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The British Columbia Retailer Jun 30, 1925

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Array The British Columbia
Vancouver, B. C. j-.™
VOL. XVII. No. 10.      JUNfc>    lS-JZO
10c per copy; $1.00 per year.
Seventeenth Year.
To Retail Merchants of British Columbia
An Invitation and a Welcome
Come to
ANNOUNCEMENT
The Second
ANNUAL
BUYERS'  WEEK
for the
Retail Merchants of
British Columbia
will be held this year during the
week
August 8th—ISth
(Vancouver Fair Week)
Under the auspices of the
Wholesale Merchants9 Bureau
of the Vancouver Board of Trade "Standard" Paper Bags—3 grades
We Manufacture and seU
tbe foUowing "Standard"
Paper Bags.
Paper Mills:
Lachute A St. Jerome,
Que.
Manufacturers since  1870
THEY ARE
"MANILLA"
"LIGHT KRAFT"
"HEAVY KRAFT"
Actually Stronger, Tougher
More Pliable, Most Economical
Most Satisfactory
Be Sure to Use the Best -They Cost No More
J. C WILSON, LIMITED
Manufacturers of
PAPER BAGS.     WRAPPING, TISSUE AND TOILET PAPERS
for   Wholesalers and Retailers.
1068 HOMER STREET, VANCOUVER. B C
Phone: 8eymonr 781
YOUR CUSTOMERS
APPRECIATE THE BEST
THE ROYAL CROWN SOAPS, LTD.
VANCOUVER, B. C 1920
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
■
EDWARDSBURG PRODUCTS
The Highest Quality on
the Market
Concentrate your efforts on pushing BENSON'S PREPARED CORN, SILVER GLOSS LAUNDRY
STARCH, and MAZOLA, the favorite Salad and Cooking Oil.
They arc the three big sellers at this season, known by
the trade as good profit makers because of their rapid
turnover and high standard of quality.
Other Big Sellers:
Crown Brand Corn Syrup Canada Corn Starch
Lily White Corn Syrup Casco Potato Flour
The CANADA STARCH CO., LIMITED
MONTREAL
■Mill
m
m
H
4 THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
j i
life
COFFEE
Saves you time when customers ask for "Fresh Roasted
Coffee." That's exactly what Nabob is. The vacuum tin
keeps the flavor in—you sell it "fresh from the roaster.
Kelly Douglas & Co. Ltd.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
rarity &&&? *U2^
NABOB
If-fiSt. HUANij
Af,
WILSON BROTHERS
Established 1890
Our Motto is " SERVICE"
We cannot offer to sell you goods cheaper than any other Arm is in a position to do, but we CAN
give actual facts to prove that it Is
ECONOMY
to deal with as
SZUZ WILSON BROTHERS, VICTORIA. B. C
WKoleftle Grocen
iBHHMHHfBMWUiMitfWMiaMM
mmmmmmamtm
SHAMROCK B
HAM, BACON, BUTTER, LARD, SAUSAGE, etc.
First Quality packing house products put up by P. Burns it Co.,
Limited, which means they are the highest grade, always reliable,
and without equal on this market.
YOU CAN RECOMMEND SHAMROCK BRAND.
P. Burns & Company, Limited
VANCOUVER
OALOARY
EDMONTON
     ■    ^_____ 1925
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
ROGERS
J
GOLDEN SYRUP
i
it
The End of a Perfect Day"
flMadc from finest flavoured cane sugar, a special grade of which is imported for the
purpose.
fPut up in all sizes of packages to suit your customers' requirements,
flln packages designed to beautify your store.
21b. tins, 24 to a case.
5-lb. tins, 12 to a case.
104b. tins, 6 to a esse.
20-lb. tins, 3 to a case.
Perfect Seal jars, 12 to a case.
The British Columbia Sugar Refining Go. Ltd.
VANCOUVER, B.C. 6
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
'Ulie
Are You Getting Full
Value for Your Money ?
When purchasing goods for your store you always specify thc best,
Are you as particluar when ordering your Paper Bags >
"CONTINENTAL" PAPER BAGS
are superior because
Quality is always maintained
Faultless in manufacture
Larger reinforced bottoms
The Continental Paper Products
Limited
OTTAWA, CANADA
Also manufacturers of Paper Bags of every description.
Vancouver
Victoria
Edmonton
Calgary
SMITH, DAVIDSON & WRIGHT, LIMITED
44 Using a Continental Bag is Bag Insurance."
point selling
for
QUAKER
Brand Canned
Fruits and Vegetables
Point 1—Qoak.tr selh by yoor recommendation to yoor customers.
Point 2—Quaker sells by the extensive and ejjicient advertising
maintained.
Point 3—Quaker selh by the high-class product inside the can
Dominion Canners B.C. Limited,
Vancouver, B.C.
Order from
your wholetaler
Frail.* Mai!**
T..
Hi ■. ■ .        ■
_______ 1925
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which la Incorporated the B. C. TRADE REVIEW.
Published Monthly.
SEVENTEENTH YEAR
OBNBRAL MEJRCHANDI9B
GROCERIES. DRYGOODS.
HARDWARE, FOOTWEAR,
OFFICIAL ORGAN OF B.C. BOARD
RETAIL MERCHANTS'
ASSOCIATION OF CANADA.
A MONTHLY JOURNAL published in the interest of Retail Merchandising and the Development of Commerce in Western Canada.
SUBSCRIPTION RATE: On* Dollar IVr Year, payable in advance.
Advertising Rates on Application.
Publishers: PROGRESS PUBLISHING CO. LTD.
Suits 101-2 Merchants' Exchange Building
VANCOUVER, B. C
Telephone Sey  3861 Cable Address—Shipping—All Codes
Kditor. J. S Morrison W. N. Code. Business Manager
Entered at Ottawa as Second class matter
Secretaries. Representing tha fallowing
Branches R. M. A.
Armstrong W. H. Grant.
Cranbrook C. J. Lewis.
Kamloops J. Ratchford.
Kelowna A. Fraser.
Ly Uon B. Rebagliatl.
Nanaimo N. Wright.
Nelson E. F. Gigot.
New Westminster	
a*ul Fraser Valley...D. Stuart.
Revelstoke R. F. Young.
Vancouver W. F. Ing.
Vol   XVII   W 10.
June. 1925
Vancouver, B.O.
THE EVILS OF SECRET DEMONSTRATIONS.
Manufacturers Paving Wages to Store Employees to
Demonstrate their Products Declared Economically Unsound and Vicious Practice.
Tin- so-called hidden demonstration system, familiar lo the trade, bul unknown to, or misunderstood by
the puhlie consists of payment in whole or in pari of
salaries of department store employees hy manufacturers, on the understanding thai the employees so
paid will eneotirau'e customers to boy those manufacturer's goods, ami is detrimental to the besl interests
of the trade
Retail stores throughout  the continent  have heen
questioned on the subject in an effort to determine
whether the trade is satisfied with the hidden demonstration system, ami replies indicate that the practice
is noi approved of, the majority who have tried it have
been forced to abandon it on the ground that it destroys sales morale, impairs puhlie confidence, Increases prices ami acts sgainst the sales of other commodities, and is generally unsatisfactory from a financial as
well as a moral standpoint
After all the buying puhlie has a righl to rely upon
the guidance of the retailer and his employees in the
select ion of merchandise, ami both these have a puhlie
duty to perform in giving the consumer nn unbiased
opinion concerning the goods they sell.
fuses have eome to our notice when* Certain merchants have permitted and even encouraged the payment of a portion, and in some instances all of the
clerk's salaries Ity manufacturers in return for the employees services in promoting the sales of the manufacturers products. This fact not being known to the
customer constitutes deception, and stores employing
hidden demonstrators are not dealing honestly with
their patrons.
There is obviously no evil in the demonstration of
goods, the evil lies in the secrecy of the demonstration.
Acknowledged demonstrations are educational, and in
many cases valuable aids to intelligent buying, but deception is destructive and defrauds the buying public.
Midden demonstrations have been likened to secret
treaties between nations, in that they create a lack of
confidence when discovered.
INSTALLMENT  SELLING.
Evil Lies in Abuse, not use of This Much Discussed and
Firmly-rooted Convenience to the Buying Public.
There have lately been countless outcries by industrial, merchandising, and financial sections against
installment selling, and it would be well to look more
deeply into the question before accepting the opinion
of those win. consider the system constitutes and economic evil, leading to extravagence, and ultimate em-
harassment.
Reputable merchants today conduct well-established credit departments regulating installment business,
and these departments are usually affiliated with local
credit agencies, From a close investigation, a paucity
of had debts and re-possession is revealed. Salesmen
in the majority of eases are not prone to overselling.
When found doing so they are sharply cheeked by the
credit office, whence instructions are issued that merchandise must not be forced upon customers, especially those who find a difficulty in meeting their indebtedness.
In the majority of cases the trouble lies in the fact
that periodical payments contracted are so large that
they endanger the income, and the entire principal of
the'system is defeated. All commitments should be
kept within the bounds of safety, and emergencies such
as sickness etc.. allowed for.   The retail merchant de- 8
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
.in
ne
feats his own objective by indiscriminately extending
installment credit beyond a margin compatible with
the earning power of his customer.
Present day advertising is largely responsible for a
desire on the part of the puhlie tO acquire better
goods, more conveniences, and a generally better mode
of living, whieh is all for the good of the community,
and were it not for the installment system, a number
of the merchant's customers who today are well-to-do.
would not be in a position to purchase other than life's
necessities. It is illogical to declare the installment
plan itself to be wrong, for many a family's start to
wards stability has been accomplished by pun!,
i home on I Ids plan, and many of our best (dtlsen*
laid tin* foundation of a formidable bunking bit
by purchasing bonds and oilier safe securities s
manner.    It is the abuse of installment selling 01
over-indulgence of eredil that** is causing UUfiili
the commercial world.   Credit when used with di
tion encourages thrift, but sound judgment and
character must enter into every undertaking, other
disaster will follow    The retail trade looking lo
tit from the Installment purchasing plan moat us.
care and diplomacy in extending credit to theii
tomers
"••li!"
UlVf
>UM
this
ih<
>s ill
fifth
•'lb-
GROCERIES & PROVISIONS
SUGAB-POST-WAK PRICES.
Dominion Bureau of Statistics Outlines Spectacular
Movement of this Commodity Since 1913
Granulated sugar is now selling al the lowest level
which has prevailed since June. 1922. The wholesale
price on April loth last was $6.41 per ewt.. net. at
Montreal. This compares with an average price of
4.20 per cwt. in 1913, a low point since that year of
$3.90 in March and April 1**14, aud peak price of 122 BO
in July 1920. The average yearly prices and index
numbers for the period 191:1 to 1924 are as follows.
Year Price      Index       Year       Trice       Index
1913 $4.20       100 1919       $ 9 90       235 9
1914
1915
1916
3917
1918
184
6.21
7.18
7.93
8.70
115,4
148.0
170.9
188.8
207.8
192<t
1921
1922
1928
1924
17.02
8.91
6.67
9.58
8.32
405.5
212 2
15S.9
228.3
199.0
Present priees have come down to about 150'i of
pre-war values, which is close to the general level of
priees as measured by 236 commodities. The current
decline in sugar values is due wholly to the expectation of a record world production which will he more
than sufficient to meet a probable record demand.
Sugar is one of the two chief food commodities
which serve as a basis for vigorous speculative dealings, wheat being the other. Since the war, prices of
this commodity have been subject on several occations
to spectacular movements.
Just prior to the war cane sugar furnished about
54% of the world supplies ami beet sugar the balance.
Vp to the middle of the 19th century cane sugar had
been supreme. Then came beet sugar and a system of
subsidies and bounties in European export countries,
whieh ultimately gave beet sugar a preponderance over
cane sugar of 75% to 25'/* in the world's visible supplies. The Brussels sugar convention in 1903 abolished the artificial system of bounties on exports ami in
the next ten years, because of more equitable eompeti-
'■■■'
lion and aU«» because of tin application of scii
methods to iis production, catte sugar advance*.!
position where it supplied 54V of world re-quirei
Jusi prior to the war Urea! Britain wss obtaining
ly half of her sugar supplies I'rum Herman*?
om* fifth from Austria Hungary When th.- wsrt
thess ssurees there was « grv.ii I v augmented d<
Upon  thi* e&tte sugar of Cubs, Java Porto  |{i> .-<
Pranee, whose beei fields then produced but liui>
Ureal Britain, made join! pure haws in ,\Yu fork
ing t>» keep prieei«? reasonable levels, ami pons
ti«>u was restricted bv a KyateM of rationing    *'
am "
was increased in the producing countries ss t
a.s possible but priees tost steadily throughout thi
years,
In 1919 supplies wets inadequate for the Pttl)
demands •in*** to the cessation of hostilities and a
shortage of sugar was stressed on the markets  "
speculation was rampant and e.-irried the price
Its j>eak in the first half of 1920    The Cuban •>
had been greatly expanded and when lute in 19*2
commercial crisis, whieh had already affected
other industries caused i severs break In sugar p
Stocks began to pile up     1921 WM a year   of    '
priees despite Increasing demand and 1922 eomn ■
with i carryover of more than 1,600,000 tons oi I
sugar which, because of the discontinuance   ot
Sugar Pinanec Committee whieh had been formed
the crisis in l92o. had to be liquidated   On lop
large carryover came a Cuban erop of nearlj i.ooo.ooo
tons Priees ruled low for the lirst half of the yea
after that, so great wan lhe increase in demand
rose iu th* last half   Demand continued lo ln<
and a world shortage of sugar was predicted ill
which became a year of greal speculative activi'
rising prices.    Kuropean beet sugar was again hi
ing a factor iu the market, having increased froi
500,000 tons in 1919-29 to 5,000,000 tons iu 1923 24
1923-24 the Cuban erop was over 4,ooo,000 ton*
largest on record and the world crop of CSnC and
BUgar In 1923 24 was a record, viz 19.7iMl.lKM) Coition also increased but supply overlook demand
prices fell    The present Cuban erop is expected
larger   than    last vear by some 7IKUMIO tons SH
world crop by 8,000,000 tons.
as
tn
i no
.11* -
.i
In
*h<*
tiA
M.l
he
hi* 1925
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
PHONE POR FOOD CAMPAIGN
Instigators Claim Service will win out Against Cash
and Carry Principle—If so, new era Dawns for
Independant Grocer.
Considerable interest has been worked up throughout the United States iu the "Phone Por Food" campaign.
Many wholesale grocers are thoroughly sold on the
proposition as being the real solution of the problem
of the Independent retail grocer. We have no doubt
that it will be helpful to those grocers who are in the
>erviee business, ami in some respects it should benefit
lhe grocer who renders no service. No matter what
ever advantages there is in it, the service dealer will
get the lion's share. The whole question seems to be
one of education, anil to accomplish the results expected it will mean a return to service business on the part
of the grocers generally. But, is the circle changing
baek to the days of service as against cash and carry?
Frankly, we do not believe it is.
The conception of the "Phone for Pood" campaign
is good, but can the retail grocery business be switched
back to a point where service dominates! The advocates of the plan say it can, and that thc trend is in
lhat direction; that the housewife is willing to pay for
service. Some are. but many are not. and it will mean
lhat those who are not must be educated to the idea
TWO IMPORTANT CONVENTIONS
The Contention of the Dominion Executive
Council and Dominion Board of the Retail
Merchants' Association will be held at the
Hotel Vancouver, July 27-31.
The ^Provincial Board of the Association
will also hold their Jlnnual Convention this
year in Vancouver, August 10-11-12.
'hat they ean buy thc service way with equal satisfaction lo the cash and carry. This is the problem that
the "Phone for Pood" campaign must solve. Thc
hackers of the plan sav this is what thev intend to do.
and cite how the "Say It With Flowers" campaign
trebled the business of the florists.
These two campaigns are not similar. "Say It With
Rowers*' has a sympathetic appeal. Price does not enter into the deal, as it does in groceries. Moreover, to
give (lowers ns a remembrance brings about the purchase of (lowers Instead of something else.
In thc retail grocery business it i.s a proposition of
getting the housewife to order over the telephone and
have the goods delivered rather than shop at the store
herself ami carry the purchases away with her, the
price being somewhat less. We appreciate the argument being advanced that phone orders take less time.
!,ut in the last analysis it eosts more to handle such orders than those on a cash and carry basis. We are not
Unmindful, either, of the claim thai is being advanced
I luit phoUQ orders enable the dealer to keep busy
throughout the entire day, as against only certain
hours in the morning and evening where grocers sell
for cash and make no delivery   or   carry   accounts.
VI    ii     ill Ts^wT/j fc.      i m
"T MADE a bet with myself today-—that
A if I displayed a dozen or so of Palmolive
on the counter, two out of three people who
came in for something else would want a
cake.   I won.
"They'd look around while I was waiting
on them, see the Palmolive, and say, 'Oh,
yes, I need Palmolive, too.' Usually it was
three cakes.
"By noon I put on a second lot, and by
evening that was gone, too. When I told
the boss, he said, 'We'll show Palmolive on
the counter every day. We've sold twice as
much as usual.'
"I said: 'If you do, you'll have to double
your orders. Palmolive never does stick
around on the shelf/
"He said: 'AH right, we'll double our turnover, if that's what counter salesmanship
will do.'"
Counter and window displays are the best
reminder advertising that any dealer can do
on a popular product. Palmolive, most
popular of all toilet soaps, is the leader of
the three leading brands. Palmolive will
pay the expenses of your soap department
and make a nice profit beside. The profit on
all other sales will be velvet.
2841 10
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAHJEH
•bun
Chloride of Lime
New Style Waterproof Package
8upp!ied by all wholesale grocers
In British Columbia
Manufactured by
CANADA COLORS AND CHEMICALS UMITQ)
Toronto Winnipeg Vancouver
Agents:
STARK & STERLING
VANCOUVER, B. C.
GROCERY PRICES CURRENT
The following are prices quoted for principal lines of leading wholesale firms.   Prices quoted srt necessarily
subject to market fluctuations.
1. W. GILLETT CO.  LTO.
Royal Yeaat—                                    Per caae
I doi. pkga. In coot 2 30
Pure Flake Lye—
4 dos. In case  5.95
I  caaea    ...... u s„
10 caaea. 4 dox. In caae  5 80
Magic Baking Powdtr—
4 OS. 4 dot. ..„  5.85
I Ofl.  4 doa  7."5
I Ofl.  4 doi   9 26
IS Ofl. 4 doi  12 50
1% I case lota.
Magic Soda, Caaa  No.  1—
1 caae (60 i-tb. packages)       . IM
5 cases or more  , .. M0
BI*Carbenate of Soda—
112 It*. kega. per keg   7.35
400 lb. barrel*, per barrel       23.70
Cauatlc Soda (Granulated)— I'er tt.
10 tb. canister (100 tba In r»ee)   15H
100  Iba.   Iron  drums   „ 12«4
Cream of Tartar— Per dot.
% Ib. paper pkgs. (4 doa In caae)....1.15
tt Ib. paper pkga. (4 dos. In case)....2.60
tt lb. cans with acrew covera (4 dos.
In aaae)   1.60
I Ib. can* acrew covera  (8 dos. In
eaae) 6 25
I lb. equare canlatera, tt dos. In
eaee) Utt
io tt> wotipn cases  „, ,„.,„.„rl.„nr„Tl.rr—  ,*jt
23 it) wrvKion pails i*
LM n»   Hnsd kvga i*»H
360 It>   lined harr-M* 3*
KILLV.  OOUOLAt A CO..  LTO
Nabob   Product!
Atlaplre,  No   2. tin* dos
linking Powder,  44  12 os. StS
linking   Powder,   12  IS*.   *i>-t
linking  Powder.  6 5*.  dos
link I rig Soda, CO  Sa,  <-»*••
linking Hoda, 24 H«. dot
Ifciras.   *4«, dos
Black   Pepper,   tins,   dos
Celery Salt, gtaaa, dos
Nabob Cuff**,  small   I Inn,   eacl)
Coffee, in ti*.
Custard  Powder.  dOS	
Quick Tapioca, dos
Chocolate   Pudding,  dos
Chill  Powder, small, dos   .,.
Cinnamon, 2 os   tin*, dos
Cayenne Pepper. 3 Una, dos
Cloves,  small,  dos	
Curry Powder. 4 os   gl»*r«, dOS
Cream of Tartar) i.
Cream  of Tartar,   X'n,   una
Cream of Tnrtur  %*,
(linger,   small,   dos
Extract! (except vanilla) 2 ox
Rxtracta (except vanilla) 4 os
Pxtraota (except vanlHa) 8 ns
Rxtracta (except vanilla) 16 os   dos      17 00
1 00
2*S
1 30
15 11
5 30
•o
75
I 00
1 00
31
•S3
m   1 00
1 00
I oo
1 60
I l»
. 120
1 <o
1 It,
S 81
III
1 30
J »<*
dos
2 50
dos
„ 4 71
dos
a no
Vanilla Rstrart.   2  ot.   doi
VajtfUi K«ir*«.-«. 4 oa, doa
VastHs Ratfaei, i *>*. dos
Vanilla  Kstrart.   II ot   dot
M»C«.    **rMJ*|l.    «l«'«
Nutmeg,   small,   dot
PapHtts, amttii. a*.*
J*!i»try Mpir*.  I tin**,  dot
Poultry  l»(-*<u»iog   H«g<».  H»v»n
Thyme,  Turns?!©.  Una,  dox
Pickling Hpt«-e. dOS   No   J
Marjoram,   Mmi.   l*»r*!<-y
Whit* Pepper, to** dos
Castor *»n. t os dos
I'tutUn Oil 4 <■« dOI
ftfttOm Halt*. ttS dot
t>iilt   Color*.   2   ot    dot
icing* (Caoeotats, Ross. Pink.
Vwnlla,  Whit*.   Almond.  OTSU
Lemonade I'owder. d<*t
Mustard,   la.   dot ■»	
Mustard,   tts.  dos
Mustard, \a dos
Mustard, 2 3 dos
Hwlphtir. Ha, d»«
Ten,  QreSfl  lab«l,   Ha. PSI  "'
Tsa, Qreen Label. Is, per o*
3a,   Ib    par luiSf*
I n»   pnokages
Tea. ds Luxe, Afternoon. I "*
Tea dr I,one   Afternoon  Ifl tH'
't'ftt t'.f I,o*i»  '.»» |»«*r  lb
Vinegar, doi
(Continued oa pai*
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J |i) 1925
THE BRITI8H COLUMBIA RETAILER
11
Lake of the Woods
Milling Company
LIMITED
Makers of
FIVE ROSES
• FLOUR •
The World's Best
Daily Capacity 14,200 Bbla.
B.C. Offices and Warehouse!:
1800 lioharda Street 1614 Store Streel
VANCOUVER VICTORIA
MARKET  REPORT
^Customers Come Again
for
ROYAL
STANDARD
FLOUR
Because its high Quality
Never fails to give entire
Satisfaction.
Stock It and Recommend It
Milled in Vancouver
by
Vancouver Milling and Grain Co.
LIMITED
Head Office and Mills:    VANCOUVER, B. C.
Vancouver, June 12.
The retail grocery business continues steady. Some
districts report trade exceptionally good, while other
sections do not show any marked improvement. The
annual influx of tourists will, of course, in a general
way benefit the grocery trade. One feature of
the trade which interests every retail grocer in
thc province is the marked reduction in the
price on tea on the Calcutta Exchange, which opened
on June 9th. The reduction, which amounts on the
cheaper grades only to frow. 1 to 10 cents per lb. becomes effective locally at OitWon bulk stock, although
it may not effect package lilies for some little time.
The better grades of India Tea do not come to market
before August, and in consequence, no reduction in
price until then is expected. The tea market has held
its strength during the years following the war perhaps more than any other grocery commodity. The
present reduction is accounted for by a very heavy
picking of cheap teas. Heavy buying, however, on the
new priee basis seems to be the order of the day from
all world markets, and it is just possible prices may
gradually form upwards.
Wholesalers report collections are exceedingly
good. Failures to date this year have been held to a
minimum. One wholesale house reports losses from
this source so far this year to be only one fifth of their
losses for thi same period of last year. This would indicate a much healthier state of the retail grocery
business.
Sugar: Prices remain steady, no changes having
taken place since our last issue. Usually at this season
advances are quite frequent, although information from
one reliable source is to the effect that lower price on
raw may be looked for owing to the very heavy production.   Our advice is still to buy as needed.
Milk: Further advances in the price of evaporated
milk are anticipated. Keep well stocked on this commodity.
Fruit Jars: The demand for fruit jars this year
has commenced earlier than usual. With cheap sugar
it is reasonable to assume that there will be a heavy
paek of home preserved fruit. Fruit jar prices this
year will be on about the same basis as 1924.
Jam opening prices on 1925 pack jam were named
on June 7th. They show a slight reduction on all lines
except strawberry, which this year has opened at $9.00
per dozen. 4-lt>. tins as compared with $8.50 last year.
The local pack of strawberry jam is very limited and
it is reported that some of the local packers have arranged for their supplies with Canners in Eastern Canada so as to enable them to complete their contracts.
Evaporated Fruits: All lines show a very heavy
sale. Prunes are held at firm prices, some sizes being
very hard to secure. New priee on evaporated figs for
1925 pack have been named, and are half a cent lower
than last year. Pack prices for 1925 are about on the
same basis as last year. It seems advisable for merchants to book their requirements of California cluster
caisins early as some of the larger packers this year
have decided not to offer clusters. 12
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
i     •
M
ay
EVIDENCE OF SUPERIORITY
ARNOLD BROS., Toronto,
protect their many thousand customers—and also their profits—
by using Toledo Scales. They
have three of the most modem
and best equipped stores in Canada. After experience with various makes of scales, they have
standardized on Toledo equipment, using forty seven Toledo
scales in a
Do not underestimate the importance
of accurate and dependable Scales.
Toledo Scales can be purchased on
the easy payment plan—with a liberal
allowance for your old scale.
Canadian-Toledo Scale Co., Limited
Windsor, Ont
Sales Rtoas aid Service Station T-retf boat tW Deanies
TOLEDO
NO     S   P   ft    I    N
SCALES
MOMEST   17 E I G   H "' M* THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
MERCHANDISINO-A PROFESSION
13
Address by Martin L. Pierce, Advertising Manager,
Hoover Company, North Canton, Ohio, to the
Associated Retail Advertisers at the World Advertising Convention, Stay 13 1925.
"The day of the successful storckeenper is gone
forever? the hour of the successful merchandiser is
i       i >
here.
"Advertising consists of interpreting to the pub-
iii-* or to that part of it which it is desired to reach, the
advantages of a product or a service.
".Merchandising/' Mr, Pierce added. " is now a
profession." The man or institution that hopes tor
success in merchandising must he willing to pay the
priee of success, A profession requires; First, native
ability; second, B mass of scientific, accurate information: and. third, a disposition, ability and willingness
to make the specific application of these principles to
the merchandising problem facing the merchant. Territorial analysis, accurate accounting, trained salesmen,
itemised fixed overhead, sales expectation by products
and departments are the foundation stones upon which
a satisfactory not profit can be built. When these
principles have been backed up by consistently stocking nationally advertised products and when the sales
of these products has been Consistently pushed by the
use of local advertising, tin* retail dealer will have opened up for him during 1925. 'An open-road to profit.'
Stressing the value of advertising in modern merchandising, Mr. Pierce discussed the question, "Who
Pays for Advertising."
"There is a real difference in the dollars and cents
value of the advertised and unadvertised merchandise.
that a dealer has on his shelves.
"No argument1" he continued, "better answers
this question than the oft repeated story of the mouse
trap manufacturer:
"Once upon a time, then* were three competing
mouse trap makers, all doing about the same amount
of business. Kach charged the trade 20 eents a trap.
The merchant retailed for 50 cents. One day one of
the manufacturers decided to Spend 1 cent per trap to
advertise. He did not raise his price to the dealer, and
the dealer did not raise his price to the public. The
advertising trap maker kept up the advertising for a
couple of years, when it was found his business had
grown to such volume that he could build better machinery. So. Instead of turning out a trap for 15 cents.
by quantity production he could make a better trap
Profit by Supplying This
Demand
As a result ot a huge advertising campaign the demand for Fleischmann's Yeast Is crowing dally. This
means profit for you.
For remember-Yeasl for Health makes healthy customers who buy more Ol every thing you sell.
Identify your store with ihe national advertising by
Showing the Fleischmann package display.    You'll
sell more Fleischmann's Yeast and other groceries.
FLEISCHMANNS YEAST
The Fleischmann Company
SERVICE
PRIDE
B
ECAUSE their superiority has been
steadily maintained. ♦.
... because they are quality products,
... because they make better foods...
pride is taken in making, in selling and
in using Royal Baking Powder and Dr.
Price's Cream Baking Pounder.
For over a half century they have been
bringing baking success to the housewife
and profits to the dealer.
Both are made in Canada
SICHMUS
EAGLE
BRAND
(Sweetened)
ST.CHARLES
BRAND
(Unsweetened)
You are building a permanent and profit,
able milk business if you are featuring
these two brands.
%t"BcHmu>&J$mittd
Offices: Vancouver.
Condensary, South Sumas 14
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA KKTAILKR
•bine
Tw «X W»«i man hiwim m> aaaaaaOaa
fmt. tnm »•#•* mt iwmiM. *. t«Mir»»t««
aaataOtam!"
wm w
The iact that 4X Bread is Good
in itself is not enough. We endeavor to give speedy service
and variety to all merchants.
I I
SHELY  BROTHERS
VANCOUVER VICTORIA
NEW WESTMINSTER NANAIMO
A Quality Product!
m                ^^^___fc^V
^*
T       Dr Middletons   1^\
IronizeU
^BB                iimi mm Mtnti**         t^KISW
GENUINE
Whole Wheat
|               FLOUR
tr^^^
A FAIR FIXED PROFIT
FOR LARGE AND SMALL
IS THE POLICY OF
1
The Dr. Middleton's food Products
Company Limited
Vancouver, B. C.
Clark's
MEATS
lOiQWCMUSIIIIBHIAlS
mw
1
*    m*
le(   lh«-  ClAf'K   *       h<-'i->  h«-lp  vou"
Clark'*. Prepared Foods
Supply Holiday Faro
Lean cooking I'll Summer is tne bott&ekeeper's sba
It1! vour enanee i<* toereaat your l»n*im-<-.s \,y selUiy
more and a greater variety of Clark's Prepared Fooqjr
Don't olYer only n few line*   you have eUHli»ineri
fur every one of ihe Clark KimhU •iUgplayitt-g ihem b
nil yon need to secure talus
Thi* gummer let the   Clark   Kitchens  help you tn
larger iale« and store profit*
W. CLARK Limited, Montreal
EltAbhlhmtnti    dt    Montrol.    P. Q.    St. Rcmi,    P. Q    -tnd
Morrow, Ont.
WAFFLE BRANO FANCY TABLE SYRUP
IS EXCEPTIONALLY OOOD.
Note: We could not improve the syrup so w« have
improved the container.
Kelly Confection Co. Ltd.
1100 Mainland Street
VANCOUVER, B 1925
m
FIIK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
15
for io cents.  This he was able to sell to the dealer for
15 cents, ami the dealer Hold it to tlie consumer for 25
eellts.
"\o\v, who paid for the advertising? Not thc
cwMsiimer. who now got a latter trap for less money.
Not the dealer, because he now made a better peicent-
aOT of profit, gave his customers better value, ami
made a quicker turnover. Neither did the manufacturer pay for thc advertising, because he now sold so
manv more that where he used to make 5 cents protit
per trap and sold a thousand a day. he now made :J
eents per trap and sold three thousand a day. He
was selling three times as many. Vet the supply of
mice hail mt increased like that. Xo by looking closer
ii is discovered that the other tWO mouse trap men
had gone out of business.
"The men who nally paid for this manufacturer's
advertising were the two who had not advertised, and
who paid with their business, if the non-advertisers
only realised It, while they are talking about the need-
[cag expense of advertising, they are really paying the
advertisers1 advertising bills.
"The   retail   dealers   who an* cashing in in the
largest way on national advertising are they who are
themselves consistent advertisers.
Mr Pierce diseased thf functions of local and
national advertising.
"Advertising does reduce the eost of distribution.
as will as »ive greater satisfaction to the purchaser.
■•The following arc some of the outstanding
functions of national advertising: I. To provide national.* appeal at low cost; 2. To instruct the publie as to
the uses and value of aproduct; •'!. To establish per-
iiiaiii'iit. nation-wide confidence in the worth and integrity of a producl; A. To promote a receptive public
attitude toward a product; and the retailer's confidence in it in its manufacturer ami its salesmen: 5. To
effect consumer demand} b. To lift thc product clearly
and permanently out of the mixed eompany of local.
sectional or struggling merchandise, into the fixed position of the limited number of products that, having
successfully passed the painful period of preliminary
financing and thc experimental stages of production,
have attained national eminence.
"The acid test of every merchandising activity is
protit. but the merchandising activity must not be
pre-judgod, it must be scientific, it must be given a continuous trv out."
R.MA TRADE SECTION ACTIVITIES
SUNLAND SALES ASSOCIATION OF CANADA LTD.
The Sun-Maid Ualsln Grower* Association will hereafter
innrkei lis products In Canada through the Sunland Sales
Association of Canada. Ltd., » »»!«'« i""1 distributing agency
for which letter* of patent were granted May S by the Do
mtnlon  government, according to announcement  which has
just been made hy the Hun-Maid organisation.
The new distributing agency for Sun-Maid raisins VvTu
take the place of the old SunMald Halslns Growers of Canada.
Ltd, which heretofore has acted as the sales and Istrlbutlng
agent for this product throughout the Dominion.
Organization of this new Canadian company brings in
marketing or Bun-Maid raisins In Canada In line with tm
Sunland organization which has been set Up and adoplfii in
oilier parts of the world and throuh which Sun Maid raisins
nre now beln sold and Istrtbuted,
Independent Gas & Oil Dealers: This division held
its regular meeting on Wednesday June 8, when the
following officers were elected: Chairman, 0. h. Pur-
cell; first vice-president, Z. J. Diebolt, with Messrs. J.
Wroe, A. R. Higgins and 0. I). Cunningham executive.
An emblem has been adopted by this division with
colorings of white and blue, and this will be displayed
on all service stations of independent dealers. A supply has already been distributed A report of membership showed a total of eighty already in this division, ami it is anticipated that a total of one hundred
will shortly be reached. The activities of the division,
although at present confined to Greater Vancouver,
will it is expected, eventually embrace independent
dealers from the entire provinee.
Butchers: This section held its regular monthly
meeting .June 4 last when Dr. Z. Strong, city meat inspector addressed the meeting. Dr. Strong gave some
valuable information regarding the work of his department and outlined the regulations which retail butchers
must observe in order to comply with the by-law, covering the operations of both butchers and fish dealers.
More stringent observances of this by-law must be carried out than has hitherto been the case, the speaker
stated Cases were reported of a number of stores in
the city who are not complying with the by-law, nor
are they adhering to the "Early Closing" regulations.
Action will be commenced against the offenders.
The question of preservatives in meats was further
discussed, and reports read from the Dominion office,
showed that this matter is receiving continual attention at Ottawa. Provincial offices throughout thes Dominion are being canvassed by the head office of tha
association in order to obtain an expressed opinion
from members affected, regarding the proposed amendments to existing regulations. Action will be taken in
accordance with wishes expressed.
Grocers: This section has been active during the
month, dealing with various problems facing the retail grocers of the province. Price maintenance was
an outstanding item of discussion, especially as regards
re-sale prices of bread and milk, and all canned goods.
A special meeting was held whereat representatives of the B, ti manufacturers of Vancouver branch
and Fraser River district assembled, and efforts were
made to outline a scheme for closer co-operation between the retailer and manufacturer. The meeting was
largely attended, and further conferences will be held
between the representatives of these bodies in order
that H. C. made goods shall receive more attention
from the retail trade than has been the ease in the past.
Greater Vancouver grocers are busy planning for
their annual picnic, which this year will be held at Nanaimo on Wednesday July 15. The C. P. R. coastal
steamer "Princess Adelaide" has been chartered tor
the occasion, and indications already point to a record
turn-out for this popular event. Karly-closmg as
effecting grocery stores in Greater Vancouver is reviving strict attention, and it is expected that Import-
nnt action will be taken before the July issue ot this
publication. 16
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
I une
P. BURNS A CO. LTD.
Shamrock Product*.
Ayrshire rotted ahouldent, pot tb    21
Ba<-on.  Shamrock,  6-8.  p*>r  tt> 45
Baked hum with drOttioc. \*vx tb . .42
Creamery Mutter, ShAmrock. carton* .38
Cheese. Canadian, laige, per lb 22H
4*heese.  Canadian,   twin,   per   tb .23
Compound, Carnation, No. 5, 12-oum? 10.IS
Compound. Carnation No. 3  I0*ouni 10 20
Cooked   Hams,   Shamrock,   per  It- .40
Dominion Hams, 12-16 lbs 29
Dominion  Ik'.con,  8-10 Iba  per B),,......   .35
Dominion Itucon. 10-11 tbs. per Ib .37
Dominion shoulders, boned and tidied   .24
DrippinK.  beef,  4-tb.  bricks 13
Hams, Shamrock, per tb 33
Hams, honed and rolled per lb 36
Head Cheese. 5-lb Uns each        ,   .55
Jellied toncuc, per tin ..„  1*0
Lard, No.  5.  12 to case 13.15
Ijird. No. 3. M lo MM . . 13 20
Lard,    ciunon.    13-Iba, .    23S»
Lard, No. 1. cartons, 30 lim. 23
Mincemeat,  kits,  2C-lb.  net,  per tb ...   .14
Meat Loaf, per lb  .   .1*
Pork pies,  per  do*  .40
"Pork, roast legs with dressing, per tt>   .31
Smoked flsh, kippers, 2a*. per Ib 10
Smoked  fish, kippered salmon, 10s
and 20s, per Ib. ..  16
Smoked Cod.  30s per Ib    .16
S*k«cted fowl, per lb                                  .2**
Selected Chicken, per tb 3$
THC ROYAL CROWN SOAPS. LTO.
Vaneouvtr   Pric*    Dot—F.O.B.   Vancouver.
or Now Weatmlnater.
Torma Nett 30 Daya.
"Apox" Soap Flakes, 24 1 Tb pktt. box 4 10
"Ape*" §o*p Flak re, 13 1 tb pkta, box 3,10
A La Francaiee Caatite.  bo* of 35  4 OS
Bluo Mottled, box of 30 ...— * tt
Crown Oatmeal, 34 la. box of 144  4 15
Climax or Montreal (wrapped) box 3$ 6 $0
Colden Wwtl. 6i Ihis of  120* MS
Qolden Bar, box of 30 3 4*
Klondyke  (wrapped)   box of  t&     * 00
Klondyke  (unwrapped)  box of 35   515
Ktero Glycerine,  box of \*A... *M
Linen (unwrapped) box of 100——™- 3 tt
Liquid Ammonia. 3 dot qta. box of St. .. 4 It
Liquid Blue. 3 dox qta box of 34 4 19
Mechanlc'a Pine Tar, box of 100 .,,.„.. ... 5 6*
Mechantea line Tar, bux of io 3 »*■*
Olive Caatlle. cake*, box of 300 2 ' , V.'i 4 51
Primroao (wrapped)  box of tt .......... 4 60
Kxtra hard unwrapped. box ot 30 3 51
Perfect (unwrapped) box of 100 _, .» 31*
Write far Toilet and  Hotel Soapa
Special pricta on 5.  10. 3*> and too
boxes,
Pendray'a Lye. box of 41 . ..,,, , „ ■-. 5 34
I'endray'a Powdered  Ammonia.  b-ax  24. 3 I*
Special price* on J.  10. 25 and IN
tioxea,
Pendray'a  Water  Gum.   Egg   Praatrvte—
0*M*M U tina per caw* ,_«.««««.„. 4 60
Ked   (Vpirn,   box   o   ftt   .,       ,„,,„„-.„-,^. 4 *»
Royal   laundry   (•lake*.   i*«*t,   O*   bbl* Mil
(Special  price on  contract)
Royal Crown Soap 6a 144a  5 50
Itnynl  CrOWV   1'iivrdff,   •?«»•»   J4»  only *** M
Itoyal Crown P-toWtitf,  lib, l»,% ot M 4 N
Itoyal Crown Cleanser. 41 nifter tln»  . 3 t*
Royal Crown Lye. box of os      -r,-...■..   5ii
Royal Crown Naptha bo* of 100       ^_ 4 10
Itoyal  Crown   Powdered   Ammonia  J   it.
w ini** Woodor, t»>* of ISO
White Swan Soap. 5a box of 120
Whita Swan Naptha. box of 100
White Swan Wtmhing rowder, fog ,,< .4
TMI CANAOA STARCH CO. Uo
Laundry ttarehaa—
•Canada   laundry   Slarth.   40-th   box
Canada   White   <ii«»%«    l>It>   pfe*******
Acme  While  tlloaa,   ttb  pkx*
No    t   White.   Hw fl-   k*«*«
Kdwuntaborf Silver Okmo, l-tb pkfi
4«> tl*
LMwardaburc    Silver    Ofc»*a    IC
fancy tin canlatera, 4i-t?>»
t->|w«rd»t-tiv   Silver   «.Jfc»e*.   lOotb
kef*   .._»>__,	
Celluloid  Starch,   d* ■»**  of  «i-;.*e»
p«r  .'«••*•
Cuiinory $tatn*o—
|irn»»n a  Celebrated   Prepared   Con-..
♦0 !b  bt.****,   p*r   Ib
I *n»da Corn Staroh 40 tb bote*, per
tt»
Challen** i**>m Starch  40-lb  bo**.*
per fb
Ctaero  Potato  W%OOl  4*-lb  feMta*  ft
Matota Oi»—
Maa-ota 0*% ta  .
"   I*    ..     .
** "   4*   ,
M *'   fig
C»en Ofrvm—
"'wan la, H to ra*a
til   12  U»  MM
; '■«   (   '.,,   f *,w
St*\ I Is «■•»»*
LHy 2*. M it* MM
&a   12 to ca*#
|M  * W roa*
Karo.   ta  24  to c«»e
1*.  53 to ca»»
Hi, 6 to sui
1 at
-. >
Ut
i«
ini
1 ti
*>:
it u
I' v.
4 M
»li
t N
II ti
I H
I 44
1».
♦ t-3
4:*
The SALE-" she is VERY big"
Three out of every four tint of Sardine* $old
in Canada are packed by Connors Bros.
Th«* whole world enjoys Brunswick Sardines What Panada
ean span-, England, South Africa, Australia, Japan, South Am
erica antl Mexico clamor fur.
Feature theni in vour windows and on yoor counter*   They
** ti
4'ost littlr and yi*t they vi**i«l lh»> «ruiM*r a H|»lrn«li»l profit
Guaranteed
NOT SMOKED
by
CONNOR BROS. LIMITED
BUck'e Harbor. N.B.
BRUNSWICK
BRAND
SARDINES 1925
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
17
BUYING IN SMALL LOTS
Wholesalers Advised to Buy in Small Lots: Think That
Over You Retailers Who are Pining to Become
Quantity Buyers—By E. P. Brewster.
Tin* advantages or disadvantage*! of small lot purchases as a principal simply resolves itself into the
much-mooted question as to whether th«> buyer wishes
to speculate i»» business or not.
Tin- only disadvantage*1 of small lot purchases, as I
see them, are thi* danger of being sold out of goods
ami the Impossibility of making any speeulative margin
tm advancing markets. If very careful attention is
paid to the buying, however, there is no necessity for
being out of gotnls—and aren't the market declines
about equal to the market advances on a ten-year overage, when we 4'onsider our line as a whole? So I believe that tin* jobbers who confines himself to small lot
purchases, aeeortling to the volume of business he (hies,
year in antl ye.tr out will make a better financial show-
ink' in the lung run than the jobber who buys in large
quantities with the hope of either making a speeulative
profit on advancing markets or in order to get special
discounts or carload allowances given for quantity purchases,
There are, of course, exceptions t<»  all   rules,  for
sometimes the opportunity presents itself to buy a large
block of goods far below the cost of production, and
there are other times when it is necessary for the job-
ber—in order to obtain i certain quality or pack for
his private label to buy a six or twelve months' supply,   lu Instances of this kind, quantity purchases must
be charged With a large overhead -Such 8S warehouse
space, interest insurance, etc, ami in addition to these
charges, must be sold at a good margin of protit for
this carrying charge is one of our big expenses of overhead.
Many well-known brands <d* goods that we handle
can be bought monthly or semi-monthly in small quantities, giving us a turnover on these goods of twelve
to twenty-four times a year-whieh greatly helps to
Increase Ottr total turnover. This ean be (bme easily
by paying careful attention to one's stock and knowing how long it akes for deliveries. It is of utmost importance to have your buyers well trained to prepare
for the demand for seasonable items when it conies—
having sufficient stock on ham! for the heavy demand
and decreasing their orders proportionately as the season for these particular articles draws to a close. Then,
when the demand has ceased there will not be any
stock to earrv over to the next season.
We have found where we have tt> carry seasonable
items from one year to the next the carrying charges
eat up all the profit there is on these items, so that
when they are sold in the following year they are sold
at a loss after the overhead is figured.
Many manufacturers have special discounts or allowances for quantity purchases, but if the quantity
"tie has to buy slows up the turnover. I cannot see
where it is profitable in any way. In order to keep up
the turnover of a tpiantity purchase, the buyer is very
much tempted to give away the extra discount or allowance to the trade in the hopes that he will get moiv
business.   No doubt, however, your competitors have
also bought in the same way and they, in turn, in
order not to let you get all the business, give away not
only the extra allowance, but also a small part of their
profit—and then you go them one better. So in order
to get the turnover you desired on that particular item
you have merely turned over more goods at a smaller
margin of profit on whieh you have received no additional benefit for your quantity purchase.
If, on thc other hand, you do not give this away, you
store the goods in your warehouse and think you are
making the extra discount for the quantity purchase-
but are you really, after taking into consideration the
way it has slowed up your turnover and added to your
interest, insurance, storage space, etc.
Manufacturers or their representatives often urge
you to buy their line in large quantities in order to
have you benefit by the extra allowance for quantity
purchase, telling you that their goods are so well
known and there is such a demand for them that their
stocks will turn themselves; also that it doesn't cost
you anything to sell their goods. This sounds nice in
theory, but if you think it is practical, tell your salesmen who are travelling on commission that they will
not receive any commission on the sale of these articles
because the goods sell themselves. Your salesmen's
replies will explode this wonderful theory immediately.
PRESIDENT OF PORTLAND GROCERS ASSOCIATION VISITS VANCOUVER.
An invitation to send delegates from British Columbia to the annual Convention of the Portland Grocers' Association was received at the local offices of the
K.M.A. This Convention took place in Portland, June
10 and 11. aud some of the delegates headed by F. B.
Connolly, president of the Portland Association travelled north to Vancouver following the meeting.
Going to sleep ends no burden; everything awaits
us in the morning, not to be put by unless we face it
and conquer it.
THE JUNE BRIDE. 18
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RKTAIhKK
nine
NEWLY-APPOINTED    DOMINION    SECRETARY
R.M.A. IS OO-OETTER.
Norman B, Douglas, the recently appointed secretary and general manager of the Dominion Kxecntive
Council ami Dominion Board. K.M.A., has already
given us an example of his ability to cope successfully
with the "Powers-that-be" at Ottawa by convincing
them that certain phases of the Stamp Aet were illogical and would work considerable hardship on the retail trade. It was mainly through Mr. Douglas1 denunciation of a recent amendment t4> the aet calling
for a duplication of stamps on receipts that the new
regulation was authorized. I*nder subsection 7 of the
Special War Revenue Aet, the new regulation prtivides
that credits on statements of accounts, when for
amounts of ten dollars or over, am subject t«» the
Stamp tax on receipts, except when such credits are
covered by separate receipts ti» which the required Kx-
eise Tax stamps are affixed. In such cases the statement is to bear the notation "Stamp Tax Paid." initialled by the maker.
DOMINION STAMP ACT AMENDMENTS EPPEC
TIVE PROM JULY 1.
Special amendments to the Special War Revenue
Act respecting stamp taxes were given third reading in
the House.
The amendments provide for a definition of a
cheque whieh will require the issuer of "wheat tickets"
or "cream tickets" or other documents issued bv a
•
eompany to a farmer, negotiable at a bank, to affix on
them a stamp. There will be minimum stamp tax on
foreign bills of $1.
Under the amendment a person can transfer an
amount to his credit from one branch to another branch
of the bank Money onlers or travellers' cheques issued by ''banks or any person," will, under the amendment, be subject to stamp tax. Cheques not exceeding $5 will not require the stamp. The amendment becomes effective July 1, 1925.
Counter Check
Western Made for Western Tradi
No   3   Autornatlr
QUALITY    BOOKS PKOMPT    SERVICE
Thf largtit Salt! Booh Pi«nt in Wtattrn Canadj
manufacturing all * too »ntt atylft of COunttr cHt-c-*
bOOki to moot  rtquirtmtnta of •very butmett
WESTERN SALES BOOK COMPANY LIMITED
Phont: Stv, S2f*5
570 Granviiit St„
Vaneouvtr. B. C.
Blackwood Building,
Cor. Otbornt *nd Muivey.
Winnipeg.   Man.
She  -"Thanks! I look eren worse in white
of longing to do what we cannot do instead ol doing
gladly the thing thai We can do
He   "You look like Helen Brown**1
She   "Thanks! I Ink even worse oi white
CONSOLIDATING THE ADVANCE
The commandant of the United Slates Murine Corps,  Major 0«n*m*J John  A   t,.j. un. „  has ttqpesttd  It
as his opinion that the World War might easily have be«*n brought n» a ronrluMnn SI e»rt> M 1^16 »*
the  surprise   attack   upon   the Turku at tialltpoli which WU MMMWSSflil fiOUW OStO
be««n   followed  up  with   a   sufAclentlv  large marine landing fore.   |o hold the MfW
teglc positions which the Turks Assorted   In   their   UBUpOfSfl   panlr      The   Incident
and the situation. as he describe*  ll.  nre similar io lhal  which  I*  OSfi  StlSS  BMM
wlih In the world of selling, particularly of retailing     It Is a AM enough thing UJ
advance one's  position   by  winning an opining skirmish in the war of nonhnitili*
ing, bul It really Is of Utile or no practical value unless one  has (he abill»>   W«
resources to consolidate that advance and make li really and permanently our OWH
Otherwise it Is largely wasted effort.    Of what advantage may it he, for Instatxe,
to add a new department or a new line of merchandise and to make a reputation
for carrying the latter, unless, Indeed, one may be   tStO that lhe quality of that  merchandise may W
counted on to remain consistently high? And where may a belter or more dependlhle guarantee of tha'
quality be sought or found than In the facl  that  those goods are advertised b >their matters, line*
lhe advertiser must of necessity always be building for  permanency   and  for  cnnliuutHi*  repeat   (MieS*
Advertising can seldom be made to pay on the baslsof single orders only. 1925
THE lMlTISIl (OLUMBIA RETAILER
19
n
u
Drygoods and Clothing
IMPORTANCE OP TOURIST TRADE TO LOCAL
CLOTHIER8.
Every year the tourist business in Canada becomes
of more importanee. Millions of dollars arc spent by
these tourists in the country ami the clothiers ami hab-
eitlashers should 80S to it that they receive a fair
amounl ol this custom.   At the presenl time all the
provinces are spending, and have spent, a ureal deal
of money on rt»ad improvement ami retail merchants
arc paying heavy tax»*s because of these rou«is. The
only advantage thev can secure from such roads is in
securing some of the business these goods roads develop
ami an imp4>rtaut part of this business is the tourist
trade.
The clothiers antl hnbertlashcrs sell goods that the
tourist needs, but the tourists will never guess this.
unless stnuething is done to bring these goods to their
attention.   During the tourist season a prominent tlis-
play should be matle t»f the class ttf goods the ttuirists
will need. Their trade should be directly catered to.
lor il is just that much extra business for the apparel
shops, business that will greatly increase the number of customers his territory affords nnd business tm
which a fair profit can be made.   In selling tt> tourists
eare shoubi be exercised that prices should always be
fair ami reasonable but, on the other hand, it is not
necessary to make a cut price appeal to  secure   this
Irade.
WOOLLEN GOODS.
Tlie sensational tlrop in woollen prices on the London market has lausetj speculation as regards future
priees ou Wool protlueis. A price advance of from 7
to io per cent became affective last January for winter Weighl lines for next season, and numerous queries are going the rounds ns to whether the much tlis-
cusscd ileeline will effect these quotations. Underwear mills explain that they did not buy wool at the
high prices rulinjr Inst December antl this January.
Hatl they done so there would have been no drop in
prices, but nevertheless tin* wool purchased by them
was considerably higher than that purchased during
the preceding season. The high prices of this spring
would probably have heh! hatl imt buyers at lasi refused to pay the exhorbitantly priced raw material.
Wool merchants held from selling as long as they couUl.
ami as soon as they commenced tt» unload the price
broke. It is eurtt'ittiy reported that in some instances
priees dropped 40'. from their peak priee.
The situation in regard to the Canadian mills then,
is that the very high price for wool or yarn matle from
these wools, was never paid, nor put into the price ot
garments, Should the price of wool drop Indow what
was paid for thai to be used in fall lines, it woubl be
some time in August before the cheaper wools could
be brought into Canada, cither in thc form of yarns or
brought to Canada ami converted into varus here.
This would be too late for use in fall lines.   The literal
opinion in the trade is that the drop in the price will
have little, if any, effect on the priee of fall underwear, and although it is quite certain that should wool
remain at a peramnently lower level throughout the
year, lines for the following fall season will benefit
from the lower priee of the .raw material.
KALE HOSIERY
Bright Colorings and Fancy Effects Predominate
Not for a long time has the retail trade shown such
a variety of fancy effects in hosiery as is the case in
t ity stores this spring, and from what is heard from
fashion centres, only a beginning has been made in
Canada towards the showing of these fancy effects.
Fancies are undoubtedly thc big thing in half hose and
this applies whether we are speaking of a light weight
.silk, wool or lisle. Socks are apparently one of the
items of apparel in which men allow their taste for
pattern and color to run wild, for we see hosiery in
brilliant colors and in most striking plaids, cheeks and
spot effects.
It is probable that the liking for fancy half hose
has been much influenced somewhat by the amount of
golf hosiery that has been sold during the past few
years. These golf hose tried out timorously in plain
effects, with just a suggestion of pattern in the cuff.
have developed until at the present time striking all-
over patterns in contrasting colors are quite the thing
antl these have been developed to go with the fancy
golf pullovers into sets having the same pattern in both
pullover and golf hose.
TWO VANCOUVER MILLS REORGANIZED.
Two years ago the Uestern Canada, a two-card woollen mill, aided by an industrial loan from the Department of Industries, ceased operations in Vancouver,
chiefly on account of disagreement among those interested in the management. A new eompany known as
the British Columbia Woollen Mills Limited, has purchased the plant and equipment and nre placing it in
operation. The president and manager of the new company, tl. F. Brnllier, comes from San Francisco. Wu is
fully experienced in the woollen business, having successfully operated plants in various portions of the
Cnited States and Canada, He has associated with him
T. W. Hemphill of Vancouver. Thc mill has been in
possession of the new company for some time now and
completely overhauled. They will manufacture tweeds,
overcoating and blankets, antl will give employment to
thirty people.
Knitting Mill Reorganised.
The Knitting Mill disposed of by the Department of
Industries was formerly known as the Quigley Knitting
Mills Limited, Vancouver, manufacturing bathing
suits, and a miscellaneous line of knitted goods, in- 20
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
ittc
eluding Jersey cloth. The cause of previous failure in
this plant was disagreement among the people interest
ed. The plant has remained idle for a year ami a half.
It has been purchased by the Burrard Knitting Mills.
Limited, a new company incorporated by Gordon
Campbell of Gordon Campbell's Limited, manufacturers of men's clothing. He has associated with hint
Mr. Shannon, previously superintendent of the Cniv-
ersal Knitting Mills. Limited.   It is the intention ol the
new organisation to move lhe plant ami equipiiM tlf
the Gordon Campbell's Limitetl to the knittiliy     i\\
building on Dufferin Street, where ample accomi Va-
tion can be arranged in ihe large three-story brick r
tory included in the assets of ihe company,  Th.   . w
knitting mill company and lhe present clothing     !u.
pany will be operated under one management mi
sabs organisation, snd will employ over one hundred
Demons,
How Canada May Build Up Wool Growing
and Manufacturing Industry
Hy Douglas llaihtm
Secretary. Canadian Woollen and Knit Goods
Manufacturers' Association.
Wool and mutton growing in Canada have proportionally greater possibilities for development than any
other farm products, while such a development would
be of tremendous benefit tt» agriculturists and the tuition
as a whole. Authorities go so far as to say that the
raising of sheep is directly connected with successful
farming in this country.
It is just beginning to be realized thai Canada has
all the characteristics for a great sheep country, but
that her opportunities have been neglected. The climate is favorable, the physical properties are suitable,
the droughts and disease which decimate Bocks in other
countries are absent, ami world conditions arc righl for
expansion in Canada.
But no great development ean or will take place
until the facts of the situation are matle clear, the dilVi-
culties and the methods of overcoming them are reeog-
liked, and an organised effort made by all concerned,
including the Government, to develop the industry,
The number of sheep in the world according to the
latest available reports antl estimates are:
North America
Central American and West Indies
South America
Europe
Asia
Africa
Oceania
41,966,200
l.!te9.:UHi
H2.H5H.lii HI
17:WH4.7!«t
107,042,800
66,810,300
tl7.H04.HIHI
&72,456,200
Of this total. Canada has 2,686,000 sheep ami iambs,
or less than half ol* one per cent The meaning of this
figure may be matle clearer iu two ways:
The annual consumption of wool by the people of
Canada is roughly 70.000,001) lbs. on a grease basis,
that is, as it comes from the back of the sheep, while
the total production in Canada is 15,000,000 lbs., of
whieh half is exported.
The number of shorn sheep in 1924 iu Great Britain
with its small area was 25,367,000, while iu Canada the
number of shorn sheep was only 1.455.417.
Climate Favorable to Wool Growing
Col. Kobt. McKwon, president of the Canadian Cooperative Wool Orowers' Association has said: "Taking Canada as a whole, it has been proved that climatic conditions are favorable for sheep raising. No devastating disease litis visited our flocks.   Yet today we
tint! ourselves up agalnsi ihe serious economic problem of consuming more wool than we are producing,
ami for i comparatively new and fertile agricultural
Country like Canada to have reached the stay* of «lr
fteieut supply of raw material for su»*h an esstfltiai an
clothing should surely demand the serious consideration tif all of Us "
And Mr W A Drydcn, a director of the name kt*
sociation. taid: "We ean j*row sueei-ssfnllv in •tVn:-.-!.*
every type of sheep, including merino, Sheep breed'
ing   in  Canada   is  economically sound, because ou?
loeks are n«t subject So the droughts whieb occur in
other sheep breeding countries or suffer front the
diseases whieh have to bv faced by the sheep hreedew
in Oreat  Britain    There nr»   no climatic or physit
reasons why we should nol grout •50«tXJO,OOQ lbs oi th»*
70,000,000 lbs of wool consumed annually by the i*
pie of Canada."
Why then, if there i* thU greal bono market m
foreign markets open, ba** sheep-growing not espsnded
in Canada!
Cp to the year IS97 when the British Preference
was granted by Canada the increase «»f our sheep pop
ulation was keeping pace with the Increase In other live
stock But today there are no more sheep in Canada
than when the British Preference was granted Bnecp
growers at that time sold their wool to the local mills
who graded, sorted and us»«l it. ami when the granting
of the British Preference closed down more thsn ",s
woollen mills containing about half the eards and looms
in Canada,  this market  was gone, and  tlo <<   WS« tw
machinery available Immediately for the careful s1
ing and preparation whieh is necessar*)  for obtati
markets abroad    The sheep raising indusl rv hai
recovered from this blow.
Mr, W  A  Drydcn, already tpioted. said furtl
"In the past, the reputation «>f Canadian wool WS«
good because il was not carefully prepared ami gn
Oood prices were not obtainable because ot the <
lions in whieh tin  wool was marketed.   The WStl
produced it alone could DC blamed     Today thi
been    changed.      The    Canadian    Cooperative
(•rowers' Association prepares and grades wool s«
it is a standard product  It can be bought sight tn
on description.''
To Conduct Research of Wool Production in Can
This particular difficulty Is therefore being
in
,M
ol
.tt 1925
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
21
eome, bttt there are others. Wool is an animal product
which is produced in an infinite variety of qualities and
with an infinite variety of uses. For example, there are
about 200 different breeds of sheep in the world, ami
breed influences the character of the wool produced.
In Australia alone wore than 800 qualities were graded by the Government there during the war. Wool is
graded ami sorted tti length and diameter of the fibre,
nnd the user has also to consider strength, elasticity,
shrinkage, color, lustre ami wavimss. Through the
efforts of the Research Committee of the Canadian
Woolen ami Knit Goods Manufacturers* Association,
thc Council tif Research for Canada has undertaken to
conduct a research into the production of wool in Canada with special reference to thc protection of the
righl classes ami kimls for use in Canada,
Another important necessity is increased information for farmers regarding the right methods of keep-
ins.' sheep. To iptote Mr. Dryden. again, he said: "The
reason why we do not grow more sheep in Canada is
that tin* farmer is not down to rock bottom. We have
not enough farmers who know enoutdt about keeping
sheep. While sheep require very little attention, very
little feeding, and kill more weeds by means of their
mouths than the farmer does with his hoc, a farmer
• an keep sheep profitably until he learns how to do so.
Lui sheep lit into the business of mixed farming as no
other farm animal does, ami iu my opinion the raising
of sheep in this country is directly connected with sue-
* ****-> •
eessful farming.*'
Woollen Manufacturing Lacks Fair Tariff Protection
Provided, however, that then* is an organised effort
to promote sheep-breeding in Canada, the most that can
be expected from natural increase ami keeping back
lambs ami ewes front market, is about 250,000 head a
year, so lhat unless some further encouragement is
granted no greater expansion can be expected. Possibly duties on wool would provide the necessary encouragement but of course the duties on wool would
have no effect unless the wool produced was manufactured in Camilla. This question of duties tm wool is a
matter for the wool growers. In 1924 the source of
supply of the 70,000,000 lbs. of wool consumed in Canada on an estimated grease basis was:
Canadian wool  retained 6,679,532 lbs.
Imported wool not further advanced than
yarn 33,449,800 tbs.
imported  wool  further advanced  than
yarn 30,000,000 tbs.
The Dominion Bureau of Statistics gives the number of woollen and knitting niills in Canada for the
calendar year l*»24 as 294, with a production of $80,-
993,663 and employing more than 22.000 workers. The
imports of manufactured goods for the same period
was 139,914,477 ol which 131,430,902 entered the country under the specially low duties granted by Canada
to goods coming from (Jreal Britain and collectively
known as tin* British Preference, These figures include
all classes of woollen goods yarns, cloth, carpet, felts,
knitted goods, etc.    but to show the increases in cloth
alone in recent years under the reduced duties thc following figures are illuminating j
Imports of woollen anil worstetl cloth into Canada
from Great Britain, ami not including blankets, furniture stuffs, flannels, carpels, etc.:
• t,   i..
192]
St|. yards
13,095,400
I922 27,014,500
19^3  28,834,700
l924  30,134,200
There are healthy signs, however, that, the public
are taking a keen interest in the problem affecting the
necessary and complementary industries of wool-growing and wool-manufacturing which could do so much
towards assisting agriculture and the maintenance of
rural towns as manufacturing centres.
WHAT DISPLAY MEANS TO SALES
Recently four tests were made with a view of finding out just what effect display had upon the sales of
well-known ami advertised articles, as well as unknown
or little known products.
Pour lines were tried out and the results are here
shown,
First artiele:
Brand, well known; on the market for 50 years. Well
atl vert ised.
Test made in 14 stores for three weeks.
Without display—result, 68 sales.
Same product in same 14 stores for another three
weeks.
With display—Results, 154 sales; increase 1267c.
Second Article.
The largest selling product of its kind was used in
this test.
On the market for 10 years, heavily advertised and
universally distributed.
Test matle in 21 stores for three weeks.
Without display—Result. 1068 sales.
Same product in same 21 stores for another 3 weeks.
With display-— result, 1824 sales; increase 11%.
Third Article."
A new kind of soap, not well advertised and lacking
in demand and distribution.
Records kept for three weeks, (number of stores not
given.
Without display—result, 52 sales.
Same soap in same stores for another 3 weeks:
With display—result. 153 sales.; increase 194%.
Fourth Article.
A 5e line of candy, well known and advertised.
Records kept in 15 stores for three weeks.
Without display—result, 384 sales.
Same candy in same stores for another three weeks.
With display—result. 1074 sales; increase 180%.
These tests were conducted from a purely disinterested investigative standpoint and show most conclusively the effect of display on sales.
Hats of Satin.
If by this time oue is a bit weary ot* the ubiquitous felt
hat. there is a smart model of black or brown satin. These
are new and extremely chic, as well as of a becoming shope.
line model is soft in line and may be pulled Into place to
suit the features of each individual wearer.
Colors of Summer.
Besides the sand and grey tones that are so fashionable,
certain vivid shades of yellow, red and blue are much in evidence, as well as two shades of green that have a greyish cast.
Knitted llowers In gay colored yarns make very attractive boutoniiiere and corsages, as well as decorations for the
hat.
Rainbow of Dresses.
Sport dresses oi" kasha in shades of pink, banana, peach,
orchid and such shades are the rage at Palm Beach. 22
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
nine
Make a Special Drive on
DOMINION
INLAID
LINOLEUM
HERE is a product that fills a long-felt want
—an Inlaid Linoleum, made in Canada,
and reasonable in price. Thousands of
housewives have wanted Inlaid Linoleum in their
homes. Now they will buy. because genuine
Dominion Inlaid can be secured at prices they
will willingly pay.
Your wholesaler carries a good stock of Dominion Inlaid Linoleum, thus ensuring prompt delivery. Plan to carry an adequate stock on display. You will have no trouble disposing of it.
Many beautiful patterns. High polish finish
Dominion Inlaid Linoleum will sell on sight.
Plan now to get your full share of this newly-
created, profitable floor covering business.
Dominion Oilcloth & Linoleum Co.
LIMITED MONTREAL 1925
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
23
(J(5«np»HE MODE"
it      As §©« By
Je&mieftte
The term "enseinhh" imw means not only a matching cost Snd dress, but any costume In which there is
an underlying harmony hit ween the two parts, and
this gives great scope for colour combinations. Too
careful matching becomes monotonous, ami om* means
of escape from this is the use of complementary colours,
that is. colours exactly opposite to each other in the
colour scale    For instance, a black or na\y-l>lue wrap
can he worn effectively with green, light red, or one of
lhe new blues or purples. Likewise a Ugh! coal, when
it is neutral, tan or gray, is extremely smart with a
dark dress, provided thai tin*    accessories   are   also
chosen with consummate eare. Paris is using a combination of "Several tones of the same colour, which they
call a "earmmu'" effect, and this is a most favourable
selo'int* for the ensemble eostumc,  A great many of tIn*
summer ensembles mnk<* us<* of a transparent eoat of
georgette crepe or chiffon, veiling a frock of another
colour.  This is n most effective combination.
It remains for the French to devise an ensemble
whieh Includes three frocks and imt a single coat One
ensemble shown consisted of a circular  cul   coat   of
black silk serge, lined with flesh-rose crepe. With this
was worn an afternoon frock of black silk serge, the
front of the blouse falling in folds at the sides to show
the flesh-rose lining, the skirt slit over a rose erepe un-
tlerslip. For the evening there were two frocks, one, of
two shades of rose chiffon, the bodice in lighter tone,
the skirt in darker, with a long jabot falling from
neek to hem-line in front, the other, of black Chan-
tilly lace over fresh coloured chiffon, the skirt of rippling movement, girdled by black satin.
A new and surprising fabric for sports costumes
(the sports costumes that look on, rather than those
that participate), is chiffon. In spite of the sheerness
of this material, the costumes are cut on strictly sport
lines. One frock of golden-yellow chiffon bordered
with white kasha had the skirt pleated, and the blouse
slit at one side.
The bathing season has introduced many new and
startling creations in bathing-suits. The smart woman
is dressing as carefully for the beach as she would for
a social function, from the tip of her rubberized bandanna to her sandals. Some of the new suits have
long sleeves and high necks, to suit those who fear
for their complexions, others, sleeveless, of gaily print
ed or plain silks are simply cut or be-fuffled to suit the
taste. Tor the energetic swimmer there is the two-
piece jersey suit of striped top and plain trunks, with
which is worn a broad swimming belt. Bandannas
and rubberised silk handkerchiefs are going to be
greatly worn this season, as are also capes of rubberized silk to match either bandanna or bathing suit.
Sandals will for thc most part be of rubber, although
braided leather will also be very popular.
Two new materials have appeared on the millinery
horizon, one. a Kelmux crocheted straw called "sang-
ha." which is evincing signs of great popularity this
summer, the other, a new felt, which, while in no way
a halter's plush, has longer hairs than ordinary felt.
A smart innovation is the trimming of bangkoks with
narrow rolled brims by using men's English washable
cotton plaitl neckties in brilliant designs in colour, to
replace the usual cross-grain ribbon. The extra length
of the tie is matle into a loop on each side in the back,
where the tie crosses. There seems to be a decided
tendency towards greater width <>n the right side of
narrow-brimmed hats in Paris.   Straw hats with tiar- 24
Till-: BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Utile
row and medium brims, faced to match, are making
their appearance.
The Oxford has increased in importance in French
shoes, as has also the two-strap shoes of brown leather.
Black patent leather, beige ami brown suede, kid ami
satin arc still thc smartest materials for footwear,   For
APPAREL ITEM8
A Color Scheme of Green
Folio-aim;   lhe   VOgttC  tor   table   dermal toils   its
color  schemes   RlasMwar*'  tt  •shown  in   the  mn'*
*hnd"'*H ot i}»><«p ftr4iumn»rm«*» amber,  BUtibfTf)   red
am) midnight Wii»* and ortfigl    Tiny graceful!) ihftp
and peppers °{ I trsmMuceai green «r«- particular!)
New Fashion Note.
*mi«w.umm««'   il* *   il HiiililillUMWIIWlWi
To soften tSC *>»••»»rHy of &S **n»att notched eoJluj
In *een on  tie-  Mi)Nrl***l  rt>At* of  the  gettoa, 001  I
Bower tacked to tii»« iap<*t. but ine Dower t* not th.
gSfdeaiS or rarnatum  which  have b**«'n  worn lor u
four month'*    l« tl A bilge lhaggj  affair In   a   ..
inatrin* the hat or the IrorS of ih«r« eASCQlfctc
• rem
lUlh!
tphire
•ill***!
tb
* tilth
• mi r
■ psst
thai
Damty New Vanity.
evening, silver brocade and blond satin are still very
popular, and the most simple of evening pumps are
using distinctive jewelled buckles.
Wry IfflSlI and of a fraCtfO) oval *ha«i«- || a ».-■» gold
fitted vanit) with a m'rror Mil in top    A itigbl piKwattrt .
tin* «prine relenee-i a little comptrtnteat containing i mftt
rouge In pasts forts
VCnJenl vanitte** o*M
u t* oss of ths daMMcst sad d
tl  | Song while
New Veri'on of Iht Shawl,
•&ae2F
m
Too ihswS (st-ottoaes io bold its owa a* the t«»>, ■■'■•-,»b:-*
»!-,-sp foi eveoims Not onl) s-rs the Spcalnh tod vm
nhnwlit morr b»'»Httfwt ih»n PVCC, 0*1 000 model* lt*f« ftp
peered These ire hsgc *tsjsstot ***** sorgvotM metal btoct^i
bordered Wits a hem as less* n fool deep stacU oi dostd^
porgeittti m i *oU4 eolor.
Timely Millinery Window Display
Suggestions
By Knii->t A. Deneh, (Special to the B C Retailer)
Millinery window displays with seasonable and
stylish offerings are always excellent bm-iitess-prodtie-
ers.
If you an hungry for some effective display Ideas,
the following suggestions should give you the desired
"nourishment."
Color Harmony
Mr. K. 3. ('tumors, display manager, Wolff«Bergcr
Co..  Moberly.  Mo..  I'.S.A., staged  a   timely  display
characterised by artistic simplicity.   This was a corner
window, so in order to catch women as ihey entered
the store, or as they passed it. the layout was arranged
accordingly.   The right rear corner of tin* trim was occupied by a screen with a carved wood top piece, underneath which was run some pleated folds of old gold
satin.   This screen was iu three wings, the two side
wings being curved to lit around the rear right corner
in a semi-circle.   In front of the middle panel, draped
front a tall stand, but just Indow the top of the screen,
was a drape of nut brown plush.   Over to the left of
this, on a low stand, was a small wicker basket filled
With bronze chrysanthemums.   Near the rear left corner was ti little, three-legged gilded table, on whieh
was placed a gilded pedestal, topped with a stylish
hat in bronze and brown mixtures.   Around the base
of the pedestal were twirled drapes of a bron/.e brocade, laid across which was a pair of white gloves, with
the ends of the brocade trailing along the floor to near
the front.    The neutral toned panmlletl background
ami the parquet floor harmonised With the entire display.
Artistic Effect With Millinery Box
The foremost attraction in a millinery display by
Tin* Up To Date IV Poughkwpalv, N V . «a* g platform, aboul I1., ftei long by 2l 2 toe\ high Thin rm
about throe feet from the Boor and was draped -tun
Royal blm* piUsh, the ends Ol whieh touched tin- lh«*«r
The middle of the platform wan occupied bj I Urgd
blue hat box, decorated with gorgeously plumed <*-!*^
The bos lid was tipped sideways, with b bow «>? oi
and blue '•ilk (about half of each color on the fabric)
the vtuU of whieh ran in the opposite direction Rishi
inside thc open box was A single blaek trimmed bst,
standing majestically on a stained pedestal Around
the floor in front of the platform was n bordi t drape 01
burnt orangt plush    Along thin border, exhibit™ ,,!
'lands   wen  several orange and brown milliner} ;!""*
els   At each front side of the trim wan g !>■
bos cloned.
Concentrating on the Model
s uiie pleasing coloring effects were achicvt
millinery display by Hamburger's, Loi Angeles
From tin- middle of the celling were suspendei
silk si reamers in pastel shades    Halfway irom !
each   streamer   WAS caught up in I loop With
knot ami garlands of flowers   Thus arranged
drapes mad* a sort of canopy for the stylish
ofl* by Itself on a pedestal at the center of th«
space,  The onlv other objeel In the trim whs
wax figure ii. black al the rear right
Mourning Millinery
Mourning millinery was featured In a uir
play by the Right Hotis,. Departmeni Store, H
Ontario.   Down in front was a large annoUlH'1
in I
I nil!
fear
liner
,11 IM
silk
'     Sl*l
floor
i\W
ton,
ii i" 1925
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
25
black with a white border bearing the following inscription :
"The Latest iu Mourning."
the rear ami side walls were lined with grey silk. Sev-
t nil grey-colored stands, each holding an example of
mourning millinery, were placed at irregular intervals
aboul th*' H"1"*. 'Ibi* Stands at the rear were higher
than those iu the front part of the trim. The latcsl
fashions iu flowing veils decorated the vacant spaces ou
ihe floor in between ihe stands.
Millinery Delivery Service
A display Idea carried tint by Delano & Co., Boston, Mass., called attention to their millinery delivery service. This concern conducts two millinery
stores in the same eity. one on School Street; the other
mi Washington Street, A recent exhibit was that lifelike painting of a negro messenger boy. This was used
as a sign lhat projected above the sidewalk of the
School Street  store.    The messenger boy was shown
carrying a hat box to a lady customer.   A companion
hanging sign utilized at the same lime by the Washington Street store did not contain the messenger boy
illustration, but it did contain the following explanation:
"Tin* Delano Ijad is coming back.  He is out
delivering hats."
Selling Supplies for Untrimmed Hats
If VOU sell untrimmed hats, as you undoubtedly do.
vnti now and then foctts window display attention on
your millimrv supplies, This was dom* by Grant's,.
Lewiston, Me. Tin* central exhibit in their millinery
supplies display was a huge basket of artificial roses.
Running from the basket handle were green streamers, which extended to pedestals grouped about the
window, In whieh untrimmed hats were shown. At the
front center, however, was a half-finished hat, with a
needle stuck in the crown, ami surrounded by a
thimble ami millinery supplies.
•Make Your Own—We'll Help You."
was lhe proclamation given on a window card down ill
rout.
An Old Fashioned English Garden
Local carnivals are very popular events iu England these days, especially among the retailers, who arrange especially attractive windows to attract the
crowds, At the recent carnival held in Great Yarmouth, England, Mr John lm Hunt. Jr., display malinger for John tice Hunt, draper and milliner, was on
the job with a striking millinery supplies display. The
window was entirely trimmed with artificial flowers
Itnd foliage, about tWO-thoUSand examples being employed.   The pear framework was composed of real tree
branches, stripped of their leaves, ami decorated with
'ill kinds of floral and fruit millinery supplies.   This
framework extended around the sides of the trim as
well as the rear, ami the branches were arranged to
form an artistic wall garden, such as are found by the
hundrcdR in England, There was a grape vine; a rose
bush; a currant bush; a cherry tree. etc.. etc. A
flight of "mossy" stone steps letl up to the background,
with a group of tiny fairies (dolls) dancing on them.
The Celling was covered with sky blue crepe paper, under which were several illuminated electric lights, imparting a moonlight effect to the setting. This display
■ittraeted thousands of people during the two weeks it
was on show ami the millinery supplies department an-
oV\ih\ a lot of additional business.
are  oper-
by means
Floral Trellis Arch
Here is a pleasing interior display idea from Bullock's. Los Angeles. Calif. At the counter where corsage bouquets and boutonniers of artificial flowers are
sold, recently a trellis arch about twelve inches by
thirly-six inches was painted a golden eolor and placed
on the counter. In this trellis arch were exhibited
sonic of the floral bouquets which were on sale. This
served to brighten up the floral millinery counter.
TRANSIENT    TRADERS
Dominion  Office   R.M.A.,  Advocates  that  strict  Watch   be
Kept on Operations of Real Silk Hosiery Company.
Ottawa, May 15, 1925.
The   Retail   Merchants'   Association   of   Canada,
British Columbia Provincial Board,
122  Pacific Bldg.,
Vancouver, B. c.
Re Real Silk Hosiery  Company
Dear Sirs: —
The above mentioned firm, we understand,
at ing in a number or the Provinces of Canada
of agents who so out with samples of the hose and canvas orders by making door to door calls. The hose is then
shipped directly from the Provincial Office to the consumer,
the money having been paid to the agent at the time the
order was taken. We are informed that in some of the provinces ihey are doing a tremendous business, even as much as
one thousand dollars per day.
We have brought this matter to your attention in order
that if they are operating in your province, you may notify
the merchants in the leading towns to watch for the representatives of this firm and see that the license required to be
paid by agenta taking orders is collected.
I! the Act in your particular province does not prohibit
the sitle of goods in this way by agents when they have a
provincial office, we think that this should be one of the first
matters which should be dealt with by your executive, that
the necessary changes may be obtained to the Municipal Act
or the Transient Traders*, Hawkers' and Peddlers' Act, whereby manufacturers, wholesalers or importers would not be permitted to solicit goods directly from the consumer outside the
district or the municipality in which they are located, unless
a license is paid, the amount of which should be determined
by the municipalities proportionate to the protection which
they wish to give to the consumer, who has no opportunity
to get restitution in case he finds himself in possession of
goods which are not of the quality which he had expected,
or for the general protection of the retailers who make a
large contribution to the community generally in the payment of taxes, community development, etc.
We wish you would advise us by return of mall whether
or not this firm is operating in your province, and, if so, any
Information which you may have as to their methods of operation and the volume of the business done.
Yours very truly,
The Retail Merchants* Association of Canada,
per N. B. Douglas.
Secretary and general manager, pro tem.,
Dominion Executive Council and Dominion Board.
TCEETEE"
THE PURE WOOL
UNDERCLOTHING
THAT WILL NOT SHRINK
, Pointe to consider
when buying Underwear
THE MAKER
THE NAME
J-HE TRADE
MARK
Highest .     r
Qua/Sty in all
UNDERWEAR
WHfN
MADE BV
%fdA
SltBUNSft),,
*<"ie -wo***,.
OF OALT 26
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA KKTAILKR
itm
British Market Reports
HOSIERY AND LACE.
Manufacturers and the Gilk Duties.
Nottingham, June i
The slump in wool prices is still exercising a disastrous
inlSuence on the hosiery trade. The average fall in better*)
yarns has been something like 15 per cent, during the past
month,-and buyers seem by no means convinced, lhal the
bottom of the market has yet been reached, t"mil there I*
some measure ot confidence as to the stability of the ttOW
price basis, much difficulty is likely to be experienced in **t>
mining fresh business, though the new basis would, if generally accepted, quickly lead to activity in those branch***
which use wool in considerable quantities, as the high eo»t os
lhe raw material has been an important factor In retar<Lr,i*
ihe recovery or the hosiery trade.
The ial) in wool prices? has resulted in request!* Mpr
made to manufacturers by merchants that, u* wool has de
dined so considerably, outstanding contracts tor Roods should
be subject to revision; in other words, they are asking that
as wool has fallen, the price which the> are asked to pa* un
goods now on order should    be   redacted    rorrettponrfliiKli
Needless to say. manufacturers are turning a deaf ear  to
this suggestion*   Contracts cannot be varied lit this w«*  ami
it should he sufficient to point out thai manufacturer*' have
had to buy their wool at much higher prices than those now
ruling, and that they have to fuilll the terms of their own tot)
tracts with the spinners.
Revised Silk Duties
The revised scale of proposed silk and 'rayon" duties
has received the approval of the *iik industr) ami hat 0?**
come much of the opposition irom "rayon" producers   al
though users of the latter fibre in mixture rafcrles remain
hostile.    By  lessening the Import duty on  silk cocoon* and
wast« (undischarged), noils and raw nilk. while retaining the
or.gie.al scale on yarns and tissue*, ihe Chancellor hSI ac
corded important concessions io the silk manufacturers of thin
country.    Respecting "rayon." although ihe imj^rt duiv  on
waste and singles yarn is lowered, the grater reduction in
the E::cise duty  will prove beneficial to British producers
The difference between Kxclse and import dutie* on "rauir*
waste and singles yarn and straw Jh now  tin. per cent'   instead of 20 p*r cent.; that on doubled or twilled thread is
200 per cent instead ol 20 per cent.   The new drawbacks also
favour ihe British industries on Imported article, msde part
ly of silk or "rayon" were anticipated, but even as altered
they are drastic.   On the 33 1 3 per cent basis the duty on
the taxable content can amount io as much as L6S per cent
on the lo per cent basis It will very from 50 to 200 per cenl
according  to   whether  the   silk  or  "rayon"  CO Men I   I**   -,.
or only f, per cent of the total value of the article; while on
the 2 per cent basis the duty on  the taxable content  will
range irom a 40 per cent minimum upwards
One point on which the nilk trade awaits a final dedslon
is tha o me.allle weighing. Host imported silk material! are
Weighted with tin. which In some instance, „,,, r,,, ,..".
as much as half the total weight or the fabric The than
cellor Is understood to hold the view that thll metallic veto
Pg is taxable, bui the schedule in ihe Finance Bill U illeni on
the subject. No doubt the matter will b,. ral)4,.,, ,„ JL ''
mil lee on the BUI.
Novelties of the Season.
A new fashion note is the Hinalt wrapped nirban mole of
Roman striped silk or ribbon, and a scarf of si k   n   i   oli
colcr   which   has   a border around one side and one end
These com,. |„ marvelous color combinations ami will add
touch or color to the country consiunie.
Feather Trimmings.
Mnrbou clipped so fine that it resemble! fur to irtm manv
of lit*- new coats for southern wear.   These   are   of    he vv
crepe or salin and ar, made on the s.ralgh. |lt„H 0| a tall-
ored model    lhe marabou appears as a band around lhe hoi
lorn of the skirt and us a finish to the sleeves.
*&*,
LIGHTHOUSE BRAND
Triple Stitch
OVERALLS
M Always on the Job M
♦Mt   farm,   in   factory,   construction
snd railroad work moi wherever
overalls «,, worn LIGHTHOUSE
BRAND nil giving honest west ami
Wiving I lie workman \ tlollnn*     The
Irlple mi it eh means triple wear |1
thv *vi\ui*,, Mini no puckering No
"Wmping of material, LIGHT
HOUSE BRAND are made tootsy lo
•llow of easy movement
:;*.U UciinJiotSK BRAND,      the
I lp!e     titelicl    ovi rails,    and    sell
rntiafaetii u,
ROCK ISLAND OVERALL CO.
Rock Island Quebec.
R. M. Foster, 3544 32nd Aveiat Weil
Vsscesver, B.C. 1925
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
27
This Thing They Call Business Ability
Hy If. R.
due of the older merchants members of our advertising club had the floor, A man of success in his husiness. antl an original and clever advertiser whom I
have hatl the pleasure of writing up many times in
national publications.
"I don't suppose he has spent |50 for publicity
in his life." commented the merchant, "but a school
kid can't Ret within twenty feet of his door without
receiving a friendly word ami a smile.
"His store is iu a little town—a one-horse town.
When he first started iu business years ago, he went up
to the city and persuaded a jobber to stake him to a
start. Now. I SUppOSe he i.s worth $125,000. He has
never used publicity, but he has always done the work
(f two men.
' * Somehow or other, he has managed never to get
led up' with his business, He had never taken a
course in salesmanship, but 1 sal around his store for
hours al a time and watched him sell people simply
through making suggestions. I think four oul of live
bought thing* they needed, but would not have bought
had thev not  been reminded of it     He always had
**■ »
ready a string of suggestions, and seemed a wizard in
suggesting things people really needed but had forgotten or overlooked."
And in a life-time in business, this country merehanl who at a cross-roads bsd accumulated a small
fortune, had not spent $50 in all for publicity!
I suppose that here ami then* about the country,
a host of similar examples could be cited -not proving
the unnecessary character of publicity, but demonstrating conclusively thai there can be unusual mercantile success witltOUl it.
Also, we can find merchants who attribute mueh
nf their great success to skillful use of publicity, and
free expenditure iu its behalf.
Important and interesting as the subject of retail advertising is, we would have to eome to the eon-
elusion that there is something vastly more important
still if mercantile success is to be had. That thing
may or may not include advertising skill. It is business ability.
A Circle of Various Segments
What is thing called business ability, anyway?
In textbooks on economies, we have found busi-
ness ability referred to as some mysterious, intangible
thing, like, for example, musical ability, which a tier-
son has or did imt have and which could not be analysed. Undoubtedly, among a large section of the
public which dties not possess business ability, the
same general attitude is prevalent, Husiness ability is
regarded as a gift from nature, like a melodious voice.
or? to use a schoolboy illustration -like the ability to
wiggle one's ears at will.
The truth is that business ability ean be analyzed.
Put under tin* analytical microscope, there is nothing
especially mysterious about it.
First of all. it is a combination thing a hunch of
human qualities grouped together to get with consistency a result, which is, of course, protit.
Now, there are a host of combinations which will
produce profit in business, and thereby qualify as busi-
nt'ss ability.
Simpson
The idea can best be visualized as a circle. If a
man possesses the various qualities which, together,
will produce a profit, we can represent him as a circle.
This circle we can divide into segments, with radii
from the centre to the circumference. The whole, of
course, will represent a piece of pie. Each of the pieces
we can label as a constituent of the subject business
ability, and we can make the sizes commensurate with
the importance we attach to the individual quality.
We can, for example, analyze Samuel Mellon, general merchant, on the basis of 100%, as possessing business ability made up of self-denial and ability to save,
industry, persistence, caution, knowledge of merchandise handled, knowledge of human nature in general, courtesy and tact in dealing with customers, skill
in pricing, skill in handling employees, advertising
knowledge, good personal habits.
Samuel Mellon, in other words, is just a plain,
will-balanced business man—the country is full of his
counterpart. They are good merchants, and good citizens.
Let us jump a few miles into another county. Here
we find Frank Dennison. This name, like others used
in this article, is a fictitious one. Frank is an enthu-
siatie. dynamic man. On the basis of 100%, we can
grade Frank with 50% or more salesmanship qualifications. Frank is a persuasive man. He makes friends
easily, and never has trouble in keeping his business
volume up.
In some other respects, he is weak. He is low in
caution, He has not the persistence of Samuel Mellon.
Some of Prank's friends are always afraid he will
sometime get interested in something outside of his
business, ant! neglect the latter. He has a complete
circle, at present, though. His deficiencies in some respects are fully compensated for by his unusual selling
ability.
Traveling away from this town, we find Orin
Townsend. Orin is an analytical, cautious person. He
knows merchandise in and out. and we can grade him
at least 35'J of the 100% for buying skill. Along with
this goes a liberal rating for credit skill. Orin is not
half as tactful as he might be. On occasion, collecting
a small bill, he makes "an enemy for life." He does
not attend social events to any extent, sticking to home.
He works hard, gets good service out of the employees
whom he picks well, and succeeds. Add up his whole
combination of qualities, and he has the complete circle
signifying business ability. ***
We could multiply illustrations showing the great
variety of combination in qualities which, in real life,
make up in individuals the thing called business ability.
Any reader of this, analyzing himself, can get an
example. He will divide that big circular pie we have
been talking about in a quite different manner, the
chances are. from others we have given here. The
total of it--the result—will be the same—the handling
of affairs to return a protit.
Weak Place in the Circle
It is not strange that men possessing business abil- 28
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
nine
Remington .22 Rifles for the Campers
Many who are planning to spend their vacation  m camp thu year **»U bt buying now ttttOO,   Her*
is a fine sales oportunity'.    Sell them Remington  22T*-~r*ttot wnth over a   century   of   espersence   »«
firearms behind them
The Remington .22 Repeater
For a light rifle thai is lightning fstl SSti powerful «'hough fof OtSmtl game UMTS ll
nothing like thfi Remington Model 12 HURSU-rt«>M Elepe&tei Weighs onl> |*V| ptm«d»
and   la   take   down.     Has    tie-    Speed/ Remitt«tou pump on inn with » #«litl *twl
receiver, and doted breech. ThH sctioii Ii ii itronfl si i isf* lad the enNMHboil isfsi]
through the trigger guard hold** like I flei    8W* ejection pfOteCtl thi ihOOter,    Hold*
15 .22 shorts. 12 tons or LO long rifle cnr'ridg«M
The Remington .22 Autoloader
Like all  Remington Repetters, Model 2*  bai 1 loltd
breech, a substantial and easily seen safety, I* hSflHtttfltil
and lakes down readily without tools. It weighs oat) i\
pounds and ba.H 11 19-Inch, beautifully rifled, round barrel
Chambered either for the regular .22 shorts* or for long rille
cartridges, but not Interchangeably The magazine Is In the
stock. Rifles chambered for shorts hold fifteen Shots, and
those chambered for long rille hold len.
Models t and fi are Remington Single Shot 22'* selling it
Idlier prices but Remington quality all through Remington
Model 25, chambered for 25 20 HI Speed Cartridge! ll a wrm*
derful small rille of big power
And Here's the Ammunition
Remington   small   bop    cartridge**   hold   lhe   world*
record for target Shooting.   Best oa the buir* eye is beat
on the game.
Remington Model 12
Remington Cutlery
n  'mi
r*vi»ias    and
TOURIST*     KMFE
KI >sf   h imtto,   In aim   I n* '
nn«   l il tr<*.   oponi    !''.••'»"*      * *
• 5l|>   l»tiilr>     ,t    ■ •" » 0 •. 0     *•»   I*'-
|*«t|ft< h   or   rrsOlif**   bw4*     I
. '....-t    ottO   t   ' owbtnaUoti   *"
a.   .!    snd   bottle   openw
Nil Mr    Hiiv.*r    N.I.I-r     »hl»W
rivets      \   knit*   „i   Remit
1)011111 v
UemiiiKton lum brought beck fine stei-i ii) pocket «ut ie- > :if>ii it'i the steel ll il
fin- cattlemen,  stockmen1   fanners,  electricians.   Ik»v  scouts, nsh+rroen   auta tourists
"Specific Knives for Specific Ifsea."   h«»h Remlnfton Quality cutlery   tt peyii
mis    Thwrs sre Remlnifmti
viltl|ir   »     ADA     SpOl I *!»»»*••>     If'
K
Ask Your Jobber*0 Salesman for Full Particulars
Remington
Arms
Company Inc.
Firearms Ammunition
Remington.
Shotguns
Came Loado
Curmrd Building
25  Broadway
New York City
Cutlery Cash Regist*
rt 1925
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
29
[ty, a thing requiring various component parts, Should
lie weak in some of them.
The more elements yon stipulate in a combination,
the more difficult, in rapidly increasing ratio, it is to
find one. It i.s like the lady who went looking for a
new maid. The girl must be experienced-—quite easy
lo meet the qualification. Also, Scandinavian by birth.
Immediately, the problem was multiplied many times
in difficulty. Then the girl must have blue eyes, antl
curls antl be under twenty-five. With each fresh requirement, the task greatly increased.
The same principle applies exactly to business
ability in a person. It is not hard to find persons of
good habits, or industrious, or Saving, or with likable
personalities, or with knowledge of a line of merchandise. The rub comes in finding individuals who have,
not One or two or three constituents insufficient to
make a complete circle, but a group which, added up
will make mn.
As a matter of fact, there are few successful or
unsuccessful men in business with "perfect" combination! of the qualities together constituting business
ability. Nearly every business man is weak iu one or
more respects.
Sometimes he need not worry about his deficiencies at all. because he has points of strength which
more than compensate. It has always seemed to us.
however, that the merchant should analyze his ability,
realize his limitation, ami conduct himself and his business to minimise the ill effects of weaknesses.
We recall an instance in which a business man who
had early learned his disposition fo "wild cat" after
real or fancied opportunities—cultivated the habit of
making no move without the Indorsement of his wife.
Sin* was a cautious, conservative woman, as most wives
rre.
We know of another ease in which a first-class
buyer and credit man deliberately sought a " merchandising "' partner.
In still another case, we know a business man who
hatl made only slight progress tor years, He based
facts, realized the weakness which was holding him
back was fondness tor hobbies, beginning with checkers ami extending right through to golf, and proceeded
to eliminate these.
A man can possess nine-tenths of the requirements
for business ability, yet lacking the remaining 10%
be hopelessly ineligible to run a business of his own.
All over the United States and Canada, for example,
there arc managers in charge of stores and departments who actually know merchandise better than
their employer, and who possess selling ability, or advertising ability, of a superior sort. We know of retail clerks who can outsell their employers two to one
any day in the week.
The manager or subordinate simply does not possess a eomplet circle—that is the explanation. So long
as he acts in a capacity where he does not require the
segments of the circle which he lacks, he is an efficient
and productive unit.
Vou can put right down that the old chap in Iowa
who has accumulated about $100,000 at a cross-roads
town has the complete circle of qualities. Business
ability is an ''all around" thing. Publicity ability may
have a large part in it, or no part at all. It is the
combination which counts, and that combination can
be made up with a wonderful number of variations,
relatively, of constituents, and even in the nature of
thc constituents themselves.
INTERNATIONAL   HARVESTER   COMPANY   TO
MANUFACTURE BINDER TWINE IN HAMILTON,
ONTARIO.
Announcement is made to the effect that the International Harvester Company will commence the manufacture of binder twine at its plant in Hamilton. An
area of 350,000 feet floor space will be required for this
purpose, and machinery weighing some 1000 tons is already on order. The fibre used in the manufacture of
the twine will comprise manilla from the Phillipines.
nnd sisal from Yucatan. The former, being more popular with Canadian farmers will constitute the larger
volume of material used. Operations an* expected to
continence in the Fall, and the company will be in a
position to ship mixed carloads of twine and machinery to supply farmers in Western Canada.
When It
for the i
lo make
out aftei
THE OVERDUE TRAIN
comes to a collection btter. the difficult  thing is to write something which combines a jolt
Wlplent will, lometniag .ha, will not give Mm real and serious cause tor offense    He must
be riven to see that vou are in earnest and yet he must not be Turnished cause tor
batni "WreM   A retailer whom we know ot was formerly a conductor on a railroad.
Main of his friends and customers know this.   Hut the letter which he used with
irra'l stress iu making collections by mail would be or great value to any retailer
lust the same    His letter is as follows:    "Dear Sir:  An account Is something like
i Ualn-thev are both late at times.    We are sending this letter to you because
vour -account with us Is a little overdue, and we're asking you-just as you would
L «he station master about a .rain that is late-'What time do you guess she'll
roll in-   llow about making out your check and saying: 'Here she comes now?
That 18 just about long enough lor a letter.   II has just about enough "jolly" tn it
OM man fee. we«.dts,a>sed to you; and yet he cannot help see. al. the time, that you are really
lhat money.   Try ll out on your own business. *-^"
30
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RKTAILKU
Max
Have You Checked Over Your
Stock for Fall Buying Yet ?
It won't be long now before Fall will be right on top of you,
and with it the demand for many lines for which there is
very little sale during summer months.
Here Are Some Seasonable Davidson
Lines for the Fall Trade
You can order any of the items listed below with full confidence. They are all tried and tested Davidson products,
and there is a strong demand everywhere for all of them :
Stove Pipes and Elbows
Stove Boards
Rotary Ash Cans
Quebec Heaters
Fire Shovels and Coal Hcds
Ash-Sifters
Stoves and Ranges
Heaters—enamelled and sheet
iron
^ranches:
hmioM m/CdAnuu
Established IMiO.
Head Office and Factory: MONTREAL
Toronto Winnipeg Saskatoon Calgary
Vancouver Pi
1925
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
31
UasU
HARDWARE, OL and PAINTS
The hardware trade is good Builders supplies are
moving out in large volume eommeasttrate with the
amount of new construction now under way, and building activity shows no sign of decreasing, judging from
the number of permits which are daily being taken out
at the City Hall. There is a minature boom on in outdoor painting, the cool bright weather of recent weeks
being Ideal for exterior application This applies not
only to residential const met ion. but also to larger projects in the downtown section ni Vancouver. Amateur painters are providing good turnover for retail
painl dealers, for this is tlo* season when small bunga-
lows and summer cottages receive their annual coat of
paint. Garden requisites have been moving out well.
Sales of sporting goods, ami camping outfits, although
not  in as great demand as at  ihis period last  year
ere maintaining a steady level, ami with ihe advent of
more settled weather will register an increase. Prices
remain fairly steady with a downward trend noticeable
in mauv lines.
* •
HARDWARE MARKETS AT A GLANCE
Sheets and Plates: All sheets and plates including
galvanised and blue sheets, Canada plates ami tinned
plaits remain linn in tendency and fairly active as to
movement.
Turpentine: Steadiness is a factor in tin* turpentine
market with the tone holding fair, business active at
unchanged quotations.
Auto Tires: Due it is stated to the keenness of competition among tin* differenl firms manufacturing auto
tires in Canada, prices of auto tires have been reduced.
Blow Torches Advance: A slight advance is noted
in tin* new quotations on blow torches.
Iron and Mild Steel Lower: Iron and mild steel are
now lower in price; new quotations show a decline of
a half cent a pound on tin* different sizes,
Nails Selling Well: With brisk building operations
under way iu the eity and suburbs as well as in the surrounding country there is a keen demand for all kinds
of nails which are selling strongly at unaltered price
levels.
Radio: Husiness is standing up better than in the
past. Tin* large number of sets now in use continue to
Create an accessory business for tubes, batteries, etc.
Bird Cages: Husiness in this line is Improving and
and a surprisingly large number of the higher grades
Of cages are being sold.
Sand Paper: Sand paper is now quoted at a higher
price. The new quotations show an advance of about
len per cent,
U
Pipe:   Distributors of wrought pipe loeally have
noticed an improved movement of this product; prices-?
remain steady and firm.
White Lead: There has developed in local distributing circles a more active movement of white lead;
prices are firm.
Cutlery: New quotations on IXL cutlery show ad-
show advance in priee of between five to ten per cent.
Manila Rope: Manila rope sells well at new priees.
The Manila rope market is firm.
Builders' Hardware: Owing to the large amount of
building builders' hardware moves out well; priees
are firm.
Sheet Lead: Sheet lead declines from a half a cent
a pound to one and one quarter eents a pound continuing the drop which for some time has been under way.
Wire goods: Brass wire goods arc about, twenty-
five per cent lower and bright wire goods have declined
ten per cent.
Binder Twine: Binder twine is being quoted two
cents higher than last year.
It is probable that there will be more declines than
advances during the summer months but violent changes are not anticipated.
STEEL PRODUCTS.
Competition is keen in this industry, and reports indicate that British mill prices are at a level whieh
shows but little margin of profit. Continental mills are
now producing in large quantities and there are reports of mergers between German, French, and Belgium interests. Few transactions other than structural
steel are reported from Ne wYork. The United States
Steel Corporation is said to be responsible, through its
export subsidiary, the United States Steel Products
Company, for an order of five thousand tons of steel
consigned to the Vancouver Engineering works. This
contract is understood to have been secured after keen
competition with European mills.
NEW   GOODS.
Guard Handled Carpet Beater—Made of No. 10 nard drawn
steel coppered wire, length 30 Inches. Tlie guard protects
Hie knuckles. 32
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RKTAILER
'hint*
SUGGESTS PAINTING
LIKE HARMONIOUS
COLORS
WELL DISPLAYED
Property owners may now have their homes painted
and pay later by the Convenient Payment Plan.
Paint and varnish manufacturers will gladly supply
full details. Or write direct to us. This plan presents
a great opportunity to increase paint sales.
SAVE THE SURFACE CAMPAIGN
Montr*'
610 Keefer Building
■ ■,.,.,.■■.. .v-:.--^-■•*.,.■>.-.*■■.,■ 1925
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
33
B. C.   HARWARE   CLUB   APPOINTS   PAID
SECRETARY.
As a step towards more vigorous activity and cooperation in the retail hardware busim-ss in British
Columbia! the It. C. Hardware flub has appointed a
permanent paid secretary in the person of Angus Mc-
I'hail. oi Armstrong, who will assume his new duties
about the middle of this month.
He will succeed Robert Ogilvie, who has been acting secretary for many years on a part time basis. Mr
McPhail is a will known hardware man in lhe provinee.
Originally with (he firm of Martin Pinlayson and
Mather. In* Required a knowledge of tin* Vancouver
business and conditions. He afterwards located in business for himself several years ago at Nanaimo on Vancouver Island. Subsequently he went to tin* interior
ni the province ami joined partnership in a retail
hardware business a? Armstrong,  lb is an experienced
salesman, said to have a thorough knowledge of the
business and also a wide acquaintance with the other
hardware men in B. C. His appointment to the permanent secretaryship was made at a meeting of the II.
0. Hardware Club, at which were present representatives from the wholesale trade as well He has sold
out his interest in business to his pari iter.
Closer Acquaintance
The gpt-to-gethcr meeting of the B. ('. club had
for its object the closer acquaintance of the members,
go that the way may be paved for a more intimate
relationship in business methods whieh it is hoped may
follow from tlu activities of tin- new secretary.
PRESERVATIVES VS ASSESSMENT
Increased  Assessments on  Well-preserved  Property
Negatived by the Value of "Saving the Surface.**
It has been reported from some cities and towns in
''anada that painting has been deferred by property
owners because of the fear that assessments would be
increased and taxation thus raised on such properties,
St.me hardwaremen in pushing their 'Save the Surface" campaign, found that their argument of in-
creaaed property value was met with the answer that
the customer was paying for any Increase in property
value, In Victoria recently, the trade secured a statement from the assessment commissioner that properties would not be increased iu assessment merely because of I heir improvement dm* In being painted.
It must not be overlooked that property values and
Assessments together with taxation have been gradually Increasing for some years past whether property
was painted or not. Some people erroneously conned
this up with the facl that tiny have painted and believe this is the cause of it.
Recently a sales promotion manager of one Canadian paint firm had occasion to call on tin* assessment
'•ommissioucrs of various towns throughout Ontario.
In each ease tlie question was asked as to whether they
were in the habit of raising the property owner's
assessment when he had painted up the property.
"Ill every ease." he stated. "Ihe commissioners emphatically denied that this was .lone, and pointed out
that iu their judgment no man should be petitlized lor
keeping his property in sanitary eondition and in good
appearance.   They expressed the opinion that with the
general Increase in values, assessments, etc., people
erroneously connected it up with painting."
It is a fact that when a person paints his property,
he increases the value both from a protection and decorative standpoint, to a far greater extent than any
increase in assessment. A great many instances are
wiven where a piece of property, properly painted, has
been increased in value from one to two thousand dollars, and sale priees have been raised from this cause.
Take for instance, a house that is valued at $6000.
Lack of paint will cause it to depreciate at approximately 2 per cent per annum or $120 per year. This,
in the course of five years would amount to a total of
$600, which is an absolute dead loss. Take the same
property and paint u pthoroughly. Don't presume
that any assessment commissioner would raise that
assessment much more than, say $500. Sueh an increase of assessment at the average tax rate of thirty
mills on the dollar would mean that his taxes were
raised $15, or in the course of five years a total of $75.
It is a very simple sum inarithmetie to see where the
property holder's loss would be if he did neglect painting by reason of the fact that the assessment commissioner had raised his assessment.
There are a great many other ways in which this
might be looked at, and a great many arguments that
local dealers might use against this idea, which is quite
common in a great many localities.
NEW RULING IN WAR REVENUE ACT.
Successful Representations Hade by R.M.A. Will Result
in Big Savings to Retail Trade.
It is estimated that from a million to one and a half
millions of dollars will be saved to the mercantile trade
of the country by virtue of the recent ruling by the
acting minister of customs and excise in regard to the
application of the special War Revenue Aet. This ruling, which was secured as a result of representations
made to the minister by a delegation from the Retail
Merchants' Association of Canada reads as follows:—
"Credits on statements of accounts when for
amounts of $10 or over, are subject to the stamp tax
on receipts except when such credits are covered by
separate receipts to which the required excise has been
affixed. In such cases the statement is to bear the notification, "stamp tax paid," initialed by thc maker.
A letter received by Mr. J. T..Crowder, second vice-
president of the Dominion executive council of the Retail Merchants' Association, from the head office, explains that the regulation is exactly iu accordance with
the request of the retailers, namely, that statements
should exempt showing credits of $10 or over, except
where receipts have not been issued for the amounts
shown in the statement."
Notification on the statement that the stamp tax
has been paid will simply mean that it will be necessary for those using the statements to have a rubber
stamp prepared with the necessary words inscribed
thereon and have it initialed by the accountant or
some other responsible party sending out the statement.
Enjoying what we have brings greater happiness
than in longing for what we have not.
Wanting other folks to be like us shows a spirit of
bitterness toward them. 34
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
.III!
W
— the demand is steady for
IMPROVED GEM JARS
Throughout Canada "Improved Gem Jars " are known and
accepted as tho thoroughly
satisfactory screw top Jar.
The demand for them is constant, year in and year out,
and hy stocking and featuring them the wise dealer ensures sound, steady Dusineai.
You should have a stock on
hand al all times, along with
our Perfect Seal Jars.
ORDER FROM YOUR WHOLESALER
Dominion Gla»t Company Limited
1
Bags to satisfy—that's all
"RAVEN" Month*
"GARRY" Light Kraft
"RUPERT" Heavy Kraft
The»e bag** art made by tht Wood* Manufacturing Company *s
Winnipeg, only Wtettrn Canadian bag rnakere, on eome of the
mott up to date paptr bag making machinery in Canada.
Our butinttt <• to turn out bagt of qualit*' at proptr pncet
That our growth ha* bttn to ettady >t dut to our friendi. th*
retail trade, rtcogniting tht tuptrior quality, ttrwtc* and •*<'»
faction found in uting thttt bagt.
Wt would bt glad to ttnd you tampltt.
NORFOLK PAPER CO. LTD.
136 Water 8t.        Sey. 7868     VANCOUVER, B.C.
Agents for B. C.
Woods Manufacturing Co. Ltd.
Winnipeg, Manitoba 1925
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
<5
HARDWARE PRICES CURRENT
Tht following art prlcet quoted for principal lines of leading wholesale firms.   Prictt quoted art necessarily
subjtct to market fluctuations.
AMMUNITION.
Loaded Shot Shell*.
Dominion i
Canuck. M
12 C, x 26 X I'* th $46.75
12 G X 'it X !4i ch. . 48.00
Imperial.
12 Q «!<i 1% «*h  ii 23
Ul X SS a 1*4 ch.  M.0Q     C
American.
CMC. Nltro Club 12 Q x 26 % I«i ch. 62.85
Volar* High Oun ... "52 »j
r Ml*  Arrow U U x 28 x 1% «h    .... 39 25
Pelers   Premier .       *8#.St
Metallic Ammunition.
Dominion
21 short Hmokelea*     4.M
22 I-olir Bmoktitas . 6.*"»
22 I. Rifle HiiRikelr*** . 7jM
22 L   Rifle IbStnOk 6 10
American.
23 Sh«rt  SmokeloM  .8.45
23   LOBf   HmokclcM .   .   . 7 60
23 I.   Rifle  Smokeic#* 9 CO
tth,   Rifle  Letmnk       "JO
ANVILS Peter Wright. »oH»* ta 139 ft**.
J5c; iivnf 139 B>«. 22c,
AXES-Boy***' A**«. IH Ibi  ftlSfl to 113 20
doi ,  doubl*   bit   «*«*•**.   unhandled.   122.20  la
I2-r* *0 dox;  htiritrm axe*. $12 Ofl dox , .Ingle
bitted axe*.   unhanded. $14 S3 tu (li.Vii dux.
SARS—Crow, 113.06 par ioo lbs
belting- -Laea,   rawhide   stdos,   $mo:
rut. 6 IC at 12 40 per 100 fttt;  V at $3.00
per 1*0 feel; U" at H 50 p*r 300 feet.
HOLTS.   CARRIAOE~-(ln   full   package**)
\  ami *malU*r  up tO 6-ln   long,   trtw 33  13
• iff lint; over S*.*}  in   27«4 off lint   Nott OtW
larger, all lengths, lew 20 ufT Ui»t. Nate new
lift  prlres |n tftfi't
HOI.T8. MACHINE-- S and .mailer up to
tin long. le*. 43 off list, over 4 - in ItSS
tt off lint; f| 1?*, unit % lew 15 oft
ll»t.     Not* new Hut prittS  in tfftOL
BOLTS, stove-Len 13 <>rr iim
BOLTS,   TIREt.c»*  20  a<M   10-%  on  -all
l«>lt# for broken package*
BOARD, Baaw- Pm USPS to s.ooo feet.
t&l €»0 per 1.000 feel
BOILERS, RANGE* to-gst*. HAW saoh.
BUILDING  PAPER   T*rr#d,  lie to 11.18
net roij. iut>r-.iing to quality* plain Ho to
Mc per roll
PPTTS—Plnte«t. 241. antique copper and
<lu!| bra*** flniwh  "4  x 2S  per pair 34<-:  3»<j
•*"!'', i»er pan- ttej 4S ** •-)■ par pair lie.
BUTTS—Wrought  *te«l.  No   804.  2H**2»i.
J! «3 txer dox : 3M, g 34 $2 5f. per dox ;  '»••■, x
4V*.  14 00 per dox
CARPET   FELT    ll  ox   f..>.It.   |3 tl  mil
PATCHES.  CUPBOARDOld  eopptr and
dull brtM fininh. ti4 80 per hundred
i'II.US* Toll H. olocfrlc weld. 3-1*!. 119 U
per tOO lb*. «*. Ill 40 per 10d n,« S-16. 915 50
per  I mi (bt
CHAIN -Lotting, 140 i 14, 13 00 ench: \
»   i»,  13 TT.  ench
CHOPPERS POOP   Untvtrsal No 0, f-2 2,v
dux: Universal No t, 127 00 dox: DntVtrsal
No 2, $33 eo not Universal No 3. $43 so dos
Home. No &&, $2 30 tarii; Home. No 65.
$2 76 each.
CHIMIN'S. BARREL No 0. $10 70 each:
No t, $11 10 each; No 2, $11 80 ench; No. 3.
$12 75   ea«*h
'LEVIS.  MAt.LEVHLE    P«r II.   l-fi^c.
CLOTHES LINE WIREIVr each, 50 ft .
$3 60 dot :  I no ft   $6 Jf»
I'lUl.l.S Hit nto,-k 35 5 off new l\*f.
hlm-kamiih 4-ln   B5.5 off new list.
RAVTROUOH- Per IOO feet. 8-ln $5 83;
10.In $6 50:  12-ln   |7 95
KILK3 circat Wnatern. 55^ off Hat; Black
IMnmond it", off Itat
QARDfiN Ho.sk in 50 ft Itnfths, un-
rotlpltd, for Bprlng delivery. ItSS■•Terminal
(>l'>*. 3-ply. H-iu IKMiO; -s-ln $18.00; *4-i'»
114.00; 4.,,|y tj-in •21,00; S-ln $13«!0; »4-tn
WO.OO; Wire wound, 4-plv 4-ln $15.ot);
S-ll) $17 00; \-|n $20 00; Coi niKaled, 3 pi/,
'4-ln $1,100.  S,.in, $!<*, 00,  \An $17,00
./'"I'l'MXtiH,   ATTA<'HKI>    S*.  ^.   *i.  »■*>*
I5C
OAMR TBAV*~ Victor, per dox No 0.
•LIO)   1,  $2 40;  IU  $4 20;  2,  |ft.40i I.  $»,M
II A N —dot No (», $4 20. 1. $5 00. 14.
II «0; 2. $10 60: '3.  $14 40
Jump-No 1. per dox $3 10; 1',. $4 50; 2,
»7 *0; 3, |» $0.
er iuv ma.
IRONB,   BAD,   COMMON~rer   100   rba —
Itia. and over 20c; 3, 4, and 5 It*-**. 23c.
IRON   hand—Per  tOO-Ibs.—IMt-ln  $«00;
'*-ln $4 00; 1 -in. $4.00.
IKON, BLACK SHEET-per lOOtbs.— 1*
guage $5.50; 24 guage $6.10; 18-20 guage.
$6 10; 26 guage $6 60.
IKON. GALVANIZED SHEET—IVr 100 Iba
-431 guage American or Engliah $7.65; 24
guage |7.25;   lg»$0 guagt $7.05.
KNOHS,  RIM DiK) II—J a panned, $3 75 per
nt
dox.
LAMP CHIMNEYS-A, per caae 8 dox..
$1 20 per doz ; A. per doz. $1.40; B. per case
6 dox   $1 40 per dox ; B, per dox. $175.
I.ANTKKNS-Short or lon«r globe, plain,
$14,10   dox. J   Japanned,   $S4 65   dox.
LAWN MOWERS- 	
._  .   blade
jlade $15.25;
BmpraSI 12x3 blade $13.00; 14x
$1.1.76, J6x5 blade $14.50; 18 x 5 b*%
10 x 3 blade $16.00, H
STAR.-9in    wheel.   3   knives,    each,    IS-lll
UM;  14-ln $8 26:  16-in  $S50;  4  knives.  12-
ln $M6; l-t-in $50 25; 16-ln $11.00.
MATTiWKS- lltk.    StM    doz;    Cutter,
^^^^^      dt>z.    	
$9 SO  dox.
NAILS. WIR&—Base MAO f.o.b. Vancouver; Cot. base $7.50 f 0 b. Vancouver.
I'l«'KS-~Clay. 6-7 ]lm.  |S.**J doz.
PINE TAB-- 1 gal. $1.10 each; ^4 gal 35c
etuh; "% pit 2i«* each.
PLASTER OF PARIS—ll.OO per 100 tO*.
RIVETS AND Bl'RUS-Black carriage. 5It>
bwn 57<-; No. 8 assorted coppered rivets
No. 8. 31c lb.; assorted copper rivet* and
burrs &)e; No. 8 assorted coppered burrs
and burrs 31c per tb No 8 COMXTtd burrs
37c per ffv,j Coppered rivet* 26c per Ib.
Coppered burrs 37c per Tb.
ROPE   BASE -B'Hish   manila.   hast,   24-:-:
pure tnaottt baas tt\o* ib.
BADIoLAS    No   *;'.   $42m* e.<.* *     Xo   U*A
$7t 00; No. X HSLOO   **ubj*-t to .""   di*.
RADIO SUPPUBS—Tofcee; w D U $•>   *.
Loud speaker. No J"S25. %*7 ■■■>' e.^-h; Erande*
phones, $7 00 enrh. ntbjciel ti 7a" bscount.
Batteries. No. 7.01, $' • each; No 5$T, $4 10
Mch.
SAW?. Bt'CK- Happy Milium. $1$J4 dox.
Happy Idea $36 H StSSi DtaMtOM No. 6 $16 80
dox    .
SCREWS   Bright    flat
list;  bright   round head    6
head    67 •"■- 10  off
*10 off list; brass
flit head 574,10 off list; bra**s round ht-ad
55/10 off list
SCREWS'"'AP-JS off USC
SCREWS,  SET--55 off list
SHOVELS AND SPADES-"Ids or Fo-t.
$11 88 per dox   S Jones or Build,-g $13.78 p*r
N
*l*<* WBmmmaiimm^m^ma.. - ,,   ,
SCOOPS -Moots No  4. $:. \n dox
$17 65 dox:   No,  8. $18.1*0 dot;  No   U\ $M »
All atKivc In black tiulsh
WILDER—*H  x   *s.  ctst
lots.   45c  pur
.nets.
teas ,*>iu- pn* if
4**c pe-* tb.
SPIKES. PRESSED—Pw IM tb*
18 no   5 16 $s to; U-ln  $7 it
STAPLES- Hdlvitnixcd fence. $* K p*r VM
It>s In full kegs; fa Hani led p»>uitrT e«ttisc
$1050 Mr 100 it's, in full tags.
TACKS—Carpet. 70c off new Mm
WIRE. BARBED -Per roII—4 point. Cattta
$0 rod. $4 15;  4-point  h<»K.  80 rods  $t<*5.
WIRE,    PLAIN    QALVAX1SED—*Ptr
lb   No 9, MJ0; No  ti $6 00
WIRE   O A A- Per \(**i tbs   No
No   11. $6 10; No   12. $6 M
WRINC.ERS    Exe.     $*sl 00     S*K
$07 oo dox.; Bicycle, $S'l 60 dos
dox
WRENCHES.   PIPE   Triri!..,   lest
cenl  off list
WIRE CLnTH Out Of Stock, Vancouver.
$318 per 100 v<i ft ; Qslvaatatd, out of stock,
Vancouver. $4 75 p'-'* 100 wj   ft
WAHHINO MACHINES -Vetox water pow-
i^r, $24.75 eaeh; Seafoam S*ttetr*tC, $TAO0 each;
HnowUli,   $17 36  each;   Patriot,   $3S M  etch T
Ml
VO, H Ifc
S-;tfe*r..
Ajax.  $171 O*
i**«   45   p*r
VISE-5.   WARREN   SOLID   BOX—IS   R)t.
$1000 each; 50 tbs. $12.00 esch.
PAINTS AND OILS.
Bran-dram-Henderson
Per Gallon
B-H "English" ordinary colore  .$4.25
B-H "English" white „ „  ~ 4.00
B-H Exterior Oil Shingle Stain-
Ordinary colors, in 4 gal. cans   |l.|r
Greens and Greys. In 4 gal. cans 1(4
B-H Anchor Shingle Stain-
Ordinary colors, ln 4 gal cans  Lis
Grrens and Greys, in 4 gal. esns   l.|l
PAINTS
Gallon
Ordinary colors, in 1 gal. cans $4.30
Martin  Senour porch  paint  4.30
Martin  Senour  Neutone white  3.75
Martin 3enour Neutone color   3.75
Martin Senour floor paint   4.15
Sherwin   Williams,   white   5.75
Sherwin   Williams,   color _ 4.30
Sherwin  Williams,   porch  4.30
Sherwin Williams, floor  4.15
PUTT**— Per  100 lbs.
Bulk,  barrels 800!bs $6.60
Bulk,  irons  100  lbs    7.75
Bulk, Irons 26 lbs ,    8.30
Tins, 5 lbs; per tb    Sty
Tins,   lib „    .12%
UNSEED OIL- Gallon.
Raw, i to 2 barrels $1.55
Boiled, 1 to 2 barrels   1.58
LEAD. WHITE IN OlI^» Per 100 tbs.
1.000 lbs. to 1 ton  16.85
Less  17.35
Bran-dram'fl  Genuine   _    ll.Oi
TERPENTINE— Gallon
1 barrel lots $ 1.70
VARNISHES— GiUIom
Elastic. No. 1 „ $ 8,30
Elastic,  No. 2  „    7.40
IV   Linoleum        6 8*>
IV  Marine   Spar      710
IV  Furniture   «...   3.65
IV Pale Hard Oil     4 65
Less 33 1-3 per cent.
I-acqueret  $6.15 less 40
Automotive Price List
ABSORBERS SHOCK—Float A Ford No
I at $21.50.
ACCELERATORS FOOT—Wireless Ford
at $1 75 each.
ASSORTMENTS—Cotter pin 13o each; Cap
screws 3Sc each; Set screws 30c each; Machine screw 75c each; Machine nut 75c each.
BATTERIES—Hot Shot $2.&« each.
BOOTS—Tire 4-in. $1.25 each.
BUMPERS— Hoover Twinbar. $10 60 each
CAPS—Radiator, $3.00 each.
CARRuIU'NCLrM—Valve grinding 6-oi.  $4
dox
CARRIES—Luggage, collapsible $2.25 each.
CEMENT—Radiator.  % Ib  Wonder Worker $5 M dox.
CHAINS-Weed MxSft $«35 each: 32x34
i: tt) I B_i 17 70 each; 33x4 $8 20 each;
ttxt WOt Htf-fe    Loaa 10%.
■■■o. . ;JK*.r**—2*x2»-j $3 75 pair: 32x3M
!:: :»> v.i •■ Dx.14 $4 *--> pair; 30x4 $3 95 pair.
TAx* t* 5>! ?n r   L#*3 Sft*t.
UBAXBBBB; WJNDSHIELD—Presto $1.75
M-cf-i;   Rakia-E-Dsafi $5 j*> each.
COOLS—Spa-it nstgSe $3.«« each; Spark
-!.;,:hf»»  VA. <**' «K*5 *
DfiSUBCTC *_S— Wind adjustable $15.20
pair.
iv.VA.M5X— '-* pt. Jet Lac $6 00 doz.; 5-ox
-,v  -■;■+-   W.-x'*,*"   U**  d x:   Martin   Senour
. ■•* PuttS. I U 13c each; 1/32 19c each;
; M &c tatAi tf Me tach; y, 96c each; %
$: y. mch
HV'RNS— ESectrfc  $5.73 each.
JACKS—No 2*:' $2 00 each; No, 4 $2 25
eacJs: No.  41 $*••» II each
LOCKS. MOTOMBTER-Jto 390 $2 65
each- No  ttl $3 00 each; No. 392 $< 50 each
MIRRORS—Rear view $300 etch
fi!t*-Montmobile. liffht $1 55 gal ; medium
$! 60 gal : heavy $3 70 ga! 7
PATCHES BLOW OCT-Locklite. No. Z
OoMCb; No t 10c each; No. 5 75c each.
No   6 17c each.
PLATES-Stea IM* aw»v«    ».h. a  r
PLUGS—Spark Champion C3c eacn, a. v,
itan €3c earh; Hel-Fi. 51«-* *i»cb 36
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
mi no
TIPS FOR LIVE CLERKS
DO   YOU     SEE     PEOPLE?
IM
As a clerk walks along Ihs street, he should "see*1
as many people as possible,   As h«* finds his way to a
scat at tho hall park, he shouhl "see** those w tho
soats to either side.
Doing his own buying at stores, he should be alert
to other people around hiin.
It may suit Ihe individual in some occupation to
«jo about oblivious to people around him, not looking
for opportunities to greet with respecl ful not!, or smile,
or pleasant word as recognised onv. but certainly it in
not true of the retail elerk. If you want to be recognised by others, recognize them. The party whom you
greet respectfully across the counter at thc store is
one. in practically every instance, you can respectfully
recognize meeting on the streets or in another store.
Of course, you will not press the matter—probably it
will be only the respectful tip of the hat. or 'Fine
morning. Mr. Hocking!" A little detail, but one
whieh. practiced assiduously, will go a long way toward developing that acquaintanceship whieh is om* of
a clerk's most important personal assets.
And when you set- opportunities to tlo favors for
others, do them.   Suppose you are away from busim***,
shopping yourself in another store.   You see a woman
her arms full of bundles, approaching the door, which
is shut. It would be easy to "not see*' her, concentrating instead on merchandise on display.
Maybe you recognize her as a customer of your
store, maybe not. In anv event, vou do the RCtttle-
manly, courteous thing—open the door for her and
hold it as she passes through,
"See*1 people quickly when they enter your store,
Generally speaking, if you are nol waiting on another
customer, you should do as Putman did when he heard
the news war had started. You remember—he left
his plow in the furrow.
If you are wrapping a bundle, or putting stock in
order, or doing one or another detail, stop at OUCO
when a customer enters the store ami get down for ner-
vice in the quickest time possible.
Maybe the customer wishes speedy sorviee. maybe
not.   Hut you arc there to j*ive il if he does require it.
Of course, it would Im* a simple matter not to
"see" the entering customer, not noticing him until
your task was completed. That is poor salesmanship,
thou !»li.
MERCHANTS!
Don't " Write Them Off"
If your debtors move away or won't pay, don't drop
the accounts.   Let us help you get your money in.
Agents  throughout  Canada  and   U.  S.
NO COLLECTION—NO CHARGE
Credit Protectors Limited
314 PACIFIC  BLDG.,   •   -   -   VANCOUVER,  B.  C.
Phont: Sey. 371
Our Motto: ''Collections—or a Reason."
Ami speaking of seeing ami not staking,
also will profit, ami his store profit if he will
things to il«» for ihe customer, Take bundle wrapping
lor example, A elerk ean avoid eonskierabli* v. l m
lhat nature simply by not ^seeing" the -un*.,,
need for It Far better tor him to ''see/'
ihe favor,
MM
.   * I   s
•"   < ii
BUTCHERS* CORNER
l"|mu application tram tin  It  <\ Hoard ot thi  H<
tail Merchant.*' Assoeiation, lhe I    S   Department of
Agriculture has supplied a sorbin of "Ki-*, Talks i.i
Meal Dealers*/' by Lawrence A. Adams, Assistant M.ir.
keiini* Specialist, whieh we aw reproducing for the
benefit of our butcher readers
No, l
In a Wisconsin   In a little Wiaeonsin village of IOO0
Village population one meat markel wrvt&
the people and the fffoprs*'t*,-«r *mi ■ I
£uec£Sa*fitii   "If he ean make money a! that gsin*? i
ean," wai thv thought of another, and i *seeoi     nest
Store WSS opetteti    From  the  Ih $»iiini»itf,  the  m
store lost money, although tt received a good p "•■ ■
age,   The sales iu the firsl store weto cut nearly in
half by the competition and it, too, lost motte)    I
simplf  truth  is  that   if   tak*'* a  population ..!
HSN» to support a meat store
Store Congestion   A Htmilar situation an thai i»<; "■
in Cities. ed in the preceding paragrspl
eurred  in  Mew  fori Citj   Oi
neighborhood store wai sueeeiKfttl   Attracted I j the
presence of thc successful More, another opened    V*
original market immediately began lo lose raoncj
ihe second store haa never made money.  Tl« *   I
there may be sufficient population a blocs awaj I    ip
port two stores waa not sufficient to warrant* thi
ing of a leeond store    THK THOUSAND PKOPMJ
MUST BE REACHED
How Many Meat   Count the number of meal
Stores in Your      in your eity    What is Ihi p pul*
City? Hon of your eity J Hon mud rural
population  in addition  to Ini
people tb» the stores serve'     Miude  tin   total  !
tion nerved by the number of stores   If thi '■*-*
very mueh leiM lhan 1000 vmi mav be Mir.   thai
meal dealers are for from prosperous.   Nearl)
per store population i* to be desired.
pity
i
< is
i«
■1*0
:i*n
nil!
The Crowded   In a eertain eity in a central stai
City. was one store to 835 people Thi
of every four stores in that elt)   ' ;'
losing money.   Many of the owners would bat
better off financially If they had sold oul and 11
work lor some one CISC.
nt
The In q neighboring eity In the nam*
Prosperous   there were 1323 people to each stop
City. out   of tell  of the  store**  Wetv  sih *
IP VOU WEBB GOING TO 01'
RRTATTj MEAT MARKET WOULD VOU HKS!
BETWEEN THE TWO CITIES!
.ini*'
S'iiw
< fill
\   A 1025
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
37
Don't Forget the    pott's risk your money needlessly
Population. In a business enterprise.   If you
are thinking of opening a market.
spend a day or two. counting existing markets. Are
IjH»re too many? You ean soon find out by determining
the population of the city. Then you must estimate
how many of the rural population buy meat iu the city.
\l.ivbe a city a little further Off has mote room for you.
Where thc population per store is 1200 Ihe retail
n.at dealer will be successful. Population per store of
HtiHi is good, but when population measures only KIMI
per store, operation is dangerous, lu some section of
jhc country combination grocery and meat stores op-
crate with smaller population than is shown above, but
DON'T FOB0ET POPULATION IF Vol ARK
THINKING OF OPENING A STORE. POPULATION
M W roNTMiOL VOIR SUCCESS OR FAILURE.
BRITISH ATTITUDE TOWARDS PRESERVATIVES
IN FOODS.
Under the auspices of the   "People's   League  of
Health," Professor F. EL Dixon. IKS., delivered an
isddreSB before the Medical Society of London. Kng-
land, on March 25tb last, ll was. he said, obvious thai
organic foodstuffs were liable to bacterial decomposition, Something must be dom* to prevent eertain foodstuffs from putrefying. The methods were sterilisation, destroying the micro-organisms by heat or by preventing their growth by chemical substances. None oi
the chemical substances prevented the growth of the
micro-organisms which caused food poisoning. Putrefaction, in a sense, was ihe safteyvalve which indicated
lhe condition of the food, and if tiny used preservatives ihey allowed the malignant organisms to grow.
In Great Britain.they had a Committee which sat in
1901, but nothing was done until 1912. when the Ministry forbade the use of preservatives in milk. France.
Germany, the United States, and Sweden had absolutely forbidden the use of boric acid except ill certain
eases, and all countries had forbidden   sulphites   iu
meat. These, if sprayed on meat, masked incipient
pul refaction and brought back the bright red color.
The United States allowed the use of beusoie acid, under certain conditions which had to be reported.
If possible, it would be much better to do without
preservatives, but if they must have preservatives they
HhOttld see that there was as little as possible and have
"nly those preservatives whieh were least likely to interfere with health. Sugar was a preservative, whieh.
like common salt, another preservative, acted entirely
by its attraction for water.   Alcohol, vinegar, spices.
nd smoking Were other preservatives.
The question of preservatives in fool was largely
bound up with boric acid ami borax. Boric acid
cheeked putrefaction, but it did not cheek the growth
of thc malignant microorganisms. Il also altered the
nature of the food. The amount taken daily of boric
• •id by practically cverpom* was about 8 grains, but it
*\as quite possible to take as much as 4H to 50 grains
'■y eating ordinary food in the '24 hours. The maximum
'lose of boric acid in the "British Pharmacopacia
*<*ts 15 grains, It had been shown by experiments
lhal babies taking milk in which there was boric acid
'"••'nine thin, emaciated and had diarrhoea The ex-
V'l'iincnt «>n healthy yottttg men was not so unsatisfac-
!"*.v but one fact remained constant, that they did not
"hsorb their food normally, in other words, lost weight.
Hie butter whieh was imported here was entirely free
from preservatives, except in the case of butter from
Holland and France. Both New Zealand and Australia
exported large Quantities of butter to the United
States, and that butter had to be free from preservatives.^ What they could do for America they could do
for Britain. What was true of butter was still
more true of margarine Many of the big margarine
factories were already using no preservatives. Sausages made by the local man needed no preservative,
but some sausages came from long distances. There
was no cold and ice carriages for carrying goods on
English railways, and until these came along they had
to be content with permitting preservatives in sausages. The yolks of Chinese eggs sent to Britain
contained boric acid, and entered largely into the manufacture   of   confectionery and Madiera and sponge
cases.
MEAT AND CANNED FOODS ACT AMENDED.
An Act to amend the Meat and Canned Foods Act has
recently been passed by the House at Ottawa, and the following paragraph has been added to section 2 of this Act:—
"Canned Foods included foods (except flsh and shell flsh),
lhat iiave been preheated, cooked, preserved, condensed,
evaporated, dehydrated, dried or otherwise processed or prepared for food, and are placed in any closed can, bottle package, or container.
Section Thirteen of this Act has also been amended, and
the foUowing added thereto:—
"All canned foods, and vegetables, or products thereof,
or any food or food products, (except flsh and shell flsh),
which may b-. named by the Governor in Council, shall be
offered for sale only in such cans or other containers as the
Governor in Council may prescribe, and such cans or containers must contain the quality, quantity, or weight prescribed
by the regulations.
The first amendment is intended to give a definition of
what, for the purpose of the Act, shall be considered "canned
goods."
The second amendment gives the Governor in Council
authority to prescribe the quality, dimensions and character
of cans or other containers in which canned goods are offered
for sale, and also control of quality, quantity, and weight of
such products offered in such containers.
AMENDMENTS TO OPIUM AND NARCOTIC DRUGS ACT.
The following an* excerps of amendments to the above
Act: —
Amendments to Section 2.
"Physician" means a person registered as a medical prac-
tioner and in eood standing under the Act or ordinance governing the practice of medicine and surgery within the province or territory wherein is tendered any prescription or
order for any drug bearing his signature;
"Veterinary surgeon" means a person licensed and in
good standing as such under the Act or ordinance governing
the practice of veterinary surgery within the province or territory wherein is tendered any prescription or order for any
drug bearing his signature;
"Denttst" means a person licensed and in good standing
us such under the Act or ordinance governing the practice of
denial surgery within the province or territory wherein is
tendered any prescription or order for any drug bearing his
signature."
Section five of the said Act is amended by inserting immediately alter the word "therefor" in the eighth line thereof
the words "signed and dated," and by inserting Immediately
after the word "dentist" in the thirteenth line thereof, the
words "whose signature is known to the said druggist or if
unknown duly verified before such order or prescription is
filled."
Sec'ion nine of the said Act is amended by striking out
irom the sixth and seventh lines thereof the words "or more
than one-eighth of a grain of heroin, or more than one grain
of codeine."
Section  fifteen of the said  Act  is amended by adding
thereto as subsection two thereof, the following:—
(Continued on page 39) 38
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Aleomdale—
Asliu, 1. IV Burnt out. (gen. store).
Campbell River-
Campbell River Drag Store—Bualneai discontinued
Chemainus—•
Hedge, A. S.—Sold out to Donald Hob. risen (gro  &C.)
Chilliwaek—
Sleeves. R. It—Reported discontinuing, (gro.)
Cloverdale—
Goodlet. \v. BL—Reported commencing, (shoe rep)
Coalmont—
Shaw. n. v.—Reported i» financial difficoltiea. (gro.)
Creston—
Mawson Bros.—Repornd discootiuulug,  (g.**.)
Decker Lake—
Brunell. P.—Reported moving to Burns Lake   (gJk)
Duncan—
Duncan Cash Grocery—Sold out to j. \v. Conuery.
Lynn Creek—
Delaney. Norman--Ooaimenced. (bakery >.
McMorran. S.—Reported sold out to J   Porter, (g s)
Nelson-
Ideal Cash Grocery Lid.—Application mad* la tOOtOtO name
lo register.
New Westminster-
Archibald. D. M.—Commenced, (gro )
Premier Bakei y— Commenced
Matthews and Carter—Reported dissolved partnership,
(bakers).
J. A. TEPOORTEN
LIMITED
WHOLESALE DRUGS
PATENT MEDICINES DRUCISTS* SUNDRIES
PHARMACEUTICAL PREPARATIONS
308 Water St.
Vancouver, B. C.
i
Sores
Rheumatism
Soothe the sore muscles or ligaments by rubbing in Minard's Liniment. It penetrates, relieves and
heals. It eases inflammation and
restores the injured part to health.
Splendid for cuts and sores. It
sterilizes and heals quickly.
North  Vancouver—
(unltfte, Ki. <t« i i* k    COBUOCflCed   (drugs).
Prince Rupert—
Blackonslti A   Reported commeoetuii (furn., etc >
Slocan—
Gin. k W   Reported **«»t*i oat to \ M Rogers (cm - - ,-
Rock Creek—
Hork CrreK Cuoper-ithi- A*socifiiioi;    H<-port<-d t
Vancouver—
Mafka II  C   Bedding Co, Lid    N«me lUnch oft regfat-gj
I? C  Woollen Mill*   Comm^nrlng
Hurrwrd  EC&UtiBg  tlUhh—C08U&tfiet0|
Arnold & JfOttBg   rommeming (gTOeffl)
Itrown   C   H    «*«onm«*fiefd (doj )
Otuurtotec Wholesaler! t.nt ^Aattfoed; B J  Carted t«*
todtnu.    ntt-vilnit   Ot mdliof* held     (Mfri   md Udlf*
tailor-*}
MaHheW*.   C—.CommeJn*«*d    (b«kr*rl.
Reliable Grocer)   Aocttoo liie itlfftrttsed
Adam*. Lewi** ■ Reiported sotd ou*  (coofe** , tin |
Iteonett. Ge«»r««- '-H*-jM.»r{ed *old OUt.  (gtSOOi')
*'Au.n]:.i ciosnitiU Company, l.nt   'fiolIttTs Mtte -■,**,-m-.v
Giant Powdei Co of Ctowdti Ltd   *App!ytn| foi chaagi
noM* io Canadian Olaot Untiled
Haoaford a* Nirhoi ■•■• Reported lofd ou* ie R w Reyes
iejnr «*r l
Peigg, H*ibe     H< !.w*rt*-d moid OSt 10 M   Hctnae-ii   *».
Swift j n  •Commence (co&tec,
Thompson. Hlrhard■ ■■ fUtftBTied #oItt QUI
Bennett, «;   W    i'mntnvtH'*'*   tetss'i.
Una*'. Wm     ILtiUff'* <Mil«- hviti   {Otttaftft   ••'<" *
Wai non.  John    iOCOfpOlHt'^d   II     JotU) .  \\ a'--..e      S.*,v>:
(glove mfrj
Vector a—
Capital JttwM Compan*. Matited   Commenced   **
and produce)
Har *•»■•». li S   tiHfoftfsno-i'd rtiofr t»u*n»«,*.» (ptot   rail tc]
Witty, Mi*  -Commenced  (confe*,, ten cream 4c
s
ALES THAT
ATISFY
Mveiy merchant like* lo make Sale*
Satinfy     IW UtlllOflt  NMtktfaCtiOll  ■"
•teller mini pnrehaser we RtfOllftl)   fffotu*
mend
Keystone Brand
School Supplies
hy reason of the ({onerous (jusntlt) o>
paper rapplied ami its excellent Quality*
these School [looks please    Thf l,i
receives a utlsfsotor^ margin of p'"'
shall ue ntil.mii Samples snd Pnccsi
Smith, Davidson ft Wright, Ud.
MANUFACTURERS  AND  WHOLESALE
PAPER DEALERS
VANCOUVER
VICTORIA 1925
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
39
OPIUM AND NARCOTIC DRUGS ACT
(Continued Irom page 37.)
••(•j) Except in the ease or a drag addict or habitual user
ol drugs Wutertng from a diseased eondition caused otherwise ihan by the excessive use of any drag, it shall be no defence to a physician charged With an offence under section
six of this Afit lhat he did Rive, sell or furnish any drug to
in h addict or habitual user for self -administration."
Section eighteen is amended by inserting Immediately
titer ihe word "drug" In tin4 fifth tine the words "and if necessary, by force, may search an> person there found."
Beetles nineteen of tha said Aci is repealed, and the following is substituted therefor*"-"
"HI. When any person is convicted of an offence against
ihis Act, 'he drug In respect of which ihe offence was com-
mined or which has been seized as aforesaid, and all receptacles of any kind whatsoever, found roniainlug the same.
Klid if thi drug be found in any vehicle, motorcar, automobile,
boat, canoe, or conveyance (o Which the said drug is found,
-hall be forfeited io His Majesty, and shall he delivered to the
Minister tO bv disposed of SS he may direct.
NO PARKING PLEASE!
The manufacturers are making It easier for us all the
lime to huy automobiles, but the city is making it harder for
nt to park them.
In order to OSC your machine in business you're got to
lhe in ihe suburbs and work In the Country,
A man buy* a new automobile downtown and it's an old
nt  by the time lie gels il home.
H<- usually has 10 purchase two machines one for driving
and one for parking
People can no longer refer to their automobiles as "pleasure cars."
Fifty thousand more people would by baying cars If the
dealers could guarantee them I place to park.
It's get tine so that you have to buy an automobile and a
puce of real estate at the same lime,
There are so manv one-way streets in town that a man is
afraid to turn over in bed at [Ugh! !<>r fear he's breaking the
law,
IP' goes around so many corners In the daytime that when
he retires he sleeps with his hand out.
One guy spent the whole night moving his bed around the
room, so that he wouldn't be parking over 15 minutes in one
spot.
The next morning when he awoke he looked on all the
bed posts for a ticket.
When his wife shook him to wake him up he thought she
was a traffic cop and started to tell her he was a stranger in
town.
The average motorist tries to observe all the traffic regulations, but in most cases he has to break three laws in order
to obey one.
In another year we'll probably have to park our cars by
standing them up on end.
Either that or lake them apart and carry them into the
building with us.
Some citiee hire detectives to walk the streets and keep
you from parking. That's nothing—you have to be a detective yoursell io find a place to park.
CANADIAN CUSTOMS ACT AMENDED
Additional Penalties Imposed for Smuggling and False Entries
Section two hundred and six of the Customs Act, chapter
forty-eight of the Revised Statutes, 1906, is repealed and the
following is substituted:
If any person smuggles or clandestinely introduces into
Canada any goods subject to duty under the value of two
hundred dollars; or, makes out or passes or attempts to pass
through the Custom House any false, forged or fraudulent invoice of any goods of whatever value, or in any way attempts
to defraud the revenue by avoiding the payment of the duty
or any part of the duty on any goods of whatever value, such
goods, if found shall be seized and forfeited without power
of remission or if not found, but the value thereof has been
ascertained, the person so offending shall forfeit, without
power of remission the value thereof as ascertained.
Every person, shall in adition to any other penalty to
which he is subjected for any such offence, forfeit a sum
equal to the value of such goods, which sum may be recovered
in any court of competent jurisdiction; and further be liable
OH summary conviction before two justices of the peace to a
penalty not exceeding two hundred dollars and not less than
fifty dollars, or to imprisonment to a term not exceeding one
year, and not less than one month, or to both fine and imprisonment.
Every one who smuggles or clandestinely introduces into
Canada anv goods subject to duty of the value of two hundred dollars or over, is guilty of an indictable offence, and
BUILDING FOR PERMANENCE
Tlie Cathedral ot Bt John the Divine, in New York, is destined BOine day to he the crowning church
edifice ot this nation ami several times the size ol Westminster Abbey. Yet today, alter thirty-one
years Ol work and the expettdii ure of $3,000,000, ii Is only one-third finished and it
Is not expected thai it Will be completed within the lifetime of any one how living
iu the city. Merchants often complain of the slowness of their progress toward
success and accomplishment. The*} tome! that the really biggest accomplishments
require the longest time in the making. They prefer to point to men like Lieut.
Osborne C. Wood, who Is reputed to have made the better Of a million within a few
months in the slock market. The lieutenant was fortunate in having a War Department behind him wise enough to nil him lo stop when he was on the crest
of the wave and able to compell his obedience. You are interested in merchandising
goods and are nol as successful as you would wish to be. Do you realize that your
failures or lhe past, for the very fact that they have been failures, have in them the potential ability to
teach you to better fit you lor success in the future even than if they themselves have been successes.
Al Francis Hacon put ii: "Prosperity is not without many fears and disasters; and adversity is not
without comforts and hopes."
.***#&''til* MttW 40
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
.is
ni
liable in addition to any other penalty to which he is subject
for any such offence to imprisonment for a term not exceed
ing seven years, and not less than one year for the first offence, and to imprisonment for a term not exceeding tea
years, and not less than three years lor a second and each
subsequent offence, and such goods, if found shall be seized
and forfeited without power or remission, or if not found but
the value thereof has been ascertained the person so offending shall forfeit without power of remission the value thereof
as ascertained.
Goods Unlawfully Imported
if any person knowingly harbours, keeps, conceals, pur
chases, sells, or exchanges any goods unlawfully Imported
Into Canada whether such goods are dutiable or nol. or where
on the duties lawfully payable have not been paid, Mich goods
if found, shall be seized and forfeited Without power of remission, and if such goods are not found, the person so effend-
Ing shall forfeit the value thereof without power of
remission.
Every such person shall in addition to any other penalty
forfeit a sum equal to the value of such goods, which may bo-
recovered in any court of competent jurisdiction, and shall
further be liable, on summary conviction before two justice
of the peace, to a penalty not exceeding two hundred doi
lars, nnd not less than fifty dollars, or to imprisonment to a
term not exceeding one year, and tmfVr^s than one month, or
to both fine and imprisonment.
Where the goods so harboured, kept, concealed, purchaser!.
sold, or exchanged are of the value of two hundred dollars, or
over, such person shall be guilty oi an indies able offence and
liable to a term of imprisonment not exceeding seven years.
and not less than one year for a first offence, and to g term
of imprisonment not exceeding ten years and not less than
three years for a second and each subsequent offence.
.t«MH>j.
PURCHASERS   CORPORATION LTD.
A corporation known as Corporation D*Achats Ltee,
(Purchasers Corporation Ltd.) has been formed with load
quarters in Montreal This company is organising with a
Dominion charter and capital of $100,000, made op ol |40Q
cumulative, preferred shares bearing interest at 7 per cent,
and 600 common shares each with a par value of $$& The
organization, according to Canadian Grocer, plans to include
five hundred grocers drawn from the provinces of Quebec ami
Ontario. Kach member joining is required to purchase two
preferred shares of stock at $50 each, payments for whieh
are to be made quarterly until the stock is fully paid up In
addition an annual fee of $25 Is charged, Dividend*, if earned, will be paid on the outstanding shares with preferred
having first claim.
According lo the manager of the company the aim Is to
group orders of members nnd buy merchandise direct from
manufacturer or pioducer wherever possible, No travelers
will be employed, members being drcoilsed each week
Goods are to be paid for within ten days after receipt and only
merchants of sound financial credit will be admitted 10 mem
bership.    Individual members an- in no way   liable for any
Plus Sales Tax
50 Envelopes
100 Sheets
P.-inted with your name
and  addrem
Pottage Prepaid.
iiikIi Qrade Bond paper,
nir.i- 8x7 wiih envoi n>
match     Four   lines   <»*
type,  •*•'*.* h  line linl  In rn-
csed »" letters. Printed
nt top centre of aiwi'i snd
<>ii i!,<|i of envelope,
All ideal Kift. I'kkIi Willi
order.
Nicholson Limited
S-stond and Arbutus
VANCOUVER,   B.   C.
debts Incurred by the company and privileges ol ll
ation "Will he confined sirlcily lo members.
No attempt ii made to hide Um raci thai ih,. organlaii
tl a means or helping the independent retailer to n»maln l
baslnest under the present condition* of keen run,*,,   ! .
8.  C.   PHARMACISTS   ELECT   OFFICERS.
B. H. Aaronton Becomes President of th« Association it
Closing Session.
At the anneal meetins of the it c PbaraiaeeotlcAi Aaaod
ation tt H Aaronaon wai sleeted prealdeni ami r \\ crow-
d**r, vice* prealdent
Leslie Q,  I fender son.  Vancouver,   WM  elected I   u rftk
for the district aa the board al the •aeodatiotj
Raeeell ll  HcDaffee. whose tawst-year term expires   h  \r''
oaaos wai reelected f»r District No 2. Victoria, and \ Osii
oway. K«mlm>p*. for District No 3, which loclodw V « Wm
mlnatef and the mainland Interior
Other members ot the council with r jreai iret to • .•-.■ .*,*■.
j t. Crowder, t*s I, Vaaeonver; vv j Barker, No I v..
tiria and H«t j  \ BacahasB, No 3. Golden
in the ibsenee ol President J A Baekham, .Mr is n -Ui
onsoa, rtee^waWeat, had charge ol the Beetles R h vv.
DofFee li reatntrar, lecretari and treasarei
Ijetlie Henderson gave r talk on the new Proprieti    \
tide* Trade* .\MorUiion. which Is now becoming I fai •■.
the retail drag itssH
Intrtna lhe iesaetai lesskm taastderatSon vai &•:■•■ ■"'■
proposed amendments to 'h** Opium and Narcotic -Drai ko
new belore the Ho«*«- al common*, Ottawa Thee* unci ■:
mi-fttn detailed In thin !**u* deal with *ale at Barcode* na
d**r license, tb*' form of preacrlpilona, tdgaatarei to *i-,<*.
mast    be    veri*8**«l     In the propos-cd «tnendmen!n in-roll U
barred altogether   Oodeiae and apomorimlnf tn u ud   ■
Oi   tlM   SCheilulC,
NATIONAL CANNERS ADOPT COOE OF ITHICS.
Tlo- National Canners  laaootetlofl have lanoti
adoption of »h«' fotloirlag Code ol Bthici to govern »
ben m the ooodooi ol that? basiaesi sad their reti
I hi* publlr
r«» RMare tha oooeamlas public th«* best cam
thai  IdeOltflC  SllOWtalgl  and  human  ihill can pp
to ettabitab retatlofli Sffth allied tadaafriei tad trad
basis Of Ju**?lr»- and falrneSSi" thr- AHOCiSttfffl tnatt :
lowing itatemeai of prlnti-plet
"To non In the preparation "f our prodacti onl)
material! which are itntad sad wholeaoBie
io amnio) isallary sad bygenic method* md •*.
In the Operation *7 our  plant**, to comply   With '•'*
Code of th" Association and all food law» ind r> t* ;  •
"To maintain Um highest itaadardi of vssMtj
"To irtrhfuity de-scribe and represent our produ
"To fulfill i*»th the splrl! and letter Of ill ««''•'
"To recognise always a paramount obligation 10
the Intereeti ol the consamtni public"
I        V   M
.    III >
More Rapid
Than Letters
The long-distance telephone
service.
IRITIIN COIUMIU TELEPHONE COMPANY, LTD. 11125
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
41
Mrs. Maine's Marmalade
ORANGE
GRAPE FRUIT
PINE APPLE
2645—4th   Ave.,   West.
Phone: Bay. 133
MONARCH   KNITTING   CO.
Limited.
Mens and womens hosiery knitted
outerwear and hand knitting yams.
Represented in British Columbia
S. D. STEWART 4 CO. LTO.
318 Homer St Vancouver, B. .C
Phone: Sey. 7525
ROCK ISLAND OVERALL CO.
Rock Island, Quebec
Representative:
R. M. Foster, 3544—32nd Ave.
Vancouver, B.C.
Phone: Bay. 5030Y
W.
PALM OLIVE
SOAP
Representative:
Oean Armstrong, 1834 Larch St
Vancouver, B.C.
Phont:  Bay. 501L
Paper bags, wrapping paper,
for all requirements.
COLUMBIA PAPER CO. LTD.
1038 Hamilton St. Vancouver, B.C.
Phone: Sey. 8822
DAYTON     SCALES
Meat   Sheers.    Meat    Choppers.
Coffee    M>Hs.    Chtcse    Cutters.
Bread Itinera
INTERNATIONAL   BUSINESS
MACHINE   CO.   LTO.
F. C. STRICKER,
Local  Representative
668 Seymour St.   Phone:  Sey. 283
CANADA STARCH
CO. LTD.
E. H. ROWNTREE. Representative
207 Hastings  West.  Vancouver.
Phone:   Sey. 59
Kellogg's Corn Flakes
Local Agents
L. P. MASON & CO.
510  Hastings  West
Sey. 2908
Phone
Milne fd MiJdelton
Limited.
Wholesale Dry gooda
347  Water  Street Vancouver.
Phone: Sey. 162
QUAKER JAMS
DOMINION CANNERS, B.
Limited
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Phone:  Sey. S862
THE   BRITISH   AMERICAN   WAX
PAPER CO.  LTD.
CONSOLIDATED    SALES    BOOK
AND  WAX   PAPER  CO.  LTD.
HIGH   GRADE   WAXED   PAPERS
AND COUNTER SALES BOOKS
Distributing Agent for B. C.
vJ Vfex Paper Specialist ^
1030   HAMILTON   STREET
vANCOuvii a c.
Phone: Sey. 3112
CANADIAN
TOLEDO SCALES
E. S. CHAMBERS, Agency Manager
424 Cordova St W. Phone. Sey. 3S11
Vancouver.
CaiiMhtaCralb..lH-d
Head Office
Local Agents:—
McNEELYS LTD.
739 Hastings St W.
Toronto
Phone:
Sey. 9337
Phone:   High.
IDEAL CONf COMPANY
Manufacturers of
ICE   CREAM   CONES
Purest Made     Cost Leaa
335  PRINCESS AVE.
Vancouver.
Oa>f*a«f.
B.  C.   Distributors  of
Messrs. T. H. Prosaor 4 Sons Ltd.
London.
Manufacturers   of   Pressors'   Celebrated Line of TENNIS and
CRICKET  Supplies.
Associated Agencies
LTD. ^
S15 PtnSor  St W.   Vancouver.
Phone: Sey. 131
BORDEN'S
EVAPORATED
MILK
Vancouver Office
332 Water Street
Phone:  Sey. 6383
STORE  EQUIPMENT
Scales, S*
icers. Cutters and Cabin-
eta—New,
Rebuiit
and Second Hand.
Cash or
Terms.
THE
SCALE
SHOP  LTD
Sey.
ati
365 Cordfl
va St W.. facing Homer.
mm* 42
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
M
ay
PAPER BAGS
J. C. WILSON   LTD.
1068 Homer Street,       Vancouver.
Phone: Sey. 781
Kmi
ROYAL CROWN
SOAPS
Manufactured In Ilritish Columbia
and guaranteed,
ROYAL CROWN  SOAPS  LTD.
GLASS   JARS
"Improved Gem" A "Perfect Seal"
Local Representative: R. G. Moore.
Domiaioa Glass Coapany Ud.
510 Hastings St. West.    Sey. 5138
IK OKIE-M
KNITTING CO. IIO.
J. J. MACKAY,
Agent.
Phone: Sey. 3081
804 Bower Bldg.
Vancouver.
HOSIERY
WATCHES,   CLOCKS,   JEWELRY
Western Wholesale Jewelers
Cordova and Cambie Sts.
Phone: Sey. 2765
PAPER   PRODUCTS
MANUFACTURERS
CONTINENTAL     PAPER
PRODUCTS  LTD.,  Ottawa,  Ont.
Local    Representatives:
Smith, Davidson 6\ Wright
Davie and Homer Sts.     Sey. 9565
McCORMICKS
JERSEY CREAM SODAS
McCormick Mfg. Co. Ltd.
1150  Hamilton   Street,  Vancouver.
C. H. KENNEY, Manager.
Phone: Sey. 3412
BERVICE   TO   OUT   OF   TOWN
8UB8CRIBERS.
The British Columbia Retailer will
ba pleased to furnish subscribers
tha names and addresses of representatives or agents of eastern
manufacturers in Vancouver. We
will alao advise where their com-
moditles ean be purchased.
Glass - Mirrors
BEVELLING SILVERING
GLAZING
WESTERN GLASS CO. LTD.
Importers.  Manufacturers
Wholesale and Retail Dealers
158 CORDOVA  STREET  WEST
Vancouver.
Phone Sey, 8687
Hams & Bacon
Swift's "Premium"
SWIFT CANADIAN CO. LTO.
Vancouver.
PAPER
BAGS     AND     WRAPPING
Norfolk Ptptr Co. UfJ.
136 WATER STREET
Vancouver,
Phone:  Sey. 7868
Water Repcllant Clothing
• BEAR
**
R. A. SIME, BC Distributer
Camalam t*mk aa iaat
MS Mercantile O'dg . Vancouver. B   C.
rmaOmai Camis a tsmmm*
GALVANIZED IRONWEAR
THE THOS. DAVI080N MFO. CO.
LTD.
123 Powell Street Vancouver.
Phone*. Sey. 4856
REGISTERED.
CHIPMANHOLTON       KNITTING
CO, LTD.
E. H. Walsh d Co. Ltd., Agents.
318  Homer  Street,        Vancouver.
Phone: Sey. 4656
Addressograph
Machine
Model  No. 3, Complete with pute
frames, 24 steel drawers and cm
met.   Will be sold st HALF price
For full  particulars apply
RELIABLE FURNITURE CO. LTD.
New   Westminster,   B.   C
UNDERWEAR
ATLANTIC UNDERWEAR LTD.
E. H. Walsh 4 Co. Ltd., Agtnti
318 Homer Street Vancouver.
Phone: Sey. 858?
TIGER BRAND
UNDERWEAR
i. J. MACKAY, Agent
00* Bower B'dg     Phone: Sey. IM-
Tit CALT KNITTING CO. LTD
Gait, Oatarie
" CEETEE"
Pure Wool
UNDERCLOTHING
TURNBULLS of Gatt
Local Office   318 Homer Street
Phone: Sey. ?W5
T.  D.  STARK
F. W. STERLING
Tei«ph°nt
Sey. 6195
8TARK * STERLING
MANUFACTURERS'   AGENTS
1043  Hamilton  Street.
VANCOUVER, B.
C.
Addressing
Mmln.sl.uu     Mu.iliraphit'fl
► »t»*mlU 1-fiUM  r»Mlin». *t*
Direct Mall Camp»(«n»
Handled Kftlrlentlr
Wrig^y Directories, lid.
tf llMiIni* W **y »J* Ihe ST. LAWRENCE LINE
PAPER BAGS
Made in Canada—from Canadian Papers
iiiiifiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
"SIMPLEX"    -   Light Manilla
" MAPLE LEAF " Light Kraft
"LION"      -    -     Heavy Kraft
IHttttlltltllltHtttttlttlltlltlttllttllUtlttltlllttltlllltttttttttltttltlttttUllltltHttlllUtltltllltttllll
A Bag suitable for every kind of Merchandise
Made by St. Lawrence Paper Bag Co.
SELLING AGENTS FOR B. C.
COLUMBIA PAPER CO. LIMITED
CARRY LARGE STOCKS IN VANCOUVER AND VICTORIA
B)
^
ffl
Premium
C?
V
&
%
Wr
Whether it be the dealer or the consumer--
"Quality First" is a safe rule to follow in buying food products. Swift's "Premium" hams
and bacon will measure up to the highest standards in eve<7 respect, thoroughly cured, hardwood smoked, parchment wrapped, superior in
flavor and with the quality that distinguishes
them from lower grade stock. As a dealer you
will find it to your advantage to stock "quality" products as you will be able to build up
a good volume of business, and on a profitable
basis.
SWIFTS    PREMIUM" HAMS AND BACON
ARE A MADE IN B. C. PRODUCT.
SWIFT CANADIAN COMPANY LIMITED 

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