <i<»«       	
castor oil. I os dos    	
factor oil. t ot Sot   	
lOpoom Salts. %*. dos     	
rVull  Colors.  I os   dos
lalafs (Chocolste. Host. rtak. Lemon
Vanila. White, Almond. Orant*) dos.
Jelly  iViwdtr, dos	
Umonada ro»dtr, 4os
Mustard,   la dos      ********
Muatard.   Ha  dos   «. «•••-	
Muatard. w* dos 	
Mustard,  l» doa
Sulphur.  %*. dos 	
Tea. *"*'**■* >*t>*l. H». P«r lb-
Tea.  Green  label.  Is.  V*r Tb
1 IS   tins.
»•. lb   psckafee  -
ft tti   packages
r*e. d# I.ui*. Allsnwon, 1 lb
t« d# Uss, Aftsnwoa H» i>«r ,b
Tm  <t* USSS,   w* Pfr  ,l"
Vintfar. d«il
P. BUaNS A CO. LTO.    •
•t-tamrack Srodueta.
\-M.hn.- «'IM ifcWiWars. 0** b>
\u*"t*   Bhsmrprtt, 1*1  9**   "'
lu*,r.t Ham. irllh drssalns 0** •■'
IS-H    t*t*sat**an  >s»u-r* **«""**■ CttrU"1'
■*• iii*.****-. Canadian, its***  i»r **	
♦• Cliacaa   Canadian twin. \m M*
V       SJoundi CSmallon, Ko  1 N «s«
,w».^i n*«»  Shamrock, par m
Dotntnkm tun**. ■••i n"       ..
pomlntoa Hs«n, l*W H*  »"'r J
,>om.n.o« should-ra. hOSSd sad rsUsd
Drlppinf. bc*f. «•»• b',cU	
llama.   ShSWrock,  \Wt »
H(im. toned snd rollsd, par «»..
Ilaad i^****  U*> ,,n, **ch	
JaUlsd tonfus. psr Un  —
I .ani.   >"    ■*•   **
,   ,,   v„   j   M i,i cass
I,ar<I.   >*,,    **   *
lMU\   ,Ail**r*.   >:•  »'•
u.,,1   No  I, cartona. M >»-
,   una   :sib.  n*t.  V*r ,b
Mlnesmssl, •»•'•• ••
llMl l^af. r«r lt»  •    	
rorkp,^^t'»i.t.eMo;-,:.-«i:
nark rossi «•• *"" ,K
Uked ash, MPI-a. m£' »J —
Bw„had Ssh. k.ppfd -««w«»' MS	
•nd tos. P«r IS -
Smoksd Cod. Ws P*r Tb
Balsclad fowl, e«" '"
Hrir tr,t ohloksn, i»**r Ib
IM
111
1.10
1.11
,ii
lis
1.10
111
IN
IS
ITI
1 11
.    10
IH
IM
. 4 tt
. 1.41
1 40
..   .SI
.   .71
..    Cl
.19
.. II
. It
.. II
. IT
. »l
. I «0
IM
III
IM
IU
IIS
till
IM
.    !•
.    tl
I t<
II
.    II
.    II
11
»o
.   f*
..   ta
... IM
. no
IH
MS
100
111
. IM
I io
110
111
IH
&tl
110
22
II
At
Ai
.24
14H
10.10
10.11
At,
ti
.41
41
24
.11
S«
40
11
I.M
2 15
2.4»»
22 \
22H
ItH
.IT
.40
,41
10H
.11
.11
.so
.34
Klondyke (wrapped) box of IS  I.tl
Klondyke (unwrapped) box of 25  1.10
Klero Glycerine, box of 144  3.11
Linen (unwrapped) box of ioo  „ I.M
Liquid Ammonia. 2 dos. qts. box of 24 4.10
Liquid Blue, 2 dos. qts. box of 24  4.10
Mechsnlc's I'lne T»r, box of 100 S.M
Mechanic's Pine Tar, box of SO  2.10
Olive Castile, cakea. box of 200 4.71
Primrose (wrapped) box of 25  „... 4.75
lloysl Crown Lye. box of 41 S.IS
Pendray's Powdered Ammonia, box 24   III
Special pricea on S. 10, 21 and IM
botes.
(Sendrsy's Water Qlasa, Its Preserver—
Cases, 24 Uns per case  4.10
Itoyal Uundry  Flakes **•'<.  in bbls.   .14-%
(Bpeclal price on contract)
Hoyal Crown Soap Ca 144s  S.M
Uo>-:»| Ciown Powder, box 24 only f.OJ
Hoyal Crown Powder, lib. box of 60 4.11
Hoyal Crown Cleanser,    41 sifter tins   1.10
Royal CYown Powdered Ammonia. 1 lb.   Ill
White Wonder, box of IM ISO
New White Swan Soap, 100  510
White Swan Naptha, box of IM  S.M
White 8wan Washing Powder, box of 24 S.M
THI CANADA STAftCH CO. LTD.
Lsundry Starches—
Canada laundry Starch, 40-lb   box .01
Canada White Gloss. Mb. pkgs 0114
Acme White Gloss. Mb pkts.    %%
No. 1 White, lM*lb. kegs  IH
Edwardoburg Silver Gloss, Mb »kgs
40-lb. 11*
Bdwsrdsburg   Silver   Qloas   l/l-
fancy  tin canisters,   41-lbs *  .1114
Bdwardaburg  Silver Gloss.  IM*tb
kegs mm   .10H
Celluloid Btarch. (boxes cf 4l<»Sgs
per  caae)    , -* iM
Culinary Starches—
Benson's Celebrated Prepared Cora.
40-lb.  boxes,  per Ib 11
Osaada Corn Btaroh 40-lb boxea, per
lb    IVi
Challenge Corn Btarch M*lb bases
per Ib 114
disco Potsto Flour 40-lb boats, Ib   .11
THI IOVAL CIOWN SOAM. LTD.
uho.   Llst-F.O.1.   Veaecuw.
m*0itm   m*w XJmlaM^.
Tsrms Nett SS Dsys.
*„.   Soap rtaota, H 1 lb »«• *"   f
TW Makes   11  »>b   ***** *** 2 4°
••Apsa" Soap FISS-S*
Csstllo. t"»* of K	
I a rrsm-alse
IT So      BlttS
ice, small, doe
111
cto
Mottled.  t«>« of 20
|, J4 •■ t>**s
«n oatmea
of IU
CIO
• OS
Ma io is Oil—
Masola Oil. Is 	
•• "   SS   *****
** -   W   mm*
**        "   Se 	
Cera Syruas—
Crown Is. 14 to case
Ss. 11 to case
10s I to case
2M, I to caae
l.lly 2s. 14 to case ....
Sa. II to case
10s. I to caae
Karo. 2e 24 to case
Ss, 12 to case
10s. C to esse
 7.11
 „».....•««••«••••• ••••
..IIM
, «..^....»M...»« "•"
IHI
 HI*
 „ 4.10
 1.70
 I.M
 -I4.M
 „ 4.M
 4.M
 1.55
 4.10
171
V
Hi
' i 16
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RKTAILER
Ajml
CANADIAN FAIR TRADE LEAGUE
(Continued from pane B)
Hav. Harold F. Ritchie Co., Toronto; F. NV ShlrrW,
Imperial Extract Co., Toronto; J P. Wilw.^;
Untie Sugar Co,, Montreal; J. A. Riddle, The Kellogg
Co, of Canada, London; .1 D. Darwin, Esc Mfg Co.,
Toronto*. W K. Dingman, Canadian Csnneni Ltd.,
Hamilton; H. W. Stuart. Wagstaffe Ltd., Hamilton;
Fred D, Linden, Edward Haines Co, Ltd., Toronto;
li. E. Thomas. J. R. Wethey Ltd., St. Catharines; ti
F Benson, Canada Starch Co., Montr.al; K. K. Lips,
1/ibbv. McNeill & Libby, Toronto. A C. Mcllhargey,
A. C. Mcllhargey, Stratford; C. IV ('lorry. Pure flow
Mfg. Co.. Toronto; Geo. Stewart, D. Stewart & Son,
Thistleton; C. T. Miller. Red Rose Tea, Toronto; John
Millar. Lever Bros., Toronto.
Law and Distribution.
The questions of legality and distribution were rais*
ed, ami their possible influent upon thc adoption o(
the policy of price maintenance.   As to .whether manufacturer's distribution would hi* adversely effected
Mr. Crowder pointed out that the retailers themselves
were the dominating factor hen-, and with regard to
legality the president stated that two of tin* most ,iuin
ent lawyers in the country have ruled that tin  mere
sotting of a price by any body of merchants was not
illegal according to the law of the Intnl. provided
such action in no way affected the price t • thc consumer.   ''There may be lawsuits," Mr Crowder -tat-
cd, "there probably will be. but no adverse judgment
ean result."
Mr. Crowder then read letters from the following
manufacturers who have signified their allegiance
with the Canadian Fair Trade League:
Thomas Beecham Company, 14 St. Helen St net,
Montreal, Que.; The Blrminghom Food Products I.M .
Bond Building, Toronto. Ontario; The Canadian Milk
Products Co. Ltd., 347 Adelaide St. West, Toronto,
Out.; The 8. P. Lawrason Company (Snowflake Ammonia), London. Ontario; Interlake Tissue Mills, Ltd ,
f>4 University Avenue. Toronto, Ont.; I.XL Spiee &
Coffee Mills Ltd., London. Ont,; The Nestles' Food
Company, Montreal. Que.; The Nonsuch Manfg Com*
pany, 257 Logan Avenue. Toronto Ont.; Phcnix Che.*-*,.
Limited. Montreal. Que.; Kowntree & Co. (Canada)
Ltd.. 40 Wellington St.. Bast, Toronto; Out.; F .1.
Whitlow Company (Flit). ItJU Dufferin Street. Toronto. Ontario; Waterloo Itrnom & Brush Co., Waterloo. Ont.; Flytox. Suprema Polish, etc,
In humorous vein Mr. Crowder said these manu*
facturers had been referred to as "peanut concerns "
in an endeavor to belittle their Influence on the trade
Of Canada. "If such capitalization as it represented
among these firms aligning with thc movement ap
plies to 'peanut outfits/ we can do with a whole lot
more like them said the speaker.
Local Wholesalers Canvassed.
Commenting up on his i ut campaign among the
wholesalers of Vancouver, Mr. Crowder Mated that he
had met with one bitter disappointment, Kvery
wholesaler with one exception (Thomson. KIHott
Ltd.) had joined the movement, and he deplored the
fact that it should be a firm in his own home town to
withhold adherence to the League,
In closing, Mr. Crowder again invited  his aml.
ionco to make a determined effort to push lines of
UlllVl.
otHng
iphat.
alien
dcfiii
rsif
tnoa
1 ii,
ifinii
those manufacturer* who are Supporting th.
incut, not that he in any way, advocated boj
products of other manufacturers, hut he *.*.> .
ie  in declaring  that   if  tin* qUOStlon  of 'li-!*:
bothered manufacturer* who tin* nt present tu
ed upon becoming identified with the Ctnadim
Trade Le-ft-gue, moh action on their pan would
the manufacturer   lhat   their   distribution   Wo
Cresse, and a reasonable protit  In* awum-.l  foi
ufscturer, wholesaler and retailer alike
To spread the information about price at intee
anee. 2'UHH) copies of the report of the genera! <,t
ini" in Toronto hate l»r« n %* nt out to the trad* in th*
various pro \ ince*     The  leaf-tic hope* thnt  th.   ret-si!
merchants will definitely »taie a» umh ns sh.*, <w,
that they are prepared to join ami to baek th. goods
thnt are put on the prirr maintenance bsiAfl \> ihottld
be understood, the exoeulives States, lhat everything
• j. \** ii.ls upon the retailer
t\rt*m*mtOWOm*
lUWllllhrlil)'r    ti     II       « ntMXM r,.,l    (fUftl I
lloutwell   t'    S   -COSHMOIHHI   itMkcn
1'nulinK   Uobrrt    <umni<-itr»«t  im«*»i*»i
WslSQS,  W     Hrt»«rt*Ml .|u*««u«omr,i  (turn )
Aiherift —
Ksrrejr, luiiri a Oo   Ltd   H*pon*«i «.mk < t
Uon (0   H )
Coitrttnoy —
Rieksoft, Joiui   iir|«»rt«"«i dttiti out isn
CranbrosS.—
l'«t«> llro*     Uuiknrtit twin* »o«iml ti|> bs  '.'l»*t>'
t «<mk| «)
Koo««. <     M     : onun*for.!   (tailor)
Crttton.—
Jar-Moo   f   HAS        |»ur.„,u>«|.,|   Hi S I
i "i
Fern It.—
Short hoi-*
J   W
Hold out  (ronf> 1
Hollyburn.—
JtffertSS, J   |l     ftriwiHriI • >M out  to J   AlSm»   {»*-»'
(»r»tif*i>r.   BrSSfl      Hurrrr-ilrcl   Ulr   Uro    Pail*   Ot'"    '
raaftettooerj I
Kamloops.—
Kamloo|>« Csnnrrtet  I.id    |(< ported belns •b*»ti>-
Western Caasen Ltd
Kt'owna.—
OSsasfsa Csnnsri IM   Absorbed b> Wssttra < i
Ltd
htrrsll,   —RspOrtSd romnirnr-i.d (fro 1
Ktrnadals.—
Taj* lor. A   N -Rtported wild out (block*)
Vouflf, A  |    t'onimenrrd ((urn )
Kimbsrloy.—
Klmberley Tailors   loinmrnred
Willi* ft l^onsman    Commenced (tailor*)
Mtrrltt —
Millbrook Co   n h Brooks n-iairtiHi noid totsresi '
M.ln-tr.—
Dodds, ii II,—Reporttd oommsaosd (am. **r)
Nanaimo—
Marrow. John (l.-Rold nut (gro. Se.)
Nslaon.—
Pm>bl**s Motorn Md    lte|mrtcd ofwulns branch a« 1
bi
II   ('
(< on I lolled on |imki   32) in*
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
TRAVELER8 WE HAVE MET
17
Sol to know, argues oneself unknown."  In this
s  , we introduce our old friend Krnc»t Ittilmcr, one
,i [he i»e*t known salesmen on the l-ower Mainland
l.niii served hi* apprenticeship iu this country with
H Stewart some fifteen year* ago. wlon he first nr-
jvetl from the OM Conn!n     !!»• showed his superior
Ernest tutrntr
intelligence at the Mart l»y coming straight through to
\ unntiver, aiul he ha* been lure ever since
11^ next opportunity was with the Swift Canadian
Company, where h<» hail hi* first "road" experience,
After that he wa* with the I'nraon*. Haddock Co., for
I vi >eam, leaving them on hi* climb to lUeeeti to take
the city for the Hubert Kffnrtl Co,, Ltd . whulcaale
^"tit and produce denier*. Vnncotiver, with whom he
* nn now been for n\i-t five year**
If you were to n*k. who la lhe moat active ami use-
1 member of the Kxecntive Committee of Vancouver
• "uneil No. 2K4. U, C T, we would just say, "Wh?
1  "''   Hulmer. of course."      He i«* now serving his
■urth year ns sn executive officer oi the l\ C. T.. and
r -sincere hope in that he may be spared for many
Vara yet iu the service that he liken so well and that
("'"'iates him.
He ha* alwny* been popular with bis customers,
• Irade and his follow traveler* alike     Pond oi nth-
'•'v he still haa time to be SCtlvc tn Masonic, Tent-
>"* orjranir-ttion*. na well a* bi* beloved l\ C, T.
HEW SOU? ON THE MARKET
"Quaker" brand eannod soup* have been placed on
"•nrket by the Dominion Canner* Ltd, Excellence
WaUty and purity of content* arc winning for the
NV proOUOt  Immediate  favor.      Seven  varieties nf
>l> are nt present being put up by the firm, the
1   "»l Setting price being 2 enn* for line.
COPPIt ROASTtRS CONVENTION
His seventh annual convention of the Pacific Coast Coffee
"■tori Association, will be held in Victoria on May 11.
and IS,
For the
Customer:
Quality and Satisfaction
Because of their steadily main*
tained superiority Royal Baking)
Pounier dndVr. ftrke*s Cream
Baking Powder have been stand?
lor over a half century* Both are
made in Canada*
For the
Dealer:
Prompt Sale and Fair Profit
APPOINTED TO DIRECTORATE
W. V. Morgan lH>an. manager of Canadian Toledo Scale
Gompany, Windsor. Ontario, han been appointed by tbe directorate of the Border Chamber of Commerce, as 'chairman of
the Industrial Promotion Committee.
CANADIAN CREDIT MENS1 ASSOCIATION TO HOLD
ANNUAL CONVENTION IN VANCOUVER, JULY 12*13*14
We have received advice from the head office ot the
above oraaniiatlon that this Convention will be held in Van-
eon ver Hi It lull Columbia member* of the National Credit
Men's Trust Association are arranging a cordial welcome and
entertainment for visitor* and their wives. The Agenda prepared for the Convention include* addresses of vital Interest
to the trade, and among these is scheduled an address by
Jos T. Crowder. Dominion President of the R. M. A. on Price
Maintenance, a subject which Is being widely discussed from
roast to coast at the present time.
RECOVERS FROM NASTY ACCIDENT
\Y. A. (BUI) Slaney. representative of C. H. Jones SY
Sons \M\. who met with o. serious accident last January,
Is ;t tea In on the Job, and although not altogether recovered,
is ailing some nice orders, for his company, who carry a
full line of tents and awnlifga. waterproof rubber clothing
and canvas goods of all descriptions. We predict a busy
year for this well known firm, who do a very large business in
»tore awnings.
An Explanation.
The newly-weds on their honeymoon had the drawing
room. The groom gave the negro porter a dollar not to
tell anybody on the train they were bride and groom. When
the happy couple went tb the diner for breakfast next, morning, all the passengers snickered and pointed and eyed
the couple knowingly. The groom called the .wrter and
demanded. "IUd you tell anybody on the train we were
Just married?" "No. sir." said the "dusky porter, "I told
em you all wns Just good friends,"
■
.11 **
I
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m 18
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA KKTAILKR
■V,
Over 1,000,000
DAYTON Scales now in use
i"*ac3 *
■ f*M. •Sf
§;$#'4
^M.*^)^^-.,^*^,^.,,,,-,^, ...
.1
***.*.i*Oi. nm^fSaatQ
l
':'»w«Wii      l-.l       ^QfA/»7*M.^
■ »•. *»••■'. . i. \i    awfp^t
u £hMnfr , ,. , ,™
■    i.7.t'immt-l^mmm*H
at'**' "ft
--.IM
v.r/v-
^» "♦S5JWS V-gatf/ J t±
DAYTON
S^J   Ijgjjp
v'S»fc .
Jhe moil beautiful Scab in Ihe uorld '!'!',
THF. BRITISH COLUMBIA RKTAILER
* h .
Profit by the Experience of
The Largest Manufacturers
of Computing Scales
in the World
BEHIND every DAYTON Salr is tin
guarantee nf a corporation that has
spent aver 80 yeans in perfecting* ita prO-
duetS.
Onlv thf vast resources ««f moucv nnd
• *
skill at tin* COUUlUUltl of a ureal orgauift-
ati«»ii COllId produce sueh a perfect Sale.
This Company was tin* pioneer in the development of computing scales and i> today the (argent manufacturer «»f comput-
inu stales in tlie world*
Quite naturally, therefore*, thin Company
has been the Hist to test out every new
idea or invention that gave promise **.'
effecting an improvement in Scale construction.
Many of these improvements have been
embodied in the DAYTON Scale Those
that eould not pass the acid test of scientific examination and practical experience have heen rejected.
It is easv to understand whv there are
to-day over 1,000,000 DAYTON Scales
iu use. DAYTON Scales are built to
la>t a business lifetime, to give perfect
satisfaction with a minimum of attention,
ami to protect both nierchant and cus-
toiuer to the last penny.
Where DAYTOX Scales ate
Miiite in Cuoiuht
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CO. UNITED
StfVlct and .Salts (tyices in alt Ptititlpal Cities
***moey and I lead (*fu*    ***i twoWLOi Ontario
INTERNATIONAL
IM
IMM *******
liunn «■• **i
■••••MM
••nmitim maim
Ml AT SUCtM
TtMUtlN MMNINM
MADE IN CANADA   ••-* «*««
OAVTON
••»»■■ mn,**
(Mm euTTtM
MM* KWIM
19
il 20
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RKTAILKR
April
7 (mh PTt
ksSS
%
ss8as?'
,    M   ■
jj**«*   ."•"•'-.o^
Pitf Your Windows
and Floors to Work
DOMINION   N
Battleship Linoleum
Inlaid Linoleum
Printed Linoleum
Linoleum Rugs
Floor Oilcloth
Oilcloth Rugs
Table Oilcloth
Decorative Wall Burlap
Sanitile
OTHINU attract* eusstomers
quicker than a well <1 rested window,   Nut In11-4   stimulates   sales
more than a well-arranged store Interior. Dominion Linoleum dealer helps
are at your disposal, free nf charge.
Klahoratc and attractive cutouts show
card*, dummy mils mul similar material
are yours for the asking, together with
praetieal suggestions for using them.
Send also for an assortment of free
newspaper electros for use iu your local
advertising.   Thev will identify vou as
|*k *     • * *    *
dominion dealer and link you up with
our National Advertising Campaigns.
Get ready he Spring fastness.    Plan
window and near displays, and send
to us for the needed material.
DOMINION OILCLOTH A LINOLEUM CO, LIMITED
MONTREAL lib
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
21
.VeB
Drygoods and Clothing
The Cotton Crop
Willi a substantially larger crop, returns from ««'t
ii manufacturers  throughout thr world  -show iiu
, American cotton going ever tin- spindle* in the
,i-ri nt ICSSOU limn *ix mouths ego," i<|». iu •',;,   \,.
liutinl Uitnk of Commerce in New Ymk    Continuing
•>, the April tons of Commerce  Monthly, the Link
In tin* early part of thr Inst crop yttor, August,
'•Jl tn July, ItrjT*. the world's mill activity waa still
<| nn the Miiall Hilton crops which ha«l gone Im
* are snd bfSttISi of thai thi*. year's total eonsump
lion bub fair lo rxrn»d last year's l>y dome 800 thou-
uiml bale*    UfilftSB ihf eurrettt eelivtty ts exceeded
the next mx month*, however, tliere will be shout
'•   million half* of Amerienn Hilton a*l<!«*• t t«i the
turns] carryover at thf sad oi July, whieh would in*
h use it Wi per rent   ami show a )arir«* gain over the
«nr carryover.
Actually, raw rollnii exports from tin United
Siati r after thr miilillr «»f last November began lo lose
ground in eomptrlson with those nf the 1924-25 nea-
-••ii    hut until oftrr tin- middle of January cotton
* im] ready buyer* in ih<- spot markets of the south
T-'unril tin- i nil of January this activit) subsided
rVhruary *nlr* in southern spot markets were not
mm li morr than half thr turnover msde a year ago,
am] thus far thr SSiSOn'l exports are more thai!  I1*1
ihntumitd bales behind those of  1934*25     Finally,
* f- ha% been a decline of nearly III i*« hah in the
**!nil prirr utiirr mid January
Foreign Importan have mi reversed Ihelr nt tl-
'mn toward Ann liean OOttofl *ilirr the lit**' hir-ix wave
oi takings that sloeks abroad at ih«* end of January
«•*« below tboSQ of January. 1925. Tin* entire bur-
•'•!i of mrryiitg thr surplus of cotton grown ill tho
I nited Stntm Inst yrar is apparently to h. borilti in
i»at couniry,    On tbe continent oi Buropt the re-
I    !** show only 87 thousand hales, or 4 per eent   more
American eotton eonsutned in the half year ended
uRituary 81, than in the previous -*iv months There
1*1 no reason to expert much change in thc outlook
1 sumption in Asia «Hd not quite equal that of the
previous half-year, no doubt due to the utrike whieh
'""irred in India. Tberc seems to be no end to thr
jirife w|,i0|, prevents expansion of trade in China
•■ "'Wi trade is apparently squeesed between tin1 oom-
'""'•ion of Jspan on the one hand and the rciump*
1,1 ' of Indian production on thr other, In view of the
'"""•I* «x|K»rt trade aehievrd in Deeember, 1924, nnd
'•<'d through to March, 1928, the present totals
m December through February. 13 per eent, be-
"indlar flgurr* a yrar ago. SW disappointing,
,,n the United Status mill consumption oi eotton
'tottwl thhiugh Ihr summer and fell on n larger
fi
than i» had ben, at the low h-vel reached in 1024,      There ean bo no denying
bul since the beginning of the year consumption has
been scarcely ahead of last season. In thc goods markets likewise transactions were in good volume in
January, bul husiness since that time has not been
brisk. Recently an official estimate put the world
consumption of American eotton this season at W/n
million hales.
The conclusion was reached that the world carryover of American eotton. stated at 3.3 million bales
last July, would this July reach 4.(5 million bales.
Now that more information of the doings of the first
half-eason is available, it would seem that mill consumption will hardly be more than 14 million bales
ami that there will he a larger addition to stocks,
than was provided for in these lip-tires. For the time
being then, the ability of the holders of eotton in thc
smith to carry stoek and maintain the value of their
proilmi while consumers are buying in the easy fashion dictated by the evidences of a plentiful supply
will determine the course of the market.
At this time of the year interest is largely centred on developments which may affect the acreage
planted this spring, From such indications as arc
contained in thc record of fertilizer sales and scattered comments on sentiment among the planters there is
a widespread feeling that little change in the acreage
will take place To date, fertilizer sales, while mueh
above those of last year when early season sales were
small, are only moderately greater than in 1923. They
scarcely indicate any gain in cotton acreage.
At the same time it must be remembered thnt
prices of eotton now are lower than they have been
at this reason in several years, and if there is a further price decline between now and the time the bulk
of the new erop goes into the ground the effect might
appear in the acreage planted. Another large acre-
age would undoubtedly have a bearish influence on
the market for the time being. Ultimately, of eottrse.
the weather will be the determining influence, nnd
about that it is idle to speculate. Stocks nre to date
lhe only really known factor upon which trading may
be based, and thev create a prejudice in favor of those
who look to ap lentifui supply in coming months.'
According to figures recently made public my the
Department of Agriculture iu Washington, the world's
eotton crop this vear amounted to about 27.8tlO.000
b.drs. as compared with 24.800.000 bales last year, or
nn  Increase of about 12 per cent.    Consumption
meantime is said not to be keeping pace with the in-
creased output of this highly important world raw mn-
I, rial This much, except, of course, for the exact estimates, has for a gootl while past been pretty well
known to the eotton trade, It 'is for this reason that
v have been steadfastly predicting lower prices.
lenying that such figures as these
■ \
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ri
: A
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THK BRITISH COLUMBIA KKTAILKR
\ptil
when taken alone are of a distinctly bearish hue, ami
it is quite possible that lower values will in the end
result.
The element of uncertainty in thu situation whieh
has been Concerning a good many interests arises from
the unpredictability of the coming erop. It is urcil
known, of course, that the large output during tlu-
past year was due in substantial mcasur; to abnormal,
almost unprecedented, weather conditions, particularly in America. It seems hardly probable that a
repetition of last year's weather freaks will be realized this season. It is possible the t". S, will again sec
the ten or eleven million bale crops that preceded tin-
past two years of larger production, ill which caae tin-
supply situation would her ather different.
THE IMPORTANCE OF CORRECT HOSIERY
SHADES FOR NEW TAILORED SUITS
Instant Popularity of Mannish Tailored Suits—Careful
Choosing of Hosiery and Shoe Necessary for
Correct Blending with the Various New
Shades.
The tailored suil question, whieh was one "i great
agitation this spring, has been emphatically settled in
favor of the affirmative. For street wear, for shop
ping and tor travelling, the tailbur is classic, and is
included as a matter of course in the wardrobe of the
well-dressed woman. The smart nc*i of the suit de*
pends upon its severely tailored lines, and its present
brevity renders a matter of moment the correct choice
of shoes and hosiery.
Grey and navy blue lead iu suit colors this season,
according to the spring showings, and the response already noted in retail stores, though tan ami covert
shades are also good, The greys this spring are warmer in tone than other years, ami therefore more flattering in harmonious combinations. The darker shades
of green are correct, and French blue is also a favorile
Plain materials are worn in preference to patterned
fabrics, except for occasional small checks, a few
stripes and less prominent plaids.
The correct color combinations of hosiery ami shoe
colors with the hailing suit shades, according to one
of the leading style services, arc the following:With
midnight blue and navy blue suits, worn with parchment shades shoes of kid. lizard, snake, reptile ami
suedes—hosiery shades which blend correctly are atmosphere, nude ami grain.
Worn with opal grey shoes of kid, lizard ami rep-
tile or suede leathers, the correct hosiery shades for
navy and midnight blue are: lilac nude,'atmosphere,
silver, moonlight, ami dove grey, With sautcrne and
boisde rose kid shoes, atmosphere, Fivm-h nude, woodland rose and sunburn arc the correct shades for navy
blue suits. With black patent shoes, lilac nude, atmosphere, moonlight, dove grev. shadow and mauve taupe
are thc correct shades. Winn thr suit is grey, and
opal grey shoes are worn to match, lilac nude/moon-
light, Piping Rock, shadow and dove grey ire the cor-
rect hosiery shades. With blaek patent shoes and
grey suits, lilac nude, silver, moonlight, Piping Rock,
' <•" grey, shadow and taupe are the correct hosiery
shades.
TAILORED HATS TO THE FORI IN LATER
8PRINO COLLECTIONS
Staple   future*,    whieh   have
been imted ill the milliner-, *|yhi
for   SORIS  years   mm   nr,   Rg-gju
coming tn lhe front iii th,  later
models of spring hats  Ittiv rs who
bits returned from Hen  York
slat*- lhat tbefC i» a distinct trend
t,,«.it.|s tailored and Inrg, died
hats
lu   thr   earlier   collection*  thi
soft   straw   hat   with   thr  drn|w-d   crown   WIS  llmo-f!
supreme    N»,w,  limit)   **i  lhe  more  esclttsivr  huts..
an* showing distinctly tailored models with iniereii
ing features in tin   way of trimiiling   lust.ad ■■' thi
ordinary ribbon band or l*»*»w, tbe ribbon trimnong b
applied in a rather irregular manner This is papm
tally striking if thi ribbon used is %>i one of thf item
geometric designs
One of the new model* shown whieh is an example
of a type whieh is being featured in many place* hai
a baud of nhtion around its high crown, which is .V* tl
four inches wide Thi* ribbon Is in contrasting ihadr-*
• »f Rome of the clear futuristic color* Tlo straight
band is relieved st the fronl **i the hat with s pieet
of the same ribbon which »* placed perpendicular "
the baud and finished off on a bins effect This torn*
geometric effect is obtained in other tailored hatfl hj
tlo use of different width* of contrasting shade* al
ribbon That is placing on lop of a sohd bttttf ril ,*"'1
a striking narrower ribbon in l"»i* do rose Thbt u
followed by one in phantom red or in love bird u'r"'*
A mtv striking effect ha* been obtained in this « ij
and these effect* all give a hint of the futuristic ideas
Artificial flowclH have onee more come Into |»'
inenee and large flat flower* are being shown on ri an)
if tin* ioh hats which New York is featuring The*
have already been copied ami «re shown in some ( Ul
adiau retail slore* At the pres* nl iiuie. though, lilt)
velvet  flower* in band* arr in great  demand Si  lh«
Canadian wholesalers These are flour in a solid eolor and make a very decorative baud on an Othel •»»"'
plain hat
Combinations of velvet and straw In rather !•*•**"
sjsed hats are  being featured  in tin   summer eolh
lions, The colors shown in these hats at   soft sh. '
like homy, OSkllUt ami soft rose
Following the voguo f«>r taffeta in dresses, laff«
ha* onee ii,.*n ,,„. jnfu |,rolMjneiier in  hats and
-f«lW taffeta, something like a lea'h.r finish, d flllni
has been used In some of the newer beret model* !'.*>
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
23
Textile Prod uction,Prices and local Conditions
Of J. B. Thom.on. President. Jam., Thornton 4 Son,, Ltd.
There hcciiih to Im- a general opinion that eotton
, ih will on thei MUillfl of the Fall lists show a slight
,j,,!hm in priee The lalesl Information is ttuit the
(,.,|, ,,f cotton for 1926 showed a total of about I'i.
..,><. r«m bale*, whieh when harvested had a carry-over
, i | 106,000 bale*, al least lhat was tlo figure on July
list  \tM
ll is rather early to estimate the 1926 crop, but
•'■•■  is a forrea*t shown that this is expected to run
son i IP., million hale*    Nn doubt, the ligure is based
largely OS the acreage which i* t.. !„• used for th,- ,n
•suing year.
I'nsiiming that lhe figure of the 1926 erop was cr
r.,' and that Ihr consumption ,,f American cotton
goes on. under normal eondition* ihe carry-over neat
.hi!*, will run something near five million bale*. Of
luurs.   the very far! tha! it is Imt mxh in the season
ken the whole situation problematical, bveaus. all
kimU of condition* may prevail b< fore the crop is bar
vwtted It might In* rca*-onahh to estimate a maximum
litis when it mute* to minimum, tins is an tinkmwu
((ttanlily. Therefore, we will not se, any lerioun de*
eliiu in prirr which will effect merchandise for Fall
l1'-''* though prirr* will Im  slightly lower for Fall de
liverj
Rayon Not Affecting Consumption of Cotton
\ num be? of fabrics srs seen on the msrket con*
Isining s lar**--*-* proportion **i Hav on «,r (Vianew ysrn*
.md looking at it from what one ices both In our own
mtinirj snd in the United Stale*, and the prevalence
sith which it is used in Ureat Britain, at firsl thought
*' • would be inclined to think it was seriously affecting the consumption of eotlon     As a matter of faet
in h world wide eondition it has had verj IHth  if any,
-ff, ,-t
The total  production of  textile   fabrics  for   1925,
Ktatisties show ihai cotton was responsible for ovei ni
!"   "nt. wool for \ti per eent. artificial silk was re
ftponiible for t 16 per eeni, while natural silk main
lalnwl ii* position ai 55 per eent   These figures are
MUnewhsl   surprising   when   We   -SPC   SO   much   Hayon
as< 2 in crepes, all classes •»! fanej goods, and particu
S»t«o*.
EETI
THE UNSHRINKABLE UNDERWEAR
THAT ATTRACTS THE ,
HIGH GRADE   TRADE
%mkM*'»^
iiarly In hosiery and underwear. However, with these
Itgtires in front of us, one can see that Hayon forms
-"l.v a v.-ry small proportion of the world's consump-
••■*11, The,, has been iu tho Hayon market a slight
decline in the price of yarns, but it really does not
affect merchandise because the cut in priee has only
bu ii Rome 25c per pound ou the raw yam. whieh when
reflected Into the made garment or textiles ean show
« nly a very little, if any. difference iu price.
Wool Market.
As regards the wool market, at the moment of
writing it is firmer than it has been for some little
time The general concensus of opinion is thnt there
will not be any decline or reverse in wool priees, ami
thai the tendency will be towards slightly higher prices 192») produced some HI} million pounds more wool
than 11**24. but when this figure is considered against a
three billion pound producl ion. it has little effect one
way or the other. One can readily see that a tpiantity
of this kind can be easily absorbed by a slight change
cither in style or climatic conditions,
We have been particularly fortunate in British Columbia this season with the early spring weather and
already locally there appears to be a shortage on a
good many spring lines. Hosiery 'is moving particu-
uarly well. Today this plays a very important part
in tin business of the retail merehanl, and has to bo
watched very closely with the constant change iu
shades both iu women's ami children's goods. Silk
hosiery and chiffon arc particularly strong. New
shades reported arc Hose de Cheite ami water Green,
which adds two more shades to the opening, which
contained a very large range of colors along the light-
• r lines The textile color card shows the following
colors to be what a representative stoek requires I'm
hosiery selling during the present season: Mauve, Bin-
rtte. Woodland. Hose. Scaspray. Hose Marie. Atmosphere, Nude, Champagne, Sunset. Peach, French Nude,
Blush, drain, Bran, Biscuit. Moonlight, Dove Gray, Shadow, Mauve, Taupe. Sandalwood."
COMPETITION IN RAYON IMPORTATIONS
In spit, of the protection granted to the fibre silk
manufacturing in Canada, in accordance with the ar-
raiigcincnl under which Courtaulds. Limited, built a
bug. plant at Cornwall. (Int., Canadian users are actually purchasing fibre silk at lower net priees than they
we're paying formerly, lp to January 1. 1925, ('anadian manufacturers using fibre silk ill their products
were allowed a drawback of 811 per cent of the duty
paid in Imported artificial silk yarns. This domestic
drawback no longer applies, but prices hnvo been reduced to such an extent that Canadian importers of
such varus from the Netherlands, Belgium, and (Jcr-
many arc offered supplies now al prices, duty paid and
fob station in Canada, which are no higher than the
elf prices, without duty, which were tpioted a year
ago. Competition is keen, and the larger buyers are
able to obtain concessions even from the lower prices
now quoted,
am,.
1
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i '24
T||K HKIT,sll COLUMBIA UKTAILKK
British Market Reports
COTTON
1926
Manchester, April
,-,,,„> authoritative Quarter* sll over ^^J* »5t
th. confession thsl goods are itlll loo desr sad lb ■ s«
n'thtr reduce the cosl ol producUoa sad msrketlni la or
der that tiiev may be placed within tl'** WW > pi • ^',r \
sick - world. Mr. Holroyd, the Prtsldeai oi be Mssiw
Spinners' Federation, suggests that while making oUusw
oub efforts to effect economies, the people In lhe trade, ai
aav rate, should refrain from lhe bad habit into which Ihej
have fallen of crying "Stlnkini fish!" an be blunttj pan It
The frequent reiteration of despairing cries is, be ■»«>•• HO-
ing much barm.
The extent to which production can be further cheapen
ed is bard to calculate, but utile farther ta this direction
can bt" done In lhe sptaiug mills and weaving sbedi For
lower prices we shall base to look to further falls lit the
value of the raw material, tu reduction In lhe chsrgta of the
people engaged In substdlsrj trades of bleaching, dyeing,
and finishing, and, above all, to the lowering of thr cost of
retailing. The doubling ol the cost ol Uw finished article
in its passage from the mills to the consumer l« lodtfeasl
ble.
The supplies of cotton Will be abundant this season, and
therefore purchaseablc at reasonable rates, may be lafetj
counted upon. The final report of the American Ceosui
Bureau shows that up to tbe end of February 18,104,000
bales of 500 lbs. each had been ginned. This is about ''.*
(100,000 bales more than the Bureau estimate,! tn June and
July last.
*,( KtK«W|t«»M'Xi|<ll«'*-*'»»«KSK»K1K* SlKWI
\pril
BKKKj .mkx
BRAOFORO DRESS GOODS.
Bradford manufacturers  compl&ifl   that   those   Who   fear
the imposition in the near future of a duty on certain Im
IKirted goods, which would, at  least, check  tlie inundation
of the home market by foreign currencies, an- indulging ia
in a good deal of carping criticism of I'.ri'lih producers if
dress fabrics,   Owing io the anticipation that such a duty
would soon be imposed not a tew  orders for dress goods
have been placed in Bradford, tlie buyers fearing they would
not be able lo secure delivery from France m time for their
spring season.   This has resulted In much more employment
for Bradford looms, and now some London buyers complain
that they are not getting delivery ot !!■<• goods as quickly
aa they require.
For a very long time the Bradford manufacturing Indus
try was In a very bad way because of the preference given
to Imported materials. The result was that t considerable
number of operatives went into other Industries to earn
their living, and because employers could not guarantee reg
ular employment there has been a marked lack of young
people applying to be trained In the weaving and oilier pro
cesses.
The sudden revival In the demand for Bradford goods
brought abount by the threat of a duty on Imported goo<t*
has therefore caught the Bradford dress goods in an unfor
lunate  position  as  regards  operatives,   Rome manufacturers in the out-dlstrlcts are short of weavers, but the great
est rouble is the lack of burlers ami menders. Thus a bottle-
jieck has been created, and there has. admittedly, been some
lay in getting the goods away after they have been i»ro
ced because of the scarcity of labor in the burling and
w fending department.   London buyers who are making loud
complaint because or this need to be reminded  that  the
shortage of labor tn the home wool textile Industry has been
brought about by their starving our domestic Indus tn   for
so long by the preference given to Imported materials  With
the prespect of more favorable competitive conditions In the
future for Bradford dress goods Steps are being taken to
bring back old operatives and to train others.
Wool Prices and Piece-goods.
So far spinners and manufacturers have been sueeewirul
In resisting ihe determined efforts made by speculative Importers of wool and by lop-makers to force up the general
standard of values in  tho wool textile Industry    Since a
ATLANTIC a   IT    LASTS
O WEAR Atlantic
Underwear if like
transferring the warm,
woolly coat of the Man*
time sheep to the back
of the purchaser.
That's why it is such a
Sod repeater.   It makes
ends and keeps them*
ATLANTIC UNDERWEAR
Limited
MONCTON. N.B.
B. H. WALSH u\ COMPANY
MONtHlAL most TOUONTO
5*Umg AsmsHfm o\tO*t, 0***n*s
UOm*mW   **Tm*0%Wfm% o*)^ftWwm\W*SW
a«x k m mn ki* xix tm m*m>*t*Mm*M*m*mwmm
*KK
■., ,f.*«m.**,*AOsi*')'M*m***\*ie**'?
H *hW>*H*AMS'IW-.*1-V*Si ' * 'I  ll
THE BUITI8H COLUMBIA RETAILER
25
For Yenf Round Sales
ijcjhthoitsk brand
nrcKSKiNaoTH
SPORT JACKETS
***** want them for all *m*Je of sport, in an sts
io*-*. I" summer Ihey ara indispensable for golf.
boating. Sailing, hunting, in winter, tht boys wear
"19*0 lor  ahitng.  skating,  enow-ehotlng.
Made of soft, SeuSle Omened doth which looks
'"0 *>*ara like chamois, theae Jackets do net shrink
tt lose their shape »n the waeh. Wet bsnds *f
''*'*r*s*n'o elaetk wool ribbing.
Mads In light or dark gray, chamois, dsrk tan,
■* d rtmdeer brown. Also In mackmaw e»oth checks,
red snd blaek. lettuce and blaek. grey snd bisck, snd
i''own And block.
Rock Island Overall Co
ROCK ISLAND. QUE.
Representative :
«■ M. FOSTIR. 2S Water Street. Vancouver i.C.
larger proportion of machinery lias been employed on tlbru
crossbreda and merinoi there has been pressure for dellv-
eiy oi tops because stocks had been allowed to get Into small
compass during the period of unsatisfactory trading. But
tills pressure fur tops was not due to any 'prospect of a
shortage of wool later in the season. Manufacturers have,
therefore, firmly resisted the aUempt to Impose higher
prices, and by declining to engage in liberal speculative operations they have kepi ihe prices of tops and yarns down to
a reasonable basis onw hieh they have been able to do business
In the crossbred department wool Is still being bought
at prices which are out of proportion lo those secured lor
either -..HUM or piece goods. Not until there is a decided
Improvemeni In the demand for cross bred yarns by tier-
man) is It likely that spinners will be able to command
prices which will leave them a fair margin or profit, and in
mi w of lite present adverse financial position in Germany
it is not expected there will be a better demand from that
Quarter (or some months.
FALL AND WINTER STYLES IN HEN'S CLOTH-
INO.
Models Shown at the Convention of the International
Association of Clothing Designers.
In the saek eont models for fall, peak and semi-
peak lapels are favored, although several designers
showed notch lapels on the garments they exhibited.
There was some talk of reviving the three button coat
tm- young men, Imt it is not thought likely that it will
In- in tnui'li demand.
The double breasted coats had a lui; showing, indicating that the designers believe that the popularity
of this style will continue in the fall season.   All saek
coats are shown with .slightly hody-tracing lines.
In overcoats there was quite a showing of velvet
collars, and some designers are of thc opinion thnt
next fall will sec a considerable demand for them.
The reason advanced for this is that heavy ulster
styles have been popular for a number of years and
that men now wish something more dressy. Thc vol*
vet collar coat supplies this, aud in addition to this
feature coats arc being shown slightly shaped in thc
hack. A model with a form titling back is being advocated in the United States, but it is not thought to
be a praetieal garment for the Canadian trade. 26
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
\|»i!
IMPORTANT   CHANGES   IN    EXECUTIVE    PERSONNEL
OF INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS  MACHINES CO.
LIMITED, TORONTO.
Mr. F. W. Nichol, who has been Assistant General Man
ager of the Company, hss been appointed manager ol the
Business Service Department of international Business Mi
chines Corporation, New York. This aewlj (rented depart
ment will have Charge of service lo users and prospective
users of the company's products, and earn ea neasrsl promo
Hon work in co.opcration wltlt the advertising and itsUstiGSl
departments. The |>ost Is one ol the most Important exeetl
live |M»sitlons in lhe Kid of the company, and »;<••■•, to Mr
Nichol in recognition of his outstanding abtllt) sad fiae record of service,
F. W. Nichol
■
Mr. Nichol joined the International Husiness Machines
Corporation, New York, in 1911. as secretary to President J
Watson, and was soon advanced to the pott of executive see*
retary of the New York office Following a period Ol **r
service, Mr. Nichol was in 1921 appointed executivi- secretary of the International Business Machines Co., Uatiu'd, sad
shortly after became assistant general manager.
J. C. Milner
Mr. James C. Milner, assistant seer.iaiv „• .».
who prevlou.ly wa. ,„ 'cK;™ ;\]"„ i'. <*** ;;««>..»..,.
appointed ealea manager.   Durlnl lb. ■»»,.., p.; ,     l***
worklnj very clo.el   with Mr. J, 8 oSUT™.^ *T
■Car, tnd Mr. Nichol, uiltunl ,  „ ,,«"«.?",',"",",
work.   He entered the aervlce or .....    .„ ' l'"1'1
I.JO ., ,„ .„*„„„, ta STom 0a%**m7mt'] iW
rapid progrea.to th; tmporuo, wffhTA   "  '
McKee. office manager. ******** «•'«! James M.
Under the leadership of Mr, OKaburv  »h* .,. i
management ll J.„„.?y, lft WtftaSUff S2	
Machine, Co. Ltd., .bowed an IncreuhH , r, "'M
cent over 1M4. and eaperlenced one ot Umlha!li*. *?.'
mm,.   A rnrthor ..batanUa, .nS^UT. ftSSTAU
QUALITY ALWAYS PAYS
BUY
Western Made Counter Sales Boohs
STf
SAUS600KC
WW
WESTERN SALES BOOK CO. LTD.
\ts onanvuls smsar
vancouvsm sc
Phono Seymour 8265
STILL THE BEST
We are keeping abreud of the time*   our |>r.
rlllets are made to loeel ■ titling ivquireini n'*>
nit.l jiiHt a litti,. above th,. regular standard * •
quality
■ 0
This PXpl-rlns why our well known
Keystone Brand
Bxprelse Hooka, KrriMilir*. Note Hooks. «t«
ate enjoying the eonAdoi of the trwl*- ant] llf
patronage of the students,
Keep plenty on your shelves
Tin V will |k- linked for.
Made by
Soil, Hands* I Wrift Ui
MANUFACTUftlOS ANO WHOLItALI
PAFt* DtALIM
VANCOUVEI VICTORIA I92«*
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RKTAILER
27
u
HARDWARE. OIL w PAINTS
THE BUDOET AND THE CANADIAN MOTOR
INDUSTRY,
T'(.    new    lltnlget is   Im inif   awaited   with   much
Tin   foM'easi   thnt   duties  on  motorcars
nui   motor ear    mnleriaU    niul    supplies    mav    be
.,:,..!   ih   taken   arrioiudy.     Some   „(   tit,*   motor*
factories    ill    fjuuidn    nre    norily    SJISembling
\.-As   whieh import  practically nil their parts and
aippltm from tba parent organization* in the Cnited
m im   Thes* ha*i* little stake in Canada and bave
m reuse to be greatly disturbed    At least thru eom«
1,0   however,  have  <|rVe|o|H«l   liiJIIMtfftrtItrtlitf  oper-
(tons in t'niiniln on n mueh higgi t ami mot,- perma*
seal Iwuds When the present plants were establish
there waa n general expeelation of more extensive
irrangementa for tnriff preferences within tin British
Kmpin and the fnetorie* in Canada were to serve ns
Itasm for export trade Ms*** there appesrs to have
H,t an n\er *nlu*i(ion of the Canadian mat kit and
iu iiiiiiottiate development probabilities
T" protect their loir [nvesltncuta in the Dominion,
"!<> of lhe Cnited Stale*! motorcar companies have
lieen handling, through their Canadian branches, s
"•!*•,'!'fiiiite pnrt nf their orders for export t«» Nations
rtntntHes nf the Itriti-hh Kmpir*. nml these Canadian
plants now depend noon export business tor thc sale
V Sl least .Ml per eent of their output During the
last year or two there hn* been S0D1C transfer ni man
ufaetuHng operation-* from Canada i»nek to thc Cnited
Aisles   ami opponent* of tnriff reductions state thnt
■silhtlrsvrala of any pnrt of lha preaeul protection lo
thnv industries whieh nre depnedon^ wholly or par<
'iftll> i|».,n ihe motor car factories for orders would
pmbshlj have n far<renchtng effect
Should the Hudget Ih- delayed, the uncertainty
ma) have n restrictive efftet <»n ••ales of motor can*
M Cat-Midi during the next few months More than li"
l,,r relit of the Cnundinu btudnCSi is (loilC in Mareh.
M"l!  May. nml June of eaeh year, ami many prosper
'be hnyera of automobile* may postpone purchasing in
"I'1,■'*lo obtain thi advantage of any price reductions
»kci) in result from tariff ehangea Thc situation
•^nltl hr relieved by an official announcement that <!»»
™* will not h,< reduced until the entire situation has
,"T" *'>i.lin| hy \\u* new Tnriff Honril; itteh action has
"'''" '"«ei|. hut mi fnr wilhout SUCCOOS,
BUY$ EDMONTON IftANCH OP GENEAAt  8UPPUIE8
Tl
MurnlmllWHI* Alberta CompMJ Uld., In** tattea oeot
!'" • imoatoa busings of ihr General Sum-dies <>«> lowe
7.7    Ths iieii,.mi suppiien carried eleclrteal «*».»"'' **
JJII aa R,.„,,r»| hardware supplleii    Tbe entire Stock SS wall
,|"  »slN slatf pas«fd Into the OOilfOl of Marshall WSllS,
HARDWARE MARKETS AT A GLANCE
a Paper.—Huilding paper is selling fnirly well for
this time of the year. Stocks are well filled and prices arc steady,
Sash Cords and Weights-Stocks arc iu good con*
ilition with sales at an average. Priees show no
change.
Sandpaper—(nil is Improving with ample stocks
ill  hand,   Prices nre unchanged.
Sporting Goods.— Splemli«l orders arc now coming
in for sporting goods. Trade in all Kites of sporting
supplies is stated to he very heavy and merchants
appear to lie stocking more heavily iu these lines
each vear.
Wire Fence 8tretchers.~The usual spring call for
wire fence stretchers has opened up.
Turpentine. — There has been no change in thc
local market for turpentine. Husiness is continuing
In fairly active quantities.
Garden Hose.—Jobbers report better bookings of
garden hose this year than last. Prices are tihchnng-
nl from last quoted.
Nails.—Nail priees stiffen. The base price still
remains unchanged at £t>">. hut some changes upward OU the old extras are put into effect.
Ice Cream Freeiers.—With the approach of spring
more interest is being shown in ice cream ft /ers.
Lawn Mowers.—Dealer orders are being shipped
to some extent, but the heavy movement is sti" to
eome    Prospects for this trade arc excellent.
Batteries.—These arc moving in fair volume.
Binder Twine.—Jobbers are still booking orders
for early shipment.   No priee change is expected.
Incubators and Brooders. — Although it is well
along in lhe buying season, sabs contium good.
Oil 8toves.— Oil stoves are moving in very good
volume,
Poultry Netting and Wire Cloth—These emit hum
fairly active for spring shipment.
Steel Sheets. — Mill priees arc rather weak, but
jobbers prices appear to be holding.
Churns.—Call for churns is fair with stocks in
good volume.
Pruners.—Jobbers are getting a good many orders
for spring delivery.
Garden Implements. — Tools are moving well
against spring orders with advanced dating*, but Oth«
■ r lim* nre not yet showing much life.
Paints and White Lead.—Dealers are tilling their
stocks for spring trade, which promises to he excellent    Prices are holding steady.
■1
1 i •-
i.l
!A
V 2K
ee
Till'. BRITISH COLUMBIA BKTAII.RK
,, .the fanner is glad
to be told
\i,
0
* $
Yes, glad to be totSTwhat
paint and varnish will do
for his farm*   Farmers
seize upon new means of rilling
and reaping. Sometimes, with
all their work,they overlook the
value of paint until too late.
Their entire capital is tied up in
the farm. They will thank you for
pointing out to them the wis*
dom of another coat of paint.
"Sate Ike Sutfeet tmd Yew Sene All" m
ic.
THK BKITIRH COLUMBIA RKTAILER
29
Tire* — Trospeets are good f«»r sales in automobile
;i,.h -his year The market is fnirly settled and de*
mnn,| 111;ht in a retail way
Torches—-Demand i* fair with stocks well filled
Wire—Sales are fair with stocks in fair eondition
Priees •<•"* so, changed
Tin •—Snleti are fair with sloek* ample Priees arc
(i rl anged
Poultry Netting bt reduced iu priee    Tin- rcduc*
lion U nlHitit five prr cent  .
Bar Iron and Mild SUtl   Hs*t quotations show
a decline of a half cent   a )Miiilid     The m <* base BOW
lwiii| three dollars a hundred pound*
Files-—Sabs arc slightly  teller. stocks are  well
RIM ind pricea arc unchanged
Oalvaniaed and "0M and "A" Wire Drops.—A
decided drop in price is noted on both galvanized and
"0n and "A" wire; the drop varies from 15 to 20
per cent.
Iron 8et and Cap 8crews.—A decline of about 10
per cent, is now recorded by raising the discounts ou
both set ami cap screws.
Fence Staples.—Along with other wire products,
bright ami galvanized fence staple-* drop in price.
Galvanised are now quoted at $6.75 c lbs. nnd bright
at *•. 0 His.
Builders' Hardware.—Prospects for a good year
in the building trade are very good. Soma building
is being done at thc present time, and there is a good
volume of work projected for the season.
Glass and Putty.—Demand is fair, with niiplo
Stocks '»n hand.   Prices have not changed,
f j',
WELL KNOWN PUNT MANUFACTURER
PREDICTS OOOD SEASON
Th* following summary of husiness. hy n promin-
rat msnufietttrtr Is *repr«***rntathe of the general im
provcntenl noted in the paint hu*inc*s in Canada at
'■a presenl time.
Vs we ndvance into the beginning of the months
of greate*! activity in the pnint and varnish business,
laotM of the spring trsde. we find that the year's hiisi
•tm is developing much along the lines whieh we ail-
!|,|l'-',|, although many keen optimists fell that
trllh thc n mnrknlde crop* of last year, nml high pric
'v sit i rn of great pftispcrity would wl in immediate
b li Ottf business we doi not feel that this would
'M li- ense. but rather that the somewhat slow, yet
wuntl progress of the last year ami a half would be
,,'n*'1 "'I Thia forecast has been borne out. be-
^JU* htialneii haa not been stimulated to the degree
l,'a! " optimists hoped Nevertheless, tin improve-
,l"'"- »s been steady, and the paint nnd vnmish sales
"' ""' "rgairixation show good gnins over Inst yiir.
1 "•peels for spring business nre grntifying. ami
;,!k forward to a continuance of the gradual it"-
Ptovcmenl which has been taking place since 1924
"''• °nr own business, we have found it necessary
'! 'v M'' <»ur inanufaettiring faeililics at our main
,"'-*1' ■■>' fully 30 per cent., partly in order to provide
™<mi nrhieh has boon needed for some time, but for
h" " ' part, to take care of the expansion which we
JJf j iHtieneing iu our business, partieularly with re*
•■W lo our automibile ami brushing laequers,
. "'  ***** also spending more money on our sales
m B,lvert*Wii| programme, than ever before because
Wi
we feel that business is going to become better and
better and we want our customers (dealers) to be in
a position to take care of thc increased buying power
of the people through increased demand for our pro-
duets.
it is difficult to make any definite statement with
regard to price tendencies, because these are matters
whieh lie in the future. Kaw material prices in our
husiness have hecn tirm all through the year, although
at the present time, there is sonic weakness in linseed
oil. white lead remaining fairly firm.
"We have had no labor difficulties in any of our
plants, ami arc employing an increased number of
men,
"Altogether we look forward with confidence to a
very satisfactory business for our agents and dealers
and ourselves during the coming months."
The paint and varnish trade of 1926 is already assured a mueh heavier volume of sales than last season.
SPORTING 000D8 SALES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Volume increasing yearly—Hardware merchants, alive
to conditions, build up big business in these linn.
The world to-day is sport mad. In every city, town
aud village in Canada every member of the family is
more or less interested iu sports. Father plays golf,
mother belongs to a lawn bowling club, sister plays
tennis, ami big brother joins the baseball team.
Tennis has always been a favorite sport with the
younger set. The great triumphs of Helen Willis, the
California schoolgirl, in Europe, have brought the attention of the public back to the courts and hundreds 30
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
\
ml
will play this year, who had for a lime neglected the
game.    The sales of tennis  rae-pnts.  halls,  ami   nets
amount to n nice total wherever there is a tennis eluh.
The dealer should pay particular attention in an m
deavor to secure the eluh business.
Baseball Now Our National Sport.
Ilaschnll has now more adherents than our old
national game of lacrosse. Everywhere there are
teams, and games are held every evening in every
centre of population in British Columbia, ami it is an
excellent idea for the hardware merchant to help organize a town league to develop players. This creates
a market for hundreds of dollars' worth of baaeball
goods.
The hardware merchant i.s usually called upon to
help stiport thc home team. Experience has proved
that it is best to give a fairly generous cash donation
to thc team, and then make the manager of the base*
hall team pay cash for all supplies obtained In this
way there will be no outstanding hills left over for thc
harware merchant to wipe off to hitter experience
each fall.
SELL PORCH FURNITURE WHILE THE
WEATHER IS COOL
Kight now is the time to preach summer furnish
ings. Probably not many sales will result for the rest
of the month or for the tirst ten days of May. never
thcless, these cool days arc the right time to get peo*
pic thinking. When the first" hot suns appear and
housewives are forced lo get the old furniture out.
they discover that "after all it will do another season," or that a little paint will make il "as good as
new." Hut get their minds tixed on an attractive net
in a new design several weeks before they need it nnd
they cannot bring themselves to look at the old forni-
lure.
And there is always the June bride—she of the
violet eyes and soft hands, whose dream of the coming
summer is one in which she will await hubby on tin-
front porch all dressed up in her lovely trousseau
dresses. Help on her dream. Show her things a lone
way from the frying-pan necessities which will bring
her down to earth ami off the porch into the hot kit
Chen long before she has realized the luxury of the set
she bought in May.
"The trouble with summer furnishings of all kinds
in this country," says the head of the home furnish
ings department in a well known store, "is that people will not buy thc better grades ami it is hard to
make profits ou some of the lines that arc turned out
here. I believe that it is our own fault. We do not
cmpliaL.zc the summer as mueh as our American stoics
do. (If course the difference in temperament has a
great deal to do with it. The Anglo-Saxon wants
over-stuffed Chesterfields ami chairs, he wants the best
dining-room sets and good rugs because he expects to
live with them a long time. The American, on the other hand, spends very little lime in his living-room, will
substitute a cheap breakfast set instead of a dining-
room suite and put the rest in a car,
"The same applies to summer furniture. Moreover, it is a choice between furniture for twelve
months' usage nnd that for two months' use. The
American spends a great deal more time on his porch
than thc Canadian. Climatic conditions in the Cnited -States nre more favorable and there is a big differ-
• in*, in \i\ui\: conditions The tlelicalcaM*ll sIioim ,,h,
vide so mueh of the Americans' food ready to eai 'I •
it can easily be   served in   the miii   porch or on th
II.
awn
NtW OOOOS
"Wo,**" PalOmej Ironing Tout, alt** I ft * In . i i » ,:,
This tibli* •;ut„l< r,itl>! nn |l« own Wg* fold* Into .» ...mjtr
bunillr Ami esi Im- »rt tt|» t**ott) tor u*r In * ft-• t*eoO&i
It  l«  a  strong,  i|ur«bte   labia,   made  of  rlrar   ftr   *jo4  h*,s
ur re*, «j nt*, iMf .••')«, m petee-at all t*»-»«ibtn«> of wsretas
Ess and Vavt«*bio  %i*t*r.
I.e!.f«h    I   lot     •MM,   Ji,    |n,     |»ar*fcr-4|   nn*   U*OA '
earlon
The Ouraej fowwlrj Gompaay arr r-hownie thrrr tn**
• let trie tow*   r»o of ihr nr« tout*-a *rr m t«o sml
burtlt-f mi*, while thu shlr.l new r»;,«.  I* o foil burner H
aril aIk*  low oti-n l-*f|w>
Tlo- polm of i)|*i|nrt|on In th*'** tie** no-l*-!* I# ih*
<»**'l ot the ow«n ho* lH«»n tolotnt on Ihr low o»en t>|«
mi r.- eoavttUcoi btlfbl, «n •rransrmmi arrived SI b> rl
'"** Ho- position Ol Ihr  .witch.-,  in thr  t*St)     All  finf
«qOlpfj«*] with o onepirrr Vltllfltd rnantrl lop   The,   r#
*«>no- In blaek hi*, or whltr ,u*tmA nnlr.li mot ihr In*
'M*-* mn br tnppb*** with a hl«h nhrlf If required
•M
-,, t
y.it
ttt
ttt
,. *
LAVING LINOLtUM
***** to Till Vour Cuitomtrr,
Whea  >ou  ..-||  turn  riiKloinerr.  linoleum or  Oilcloth
laemi  uu laforniailoo; the, .m ippn*clai« n more     *
fOO  Ihlnk
I     NfVSf  line ItrOQI   nnob*  when  rliuwlna.   the,   •!'
wstii   ''rn    {$* m>  ,,,,,r ",,,,, **** "^ w*rl"   "u
Hiii(MiihWh'M ,M>lf'* ,,,lo,,,,,m   he csrrful lo ner that n<-
3    Plane down level all Snot*; nil whir erai-M
finish       *** ont* ,n * wh,,,, '° *,vr >OMr linoleum « i
mimnlr 0hl> "m>M br,,4," when tiaiiins. or belter »
" flttw1,r ro,»»i. Insert mods ami replace monldlni
burlin^SlJi W,",,,,',K   floor   use   water   uparlnitlv.   •*"   Hi
burlap bioklni win no, *,« we. *n,i Umi ihoritm lln
waJ'th!?!!! ft!u,!K' w varvUi'«° **** mile ',|>»|",, pn(
M> M,M" esaet slse «»r room
nlsh wm II ■w"l,r !f h*rdest the use ot i reliable floor rn
n,»'> *m prolong life of pattern, I «l Jt.
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
How Best to Light the Store Interior
sjMtm s* wegsstjss SWT^^^^Xr--^
:il
I    eorreel  window and store lighting the proper
.,f lamps nml equipment is nn bnportanl factor
li :-, three OUl <»f lefl store* nre proper!) illumin-
,t(,l ivhih one in thirty the show windows 1ms tin*
• lighting whieh ninkes for toost effeetlvc dis
i] iip|M-nl
Artificial light seems lo be -something that we bavo
:.,.; 10 elate to tot 90 l°"g thnt many do not -»i<« it
-i, proper perepccllve    It far tmi frequently is
lAMed as a io eewuiry evil, rnther ihnu lhe vital iocs
.-,  nnd lomuietnlnble ns.#ei  winch it  renlly is when
. il) used
M. * s merchants wanting a system of artificial light
;   forth and buy   *a" lamp and * a" future,  giving
"    '.,,■,] to lhe effect tiny are g«»ing to prodtiee.H
,- \.v i«mi strongly emphasised that theft* is a
righl *nd wrong way to lighting    The right waj  is
j>4\,<!  with  prolilalde  Un. lits.   the   wrong  with  dt •
• ,< lion
v   i tlo  inenmbscent lamp was Introduced com*
! i!\ in 1079, ii, t»Mk ba% been rapid!) improved,
. til loday we lind in general use two form-, of lamps
"   iiiillses a tungsten (llament operated in a eaeunm
ml pmdneing ipproiintitety one unit of Kght for
ft)   null   "f   poWcr   roUMIUo d      The   other   Utilizes  a
itgsien lilnmeiit operated in an atmosphere of inert
t -    This fom of lamp in il» larg.r sir. * produces
unit of light for every half unit of power eon*
M
i ■ -"
til .
H i .
•Villi
U,|"
ti) u
Ihr !
it* !'.
ing .
lu ,*•
fftVtn
v new types of lamps hav. also been developed,
I particular \nhie lo the merehanl being tin day
lamp which by virtue of its color correcting bulb
i-is lijfhi ihe approximate equivalent to daylight
iiuiraldr for lighting at, as devoted lo th.   Rile
lixpliy of merchandise to l»e used in the daytime
Hiiploving this lamp its -should be Uirnc in mind
thr color correction is afforded nl the expense of
'-"•rption the exeew red ami yellow light rays
in the ordinary lamp being filtered OUl   Tliis
111  about   one-third   le*-*  light   being   radiated
would Iw tlo en-ve from a clear lamp «»f the same
This slight Mi-rihe,   iv howevir. more than jus
where true eobir \ nines are to U   shown   and
ti distinctive light  is desired
Urge Lamp Better Than Two Small Ones
dhei point t«» be borne in mind In eoiudderlnn
'Hiy q|}ei1$6it, is thnt Olte large lump gi\is off
'rrtbly more light thnn would two small lamps
name combined total WiltagC     That  is a  100
imp produces I.Mil units of light, while a 50
-«n»p produce* only Tssi units of lighl    thtli two
i lamps would give n total of 1000 units of light
' "at! unit having n balance of 80 \» r cent  in
"r    Hence from the Standpoint «»f better light
well as n matter of convenience, etc. it is well
"'"*;'  with old  type  multiple  arm   futures  in
"ingle units
Different Types of Reflectors
•atteh for lamps, now  a few  words as to rcflee-
It is in order to protect the eye from the ghtring
lah,,> ,,,J"","t- to bud nn element of decoration or dress
»P the lamps and control the raw light produced by
lhe lamp that reflectors, or fixtures, as they are sometimes called, are Used
Of reflector* then* sre many forms available, some
of which are good and some of which arc poor, but
regardleai of th.ir merits or demerits, they may be
classified as of three types*.
I lim? reflectors which send most of the light from
the lamp down to the display area are cither of the
o|>en mouth bowl or enclosing globe form, and pre-
suit the most economical form of lighting. Semi-indirect reflectors which send most of thc light from the
lamp toward the ceiling and depend upon the ceiling
to redirect the light down to the display area. This
form of lighting produces somewhat better diffusion,
ic, soft shadow and a lower brightness in the unit.
bul requires more wattage to produce a given quantity
of hght because of thc absorption occurring at the
celling
Totally indirect reflectors tend to throw nil of the
light from the lamp to the ceiling and depend upon
tin- ceiling to redirect the light down to the display
aria This form of lighting produces a very well diffused light, and no light source is visible to the eye,
• \c pt when luminous bowl units are used, when the
brightness is very low, However, still more wattage
is required In order to produce a given tpiantity of
light because of the Mill greater volume of light absorbed by the ceiling.
Htiefly the essentials which should be embodied ill
I good store lighting unit are:
1 It must have a relatively high output to keep
the cos? of operation as low as possible.
2 It must not expose tin* bright lamp filament to
view, but rather soften or diffuse the light.
:»    It must be low in first cost to prevent the invest-
im nt charge being e\ces.sive
4 It must be neat and sufficiently decorative in
appearance
,'i It must not concentrate the light In a narrow
angb. but emit considerable light to illuminate the
wall shelvei
g |t must not tend to accumulate an excessive
amount of dirt and must be easy to clean.
Lights Should be About 10 Peet High.
Tin   well ■designed enclosing globe form of direct
Kghting unit answers all of the qualifications, and is
most generally employed In interiors. With it. for
good lighting'should be used lamps of n sise equivalent appn.vimatelv two watts per square foot oi floor
area to be lighted
)*■  i■>   11*.i'• - ■ •
The importance of using the right sise ot lamp in a
give, reflector should always be b  '" mind, for
■  with  lanins of a size
reflector should always be borne in mind,
ioo often reflectors arc used with lamps of a ,-.-■
much bigger than that for which they are designer!
such a procedure ia aa ridiculous is trying(to fit a i'/g
V
7.
.7.
Such a procedure is as ridicul
head with a ":s hat     It nol on
1*4 in poor ap- 32
THK BRITISH (OLUMBIA RKTA1LHK
April
pearancc, but in glaring and ineffectively controlled
^Lighting outlets should be spaced so a uniform.distribution of light and unobjectionable shadows will result. Sueh a condition may usually be obtained |.>
spacing not further apart than the hanging height 01
tho units above tho floor. There is a tendency on he
part of the uninitiated to hang lighting fixtures loo
low, with the belief that better illumination results
will' be obtained. This, however, is not the case
Lamps should always be well above the line of view,
and with the ceiling height found in the average itore
lamps should be hung IU ft. or 11 ft. high.
Light Lost by Dirty Lamps.
Attention should bo given to the eolor of wall and
ceiling finish from a lighting as well as a decorative
viewpoint. With any system of lighting some rays
go to ceilings and side walks. Dark colon and tints
absorb more light than do light ones, hence dark *ur
rotindings mean high light absorption, and for a given
size of lamps less Illumination than would be the case
with a lighter finish. Furthermore a light source
against a dark background i.s more glaring and trying
upon the eye than when mounted in relatively light
surroundings.
The importance of cleaning lighting equipment i»
another factor whieh cannot be too strongly emphasised if satisfactory Illumination is desired Dust is
bound to accumulate on lighting equipment, and if
not removed at frequent intervals, will result in a
great loss of light with no reduction in current consumed.   Cleaning is an economy.
TRADE NOTES.
(Continued from page t*«i
New Weetminiter.—
Apex Auto Tops (J. A. McMillan).-Reported romincnc
ins.
Lclth, I). M.—Reeorted resumed lm nine km (watchmaker).
B. M. Clark.—Commenced (hosiery),
Jubilee Bakery .—Commenced.
Midway Garage- <;  H. Bingham reported sold lm rest
to 8. David.
McDonald, R. ('.—Reported acquired Wetl Knd Shoe Hon
pital In Vancouver (ll. & S.)
North Vancouver.—
Knill, Jack.—Commenced (gar and aulo BUpply.)
Pender Harbour.—
Rankin  k   McDonald — Reported  Hucceeded  bl   Dollo
Bros. k Co. Ltd.
Port Haney.—
Pacific Berry Urowern Ltd.- -Being absorbed by Weil era
CannerH Ltd.
Prince Qeorge.—
Leith Bros.      Dissolved psrUierihip,  J. Leila rel it m
(hardware).
Summerland.—
Wilaon. M. Q, and Co. Ltd,—Reported assigned- t n
Beaton cuHtodlan.  Meeting of creditors hold.  '
Vancouver.—
Delaney k Ward.—Commenced (hardware)
Plllon, P.—DUcontlnued  (gro.)
McLean k LIvlngBtone.-DlHcontlnued (Kro)
Patereon Wire k Iron Works.—Incorporated
Pratt, C—Reported Hold out to II. Rwjj (Kro)
Rogers, M. J.—Reportnl Hold out (gro)
Evana. Walter F  - Sold out Victoria and Vancouver
branches (musical InBtrumcntH). u   r
Arnold A Young- Reported sold om m Wm. J)irrHl)P
McKlnnon Bakery.—Commenced
National  tanner*.   Lid       Reported   being  al
Western Canner* Ud.
peck.  T.   U   C*   Ltd--   Reported   m-I-j  out
plain sing),
Stoke*.  W   II     Rc|*orlrd  mlit out   (gro >
hiks*. t B. loeessdid to Dotes?**] Oro•■:
ft* Id i t.d MandefoiU*
Kell). Mr*   f    Hlork bring offered for nl* l<
T   A   (D  0  Ar 1
Lee. T   II -Incorporated  aa T.  II   lw,  Lnt
wear)
llaron llro*    Italliff • »*t«- ad»erts*c«l (gro   ».,
Urown Urn*   Itaklnjr Co   Lid    ltr|Mirt ••! *of.; ...■,
Carnegie Meat and l*l*b Market    « .mm, m. ,|
llairhcr Hardware Vo    Mtoek ed«*-ut«ed lot Ml
Matthew*, K    CwtnmoWSOti (baker))
Morgan. 1    Reported wold out to Wm   tAutrn •
Knblrmon A   Warren     Repo.t   I <* nd (Ml  10 Cl
ham (11 k Hi
IVi
I VI
CM
I   i   i
Victoria. —
Murra)   lleur) J    Sold out to David W   II-.I  ■*
Klkin. Alfred    tiuitt oul to Jame* Mio«,.i U*l
ftOMO Rro*   Ud    Returning bu»ln«-.. m retail III Ul
r«K*more, (irorse    Mold oul to Herb* r   l»i *  n;
Itearh Kaam*. Lid    Amalgamated  «uh oth«(« ri VVh
cm i anner* Md
Ther*- l« one objection to Ihr colorful whrmn
dre»* predicted for thf mining *ummer   what win * •
Bias  do  «ho  want*  to  attend  a  touts   tit****   >,-*:'■*> '
. i
The  Secret le Out.
\  w**oUhi   girl  from   America  tm   attending   i   melt
function at a country  h«»u*e In HKngland
Amu   American*  hate not  »urh  health)   CfBBpU i •   • M
**• have     **i«t  »n  KnglUh durhr**  to the girl      I   ***•*
wonder *h) our noblemen take »urh a fanrj  10 ton    *■'
fare* "
It  tat'l our  white  farra  that  aitrart   them     r««.     '■■'■
the   American  girl    ' It"*  our   grefObaellS *
Retalere—Maintain Profits
ib* you mark up your profit on your Uld
down eost nml KSTIMATK your cost of Horn*
buiineti on your TOTAL SAl.KS
IK So Vol* ARK l.oSIMJ MONBV
USB OUI NEW METHOD CHART FOR
10 DAYS FEEE
If not satisfied, return the chart
If yon art satisfied, mail $150.
CMP COUPON AXU MAIL TODAY
NEW METHOD CHAET
Date    .
0. C, Krood, Box «27, Dumliis, Out.
Please -semi mo New Method Chnn
f«»r quick nml ncciirnte |irlciuir of goods, I
satisfied with it I agreo to mail yon ♦!.W I"
set within ten days or return charts.
Siuned
Address
*** 1926
poffkK BLENDINO 18 A PROFESSION WHICH
1     HKQUIEBS BEILU ENOWLEDOE AND
EXPERIENCE
(Continned frotn page n *
■{. made from coffee Improperly roamed in
llllc to the palate CVCD though it  was of a
.111y to atart  with    The  range of tempera*
proper roasting i* very narrow, then fore the
intuit   have   accurate   knowledge  of  ihe
• hint recjulred f«»r ench blond
I      in vie* of the fnet tlmi ihe ooffee roasting
has undergone Mich marked chaugi I nnd Im
highly teehuienl. requiring real *kill nml
we still h«ve some engaged in the lm*i
.., ,        knowledge i* very limited    One could not
• . more vivid picture of thia inefficiency lhan
• et that in WI* 88 per cent  of thoae engaged
• •*.. Imattieaa only did fit* per nut of ihe \ol-
ih the other 4'i per cenl  did SKI 4 per eetll
* iherc an* merchant* who continue to huy their
ipn   s from ihi* elaai of roaster* nnd wonder why
if effort a to huild up a aoUfttantial coffee business
THE BRITI8H COLUMBIA RETAILER
eenL, oven more. There may bo
11.
HI)   I
R|
11,
i1-**
TIPS POE LIVE CLEEE8
Getting RemlU Wfclh Standardised Sales Talks.
natly,   in   the   literature   of   manufacturers
.■as tn your Itore,  ih« re  are  fttamlnrdi»vd,
ilea talk*    Sometime*. th«wr are in the form
•sfleU. with aketchea showing you just what
•wiling o given article and with text tell
lit what to way     You arv adn*»il to memor-
ndardifed arlUliff talk      \b> you*    DM >'«»tl
a* id«a outf
t the rik'ht plan 09 atnndartlir-ed Mtlea talks,
for a retail -talesman to bate dJaeotlmiring
ottcertlltg  eipcricucc*.   ending   in  eoisdemua-
I Iht idea, with them     A ataudardircd *alc«t talk.
fin with, can caaily irriii lo make a patrol out of
n    It enn eaaily weent that  the  retail salesman
"•*<.■'■'• his own nenteneca to fit the situation. could
<>• h l»etler than thia »tcre«»typed affair Kvcu
who cnthuaiaalically atop to nicmorixc and
t talk unite often ipiit it diagimted
Iwcatnae they do not ondcrstnnd in** and out a
*nhjeel      The fttandar-Hxcd fcah* talk  is an
•    It i%. again, a delicate instrument  It must
"I    When it haa been mastered, often the
of the u<m r i* increased five hundred per
l\ •■ .
(  I II
All !
thr
ttcrl
11 I
Bruises       Sores
Rheumatism
Iteths the sere mueclee er !!§••
menu by mbbinf In Minard's Llal.
meat It peeetratee. rellevee tad
Heals. It eases OiSammatiee- and
reetaree the injured part te health.
Splendid for cote and eeree. It
sterilises sad heals aulehly.
ever between the results obtained with the sales talk
no comparison what-
 "iii.i   .;,»' "■■'■•-
and those formerly secured.
A Mies talk cannot be mastered all at once Kv-
perta ... work with these talks say there are'three
o\sm to their use, There is the initial learning stag,
when the user stumbles and stammers more or less as
be tries to adhere to the message he has attempted to
Umrtt "hy heart." Usually, there arc several days
Using the memorised talk, that the retail salesman
»ees no beneficial results accruing from -it. He does
mil see that he is making sales anv faster*, on the eon-
iniry. he quite likely feds that the stereotyped talk
»h losing him sales. During this period, however, the
retail aaleaman should remember that it is a part of the
price he has to pay. |.,t him think of the arduous,
lengthy leaaona through which the pupil of the violin
must progress to obtain ultimate mastery
There an* a number of days, perhaps as many as
twelve or fifteen, to this stage, then the persistent
retail salesman enters the second stage. He can reel
off his standardized talk, hut he is too glih in its
presentation    His manner is too much of the machine
order
After a little time .though, he passes from this
stage to the tinnl one of mastery. Now, while repenting form paragraphs In* takes pains to pause at unexpected times, stumble a little on occasion, so that he
gives the impression of spontaneous expression. At this
singe, while laying his piece, as it were, he studies
closely his prospective customer, to note reaction.
He finds that, using the standardized talk, he can
study the customer far more than he could when composing ns he went along. As he senses objection, liking, nml so on. he docs not hesitate to depart either
temporarily or permanently from the set talk.
At thin stage, the retail salesman will "swear hy"
the standardised selling talk. It has enormously increased his selling efficiency, Further, selling is not
marly as hard work as it formerly was.
Tin* m\t time you set out to master a selling talk,
be ready to "pay the price" That is trifling compared with the results the selling talk will secure for
yon, bul it in something calling for real "stuff in
you Be reaily to persist Know during the discouraging stage that the stage of satisfaction and elation
is hound to com. later it' you "stay with it."
And regard selling talks found in manufacturer's
advertising literature as something to be availed of at
• viry opportunity.
J. A. TEPOORTEN
LIMITED
WHOLESALE DRUGS
PATENT MEDICINES DRUCISTS' SUNDRIES
PHARMACEUTICAL PREPARATIONS
308 Water St.
Vancouver, B. C.
.
3 V 3*4
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
A|>n!
WESTERN GLASS Mtant
-PRICES RIGHT
—SERVICE  FAST o\
-QUALITY	
POLISHED PLATE GLASS
MIRRORS    ::    WINDOW GLASS
Western Glass
Co., Ltd.
158 Cordova Steret Weit
Vancouver, B. C.
Phone Sey. 8687
WATCHES.  CLOCKS,  JEWELRY
Western Wholesale Jewelers
Cordova and Cambie Sti.
Phone: Sey. 2765
B. C. Diatributore of
Meeere. T. H. Proaeer A Sona Ltd.
London.
Manufacturera  of  Proaeert'  Celebrated Line of TENNIS and
CRICKET Supplier
Associated Agencies
LTD.
615 Pender St. W.        Vancouver.
Phone: Sey. 131
8PRING ANNOUNCEMENT
Fancy Silk Hose for Men at
the 'Right Price."
Write for aamplet.
i BEAR
»»
R. A. SIME, B.C. Dietributer
TUB BLACK  MAMUfACTUSIMO  CO.
318 Homer St.      Vancouver, B.C.
WRITE YOUR OWN
Show Cards
8HOWCARD WRITING it a book
of 196 payee elegantly bound In
battleehip grey cloth, with over 200
illuetrationa.. .Send for it today.
Price 12.00,.. Money refunded if not
aatiafactory
Prefreis Pabliikiai Co., Ltd.
101*2 Merehanta* Exchange Bldg.
Vancouver, B. C.
r. W. 8TERLING 8ey. 6185
STARK it STERLING
MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS
1043 Hamilton Street.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Phone:   High.
IDCAL CONE COMPANY
Manufacturer ef
ICE   CREAM  CONIB
Purett Made     Ceet Leee
335 PRINCES! AVE.
Vancouver.
(WfaSif
PtaauuM  i.«i.    I'm i
a.   i !■
I   J
Addressing
MalllMi Ltasa     ftU.ttar ap-Mi*
Voaioallmlatiaaa ta**l*a** •**-
Direct Mall Cempalant
lUrSM HtlrtMily
Wrifty Direct-***, ML
tm hmiii-4* ■* in W*
Scaltt. Slicera. Cutttre and Cabin.
eta—Ntw, Rebuilt and Second Hand.
CatH or Tteme.
THE  SCALE  SHOP LTO
Sty. 2881
365 Cordova St. W., facing Homer.
SERVICE   TO   OUT   OF   TOWN
SUBSCRIBERS.
The Britiah Columbia Retailer will
be pleaeed to fumlah tubeenbere
the namee and addreeeee ef rapes*
eentatlvee er agente ef teeter*
manufacturera In Vancouver. We
will elee adviee where their
medltiee can be purcheeed.
Manufacturers1 Agents
(Vancouver, unlttt othtrwitt ttated).
(Inaeriioni  aader thll  headlaa  are
charged  nt   the  r»i«.  of  || 20 a  line.
for Mix moBtbs, psysbls la sd-reaee),
DRYGOODS
Monnnli   KaltUai    CO     Ltd.,    31*
Homer Street -s   i»  Stewart a Co
Ltd   Phoae Bey, ?r»25
Hock I-hi nd Overall (ii, Hoik In
land, tin*'   li m Poster, II Wsler Hi.
The lllark MfK Co, lesitle It. A.
gftOS, :tlH Homer Street    Hey   lf,33
Allantle I'nilerwi-ar Ltd., Monelon,
N.ll K II Welch k CO, Ltd, 31*
Homer Street.   Hey   Hf»«7.
The  Call   Knitting  Co.   Md..  Clall,
om- j. j. MseKsy, 804 Dower i»i«i*
Bey, 8091,
C, Turiibull Co, l.id, (}a||, Ont.--
s, i) Btewarl-4 Co, Ltd., nix Homer
Street   Hey. 7r*2.r».
Thomson   615  IU.Uuk    Weet    H
737T
CMjaaaa Holloa Kaiitim . „ *...,
lUmlluiii   imt    g   ||   Walah a n
l.i«i. 31* n«»in.s  Btre«i    •«.,
GROCERIES
I A11 All A    SUr. I,    I o     |.f.|      S|   ;     .,
R   II   Himntrrr   :•»;   Heallngi •*,
KrltoCg   fo   Of  I AllAlt*  Ud     I'     ',
■»nt   i. p  Maaaa a   <>   ,\   \\u
lug*  Wr«|      «te)    UU
Canadian   Pottum  C«t*sl to   I.".
r-ioMli      Mr\>rtf'»    |,t«J      *%%   Hit
ins» w«»«   H**y  %n:
**.m*»m**tt*mim*mm**awMi*i^<m
l*aimolh» i amimf-} of * madi Ltd
Toronto t»nt EMaa htW**tt*at '*'<
\jtrth   itfam     lit*    Sell.
• 'a-.A'Ia  i olo; *  And  CtMHtleall  I. !
Toronto    Stark A  Sirrim*   '. *  ' IU
Bum Bire#i   ****  di^s
tjtt*' of ih* \Voot«t* \ii''!vc re r
UW>  111. fi»r.|«   tilt**-'        $*)    .'*.'**
W    ClBft   la<l    \|ontr«**l   Q»*    '
I'  SUrk   i:i llAnillton Si     lej   '. *
Iktrdon     MMk     In      LM      V     If***
i,u*'     \jtnrol   Or*|r*    111   U*'- '
ti***   **.\t
M«*» ormirk   II'a   t o   Ltd    I •   '
On*.     Uwol trttlrt-    | IS<»  lUn **
Sts   3«13
1     W    lillleti   Mia     Cd     I   '    ''
MrKArlAllr   U*0  \l*»t*   St   S«J    I3W
STORE   EQUIPMENT   A  SUPPUES
ini^niAtionAi    Baalaees    m»< I'■■*
i'«    l.trl     Toronto     MkaI   Offln    t**
Humour St     Se>    :•*..
'.ill
I'anaillAti  ToUilo Bealss    •■
Wtadsor, Oat   I  I  Cbenib*'
Sim thi- Siren     He*   3911
CoatJaeatal  Paper  Prodoci** ''■
tlttAttA.      Mnl      Smith,      l»AV|l|»<'        ■*•
Wriain    Ht*y   nun:.
J   f   Wilaon. Mil    Urhut'*. Q««
LooaJ offlrr,   |n60  Homer  Ht
7M _
IIaiiiaiii   |»a|M»r  rrodorla Co.,  '
12X0   Homer   Itrett* Norfolk   I'
Co, I.M. ns Water ItreeL  Bej
ami ;%e,*n
BPORTINO OOODS.
Prosser, t h a loaa l**« ,*on
Kiik    AdKoelateil   Aseneie-4.  f>*-<  •
•tei hi w.   Bey, 111, Are You Ready for the Ice Cream Season?
Sllpulftl'
i iiXTI.NK.M VI
lee I'i« mil I'iiiU
ALWAYS
ICE CREAM PAILS WITH BAG POR EACH PAIL
THE CONTINENTAL PAPER PRODUCTS
Limited
OTTAWA CANADA
Alto manufacturera of he Cream Dithes and the popular Lily Drinking Cup
if out on*
Victor*!
•   SMITH, DAVIDSON & WRIGHT, LIMITED
Edmonton
Calgary
I
m
*1
-111
1   ' fc!
tt
SWIFT'S PREMIUM
SUMMER SPECIALTIES
For the Picnic Basket
*   *
Now is the Season to stock a good full line of
our Summer Cooked Ment Specialties, including our Premium Cooked Hams, both round
Ud flat style Your trade will ftnd any of
our Summer Specialties ideal lor Sandwiches
and other Picnic purposes. Ready to serve.
Absolutely delicious and satisfying. You will
find these products a winner with your trade,
and I profit maker for yourself.
ALL OUR PRODUCTS ARE GOVERNMENT
INSPECTED
•A?
SWIFT CANADIAN COMPANY LIMITED iyartfestSe//e/s
"HpHREE EIGHTIES" Hosiery for
X women are knit with one aim in
view—to combine comfort, appearance,
wear and economy in most satisfactory
fashion. That they do this is proved.
we believe, by the fact that they have
the largest sale of any one style of
hosiery in Canada. They are seamless
cotton stockings, reinforced at toe and
heel by three-ply yarn.
For misses and women—sizes 4'j to
8'/ia 8*2 to 10. In black and popular
shades—attractively boxed i»i dozens.
Order "Three Eighties*' from your
wholesaler.
Chipman-Holton Knitting Company, limited,
Hamilton, Ont.
Mills at Hamilton ami Wcll.tntt
^osiery^mforyiisses &Wometi

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