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The British Columbia Retailer May 31, 1924

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Array The
British Colum,
b/a
I
VOL XVI. No. 9
Vancouver, B. C.
MAY, 1924
20c per copy; $2.00 per year.
Sixteenth Year.
Can You Afford
to sacrifice accuracy ?
A Hair Perhaps Divides the False and
Tnii "---ami yet the merchant who uses a
Toledo knows that even the "hairsbreadth"
in accuracy is achieved with every ounce of
(goods In* puts on his scale.
An accuracy maintained permanently over
th<* long years of usi*. an accuracy that cannot
become unpaired through changing temperatures, or springs which lose their resilience,
Toledo Scales weigh by gravity alone, weight
against weight, honest weight always.
Ami that hairs-breadth of in«accuracy—just
08 tin* drop of water wears away the hardest
roek, so will the constant drip of over weights
wear away your profits.
Protect yourself, customers and reputation
by using Toledo Scales. Write for full details
of models, prices, allowances on old scales and
easy payment terms.
Canadian Toledo Scale Co. Limited
Head Office and Factory
Windsor, Ontario.
Salts Office ami Service Stations Throughout
the Dominion.
Vancouver Office, 424 Cordova St. West
TOLEDO SCALES
NO SPRINGS-HONEST WEIGHT PAPER BAGS
Standard—Light Kraft-Heavy Kraft
Paper Mills:
Lachute and St. Jerome, Que.
Manufacturers since 1870
These are our leading lines and have been for years
the best bag values before the retail trade of Canada.
The paper  used   in   their  manufacture   i*  specially
made In our own paper milk and is actually tougher *»nd
stronger.
If a better bag were possible .1. (', Wilson. Limited
would make it.  "»2 years in the buaineaa
J. C WILSON, LIMITED
Manufacturers of
PAPER BAGS.     WRAPPING, TISSUE AND TOILET PAPERS
for   Wholesalers and Retailers.
1068 HOMER STREET, VANCOUVER, B. C.
Phone: 8eymour 781
MAKE BIG
IS BY FKAlTIUXfi
CROWN OLIVE
Manufactured
in British
Columbia and
Guaranteed  by
"The
Perfect
Toilet
Soap
i*
THE ROYAL CROWN SOAPS, LTD.
VANCOUVER, B. C. IU*'.
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
3
How Many of the 57 Varieties
Have You in Stock?
HERE IS THE LIST:
Hijtu   Baked   Beam   with   Pork and
"Tomato saw**
iieiit* u«k«*d Beaai wui»»m Tomato
Sauce, *Mh Port   ik»»n>» style.
Heiat Hiked &vm* m Tomato s«un-
without M*'Bi**Vit''i»rlmi.
linns Baked Red Ktdn«n Beaut
Ks-jai Peanut ESttUit-.
H-eUit (*r««*ni of Tomato Soup.
Betas Cooked Speftettl
HHns hill Pickle-*
)blxit Swett Mtdgtrt Gherkins.
Helm Preserved Sweet Gherkins.
Reins Preserved Sweet Mixed pickles.
Heiai Sour Spiced Gherkins.
Iff loi Sour Midgel Gherkins.
Heiai Sour Mixed Pickles.
Heinz Chow chow Pickle.
Helm Sweei Mustard Pickle,
Ketus Queen Olives,
Htelni Matuaniliii Olives.
Helns Staffed Olives.
Hviiu Pun- Olive OIL
Heinz Sour Pickled Onions.
Heinz Worcesterhsire Sauce.
Heinz Chili Sauce.
Heinz Beefsteak Sauce.
Heinz Tomato Ketchup.
Heinz Prepared Mustard.
Heinz India Relish.
Heinz Evaporated Horse Radish.
Heinz Pure Malt Vinegar.
Heinz Pure Cider Vinegar.
Heinz Distilled White Vinegar.
Heinz Tarragon Vinegar.
Check   it   over—and   figure
the profit in the ones you handle
Have you ever figured the profit on the others ?
HEINZ
3?
MM THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
 "I
Mav
Sell
B. C.
Products
|kvsmm»-%
Sell
B.C.
Products
Wild Rose
Pastry Flour
MADE IN VANCOUVER
     aa
Vancouver Milling and Grain Co.
LIMITED
Head Office nod Mills: Vaacoaver, B. C:
It
WAFFLE BRAND FANCY TABLE SYRUP
IS EXCEPTIONALLY GOOD.
Note: We could not improve the syrup so we have
improved the container.
Kelly Confection Co. Ud.
1100 Mainland Street
VANCOUVER, B. C.
The "Pull" of
4X Advertising
THE '•pull" of our consist*
est advertising means tluit
it created i willingness to
accept Shelly** 4X Bread. The
fact tint! these customers eome
again and again indicates tin* uniform goodnesN of IX Bread.
Every person  who eomes in to
purchase « lotf of 4X Bread is«»
potential etistoBtor f*»r other lines.
SHELLY
BROTHERS
VANCOUVER
NEW WESTMINSTER
VICTORIA
NANAIMO
J?
I77//J
V**o
totim
SPECIALTIES
BEST KNOWN & MOST
CALLED FOR BRAND OF
CANNED rraiTS.VTOElABUS
& FOOD SPECIALTIES IN
AIL THE WORLD 1024
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Willi Sfhlch In incorporated the B. U TRADE REVIEW.
HI
•I "J
li
i
i'-'Vi
fPi
ll
i
I
7M
'•The End of s Perfect Dsy ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
llde from finest flavoured cane sugar, a special grade of which is imported for the
lIPuUpTall sizes of packages to suit your customers' requirement,
flirt packages designed to beautify your store.
21b. tins, 24 to a case.
Mb. tins, 12 to a case
10-lb. tins, 6 to a case.
20-lb. tins, 3 to a case.
Perfect Seal jars, 12 to a case.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
- ■ ■ -.{mTum, 6
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Mav
A Careful Survey—
Of the fire Insurance field of this Continent shows
that over 85% of the Total Insurance is placed with
Stock Companies.
The Sign of SAFE Inmrance
j"£*S>
924 Hastings Street Went
Vancouver.  B.C.
Ihe, ST. LAWRENCE LINE
PAPER BAGS
Made in Canada—from Canadian Papers
IHIIIIIIIIIIItlllltlllllllllflfllllllllllllllltlfllllllllfllllflllltllllllltlllllllllllllMIIIIIIIMIIMflllfH-^l
"SIMPLEX"    -   Light Manilla
"MAPLE LEAF"  Light Kraft
"LION"      -    -    Heavy Kraft
ItllllltlUHtlllMlltlMllllllllllttllllllllllltiliiiiiiiiuitititiiiiiiiiMtuiltiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiii,,!!,
$
A Bag suitable for every kind of Merchandise
Made by St. Lawrence Paper Bag Co.
SELLING AGENTS FOR B. C.
COLUMBIA PAPER CO. LIMITED
CARRY LARGE STOCKS IN VANCOUVER AND VICTORIA 1924
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
t   BRITISH COLUMBIA
JAILER
Secretary.  Relenting th. faii—,^
Branches R. M. a.
Wilh which la IncorptnnliKl thi* H   C. TRADE REVIEW
Published Monthly.
UBNBRAL MBRCIUNDI8B.
GROCERIES. DRYGOODS,
HARDWARE. FOOTWEAR,
OFFICIAL ORGAN OF B.C. BOARD
RETAIL MERCHANTS'
ASSOCIATION OF CANADA.
A MONTHLY JOURNAL published in the interest of Retail Merehan
dning and the Development of Commerce in Western Csnsds.
SUBSCRIPTION RATE; Two Dollar* Per Year, payable io adrance.
Adrertialni Rates oo Application.
Publishers: PROGRESS PUBLISHING CO. LTD.
Suits 101-2 Merchants' Exchange Building
VANCOUVER. B. C.
Telephone 8«*>*. 3S61
Editor, J. S. Morrtaon
B&lsre-d at Ottawa as s-mmd-claas Butter
Agass,z W. A. Jones.
Armslron^ G. H. Smith.
     Chilliwaek A. Kdox
SIXTEENTH YEAR   Cranbrook J. L. Campbell.
Kaml0°P8 A. H. Muirhead.
Kelowna A. Fraser.
Ladner A. W. Bull.
Lvtton .... B. Rebagliatl.
Merrltt C. J. Mills.
Mi88lon F. C. Lightbody.
Nanaimo w. F. Norris.
Nelson e. F. Gigot.
New Westminster D. Stuart.
Revelstoke J. p. Hume.
Vancouver W. F. Ing.
Victoria J. Wallis.
White Rock E. H. Hardy.
Cable Addn-ss—Shipping-*—All Codes
W. N. Code, Business Manager
Vol XVI No. 9.
MAY. 1924.
Vancouver, B.C.
Time Payments
l! is regrettable that when this country should Ih*
advancing towards a period of real prosperity, there
should be « growing tendency among a eertain element
of the consuming public to make extravagant pur-
rhai-seson the partial payment plan
Tin- automobile is perhaps the most popular item
10 eome under thin method of purchase, hut it is hy no
means tin* only faetor in the   easy-payment   system.
Furniture  has been  purchased  mi  the  time-payment
plan for many years, ami latterly, we (iml Included,
pianos, grnmaphoncH, moloi*.hunts, jewelry, radio sets.
houses ami what not Nothing seems to escape the time-
payment erase, and the appetite of the puhlie has heen
thoroughly whetted for luxuries.
In spite of the more liberal wages   enjoyed,   this
method nf purchasing is having a had effeel upon business, and it appear* that the higher the want's, the
stronger the Inclination to obtain things whieh hereto*
fore were beyond roach.
lairing appeals to buy this of that, tor a small cash
payment have been responsible for the increasing desire
1,1 spend, and the public have been gulled into contracts,
whieh subsequently prove a hardship to carry through.
Taking the ease of the automobile. 7.V.  of whieh are
wild to be bought on time, (and there are probably one
•u ten of the population of this provinee running either
a flivver »»r a more expensive machine); it is a simple
matter to become the driver of an automobile by paying one-third down, but prospective buyers do not take
into consideration, brokerage charges, interest whieh
must be paid, insurance, aubsequenl repairs, oil, gas,
CiC*   When these charges are reduced to twelve month
ly notes and must be paid as they eome due. or the auto
is reclaimed, purchasers find it difficult, if not impossible to meet thellt.
There are in addition, rent, living expense, clothing, life insurance, and possibly payments to be made
on the house, piano, aud other items, or interest on
mortgages, and it is obvious, that despite wage increases granted since the war. there is insufficient to meet
this galaxy of indebtedness.
It is consequently necessary to stint here and there
to avoid losing the automobile, or some other item
which has been bought on the time-payment plan. Unfortunately it is generally the grocery, clothing, or
other stores selling life's necessities which are held
back in order that luxuries may be enjoyed. In plain
language, too many people are living beyond their
means, and the time-payment plan is pointed to as the
main cause Of trade curtailment. If such a large percentage did not wish to live on the same level as the
rich, business conditions would be in a much better
state.
Luxuries should not be enjoyed unless they can be
paid for in spot cash, and where people arc spending
their future income before it is earned, there is bound
to be a flare-back. It is perfectly in order to buy necessities on the time payment plan, but unfortunately
that demand is rather limited, and the burden proportionately light When it comes to an automobile, however, an expensive radio set or numerous items coming tinder the classification of luxuries, the purchase of
which could be easily postponed until the ready cash
is available, purchasers are showing a lack of vision, THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RKTAILKR
Mi
ay
and jeopardising their spending power in a manner
which results in no prosperity, either for themselves.
or for the community of which they arc a part.   More
conservatism, ami leas veneer would be a suitable i ol
for the majority who purchase luxuries on th-    ,
payment plan
GROCERIES & PROVISIONS
GENERAL BUSINESS
iii
The retail grocery business is in a very healthy
state at thc present time. Volume is not as large as
might be expected, but credits am! tin* markets an*
much more favorable. The store that is catering to the
family trade giving credit aud honest service is in better shape financially than it has been for some years
This condition has been brought about to some extent
by the gradual elimination of quite a number of the
smaller stores, the pioneers of which set themselves up
in business shortly after the war with no experience in
their adopted venture and little capital. The owners
of these small establishments have since discovered to
their sorrow that a better livelihood is to be math* at
manual labor than with a small grocery business, with
the consequence that many have ceased to exist to the
betterment of the established ami legitimate retail
grocers.
While conditions at present an* good, no particular
rush should be expected for the m*xt few mouths at
least. In the Eastern States business at the present in
experiencing a reaction which may reflect to a leaser
degree iu Canada. It is expected however that the
fall months will bring a renewed buying activity,
Wholesalers here are experiencing a lull in so far
as thc logging camps trade is concerned It is stated
that there are sufficient logs in the water close to Vancouver and New Westminster to keep the mills supplied until the end of this year. <^uitt a number of the
smaller camps arc at present shut down and the larger
ones are contemplating doing 80 in the near future. One
prominent operator stated recently that by July 1st
there would not be a logging camp operating unless
something unforseen happens aud he also staled that
there was little possibility of anv reopening until early
1925.
Sugar: This very staph* commodity has reduced in
price considerably since our last issue until today's
quotation of $H.H5 per LOO ths. which is lower bv fifty
cents than the lower price of last spring. The heavy
world crop, (the heaviest on record), no doubt is forcing prices down. We are inclined to think that the
trend will be for lower prices for another thirty days
at least, after which advances may be expected owing
to tin* heavy demand for preserving which will com
mence about June 15th.   In the meantime buy cautiously,
Canned Vegetables. Local stocks of peas and corn
are wry limited ami as further supplies of Canadian
is out of the question until new slock arrives, prices
here have advanced to $1,75 do/., for 4 sieve peas and
$1,80 do/, for choice quality corn. Standard grades are
5 to 10 cents per do/., less.    Tomatoes also continue
V
high but supplies are ample to cany through Until lhe
arrival oi mw pack. 1924 pack California asparagtui
reached the market recently, The arrival was -,,-■*,
opportune as wholesalers stock were depleted Prices
arc slightly higher than tin* opening pries of 1923
pack, being $4.75 per dos* for nod green lips .
|5,00 p. ? doz  for med. white tips, wish other sizes sail
grades proportionately higher    Arrival of n.u j>.....
California spinach is also expected in the wry near
future, prices will be slightly lew than those prevail'
ing on last year's pack
Cereals; The price on popular brands of Con v.
has given the re toilers the opportunity of laying ii
supplies tor summer business at poetically wholesalers
costs,    I? is to be hoped howeu~r that for the benefit <»?
thc trade generally this situation will adjust Itself
Johnstons Corn Starch, a big -*»•*■ e Her In*r> previous
to the war is another old lim*' come back I? is packed
10 1 H>   packages aud tin* pric,  is H t*cnts p< ? psekagt
Canned Fish: lt|n<* Point oysters remain Beara
high in price   the present market is fl **■<» fen Js
$8.25 for -s    A recent arrival of cove oysters i> beii c
quoted st 12.25 for Is. *■#.' R5 for 2a   Sockeyp salmon i?
slightly    easier,    tn*w     prices are **$] k50 for tall* Iftd
$14.90 for halves With salad season fast approaching
lobster and shrimps will be in great demand; present
prices ore attracUva,
New Lines: The World Mutch Company's oca pro
duct is nowhere and ts getting distribution to the ft inii
trade     The   targe   plant   in   Quebec   which   fort
erly produced the Red Head Hatch has been taken over
by the World  Match Co, which company  with each
American and European affiliation comprises the largt «i
manufacturers  in   the   world    twenty -seven   factories
being operated   Tlo - World" match is distinctive in
is much as it has a square stick making easier to grip
and the stick is colored red     It is packed in om* si
only, a package of approximately t^l matches, to re
tail at 15 cents per package    The price to the retail
trade is $15,58 per case of III packages     The manu
factUrers are  well  phased  with  the ilistribiitii.it  niul
predict a big sab as it shows the retailer a good profit,
nnd the one si/c minimises his stock investment
Mrs porters "Blue Bonnet" brand salad dressing
is another new line that is receiving the whob hearted
support of the retail trade     Mrs   Porter, who in Wi *■
known to many local retailers, recently disposed of her
interests in the former company bearing her name
hereafter will confine her effort* to the marketing »■■
the "Blue Bonnet'4 brand which contains the eompleb
range of salad, mayonaisc, tartar sauce ami thousand
Island dressing in all sizes at popular prices Mrs P,,;
ter is an ardent demonstrator and will give her •friend*-'
the opportunity of sampling her wares at the comb
exhibition, 1924
T11K RMTISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
THE COFFEE OUTLOOK.
9
Prices for »!«>' coffee are nominal ami lower for ths mod-
l0m l!((| pooi grsdss of Santos   Baying is confined to lots
,,,,*,,! 10 round out slorka, aceordlns to James H. Tsylor, of
m;imh.!, buetler A: Co.. who in revtewlag the general litua*
on laid la part!
rioi <»» 'itc "p"** ire scarce, bat unless the price ot rut*
un.j should advance may become easier when those afloat at-
,.{VI<    However, prices of Hlos are much above the May quo
lallon on our exchange.   The visible supply of Brattl coffee
0   :j:,  failed HtatiH In 818,906 bsgs, of which 448,160 are
nijoat. and compares wtth i risible ol 1,112,080 bsgs i year
Stock* in BrSStl are l.of,r*.oo<» baas. toiiHlwiliiK of 1x7.000
!;,, and 878*000 SaatOS, Sgslnst I tola! last >i*ar of 2.s5o,ooo
i.o"-   Hot tt ihe Santos and Kio receipt! are ai the restricted
ill    The clearance from llratil during March were not ax
large aa unual aud amouumd io 1,009,800 bags, composed of
J30.000 Hl«> TS?,00Q Santos, 2MMH) Victoria and 84,800 ihihla.
The deliveries in the United States for ih»* nine month*
ol the present crop ot Hrasll toffee were 5*884,81) baas, an
increase over the previous crop of 889,281 hags; the deliveries
oi ail kinds I n«h«* United States 'or the nine months were
R.391078 hags on » basis Ol over ll.OOO.oou bags yearly and
ui excess U»r the nine mouth* of 900,788 bags over lasi >.*ar.
The  dellveriai   In   ESarope  during   March  were   1,078,000
bsgs   and   for   the   nine   month*   of   this   crop   were   8,-
0*20,000    baa*    In    Kurope    aud    198,000    bugs    elsewhere.
These f!gur«*s, together wlib those for the United Stales, make
if world deiivetlej, for ihe nine mom))** of this crop 17.209,*
•'*»- bags oa a ba*is of 82,14*1,844 bags pei font, against 18,717,-
on hagt for ihr* previous crop >«-ar
The deliveries thi# crop pear promise to be the largest
r?-r*r recorded, even being greater than the world's production
tor this crop, which is above the average.   The above figures
ire Important when it i» considered that the worlds visible
tupplj and including the Saoioa crop held back through Government resiHeiton, together with ib** ifjti 15 crops, win noi
l-robably amount lo as much as ihe world's yeeiij requirements In out Judgment !<»w pricei for coffee can hartUv be
expected for several year*, as consumption i* apparent!] now
shorn etjuat to ihe normal >i"«rlv production. The world's
Visible supplv ojj April 1, according lo the New York Coffee
Exchange, won 8*891,888 hags, i decrease daring March of
380.S78 bags
REPINING CO.  PREDICTS  HUGE   SUGAR  SURPLUS
Fedfrai  Sugar  Reftmng  Company  Estimates *  Million Tons
Will he Csrncd Over to New "Sugar Year.'*
N. w York. May, 15.
More than | million  tons ol  .«ugar will be carried into
lhe new   "sugar >e»r" on September  !. is the prediction of
lhe Federal Sagat Reflaiai Companj In a statistical forecast
Ol the Industry la a recent trade bulletin lu view ol this
lIWsUOB ihe companj predicts that, because ol the large ex-
peeled la-crease in production and earlj harvesting here and
In Kurope. Cuban and other "inside** sugar producers will "en*
desvor to dispose of «u this year's crop before September or
1 ictober **
This will be done IO avoid competition oi new crop sugar
*hich will he available Several reductions Iti the price of
the refined product hav«* been announced Istetj The Department of Agriculture's estimate Ol sh eae* crop as given out
recentlj places the figures al 8,800,000 tons.
The Cuban output is estimated hv the companj si 8,813,000
ions, and after deducting exports, local consumption and sugar
■alresd** sent m the Untied states, there win be i balance,
Braid's Best
Tp± rl    Tippy Tea~
■^ ^|   Just the buds and
■■mmmmmm.   leaves from the
tip of the stem,
Wai. Braid & Ca., Limited, Vancouver, B.C J
; UK AIDS
i Btsi
l!    I t A
The Wig Profits are in a
Rapid Turnover
—not in big mark-up
The dealer who grasps at a big mark-up
item often gets fooled. Big mark-up on slow-
moving stock won't put money in the cash
register.
A very good illustration of this can be
found in the average dealer's soap department—where from 8 to 14 different makes
are carried in stock.
Three of these brands compose 85% of
the dealer's soap business and turn over 17
times a year. The remaining brands receive
only 15% of his soap trade and turn over but
once annually! In other words, the largest
part of his investment is lying in the store,
becoming a heavier debit as the season goes
on — and the bigger theoretical profits never
materialize.
The three leading soaps may not carry a
sensational profit per individual sale—but they
sell themselves, through quality and the good
name they bear, on an average of 17 times a year.
Palmolive Soap ranks high among the three
leaders. Because it is well known and well
liked everywhere. Rid yourself of the stock
that compels a big overhead. Palmolive keeps
the cash register busy!
ill
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2444 10
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Mi
;ty
St. Charles Poster-10 x 25-Now Displayed on Billboards from Coast to Coast
Helping You to Sell More Borden's
St Charles Milk
Tell Your
Customers to
"Use it wherever
the reipe calls for
milk."
From Sydney to Prince Rupert this poster carries lhe
Borden message to the housewives of Canada Helping
you to sell more Borden's St. Charles Milk.
it is but one unit in the Borden advertising campaign,
comprising posters, newspapers, magazines, street cars,
recipe books and other direct by mail literature.
By featuring Borden's St. Charles Milk in window and
counter displays you cash in on the most extensive
milk campaign run in Canada.
Wrile for jree dummies and attractive cards and
window strips. With them, display are easy
to make.
%z^erdi4v &.mQnuted
Vanco
uver
Tell Your
Customers iti Double
the strength of
ordinary milk. !'»24
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
11
tHill
•I
la
V11„,lliig to thi* company, of 2.171.331 torn* of Cuban sugar
lHble for thia country.    Porto Rico will have available
>ti mm*. Hawaii 3*3.497. Philippines 237,417 and Virgin
tndi 2,000.
Trade to Avoid Surplus.
I   there l« added possible receipts of full duly sugar and
,*y present  raw stocks and exports are deducted, the
balance available will be 2.949.735 tons.
Phil year'* Cuban crop Is -expected to approximate 3,«JOO,-
lons, according to advirt** received by the company from
representatives,   Receipts at snipping port* continue at
md flgurcn, tho total for lhe flr-st week In April, 222.136
i, ,^reeding all former record* but one Total production
!,e end of March was 2.874.340 tons. llx,565 tons more than
: resr,
In the last half of March alont 551,771 tons were produced. The nine centrals which closed during the week turn-
ed out 936,786 bags, against 867,587 bags in 1923. The weather continues favorable for the crop and talk of a political uprising is not taken seriously.
The trade, in the opinion of the Federal Company, is not
inclined to carry any surplus sugar at the present time, and
raw sugar buyers are disposed to await improvement in demand for the refined product, because of the present situation and also the Department of Agriculture's announcement.
Ihe department forecasts increases in world production of
sugar and sharp competition between producers of cane and
beet sugar when the European growers attempt to regain
their prewar position.
Ml
9
ill
The Meaning of Maintained Prices
Every Orocer 8bouid Know What Maintained Prices Mean.  Study This Article and "Get Over" the Facts
to Your Trade!
Considerable argument is Indulged in Irom time to
tllltC IS to thc effect of eljt prices on business, ami lhe
following questions and answer* offer entightment on
the subject;
Question* What Is meant by minimum price maintenance!
Answer—Minimum price maintenance is a proposal
thai il he mad*' legal ami possible f'»r a manufacturer
o( a trademarked article in establish a fair minimum
retail price, tt would then Im* msde possible for the
manufacturer to maintain this price throughout the
process of wholesaling ami retailing.
Q.—What ia the object of price maintenance?
\   To prevent ruinous price cutting.
Public Dots Not Benefit.
Q.—But doesn't the public benefit by price cutting!
A .--Not in the long run   It is a fallacy to assume
that  the  price  cutler pockets the lsos.    The    public
makes it up on other purchases
Q.—>Just bow docs thi- public make It up?
A.—When a dealer cuts price, he generally loses
money, He must retrieve this loss by adding it to the
juice of other merchandise that lie sells.
Q.--I1 priee maintenance now practised!
A- Yea. iu most eases; notably in automobiles, The
munufa<'tutvr* of automobiles have no difficulty establishing ami maintaining thc retail priee. If you don't
think 80, go to a l*'ord dealer and try to buy a new
Ford car at a out price.
Q.—JJOW is this poHKible?
A.—Some trades are so organised 'hat it is possible
to maintain price, but as the retail grocery business is
•'»' present organised, it is very difficult, in fact almost
impossible.
Can't Maintain Prices.
Q.—Can a manufacturer of groceries now maintain
prices!
A- In a few isolated eases it has been accomplished
under difficulty. Generally it may I"* S»»<1 ■* is Hot nt
present practical. The proposal is that a law be passed
allowing producers of trademarked articles to set up
machinery tn maintain prices against ruinous price cutting-
Q.—Under this scheme would prleo maintainance
apply to all merchandise?
A. Only to trademarked and branded goods, The
•'"Kb*, bulk and unbonded merchandise would bo bow
in the same way that they are at present, and the producers would not maintain priee.
Q- But wouldn't priee maintenance allow a manufacturer to maintain a high priee and pile up exorbitant profits?
A—Absolutely not. If a manufacturer should establish a priee higher than his competitor's, quite naturally business will drift to his more moderate or lower-priced competitor. There would still be competition between manufacturers. One manufacturer would
endeavor to give a large package for the priee than his
competitor gives. Another might endeavor to give extra service of quality. In other words, price maintenance does md eliminate competition between brands or
producers. If anything, it stimulates competition between producers, for each will endeavor to give the
biggest value for the particular priee he maintains.
Q — Have we proof that prices would not rise under price maintenance!
A.—Yes. The priee of automobiles is controlled by
tin* manufacturer until the machine reaches the consumer. Certainly no one could say that a motor car
could be bought more cheaply if the dealer made the
price instead of the manufacturer, who makes and
maintains it. There is strong competition between
the various manufacturers to give the greatest value
for the price they maintain.
Doesn't Kill Competition.
<*.—iiut wouldn't price maintenance stifle Competition!
A.—Not in thc least.
(j —Would priee maintenance apply to nil products?
A.—No. Thc option to maintain price is with the
manufacturer. The proposal is simply to give him
thai right in case he chooses to do so. There is nothing
in the price maintenance proposition to force a manufacturer to maintain prices iu ease he does not choose
to do so.
Q.—It* a number of manufacturers of trademarked
articles maintained a resale price, would it eliminate
competition between grocers?
A.—No. It would only eliminate ruinous cut-price
competition on certain branded articles. There would
still be the same incentive among grocers as now for
active competition on basic items, bulk and unbranded 12
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RKTAILKR
Mi
ay
^w??\
Coffee
NOW IN STOCK
The New Key Opened Can
WILSON BROTHERS
Established 1890
Our Motto is "SERVICE"
We cannot offer to sell you goods cheaper than any other firm is in a petition to do, but we CAN
give actual facts to prove that it is
ECONOMY
to deal with ns
l^UZ WILSON BROTHERS, VICTORIA, B.C.
Wholesale Grocer*
*ammmmmmmmmmammammaatimmaaa*aaaimymamtimama
SHAMROCK RRAND
HAM, BACON, BUTTER, LARD, SAUSAGE, etc.
First Quality packing house products put up by IV hums & Co.,
Limited, which means they arc tho highest grade, always reliable,
and without equal on this market.
YOU CAN RECOMMEND SHAMROCK BRAND.
P. Burns & Company, Limited
VANOOUVER
CALGARY
EDMONTON
mmmmmmmmmtiamBmmmmmmtmmamm
MM THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
13
„1M„U, service, display, sanitation, advertising and up-
[",,,;n* aelling methods.
Gives a Minimum Price.
n Would price maintenance allow the dealer a
satisfactory proftt!
\     If the producers maintain prices too low to meet
ihr fancy of the grocer, he need not handle thc goods.
[lowcver, minimum price maintenance would establish
only a minimnm resale priee below whieh merchants
would nol be privileged to sell The dealer could
charge as much more than that price, as the character
nt the service he rendered might demand.
(j    Briefly, who has endorsed priee maintenance!
A Thousands of business Ionises, including manufacturers, wholesale and retailers More than six hundred trade associations! Including both wholesale and
retail grocery sjaiociationat as well as many public and
business men.
t} Quote what one or two prominent people say,
regarding price maintenance.
A   Justice Brandeis of thc 1   s, Supreme Court
one. said "The rut-price article would more appropriately be termed a ■"misleadcr" because ordinarily tho
very purpose of the cut price it a false impression."
•j nit ice Holmes, of the 1\ 8. Supreme Court, said: "1
cannot believe lha! in the long run the public will pro*
tit by this eourt permitting to cut reasonable prices for
(tome ulterior purpose of their own. and thus to impair, if not to d-eatroy, the production and sab of articles whieh it U assumed to be desirable that the pub-
lie should be abb* to get." Mr GaakiH, Federal Trade
Commissioner, only recently made an exhaustive study
on this subject "Public Interesl demands resale price
legislation. **'
Vital to His Welfare
Q.    Why    should    a    grocer be interested in price
tuaintenancef
A    The average grocer would have much to gain
umb-r   such   a   system,    It mav eventually determine
whether he will be abb   to remain in business or not.
Ruinous priee competition has driven many a dealer
out of business. „
Q-."   Give an example
A.~In Montreal there was a small neighborhood
grocer oi twenty years' standing. A store with large
1 WWJttl backing opened near him and started a price-
dashing war. The grocer had this option: either to
mse much of his trade, or to meet each cut in prices.
"• Chose to cut in prices accordingly, but in a short
»me went bankrupt. The newcomer was then able retrieve his losses. There have been thousands of such
cases where the small man was driven out of business.
Study the Plan.
Q.-—Whal can the grocer do about price maintenance f
A He should study the proposition. If he approves it, In* should then use his influence in favor of
it. Sell the general program of priee maintenance to
your customers, your business associates and the houses with whom you deal. Talk and discuss it upon every
occasion.   Create sentiment in favor of legislation on
this subject.
SYRUP FROM RAISINS.
Sun-Maid Co.  Perfects Byproduct Which  Will   Be Offered
Trade.
After a year of development in the Sun-Maid Raisin Growers' laboratory in Fresno, Calif., a new syrup product has
been perfected to add another outlet for raisins. F. M. De
Beers is in charge of the department which will look after
manufacturing operations.
For more than a year it has been known that the Sun-
Maul Raisin ('.rowers were working on the development of a
strictly high-grade syrup which would meet ali the requirements of the best trade—for the most exacting housewife as
well as for bakers.
owing to the fact that a great many difficulties were understood to have been met in attempting to perfect, in commercial quantities, the high grade product which was desired,
no public announcement on the subject of syrup have been
made.
Several months ago. while experiments were being conducted on a semi-commercial scale, Mr. DeBeers went to
Fresno in a consulting capacity and is understood to have
made a number of recommendations, along which lines the
association lias recently been working.
His present affiliation with the products division of Sun-
land Sales is now understood to be brought about by a desire on the part of the association to still further develop the
process for manufacturing raisin syrup of Sun-Maid quality,
and in sufficient quantity to enable the association to offer
it on the market at prices in line with other high grade
syrups. Operation of the syrup products department under
Mr. DeBeers' supervision has begun.
Phone:  Sey. 3213
Established  1899        	
j. W. BERRY
_.« VANCOUVER, B. C.
m HASTINGS STREE' WEST. 	
BULK  TEAS
HtVtHfJ IDMUUHd IH bulk T.„ (or 30 ,.»r.. m, .*»*■•" •"« ">"'« "> »»»•" <** bM ™ 'h*>u"1 *
valuable—I Know it has been to many.
0,f€r '°mCh7.u (tWtbs.n.tt) Indian tin. B 0.^^a^^^^ZZZZ^ *
200 Chests  ilOOtbs.nett)   Ind.an fine  B. Pek at, ptr m., ouxy pa.a w
300 Cheats dOOtbs. nett) Indian B. Pek at, per tb.. duty paid 44c
Very good  liquoring  Tea.
200 Half Chests Ceylon Bro. O. Pek. at, per tb., duty paid  **    »4c
Very fln. tlpP7 BO  P.k.-fine value-no need to pay a higher price than this for very *neTea^^ 14
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
M.
av
Reaching almost every family in the province, this season, either through the local
newspapers in which it appears or the national magazines that carry it, Carnations
advertising will be read by practically all
the milk users in your trade territory.
It is especially strong, convincing and attractive
this year. The " can-in-bottle " illustration shown
below is bound to secure attention.
By arranging your displays to take advantage
of this you can put the strength of this high
power appeal back of your own business.
"Made in Canada"
Carnation Milk Products Co. Ltd.
134 Abbott St Vancouver, B. C.
This* Directions
Accompany this
Illustration when Your
Customer Sees It.
You can dilute tht double-
rich conttnts •/ this can until
thc quart bottle Is filled with
pure milk..
Full
Net
fg Weight
It's not only the quality of Clark's
Beans which appeals to the housewife.
The full eize tin and the Govern,
ment inspection Seal * Canada Approved"
on every container arc inducements to the
canny provider.
The time is " now " to let the Clarke
Kitchens help you to larger sales and morr
profits.
W. CLARK, LIMITED, Montreal
IstabUSftmtnU  m\  MottXrmmt,  Out ■   It    Ham*    Qua.,  a*<$
Hswr*sf*h Out
90 per cent of
STEVENSON'S
QUALITY BREAD
IS SOU) BY
RKTAJJ, GROCERS
THE   WISK  OROCKR   WILL
0NDBB8TAND WHAT THAT
FACT MKANS TO HIM.
Phone Fairmont 227
VANCOUVER, B.C.
_^_^____ .. THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
15
frmpmw
$wttitl| Annual (Emumtttim af tip M. loarii
•Ertatl -JHmtiantB' Association of (Hanak, lar.
So br tplD at tfrrtitt. B.(£.. Junr 4tlf. 511). anil 6tl|, 1924
Hriaif a&aii. 3unr 4th
MORNING SESSION:
9,00 Conreotten Proe«*dlois Reffetrsttoa.
10,00 Convention c»u.*d to ordet b> President.
10.06 Reading ot Btottet calling KetUai  Roll Call ol
Officers, Appointment «$ Report! Committee, and
CitdsnttalS Committee,
10 lit Minnie* at 1923 ConvenUon,
|Q If. S»<rr«*unrv,»* Report.
10.t§ President'** Report.
11 io Treasurer"* Report.
113c» Auditor* Report.
community  Btoglng.
Adjournment,
l.00 l.unrliHin   Adelphi  Hotel.
S* ieeti«o# b> Orchestra.
Non*. The pr«**ui«'!i$ will annoance tbe appoint-
mnit ol  tin* followinK committers ai  luncheon:
Khumce and Adminifttratlon. Constitution. Resoltt*
iicns Mud Nominations,
AFTERNOON SESSION:
2 SQ CoaveaUoa programme.
Eveninfl*. Dance In I OO K  Hall
MORNING SESSION:
9.00 Convention called to Order.   Hearing Delegations.
Receiving Resolutions and Acting on same.   Com-
mittees' Reports, etc. Adjournment.
1,00 Luncheon—Adelphi Hotel, under auspices of Merrill Branch of R. M. A.
Community Singing.
Selections by Orchestra.
AFTERNOON SESSION:
SL3Q Convention called to Order,
ir. finished business.
Questions and New Business.
Election of Officers.
Election of Delegates and Alternatives to Dominion Board and Dominion Executive Council.
Appointment of Auditor.
Arranging date and place of next meeting.
EVENING SESSION:
6.30 Association Official Banquet.
Jffrt&M}, Sun? fitly
9.00 Auto drive around scenic Nicola Lake to Quil-
chena, returning to Merritt over Hamilton Mountain.
1100 Lunch—Adelphi Hotel.
Convention Message from the Provincial Office.
, u ,.-,,* following message to all Branches and Members of the British Columbia
Tht* Provincial fetocatlfe lenda tae rouowing «««»«    ^
Branch. It. M. A.:- .    Kamloops. and we are once again looking forward to meeting old
"It I, now a r«ar lllICi our last '»"»'»'     l" f.!   | °^ M „u. Relation.
friend* and also new memberi who haw beeom« *"'»*«       , h     h other idoas and suggestions, that we may
Ul u moot with cordiality andi ronfld. ace, «km"*w m endeavour t0 encourage along practical
profil irom this noquslntaaceehlp.   Ui on <utu an> i
line*, the functioning Of OUf AsaoelaUon. assembled from all sections of the province, and such cau
Many and varied will be the ideas Iron, han  Vf"V,07 where Importanl questions can be solved from the
unlv   proporl)   be deliberated upon  al   the  annual convenut   .
soma! anglei at which Utey are pri*ented. realising the demand aud necessity that the major portion
Thi* will  be essential!)   a  retailers {°^iU      ;"\nR  as lai- as possible, set speeches.
of ou. time bv apportion^ to debate, we are   iimin. ma. gj  ConvenUon, and a sound constructive pro-
II is our itoeore hope thai ireotjpwd «« * 'J(l0m,,
Kiannue outlined for the coming fear.
COP SAVE THE KING.
,i   , noil    Tin*. Adelnhi Hotel will be the Convention head-
The ConvenUon Sessions will be held to ft. < onvenl      Hal     ^^"J of imporlant work to be done
quarter, a. all times when tbe ^^ven.io..  j, ««« i«     «        ^ [Q order tl       lme> „j every d*
a. thll ConvenUon.    For this reason »'."',,     ^,00 will be charged to all visiting delegaes.   The ladies a.e
Bgate is requeued lo be there.   V''K I    to    ,e official   luncheons  and  to  the official  dinue    oi1  Thu«adjJ
m^r-mrmmmt^sTmTm^^
found the very best In lly fishing and trolling.
til
ill 16
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Mav
::**:::;;:i:i;*:
HAKIM-
Chloride of Lime
16 oz. Package
Supplied by all wholesale grocers
in British Columbia
Manufactured by
CANADA COLORS AND CHEMICALS LIMITED
Succeeding
THE JOHN B. PAINE CO., LTO.
Toronto Winnipeg Vancouver
Agents:
STARK & STERLING
VANCOUVER, B. C.
*.•**-•_ -#«-^-v-frt-**. -*—*»...—*..*
Tho confldenco created In
tho mind of your customer*
of your ontiro lino of goode
io appreciably increased
by your recommendation
of articloo that havo boon
pro von to bo of tho highest
quality.
MACK BAKING POWDER
CONTAINS NO ALUM
E. W   GILLETT   COMPANY  LIMITED;
T i.mi ,H T( »     (■ ANAC.iA
GROCERY PRICES CURRENT
The following are prices quoted for principal llnee of leading wholesale firms.   Prices quoted art necessarily
subject to market fluctuations.
RAMSAY BROS. A CO.. LTO.
10c Assorted Sweet Biscuits, package*.
per dozen 	
llo Assorted Sweet Biaculta, fancy carton, per dozen 	
Chocolate Bars, assorted kinds, 2 dos
to a box, per box 	
Cream Sodas,  in,  tin**,  saob
10c Cream So-dun, packages, *\*>z
15c Cream  Sodas,  packages,  doz
Family sodaa, package*, per dozen  f
Queen  Royal  Cream  Sodas,   per Th
Queen Royal,  tins, each   	
.'.*(,
i M
SI
.40
i r.)
2 4"
V.
N
Bi-Carmonate  of   Soda—■
112 U>. '.■**. put 'm***
4"0 1*1)   barrel**, per barrel
t IS
13 ti
iVr   Ib
ISH
r.\
t'vr  dos
E.  W.  GILLETT  CO.  LTD.
Cauttlc  Soda  (Granulated* —
10 lb.  -raiJMtter   lid*:'  !!>»  tn    t««« »
100   Ths    iron   drama
Cream of Tartar—
H n>. paper pkan  {i <io*  In ease)    I H
'■i Tb   paper pkttD    (4 dot.  in .at****-      Z "t*>
\t n> run** with screw covert it »t»,»
m case) 3i»
1   TV   <an»  f* rew   c<jv«*n»   (3  <Ji>*    tn
caes oj
r. n»  squars «i»ni*»t«-r», «.•*, dos  In
II
■a in* i
io n»  wooden casss
Royal Yeast— IVr ctxwa
3 <loz.  pkgs.  in case 2 to
Pure Flake Lye—
4 doz. in case   ,*, '7,
5 cases     5,83
10 oases, 4 doz. in case 6.80
Magic Baking Powder—
4 oz.  4 doz  f,'M
6 oz.  4 doz  7.7ft
8 oz.  4  doz  (».25
12 oz. 4 doz  12.5't
S^ 5 rase lota.
Magic  Soda,  Case  No.   1—
1 cahe (60 1 tb. packages) 7.40
5 cases or more   7.30
H i'i   wooden i««ii»
100 fh lined K.-nf-
3Cu ib.  Uned  barrels
KELLY,  DOUGLAS 4  CO.,  LTO.
Nsbob  Products
Alum,  '-4«, d».z
Allfipit-e.   Nd    3,   tins  ilnt
Baking I'owder.  4*  12 <* , <\„t
itakinK Powder, ff 1*8 oss
Baiting Powder, 19 Ifta, -io*
luikitMf Powder, fi 5n. <ii»«
Making .Soda,   M   \*,   rnnv
Baking BodS.   34   }§•,  dot
Borax,   %n,  doz
Black   Pepper,   tin*,   doz
Celery Said giant*. iK»z
4«
tl
I V)
1 oo
■:*%:.,
tn
U30
III 10
r. so
.    .60
] on
1 00
XaUtii •«>**fc»>. *?»■..*,u tin* tarh
'N.ffr-in,    \m   ft<
I '..ttar    lm   ft.
('usUrd   fNtw.W   .h>»
Kfui * ffipfffira, dos
Chocolate  Pudding, dot
Chill   POWtefi   «m«ll.  dm
<1nn*Mit»n. I OS   tin*.  dOS
Cayenne Pepper, I tin». tea
Ckj-raa •*»»»u, dos
• 'urt) I'ttw.in   i i>*  gtssSt doa
Otager,  small,  *u*»
17 it.»> is (except ranllln) I os  doi
Kx tracts   .»'.*..' vanilla) t os  >!>>«
i.itnuu (eacepl eawllla) * os dos
VitttilU   Kttr M <     .'   OS .   <t<>*<
Vanilla Kx tract,   » ot,  ■*••*
Vaiilllrt  Kttfu. t     I   o* .   tb«»
Kxtrnrta   asBortvdL   II  oa
Usee,  «»H»ii. ii..i
Not we*,   small,  <i«.*
Psprlka, i'ii"!'? ulna*. ,u,t.
Pastry Bplee, I Una, dOS
POullf)   l>i-i>«wir*iK.  mOSm i-hivm).
Thyttm.   Tumeric.   tli»i»,   '!<»«
I'lM.iiliK   Hpin*«*.   (tut     No    |
Mmjoiinn.   Mini.   RsrslO)
'i"«ttnrl«   ,\<*iil.   '<«,  doi
Whits Pepper( Una, 't*»»
t'lmlor nil.  2 o*   dOS
Caatoi * mi. t rn  dux
lOpSOm Halt*,   i^n. dOI '
i-i nit  Colors.  I ox   iiu» YA2\
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
17
(Chocolate, it«*-. Wok, Lomea,
,(  white, Almond, ormnfai *»«'*
f>owder, dps
; , „„),. powder, dos
yuxtard,   >»•  iU,t
o   ,t.t,A.    4«-   dOS
.,,. t ,i«i. ||s das
H ;.Mir. 14a, dos
i. ,   oresa Label, -W* pa* n»
,;,een !-*»*»*-».  )»- IM* »'
>   it.,  -packages
, tt<   psofcegss
,t,-   I.Uie.   Afteimx'0.   I   tb
'.,    ,u* LUIte. ,Sftern»H»n  4* per tb
*i, ,    ,lr   Lux*   •>••»  1**^   ,'1
Vinegar,  ■*•*
THE W. H. MALKIN CO.. LTO.
••Mslkln's •set" Products.
arrowroot  I»t   Vincent >
j! 4 ex etna         PSPdOS
tl I ot    •**•" dot
Staking I'owder  flPWS  RMMpfeaiS)
prr dOS
per  d*»t
nrtf dM
I er.
13
2 2i
|JM
4 :,*i
110
a.:
SS
62
ai
n
M
J 3**
is  *..* ..i
baking Soda
ij 4 "t  etas
U I   M    tin*
i >ucoa
:« * <»x
( | BSs (Vi'unm  t'xck)
i fb tin**'
-,*>«.««*. al Tartar *•***•% par*)
U | ui   etna
ll * <»»  etai
Sl/lS tin*
! 44
J-6
' 00
I* u
\mr d«>X
p#r dot
jwrr dot
}M»r It.
Jw«f   Aot.
pmr doa
PS    >!*■*
4S
6d
: 5*0
its
Custard i'owder
4 oss   etas per doz.    1.00
h ot i ttiH per iioz.   i.uu
i»rug Btmdrles
Borax,   12/4 or    per doz.      .75
Epsom Baits lf/4 Ot etna 50
Sulphur, 12 4 oz   cms  per dot       .60
All other
i;uf,u t."* Vanilla    Flavors
N/9 ot, per dox, I DO 2.50
1*4 Ol per doz. *> 7."> 4.7f>
*   Ol PW <loz. 11 "O *-».f-'*>
H ot per doz 21.06 17.00
.'•. <.*-**. per doa M.00 24.00
Ulyrerliif
12 2 ox btt      per dot.   175
11/4 OS Btt per dot.   3 26
Honey
24/»  ox   Jam per doz.    2.25
24/18 ox   Jar* per doz.    3.00
24 "la   tint  per doz.   4.50
It/is  tlna  ...      per •»«>*•   •**>
Jetty  Powders  (all flavors)
U ♦ os. paf doi.     95
Lemonade Powderi
SJ 4 ox etas     per dot.    1,25
1! S OS etSt         per dox.   223
Mustard
12 Is  Un*                                     I"**" Jo*t- l50
12 »« oa tin*  per dox. 4.50
24 Is  tin*   per dot 8 60
II in Un*                 Pern) *M
gplce* and BetSOtltOgt
Mtef*s 12 J tin.-*                 per dox IM
Ontksman 19 I ttns            per dox. 1.10
Clows ^ I Htm                 vvr t[ul -1*0
Curry Powder '- 3 Was      per doz. 1.75
CfcSH powder                       Per dos. 140
<iinger 12/3 tins  per doz.   1.10
Mace 12/3 tins  per dox.   1.60
Marjoram 12/3 tins  per dox.   1.16
Mint 12/3 tins  per dox.   1.1*8
Nutmeg, 12/3 tins  per dox.   1.15
Paprika 12/3 tins  per dox.   1.40
Parsley 12/3 tins  per dox.   1.16
Pastry,  mixed, 12/3 tins per dox.   1.15
Pepper, black, 12/3 tins  per dot.   1.00
Pepper, cayenne 12/3  tins....per dox.   1.20
Pepper,  white,  12/3  tins per dot.   1.16
llckling   Spice   12/3 per doz.   1.15
Poultry Dressing 12/3 tins ....per dot.   1.00
Sage, ground 1*2/3 tins  per dot.   1.00
Sage, rubbed 12/3 tins  per-dot.   1.00
Savory 12/3 tlna  per dox.   1.00
Thyme 12/3 tins ..... .....per dot.   1.00
Tumeric   12/tins      per dot.   1.00
Whole Cinnamon 12 ctns per dot.    .60
Whole Nutmegs, 12 ctns  per dot.     .60
Whole Pickling 12 ctns  per dot.     .90
Celery Salt, taper bots ...perdot.   2.10
Curry Powder, taper bots per dos.   2.25
Tea
100/ls    perlb . .65
60/i^s   perlb. .67
30/ls and 20/-&S assorted  perlb .66
l2/5s   perlb. .68
Vinegar
24 qts pei' doz.    2.40
Marmalade.
24/1 glass  per doz.   2.75
12/4  litho tins per doz.   8.40
.Jams. „ ..
Assorted 12/4 tins  per dox.   9.00
Apricot 12/4 tins  per dox.   9.00
Westward Ho!
Ob Io Lob Angtieg lor Ihs Annual Convention ol
«h«> N   A  It Q . June 18, ll, iv. 1<C
Across Uts oo&Uoool oo s private inUn—Jusi you
mid poms buaitifM friends* M&ing all t i*«*r** ti to we
gaining many month***' work ol knowledge In a
eoople of weeks,
TUm Ii ftttlni iborl and foot local cbainnan Is
walling m |u*ar from >ot».   Write him n»w  that >ou
want to go
The Fleischmann Company
SERVICE
YEAST
AUK YOU HANDLING
RAMSAY'S
« QUEEN ROYAL »
LINE OF
CREAM SODAS
Packed in large and small tins. A delicious appetizing; biscuit. It will appeal to your customers. Ask
our representative to show you this line or write or
phone us order.
This biscuit will give every satisfaction. Let ns prove
this by sending you a trial tin at once.
Ramsay Bros. & Co., Lid.
VANCOUVER, B.C. VICTORIA, B.C.
v*-*   1
•_ taXciZi
>v .._ . •"* l *** . . . k-k -&4B
\7A
S.VH you ft. wh.„ ^J** 'JRJES
keeps the flavor in-you sell *,t   fresn irom w
Kelly Douglas & Co. Ltd.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
|ABOB
i f'AtKt
I 18
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Ui
.'IV
Blaek Currant 12/4 tins        per •;■*>* I.1J
Damson   12/4  tins per dox. tf 00
Gooseberry 12/4 tins  per dox. Ml
Loganberry 13/4 tins  per dox. 1.00
Peach 12/4 tins     per dox. »&<•
Plum 12/4 tins  P«r dos. r-^0
Prune, 12/ tins par ■*»*• »*g
Raspberry 12/4 tins *.o>
Strawberry 12/4 tlna    per dox.   9.,b
P. BURNS 41 CO.. LTD.
Shamrock Products
Ayrshire rolled shoulders, per lb 1*>
Bacon, Shamrock. 6-8. per lb. 314
Baked ham. *'ith dreswnif, per tb ... 3"**
Creamery lUitter. Shamrock, carton* 3i
Cheese,  Canadian,  large,  per lb M
Cheese,  Canadian,   twin,  per  lb .n*
Compound. Carnation. No. 5. 12-ease S.S6
Compound. Carnation No. 3. 20-case 9M
Cooked  hams.   Shamrock,   per  lb JO
Dominion hams, 12-1€ Iba 2-*»
Dominion Bacon, 6-10 lb*, per lb 24
Dominion Bacon. SO-H ll>s. per lb 23
Dominion Shoulders, boned and rolled 1*
Dripping,   beef.   4-lb.   bricks .    12
Hams.   Shamrock,   per   Ib         2«i
Hams, boned and r.Mle.1.  per Ib .30
Head Cheese, Sib. tins, each  SO
Jellied   tongue,   per   tin   .- _ —     Lfl
Lard, No. 5. 12 to case  9 55
Lsrd, No. 3. 20 lo case      ... IM
Lard, carton, 15-lbs  .   ,lt%
li«rd.  No.  1,  cartons.  3o-tbs.     .  17
Mincemeat, kits. 26-lb, net, per tb        .14
Meat  Loaf,   per lb  15
Pork Pies,  per doa 35
Pork, roast legs with dressing, tb M
Smoked fish,  kippers.   20s per lb 104
Smoked flSh.  kippered salmon.   10s
and 20s. per lb  .14
Smoked Cod, 30s per tb ,16
Select ed fowl, per lb  . 'JI
Selected Chicken, per lb..  IS
THI ROYAL CROWN SOARS.  LTO.
Vsncouver   Price   List—F.O.B.   Vsncouver,
or Nsw Westminster.
Terms Nett SO Day:
"Apex" Soap Flakes. 24 1 lb pkts. box I tl
"Apex" Soap Flak**. 12 1 lb pkt*. box MO
A   I .a   Franca ise  Caatile-.   box   of   25 4 05
Blue Mottled,  box of  20 | 2*>
Crown Oatmeal. 24 6s.  Imx of 144 4 tt
Climaa ar Montreal (wrapped)  i»»x % tJt
6 25
4 M
MS
635
IM
isS
4 10
1.10
5 <o
3 |S
»H
4 60
.i n
Kotshxh   lllu,'  ...oilled.  I«.\  of So
Golden West. 5s.  ■"•ox of !20»
Golden West Powder, 3 tb   »*>x of 24
Golden Bar, box of so
Kiondyk,** (wrapped) bas of 26
Klondyka (unwrapped) i*»*x of 25
KJero Glycwins. i"»x ot it*
Linen   t unwrapped)   box   of   100
Liquid Ammonia. 2 doi   qts   box of *M
Liquid  Blue. 2 dos   qt*.  Imix of 34
Mrrhanics   line   Tar.   Imx   of   10«
MechanlO'S  Pine Tar.  box of M
Olive Castile, eakaa, u»x ol WO
primrose (wrapped) bos of *&
Kxtra   hard   unwrapped,   bo*   of  3t»
Perfect (unwrapped) i«»\ of 101
Writ*  for  Toilet  and   Hotel  BOOM
Special price* on 5.  10.  25 and  loO
boxaa.
IVndra> n  Lye.   t*>*  Of  4* 5 3*»
Pendray's Powdered Ammonia, boa 24. 3 N
Special prices 00 j.  10. 25 and  loo
lnjxca.
Pcndrsy's   Water   Giiu.   Ess   Prsservsr—
t\i*•*■*> 24 tins per BOat 4 60
Red Grown, u»x a ns 1 10
(loyal laundry* Hakes, Slri,  In barrel*
(Special price on contra**!)
Royal Crown Soap, la, bos ISO, i «v   * 5 *»*>
Royal Croara  Powdar,  boa  n* otd)    UO
Royal Croam Powder, 5 tb Ing >»f '7*    1 *&
Royal Crosrn Clsaaasr, boa, of M s»k«*» *&*»
Itoya! Croat*.  Lye. box of -«S Ml
Royal Crown N'aptha box of too LOB
Royal (Vown Powdered Ammonia '. n> i.*4
winie Wonder, boa of 100
White  Swaiv   BMPi   Is,   t«ox   Of   ISO
White Swan Naptba. boa of 100
White   Swan   Wnahins   Powder,   3   ft*
bos of ;»
J.   W.   BERRV.
100 Mattings St. Win, Vancouver.
8ulk  Teas—
Choata, dboteMt Qppy n>.tun pup
100 ft<*   nett. dot)   paid
Cheat*.   <ht>»<e.   hsOVy   iiijoof if******,   tn*
*lian.  Hi'   ISO lb*   t>etl. dutjf  jW'4
a l*
i i»>
I Pt
* 01
#»t
ti
Chests, line Indian B P. |«o \\>m  ....
duty p.ii.|
• •heats   goon  Hquorins  Indian  n r*
100 tbs  nott, duty paid
Very   ffu-od qtiahty
tt CtteMla Ceylon.  |tup   ,j„,v iKi  1
h Chests Ceylon  |j|v  dut>  paid
THE CANADA STARCH CO.  LTD
Laundry Stare ate—
Otnada |jmo#*)i Mandb, ia-tti r....
Camttbt    While   QIOS,    !•!»»   pWrr   '
A.tne   White   »;i.Mt«,   in,   t>Ke*
A raw  White tlUtm,   l-tt,  pkff*
No   l   While 3-H» <*»rt<,n».   j»n,
No    t   White   loo It,  keen
No    J   While  MS>A   bbls
Kdwanbubora  Silver   iiU<m».  \.\b p)gp
40. tb
*Biwstf<lghw|   iltftw   «it.**«   i/g.
f»n«*>    tin   ."«ni#ter»,   ».».«,
KdWitf-dsbtitff   HIH-er   iik««i*   « «  ,»,.,■,,
Ud boaaa, 10-1*
tOdwardabnrg  iHiher   Qlosa,   iimh-h.
aaga
»Vtiut»>i«!   Mlarr-fi    (ftQEK   of   tf»pHiy
psf sags) 1
Cutiofy  S<arch«»—
l!eu«*»n »  Cel»t>i*ated   Piwtsiistl <m-
4ft-ft,   li»,»e»,    001   ft.
QsggdR CPtu Standi Ml tt. i*>*t,<«. j»r
lb
Xrtga Dora Bfafdi 10 tt- km, pot n>
disao Ptitalo Motw 4<*-tt» basso J'*
Corn  Syrup*—
I'mtii   t»   M   |0   SMS
is 13 t** oaas
IPs * t.t hiss
Igs 3 to sags
Lily la 34 to COSS
S-« S3 |o .-«**
Igl i tn CMOS
HP 1 {«• nMS
Kflf<* 3"  "34  tO '■'«»*■
Is Ul 10 OgSI
tO* 4  |m soil
is
M
■it
t!i
U\
* *
t H
1 ,
i
i *
i ''.
Bags to satisfy—that's all
"RAVEN"   Manilla
"GARRY" Light Kraft
"RUPERT" Heavy Kraft
These bags are made by the Woods Manufacturing Company at
Winnipeg, only Western Canadian bag makers, on some of the
moat up to date paper bag making machinery In Canada.
Our business is to turn out bags of quality at proper prices.
That our growth haa been so steady is due to our friends, the
retail trade, recognising the superior quality, service and satis
faction found in using these bags.
We would be glad to send you samples.
NORFOLK PAPER CO. LTD.
136 Water 8t.       8ey. 7868.      VANCOUVER, B. 0.
Agents for B. 0.
Woods Manufacturing Co. Ltd.
Winnipeg, Manitoba. 1!
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
!9
,1
DRYGOODS and FOOTWEAR
CONDITIONS IN THE DRY GOOD8 TRADE
Spring bustaesa has been moving will and there ap-
j*,a» to be « feeling of confidence among tbe retail
irade, due in pari to ih«* sodden advent of warmer
weather. Retailers bave been placing orders in greater
volume, and although ih«* lowering t»f the nales tax
frnm b to "»jb*r cent, i* eonsidetvd of small account, it
ts nevertheless a *ti*p in the right direction, and fur-
iht-r reductions are 1i»t»k»*«t Un\ Buying for Immediate
requirements only Is still the practice, both large and
small store* following thi* policy,
Wool fabric prices are strong, with demand especially good for flannels of the colored sports goods type,
snd Icwcy cloths. Tin* pirn- goods business, strength*
ftti'il l»y the tendency towards mannish suits is particularly brisk, niul i In* buying i»f coi tons h reported (tuitc
active, much busim****. being done In wash fabrics,
The suit vogue, combined with backward spring
weather In certain sections bus had a somewhat depressing effect on dress sales, but orders for later deliveries
im» moving out and resulting in good sales.
Thc raw cotton market continues strong, md \\w
finished product remains In a very stable condition.
There is brisk trade in neckwear, a large quantity
of collars, cuffs, vestees and Jabots are selling in
plcot, flannel, repeloth, crepe and Inn*.
Demand for gloves in well maintained with sales reported better than at this time last year, due to the
combination <<f lower prices of kid, and the heavy demand for suits.
Light shades In hosiery havi* made such an imprcs-
won, ami havi* become so popular that mill-** are kept
busy In filling orders for thin newest in legwear from
the centres of fashion,
DRESS UHEN DEMAND KEEPS OP
THE TAILORED DRESS.
T ^«0»^t^,^AS?M
nexl fall accraa to bo thc general feeing ."'*;, ,•„,,.
Ita in Hook** .trip™ nmlh»,rl.n** *■ «;* «*$?&
next .canon.   Twill flannola arc ateo a ppeai we
rtripo. oi* thc hairline type. White the s, ripe tor a pi   *.
haa been mostly blaek or whito, here mm to '   '
Ing tor il In colora and comblnat on. ot cote» to
There are oven a c novelty twilla with thc tiny ami
or with blocks.
BOYISH  LINGERIE  CORRECT-BRIDES   ARE
WEARING COLORS.
The tailored mode in outerwear has most assurded-
lv found its way into undergarments, recent visitors to
New York declare. Pajamas are a bigger number than
ever before, and with them appears a scarf; combin
ations arc featured everywhere in keeping with the
very tailored silhoutte; even the bath-robes have notched collars, closely fitted girdle, set-in sleeves, while
occasionally a waistcoat appears in thc very new night-
•gowns
The brides who arc strictly commc il taut this year 20
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
IV
h-Knit
OSIERY 1"-l
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
21
\tffn .,.7*iy^
V
i-|»oi
ioliowing colors as well as whin for their
trousseau: Orchid, peach, honcydew. Madonna blue,
flesh and tearose Moreover they must use laee, white
and Colored, narrow an»l wi«l« and of every kind known
to modem femininity
•flALE ATTIRE
Fashion Notes from "Jew York
Novelties In half hose are growing In favor and buy-
era returning from abroad say that Americans are
scouring foreign markets In search of unusual and acceptable ideas In half heme with which to make the novelty Idea a feature in next fall's business. Ideas in
wool, silk, and wool, lisl, and silk which have a iouch
of color or design to contrast or harmonise with a certain tendency that is noted in men's hats, shirts, glows,
it is believed, will bm\ sn Interested market occasion-
ed by customers who are beginning to express colorful
ideas in the things they wear
Shirts are being shown this spring in the largest
varity of distinctive colorings and patterns that have
appeared in many seasons Rats are being sold in
mixtures that get away from the standard tones stable
for a number of years. Light colors In suits are awakening an interest, and it is more than likely Hint it
these developments get a tirui grip Oil the puhlie. ha
hose will fall in line with the general movement in tins
direction.
Sprightly looking socks arc being shown and Hold
in men's shops and develop considerable consumer interest al prices around $1 and $1*50. Low shoes continue to hold their popularity with the style customer
who buys this kind of half hose. Only a very limited
number have been wearing gaiters and the fancy hose
idea, therefore has a fine chance to exhibit itself.
Vertical stripes show signs of activity and form
what seems to he the most significant swing in the di-
reetioii of design tendencies. Various stripes are produced in pencil effects, and offer thc merchant an opportunity of displaying an old idea in a new light. At
any rate, while vertical stripes arc familiar as belonging to various periods, the fact that they have not been
featured in any large way recently gives them a new
and different look to the retail customer who will accept vertical stripings as something nuW. Checks are
liked and fancies generally arc wanted. Clocks are
not so good. '
Wool hose, it is mentioned, while it continues io be
a very important member, is showing some of its pop-
larity with other things that are coining to the front,
I.isle is going stronger and silk is coming up into increasing popularity.
Reports are to the effect that flannel trousers are
to be widely worn this summer and will replace to some
extent knickers which last summer were worn at all
sorts of times and occasions. This may or may not
mean much to the hosiery business, but at least it will
develop some interest in hose to wear with white and
gray flatined trousers. In thc hosiery trade there •;
some comment to the effect that men, instead of wearing while socks with white flannel and white shoes, as
a general proposition show a disposition to sport black
socks instead. There is some interest in half hose in
Ihe gray blue or powder blue color, used as a ground
for a design.
MEN'S KNITTED WEAR.
Bright hues and variegated designs for men'a sport
coats are a strong feature in men's knitted outerwear.
Tan. ranging from light to quite dark shades will dominate, with these colors seen in a big selection of mixtures and combinations.   Fancy fronts will be in evi
deuce, and it is somewhat interesting to recall that in
tin* old days these garments were known as sweater
coats, and were generally worn under coat and vest.
today they are sport coats worn as such and growing
more popular each year. Rib stitch and flat stitch patterns will be favored when the "summer months arrive.
and a sprinkling of brushed wool garments will also be
show n again this season. One variety of the light weight
models, tan in color, shot through with white and tan,
with white perpendicular stripes, back and sleeves of
solid tan. made of soft wool has a very smart appearance.
Tan has also been selected in a patterned sport coat,
known as the "Rist-Mit." an all-year-round-seller.
The patented feature is an opening in the cuff whieh
allows tin* wrist to be employed as a semi-glove when
the thumb is thrust through the opening.
HERE'S AN EASY ONE.
wner:   "What   will   it   cost* me to have my car
0
fixed?
(iaragcn.an: "What's the matter with it?"
"1 don't know."
"Forty-eight dollars and titty cents. A*
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
UV
FOOTWEAR
Here is Unequalled Value!
A Feature Line that Will Draw Trad*
Here's the pedigree of these new Atlantic
Sweater Coats-
Made from pure wool, no waste of any kind
being used
Material dyed with the best alizarine dye. Will
not fade when exposed to the sun or rain.
Latest American models. Perfect fit.
The same attention is given to the make and
finish as to the most expensive coats on the
market.
At the price there is no equal value
on the market.
Order now.
ATLANTIC UNDERWEAR, Limited
MONCTON, N.B.
E. H. WALSH & COMPANY
Montreal tnd Toronto 47
Selling Agents for Quebec, Ontario and Wettern Province*
GENERAL CONDITIONS
■7
Conditions in the footwear trade are liable *
come more stable as a result of the budget anm
ment that the wilts tax on boots and shoca biel
rubber footwear is to be reduced to lift) per CCUI f
is not however anticipated that there will bv anv ,v
tie cut iu the retail filing price, sinet* buyer? ,
merely been holding back owing to lhe Uncertainty . r
to what the finance minister would do with th,
tax, ami now that the reduction is prohahh* th,«  ■■,*,
in a position to navigate along definite linen,  in      \
cases th»* reduction will mean tin* difference between
protit and loss to lhe no-reliant,
Footwear prices remain Hrm ami present prices arc
maintained at tin* present level onlv because manufacturers realist that, despite heavy overhead cost* and
sub-normal production, the public would nol take kind
Iv to anv Increase in sin price if footwear
Kair activity j* noticed among factories turning «*u?
novelty Urns, but ihe general ton* of thc manufacture
ing busimss i* thill, and factories are working *
below rapacity.
It is realised thai the sabs tax reduction will I
the effect of placing domestic manufacturers in n bet-
ter position to eombat the influx of Imported shoes
MUCH ATTENTION IS OIVKN STRAPS
Strap varieties in Women's footwear at«  fl CCUllt »>f
interest l*oth from the standpoint of the more conserv-
ativc one and two strap numbers, and as regard* what
the ma rfture holds for novelties showing strap car**
lationa
Straps at the moment look like the one Mire bet for
turnsole varieties for ihe next icveral months, Above
all other reasons for this is the fact that straps are very
appropriate ami unite in keeping with almost an> tpyc
of costume And real service ami comfort i«» the wear
er, while noi at the expense of style j*, afforded hj
straps
Materials iu strap varieties as well as in tongUfd
Styles favor patents and satins in solids and eombhta**
tions for immediate ami future Black is the predominating color.      HoWCVCr,  grays,  fauns ami  even btgfl
shades are combined with the blat ks as are Ruedes
cades ami even <*alf and ki«l   particularly for foxing*
Blaek ami brown kid are also Included for Immedi
Helling, bul not iu anv greal way,
tf     S3 «
Por evening wear dainty blaek ini Stoeklnp » ' "
eohwed transparency are the thing,    Some of thi **!
ings of this type show fancy laee fronta, extemlinn
from instep almost to the knee, ami on other drt
sheer black   hosiery  French  chicks t»f  tlrawn  Ihi  »<«
work are featured,   Them* eome in black only, sine-     *
contrast of the flesh beneath is necessary to be
live.
Silk and lisle hosiery will be worn with street    '•*
wear in a ribbed effect, which is really a drop •'
ami which are efficiently good-looking in the li*
tone
Sandals in many clever effects are typical "
season'» new footwear styles,   Novel strapped •■■"
arc a feature of ihis type of shoe, which Is of p THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which ii Incorporated the B. C. TRADE REVIEW.
23
si
or sal in. and has somewhat high heels, and em-
deep cut-outs and much use of fine strappings,
made Of satin  brocade are usually elaborated
it rapping of plain black satin, and those of black
de with patent leather.   Spanish heels from i% to
ohi double that height are featured in some models
ni* oval or square cut buckles on others.
Kvciiing slippers show a preference for blittcriug
,cis made of silver or gold brocade combined with
I exactly matching. These new styles aiv handsome-
v finished with tin* lines! of strapping in sandal effects,
sally fastening towards the back with a single pearl
button
Por warm weather there are s<»me attractive white
shoe styles including a new light weight washable kid
slipper, while stiede and ftnew hite calf will, of course
he in the summer range.
Sports shoes are limited to a few decidedly smart
ami good-looking types, such as the sport Oxford, math*
uf wry lighl tan calfskin, with a low he«l and sole of
crepe rubber with shredded heel,
VANCOUVER FIKM TURNING OUT PINE
FOOTWEAR
The .! l-cefclc Company, Limited, after adding considerable space to I heir Vancouver factory, arc busily
engaged turning out footwear of a distinctive class.
fashionably correct, and retailing at a moderate price.
J. A. Thurston, factory representative for thc company
during his visit East purchased a quantity of high
grade English machinery, designed especially for manufacturing fine models in men's footwear, and the reeenl exhibition staged in the Canadian Manufacturers'
Building on Granville Street, where thc newest models
were shown, attracted widespread attention. The
"lieekie" boot has long been popular in Western Canada, and travellers returning from prairie points report the opening 0f many new accounts. Mr. Harold
l.cckic. sales manager for the company, in securing the
services of Joseph Berry, who has hecn identified with
such well-known manufacturers as Florsheim, Nettle-
ton, etc., has acquired an able assistant superintendent to Mr. Thurston.
BRITISH RUBBER FOOTWEAR.
British-made goloshes and rubber foot-wear up to
the present have not won a place in thc Dominions,
but some months ago Canadian lasts were sent to Scotland ami rubber footwear made on these lasts is being
offered to retailers in thc Dominion at prices which are
reported to be considerable less than those of similar
Canadian-made goods. It would seem that a serious
effort is to be made to establish British rubber footwear on the Canadian market. Thc undertaking will
probably necessitate carrying large stocks in the Dominion.
Special Sales
Every si»irv must face sooner or later the problem
of Special Sabs At ton* time special sales may be a
good thing; at another time they may not Special
sabs may be valuable to one store in a community but
when other stored take up tin* idea it may not be so
effective for anv of them.
We hear a great deal of talk nowadays against
special wiles, but when all is said ami done it has a
powerful appeal tti the average consumer ami. while
the Idea is old ami often overworked, still there are
consumer* in practically every community whe will re-
spond continuously to the appeal of any special sale
which they feel is genuine.
There is one thing, however, that every store should
decide for itself before it attempts to use special sales;
that is, whether or not tin* consumer in his community
will really believe that such a message is true. Not a
few Consumers have reasoned out  lhat  the store that
continually advertises to sell goods at coat, mar cost,
or below cost, cannot ultimately exist on this plane.
Consequently, they conclude that either the store advertising is not true or else they conclude that the normal prices of this store are already too high. If they
believe in the special sale appeal of one store they are
likely to Conclude that other retailers are profiteers ami
whenever any retailer, no matter who he is. gives out
any hints, suggestions, or reasons why his competitor
may be dishonest, unreliable or a profiteer, he is scattering seed which will result finally in a reaction
against him. unless some wily competitor actually is
profiteering, There are hundreds and t houses nils of retailers ami other advertisers who do not believe in this
doctrine, bul sooner or later they arc hit by thc results
of BUCh a policy, whether they recognize it or not.
Many stores in all lines of retailing have made
phenomenal successes by refusing to run special sales.
They are operating upon thc policy of being thc leaders among the merchandisers of a community* They
place their sales emphasis on thc fact that they secure
tin* latest, up-to-the-minute merchandise price, emphasizing store service an dthe quality of thc merchandise
ami driving home the idea that price is largely thc same
everywhere. In this way they do not attract thc so-
called bargain hunters who will chase all over town to
save a half-cent. They believe that their business is to
sell merchandise in season and they create an atmosphere of quality and service. On thc other hand there
arc probably just as many consumers and possibly more
who will be influenced by the sales appeal.
There are a number of sales fundamentals ami
guiding policies which should lie decided upon by a
Store that contemplates building business through; the
results of special sales, "loss leaders," bargains, clearance, left-over and season sales.
Thc idea back of thc sale.
Time limits of thc sale should be clearly specified.
3. Specific articles, lines of merchandise and departments affected should be clearly indicated.
4. Windows should be decorated to co-operate with
the publicity of thc sales effort.
5. Policy of ''comparative prices."
In order'to make a special sale carry a real convict ion of truth, sincerity, and realism to the mind of
the consumer, it is necessary to have a basic fundamental idea back of thc sale.  One great difficulty with
1.
*> 24
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
most special sales is that the reason for the sale sounds
hollow and untrue. It docs not carry conviction' The
reasons given are trumped-up reasons ami such reasons
usually act as a boomerang against the goodwill of the
majority of regular customers of the store. The ordinary terms of "Clearance Sales." and "Inventory
Sales." "Special Sales." etc.. have been heard by ihe
consumer so many times that she docs not ordinarily
believe them* Furthermore, she has been cheated,
wronged, and defrauded so many times by these so-
called "sales" that sooner or later she becomes petrified to such appeals. This is one of the big difficulties
iu thc store advertising of all stores that use the special
sit les idea.
Thc exact date and hour of opening a stile should
he clearly specified in the store publicity: also the exact date and hour of thc closing. If these time limits
arc not well displayed and made perfectly clear, consumers who come late will be sorely displeased, and
feel that they have been unjustly treated by the store
management because these facts were not made clear
to thm.
Not only should thc specific articles and lines of
merchandise in the sale be clearly specified, bul also
thc personnel of other departments ought to be informed daily of the sales which arc being nut by the
store so that everyone in the store mav intelligent I v
• *» r^ *>
answer the questions of consumers concerning tin* articles on sale. Many an advertising program has fallen
down completely because of the lack of just such coordination with the other services of thc store. When
the delivery boy, comes to the home of a consumer, to
her he represents thc store, ami if he should have a
copy of the store advertising iu his possession  it the
time ami could intelligently answer the quest ic     ,**
lhe consumer, sin* would have far more respect |V    k.
I * i (I
• tore than would otherwise be possible,    l-'urtbti!    ...
the delivery boy might have n sign on his wagon si    .,
' *■*•**.
additional publicity i<» tho sale ami other adverti   K
rtfo-ftS Of the store.
The store manager who spends his money for in   ,.
paperoreJreular advertising ami oes not put eopii  ,,*
that newspaper advertisement Or circular iu his
•lows, handicaps himself and bis sales program unm
Barfly.   Often, very often, oftener than most store n
agers realise, consumers will sec advertisements     I
practically decide on buying the merchandise disj'"
ed, and then when ihey get down town will absent
mimledly    forget    which store advertised the article
which they wish to secure,   Consequently, if only me
consumer jar day could h«* thus reminded, it would
make it worth while.  Furthermore, windows should be
decorated in harmony with the publicity in force nt ihe
time,   By harmony we mean not only the kinds of merchandise, but also the form ami atmosphere of d«<..;
ation.   Last Christmas a progressive jewelry store wan
advertising a high quality display of diamond ringi
The   window   display contained Ihdusands of dollar*
worth of merchandise, and an unusually well worded
ami appealing scries of advertisements were running in
the m wspajH'!-*.  lu addition a direct-mail folder, whieh
was well printed in color*, was also circulated in lhe
community   Then in the window along with this high
grade merchandise were hung a number af cheap ih<
ami ten-cent Christmas bells, whieh not only cheapened
the whole display, but some consumers sctualli wert*
ft a- •
(Continued on page 2"
n
BIG VALUE
FEATURES
of the
Hosiery That Wears
tt
1. Tapering toe—gives longer
wear.
2. Deeper 4 ply heel—gives perfect instep fit.
3. Narrowed ankle—gives ankle
trinmcHs free from wrinkles.
4. Deep elastic knit top—Ills
knee snugly, yields with
every movement.
5. Double soles—for extra mileage.
6. Special numbers—for those
who require an unusual combination of sizes.
Your Customers Are Out For the Biggest
Values They Can Get
GIVE IT TO THEM
With Circle-Bar Hosiery
Today more lhan ever before, your easterner! are determined to gtt the
most hosiery value for their dollar
Wide awake dealer* are giving it lo them with Onm liar Hosiery     Its
6 Big Value Features Impress a customer Si  a gtSBOl  with the ettra
value offered. Comparison serves to strengthen nn** Impression   Loaget
wear and greater comfori prove n.   Result -SstlsflfKl customers. laCTCSI
ed sales.
Check over the fi Hig Value Features of flrrh* liar Hosier)    and \0\ us
send you prices    Vou will he QUleh t<i realise ihe unpniailed valu*s
Clrele*BST Hosiery Includes all st>|e* for men, W08H n and children. Its
botany wool, silk, silk tad wool coroblntUons mercerised \\*w ami
cashmere.
Circle-Bar Knitting Co. Ltd.
Kincardine, Ont
Mills at Kincardine and Owen Sound
MMItttO
Hostunr 1<W
THE BRITI8H -COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which Is Incorporated the B, C, TRADE REVIEW
Merchants to Meet at Merritt
Chosen Headquarters for 1924 Convention of British Columbia Branch
Retail Merchants' Association
o«
Situated in the Nicola
Va, y, where the Coldwater
Bn,l Nicola Riven j«*tn. thc
town of Merritt lies nmidnt
mmv *.i tin* most picturesque
ui i'.ritish Columbia's seen*
,,-*. .ltd has long been CCCOg'
lib'i SS »n ideal Hjw»t f«»r va*
eatfonists. It is* hen* that
th, annual convention of the
It r Branch, KM A. will
lata place during the tirni
w.-k in dune, and from in*
tiientioti* nl this early dale.
• large attendance is expect**
en
li must be remembered by
nil who anticipate sojourning to .Merritt, that thin eon-
uniton, although coma it nt*
ink* a pleasurable meeting*
time for the retail fraternity, tauat noi. and Indeed
cannot in this instance, Im*
regarded In the lighl ol i
vacation.
Two days only have been alloted for the eonven*
lie j, and as there is n V8St amount oi work to be done
il v. ill be readily seen that clockwork precision must
Nicola   Lake.
regulate the proceedings, in order that due deliberation be given to the problems confronting the assembly,
and also that the entertainments provided for the visiting delegates and their
wives may be taken full advantage of.
The Convention program,
outlined elsewhere iu this
issue will attract many retail merchants from all parts
of the country. There arc
difficulties confronting the
retail trade whieh will be
freely discussed, and those
merchants who are alive to
them, will see to it that they
have a share in these discussions.
Thftftd sale for .Unl^P^
•CEETEEVAIRtLITE
The UNDERWEAR ThatWiu Not Shrink
OF GALT
MBMMHttanaKa
^,,,„^^^^ 26
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
CALIFORNIA STORE HAS "SPORTSLANE"
Unusual Setting Helps Knittedwear Sales.
A store in Oakland. California, has a department
devoted entirely to knitted outerwear, whieh has become famous among the travelling public all over America. It is called "Sportslane," and in operated by
the C. C. Capwell Co,
Sportslane occupies a space 75x35 teet. This is
marked off with beautiful ferns and palms. The lane
leads to a club house built in the style id' the Spanish
Renaissance, with terra cotta walls, colorful green ami
yellow striped awnings, window boxes, lattice-work
overflowing with purple wisteria and an entry way with
a floor made of bright tiles. Peach trees arc in blossom
in thc grounds and canary birds sing from their hiding
places in thc branches. Over thc tables which are placed here and there in the grass tliere are sunshades of
striped awning to match the window shades.
The name "Sportslane" has been copyrighted. It
stands out in large cutout letters of blaek fastened to
a tightly-drawn banner of white gauze. All garments
shown here carry that label and nothing but sporting
varments are shown in this section.
COTTON.
EXTENSION OF SHORT TIME WORKING PERIOD.
Manchester.
The raw cotton market continues very unsteady, and.
as no one knows how much raw cot ion will be left In August
or September, operators are compelled to act cautiously.
Unquestionably the Federation of Master Cotton Spinner!*
had this consideration in view at their last meeting, when,
after recording that the short time movement In mills spin*
ning American cotton has considerably Improved ihe position
of the trade, they went on to recommend that ihe thteedays-
a-week system, which should be prolonged through June, July,
August, and September, holiday stoppages to be counted in.
At the same time members are requested to send lo the
short Time Committee weekly full statistics regarding production, sales, and deliveries of American yarn, and the com
mil tee are empowered to extend the working hours If a speedy
improvement of trade during the summer months should
justify this course.
Meanwhile unremitting attention continues to be paid to
the most pressing need of the industry; the extension of col-
ton growing fields and the production of (he staple at the
lowest cost. Encouraging reports come from Uraxll and
Peru of the growth of cotton exports. I nKast Africa important new railway works now being constructed will make existing cotton fields increasingly accessible and will open new
territory. In this region there is much room for further de-
velopment. Attention may also be directed lo the facl that
competition in cotton growing In various quarters of the globe
may have the effect of Increasing the acreage under cotton
In America. Even at prices considerably below the existing
level cotton growing Is a lucrative business, and all experience
shows that it is the lucrative busim ss that expands.
BOOTS AND SHOES.
Manufacturers and Higher Prices.
Northampton.
Many factories in Ihe boot and shoe Indus!rv worked at
full pressure in order to cope with the demand for Batter
Irade, and in a number of cases oven line was necessary to
meet the sudden rush of orders. This applies more pari leu
larly to manufacturers of ladies' and men's fine goods, as the
producers of heavy goods have not yet reached lhe period
when Ihey can look forward with confidence io Improved busi
ness.
Apart  from  Ihis seasonal pressure, however,  there Is a
steady inflow of orders, which is keeping makers of the bee!
lines busy, and there Is reason lo believe that tin- -
months of this year have produced results of a much mo
isfaetory character than have been obtained for three
years past. Most manufacturer* have a substantial tn
ot trade in hand, and some find il difficult to obtain g
really elllrlent labour that they could utilise |n the <•
which cater for the medium quality trade business |»
unevenly distributed, for a while In some quarters fujj
is being worked. In others there 's » denrth of order, ,,
eratlves are restrieied to three or four da)*" maptoymei
week.
'ng
at-
»ur
• '• t
i*u
res
'■ J
;i**
up
WOOL TEXTILES.
New Wages Demand.
Ilf.*,*!
The operatives in the woollen and worsted Industries ui
the West Hiding of Yorkshire hate formally made Own- demand for an advance of wages to commence when tin- preseal
agreement expires at the end of this month. This its a pr,*,
etedtng more in accordance with fashion than CffBnWftB tsmm,
it ignores the difflcalties which the vented ladastrj ba
the present time to face.   The fail that French fabric*, *M<h
conn-  in direct  competition   wish  Bradford made material*,
can be sold in ihis country at a profit foi Jusi about u q....-.,
as it cost a tO produce similar material in Bradford does
appear to concern ihe Operative! or ttoir trade union leaden
Competition to wool lexUtei ail ever the world i* noi fat
keener than ever before    It will beoOQtS accentuated ahei.
1jerman> get* her wool let file tmk**trie<*». pipeelai!) the V n
Ited section, are no longer in « position to mvft anreatrlcii*d
foreign competition al home tad abroad, and eaah-ti 001 Op
erative* to be maintained ia a macs better position titan ih m
elsewhere The rntuil of an advance In WlgfO, and, ir th*-*
irade union leaden can bring H about, a «**»»*• pul son imma
tion of hours of labour to ** v*>t week, wm mean an advanet
in tin* price of our riotb* both for men's and womeo'i veai
and of course u «iti b*< round Usil both wholesale and retail
distributor* will buy what the) want in ihe obSSpeal market,
regardless of WttSt happens to wool textile operative* in tin-
West Hiding Of Yorkshire
SCOTTISH TWEEDS AND HOSIERY.
Husiness ha* been w« H maintained in ihe geottiah ItWd
trade during rtocot weeki Some oi Um bone merchant! iw
ordering a mile more greet] Several Btsaatsctartia !»«»♦•
received additional orders from th»* United states «<>d the
Far East. Home merchants art* now taking more of tits
fine and Bt-SdiSO CbCViOtl in preference to bofan) worsted
because oi the rise in the price of she fine rllllSfl «»' SOOh
If Is expertiil however, that tWIHMtl will again be advanced
in price, because most of the manufacturer* bsve now nasll
stocks of th»- raw material on hand, and are ha*Ing to paj In
creased price* to lite spinner*
Hosier)   and  underwear   manufacturers   Sfl   ""It  rather
slack.    Spring ord«*rs are not  eomlBg well  to band, bOl
view of ihe lacrcasa ia tat price or fine wools merchants sre
now beginning to order for next winter    The) are objeeilBfl
tO an advance In prices, and  In  mosl  OSSCS  BSnStaclBreri
bsve been wining to ■harfl las difference between prases!
prices and those of a Mar ago    The .)■ tn-vol for Sallied w
en gMldS for outer w.-nr I* still latfafaCtOf)
GOSSARD CLASSES IN WESTERN CANADA
The Western Training Schools for tin* Canadian  II   *•*■
Goaaard Co Ltd.. win give the following eoarsei timing I
next few months
Winnipeg   Ma>  :»fi to 30
Regies-*June 2 lo fi
Calgary  Jane J* io 13,
Vancouver   June 16 m 20
WHO TOM EDI80N IS.
"Who is Thomas A   Ktlison ?"
"lie is iio* man that Invented th.* phonograph si
the radio to keep ns awake so that vie WOtild Stay
all night using his electric lights," 192-1
T1IK HklTlSli COLUMBIA RETAILER
27
ftnttS   0
(Continued frtuu page 1*4)
the   genuineness ot the diamonds dis.
Copies  ol   the various newspaper advertisements
-should be posted on bulletin boards in the store, so that
ii;. .iistomer might have her Impression of your act-
using further intensified,    In thesi  days of ;i vast
liiplicit) of advertising appeals, the one outstand-
irjiture that should always be sought is "intensity
impression," niul thin intensity undoubtedly is tn ul-
liplied l>y having the advertisement seen as tunny times
j(s iMusuble.
The problem of "comparative prices" is always
with us, By "comparative prices" we mean such state-
ment* as "wan oUc; now '27c;" or wss u1.69, reduced
to *1 I!*," etc. The public have In*, n fooled SO many
limes hy these unsupported claims that ii is undermining ami weakening the whole program of retail advertising. No doubt, sooner or Istor, some regular process will have to be devised to se,  that Untruthful ami
misleading appeals orv controlled or eliminated, and
many of the now exaggerated statements minimised.
Seasonal advertising «f goods is not necessarily the
same n ''seasonal wiles" There in much efficient snd
ffeetivo advertising of seasonal goods which docs not
at all carry the seasonal *nl«* idea  Ordinarily, the va-
« -tt
rauia! <*a!e is made an excuse for the special sale, some-
timca it carries conviction and sometimes not. The
vasonai sal* in primarily one of tin department stuns
although many regular retailers snd some chains indulge in Seasonal sales As n rule the chain stores do
md have many seasonal loft overs; their method «>f anticipating consumer demands has been sn can fully ami
accurately estimated in advance that tiny are able to
hllV rather closely to their needs     The chain store is.
of course, more efficient in handling Its turnover, snd
thus thev eliminate much »>f the need for seasonal sales.
The large department stores have rather actively
estimsted the mouths in which the peaks of sales have
been reached ami thus suggest thc time for the tsea*
sonal ch-an tip of these leftovers, The month af January suggests sales of "piece goods;11 April, "Spring
waists. Htiits. coats, millimrv, gloves;" May. 'Milliu*
1 ry ;" June, "Summer dresses, skirts, piece goods,
waists, neckwear V July. "Sweaters," September,
Millinery;" October, "Piece goods snd gloves*,'1 November, "Suits, coats, millimrv ami furs." December,
OloVeS,  neckwear. Under •garments.    dresses,'     Those
Articles, of course, vvill vary is they concern the Spring,
Summer, Pill and Winter seasons This same program
could easily he worked out in a general way for the
Reasons] high ami low spots for grocery stores, hardware, jewelry, drugs, etc
The anniversary sale is always i good one. A greal
deal of publicity can be gained by connecting the history of the stove with the history of tin* community aud
thc  anniversary  Idea   may be put over In dosens ol
Ways-   such as having the sale on say 20c articles Oil
the 20th anniversary; 50c articles on thc 60th anniversary, Or, the date* may he added to these ideas; Cor
instance, on the 20th anniversary the sale may be put
on on the 20c articles. $l.*2i» articles. $2.20, $3.20, etc.
'hiring this sale, of course, n number of free publicity
articles might he printed in the newspapers. The pro-
k'resM of Ihe store would he connected up with that Ot
the Community and would enumerate thc features 01
community development in which the sloro has taken
an active part,
s.  s o ,s which lee   that they want to use a
»        o   tin. mad" policy regarding special sales,
•     ranng their basement as a headquarters for all spee-
••1 sales effort, calling it some such name as Bargain
•asci,,,,,,   |j ,    „ivin„ th(i impn,ssi()n tQ the eonsum(,r
n,;" ;'" the lclt-overs, odds and ends, special types of
merchandise which are reduced, are sent down to ihe
Basement, This leaves the store free to carry out its
program of selling quality goods at normal prices.
In the final analysis, the Special Sale must carry a
conviction of truth and real sincere conviction hack of
[t I It is to he permanently successful and really help
hmhl a greater and better store.
TIPS POR LIVE CLERKS-
The Priends who "Park.'
Call the policeman, if you can't think of a more
tae!ful plan to handle friends who make themselves
store pests.  < »i* throw them out of the store yourself.
A yong man just left our town feeling that local
merchants were the worst lot in the state. (They're
not thcr're the best I) The state of mind, and the unhappy departure, all were traceable to the fact that he
had too many friends, of the wrong sort, for his own
profit
Ih was discharged from the Huh store. He resigned from the Mingle Brothers—after having refused to
obey certain suggestions. The same old gang followed,
sympathizing!)-, tt) his third connection, then the
fourth. When he left the latter, after a disagreement
with the proprietor, he was through with the town.
Tin- gang didn't follow him to the next town, and
if he doesn't acquire the same following there, he may
make a good clerk.
Affability and congeniality are mighty desirable
I raits in a man who waits on the public. That is all
the more pity that Jim Hart let his own spirit of good
fellowship go astray. Jim was likable, and he always
felt like swapping stories when the other fellow did.
•First one, then another, learned that hy dropping into
the Hub store there would be a pleasant half hour with
Jim Hart. Whether they had any business there was
beside the point. They would drop in to see Jim, and
Jim always would welcome them with a joke which wet
their sides to shaking.
It was pretty much the same way with a customer.
If the customer, having bought, had a little time on
his hands, Jim always could accommodate him with
amusing and interesting discussion.
"Those fellows don't buy anything," said the Huh
store man tt) Jim. "Shoo Vm out!" Cure Vm!"
Jim didn't know how to, or wouldn't*
The good-will and friendliness of customers is a
precious thing to possess. It brings people into ihe
store all the time. But a clerk can go too far with it.
A Store is a husiness institution, and to encourage
loafing in it is to impair the efficiency of the clerk and
the appeal of the store to others. Customers come to a
store for service, and a gang whieh constantly occupies
the clerks, constantly has to be faced on visits, can become a vital factor in driving away trade.
These fellows who come in to loaf don't grade high
as citizens, as a class. If they did, they woudn't be
loafing around. Some of them may be actually undesirables with a poor reputation around town. They
are not a good advertisement for the store.
There is a knack in learning how to give a customer
aasswj^ii^^.. ^:.^ 28
TIIK BKITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Mi
iv
J. A. TEPOORTEN
LIMITED
WHOLESALE DRUGS
PATENT MEDICINES DRUGISTS* SUNDRIES
PHARMACEUTICAL PREPARATIONS
i
308 Water St.
Vancouver, B.C.
■sSffi*
mm
Bpm»**eAJt
The
Old Reliable
□
Minard's Liniment
Co. Limited
Yarmouth, N. S.
British Columbia Makes
Fine Toilet Tissues
Th. N.u.l.r who itoct.1 ,„,, ,„, bfhind
Tillicum Toilet Tissue
or
Falcon Toilet Tissue
Rnd, g  profitable trad* bes.det offering a  Made  In
B. C. Producl .uper.or to imported NnSS for whtch he
pays as much,
Both arc genuine two process
Man.la  Crepe   Tiseue   (not   ImtUtion  crepes*   touoh
yet very toft and easily soluble in water
Ask for prices and samples
of these Made in B   C.
papers
Smith, Davta ft Wright, Iii
MANUFACTURERS  AND  WHOLESALE
PAPER DEALERS
VANCOUVER VICTORIA
tmmtmatammmmtmmmmwmatmaaam
BE CAREFUL
Fire losses are increasing.
On the North American Continent one city dwelling ia
destroyed every four minutes.
One hospital, five churches and five school houses bum
every day.
Every day forty-one persons lose their lives and forty-
seven are injured by fire.
DONT BE CARELESS; CLEAN UP.  SAVE LIVES
AND PROPERTY.
Retail Merchants' Underwriters Agency
801 VANCOUVER BLOCK    mt      . °   * C
Vancouver. b c     Northwestern Mutual Fire Association l:v
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
29
t,v(,n attention, yet aetually getting from him to thc
m%i'customer, or to a atore chore, In thc quickest possible time.  Every good clerk moat learn that knack,
\ntl ii' frienda acquired elsewhere form the habit
,,* "dropping around" to kill time, break them of it—
evt,ii if y*m have to tell them bluntly that their calls
|nt, pfert* with your efficiency ss a clerk and your value
i„ [he store. Don't Instate to apeak the frank truth to
tin m, it you have to.
NANAIMO BRANCH R.M A. ELECTS OFFICERS,
1924-25.
The ninth annual meeting of thc Nanaimo Branch
,.{ the Retail Merehanta1 Association was held May 6,
at \h*' Board of Trade Rooms In that city. A very interesting addreaa wan rendered by Provincial Secret-
an Walter IV lug. win* on hia return to Vancouver
nit«*r visiiinn Conrteaay, Cumberland, Duncan snd Vie-
toria teas enthusiastic regarding thc Nanaimo tneeting.
pres Wilson and secretary W 1*' Morris gave Interesting reports ol the years' activities, whieh clearly Indicated the sound condition of lhe Nanaimo Branch, and
promising pn*sjn-ets for the present year were forecast
following the meeting, s supper was indulged in at a
local eafe, and thc proceedings terminated in exprca*
stons of goodwill among all present The following
officers were elected for thc coming year; Sobt. T Wil-
mn, pretddent; Pred Jepaon, Hee-presidcnt; John Wallace, second vice.president. 1* A ('nwiuan. h«»n. secretary; Chas A Rawlinaon, hon treasurer; Executive:
Messrs ,1 P Doyle. J C. Dakin, A Naah, J. B. Nichol-
•*"it. Attain, OUver, Wm Brown, Pred «t fielder, Olivet1
Bby, M. Gtasso, D, ll Becklcy, Karl Fletcher, Norman
Porfleld, Secretary William V Norria and H Hickling,
auditor.
GROCERS AND BUTCHERS PICNIC
To be held July 16, 1924, at Nanaimo.
Arrangements arc now complete for thc annual picnic, whieh this y»ar is to be held in Nanaimo, on July
16 next,
There will, aa usual be a large crowd attending this
annual event ami from the personnel of the picnic
committees, thc outing will be attended with every sue-
eeas. The c p H steamer ss Princess Adelaide will
carry thc holiday-makers to Nanaimo   The following
* . s
merchants have been elected to the -rartous commit-
t« es:   -
Chief Officer: ll. Morrow,
Assistant Officer: Iv K McTaggart
Transportation; Mr Brown.
I'inanet*: c. Clarke, (chairman).
Sports: J. Merilees (chairman),
Announcers and itartera:   Messrs.   Fllgginson and
Anderson,
Judges: T. While, (chairman); and representatives
01 wholesale houses,
0roundsmen: Messrs Walford, Lyon, Lincoln, Bro-
gan, Beaton, Orr and McKay,
Entertainment: Messrs. McKelvie and Niekerson.
Prizes: Messrs. Viiieenl. .loins ami Brown.
Equipment: J, S. McKay.
Catering: W. Allison,
Advertising: Messrs. McTaggart and McDowell.
Tickets: .1. Morrileea,
Adults. 11,80; children, 90c, return faro,
Don't Forget the Date, July 16.
VANCOUVER TAILORS ORGANIZE.
Enthusiastic Meeting Inaugurates New Trade Section,
R. M. A.
On On May 5, the merchant tailors of Greater
Vancouver decided to form a trade section of The Rc-
'ait Merchants Association, and at a representative
meeting held on that date elected the following officers:
President Thomas Morgan; first vice-president,
Pred Hartte; second vice-president, C. Wray; Hon.
treas. S. J, Creasy, and secretary, Joe Daoust.
A dinner was given at the Amhassadore Cafe, May
15th, and representatives of the leading woollen and
tailors supply houses, congregated to hear an address
given by Mr. Dunn of the firm of Dunn & Sundbcrg of
Seattle, who spoke on the "Value of Co-operation and
Organisation." From the enthusiasm noticed at this
dinner meeting, it is evident that the Tailors' Section
of thc Association will rapidly become a very live factor in the activities of the It. M. A.
AMONG THE TRAVELLERS.
Early this month the Grand Council of United Commercial Travellers of America, the ({rand jurisdiction,
Oregon, Washington and British ('olumbia, met in Bel-
lingham, Wash. As the Tulip Festival was on at the
saint- time, it is needless to say that the sixty odd travellers who went from Vancouver had a real time.
The travellers participated in the parade and naturally attracted almost as much attention as the prize
float, sent by the City of Vancouver.
Friday evening. Bcllingham Council. V. C. T., entertained the visiting travellers and their wives at the
Leopold Hotel with a splendid banquet followed by a
delightful dance.
The business session occupied almost two days
winding up with the election of officers.   The following
were eleeted :—
Grand Counselor: C. H. Begg. Portland.
(Irand Junior Counselor: W. B. Tullidge. Vancouver.
<irand Past Counselor: F. H. Rice, Seattle.
Grand Secretary. A. H. Metzelaar. Portland.
(J rami Treasurer: J. G. E, Wettorstrom, Seattle.
Grand Conductor, Jos. Ball, Tacoma.
Grand Page: Fred Williams. Bellingham.
Grand Sentinel: C. L. J. Smith, Seattle.
Grand Chaplain: H. B. McKelvie, Vancouver.
Grand Executive Committee: S. E. Hill. Tacoma;
lv R. Krause. Spokane; Lester Davis, Everett, J. D.
Denholm. Victoria.
Representatives to Supreme Council: Capt. E. B.
McMaster. P.G.C., Vancouver; P. 11. Rice, (!. P. C.
Seattle: Henry A. Thompson. P. (1. C. Tacoma; J. W.
Watson. P. G. C, Seattle.
It will be seen by the above that the Canadian boys
rank high in the esteem of their fellow travellers in
this jurisdiction,
\V. B. Tullidge. crack salesman for the Western
grocers, being elcted to the second highest office in the
Grand Council.
H. B. McKelvie. 0. C. tobacco, with Kelly Douglas
& Co Ltd., was appointed Chaplain.
Capt. Iv IV McMaster. P. (!. C. representing the
"Kardex" visible tiling system for IV C. and secretary
of Vancouver Council "284" U.C.T., and the Commercial Travellers Association of Canada, was elected to
represent this Grand jurisdiction at the Supreme Council which meets at Columbus. Ohio. June 24th to 28th.
nnd J. IV Denholm of Victoria Council No. 434, was
elected to the Grand Kxecntive Committee. 30
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
GENERAL CONDITIONS
April business in the hardware trade showed improvement over the previous month, ami with the advent of warmer weather af the latter em! of the month
a marked stimulus was noted in all branches.
Heavy hardware dealers, however arc somewhat
discouraged by the lumber Industry's decision to «*ur-
tail operations due to the decreased demand from oriental markets, but this situation is counteracted by tht*
steady demand for marine hart!ware, ami dealers in
this class of goods report brisk business.   There ha*
been a very large demand from boat owners and yacht-
men, who have been busy reconditioning their era ft
for the season's activities.   Stores are BOW bidding for
trade with the increasing number of tourists who ate
visiting this part of the Dominion, and the inHux will
grow steadily as the summer months approach.   Really
good business from this source is anticipated.   Householders have made a good start in painting up their
property, and the "Save the Surface" idea is becoming generally recognised as a sound Investment in
property protection.   The question of Eastern Houses
underselling the local men in the nai! business, bas been
satisfactoryily settled, and carloads are now coming !<»?
ward at a cost corresponding to jobbers prices,   r*ocal
quotations have been reduced forty cents, bringing the
today's price down to $n a kei:.
MARKETS AT A GLANCE
Cutlery.
^*iS5.swa-si ■* •
n Hack Saw Blades
Roofing Paper.
*£ "'•"•" »Mr- -v ui,,,.. ,
*£ "*■ *-^i,, h •  , ,
uh- w»re Cloth.
^s:,s. ■ ■■ m .„,,„,,.
* * *■
New Prices on Some T {«<-.„  , *.
^w price, „„** ^V°\*<"» •* MU.
WWte lead tricet Vnattecu*, *,„ d-   .
Price of bench acrl^r       m into *m<* &Pon the
Sand Paper
Wry good demand.    Storks gOOdj pn> • •-
Wheel barrowi
Oood demand from rontmrtor* and .**r
from Individuals tot garden barrows     ***    .
prices stead)
Linseed Oil Market Steady
Unseed oil market fa naa ttfeady aftei
elines bave been made recently.
Turpentine Movement Oood; Prices Jnchar.,;d
Th» movemeni of turpentine ha* beei tn
\*» change baa been made *u prices-,
Piir Iron Market Quiet, Prices Unchsn    i
Pig fron prices remain the same aa I Mil .
loess in this line haa been tguiei
Wire Mails Decline
Wi?v nails deciiiM     Tb* new ^notation.* *hi
eline of fort) w nts i keg
Hockey Puck* Reduced For Fail DgHvary
The Dnnlop Rubber Oo haw* issued full p
rubber hockey pucks showing reductions in
with «»ne «\c< ption
Reduction in Prices of Grindstone fixture
A reduction is announced locallj on yrjod*.*
lures    A good movemeni i** reeortled as iskiui
In -his Jine
Iron Sheets
Iron sheets are now   quoted at  b»w«r prii -1-
being thc result of lowering Ih* dales \m\%
Sad Irons
A ".iik-bf reduction has been rccowled In Ihi
of 8lw   Potts' Md irons
kreen Doors.
Loral retail trade reports busfnesa is opening
3crcws,
Sales are   good     Stocks  tfC   fairly   well   .«'*',",
Prices remain steadv
**
Sash Cord
very good demand developing      Blocks
prices Heady.
Hone
Some demand is developing, Stocks are good; i"*
steady.
Putty
Putty sales are fair af prices unchanged from
list
Jhellac
Fairly good business has been done in the Sin!
market.   Prices are firm unl unchanged.
Poultry Netting
Poultry fencing and poultry netting ore moving •*'<
Prices on these lines are firm at levels whieb have bei
iii force for some time
mmmmaaammm IIC'I
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
31
Spades and Shovels Move.
[Valetl locally report a brick movement in spades
hovels.
Refrigerator Booked Orders New Going Forward
Hooked orders for refrigerators are now being ahip-
i, .i    Fairly good sales have been recorded in these
Builders' Hardware.
[iuilders1 hardware is selling in good quantities.
prices 00 general lines of builders' hardware are un*
rl   nged.
Sporting Goods Sales Continue to be Good.
-**,de of baseball and tennis supplies i*, good this sea-
-md is developing rapidly.   Prices hold firm at
i is recently quoted.
Automobile Accessories.
With thc line weather prevailing demand has pickup considerably ami indications point to good business  being   maintained.   There   have been no price
;. s since our last issue.
BUDGET CHANGES AFFECTING THE HARD
WARE TRADE
A number of additions have been tabled io the bud*
..■• * resolutions which will be of benefit to manufactur*
t»ren of Implements and of steel The evolutions provide for the reduction of thc mbs t»\. in line with the
original reductions on implements fabricated before
i h< budget was announced This was devised to place
the Canadian   seller  on an equal basis with United
States dealers who are nol called UDOU lO pay S sales
* ix in their own country*
Placed on the Free List.
Shovel ha miles and stems are placed on the free list.
These, it is understood, all are imported from the United States. Rolled iron and steel which goes into the
manufacture of implements, also is placed on the free
list.
As a concession to the steel manufacturers, ingot
moulds, which are now taxed 5, 7% and 10 per cent,,
an* reduced to British preference, free; 5 and 7V<>.
Concessions are also made on slag and similar material for blast furnaces and smelting operations. The
duty on lire brick also is to be reduced.
Tin* duty is reduced on racing shells used by amateur
rowing clubs imported for the exclusive use of the
clubs.
Other articles exempted from the sales tax are: Fire
brick, ingot moulds and articles used in the smelting of
iron on*.
Lap-welded tubing not less than four inches in diameter for water; oil and natural gas wells.
Materials for the manufacture of fertilizers; dry ma-
t* rials to be used for thc same purpose as spraying.
Sabs tax on creosoted railway ties is cut in half.
The value of imported matches and imported playing cards will include excise taxes.   This change will
make the same system of valuation on imported as on
domestic matches and playing cards.
To Take Out Licenses
All wholesalers and jobbers are authorized to take
out licenses provided they give the necessary security
for tin* payment of the tax and other requirements.
This change will put all wholesalers and jobbers on
the same basis.
In addition to wood handles for shovels, machinery
Special Introductory
Offer
Ue an* selling aud introducing a
POR our old and new eustomew
Fin mli, i-**********************************^*********************************-
U  S..     v   'l tin     tut*,     2
wlth drawer. 8fa» of top 26x46 or two of
-ok our old and new cunoam. n.       ;^  '     108 Dresser, fumed
new tin. at a discount   I ><• offci is. uae a*.w                  q{
Inish, One No. 108 Dresser, Ivory or W hlte Enamel    n
Iresacrl8.in.xa4.ia top; Wn.x24.in British I lit, Mi       	
Two   Kitchen   Tables
same table 24 in   X 36411.
Price for thc four pieces as above
$38.00
This offer only for a limited time.
,so place orders early.
Dowling Manufacturing Company
1-,vr ™ ****© vawfiOUVER.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
266 Second Avenue. 32
l« J.     I      I
II
SWtt! (9**.
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
^minimi
.M;u
U
Eben Smith's lone cow died the other day after drinkin a
ttp^ri    lTbhM '"I meamn' t0useon his *«■ ««
the past week.    If he'd saved the surface he'd have saved all.
own loci .dver,i.i„g, window and «JLX*v^     l"""^-! C"mP',i'*n wi,h »°u'
all who enter your Wore. P  y' md ,n Save **• Wace luggertion. to
»AV[ THS SURFACt CAMPAIGN uil K   , 1924
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
33
of
ini
class not manufactured in Canada for handling
ires and other materials to be charged into a blast
,,  is placed on the free lint.
ie new provisions also specify a drawback of 99
tnt on materials which entered into the cost of
iltural Implements on hand or in process of man*
'nre in possession of the manufacturers ami uu-
wb\ on April 10th,
Then is also a -similar drawboek an all materials entering into the cost «»f Cyanide of potassium ami cyan
j,i, of solium.
The reduction on racing shells is In tho British preference which is reduced from IS per eent lo 5 per
n.*n!    Then* i* no change iu thc general tariff.
NEW COOOS.
Ajkq SUcrtng Brace—Matt* front malleable iron, black en-
■»m«au-4, tssttnt «o the uejM-r part at dash at one end ami to
• Itceriai column «i the tuber preventing all vibration and
taldftf *?<***tn*a column «-* *<>H,| si I rOCtt, motl tar^n* cars
f»   a rb-Mce til thi* Mm! and llu   foM it a loi better with
> ■  tarnished complete with bolts, suit)* ami icrews; weight
• eh i" (maces   One in » carton.
Rear Whtfl Unlet.—A Kord brake Utal acts SB Miiooihly
nnd posiUvetj as Umse oa ib«* bifbest priced cara, u altacbei
10 lM,th rear What! brake drttttl and taken the place of the
irsaaiBlsskni i«u brake which ix eltintnsted entlrelj oper
iitf irom ihe ragalai Poet brake pedal, made with bronse
busbtngs, sottd itaet pall rods, effloteai equaliser* and doub*
■•• adjaatmtota, finished la black enamel, packed one set In a
l".V keiKhi 12 lbs
Supreme Electric Lantern; thi Kind of 1ii:hi everybody
needs, became n Utrowi Ki rays In every direction and leaves
i lie hnmi rree; carries three No, 980 unit-cell battertei con*
cealed In ihe bottom; lined wltli ball handle and hai a strong
■aire c««o to protect lamp from breakage, specially uaeful for
molortats, farmers, csmpars and In the home; wetght per
doaen Without batteries 21 lbs.   One dozen In » ease.
THE CROWS NEST PASS AGREEMENT.
British Columbia's Hardware Distribution in Prairie
Sections will suffer considerable hardship if this
agreement is re-instated.
It was in the year 1897 when the Laurier govern-
ment was m power that the Canadian Pacific Railway
undertook the const ruction of the Eastern British Col-
nmoia line, known as the Crows Nest Pass, and a bargain was struck with that government whereby, in consideration of certain subsidies and concessions it agreed
to a -schedule of maximum rates on grain and flour from
the prairies to the head ot* the Lakes, and on certain
commodities westward.
A reduction in rates and tolls over the prevailing
tariff was to be made by thc company on certain goods
"westward from, and including Fort William" and
"from all points east of Fort William, whether by all
rail, or by lake and rail."
So far as manufactured goods were concerned, it
was on the Westbound freight movement only that
there was a reduction called "for, and this the basis for
all the adverse critisism voiced by the people of Western Canada.
Among commodities to enjoy the lower freight
charge with amount of reduction were: coal oil from
Fort William westbound, 20'j lower rate; agricultural
implements of all kinds, set up or in parts, 10%; cordage ami binder twine 10% ; iron, including bars, bands,
Canada plates, galvanized and sheet, pipes, pipe fittings, spikes and horseshoes, 10%; window glass 10%:
paper for rooting purposes 10% ; paints and oils of all
kinds, 10'; ; woodeuware and furniture (household),
10', ; fresh fruits and livestock were also included in
the list.
These concessions naturally stimulated the development of the west, but at the present time about the
only commodities specified in the terms of that agreement that are moving westward are farm implements
and sundry livestock.
Low rates were enjoyed on those commodities until
the year 1918. when the Borden government set aside
the agreement as a War Measure Act, and the following year when the Railway Act was revised, parliament gave the Railway Commission power to set the
agreement aside for a further period of three years,
ami this privilege was taken advantage of.
In 1922 a bill was passed suspending the agreement
I'm* yet another year, except insofar as the eastern rate
on grain ami tlour was concerned, and giving the government power to extend the suspension twelve months
by order-in-eouneil.
Tin* tdd rate will again come into effect on July 6
next unless some action is taken at the present session
of parliament.
The most disturbing factor in connection with this
agreement which has caused bitter dissention among
the citi/.ens of British Columbia is the ceding of some
600,000 acres of land in the south cast corner of the
province, including some of the richest coal areas on
the continent, in return for which British Columbia has
been saddled with freight rates which practically shut
her out from the prairie markets. Provinces which
have eonceeded nothing in the form of subsidies for
Ihe line, are granted favors.
Hardware manufactures here are making a bold bid
for the western trade in practically all thc commodities 34
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
This Canada Wide Advertising
Directs Business to Your Store
Sixty of e,.,„a,ia*, ,„„,, •„„,„,„; w ^ fow i(a).	
mmari ,«,iv, tar „„„ („ tdIta|,,,,. 1„lllH,.iiii,.> nf ^^ ^
•'.'" """'"""" "***  ""'I ""'Hi„i,„* l.m..l,»„, Ron    ft*, •«
'" *'"" ""• "•»"> ««i* oi .»,i, *.!,„, „ ,ri„,. ; ..„,
pmentfag fo«*hl „„„„„„„ „„„ „r„ ^    (m||wm| ^
gwwiog popularity oi *, ,;,„, ,.;„„,,.„,„ for „, floo|i
They an* directing business to
your store    Are you making it caa\
r,„. u,. , *       "■    j*'" hihkihk ii ra-n
i,, ,„„,, „, r,.,.,„„i/, v , m ihr      	
tnet for Dominion Unolenml
'rrv?* lowt ,,iH,,h,> ■"■»«■ fcjww
Papcw.   We'll gladly send yon hoahmid fo     »   i , *
,..j,„v     .   „   , , " P°"n»W,   flee  ,,f  rhlirj-e.   what   wimOM
iiini.s. counter cards mtmni.  i    11 .
Use effectively to increase  voir business      U 11     ,
m-i-i  .    ,     . '         vv   wo will aiao give ym expert
"-..staneein planning yonruimiows    Write M toth.v
•J" OikJodi and linoleifm Co^ Lanitcd
MONTREAL, Canada •••>}
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
35
stipulated under the afreement for preferental rates.
in,l j, the old agreement b resorted i<» eastern manu-
fat'tu! is will be abb* lo ship their goods two tu* three
hundred miles further w«*sl for the name money, thereby capturing the western markets, to the detriment of
V, nt* rn houaea.
THE POWER OF THE CUSTOMER.
I have tht power to build up or tear down thu
wonderful establishment of yours. Without me your
store could not emit,
I do not always judge style or merchandise cor
rectiy. I eome to you for advice. Just at I go to j
tawyer or a doctor, because I feel that you ought to
k-*o* all there it to know about the merchandise you
ten in the department where you are working. I $%.
peel you to advise me correctiy-~to help me-—to as-
i,it me in making my selection. If you mislead me
or show a lack of knowledge. I not only «-u lose < on-
Me nee in you, Out I will also lose confidence in your
itore. and go elsewhere for my purchases.
When l approach your counter. I like to be greeted by someone who does not have to finish the gossip
o' the Omy with aomeone cist at the counter further
down, or someone across the aisle, before they can
wait on me,
I detest a curl answer to my question—a "smart.
steekf reply, *i%4 the sales person wno shows a tack
of interest in m*. Even if I do not buy today, remember there art many tomorrows.
I eaptct service. 1 demand service, and if you will
not give me service. I win go where I can get It.
Give me  service—The  kind of service I  eipect
and I will make your store the greatest in the com
mumty.
Armstrong-
Jon*'*. Wm.*--Htported twiiti out to Wm Braai tbuirher).
Johnson *i lira)    tnnKohi***} (QrocefS)
Chiiiiwsck—
Par-wan jk N,lme« --Baatneai being advertised for sab* by
C c. M T. A (man's furn*, &c\
Cumberland—
Mumford's tirtwery — Dissolved partnership. Titos  H. Mum
n>rd oonilnaea
Central Park-
Hunter, K w. Hold out to i\ i» McDonald (gro.)
Mayne Island—
Kriterj,. Bertram \ Reported rocceeded by Harvard Bros.
(Q S )
Nanaimo—
Thompson. QoWttw Ac Ktockwell   Reported dissolved part-
aershtp; Thompson a Dowte eontlnalng (grocers, Ac)
New Westminster—
Central Host Market—Dissolved partnership. (Batchers)
Reliable Furniture Company   incorporated.
Port Hanty.
Nightingale, J. n.—Reported sola oui to Frank Maak&tt
(Meats).
Vancouver-
Heaver Grocery—Reported sold out, (G. B, Scales).
Ideal Clonk Co. Md  -J D. Small appointed custodian.
Caaadn Produce Co    Dissolved partnership,
Economy Meal Co, Ltd   BallUf reported In possewlon,
Tladalll Ltd.-To be wound up voluntarily. C. D. Rolatoo ap-
Pointed liquidator. (Sporting goods, etc.)
Canada Chemical Co.—Battlffi eale held.
Royal Typewriter Co.—Oasetted as ceased 10 cany on business in B C,
CONVENTION NOTES
TO REMEMBER
Visiting delegates should arrange to reach Mer-
ritt Tuesday evening June 3. It is planned to regis-
ter as many delegates as possible on that date.
* •     *
Branches and members of the Association mutt
forward all questions and resolutions to be placed
before the Convention, to the provincial office without delay.
«     »     *
Each Branch is entitled to send five delegates,
whose names should be forwarded to the Provincial
Office immediately, in order that their accommodation may be arranged for. The Provincial Office will
make reservations if desired.
* •     *
An attendance of at least one hundred delegates
is anticipated.
Victoria-
Mean k Hiscocks (druggists)—Albert M. Claerihue purchased interest of William M. Dean estate.
National  Motor Company,  Ltd.—Applying  for change of
name to Sun Motors Limited.
Victoria Owl Drug Company, Ltd.—Succeeded by MacFar-
lane Drug Company (not Inc. (Retail drugs, &c.)
White Rock-
Marshall. R. C—Reported sold out to MeLeod & MeLeod.
ID. C... &c.)
WRITE THE MANUFACTURER.
Occasionally, an enthusiastic salesman leaves yon
with an order for merchandise ina quantity whieh. when
it arrives, does not move in aeeord with your hopes.
Yon begin to regret yon bought so much, and then feel
mighty sorry that yon did. A postage stamp and a letter of a few lines will often release you from your
puxzle.
Write to the manufacturer of the article, marking
your letter. "Advertising manager0 Tell the gentleman exactly the tix yon are in—you bought the goods
nnd expected to sell them, and you have not succeeded.
Say you would like some selling suggestions, ideas,
which will move the slow articles out.
Of course, you may happen to hit a manufacturer
dead to his real interests, but you are much more apt
ttt find one who knows that he's lost a customer if he
doesn't eome through with the result—producing ad-
viee -and perhaps made one if he furnishes a solution.
You'll get help in most instances.
A manufacturer alive to his business knows better
than anyone else how to sell his article at retail—for
the very good reason that he has constant cheek on
merchants and how they push his brand. He knows
sales stunts, display methods, advertising ideas, they
have used with success, and he's glad to dish these out.
So put your problem up to one as interested as you
are in its solution—the manufacturer. He can help
vou many times.  Write the advertising manager, 36
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
M
.!*,
Teapots!
Most folks want a teapot that is more useful than pretty.
We've tried all kinds in our place. Some of them, when full, could Hardly be
lifted on account of the awkwardly-shaped handle j others got so hot you couldn't
touch them.   Others couldn't be cleaned.
In this new Special Davidson Seamless Enameled Teapot I believe we've got the teapot of the
century.
There is a no-heat handle—one that gives you a full, comfortable grip, The moment you pick up
the teapot you know it won't slip when you start pouring. It doesn't atrain your arm and doetm't
get hot. There is a special Davidson patented hinge on the cover, ao that it opens and abut*
just like a well-oiled door.
It's made in one piece—a seamless article. You can see what that means easy to clean—no
crevices or joints—no taste of the tea used at the last meal
But the teapot is just one of all the things we have in our enamel ware line.   You'll find some
thing about them all that will make your customers want them in preference to others.
Our salesman will look after your need*.   Or nend your
order in direct.
TA< $tHt+t J&fam&u.
-y
amfie/i j(k!C(M™M
{Branches:
Toronto
Winnipeg
Established 1800,
Head Office and Pactory: MONTREAL.
Calgary Saskatoon Vancouver VX2
• I
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
37
HARDWARE PRICES CURRENT
The following art prices quoted for principal lines of leading wholesale firms.   Prices quoted are necessarily
subject to market fluctuations.
AMMUNITION.
Us-iiKf Shol Shell*.
Qd"*
C .i "
I** '
IS
Ijrtfl
Arfr<*»ca«.
•* s
It
tu*.'
tLi.t>
If tw
Si ?l
h
i: ii
ll.SI
, ,    ,,,tt*i i*l«l» li Q * 2* * IS
I <■'.• * 1 I list) OttS
u C    Vr««,«w J-J Q j U » m « h
, | ■ |   iTeinltii
Metallic Ammunition.
Dominion
.. thuri Smolteiais
.'.-  ,..'!-,« Smoksteas
.. !    luSe IftooSekiii
K;flr   l.r««s«»k
:,» s -ft ttroofcatsai
,. i Ijum .*»j»n*fc.«*i«*»*»
."J   >,     little   t*ir»<«i,.«*-'.rt>*»
!i',!*.«•   I ■*>%»*■»*»«*&•,
ANVILS■ * I'#t*r Wright. l-?tb»   io 111
:.   »w iss n>« tie.
mm  !•*■>'»• A****, is a*.* ttS.il *<» tu
! g   doable i>u aaaa- aaSaaatad* $,** •*
I;:...- ttut    banters aae*. Iti*.' doa
*.■<•■; »&**. unban-tit**!. lift J« t«* I
hah* <*«»■». Ill oo p*r IM n*»
HELTIi*&3""   ImCm,     raw hid*     OtQm*
il   I |f" At |t|a |»r l»» |«Nt»t.
it mm fan: »•»** st m so p*t
BOLTS.   OARIUAUK   Un
i.t 5  »m altar   Ujl  tc» f>ln
III
». »'.
t ft
* io
s i*.
* ia
5 si
Oi* ,
H
;<» tu
atnfte
ft (vO  ,!• I
II W.
V  at   |J N
IM fast
f/ull    p*«?hsg«ll>
tone   U*» W^®
LANTERNS Short or long globe, plain.
Ill M  doi .   JSPSftth*.I.   |U,M   do*
M VTTiK'KK-l*1<k. $!0.»o cudi; Cult.*!.
|{o |0 eUfe
MoWEHS. LAWN-Woodyatt: 4-bladexl2
Inch, tlDS-S. l-i.i.i.|.-t!l inch. Ill 00; 4-blade
tic in 111 Ti ftmpreas. Mn Made x 12-ln.
U3&<>. IU.*.!.- x 14-ui. $a3.ou; 4-blade x
16-in      113.75.       Great     American!     16-in.
133 W.  11 Inch. SKT6. 19 Inch, $18 50. Penn-
sulvanle   Junior:   ll   Inch,   121.50;   16  Inch,
134 Hi  !« inch, 127 2$.
NAIL& WIRE -Ihitw UM t.0.0. Vancouver,  ful. lata* I" SO fob. Vancouver.
NETTINO. POULTRY—Per roll~2xl2.
I*. <M itll. 1100; 2xJ«. |4 20; 2x10. 96.80;
laSi  H.TI: 1x2'. liw;  U3«, 17.00.
M.'TS—Per   100 Ths   tavance over list—
square, atnaii w*i*»  II75; square, c«w? lots.
%c U.   hexagon,   -wmll   Jots.   *A'&,   hexogan.
««**   I*****.   ti H,
riCKS—CSar. ••! a.*  t« 40 do*.
Iff!
■«*.   »»*« ***** sn   16/10 -*»ff lit!. 7,1* »t»4
r. atl krvath***. !«■«• tl 0€ Hoi    N"1" nrw
U»1 i»ri/*«*# it» attnel
|t*'»l.TS  MA*CHtNtt— H ana «m»H*r up
t ir   baf ?«**« J2T II »a H*»l
; ■ * I   .ff u*#l. S & "I19 *ft«l 's*
,»;    Sole sew h*i prteas 'n
t*'!,T*<   HT«»vr#-   t-***  »:H*'1<» "f 51*1
IH>t«TH    TIUIJ--I-.-M*   2m   *«W   «*'''*   *»n  *!!
fc«*iHt roe bf-»*t»n pacsasea
BOARD, Oeaete I'll l.-w* «<> 5*^ ,#*L
|£: **> i»*r  l.-MW  f***t
l»»tl.KIU*    ItANOH** a8*(f»l»
I lUitNU  I'Al'Wt  TSrwA
<• roQ   ^eeoettns to <ii>i»*'{5>'
iutts—Ftotafl, -HI. inm**»« -WPP*'
nn|«h  2S**IS   P«   »"**r  ,s*'
•I»««
lo
o?#*r 4* in Imw
IMS SS "10 *,flf
t*ffr«*t
111 JO -jxich
lie t.. ll II
riain We i«
•n4
I tax
    2S-*5S^	
iu t**» |wir Me; is*is iH,f i-***"*" *i":   ,,.
fHTTS Wrouthl  tlw»S   No   1*4   IH"'-1*
lt«  per doa: is^s w***1 par ass.? m*
*'     l> I? »*r d«» M      „
fHRPsrr n*:i.T  tl «*, Mtb. us* ro«   .
<**T-*r*iiEH. CtlfHROAltO obi tetopot aao
dt>u bmM nf-.uh  iijo*"* i>*r huftdrod
(TtAtN  «Vi! ii  *lactrk wold. I*ia. J*,1;'.
'; Ibi    S, III 4*> H«***- IM tO*   I 5li   »K,'>
pei   ' « R»e ,    ,
ntAIN   i.«*timr. f»*U x t«. Mi» *,fl•*,,   *
l  ' t   l,t f| *>.j.,'h
t*Hoti*KRS P'ootv—Unlvwaal w
••nt     lniv-^m.1 No   I. U7 •**» <»»«
v„ j   |MM dm    i'ni%-rr«*» 8*0  **, -M3V"'"f
Mom«, v«  R. M.M «m*i; ff«aa. >°  6**
rwtWS   BMtRF.l.t, N«  o  fio.oeaen.
Vo t  in.ii each  Ka J. Ui|fl ,,*<"h  >0
i*' ***• ^.» h
! IMS    M VI •' •VtMl*.    Prr   11*    !H*
1 l/>THRS i.i vi* wtR**—Par saoa,
I • * .i, *    |M ft   l1^ II
1'Hii.ih   int    nUM-ii    tl & "ff  a**"
' kmltMntfh ••   in   I7S "ff "**'*' ''*'
j  \ \ Ttf| iff'll     i*«*      IM   ''-'-!     ■ !"
•■  %* 10    12 In   17 N
nt.KS   OrMtl Wtwltrn. S&<r* "ff ll»t;
• **..-' H-a ofr im ,.„„
'iivni.-jt.i'ftr  «loit   n»lri»   V — w  »ir*»r
*   MM   Mn   ism. l-ln   »*««; I In  M
rn*  Par  ri"t"n  r*»i""
S: 8-tn M.M! I«*ia      , «
fmit;   S"
o i.*: tt
lint versa!
So fi.
lint;
|*,V3.
Mark
113 tl
l4*J-pty loc
:>
iiooo
Nn»
Iron,   \n«    0  t"   1.
1   nnd   lm»'f,   »9 ••»
'•<'HIM*iJATl*r»
• In 13 Tu. «-in tt
iiiisi-:, WATBVt
I •ply  W - n  fo«»t
iionsR sHOm
!•**«■  lftcp.d ;  iron,
per iti'i tha
IU(tN8    RAD.    roVMoN    IVr
'  n**«   nnd mmr 2?<-   I   I. snd D no*  1 *•'
KNOWS,  HIM   DOOR-  lHl'.«nni*d.  13,.t>
doe
LAMP   mtMNKYS   A,   par  **•*"',   ■   i>ill((,
MM |.-t* dox;  A    J^r dox   ll.JO:  ftPJ"  ,a'r
« dox tt.|t par dm ; B i**-'* oca H *"
100
n.VK TAR-
s
cul 8k* eaota; s k-»i . •-*>*
••at'h, s f»i i»«* each.
l*l,ASTi-:R <iK PARIS—I1M jwr 100 lbs.
RIVETS AND BURRS—Black can-life. 5Tb
hurt* Me; Ko » «»*i»rtt*<l copiwrwl rivets
No I S4c lb ; ;iim.rt-.-<.l copper rivets and
Imrm Mas No I atworted coppered burrs
i»n,l tntrr* Jlc p«*r lb No 8 coppered burrs
J7c r.er n> ; Coppered rivets Sic per lb.
Coppartd burrs J7c per lb.
ROPS RA88 liritlsh manila. base, 16V4c;
pute mitnlia. )mm* 19c
SAWS, Bt'CK—Happi Medium, |14.6fi dot.
HapPV Idas llCll dox   l»i**-*ton» No. S I16.8H
d<«I
K< 'RKW8 —Bright    flat    hwid
Sat; Iwrllbt round head. -S3/10 o .  __ .
flat head ITS(Vt off lisl; brass round head
tt/MJ off Utit
f^^lKWft.OAP—II <»ff 11*1
scitkws, shrr --m oa Bat
SHOVELS AND SB A DBS—Olds or Fox.
IU i*> |*>r dox  S Ji»n«*« or BulUlo* IW.iO per
67S,1t) off
«5 10 off list   bratw
lbs.—m-in-  U 60*
dot
iron. BAND—Per loo
IVIn.  HM; i*in. 14 5o
IHON. BLACK SHEET-par lOOIbs— 16
KUft-ge |« 10. 4 rmse 16*00; 18-20 guage.
|« •*•*   S6 Kusge 17 20
rr —
«... n «»•»' »• V^J8ir,aiiPFT-P«**l«l1*"*        CAPS—Radiator, liuo eacn.
T^^^rf^^^ W   !A     CARBORUNCLUM-Valve grinding
Martin  Senour Neutone color   3.73
Martin  .Senour floor paint  4.15
Sherwln   Williams,   white     4.65
Sherwin Williams, color   4.30
Sherwln  Williams,   porch     4.30
Sherwin Williams, floor  4.15
PUTTY— Per 100 Ibi.
Bulk, barrels 800lbs |6.60
Bulk, irons 100 lbs    7.7*5
Bulk, Irons 25 lbs    8.10
Tins. 5 n>s; per lb    *%
Tins,   lib \l%
UNSEED OH*- Gallon.
Haw.  1 to 2 barrels .....| 1.30
Boiled,  1  to 2  barrels     1.33
LEAD. WHITE IN OIL*— Per 100 lbs.
1.000 !b8.  to 1  ton   $37.60
l^ess     .  19.60
Brandram's Genuine  -    11.03
Tt-RPBNTINE-                                 Gallon.
1   barrel lots   I 1.80
VARNI8HES- Gallon
Klastic. No. 1 .„' f 8.30
Elastic. No. 2     7.40
IV   Linoleum       6.80
IV   Marine   Spar       7.10
IV Furniture     8.65
IV Pale Hard Oil    4.65
Less 33 1-3 per cent.
latcfjiieret  16.15 less 40
MORE   LIGHT   LIMITED.
Prices to dealers.
Lamps   for       18.00
lanterns   for    $6.75
Junior mantles  per do      .75
Automotive Price List
ABSORBERS SHOCK—Float A Ford No.
I at $21.50. _   m
ACCELERATORS FOOT—Wireles8 Ford
at $175 each.
ASSORTMENTS—Cotter pin 13c each; Cap
screws 38c each; Set screws 30c each; Machine screw 76c each; Machine nut 75c each.
BATTERIES—Hot Shot $2.96 each; Dry 6x
o tt  53c 6-Ach.
" BOOTS—Tire 4-in. $1.25 each.
BUMPERS—Twin bar $13.60 each.
CAPS—Radiator. $1.00 each.
6-01.  $4
i»-*-  Kurt*'*  tt ***'■     .
MwMH.  No   4. $1795 dos.
$19 ss. doa.; No. io
lots.   42
K'.i.*««*    It &
si Ji m »i*k
llltl Au ; No   8.
AH sKnve In black finish
S»tLt»KH-S\S,    l*'*>!l<'
lr»*   Ho   |H*t   Ib
SPIKES, PRESSED—Per 100 lbs
fl <Wi. HI   $7 H; H In   Iy.oo
STVHLKK 	
■***-•■   In full ke**: (ti«
1,11 ner 1"" lt>s   in full kegs
No. 6.
$20.00.
per   lb.:
% inch.
,;«lvHni.-Mence. Jg'lJLjf
Ivsnised poultry netung.
I
list
iLVANIZBD— Per
cattle.
100
n< n«
TACKS-CsrtMit. 70c off new
WIRE BARPED-Pw roll-4 point
ia™ kn }&*!*■■*"**"
™\t»tVA.;*•   . n|600
Ktnv o*^ ***** No. 'o. $6.00
So   11   •« "v  N"   !2* •*- *
'   WR.NV.ERS-»*     ».••
MTM do«. Blojsda l«.ioaoa
*S     „..ivr. \i nflllNT'^-VeloTt wstw pow-
\V A SH IN O M A t li l > r-. .     |76 00 ,%ul.h:
ntl» etohrM tbs. WOO eaoH.
PAINTS AND OILS.
Brindrim-Hendenor. ^
$4   "
das:   Safety..
; Ajax. IITH.OO
$19.0(1  each
POX—33   lbs
dot
CARRIES—Luggage, collapsible $4.30 each.
CEMENT-Radlator, % lb Wonder Worker $6.40 doi.
CHAINS—Weed 30x3% $6.35 each*. 3«xS»*
17.00 each: 31x4 $7.70 each; 33x4 $820 each;
:Wx4 $9.00 each.    Less 30%.
RID O SKID-30x3K $3.75 pair; 32*SK
13.96 pair; 34x3% $4.10 pair; 30x4 $3.95 pair;
.13x4 $4.50 pair. Less 30*7r.
CLEANERS. WINDSHIELD—Presto $160
each; Mayo Skinner $7.50 each.
COILS—Spark single $5.66 each; Spark
double $11.00 each.
DEFLECTOR'S—Wind     adjustable    $15.20
pair.
ENAMEL—% pt. Jet Lac $6.00 doi.: 5-or..
Wonder Worker $4.80 dot.: Martin Senour
Ottlck Drying. 1/64 13c each; 1/32 19c each:
1 --16 31c each; K 54c each; ^ 96c each; %
$1 70 each.
HORNS—Electric $5.75 each.
JACKS—No.   200  $2.00 each:  No.   4
ench: No. 41 $6.00 each.
I/1CK3.    MOTOMETER—No.     390
each: No. 391 I3.-00 each; No. 392 $7.50 each.
MIRRORS—Rear view $3.00 each.
Ollr-Monamobile, llg"ht $1.55 gal.;
$1 60 gal.; heavy $1.70 gal.
PATCHES BLOW OUT—Locktit* No. 2
each: No. 3 30c each; No. 5 75c each:
6 17c each.
$225
$265
each.
medium
  rer «*»"•■- fi^  eacn;  N0.   3  awe hw<   *"v.	
HH   ■K»*MV o.d;;ry OOtor. 'J- No   6 "c^jch each
" "  ^T'JS OtTsSnita 8t«»n- „ ,f rl posV-Spafk Champion 63c each; A. C.
R£SS^^5=,'*s ^*t%m&gmv* ••■•■
,";«,::'V -*?„,•-„.„, ,,t ^^A^^i'X.^^»m
tbs -'
p»T
doi ■
Anchor Bhlngls stain
Ordlnarv color**.  III K sal
Orreni ind «rey». i«
PAINTS
Ordinary
Martin Senour
eotors, i« I
porch
Martin 8enour N»"^1»'
nui cans
tmint
white
Oa11••,',
$4 30
4.SO
3.83
PUMPS—Tire
^MLS-Wobe >Tn m 90c *™\ia tr«Ad* 30x
FabrlcTlres. universal non-skid tread. 30x
8V*   H8 M:         ..,   ., Kn. >®*.W> $2.75: 31X
C.r-v tube**:  IOSt*l*«lt g, -- ----
32x4 $3 75: 33x4 $3 85   34x4 M.io,
less 30 per cent off list.
$3.50:
Tubes: 38
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
M„
Sales and Production
Average Sales—What They Mean to the Retail Baker
and How to Maintain a Consistent Balance
Itv .lullii M   llarth \
UK most importanl thing to a merehanl Is the
customer.   Thr baker is a merchant   The cua-
tomer has tht- direct  relation to production.
What k a, customer worth?
Lei us analyse the receipts of one retail baker, and
just what liie customer's dollar and eenta mean! to llu*
business registered.
The salt's for the year were $45,000, thai is what thr
customers left in exchange for baked gooda.
Thr year contained 306 days of bttstaesa*
The average day's sties were $147*00, and a inn**-
tion.
There was an average of 36S customers a day,
That meant thai each customer left an average of
.4025 (forty ami V, cents) per day, or, thc sweet stun of
123 dollars and 16U rrnis per year,
Every Customer is a Valuable Customer-
It takes every customer to make your average eat*
tomer, and all agree that a customer of a Mail baker
who will spend $12.'J.()o each year over the counter and
take away thr goods is a valuable customer,
You can't slight any customer, whether small or
large. They ar,, the "It" of your buaineaa, Whin you
ask "how is business," thr answer is "his good or
poor."   Thr average customer is It.
If you ran g<*t this sense of valur accepted, first by
yourself, thm by your sales folk, you have the fundamentals of successful merchandising, Without it say
or all of us in thr rrtail baking buaineaa will dub along.
Thr average customer produces the average sale,
Thr average salr is thr control factor in production,
and iu profit.
A proper conception of thr average salr stimulates
merchandising effort, and is the one thing thai can
"srll" thr valur of merchandising to the retail baker
—production follows.
An Instance.
In thr year 1920 things in genera) were poor, In
May it was noticed that customers wen* falling off, The
moving season had brought a decided change- one thai
could l>r noticed. A way had to be found to Increase
either customers or salrs to customers—the main pro*
blem being to secure more receipts to raeel the simple
business needs of fixed expenses and upkeep,
Th old army game of cutting prices To invite more
customers was discarded as passe, and economically unsound. Modern business can't afford to "three fihell"
itself as an innocent amusement. Lower prices io be
absorbed by a lower standard of living was judged is
equally unsound. Il was decided that nothing could
be gained by either standing still, cutting prices, or
any of the negative policies of meeting these periodic
slumps.   It was decided that the best drfenrr would be
18*828
;I:;.
#u. I *j%
?»)>»-
1021
136,926
7 "I'MI   pr-odUrrd  Stl   t»*
Mi.
I ■
an offensive launched to Inereaae tlo* average ash    \
study was made of the o'veragu sale, and a protean
of variety and Intent* Belling put into vifwt    The r«
Ml!?;
1916
\ Ota!>« r of* customers
Average sale dally
Ye-ar** business
19*20
Kumber of cu-stowem
A vrmjft sale daily
\ ear s business
A decrease ol rustomrra
ewsm of $3,640,
A mighty lesson was Inirocil, not only was ih vrttM
pasted for ihe stump period, but ih«* new Idea han bepti
carted on through theae years of recovery and |
ji«-rity. This year, 192$, brought gg notod- N
ami an average sale oi 4025 on « slightly lowet pri*
following fact of more customers hnaight
thrpugh thr prestige of better customers has eontii
ly increased business Thia in a neighborhood bakery
where natural drawing power baa eertain territorial
margins, Increased busines-* from the name lerrtiory
has brought In 1023, 111J^ customers at against 99.KH*
In thi year lilt, mnl 9i,84fl in 1120, the yea rthin policy of streaaing merehandMng was started Bel in
customers have brought mi»rr customer* goodwill
computet its earnings ou tlo* compound interesl basw
It Must Be Done.
Tin- situation was mei onlv after a clear analyst** ■ »l
all conditions had been made    The natural rn*h ol
buaineaa that had carried a regular and litti-* ranee
lim of goods over the counter with small aaica en<
hail p.i.Hsi*!   possjidv never to return    Thc only
that could be found to restore reaelpts was lo leropl
buyer to add more baked gooda to ihe family '
That listens big, <»i broad, perhapa far-fetched; hut n
tin* last analysis that in exactly what waa done as>'•■
learned by some friendly questioning of customers
ing to talk
It takes in w and better gooda to tempi regular *
tomera to buy more from tin* baker   The cualoti
as will aa the baker gets into a nil   Rot4myton
rut production, an* montly mriital contentment or h
ness,- tlo* coarse of hast realatanee thai lands us
ways a  lilth* downstream     Thin*  was a  willing"
to gel out of the nil as soon as the situation was it<
iii/rd. ami faced-   It only needs Ihe righl methods  I
whole program retted on ability to produce a ;
I       I w I
ami better line of gooda that would stand aeliin-s
re-selling to the same customers,   A linr thai wot]
naturally lend Itself to introducing more eommerei 024
THE BRITISH COLLI
■ tj(l(j goods into the meals of ih. families being pro*
.«    ;il| by her majesty, tin* average customer,
1*reduction had t<» buckle down ami take orders
.     j|u, -sjtire that operate* directly under a permit
•   ij,.,• niajesty,   The idea of transferring power
from Ihfl simp tO tlo store was against tradition, but il
j!U,i <u, in* dour. Production was tuned np, Tin* trade
iournalt were rrad ami studied tot new recipes. The
remnants of the war conception of the right ami proper
material* ami quality were thrown out. Production
..oil. v was amended so that there was little left of thc
original. The butter bill Increased, the milk hill talked
in larger figures. The whole idea of quality was step*
iM.! up A poat-graduatc course in better baked gooda
wn$ being eonalu-cred and iio* bota and his foreman
sv,n i nlistrd as prospective pupils Tin- School start-
,,! and tin boss and his foreman were pupils and interested pupils They got so much out of ii thai fitted
and aided their new policy thai th** other young man
rklng fof him was sent to a following class. This
school work. In fact, wan a big factor in giving them
iht ability ami suggestions needed !«• carry out the new
poli-rj Not n week paased bul some nen and tempting
article was offered her majesty for approval, And she
approved approved «»f the new articles and of thc new
policy Prom the sales counter, reaching both ways.
In om direction baek to the end of the shop, and lhe
other way into the dining rooma of the (ststomera tin*
nrn policy was fell The old eaah register knew all
it If    it took lem punches for aw idle,   bul   each
h counted for more,   The high.r average sale had
arrive*
What it meant It meant thai a crisis had been
reached and passed It meant that both consumer and
producer had been jarred onl of a rut It meant better buaineaa for both*
"l" ■!'■'   " "
Lake of the Woods
Milling Company
LIMITED
Mr-Jew* of
FIVE ROSES
• FLOUR •
The World's Best
Daily Capacity 14.200 Bbla.
B.O. Of flow and Warehouses:
1800 Richards Street 1614 Store 8treet
VANCOUVER VIOTOEIA
IMBIA RETAILER 39
It also mean! a good Heal to the owner in a business sense. A good merchant i.s not necessarily a profiteer because he makes more money on a given sum of
receipts than a poorer merchant. The better profits
are the rewards of better merehandising—"merely
that, and nothing more." With the increase in aver-
age sales the owners' net protit accrued considerably.
Overhead was not disturbed nor increased. Better
goods kept prices stable on a lowering market while
the increased labor cost for these better goods was negligible. The trifle needed for clean cards and advertising was readily offset by less wrapping cost. In fact
tin* higher average sales worked directly into increased percentage of profit—something that had not been
contemplated when the policy was first, considered.
Beyond all that the old adage that nothing succeeds
like success was again proved, satisfied customers buying increased quantities carried an advertising story
and appeal that has brought increase in customers
while holding or slightly bettering each year's average
sale. This policy has worked better than contemplated.
The reason behind it is that the fundamental was
sound. Sales, or merchandising, came first as the factor of business determination. Production was co-ordinated to the need of the merchandising policy. Until this principle is recognized iu the retail baking business, we will never find the progress and prosperity
thai is inherent in the trade. These records are from
actual shop records so kept "that he who runs (a retail bakery) mav read."
Bread       '    $43.22V*>      35%
Rolls       11,11%        9%
Sweet Yeast Hoods       30.87%      25%
Cake Cookies          19.76 16%
Pies         12.35 10%
Pastry 6,17%        5%
Seven out of ten
loaves are Baker's Bread
Twenty years ago. only two and one-half
out of every ten loaves of Bread eaten were
Bakers' Bread.
Today b cities, seven out of every ten
loaves of Bread eaten are Bakers' Bread.
What has made the difference! The great
Fleischmann national advertising campaigns
have done their share to educate the nation to
the value of Bakers' Bread.
Another big series starts in 1924 to help the
baker increase his sales.   Your sales.
The Fleischmann Company
Yeaat
Fleischmann's
Service
Diamalt
Hi
j
1
"**^w»W'*'?Wr*ri^
,..,-■■ .--'**■•... ■ •--_- -
jiiiowitij*jwf*»w^*ftmTii* nni"-*rifrt'Vi-rtiei-i ■ w'*wm*i*m'*&-<' 40
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Hi
•■iv
Flavored Shortening for Pound and Package Oake.
Formula.
Butter, 25 lbs.
Vegetable shortening. 67*- lbs.
Salt, 2'/4 lbs.
Dried milk, 2»4 lbs.
Water, 3 lbs.
Mace, 2 ozs.
Vanilla flavor, 2 ozs.
Oil of sweet orange. ■•_■ oz.
Rosemary oil, j i oz.
Method.
Put the water, milk and salt into the mixer ami Mir.
Then add the butter and vegetable shortening ami stir
slowly until the mixture has become incorporated  v,n
the mace, vanilla ami volatile oils ami again stii 2t,
ly until completely incorporated.    Put  thin mixture
into tube and then into a refrigerator for Bboul fron
•I to t» days, after which it may be used.
This may he naed in the same proportion a- butter
in straight pound eake or ns the shortening in com.
mereisl and intermediate pound and package eake !).*
not add any other flavoring or salt when this shorten*
ing is used. By incorporating the ihortcning, mIi
dried milk, water, salt ami flavor, a combination -,<*••„..
what resembling butter is produced. The flavoring
matter is absorbed by the shortening and during the
creaming becomes excellently incorporated with tin-
other COnstitntCttta of the mixture.
TICKETS AND   LABELS
made bv specialists.
A specialist. In any calling, If on* equipped to produce results promptly, satisfactorily nnd economically.
This Is where our plant differs from ths everafs print-
Ins offlco. We carry In stock many tons of colored eard
boards for Immediate use. At one operation, with our
modern specialty machinery, we print tickets in two to fottr
colors on front of ticket and on the back; number each
ticket the same or consecutively and perforate sheet
both ways: or we can print your tickets and re-wind
Into rolls to suit, each ticket numbered consecutively
and correctly. We make bread labels In two colora for
the price of printlnf one color. In Quantities, and put
up Into rolls of 5.000 We make the tickets for tha
RC.K. Ry. by the millions: for the North Vancouver
Ferries; for the Government, and all kinds of theatre
tickets.    May we not be of service to you.
NICHOLSON, LTD.
Phone: Bay view 3/1
I0M tnd AVENUE WE8T VANCOUVER, E. C
Tlneo* liinsie bOOtl nt old    Me- MUren
leajctle   boots*    Wer«*   lhe   Work   u
tutaalnatfvff Blind    \vh«» coold i mm
espeet to -aall aevea tea-guts in *
tf&gfe step*
The stori of tits ftnvea4eaaa4 booli
wa* written la Un* days Ions btfOffl tlo* pfsacoi uao*
with u* sreai posslhilltlff These -jajfi there in ac
need tor iueh wonderful stopper* There \# th*-
telephone tl 1* no eRori now to talk a hundp-d
limes -#*nen leajtur*. Tlo* world ll tfirtaatlj at CHtC'l
door. This ase of wonderment tn based, 100, 0b
imtcinatioit. but u in ttnagfaaitoa p\o* practlcsl ei
periment and Rf«»t de *■ e lupin »*nf.
IIITiSM COIUMIIA Till MOM COMPANY, LTO.
Beech-Nut
Chewing Gum
Tha full-flavored goodness of
Beech-Nut Chewing Cum
remains unequalled. It contains nn abundance of deli-
cioue peppermint—leaving
tho mouth cool, clean and
refreshed—tha breath pleasantly sweat.
Juat recommend Beech-Nut Chewing
Gum to each cuatomer once. That'a
enough.
There ia a springy liveliness in Beech-
Nut Gum due to the pure chicle, that
immediately captivatea.
The peppermint flavoring ia aurprisingly
delicioua   even to habitual gum uaera.
Juat aak your cuatomera to try Beech-
Nut once. That'a enough to make
each one a regular purchaaer.
BEECH-NUT COMPANY OF CANADA, LIMITED, HAMILTON, ONT. ii:2l
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
41
Buy in British Columbia
Mis. Maine's Marmalade
S^te&-_. 4s^
ORANGE
GRAPE
FRUIT
PINE
APPLE
Ma%k#X>
IB  ORANGE I
bKl                                                           W^r
X WHISTLE
Wrapped In  Bottles
CROSS 4 CO. Vancouver.
PALM OLIVE
SOAP
F. B.  HARTNEY,    Representative.
701 Pacific Bldg., Vancouver.
CANADA STASCH
CO. LTD.
E. H. ROWNTREE, Representative
207 Hastings  West,  Vancouver.
Milne
& MiJJelton
Limited.
Wholesale
Millinery.   Notions  and
Smallwares.
347  Water
Street          Vancouver.
QUAKER JAMS
Made of frosh fruit nnd sugar; the
purest of inffo-tMsnts,  win satisfy
Ihi' most exacting.
DOMINION  CANNERS, B. 0.
Limited
VANCOUVER. B. C
MONARCH   KNITTING   CO.
Limited.
Mens and womens hosiery knitted
outerwear and hand knitting yarns.
Represented In British Columbia
S. D. STEWART.
318 Homer St. Vancouver, B. .C
E Chrystal & Co. Ltd.
Sash,   Ooors,  Store   Fixtures  and
Alterations
108 Georgia Street E.   Vancouver.
, »    ,**»»«.  S.S.
NABOQ
TEAre!
PAPEB BAGS
Paper bass, wrapping paper,
for all requirements.
COLUMBIA PAPER CO. LTD.
1038 Hamilton St. Vancouver, B.C.
J. S. Maxwell & Co.
Representing:
Clatwortky A Seat Ltd., Toroato
Matuifaciurers of
Wax  Fugures. "DurEnam"  Forms
Display  Fixtures, in  Metal, Wood
Glass, Clothing  Hangers.  Artificial
Flowers, Valances, Silk Plush,
Decorative Papers, etc.
500 Mercantile Bldg.. Vancouver, B. C.
Phone.  Sey. 1533
HEINZ & CO.
57
1138 Homer St.   Vancouver, B. C.
JEWELERY
Complete     stock     of    diamonds,
Watches,   Silverware,   etc
WESTERN    WHOLESALE
JEWELERS    LTD.
Cor Cambie and Cordova Streets.
VANCOUVER. B. C.
CANADIAN
TOLEDO SCALES
E. S. CHAMBERS, Agency Manager
424 Cordova St. W. Phone. Sey. 3911
Vancouver.
Fire Insurance
Retail    Merchants    Underwriters
Agency.
420 Pacific Bdlg. Vancouver.
tin-
Phone:  High.
IDEAL CONE COMPANY
Manufacturers of
ICE  CREAM  CONES
Purest Made     Cost Less
335 PRINCESS AVE.
Vancouver.
Associated Agencies
LTD.
IMPORTERS
Artificial Flowers, Trimmings, Nov-
elty Jewelry, Veilings, Dress Or.
naments, Butterfly Wing Jewelry.
615 Pender St. W.        Vancouver.
t^ifs^^
I    BORDEN'S
EVAPORATED
MILK
Vancouver Office
'         332 Water Street
VlonliH'
IstjHARUS
BEECH NUT
CHEWING GUM 42
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which is Incorporated lhe B   CS TRADE KKVIKW.
::   Buy in British Columbia   ::
Mi
;iv
PAPER BAGS
J. C. WILSON   LTD.
1068 Homer Street,      Vancouver.
ROYAL CROWN
SOAPS
Manufactured in British Columbia
and guaranteed.
ROYAL CROWN SOAPS LTD.
PAINTS
MARTIN-SENOUR
CO.   LTD.
1505 Powell Street,
Vancouver
mfciictf-ia
KMTTMfi CO. ITI.
J. J. MACKAY,
Agent
804 Bower Bldg.
Vancouver.
HOSIERY
YEAST
THE FLEISCHMANN CO.
W. S. DUNN. Manager.
1166 Burrard Street     Vancouver.
J. A. TEPOORTEN
LIMITED
WHOLE8ALE   DRUGS
308 WATER    STREET
VANCOUVER, B. C.
McCORMICKS
JERSEY CREAM
SODAS
McCormick Mfg. Co. Ltd.
1150 Hamilton  Street, Vancouver.
C. H. KENNEY, Manager.
SERVICE   TO   OUT   OF   TOWN
8UB8CRIBER8.
Thc British Columbia Retailer will
be pleased to furnish subscribere
the names and addresses of representatives or agenta of eastern
manufacturers in Vancouver. We
will also adviae where their com*
modities can be purchased.
Carnation Milk
B. C. Representative:
OPPENHEIMER   BROS.
134 Abbott St. Vancouver.
Hams & Bacon
Swift's "Premium"
SWIFT CANADIAN CO. LTD.
Vancouver,
PAPER
BAGS     AND     WRAPPING
Norfolk Papar Ca. Ud.
136 WATER STREET
Vancouver.
Water RcpeUant Clothing
■etACAf
i BEAR
»a>
R. A. SIME, BC. Distributer
fiB-jhn msstk saistl
508 Msrcintii* Bldg.. Vancou*tr. O   C.
teetmmmi Qss* • hmmOt
GALVANIZED IRONWEAR
THE TH08. DAVIDSON MFG. CO.
LTD.
123 Powell Street
Vancouver.
1CGI3TERKO,
CHIPMAN.HOLTON      KNITTING
CO. LTD.
E. H. Walsh 4 Co. Ltd., Agenta.
318 Homer Street,        Vancouver.
FURNITURE
Fir Furniture of Quality.
DOWUNO   MANUPACTUR
ING COMPANY.
366—2nd Ave .E.   Vancouver.
UNDERWEAR
ATLANTIC    UNDERWEAR    LTD.
E.  H.  Walsh  4  Co.  Ltd.,  A9ent«
318 Homer Street
Vancouver.
C. H. Jones & Son
Limited.
Manufacturers
PIONEER    BRAND
TENTS.   AWNINGS.  FLAGS   AND
CANVAS 00008 OF ALL KINDS.
Jobbers of:
Gold  Medal Camp Furniture
Cotton duck, alt widths and weight*
28  WATER    STREET.
Vancouver, B, C.
acwewraaac^^
T.  D.  STARK Telephone
F. W. STERLING Sey. 6<9b
8TAKK & STERLING
MANUFACTURERS'   AGENTS
1043  Hamilton Street.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
PRAUD IN8URANCE
ALPRED W. McLEOD, LTD
Vancouver and
New Westminster QUAKER  Brand
Peaches
How's your stock?
Have plenty on hand, we
can tell you why	
Halved
or
Sliced
Dominion Canners of B. C. Limited Vancouver, B.C-
r'
f
Brop!
an
tSWj
Stock the BEST. Our "Brookfield" brand creamery butter is
made from pure sweet cream cannot fail to give your customers
entire satisfaction each pound individually wrapped and
packed in a sanitary carton, assuring the customer of cleanliness
and the butter reaching them with it's full richness and flavor.
Swift Canadian Company, Limited 90
Texture That Satisfies
Mothers' Demands
LITTLE DARLING and LITTLE DAISY Stocking!
owe their tremendous popularity to the fact that their
texture and comfort qualities satisfy the demands of mothers
who insist on the best of woolen stockings to protect thc
chubby little legs of their children when days or evenings
are chilly.
A complete stock of these famous stockings on your counters
and shelves will prove a source of year-round profit ,\nd
steady sales. If your supply is low, you can order immediately from your wholesaler.
Little Darling Stockings—for infants. Little Daisy—for
children of all ages—silken toes and heels. They come in a
wide range of dainty colors—and black,
Chipman-liolton Knitting Company, Limited, Hamilton, Ontario
Mill* at llamilioo snd Wellsnd
Buster Brown, Three Eighties, Little Darling,
Little Daisy, Rock Rib, Hercules, Silkoline.
LITTLE DARLING"
"LITTLEDAISY"
Pacific  Pnntfri  Limited.

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