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The British Columbia Retailer May 31, 1925

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Array The
British Columbia
Vancouver, B. C. mav      « aa-.
VOL. XVII. No 9 MAT,     1925
10c per copy; $1.00 per year.
Seventeenth Tear.
INTERNATIONAL  BUSINESS  MACHINES CO. LIMITED
Factory and It,ml (Met    \\ nt Totonto, Ontario
INTERNATIONAL
TiMI   •trOHOfH* ItlCTdlC  T.M«   trVTIMt
*»**«■ iukpi oooa mciikihi
■ IICTNIC CLOCK* TABUIATIM* MA CHI Nil
Sttvict and Sales Officii in alt Principal Citlts
DAYTON
coMFuTma •c*»it« corrti miili
MI*T •'.IGIM* CNIIII CUTTMI
MADE IN CANADA   — *ho»im        ...«. ...cm PAPER BAGS
Standard—Light Kraft—Heavy Kraft
n
Paper Mills:
Lachute and St. Jerome, Que.
Manufacturers since 1870
These are «»»«r leading lm-"* and bave been for yean
the betl bag values below the retail trail**- of Canada.
The paper used in their mantifaetnfe Is speeiaUy
msde hi our own paper mills end is actually tougher ami
stronger.
If a better bag were possible «'. C Wilaon, I.united
would make it    ">l years in the business*
J. C. WILSON, LIMITED
Manufacturers of
PAPER BAGS.     WRAPPING, TISSUE AND TOILET PAPERS
for   Wholesalers and Retailers.
1068 HOMER STREET, VANCOUVER, B. C
Phone: 8eymonr 781
YOUR CUSTOMERS
APPRECIATE THE BEST
THE ROYAL CROWN SOAPS, LTD.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
-a?
il
i*i
i 192;-.
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
V*
o
I
****JZ?*
\\
Also   manufacturers  of
Kellogg • All-Bran.
Kellogg's  Krumbles.
Kellogg's Pep. and
Kellogg's Bran Flakes
With Other Parte of Wheat.
The most  stupendous
Advertising Campaign
ever put on in Canada
for any Ready-to-Eat Cereal
DAILY NEWSPAPERS WEEKLY NEWSPAPERS
FARM PAPERS MAGAZINES
TRADE PAPERS
an' carrying the striking, vigorous Kollog-t-* "Copy." There
are 1,656,236 families in Canada—the huge Kellojf*^ list of publications has a total net paid circulation of 2,.r>04.27(>—over 50
per eent more circulation than families!
Ami every Canadian sees a Kelloirro: advertisement at least
every third day!
GROCERS!
Such liberal assistance in helping you to move your stoek aud
give you TURNOVER is worthy of your co-operation.
FEATURE KELLOGG'S
IN   YOUR WINDOWS
It Pays      —      Handsomely!
Try any ready-to-eat cereal. You won't -find
another that even approaches the marvelous
flavor found only in Keltogt's Corn Flakes. THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
April
llfcjgtittir
Saves yon time when customers ask for 'Fresh Roasted
Coffee." That's exactly what Nabob is. The vacuum tin
keeps the flavor in—you sell it "fresh from the roaster.
Kelly Douglas & Co. Ltd.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
SaboB
!■!
)(,UM AS f-K
WILSON BROTHERS
^■■■■■H Established 1890      flH^HH|
Our Motto is "SERVICE"
We cannot offer to sell you goods cheaper than any other firm is in a position to do. but we CAN
give actual facts to prove that it Is
ECONOMY
to deal with us
5Sf&J°S WILSON BROTHERS, VICTORIA, B.C.
WKoleiale Grocers
SHAMROCK BRAND
HAM, BACON, BUTTER, LARD, SAUSAGE, etc.
First Quality packing bouse products put up by I*. Burns & Co„
Limited, which means they are the highest grade, always reliable,
and without equal on this market.
YOU CAN RECOMMEND SHAMROCK BRAND.
P. Burns & Company, Limited
VANCOUVER
CALGARY
EDMONTON 1!>25
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RKTATLER
5
ROGERS
1
GOLDEN SYRUP
"The End of a Perfect Day"
UMadc from finest flavoured cane sugar, a special grade of which is imported for the
purpose.
UPut up in all sizes of packages to suit your customers* requirements,
flln packages designed to beautify your store.
2 lb. tins, 24 to a case. 10-lb. tins, 6 to a case.
51b. tins, 12 to a case. 201b. tins, 3 to a case.
Perfect Seal jars, 12 to a case.
The British Columbia Sugar
■HHSBHI VANCOUVER,
"*Ej****e'**-" ■-•*- -- -"- - *-'- •  •
tarn THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
M.v
f
Always Stipulate
CONTINENTAL
Ice  Cream  Pails
WHEN ORDERING YOUR REQUIREMENTS.
RECOGNIZED BY DISCRIMINATING MERCHANTS
FOR THEIR DEPENDIBILITY.
Can be obtained with wire handles or individual bags for each pail
The Continental Paper Products
Limited
OTTAWA, CANADA
Also manufacturers of Paper Bags of every description.
Vancouver   j
SEL     SMITH, DAVIDSON & WRIGHT, UMITED
Calgary       \
"Using a Continental Bag ia Bag Insurance."
For Repeat Business, Sell
QUAKER
Trade Mark
Brand Canned
ADVERTISED GOODS
ARE ASKED FOR
Fruits & Vegetables
British Columbia grown Peaches, Apricots
Pears, Plums, Tomatoes their natural
piquant flavor is enhanced hy selection
and clever cooking in the Quaker kitchens
Order from
your Wholesaler
Dominion Canners B.C. Limited,
Vancouver, B.C.
..*'** —_ ! 92f>
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER 7
BRITISH COLUMBIA 8*cr"'r'"* »..*..-«■•,.«,. -.n..^
RETAILER
With which tn inrorpomltN** the H   C. TRADE REVIEW.
Published Monthly.
SEVENTEENTH YEAR
OWNBRAL MBRCHAND18&
OROCERIE8. DRYGOODS.
HARDWARE. FOOTWEAR.
OFFICIAL ORGAN OF B C. BOARD
RETAIL MERCHANTS'
ASSOCIATION OF CANADA.
Branchea R. M. A.
Armstrong AV. H. Grant.
Cranbrook c. J. Lewis.
Kamloops J. Katchford.
Kelowna A. Fraser.
-    Lytton B. Rebagllatl.
A MONTHLY JOURNAL published in the interest of Retail Merchandising and the Development of Commerce in Western Canada. Nanaimo n. Wright.
srilSC'RIPTION RATE: Otiv ]k>\\ht IVr Ye«r. payable In advance.
AdftrtlilDg Ratat on Application.
Nelson E. F. Gigot.
New Westminster	
and Fraser Valley...D. Stuart.
Publishers: PROGRESS PUBLISHING CO. LTD.
Suit* 1012 Merchant!' Exchange Building
VANCOUVER, B. C. Revelstoke R. F. Young.
Telephone &vy  3861 Cable Address-Shipping—All Codes
Editor, J S. Morrison W. N. Code. Business Manager    Vancouver W. F. Ing.
Entered it! Oitawn M Second-class matter
Vol   XVII   No. 9,
Mav. 1925
Vancouver, B.O.
"Early-Closing" By-law Repealed
Action of Civic Authorities Declared Unsound by Representative Retail Grocers of Greater Vancouver
—Petition   Presented   by   Small   Storekeepers' Association is investigated by R. M. A.
IU granting thc petition of the Small Storekeepers Association for corner grocery, and delicatessen       1
shops to remain open indefinitely during th<- evening,
ii would appear that tin* civic  authorities  have  defeated the object of the applicants presenting it.
The repeal of the bylaw will result in all grocers
remaining open, for ii is nol to !>e supposed thai the
legitimate grocer, (who is naturally competing with
sll retail stores carrying grocery lines), will permit
business after six o'clock to bv transacted wholly by
small stores.
A number of leading grocers oi Vancouver have
gone on record as being entirely opposed to tin* abrogation of the by law and are determined to discover why
such a step, contrary t«» tin* best interests of tin* groc-
• ay trade of Greater Vancouver, has been taken by the
authorities.
In a brief account of the activities of tin* Greater
Vancouver Grocers' Section of the Retail Merchants'
Association, appearing in this issue, it  is stated that
over one hundred aud twenty Oriental storekeepers
have attached their names to tin* petition. Being ineligible for a vote, these have no voice in civic administration,   nor   were   their   names   countenanced   by
'he authorities, It is also affirmed that a final
check-up  will   reveal   the   fact   that a very   large
number of signatures appearing are those of small confectioners, and delicatessen shops, who signing them-
Reives as grocers, will automatically be prohibited from
remaining open on Wednesday afternoons, It is more-
over doubtful whether any governing body is empowered to accept signatures of those who   attach   their
names to a petition calling for the abrogation of a
aw respecting a business other than their own.
The small store-keeper has continually complained
of lost business through being forced to close his doors
at (» p.m. He contends that thc tourist trade, towards
whieh. large sums of money have been subscribed by retail merchants of tho city, i.s largely curtailed owing
to the early closing law, and also that thc working man
i.s handicapped in his desire to "shop around" after his
day's work.
There is no doubt that certain tourists have been
inconvenienced when arriving in Vancouver after closing hours, ami if those storekeepers complaining have
subscribed to advertise thc eity to the tourist, there
may be ground for grievance. Vancouver citizens, as
a Whole have not complained because their stores closed
at I* o'clock, aud it cannot be suggested that the tourist, however welcome, should be allowed to determine
this question for them.
The working man alluded to. as far as ean be ascertained, is iu the habit of "knocking oft'" work at
4.30 and "> p.m.. and if it is true that domestic purchases
are wholly relegated to him. he not only has our sympathy, but also a considerable margin of time in which
to execute those household duties.
The claim made by the small store-keeper that thc
retail grocery store employee will not suffer on account oi the prolonged hours, is obviously incorrect.
The movemeni will rapidly spread from the one-man
store, and the whole fabric of the retail trade of
l{renter Vancouver will be demoralized unless the abrogated by-law is substituted by an enactment which
will work as satisfactorily. 8
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
May
fe~U
GROCERIES & PROVISIONS
*  a
MARKET   REPORT
.Mav I Ith. 1925
Retail grocery business throughoul the province
contiues to show a healthy tone and prospects are
bright for a good summer's business. Summer resort
points are beginning to gel ready for one ol the busiest
seasons and those who plan ahead for tourist business
are looking forward to a very good season.
Trices on staple grocery commodities continue firm
and steady without a possibility of material reductions
in staples for some time at least. .Just so long as wheat
and Hour continue at present levels, so long will prices
remain high. The price of wheat effects the price of
many other cereal products that are grown in a similar
manner, such as peas, beans, barley, rye, oats, rtv , no
that a great many products of these lines fluctuate with
any material change iti wheat prices.
Sugar: Present basis on granulated sugar is now
$6.75 per cwt.. a reduction of Ml cents since our las'*
issue. Our opinion is that the market on this commodity
will continue weak for at least another thirty days,
after which the heavy demand for preserving, and th<
summer drink trade, will commence.   This increased
demand may have the effect of stiffening tin* pric.- On
the other hand, one must not lose right of the fact that
the world visible supply is greater now than ever in
the past.   Huy as needed.
Canned Fruit: Fruit sales continue in good vol.
umc and will be good for another thirty days. Hawaiin
Pineapple Packers have announced prices on new pack.
showing a reduction of approximately 10', over las!
year's prices. Since the advent of Singapore Pineapple at prices very much lower than the Hawaiin product, sales of Hawaiin pineapple have nol been nearly
as good as they were during the period when Singapore
was unavailable. Good quality   Singapore   pineapple
can now be purchased at $6.25 per ease of 4* No. 2 siz«-
tins as compared with $5.80 per ease of 24 No. 2 tins of
the Hawaiin variety.
Canned Vegetables. No. 4 Sieve Peas are beginning
to show signs of a shortage before new pack will be
available.   Corn also remains scarce, and high in price
Other lines of canned vegetables an- holding a steady
price level and are moving out  freely,    N,*w asparagus prices have been named for 1925 pack and show
reduction of aboul 10$ over 1924 prices.
Milk. The trade wen- rather surprised to receive
notice on May 9th of an advance in prices OH evaporated milk. Hotel size has been boosted 25 cents pei-
case. tall size, and family size 20 cents per ease, and
baby size ten eents. It will be recalled that manufacturers announced a reduction of about the same figures
on April 1st.
Bulk Dates. Hallow! bulk dates as predicted are up
in price to seven cents per pound.
Cider Vinegar, With lhe discontinuance of thi w
of spirit brown vinegar, a *rcat increase in tlo n„ ol
eider vinegar la anticipated, The U s. market* havi
for some time pa**** been big users ol 'hi-, gradi    I* i.
estimated   that   *'■"".    Of   thi!   Vinegar  Used  there  u tli,*
eider variety    Graves Bvnngclenc Brand, packed in
the Annapolis Valley of -Nova -Scotia, \n no* obtain-
abb   hixi  lit bulk at **<* CCttiS pet gallon, and in {t><>/
botths at 12.25 p< r dosen.
Jam. Pure strawberry jam «•> becoming a leam
commodit) prices having advanced to |9.50 pel d
for the No I **u.v Tlo* outlook fo? thi strawbi rn crop
in B C this year la nol st all bright, and everything
points to much higher prices on strawberry jam this
year
Canada Dry Ginger Ale. Thia ta a grocer**} lime that
has come into promlnanee here during the past tea
months It is a line that ail up to«Ute merchant* sr
featuring ll i*-- packed 50 pints al I4.'1-!** per ease, st
ItfO spli?**-, r| ■*-! j i <w> per caae, also a handy househe
package of 12 pints si *2 2* j*. ? *b*t v^r.o-V-..- ,\*\\*i
tisinjg material ia available for window or counter Ursula vs.
...■
BUYERS WEEK TO BE HELD
DURING EXHIBITION
Board of Trade Bureau is Sponsoring Invitations to
Retailers
Vancouver's second annual buyer's week will w
held this year during the week of thi Exhibition.
Augusl g in i.*> Circular* sre being ien1 out by
wholesale merchants' Bureau of llu Board oi Trade,
under whose auspices buyers' we* u will be held, aasins
local distributing firms to register, An Invitation -sui
be s«*nt to all ihe retail merehanta of British Columbia
outside of Greater Vancouver to visil the city, and l«e
firms registering will have their names and the liars
which they distribute, prominently displayed i»i
invitation.
Buyers who visit the rity during the week will
have their transportation fares, refunded on tl"- ',nsl"
Of I fare and a third.    Including    Pullman    charges,
when their purchases amount to **"',)n   Sugar, -■■■'■"
milk, nails and barb wire will be exempted fron
making up this total, because of tin* very small nn "*-'!"
of profit in these lines
The bureau is taking a plebiscite of wholeaal-
to see if they are in favor of Including Alberta
in the privileged list of buyi ra, the amount of j"1
Cor buyers from that province i<* be $1000. 1925
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
MAKE YOUR TURN OVER PROFITABLE.
Rapid Turnover ia the Key to Successful Retailing—
When Turnover is Turnover and Not a Sham.
Every well-informed grocer knows that success in
the grocery buaineaa demands a  rapid turnover of
goods Goods must conn- into your store and pass out
rapidly. But how to get that turnover—how often,
and in what quantities to buy is a subject of much de-
hate about which a great deal of claptrap has been
written. If a merchant is so bent on getting a fast
turnover that he violates the principles of good business, then be more than wipes out the savings effected
hy rapid stock turn
The question then is how to gel a rapid turnover!
Is it by buying in small quantities? Is it by buying
often every day or every week? Is it by cutting
down the number of lines? Is it by concent rating on
a few well-known brands' Is it by cutting out variety?  Let us examine these points
Now don't mistake the fact that yetting a rapid
turnover is of great Importance. How you get it is
fully as important If a grocer buys in such small
dribs that he makes himself a nuisance to the whole
•saler or distributor, then rapid turnover has accomplished nothing. If. in order to rgt-t turnover, a grocer
habitually atks the distributor to till orders in broken
ease lots, then there is something wrong, ami rapid
turnover increases the eost of doing business instead of
reducing it. if, In the pursuit of rapid turnover, you
make of the wholesaler nothing more than a glorified
retailer, then our system needs revision, and rapid
turnover is nothing more than a bit of pettifoggery
and a sham.
Vou can's get away from this fact: it costs a
whole lot more for everybody from the manufacturer
on down—to do business in broken case lots than it
does in full eases Suppose you give your order for
part of a case -of goods What happens? The distributor has to open a full ease, dig out part of it for your
order, repack your portion into another ease, then earl
off what remains in the original ease to a comer of his
warehouse  where the goods are subject  to pilfering
ami deterioration.
It costs money nowadays to repack goods. \\ ho
do you suppose pays this cost? Of course, the distributor does to start with, but it k'ocs into his expense
« f doing business. If the retailers call on him to till
many orders in broken case lots then his expense ot
operating must soar skyward. Tin-re is only one place
where he can dispose of this high expense he passes
ii on to you. the retailer, and rightfully so.
Now. maybe you can pass this unnecessary expense
en to the customer, but competition may force you to
stand some of it yourself.
Yet everybody is pressing the wholesaler to bring
down his cost of operation. How can the wholesaler
bring down his expense while his customers demand
and insist on unnecessary and expensive service?
There is also the expense of delivery to be eousid-
'ted. If you ask distributors to fill driblet orders,
that means they will have to deliver a whole lot more
often than is absolutely necessary. It eosts a lot of
money to run a truck' handle, bill, and ship orders.
Here, again there is but one place where this expense
'•an be absorbed, and that is. it must be passed on to
tho retailer, ami rightfully so.
"T GET a lot of valuable pointers, studying
X what goes on here in the store. Figure it
will help make me worth more money. And
I may be in business for myself, some day, too.
"Well, something happened yesterday that
gave me a new idea on this problem of turnover. The boss plans always to keep stock
turning over—making more profits—keeping
his money earning more.
"So we've got into the way of buying in
pretty small lots. And on merchandise that
moves fast, we quite often run clear out—
before we can get a new order filled.
"Yesterday Mrs. Madden came in—a good
customer. She asked for Palmolive, first
thing she had on her list. And we were out
I tried hard, but couldn't sell her any other
soap.
"Result was, she walked out without buying anything. Kind of mad about it, too. I'm
afraid we'll be some time getting back her
business.
"And the same thing happened 5 times that
I know of, yesterday. The Palmolive is in
today. But that doesn't help what happened
yesterday.
"So there's something I learned. Never to
order too little, never run out of a big-demand article like Palmolive."
There are three toilet soap leaders that
turn over far more rapidly than any others.
Palmolive is a leader among these three.
2»0»
*e 10
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Mav
DOG Brt*Nl
a ROYAL YEAST CAKES
6 MAKE PERFECT BREAD
Chloride of Lime
New Style Waterproof Package
Supplied by all wholesale grocers
In British Columbia
Manufactured by
CANADA COLORS AND CHEMICALS LIMITED
Toronto Winnipeg Vaneouvtr
Agents:
STARK & STERLING
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Protect yourself
against variation in
quality. Stick to the
products whose quality is uniformly high
grade, with never a
bad lot to injure
your store's
reputation.
z.iwum and ,ase y°ur
customers.
E   W   GILLETT  COMPANY  LIMITED
T( ip< IN T< )     ■   AN A.'iA
GROCERY PRICES CURRENT
The following are prices quoted for principal lints of leading wholesale firms,   Prices quoted art ntctsaardy
aubjtct to marktt fluctuations.
B.  W. GILLETT CO.  LTO.
Royal Yeaat— Per case
3 do*, pkgs. in case  2..10
Pure Flake Lye—
4 dos. in case    5M
5 cases  5 8i
10 cases, t doz. In case 6 go
Magic Baking Powder—
4 os. 4 do*  E.SS
t os.  4 doi  ... 7 "6
I os.  4 dos  9 2!*.
12 os. 4 dos 12.60
lift 5 case lots.
Magic Soda, Case  No.  1—
1  cats  (60 1 - tt».  packages) *i.6o
5 ckh«'k of mora     8.40
^■Carbonate of Soda—
12 lb. k-sRH, per keg 7.35
4d0 It), barrels, per barrel  2?..70
Caustic Soda (Granulated)— Per lb,
10 Ib. canister (100 lbs in rase)   1J-.14
100   lbs.   iron   drums    J2><4
Cream of Tartar— Per dos.
% lb. paper pkgs. (4 dot In case)....1.33
% lb. paper pkgs. (4 doz. In case)....2.60
% lb. cans with screw covers (4 dos.
in  oase)   - 3.60
1  tb.   cans screw covers  (3 dos.  ln
esse)    6.1*6
6 lb   square canisters, % dos. In
case)    - - Hit
io it» woden east* **.
** it» wooden patis
100 TT».  line*!  ke*s
360 Tb,  lined barrel*
KtLLY.  DOUGLAS 4  CO.,  LTD
Nabob   Products
Allspie****,   Sn   3,  tins   do*
Making  Powdtr,  4*  12 Ot., dot
Hakina Powdsr, 12 2s*   Snn
Pa k ine  Powder,  6 5s,  tins
lt«klriff Mods,  60   Is.   rase
linking Hoda. 24 H*. dtt
Itoroi,   Vis. dos
Black   Pepper.   Uns,   doz
Celery   Salt,  glass,  dog
Nabob Coffee, small tins,
Coffee, i« lb.
Custard  Powder,  dOS
Qulnk Tapioca, doz
Chocolate   Pudding,  tint
Oilll  Powder,  small,  do*   .
Cinnamon, 2 oz.  tins, doz
Cayenne  Pepper,  3 tins,  doz
Cloves, small, doz   ,
Curry Powder, 4 oz. glass, doz
Cream of Tartar.  1,
• ■ream  Of Tartar,   %*,   tins
Cream Of Tartar  %*,
-c; Infer,   small,   dos
Kxtract* (except vanilla) 2 os. doa
extracts (except vanilla) 4 oz   doz
Pxtraota (esce>pt vanilla) I oz  dos.
NI'll
{ti
M
37
Extracts (except vanilla* 16 os   dos
j M
Lil
I 30
16 10
no
N
7*i
1 Ofi
1 (V0
Alt
6.1
.  1 00
1 (iti
I.M
. I 4<*>
1 10
1 2<-
1 tn
1 7ft
r, ir,
. 2 ss
! 10
1 1ft
3 SO
. 4.76
. Iftfi
1760
Vanilla Kxtr*<-t.   3  os.   do*
Vanilla fatftfi    4 OS,  d***
VanHU Kitract.   S  nt .   d«->*
Vaalfla Batract, 14 »*  4«a
\l... t-     SffMll,   ,*,,.$
Nutmeg. »in<»n. doe
Paprika    small    ■'.,..$
Pastry Spirt,   3  tin*    <P>i
Poultry   \,remains    9*0*,   S**mTf*
ThytOt,   Tumeric,   tins.   d<«»
rtf kuns Bplce, doa Ko I
Marjoram, Mint p»rsi*v
White Pepper, lint  dos
'"astor  nil    ;  ,,f    ,t,»i
• astor ml   4 nn   <b>a
Rpeem Btltt. Us. do*
i->t>it   Colors   J  o*   do*
Mng*   (CfeOCOUtt,   Hose.   Pink,   htmot
\ unlta. White    \t»n«>n<l   Orongt)  ,l'J
'« M     PoWtta     tl„ti
Lemonade Powder,  do*
Mustard,  is   do*
Mustard,    X^a,    do*
Mustard.   **%*   d->*
Muttard, 2 ft <U*s
Ptitpttttr, %n, do*
''Va,   <iri>fth   |i>l»el.   '}»,   per  ft<
Tea,   "Jreen   Ltbtl,    1*.   pel    lb.
3s.   tti    packages
I iti   packa#ts
Tj.rt, ,1k i.uxe, Afternoon  1 tb
Tea da Luxe, Afternoon %* pw Ib
'"'ea  dt l,o*e  '»» |ier tt**
Vinegar,   do*
(GonUfiUtd. 00 puK'* 18)
Ml
rt
*.: *'
}< K
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* N
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I It
5 Oi
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I I*
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1" 925
THK BRITISH (OLUMBIA RKTAlLEli
ll
By propel: management, it v.ill not hv necessary t»»
do much broken ewe buying. Most groceries are pack
,-d in small containers tor thin very reason. So, by ali
means buy ifl full ease or carton lots.
But a grocer may say. "Ifl Imy certain articles in
full cast's, it will taken too hum to sell them." Then
you haven't urot enouirh customers buying that particular article. Thc trouble may he that you are selling too
many hramls and your sales are split up.   If you cannot
s< II enough ol a eertain product to huy that product in
full cases, then maybe you bad latter not handle thai
product
Very often grOCCra handle too wide a variety. Of
course, the million dollar food market can handle l
wide range ol brands and still get S good turnover and
make a profit Hut the majority of grocer* cannot get
away with it They must concentrate their sales on a
few hramls    Thev must educate their customers awav
• at
from a wide variety of products and teach them to
.house from two or three iu each lim*. Then the grocer can huy those tWO Or three In full case lots and still
get a rapid turnover.
By concentrating sales into a few brands, you ean.
perhaps, even huy several eases of a certain brand.
an*l get an advantage. Hut tlon't huy in big quantities
for the sake of an extra discount unless you are sure
von can sell all the gooda in a reasonable length «>f
lime,
You must also hear this iu mind: If vou try to
keep loo many different products ami brands, and you
huy in broken cases or driblet Quantities, vou will find
il hard to keep up your stm-k Vou will be oul of
some itrms much ol the time. You can't sell what you
are oul of, It's better lo keep fewer hramls, and then
huy them in the rich! quantities, You'll gel a turnover  and keep up your stock >»• that you can satisfy
unit trade.
Of course, all this must be subject to the rule of
common sense, fn some items, say cigars, for example, il would be foolish t<* huy most hramls in full
eases Hut what we say here applies to the majority
of hems in the grocery store.
Mow, here is another phase of 'his same problem:
There are some items for example, certain canned
foods   that are packed hut once a year,   Obviously,
the canned peas thai the consumer buys in April will
have been packed the BUmmer before, it is B question.
'hen. as to who is going to carry the peas over the
winter It may pay you to do BO. Here's an opportunity for good judgment, and most groeeTs have found
lhal :t pays to work very closely with their jobbers on
matters of this kind.
NOW, then, should a grocer buy to gel :i rapid turnover! The answer is simple Handle only fast moving articles.    Huy only the gOOflfl that you know you
ean sell rapidly. Don't handle too many hramls. Concentrate on only a few well known hramls in each
"hiss, Then uet all of your customers to buy those particular brands. Well-known products are the ones that
will best enable you to do this. Good salesmanship on
your part is still necessary for success in the grocery
business,
t'lose out all the slow movers ami shelf warmers in
your Stock.    You will then be able to buy in ease lots
nnd at the right intervals to allow the wholesaler to
confine himself to strictly wholesaling, and not retailing, Ry the right kind of management you can avoid
broken package buying, and too frequent deliveries.
nnd, at the same time, get a high rate of turnover.
Lake of the Woods
Milling; Company
LIMITED
Mtkwiof
FIVE ROSES
• FLOUR •
The World's Best
Daily Capacity 14,200 Bbls.
B.C. Offices and Warehouses:
1800 lieharda Street 1614 Store Street
VANCOUVER VICTORIA
A Line that Sells
ROYAL
STANDARD
FLOUR
It's reputation with housewives
places  it  in  constant  demand.
Milled in Vancouver
by
Vancouver Milling and Grain Co.
LIMITED
Head Office and Mills:    VANCOUVER, B. C. 12
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
M
IV
'
The Season for
Mazola is here
■A
jDUSH the product in seasonable
*     demand.
There will be a bigger sale than ever
this year for Mazola—the Salad and
cooking oil that makes delicious summer dishes.
Be sure to order your extra
supply early
The CANADA STARCH CO., LIMITED
MONTREAL
Manufacturers of the famous
fV3SJ.*K»S^     i Minn       ■*/*.•*.       ■ ■ ■ ■'   _
WiAHDhBuHG PRODUCIS 1925
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
13
II
To ht us repeat: A rapid turnover is absolutely
necessary for your SUCCCSS iu the grocery business.
Hut how you get this turnover is of tar-reaching importance. If. in getting rapid turnover, the cost of
manufacturing and distributing is increased, then thc
KAVlng matle by rapid turnover is wiped out, ami the
retailer ami the consumer are no better off than before.
HOW MUCH TO PAY CLERKS
Stores Supply Data Showing How Much to Pay
Employees.
"What   should   he  the  salaries of salespeople  in
differenl kinds of stores!" i*. a question frequently
naked hy retail executives.
Comparison of data supplied by a large number of
department stores shows that the average salary of employees in the following departments should be:
Percentage
of sales
5
Men's Clothing
Melis   Shoes
Men's Hats
Boy's Clothing
Men's furnishings
Toilet Goods
Notions
Furniture
Groceries
Sporting Goods
Women's Clothing
Women's shoes
Millinery
Furs
Jewelry
Dress Goods
Hosiery
Kitchen Ware
Groceries
Hardware
Drugs
Clothing
Furniture
Shoes
Dry Goods      —
i,
.',! it
w4
6
M
I
4
Wa
6
Wa
r>>.,
b
Wa
6%
51 i
41,
5%
7
si"
Ti I
7
9
<;i:*.
"Count Me In!"
Hundred! ol ffoeeri have written their local N.A,ILG.
Chairmen Buying,
"I went to Ix»» Angelei las! year. St. Paul the
year before, snd 1*11 t>c ia Dubuque on June
22ml an sure as shoot In*. The conventions pet
belter antl belter every year and I Ret more
antl more out of tbetn.   Count me in*"
Combine your vacation with a profitable business
trip, Write vour local chairman he can count you
In!
FLEISCHMANNS YEAST
The Fleischmann Company
SERVICE
The world's most famous
baking powders
To the housewives they mean purity,
wholesomeness and reliability.
To the dealer they mean satisfactory
profit, satisfying turnover and satisfied
ni^tonters.    It pays to carry them.
Made with cream of tartar,—no finer
halting powders ean be produced. Order
front your wholesaler.
Made* in Canada
rrtKagntlu-'*-
>
/<**
■*•"■
"Ssis^
i#
4*A
EAGLE BRAND
Since 1857 the Safe infant food.  Sales
greater than all others combined.
Offices: Vancouver.
Condensary, South Sumas 14
TEE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
M
IV
Preparedness:
t
The steady ami effective ail vertising of Shelly's 4X Bread
creates an increased demand
and willingness to accept 4X
Bread. Be prepared to get
vour share of  the  business—
•
the buying public have confidence in the uniform quality of
4X Bread. And remember-—
every customer who comees to
your store for a loaf is a potential customer for Other goods.
L
SHELLY   BROTHERS
VANCOUVER VICTORIA
NEW WESTMINSTER NANAIMO
A Quality Product!
IDr MiJdleton* T^%
RONIZEJJ
I iuk nmmm Mi«tl«l ^^^SW
OCNUINK
Whole Wheat
FLOUR
A FAIR FIXED PROFIT
FOR LARGE AND SMALL
IS THE POLICY OF
The Dr. Middleton's Food Products
Company Limited
Vancouver. B, C.
There is a Great Change in
Housekeeping  Methods
When ordering Clark's Prepared Food* don't forget
lha! housekeeping hat changed. Many more people are
avoiding cooking and seeking all manner ot ready io-
serve dishes Clark's Prepared Foods offer a large variety
for  which lhe  increasing   sale shows lhat   there
;» a
demand.
Increase Your Profit* by Catering
to Thia Now CUm of Consumer
Made in Canada, by Canadians and Canada Approved
are added appeals which lhe quality of Clark's Prepared
Foods further enhances.
W. CLARK Limited, Montreal
Estabiishmtntt    ox     Montreal.     P.  Q
Marrow, Ont.
St. Rem»,    P   Q     a***
WAFFLE BRANO FANCY TABLE SYRUP
IS EXCEPTIONALLY OOOD.
Note:  We could not improve the syrup eo we have
Improved the container.
Kelly Confection Co. ltd.
1100 Mainland Street
VANCOUVER, B. G* 1025
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
16
(Continued from page 10)
THC W. H. MALKIN CO., LTO.
"Malkln'e Btst" Products.
Anowroot   (81    Vincent!
\l 4 os ctns. per do*
12, •  oi   per dot.
Baklnf Powdtr (fur*  Ihonphste)
♦1/13 o»    per do*
13/2i|f l,,r ,,°*
IJ/J* P«*r dos
1 40
2 76
3 00
9. so
45
60
Baklnf Soda
11/4  OS.   etns per dot
11,1   r»t    ttiia ..      p«r dot
Coeoa
24 I os P*r dot    2 IS
CftttiKi  (Wonm  Tack)
: n>  tins p**r Oi
i*THm of Tartar ttt*4 pure)
.63
Ul oi   em*
par dot.
i -a
J'.S  Of   rim*
P0t do*
2.49
ll is lias
per dot.
509
Cttetifd VtmOor
4 «>i   rino     ,■„„>,.
p*r do*
1 »»
1 Of   r!rv»
imt doa
J 19
t'ftif BwndrUMi
Boras.   13 4  ot
per dot
.:&
Mpaom   *«.,it*s   lj
1    ill**
per <5>'i
to
Kuiphur. 11/4 ot
ctns	
.,.   per dot
«
Kx tract*
vu rt.
*\,»r*
12 .* on
iH'f   dt-J.
U3
l'i/t   OS.             per doz. 6.25
8   0* pet- doz.     12.U0
18   Of,  per doz.     23.00
6J  oz.' per doz.     33.00
Oiycerlne
U'l ot bts,    „ per dos. 1.7S
11/4 ot bta  per dos. 116
Honey
24/1 ot   Jars  per dot, 1.26
24/18 ot  Jars per dot. 1.00
24 U   Una   per dot. 4.50
Ilia   tlna _ „„.. per dot. 9.00
Jelly Powders (all flavors)
12/4 ot,   per dot. .95
Lemonade  Powder:
12/4 os ctns  » per dos. 1.25
12/1 os ctns   per dos. 125
Mutts rd
11/38 tins  per dot. 1.50
it/to ot tins  - .. per dot. 4 60
24/ls  tins      - -per dot 8.60
U 8   ttii»                                   per tb .52
Spices and Seasoning s
Allspke 12 3 tin» per dot. 1.00
Cinnamon  12 3  tins  per dot. 1.10
Clove* 12,3 tins  - , per dot. 1 40
Curry Powder 12/3 tins  per dot. 125
Chili   Powder    —  per dot. 1.60
Ginger  IS/3 Uns - per dot. 1.10
tfiftee 13 3 Om  per do*. 1.60
Marjoram 12/1 tins   per dor 1.16
Mint 12/3 tins «.   per dot. 116
Nutmef. 12/3 tins —per dot 1 60
Paprika 12/1 tlna per dos. 1.40
Parsley 11/1 tins per dos. 1.11
Pastry,  mixed, 12/3 tins......-per dos. 1.16
Pepper, black, 12/1 tins  per doa. 1.00
Pepper, cayenne 12/2 tins....per dos. 1.10
Pepper, white,  12/3 tins .per doa. I.t*
Pickling  3pice 11/3  per dos. l.li
Poultry Dressing 12/3 tins....per dos. 1.05
Sage, ground 12/ tins   per dos. 1.06
Sage,  rubbed 12/3 tins  per dos. 1.06
Savory  12/3  tins  per dos. 1.05
Thyme,  12/3 tins  per dos. 1.06
Tumeric,   12/3  tin9    per dos. 1.05
Whole Cinnamon,  12 ctns per dos. .90
Whole  Nutmegs,  11 ctns per dos. .99
Whole Pickling 11 ctns  per doa. .90
Celery Salt, taper tots.  per dos. 1.80
Curry Powder, taper bots per dos. 1.76
Tea
loo/ls   per lb. .49
60/«£8 per lb. .71
35/l« and 15/^s assorted per lb. .70
12/58 per lb. .71
Vlnegcr
34 qts „ per dos. 1.40
Marmalade.
12/4 litho tins  per dox. 7.60
Jams.
Assorted 12/4 tins per dos. 8.16
Apricot 12/4 tins  - —per dos.   8.60
Black Currant 12/4 tins per dox. 9.60
Loganberry 12/4 tlsn  per dox.   8.60
Raspberry 12/4 tins       8.60
HEADS    OF    THE    KELLOGG    COMPANY    ANO   THEIR
EMPLOYEES GET TOGETHER
Where "Pep"* and "Go and Do It" Cut a Very Big Figure.
Tho Following description or Messrs. Kellogg*! "Got To-
gether" moating, when hoods oi the concern travelled from
Battle Crook, Michigan to Boot their talesmen and employee!
In London. Ontario, **»tu in* ni Interest tO many of our
readers, who, foi manj rear! havi- bandied tho products of
the Kellogg Toasted Cornflake* Company
Thr go! together Idea ia one of the most commendable
outgrowth! of modern lodustrj and commerce, it enable!
tin- big men behind big business periodically to meet the man
who represent ihem io the Mist field, go over tho field with
tin-in while looted at the offloe table, compare notea and dis-
(in*-* tho situation from th<^ viewpoint oi each individual. Tin*
results ol those conference! have boon such nt to make con-
ft 11>rices <if the kind annual affairs.
No flnn \'\ -Unoriot hotter ipprociate! lhe importance of
lhit Kit together spirit than the Koliogg Toasted Cornflake!
Company, ol Rattle Creek, Midi, with branch establishment!
in thti cit> and In Australia This was dearly demonstrated
here on Saturdaj Match *>. whoo the big men o< thai concern men who do business In mtllloni ench yeai—oame to
the citj ii.ini Battle Crook for the very purpose of mooting
their laioamon from all over the Dominion. The visitors included j. t, Kellogg, president ot the companj and son of the
founder ol the greal concern, \\\ K Kellogg; J. F. O'Brien,
VIce president and director ol sales all over the world; K. J.
Freeman, chief of the headquarters advertising staff, and it.
<' .Smith. Toronto, publicity agenl for Canada.
Kellogg salesmen are known all over the continent for
Ihelr "pen." which seems to be the company's watchword—
men who. while on *lut>, Keep "on their toes'" and let nothing Interfere With business. This "pep," it is plain to be
Been, they goi from those at tho head of the company's affairs.
Messrs. Kellogg and O'Brien and at Saturday's conference
those had a fresh supplv of the ingredient injected into them,
The get-together spirit was carried still further by the
Visitors! foi- leaving the city the> got together with the work-
er! in the local factory, the men and women who produce the
goods which have become famous all the world over, around
the oldest it institutions, the festive board. The scene of
the gathering was the Masonic Temple, and the guests numbered about 100 men and women, aud a jollier, "peppier"
crowd never cot together. Seated at the chief table, besides
the visitors from Battle Creek, were Mayor and Mrs. Wenige,
Mr. Frank Cordon, general manager of the company for Canada, snd Mrs. Gordon; Mr. C. Garfield McCormick, sales manager for Canada, and Mrs. McCormick. While the feast was
in progress a splendid orchestra added to the enjoyment, and
when it was advanced another stage. Mr. Gordon opened this
stage by proposing the toast to the King, which was followed
by the singing of the National Anthem.
Mayor Wenige here voiced London citizens' appreciation
of the value to the city of such a concern as Kellogg's, and
referring to his own position likened the job of mayor to that
of the colored bootlegger, who. when asked by a customer if
his wasn't a profitable business, replied that there wasn't
much money in it but he met all the nice people.
Then President Kellogg was called on by Mr. Gordon to
address the assembly, which he did in true Kellogg style. He
lei his audience know at the outset that they were a big
famil> of which he was proud and then followed with an address breathing the spirit of "pep," the spirit that enables a
man to do that which others believe to be impossible. It
was a speech replete with humor and sound get-together
sense.
Mr. O'Brien's remarks were also punctuated with bits of
humor. What to Londoners was the most important part of
his speech was the statement, which was greeted with applause, that the company expected to in the near future start
in the oat-milling business in London, a line in which they
were already engaged in the United States.
After the speeches the entire party got still closer together, when all ascended to the ball room above and engaged in dancing and cards until close on to midnight. Messrs.
Kellogg. O'Brien and Freeman deferred their return home a
Tew hours to participate in this most enjoyable part of the
night's programme.
Both the ball room and the banqueting hall were elaborately and beautifully decorated for the occasion.
*/ 16
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Mav
P.  BURNS A CO.  LTD.
Shamrock  Products.
Ayrshire  rolled  shoulders,   per  Ib
Bacon, Shamrock, 8-8, per lb
Baked ham. with dressing, pet u>
Creamery Butter,  Shamrock, cartons
Cheese.   Cnntuiiati.   large,   per   tt»
cheese, Canadian, twin, pw lb
Compound, Carnation, No. 5, 18-eass 18
Compound, CarnaUon No, •>   I0*cass 18
Cooked  Hams,  Shamrock,  per  lb
Dominion Hams,  12-Hi tbs.
nonunion Baeoa, 8-18 it's   per Ib
Dominion Bacon, 10-1*1 ihs. per m
Dominion shoulders,  boned and rolled
Dripping, beef, t-tb. brielta.
Hams,   Shanuo k.   per   tb
Hams, bolted and rolled, per tl)
Head Cheese, 5-lti  tins each
Jellied tongvie, per tin  1
Lard,  No.  5,   1-  to ease 13
Lard, No. ::. 88 to ease in
Lard,   carton,   15-lb&
Lard, No. i. cartons, 88 tba
Mincemeat,  kits,  36-Tb,  net,   per lt>  .
Meat Loaf, per lb ....        	
Cork  pies,  per  doa	
Pork, roast lege with dressing, tits
Smoked  lis!*.,  kippers,  80s per   tt'
Smoked  flsh, kippered salmon,  19s
and 20s, per lit	
Smoked Cod,  30s per Vt*	
Selected fowl, per n»
Selected Chicken, per n».   ...	
■Im
11
to
18 M
18
18
11
•:i
13
60
IS
|Q
8814
M
*■*
;*
IT
tn
IS
t6
3"
,88
THI  ROYAL CROWN  SOAPS.  LTD.
Vaneeuvsr   Pries   List—F.O.B.   Vsncoi/var.
er Ntw Westminster.
Terms Nett 80 Days.
"Apex" Sosp Flakes. 24 1 tb pkt», box 4 10
'Apes*' Soap Flake*. 12 1 tb pkts. boi I 40
A La Francaise Castile. tx>K ol it 4 OS
Itlue Mottled. bo* of 20 ^.m,..^,...,..^.. ■ tU
Crown Oatmeal, 24 *». box of 144 4 IS
Climax or Montreal (Wrapped) tog Hi fi S*
Ootdea Wait, 8s bos el 3»" iJW
QotdM Waot Powder, 3 lb bog Of 24 **o
i Jo Men U»r. t*-s of 3D 2 W
Klondyke   (»rapped)   t*>x   of   % ... . <W
Kkmiiyke (unwrapped) box Si II I *^
Klero  Glycerine   l**i  <»f  144. .Ota
Linen   (unwrapped)   U>*   Ol   IM I *&
Liquid Ammonia. 2 dos ql# tog Ot "*4 4 J*
EAtttld BSsie   1 do*   qts   b<>* of !4 t \Q
Mechanic's   Pin<»  Tar.   t*>*   of   BW      ,   . 8 **#
Mtechanle's l*»n« Tar. tog of M I M
01}vi Castile, c»fe*», \mx «,», *x>o t sj
PrimnxM (wrapped) tos st Ut ....«*•»««... t**>
Extra iwird unwrapped, tos <»f tt I ii
J'erfeel  {unwrapped)  box tit IM J li
Writ** for Totfctt and  Hotel Boa|M
BpOOial pflOM »n i,  !0.  24 onA tv>
toxea,
I'endrny'ii Lye.  bt*% of 41 Mi
Peadfanr*g Powdered Awiwuttit, **•*>* n. 11|
special prier* on i.   1$, 2* end  10**)
togae,
Pendray'a   Water   Gt*u.   Egg   PreMevt'-—
Mumw 24 tin* per -*-»*«-. 4 U
l'.«*«l  Crown,   box 0  f*.S 4 4;
Itojrai J^4un>!;>   Flakss   18--.  ia tots 108
(Special priee <n OOOtfOCt)
P.oyal Crown H«mp I* ,4*4* | M
Royal Qrown Powder, bos  84s •■* Ij iAtt
Royal Crown Powdert Ufa, i*>\ tst H MM
Ho>«| Cr«wn <*iean«er, 4* sifter tint. 5 is
Roygj CtoWO  Lye, tag Of fl J IS
Royal Crown N«pth* box of \m . 410
Itoyal crown   I'owdered   Ammonia  1  ft.
White   W.uUr     Bog   ,*•}   I mo
White Bwan J4-.*»p,  i* b«»x of 120
White fiwan Naptha,  bOI «f loo
white Bwaa Weaotaf Powder, t*,% ..• , •,
THI CANADA iTARCM CO.  LTQ
Laundry   Slanhes—
i*a!»a>!j Lanndr)  Start h   ta tt« i.lt
Canada waits uhMg t-n> pi>e»
Aetna White 'Ji****.  i-n-  pirgi
\'o   i  w*hM«.,  uo>tt *aafi
t:dw»nWt*njrg Hliv#r Obmm,  1 lb  (kgt
4» n>
BdMPOfdflNNS    fitter    (H008    I «•
fsnry  tin  eani*»t«>!r».   Il-tb*
EktoanlalMifi  SOsto*   Qloea,  100.o»
keg* ,„,„., „^
Cetlukeid   J4t.*rr-h.    (bttS-fS   of   4i-pkgt
per   I:»OM 1
Cuiirter-jr  8t«'«>*e»—
Bemoo» Catoatatod t'-*ep*-#4 Cora,
li tb toxea  pei tt
Csnadn i'«m Htar-dh ie!b bo sea. pa
ftialtami Don .**«»j*:h io*ft togas
I v ■     ft-
Cfcgoo Patala floor 4*>'fb toasa tt.
Maiei* o»»—
Hasstta oii, i*
"   ft ...
,,   t#
Cam ag»wge—
I   * >■» r,   J«     ;*4   t.)   1- a»»
ufc*      *.    lo    rtta&
!*>•.    *i   (fl   <•***
la ss t» oooi
\S% 4 i«j COM
K#"«>.  1» J 4  t»» -pgga
lf»,   tJ t»» r««*
»<*», 8 le «****
A SPECIAL PRICE
Make Brtininrlck Bmtid Sardinoo your "weekend spot
i;tlV Feature a redneod jiri<*. 1)J( n bn\i doxoo lim. l*»t
a full <ase in th* window and aome on th»* eountor
Bverywherc people arc buying BrQnstH-ek Sardlnoa by
th«* doten and half dosen. Tin* gped&] prtec !•• a «r«*.*tt attraction,   Try it
Vou* margin on Brtutswlek i** ample to aUon tot thin re
<in>*tiuii and tlu* i»i^' Inereaae In turnover will more than
repay you,
CONNORS   BROS.,   LTD.
Black's   Harbour, N. B.
'Coim^'
BRUNSWICK
BRAND
SARDINES
IH
tt >w
111)
4 1
i*»\
I fj
*»:
T4I
M 10
:: tt
|: N
« ,i
i*.*
i ::
It v,
i M
Hi
111 1925
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
17
Druggists* Profits Protected Through Price
Maintenance
Sir William Olyn-Jonea toils how the PA T A of Englana* has Established  a  System   Among 80,000
Stores on 4000 lines of Merchandise.
Knthless cutting of prices, and Hip evils attendant
thereto, whieh have during recent years been a very
real menace to merehanta in almost every line of trade,
and perhaps more especially to the druggist fraternity
was very thoroughly portrayed in an address by sir
William Qlyn-Jonea to an appreciative representative
audience at lhe Hotel Vancouver on May 1 last. Sir
William, who is secretary to the founder of the Proprietary Articles Trade Association of OtSSi Britain,
\uts the prime mover in the establishment of price
maintenance in the drug trade in England, and is completing a tour of the Dominion as organiser   for  the
Canadian Proprietary Articles Association. He explained how the need for joint action to meet the prob-
Sir William Glynn-Jones
Kin of price-cutting had become manifest twenty-nine
years ago in England, when it was found that proprietary articles whieh represented about 60$   of the
volume of business were being sobl at a gross profit oi
TV,',, when the coata <>f doing   business   were 25%.
sir William pointed oni thai during that period the
unprofitable lines wen* being sold at the expense of the
profit makers, ami the absurdity of the manufacturers
spending large sums to acquaint the public with prices
on their lines was evident when such lines were drastically cut by retailers ami wholesalers.
Sir William explained how an established minimum price not only offered larger possibilities for pro-
lit. Imt in addition gave a merchant a more secure feeling because he knew that his priee was the lowest
available,
Sir William told his audiences that a government
report on the I'.A.T.A. during the war declared It to
be an anti-price-cutting organisation ami imt a price
boosting one* tlrnt it was classed among the benefits
to the community which had formerly been served by
an inefficient machine, and there were today 8000 stores
aeUing 4000 articles at a fixed priee, showing a working profit.
Resuming, Sir William stated that when a manufacturer is sufficiently interested in the distributor to
see that he is fairly paid, his distribution to the public will increase materially, whieh certainly was not
the ease in the price-cutting system.
Were it not for the organisation the manufacture
of these proprietary articles would have been in the
hands of ten or twenty corporations that would have
hatl the public by the throat, and although established
prices benefitted the retailer more than any other factor in distribution, it was only by the co-operation of
wholesalers and a few manufacturers that the organisation was put on its feet. It had taken considerable
time and effort on thc part of the retailer and wholesaler to convince the manufacturer that the plan was
in his interests even on the evidence that the lower
the price, the greater was the consumption.
The speaker, outlined the working of the plan since
its introduction when the manufacturers of only 12
articles were interested. Buyers were induced to give
an undertaking that they would maintain the resale
price, antl that they would refuse to supply such merchandise to any other distributor named by the association, it meant a great deal to convince manufacturers that they should take a step which meant higher
prices to thc consumer overnight. Sir William expressed sympathy for thc wholesaler who was unable
io talk up to the manufacturers on the subject as aggressively as could the retailer. He also stated that
while it was quite possible for the retailer and manufacturer to get close together on thc plan that the
wholesalers' service might be greatly dispensed with,
it was found in practice that a very large part of the
stock of protected proprietary articles was to be found
ttn the wholesale shelves.
"We had shown the wholesaler that he was an
essential partner in the plan and so we had their support in not only the letter but the spirit of the under-
takinir. Wholesalers refused to sell any man on the
'stop list.' In return for its support retailers pledged
themscelves to use the wholesalers' machinery and to
see that the wholesaler secured a fair profit for his
services," continued Sir William.
Hy this co-operation it was pointed out that retailers buying for a price-cutting retailer were quickly traced by means of marked packages. The wholesaler was so satisfied with the plan that he went out of
his way to help the plan.
Discussing the evils of price cutting the speaker
asked, "What does a lower priee matter if you have
to sell to thc public for the same priee you buy at?
It is the margin that counts."
Manufacturers who had opposed the plan and
sworn that they would send people into the stores to
demand their products, found they could not do so in
V 18
THE BRITISH COLlvMBlA KKTAILKR
M?
!V
Washington Watches
When you sell a customer a # The  name   " Washing.
: Waohington » he's satisfied ::::::::::::::::^^^ |or| „m% wMch fc ^
It is now just two years sine, we wen tor* guarantee ol satisfaction
tuuate enough t«> secure tin now Canadian
Agency for ''Washington Watches During
that short lime this line has built tip ii wonderful reputation among watches aeiling a? popular prices.
Showing the 7-Jewel grade with the
new style dial and case. This costs
wholesale complete $6.95 less the
cash discount
All lints of "Washington*' Watches arc
folly guaranteed and are supplied In a greal
variety of shapes ami Styles
Write for prices, and more eoniplete Information,   If will pay
Sole Ac ents for
WASHINGTON    and     WALTHAM
WATCHES
The oOGsto illustration shows
mo twelve lift. tIMtwtl
grade, also suppned In t, li,
and t? lot***- wtth plnitl or
Isoey d«ais.
Western Wholesale Jewelers
301 CORDOVA STREET WEST, VANCOUVER, B C
practice. The salesmen of those firms eonld not sell
the retailer and the latter got along very nict Iv with-
out those lines.
"It was not long before many nf .such manufacturers realized that they would derive a greal deal
more benefit from their advertising by taking steps to
lower the resistance existing along the line of distribu
tion botwe«*n himiM-lf nnd tin- customer/' said si
William iti conclusion
Sir William lily on Jones is a  former n ■
parliament and was prominent in connection wii
chemical research work during lhe wst Twent) "i-"1
years ago he was a small druggist in an obsenrt psi
of t-ondon, England.
" WELCOME TO OUR CITY.''
win-ti a distinguished visitor comas •«» our shores, *« do everything possible !"
evidence our ptessure al bii coming Usually the police .u><! the national »a>a;*i ere
turned oui ami there i* much speech making ami tin distinguished Bias li present*
ed witii "Tin- k«>h ol the Cltjr*w whatever lhat means I* doeea * «<•«< much to bi*•*•
him these symboUc key.--, Tiny actual!) in oo lock    Bui tht) mean » lot to Wm
They say what cannot easily be juit Into WOfdS , Is BIS) prove tin i>i-o|»«n<t 10
you bui it Ih a facl that every norma n jreST In thll country SPpPOStmslelj |S,000,
ouo worth of greeting cards are told, Thai li prool enough that people IIIW u* '"
greeted* else oo such fortune would be ipeat annually for greetings, The one-, bll
reason why the small itore snd the smalltown *tore oi today are holding their own **o well sgsinsl lh«
encroachments of their large competitors Is because the) are ths "greeting type" «»f stores ta tliem
customers know they win be welcomed ss friends, itol merely offered routine service si strangers The
Canadian people are Htm provincial enough, thank heaven, to sppreclste aeighborllness, tt will noi
Cost you $5,000 a year, Mr. Entailer, to ssy, "Hello" to those who will visit yom store da a Biattei
of faci, it win not eoBt you anythingi but it will "warm the cockles of their hearts" toward you, at* the
old Baying goes and will pay big dividends.   Try It At Ivtmi nay, "Hello" to *nm all. 1925
THK BRITISH COLlvMIMA RETAILER
19
MARKET   NOTES
In primary markets for cotton goods a noteworthy
feature is the increased firmness Of wide print cloths.
Trade in print cloths continues light in volume ami unevenly distributed, Demand for finished cottons eon-
sisis mainly of small, though frequent repeal orders.
Trade in such goods, as well an in silks ami woollens,
is confined principally to fancies, novelties ami highly
styled lines, many kinds of staple fabrics being HCg-
lected to an extent seldom, if ever, experienced in pros*
pcrous time -
Woollens ami worsteds, especially fall lines, are
qttiet, the further -harp decline in the Australian wool
market seen iny s<» have retarded business owing to its
possible effect upon prices for fabrics. Clothing manufacturers report thai fancy and high-colored lines
have been well patronised for the fall seastoi. but that
business in Staple and semi-staple apparel has been
much below normal It is intimated in some quarters
that clothing manufacturers, in the near future, may
offer supplementary lines of lower-priced clothing in
an effort to stimulate demand.
HOSIERY AND SHOES
Movet before have shoes and hose been such talked
of items of feminine accessories. Last season's ideas in
shoes and hose are entirely unsuitable for this year's
enscmbb, tnts year's coats ami ihis year's hats. Stocking are colorful in the full meaning of the word, not
merely different shades of sand as they have been during j In* pas' year or s«>. but striking suit tones have
been matched, more noticably cheri, mosque and rosewood. Blush ami rose an* particularly good in chiffon
hose especially when worn with the Windsor tan shoe,
\ survey of the color demand which has been
taken by one New fork house shows that in regard to
silks. 82 per eeni of the demand has centred upon 16
OUtof a total «>f H colors. Tin* first 16 colors in medium weight silks an- as follows: Black, cinnamon, biscuit. French nude, gunmetal, fog, pearl, noisette, white.
moonlight,   French   gray,   atmosphere,   champagne,
cedar, buck and dove.
Then eome Sinus.    Brown In its many varieties is
bv far the lost eolor this season.    White combined with
black is good, and such bright hues as scarlet, almond
green and jade are seen everywhere.   As for evening
*hoes. the tapestry designs are stressed in brocades ami
gold- and silver, strawberrv ami blue are highly ap-
proved shades. An added VOgUC has been u'lven the
Ibi by I,on is heel even for dancing, Simple styles are
somewhat better than the cut-out ones, and buckles arc
returning to grace again,
Shoe stores reporl a growing call for blonde satin
shoes not only for dancing but for street wear, and
almost (-very store displays one pair at least of cross-
Word pu/./le blocked shoes. There is also a real interest in two-color combinations, especially in strapped
kill models.
Chiffon hoisery when first introduced on the Canadian market was more or less an uncertain quantity, as
ihe trade were forming their own conclusions, ami the
majority of manufacturers were not certain what the
venture would bv because of the tremendous amount of
seconds which were almost sure to be turned out, and
uncertainty as to their durability. Hut one by one
tiny fell into line, aud today Chiffon Hosiery may be
regarded in the category of staple goods. Last summer
the sab- dropped off to some extent, but today it is reported to b'* coming back stronger than ever in the
United States, ami this generally means also in Canada.
So tor next fall, hosiery manufacturers estimate that
the proportion of Chiffon Hosiery as against medium
and heavy weights will be about fifty-fifty. This applies to full-fashioned hosiery only, as it has not yet
been possible to produce seamless hosiery iu sheer and
chiffon weights, which have proven altogether satisfactory, Tin* tendency in colors runs more to strawberry ami dark touts with less and less black.
MILLINERY
There is a strong inclination towards the larger
hat this season, but the small hat continues to give the
new vogue a run for its money. The more popular
among the colons are light tans, terrapins, kasha, green
ami conch-shell Black and brown are loosing favor
to some extent, fascitis, navy and cyclamen, are prom
ising.
The Shapes
Hair nets are large, the cloche shape is reviving in
felt and the little upturned brim model is very important in both straw ami felt. Crowns are often
fitted, or have ridges across the top or sides.
Medium-sized, close-fitting hats have trimming
which is rather elaborate, "ribbed" effects being
st resse.
The larger hats. hair, erin and other light and
transparent straws, are as a rule selected for wear with
the light colored costumes, adding the Spring-like finish
to the silken ensembles, or those of cloth iu the pastel
shades,
Trimmings
All are worked into the silhouette of the hat so
thai no hat seems heavy or elaborate. Combination or
ensemble ribbons are good. Novel flower arrangements
are frequent with white gardenias leading and large
roses second, Rhinestones, fruits in colored stones and
two-headed pins are the most important novelties.
Forecast
Crushed grey felts combined with straw and highly colored Hamrkok straws predicted for late in May;
large, flower-trimmed hair nets for June; white felt for
duly, ami velours for early Kail.
Late Paris News
Mauve tones from cyclamen to Bishop purple and
Parma violet—-crowns with rather large brims that
eome well down over the head—velvet ribbon, bunches
of cowslips, guipure laee and organdy for trimming. 20
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Mai
■    «     ***    .  '
'■* '■■■'        ■>.. v/Vu,; »*»«-: 1925
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
21
Colour Harmony and Contrasts
Pleasing Harmony and Contrast Essential to Effective Display—A Useful Color Chart.
Nothing detracts more from a window display than
c(dors that flash whether it be in a decorative material
,f|- the merchandise on display,
It is a mistaken contention with some people that
it is only the person with the so called "eye for color*'
that is abb- to properly present them with success.   It
is true that some people seem better adapted to carry
out this work than others, but a little study Will soon
convince the reader that it is a simple maUer after all
It is not the intention to diseuss all the details here
iu connection with the handling of colors but rather to
pass on a little knowledge that will be useful in the correct presentation ol color as it applies to decorative
materials and merchandise displayed in the show window etc,
Color is simply ordinary daylight deprived oi same
of Its properties. The sensation of color is caused by
daylight striking an object, the rays of white liyht
beint: separated and part being absorbed by the object,
ihe i thers being reflected into the   y«*
A practical demonstration of this can be made by
shutting all light from a room and then making a small
hole iu some part of the room to admit daylight, place
a prism of glass into this ray of light and after passing through the prism the ray will be separated. These
colors are the elementary colors of white light known
as the "primary colors." The three primary colors are
retl. blue and yellow and colors are in harmony only
when they contain all three primaries in some proportion. Tints are simply lighter shades an din li'irmon-
tion. Tints are simply lighter shades and in harmon-
and white will harmonize with anv color.
af
The accompanying chart gives a comprehensive
list of the principal colors that will be found necessary
for application in connection with display work, along
with the colors that combine with them in their correct
order and if this chart is followed out no difficulty will
be experienced even by the person with no knowledge
at all of color harmony.
CORRECT COLOR COMBINATIONS
Pr ne p.ii Color
It own
Light
Medina
I'.uk
inn
Drab
Green
Oral
Light
Medium
Dark
Light
Medium
Dark
ygS
Medium
Mark
Light
Medium
l»atk
Lighl
Lavender Medium
Park
I.Ik If
Maroon    Median
Park
Orange
Purp
Light
Medina
Hark
i
Light    '
Med'u'ei
Hark
Pink
Ked
Yellow
Light
Medium
Hark
Lighl
Medium
I lark
Light
Medium
hark
Perfect
Cream
Cream
Cold
Greens
Cream
Cold
Ught Blue
Medium blue
Hark blue
Light cream
Medium cream
Medium goto
Ught blue
Medium blue
Dark blue
Lighl purple
Light purple
Dark purple
Cream
Silver
Gold
Purple
Purple
Purple
Lavender
Heliotrope
Lavender
Light   blue
Medium blue
Medium blue
Cream
Silver
Gold
Purple
Porple
Purple
Excellent
Ught  blue
Light blue >
Turquoise blue
Lighl brown
Medium brown
I»atk   brown
Salmon pink
Hose pink
Roae pink
Salmon pink
Hose pink
Rote pink
Hose pink
Salmon pink
Salmon pink
Hose  pink
Salmon pink
Salmon pink
Light  blue
Medium blue
Medium blue
Medium blue
Medium  blue
Medium   blue
Light  green
Medium  green
Medium green
Lavender
Heliotrope
Purple
Light tan
Light tan
Light   brown
h   '
Light   brown
Medium brown
Dark brown
Strong
Myrtle green
Medium   green I
Medium orangej
Yellow-
Yellow
Orange
Good
Salmon pink
Rose pink
Dark brown
Olive   green
Medium  green
Medium   green
Medium green
Medium green
Dark green
Purple- -
Yellow-
Orange
Red
Wine
Maroon
Wine
Medium red
Dark red
Medium green
Medium greea
Dark green
Red
Wine
Maroon
Light brown
Medium tan
Dark brown
Medium gray
Pale blue
Light blue
Light yellow
i   Medium yellow
Medium orange
Light  green
Medium green
Dark green
Light  yellow
Medium yellow-
Orange
Light tan
Medium tan
Medium brown
Medium  green
Olive green
Dark green
Light blue
Navy blUQ
Dark blue
Medium  green
Medium greed
Dark green
Light  brow i
Light  brown
Medium brown
Green
Silver
Gold
Light gray
Medium gray
Medium gray
Light blue
Navy blue
Dark blue
Light green
Medium gr villa rk gren
Fair
Niie green
Reseda green
Medium red
Medium rel
Medium red
Medium red
Heliotrope
Lavender
Purple
Medium gray
Navy blue
Med.  lavender
Lavender
Heliotrope
Purple
Light green
Medium  green
Medium  green
Medium tan
Medium tan
Medium   gray
Gold
Gold
Silver
Salmon pink
Rose pink
Medium gray
Light green
Medium green
Medium green
Light yellow
Medium yellow
Medium oragne
Salmon pink
Rose pink
Heliotrope 22
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILEB
M v-
There's Lots of Linoleum Business Waiting
for You This Summer
SELL!
City Floors
for Country Homes
SELL!
Dominion Linoleum Rugs
Weatherproof, Waterproof, Non-fading, Easy to Clean!
to Folks Who go Away for the Summer
DOMINION INLAID LINOLEUM
You no longer need to pay high prices for imported mia»d linoleum. It >• now m»0*
in Canada, by ourselves, in a wonderful ra nge of attractive patterns and colorings.
This opens big sales possibilities for dealers who oro an«ious to e*tend \r*o*r floor cov
ering business. There are hundreds of prospects for inlaid Linoleum who Have only
been deterred from buying, by high prices. Now you can quote prices that w»n land
the business. You will and Dominion Inlaid L noieum with its soft, high polish finish
one of the best selling and most profitable lines you have ever handled. Send for new
pattern book.
Plan a Fall Campaign in Inlaid
Write us to-day for Dioplay Material, newtpaper electroo or
any other taleo helpo you need.    They are free.
Linoleum Company Li
MONTREAL 1925
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
23
... Kjut*x* tut* nn it n « mm n-n km » mt u n x it wnn nn a u x nxw^
|| ^BTpHE MODE*
Ji      As Seeim By
Jesumette
st
St
i
^.;^*)n(ixijwwx*x90t*t kkwikw* s nn -mt x Kitxmt nuwivxnmai *.
^oOs^ Sow  that  summer is al-
^|l Q must   upon  us.  it   would  be
<*yLW u'" tn st'  w'la* '** tr«»itiy: to
comprise t h«- wardrobe of
tlie tix- smart woman, all iu*
dications pointing to a sea-
sou of white, pastel shades,
nnd brightly printed erepes
and chiffons.
The  two-piece  spoil   dress
will he a most important
item, whether il be matle of
kasha, flannel, jersey or dik
crepe, Both the blouse and
lln- skirl will take many different aspects. The blouse
may be straight ami sleeveless with a scarf collar, or it
may be tailored, with set-in
pockets, the new Chanel
neckline, and smart  raglan
shoulders. It can he worn
with or without a belt The
skirt may be more varied,
hut always,   of   eourse,    in
keeping with lhe blouse, and
never without pleats, whether hut the one chic Chanel
kiek pleat ;it trout, a group
of line pleatS at  one side, or
the entire fr<»nt finely pleat*
ed ot* box pleated.  The hack
in always straight. With this two-
piece dretW should be worn a hat of
tin* exact shade of the fabric, and
short white or bicge pull-on wash-
nolo doeskin gloves.
Willi the tenuis Reason hen*, the
problem of suitable tennis frocks
nlno concerns one's wardrobe, and
many of these are matle with circular skirls to afford movement,
idnec pleats are so likely to crush in
wash drosses.   A shod l»o\ eoat. not
unlike the English blazer is going t<>
Ih? worn to a very great extent with
the tenuis frock.
The ensemble of printed dresses
•iml plain eoat is another import-
mil item.    It is title they are greatly
worn everywhere,   but   distinction
■•nn lie iu the rut of the fabric, and
the fabric itself.   Both frock and
••oat should Ih* 8S plain as possible
lo attain the greatest degree of
smartness.
The untitled velveteen eoat is an
important addition tti the wardrobe.
us it ean be worn with day frocks
ind evening frocks Goats are also
being shown  in  plain  antl  quilled
V
i. far- —*
@
li
taflVat. which fabric seems to he coming into its own
again
There has been no change in the millinery mode.
In fabric, felt and bankok still take the lead, while the
very small hat and the quite large hat remain smart.
Then the wardrobe is not complete without one gaily
flowered chiffon evening dress, at least. Even afternoon frocks of this material are very chic. One should
not forget to add the dancing frock of black Chantilly
laee.    One model bv I'atou uses a balero effect and
*
hanging ribbons, two notes of the season, with his
characteristic slightly raised waist-line.
Pastel doeskin shoes are now very smart, but should
be worn with distinction.   They are always good with
a white or beige dress, with a hat to match the shoe.
They may also he used with a dress in a harmonizing
tone of the same color, to create an interesting progression. But to match shoes, hat and dress exaetlv is not
smart. The pump is supreme both for day and evening wear. Lizard-skin iu grey, beige or brown is ex-
celent combined with suede and glace kid. The new
very light beige glace kid leathers are destined to have
a great succes for day wear, just as blond satin has
very few rivals for the evening. A walking shoe of
brown kill is very smart. White buckskin or suede
shoes, white trimmed with polished leather, ami sandals will be very popular.
/>•*
%u.eM 24
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Mav
The Artificial
Silk Industry
From a position of inconsequence, not tn say ot
actual derision, in the textile trade twenty years ago
the artih'cal silk industry has assumed an enviable role,
its annual output at present running well over 100,-
000,000 pounds. As production of yarn has expanded,
markets for the new textile have been broadening until
today an almost insatiable demand taxes the now
greatly enlarged facilities everywhere Bnlargo-
ments of existing plants ami Ihe construction of additional units are actively under way. several estimates
of the probable outturn this year totaling above 150,-
000,000 pounds or double the crop of real silk, hi
certain centers machinery is being run night ami day
in an attempt to keep abreast of the demand.
Nearly two hundred years ago the conception of a
lustrous textile simulating natural silk in feel ami appearance captured thf scientific imagination, (hough
the products of researches iu this Held were at firs! extremely crude and imperfect. Bxperimcuts of an eminent French chemist, Count Milam- d*- Chardonnet,
were the tirst to yield a fibre of commercial Importance to supplement the production of real silk.
Four different processes have been evolved for the
manufacture of artificial silk, or rayon as it is termed by a consider.*!bit- portion of the trade here The
purpose of all the methods employed is, essentially, tin*
conversion of cellulose, tht* Structural principle in the
vegetable kingdom.   Mills using the viscose process
obtain their cellulose in large measure from wood pulp
Scandinavian. Canadian ami Maine spruce has been
found particularly acceptable for this purpose. Manufacturer:; who employ any one of the other three important methods generally use cotton in the form of
(inters tn- of waste. Though the linter requirements
of the artificial silk industry, particularly those nf Oer-
man mills, have attracted some comment, until recently thev exercised a comparatively minor influence on
* a I •
the linter market.
Although acetate artificial silk has been on the
market tor sonic years, the genius of Swiss chemists
has been largely responsible for a recent innovation in
that field   At the invitation of England, France ami
the United  States  factories  were  established  during
the war for the manufacture   of   cellulose   ascctatc
"dope" for airplane wings and they were placed un-
r the supervision of these scientists.   Hostilities OVCF,
large capital outlay in plant and equipment made
mpeiativc that the mills be shifted as rapidly as possible to a peacetime basis since the demand for their
output was necessarily much curtailed.   Researches
previously hatl led to the belief that artificial silk of
peculiar merit could be made from cellulose ascctate.
its value as an insulating material was at once recognised. The vision of the originators has been amply
justified in the results of lhe process which has made
possible the production of an almost watertight yarn
capable of being spun commercially in counts or tier-
nicrs as fine as 40's equal to I'M's count in cotton
yarns
Especial consideration has been devoted to the
perfection of finer yarns with a view io extending their
w
LIGHTHOUSE BRAND
Triple Stitch
OVERALLS
"Always on the Job"
On farm, iu factory, construction
and   railroad   work   ami   wherever
overalls are worn UOHTHOU8E
BRAND are giving honest west and
saving th.- workman's dollars   Tbe
triple   stitch   noans   triple   wear   ll
tin* se.-tins, nod no puckering So
skimping of material. LIGHTHOUSE BRAND arc made roomy !••
allow of easy movement
Sell l.tiillTIIni SK BRAND, th.
triple  stitched   overalls,   and   sell
-iti-.fact ion,
ROCK ISLAND OVERALL CO.
Rock Island Quebec
R. M. Foster, 3544.32nd Aveaae Weit
Vancouver, B.C. 1925
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
25
ne in the weaving of delicate fabrics. Truly ama/.ing
progress has been matle in the introduction of these
line-size rayon yarns iu the construction of such materials as laces ami line ribbons, Nottingham, the great
■■•ee centre t f Kngland, has profited by thc introduction of artificial silk into lace making since the cotton
lace-making trade has been for a long time in acute
depn ssiou.
C ranee was firs' in the field as a producer of artificial silk but on the eve of the war Germany ami
England hatl forged ahead. At that date operations in
lhe United States were still comparatively small ami
■oulined to one company which was unable to supply
even half of the small demands of users there. The
years since 1913, ami particularly the last four or live
years, KaVC seen remarkable developments in the industry, both from the productive ami distributive viewpoint     There  WOltld  probably  be  00  very  promising
market for an output of 1924 dimensions had not artificial silk yarn shown a vast improvement iu quality
river its 1813 prototype l-'uriheiemore, prewar markets were Limited to n few countries and a few industries Conditions today in consuming centers show
cleat ly the changes which the postwar development
has brought,
Present Situation Abroad
On ihe Continent, despite the extraordinary extensions recently completed, the demand for artificial
silk -.Imws no signs of flagging. All of the yarn that
the mills can produce is readily absorbed and the market is siitl unsatisfied* The Lyons district, the eon- of
ihe silk industry in dance which has enjoyed for generations an established reputation for the production
of high-styled goods, has given artificial silk a warm
reception. It is conceded that the rise of the artificial
silk industry 1ms been one of tin* must impressive of the
postwar industrial movements in Prance.
England, too, lm* received the new textile with
approval Cotton ami wool manufacturers, as well as
-ilk and knit goods makers, have attested to their regard by taking greatly increased quantities.   Existing
rayon mills have been urged to their fullest possible
production ami new factories are being built. Still the
home ami export demand is far from sated. Hence the
largest British producer is establishing a viscose mill
in Canada where an abundance of wood pulp is assured.
Canada has been importing artificial silk yarn at
lhe rate of about 1,600,000 pounds a year.
It is believed that plants located on the spot will
ultimately supply Canada's textile mills, releasing s
considerable poundage of rayon yams of English manufacture for consumption In Europe.
In the Par Bast as well as in Latin America artificial silk is making headway. Strangely enough.
<'hina tin* traditional birthplace of the real silk in-
■ lustry. is Opening up as a market  for artificial silk.
Tho trade is still small but has already caused a considerable flutter there among factors interested in the
"I'l'ehamlising of raw silk,    India also is absorbing
'syon yarns ami fabrics. During 1924 India bought ab-
'Oftd 860,000 lbs. of artificial silk ami yams alone as
omparod   with   352,000 in 1923 ami 131,000 in 1922.
The cultivation of new channels for distribution
'■' artificial silk yarns and fabrics has not been made
"1 Hie expense of long-established outlets.   The main
tenance of old markets and the establishments of new
connections have been secured by offering a progressively improving product at a relatively low and stable
price. Many manufacturers, harassed by the prospect,
of often daily fluctuations in the cotton, wool and silk
markets, have viewed with special favor the effort of
rayon producers to eliminate frequent price swings.
There is nt) indication of any abatement to the demand for artificial silk, and the large capital necessary
as a mere preliminary to commercial operations, the
technical difficulties in the way of effective production,
the necessity for manufacturing on a very large scale,
ami of maintaining expensive experimental work in
connection with the yarn mills, have conspired to
limit tin- numbers engaged in the industry.
ODE TO A STRAW HAT
tt new straw hat.
In thee I strut;
Aristocrat
I'm nothing but.
1 lift thee lo
A passing maid;
I'm proud of you,
Thou thing of braid.
Vet. I some day.
Will stamp thee tlat.
Cast thee av.av—
An old straw hat.
Ami maybe I
By friends will be
Cast off (poor guy)
Like you by me.
So 1 antl thou.
(I hat. today
Will flaunt us now
While vet we mav.
Old lials. old men.
At these folks glower
We'll suffer then;
Hut now—our hour,
0k\
EET
THE UNSHRINKABLE UNDERWEAR
THAT ATTRACTS THE .
HIGH GRADE  TRADE 26
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA KKTAILKR
TRAVELERS WE HAVE MET
Mav
British Market Reports
DRAPERY  AND CLOTHING
Increased ReUil Busines*
Retail reports are very encouraging, business having in
creased considerably during the wee*. London ftrmi find both
counter antl mail order trade substantial, antl much mote
activity prevails in the provinces. Certain large distributing
Arms continue to import big quantities of cheap foreign man
ut'actured wearing apparel.
A steady flow of new orders since Easter is reported by
the wholesale trade. Inquir> lor sports clothing has been
very brisk, the opening of the cricket and tennis seasons
bringing a large volume ot business. School clothing departments are experiencing the busiest time of tne year, rerj
man> thousands of new outfits being required for the summer
term. Fashion goods of all kinds lor warm weather wear are
sought alter by retailers, who have to study the market witu
far greater care than in former years, owing to the constant
changes in designs and never-ending stream ol novelties lhe
extremely popular apache scarves are now meet tag with
growing competition irom what are known as Jockev m*ck*
wraps. These latter indicate the decline of tne decollete seek
opening in connection With outdoor wear. Trimmed ami
s;mii-trimmed millinery is selling well, ihe bulk demand be
ing for hats of small dimensions. Some retailers complain
that makers are concentrating too much on these close-fttUng
shapes and ignoring the still important business in matrons'
headwear. Demand lor women's hosiery is enormous, and
favor is shown to brighter shades. Knitted dresses and suit*
are very prominent in wholesale bookings, while In Woven
goods repps lead in number. Irgent repeat orders for this
material have been placed with the manufacturers
COTTON.
Period of Heavy Depression.
Manchester
Business continues to be on a restricted basis Of a revival of trade or the placing of large orders there is no sign
Many firms are faced with the alternative of accenting term*
which show no profit or allowing a large proportion of Ibeil
machinery to stand idle. In some cases prices below the eost
of production are accepted.
The operatives, in their latest reports, emphasize the unfortunate condition of affairs. They say that for four yean
there has been practically continuous short time working, and
thai not sine the cotton panic in 1*61, caused by the American Civil War, has there been such a long spell of depression or so much unemployment.
One of the largest yarn agents, speaking on the Exchange
recently, summed up the situation as follows:--"During the
last six weeks trade has been as bad as at any time since the
war. People will not buy. Three main causes are at work:
(1) Dealers expect prices to come down still further The
fact that negotiations are in progress among all branches of
the trade for the purpose of reducing costs, and thai in the
early stages hopeful words were used, has been an encourage
ment; (2) the poorer World Is becoming accustomed to the
consumption of a smaller quanth> of cotton goods; (3) for
elgn competition Is growing.
The fact that the Japanese are underselling the English
in Eastern markets in the class of yarns that the natives
weave on hand looms has led to the suggestion that Lancashire firms should make the necessary alterations in their machinery, should purchase low grades of Indian cotton, and
should expand the trade in coarse goods. The proposal has
not met with much favour. Expert! are not at all sure that
in this branch ol business the Japanese can be beaten. There
is no guarant-e that tliere would be anything like an adequate
return lor the outlay on machinery which would be necessary
in order lo lake the step of developing a low class trade
HOW ABOUT TM£ WIFE?
"I know a town where you can get a pound of sugar I wo
pounds of coffee, a beautiful wife ami B quart of whiskey for
$2.25."
"Gee! That must be rolten whiskey."
Commercial    Trawlers    are    reecgnlsetl    t *k
"Front Um" men of uur Industries nm| rmmurnetar.
Inf. They aiv the link be!Ween lhe maim!,...■•-,„.,.,.
wholesaler, ami the retailer, ami have prolml.U ,m*iv
influence than an> other eta* or organisation ii. ,-xbi
• nee When times ar. -.lull, they carry optimism ||Hj
-good cheer from on, nui nf lhe country tn the other
ami when times are good, they not an a balance wheel
Prank 0 Ptsmt is at the head of *:m • ,|,K
year ami is surmumhd by a splendid |0| 0f officer* uhu
are determined to make VaneottVcr Council a real in.
Alienee in Brtllah Columbia
l-Vaser travels for F A Jon<s. another prominent l.CT. ami l: C representative for W V Mac
tlonahl ine manufacturer* of M Tobacco with a
Heart" brand of tobareo and eigareUca,
UB r rank's return  imm over-sens he became ft*
noeiated with th, KeUy-Douglaa c Ud , .,f ihis eity.
and was with them until lax! July He is ui-ll known
not only in his eommerefal Industries but nls«> in Ihi
realm of sport last year playing iVcrosse with lh*
Native Sons of Canatla team lu winter, as line per
mils, he bowl* indoors anil iu summer is an active m<••
her of the Vancouver l-awn Bowling Club thai iv
when he is not selling tohaeco, or Halting    Frank U
MaomeM Rahermanl If you tlon't believe It, jnai   J*
him
Vancouver Counet 1 No 284,   United   Commi
Irjne), is «»(* Atoeiien \s the secotol largest CotimV In
I anada, and also in the jurisdiction of Oregon, V-i !|
ngton and Kritinh Columbia, ami for the second y. n
m succession lm* won the handsome rilver cup don•"'
by the Grand Jurisdiction for the greateal net Inert   *
III loembeiship.
SAFETY IN NUMBERS
A bookkeeper applying tor a job was being Inter**)'
i»y his prospective employi r
"t presume you full) understand all lhe details ol da
enlrj bookkeeping."
"I'll say so.    Last  place |  worked  I used triple ai
One sel Ihowtag actual profits for the bos* j one set sho*
no profits for the stockholders, ami one set showing 0 lo
lhe Income Tax auditors," m THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Common-Sense Delivery Schedules
27
As a demonstration of the possibilities in suggestions, tin* question, regularly used by sales-people:
Will you carry this homef" can hardly be improved
nn. Supplanting the question: "Shall we deliver
ihis'" it always, sometimes by an enormous amount,
reduces delivery volume.
Only a detail, it has great significance in connection with operation of any delivery system. While
niaiiv stores dealing with many customers, will not
,are to ask    "Will you carry this home*" still close
attention lo the suggestion given customers should be
(he one, which, looked a! from all sides, is the most
beneficial to the store.   Ami certainly, with every bus-
a a
in.ss I licit conies tin point when further effort to increase deliveries is a losing proposition. .
The same principle, too, applies t<» the frequency
and other details «»f delivering,   Pursuing pure logic,
a store will profit much by going all the distance to
(rive the customer what he asks for. In other words,
the store wiii deliver !«• any point, at any time, on a
moment's notice. While few stores, simply because it
would be attempting the impossible, promise this, still.
.1 great many approach il just as closely as physically
possible The purchase may be only \\ ten-cent one—
but if the customer asks for delivery at once to a remote place  he is popularly conceded to be entitled
*,. it
Is lhe merehanl always right w In n he figures such
delivery icrvice, costing more than thc gross stiles.
my nothing of profit, n-allv pays him in the end!
An interesting experience an showing that other
things than the impulsive desires of a thoughtless pub-
lie should govern, ennui to our attention nut long ago.
A store for yearn has been up against the problem
if delivering a large proportion ol ail orders at two rush
periods of lhe day    The drivers came on for work at
the ilSUal time, but  some Of them did not  leave the
itore until 9 o'clock or even later. A little later ensued a period of intense hurry and dash.   Telephone
eiders piled in. for immediate delivery. Kvery customer "must have at onee " Tin drivers did their best,
bill always there was overtime at the lunch hour, ami
all too frequently there were disappointed customers
Finally, the store management determined on a
radical departure, it announced thai all morning deliveries must be received as orders before closing tunc
the  night   bi fore.     All  orders   for afternoon  delivery
must be received before 11.00 o'clock lu the announcement which other stoics greeted with thc assertion: "Tl.ey can nev. r get away with it" •■■the
store stated twin consideration for delivery drivers and
thc customers actuated the new regime, Tho new
system would uivt drivers a fair show in comparison
with other workers. Again, this would make the customer absolutely sun* of deliveries arriving by a certain time.
Habits of customers are mighty important things.
and more often to be heeded, even though illogical or
nonsensical. In this case, however, the store proves
lhal customer's habits could be overturned. There
*-as some friction In getting tin* new scheme started;
nf course some customers were lost, temporarily; most
nf them later coming back.
lu general, however, the new delivery system was
an entire success.    After several years of use, it, is
now a fixture.
And the store benefits in numerous ways. The
present delivery system does get goods to the customer when the customer expects them. That means that
fewer customers are lost because of failures of delivery
boys to connect. While the drivers are on duty, they
are always at work. Before they start out in the morn-
big, the store has lined up deliveries in the efficient
way only possible when every order to be delivered is
known before the first one is out of the store.
There are none of the hectic, rush periods which
played havoc with the mechanism of cars, the distribution of stores employees, and—sometimes—the good
will of customers.
Another result is increased good-will of drivers.
Tiny feel the store is giving them a fair show, the best
it knows how. This store, it i.s interesting to note, in
consequence has a very low rate of turnover among
drivers. At the present moment, in fact, every driver
on the force is an old one.
When a store starts out to increase efficiency in
delivery, there are other things to study than supplies
of gas and oil. garage arrangements, standardized rules
for drivers, and so on. Other things to study are fundamental ones connected wTith delivery, such as the
time of delivery, the manner in which the normal rush
periods are dealt with, what is done to keep the drivers loyal to the store—so that thev will look out for its
interest, even though not required to do so by rule.
Common-sense in delivery deals with all these
things. And pursued to its most efficient conclusion,
i? means that the insistant pressure of the thoughtless
public for prohibitive service in delivery must be met
and stopped at a eertain point. Bear in mind always
that the store-deliverv systems which try to do too
much every little while throw a wrench into
store machinery by failing to deliver to the customer,
and wrecking his good-will. The same common-sense
set of policies will record a higher average level of
achievement, from the customer's standpoint, than
will the ill-considered system, followed because others
have lhat system.
DILUTED SYMPATHY
A certain wholesaler had been trying, unsuccessfully and ior several months, to collect an account of
some $50. Then he heard that the delinquent debtor
had lUSt suffered B bereavement: his wife had died.
Forthwith, the wholesaler tools his pen in hand and
wrote the following letter:
Dear Sir:- I have just learned of your recent
great loss; and 1 am moved by compassion to write you
these few lines of sympathy.
At such a time as this, we business men must forget business and draw more closely the bonds of brotherhood. At such a time, when sorrow visits one of us,
we all must remember that business is not all; and it is
iu siieh a spirit that T am extending to you the hand
of condolence, 1 want you to know that my heart is
w ith vou in this, vour hour of trial.
Bul when all the hubbub is over, you might send
me a check for that $50 you owe me,
yours very truly, 28
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Mav
LARGE BUYING GROUP FORMED IN THE EAST
Department Stores Doing up to a Million Dollars and
Over Reported to Have Joined New Organization,
Designed to Simplify Competition with Chains and
Large Mail Order Houses.
Between forty ami fifty departmental stole*
in Eastern Canada doing business between $100,-
000 antl $1,000,000 a year, are reported to be
uniting in a Buying Group for the purpose
of buying on more equal terms with the large de-
pai'tmental ami mail order houses, and chain stores-
selling in competition with them. The buying power
of the group is estimated at between $12,000,000 and
$20,000,000. The principal aim of the m*w organisation, which will probably be known as the Associated
Department Stores of Canada, is to bring members 00
a more equal footing with chain stores, believing that
by uniting their buying power they can purchase more
goods at better prices, and thus take advantage of belter terms in their selling.
This organization is not confined to Ontario department stores but will be open to the Dominion, ami
although only operating at present in the Eastern eity.
it is predicted that department stores in other centres
will rapidly become interested. There is of course objection to the scheme voiced by manufacturers, whotiC
policy is to sell to the wholesale trade only, but tlie or
iginators of the association consider that thev will be
t> *
able to purchase most of the goods on the quantity
basis.
There are predictions that the next ten years will
J. A. TEPOORTEN
LIMITED
WHOLESALE DRUGS
PATENT MEDICINES DRUGISTS' SUNDRIES
PHARMACEUTICAL PREPARATIONS
308 Water St.
Vancouver, B. C.
»
■*™w
mm
-Arret t-r—
Bruises        Sores
Rheumatism
Soothe the sore muscles or ligaments by rubbing in Minard's Lini.
ment. It penetrates, relieves and
heals. It eases inflammation and
restores the injured part to health.
Splendid for cuts and sores. It
sterilizes and heals quickly.
sec consolidations in many line* and the rh-atioi   t
vast corporations with assets which beretofori h«v
seemed out of tin* question because of their si/,   ti
will be dom   OH I BCalc that   will make \hv j.r, ,w.*ir
history of Industry beggarly in comparison The trend
is said to be distinctly toward consolidation ol ma,*J
smali units into large chnin-v    In tin- Itll road snd in.
dustrial fields, and more pronounced In the public util«
ity fields, it is said, a targe era in consolidation |g in
sight.    In the  banking field  normally   the mo*|  eon,
serv.itive, the merger idea »* taking hold In a surpra.
ingly vigorous fashion,
The expansion of various enterprise h snd ibe rspid
development ol machine-made methods ol mauuiaetw-,
and frequently the increases in production costs thu>
brought about have all eontriboted to the trend dm
petition baa also forced many cone, run engage**! in jj|i,.
businesses to consolidate This element in the economic
life of the country will no! be eliminated from th- pii
lure, as the small concerns still will continue In open
iiott. and th*- larger units which in themselvee ire eon-
Holldationx ol smaller units, will hav,* plenty oi eow-
petition from large eonsolidatioim
rof ** sample In the automobile bo-si m-ve tht *h V
unit companies, natch bs Pord ftfld Dodge, are expected
to continue si such.   But in the organisation known m
the General Motors Corporation theri in u large roni-
pan) r. pr* si n'ing a consotittntion «»f R number ni units
And other inch consolidation** are in existence rone
petition in lhf motor industry is said {0 be «ren keener
'han when mitre companies were uHualiy in lh-8 field
The keenncjtfi of tae competition follow* the catting
down of production cost* through ef'fnen<\ aietmKu
In levels •*«» tow that only the tit ean stirviv-
Students Like
Keystone Brand
Por RCVeral yearn   consistent   newspaper   tnd
maga/iue publicity has been given to Ke*fStoUt
Brand School Supplies.
Students throughout the province have lean
that this trade mark   stands   for   the   Mghcal
quality,
It is easier to sell
Keystone Brand
Smith, Davidson 4 Wright, Ltd.
MANUFACTURERS ANO WHOLESALE
PAPER DEALERS
VANCOUVER VICTORIA
aOmtaiaammamtmmm
llll     I III—
J
■M 1925
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
29
RMA TRADE SECTION ACTIVITIES
Grocers. Several important meetings ol the Great*
er Vancouver Grocer* Section, K.M.A. have been held
recently, and among matters of interest discussed, the
question ol rescinding the Early Closing By-law by the
civic authorities has been given due attention. Controversy as regard early closing commenced several
years ago, and it was Considered that the existing bylaw gave merchants in every line of business a square
deal     A  copy ol the  petition presented to the civic
authorities by the Small Storekeepers' Association has
been obtained by this section, ami the primary cheek-
up shows at least 120 straight Oriental storekeepers
included in the signatures attached. A final checkup
is expected to reveal the fact that the majority ol dealers who have sigiiitl themselves as grocers represent
the small confectioners ami delicatessen emporiums of
Greater Vancouver, who cannot rightly lie termed
grocers, Legitimate (*rxoecrs of the city are determined, 'hat before assenting to the extinction of the bylaw, a very thorough investigation shall be made.
Annual Picnic. This popular annual event is re-
reiving considerable attention, ami although at the
lime of going to press, no date has been set. a great
deal of work has been done by the commit tec in charge
* Im
to ensure 8 successful holiday.
Bread Situation. The juice controversy among
bread dealers is occuping the attention of the grocers.
and although not directly interested In the cause of
the dispute, it is Considered advisable lo sec to it that
lhe grocer is not left "holding the bag" when it comes
to protecting their fair margin of profit.
Comparative Buying: and Advertising. Grocers are
showing particular interest In tin* co-operative movement, and plans arc being laid to launch a campaign
in the mar future to take advantage of co-operative
methods.
BUTCHERS
Since    the   reorganization   of   'his section some
two months ago. representative meetings of Greater Vancouver butchers have been held. Outi
standing among matters discussed by this section is the
prohibition of preservatives in meats and meat products. A resolution protesting this measure has been
forwarded to the Dominion office of the Association at
Ottawa, who will take up the question with the federal government. Butchers here assert that thc use of
a small amount of preservative is not detrimental to
the public health, and that unless relief is obtained,
not only will the butcher suffer but the price of meat,
will increase to the consumer at least 10%. It is declared that permission to use preservatives will prohibit waste in connection with the butcher business, as
the use of preservatives is considered absolutely essential iu the manufacture of certain commodities, and
the amount necessary does not exceed 1/10 of 1%,
which can in no way jeopardize the public health.
Sanitary Laws. Enforcement of these laws was discussed at a recent meeting, and an invitation has been
extended to the civic health department for their representative to address the next general meeting of the
Butchers' Section.
Closing* Hours. This section is entirely opposed to
any extension of present hours.
Misleading* Advertising. This question is tabulated
for immediate attention.
Note: This active section of the Association has
shewn an increase of 100$ in membership since reorganization.
GASOLINE AND OIL DEALERS
This section is a new development of the
Association's activities, and is known as the
Independent (Jas and <H1 Dealers of the Automotive Section, composed of the gas and oil service stations of Greater Vancouver. One of the main purposes
of this section is to look after the interests of the gas
dealer, and augment the service rendered to the general
public. Since the formation of this division, some six
weeks ago. a membership of fifty has been enrolled and
ihe objective of 100 members set by the executive is
expected to be shortly reached. At a general meeting on Mav 20. final details of outlined plans were discussed and a regular programme adopted. It is eventually hoped that.the operations of this division will be
so arranged that every gas dealer in the provinee will
become affiliated, ami reap the benefits of its activities.
THE MERCURY BOILER
The General Electric Company recently announced the perfection of the so-called
M.nui.v  Boiler by W. \- ft Emtaet, Its Inventor.   This new boiler is said to be a
marvel    11 is about 60 per eent nunc efficient than ihe modern steam turbine, which,
.., ,_._^   In  tarn,  Ifl  KbOUl   10  I'er cent,   more    efficient     that     the    best     reciprocating
Q^.Q-Mli'^B engine,   Furthermore the boiler with its vaportaing equipment, occupies not more
more lhan one thin! the span*    taken by the equipment it supercedes—Modern mer-
ly.. ■   ehaadislng- SSS i,s np-lO-the-mlnute power equipment,  too.    It's mercury  boiler is
vk.... ta.JtrJl Turnover, which can make it possible for a retailer who makes an initial investment ol only $1,000 but who makes a complete stock-turn daily and reinvests
daily to tlo Mich ft business that he WOUld have nearly $20,000 to invest on the first day of his second year.
though he had been doing buaineaa oo a net margin of only l per cent, it is Turn-Over which can teach
merchandise thai shelves are not places to repose as in a warehouse but are rather hurdles for them
U hurriedly lump over during their living trip through the retailers and out again to the consumer.
li Is Turn-Over which eunnot operate on the kind of goods whieh habitually stay on the shelves for up-
wards of a half vear. compelling the payment of their share of rent, insurance. Interest on invested capital clerk hire antl the almost endless list Of items which go to make up Overhead. Have you the
Mercury Holler of Merchandising in your establishment- It requires less store space than the selling
machinery it supercedee, 30
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA KKTAILKR
-Mav
Here It Is
a Patented Stovepipe With
No Outside Fasteners!
Davidson's STERLING Stovepipe
Here's something entirely new iu stovepipes that will give your fall bushes-,
a real boost,
It entirely removes the old trouble With
fasteners ami nuts which interfere with
cleaning.
In Davidson's STERLING th.* fasten-
ers arc inside.   This gives a smooth «\.
terior which lends Itacll ea-iily to el< an
ins-    Your customers will appreciate
this when you tell them about it
The demand for the Sterling is great
ami you should order immediately for
quick delivery    It you ean't wait for
our salesman si nd UJ the order direct
it will get prompt attention
.M
l&ranches:
iWt&O/l WGcYtnrM
Established I860,
Head Office and Factory: MONTREAL
Toronto Winnipeg Saskatoon
Ciliary
Vancouver 1925
THK BRITISH <OLUMBIA KKTAILKR
31
n
y
HARDWARE, OIL w PAINTS
BUSINESS IS LETHARGIC
While expected gains have appeared in certain
lines, as in the automobile trade, after the fust month
.•! spring, yet it is manifest that results as a whole
have been disappointing to those who looked tor progressive expansion ami the business situation, while
fundamentally sound, lacks the increase   in  activity
which it was hoped would come with the change of
seasons
The trend of most markets is still iu a downward
direction, ami the bulk of demand is to till immediate
or early  needs only.    With sharper competition  for
husiuesvs, moreover, some purchases have been deferred
because of a possibility of further concessions by sellers, The fact that iu most instances supplies can be
obtained Quickly when they are required also tends to
isob! buying within close limits, frequent ordering in
moderate sired Jots being tin rub. This serves to keep
slocks of goods in distributing channels in a wholesome position! but is causing a restriction of production as a means of bringing it mote iu line with actual
consumption.   Ye? the present recession iu Industrial
activity is less marked than that which was occurring
a year ago, and iu marly all cases financial reports now
coming to hand show larger earnings    for   the    first
quarter than for the same period of l'.rJ4.
HARDWARE MARKETS AT A GLANCE
Vancouver, May 14, 1925,
Garden Hose and Lawn Sprinklers. An increase in
buying is looked for with real warm weather; prices
HrC si cad v,
Bolts and Nuts: The movement is rather slow but is
showing some development.
Axes: Prices arc expected t" continue unchanged
throughout the season, sabs continue to be very good.
Roofing and Paper: Sabs are showing a steadily increasing volume; no price changes.
Builders Hardware: Sales continue to be in a most
satisfactory volume; jobbers prices remain unchanged,
Galvanized Ware: There has been no change during
the past week; priees are steady ami sales reasonably
Rood.
Field Pence: Sales very satisfactory ami prices are
steady, showing Improvement,
Chain: No early change in price is expected; sales
(rood,
Parm and Garden Tools: Very satisfactory move-
ment of these lines is reported hy most jobbers in this
district.
y
Lawn Accessories: Things are quite satisfactory in
this branch of the retail and wholesale hardware business.
Pishing Tackle: Sales are holding up to a remarkable degree.
Automobile Tires and Accessories: A fair demand
has sprung up for tires, accessories also have become
more active; prices are unchanged.
Batteries: Radio batteries still are moving well.
but demand for flashlights is quiet as usual at this time
of tin year.
Shovels: Demand for shovels at present is good;
prices are unchanged.
Paints and Oils: The spring weather has stimulated
the demand for mixed paints for outside work. Lead
ami oil arc moving in better volume.
Wheelbarrows: Clean-up work is making an improvement in wheelbarrow sales for home use. Contractors arc looking over their equipment in this line
ami arc starting to buy.
Sash Cord and Sash Weights: Spring sales are not
very heavy although building is well under way; priees
arc firm.
Pyrex Ovenware: There is a steady market for this
iiue of merchandise with no change in price.
Rope: Call for rope is nominal, with good stocks
from which to draw: prices are unchanged.
Wire Cloth: The seasonable demand for this line of
material is beginning to be felt; stocks are well filled
ami prices steady.
Wire: Sales are showing some improvement, with
stocks well tilled; prices are steady and lirm.
Screen Doors and Windows: Demand is commencing with slocks well prepared for a very heavy season.
Steel Sheets: Call is fair with heavy stocks on hand;
prices are steady and unchanged.
Tin plate: As with steel sheets the demand shows
but little improvement as yet. Storks are in gootl condition ami prices are firm.
Oil Stoves and Ovens: (HI stoves are moving out in
gootl volume.
Sandpaper: Sales are increasing slightly in a retail
way with ful Istoeks on hand; prices have not been
changed. •>•»
.*)-
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA KKTAILKR
M
ii v
A PROMINENT
AND COLORFUL
PAINT
DEPARTMENT MAY
who came
monkey-wrench
Property owners may now have their homes painted
and pay later by the Partial Payment plan. Paint
and varnish manufacturers will gladly supply full
details. Or write direct to us. This plan presents a
great opportunity to increase paint sales.
SAVE THE SURFACE CAMPAIGN
610 Keefer Building Montr<»l 926
tti
CHE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
33
Make the Town Talk About Your Paint
Department
The Best kind of Advertising is the One That is Heard—Attractive Displays Make People Talk—Distinctive Advertising Results in Word of Mouth Advertising.
•The best advertising known is word of mouth
advertising, that is, a satisfied customer telling another
his opinion in regard to a product or service that he
had made use of.
"Courteous ami attentive clerks may make a store
or department talked about over town ami the recipe
i. nt of valuable word of mouth advertising. The merehan! should train his clerks in the proper manner of
muling thc individual customer, This presages a
knowledge on the par? of the clerks of tin* psychology
of human nature.   It will pay tin- merchant to see that
iiis cb-rks have this information because a satisfied
customer is the best medium of advertising known.
"A givat many stores have found that it pays to
yivc free service to their customers, Rest rooms, free
telephone service, private garages, are some of the services lhat may he mentioned. A large department
store devotes about one-sixth of an entire floor as a
rest and waiting room for its women customers. It
also has a large .space at the service of its men custom-
ers. Sot all merchants, however, can go to this extent
in furnishing service.   It is possible, though, to provide
;i small rest room and telephone service, or some other
service that the merchant may have in mind that will
give to tht- store the value of word of mouth advertising." says tin American Paint ami <*i 1 Dealer. It goes
on to say:
Goods That Talk Make People Talk
"One method Of Causing a favorable impression on
the customer is an attractive display of merchandise.
This factor is well known to most merchants. The customer likes ttt have merchandise displayed iu such a
manner that he can see what he is buying, in most
cases sample the merchandise, The store that is usually the best patronised is the one where the most up-
to-date fixtures are used and where every effort has
been made to attractively display the goods for sale.
li causes favorable comment that h another word for
mouth atl vertising.
"Window display is another way of getting atten-
'ion from the customer that will lead him to talk of
your store. The show window is about the cheapest
and most effective form of advertising known.   The
merchant should use great care in trimming his window
and making displays of merchandise,  He should study
the methods Of Other successful merchants and he
should make the best Use of this excellent method of
attracting attention to his store.
Specialities Create Comment
"The selling of a particular kind of merchandise
has caused many stores to be talked about, to cause
many of them to stand out predominant in the field.
The carrying of a particular brand of paint, for cx-
"uplc. may give to a store the value of word of mouth
advertising,   The paint is known through advertising,
perhaps, and the brand has been unconsciously associated as a quality product because ot" the effective use
af advertising,
"Distinctive advertising is another method of getting word of mouth advertising. Many stores have
news items as part of their advertising in the daily
press,
Pacify the Kickers
"Intelligent attention to complaints has given to
many stores the value of word of mouth advertising.
Many of the larger stores give the customer the benefit of the doubt iu all cases. The merchant will do well
ttt investigate the slightest complaint of one of his customers because the dissatisfaction of one customer
might mean the loss of many more.
"Tin* personality of the owner of a husiness has
given to a store the value of word ol" mouth advertising. A dominating personality spells success to a business. The merchant should realize that his store is but
a reflection of his own personality. He should, therefore sec to it that this personality will be constructive in word of mouth advertising in place of negative,
whieh will be the cast* if he does anything that reflects
against his business honesty or character.
"There are many other things that may give to a
store valuable aid in Word of mouth advertising. The
merchant must study his individual problem. There is
hardly a business that does not have some feature that
may well be capitalized in such a manner that the store
will be talketl about over town. The capitalization of
this feature will give to him a valuable aid in making
his business a success.'''
NEW   GOODS
Coffee Mill, capacity 1 11)., hardwood back, lock nut
adjustment, canister decorated, castings black enamel;
weight per dozen 16 lbs.
»! 34
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
April
r
There's a Demand for this Jar!
—and you should have your
share of the business
There is no greater favorite in the kitchens of Canada than the "Perfect
Seal" Jar.
That is because it meets
the exact need of the
housewife. Uniquely designed, it ensures tight,
trustworthy sealing.
Perfect Seal and Improved
Gem Jars are known
throughout Canada. The
dealer who stocks and displays them cannot help but
find a ready market, because they are the Jars
people ask for.
ORDER FROM YOUR WHOLESALER
Dominion Glass Company Limited
"RAVEN"  Manilla
" GARRY " Light Kraft
"RUPERT" Heavy Kraft
Breads oi Paper Bags, oil** Paper Bags
nide ia Weitera Caaada will iatere year
PROFIT. MR. GROCER.
By your cattoneri latiifactioa ia rtceiviag
their mercbaadiie ia food coaditioa
NORFOLK PAPER CO. LTD.
136 Water St. Sey. 7868 VANCOUVER. B. C.
AgenU for B. C.
Woods Manufacturing Co. Ltd.
  Winnipeg, Manitoba. 1925
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
•<5
HARDWARE PRICES CURRENT
Tht following art prices quoted for principal linet of leading wholesale firms.   Prices quoted are necessarily
subject to market fluctuations.
AMMUNITION.
Loaded Shot Shells.
Dominion:
Canuck,
M
is 0 * II * IH ch,
tit*;:,
U «; x M .v 1% *\i
. (I 00
Imperial.
'.' (J  -,  :<1   I'i  'Ii
, Til 2-i
U x U * t'* eh
... M.tW
American.
i'sii' Nltro «'iui» tt 0 x SS s til c
ii UN
IVtrtH   High   <Hlll
.. &2 ii
I'M!'   Arrow 12 0 x 2* x  1'•» < *h
, tl N
Patara  Premier
SS H
Metallic Ammunition.
Dominion
.'2 lllOtl  Smokeless
ill
it Lona Bwoltalaaa
»; ■".
:«*  I.   Rifle  Hmokele-**
.    7 |0
22 I.  Hi tie Lemnok
,   6 10
American.
?3 Short iBtekaltaa
I Oi
23 t^tia Brookeleae
J   .-,!>
:s i.. Ride Smoksteaa
|   .,,')
S2L   RIBt  Lsamols
7 !0
ANVILS   Pa-fur Wrigtii. lOffea. to 139 R»a»,
:*.■. ..-.rr lm Bw ISo.
AXES Boya' Ai--*, tn r>» *i;«> to lis*«
<t<»i ; doithl* Ml s»«'*. oftto-aaated, 112 10 i»
US.IS d<»t .   Jointer* axes.  $32»W SOS .  *!t(gi«
bitted ox**, uohandNNt, 110.10 to lisoo d->x
BARS   Crow, 611.68 per W IS*
BELTING   !««<•««.    rawhide    aldea,   ts 40:
ettt, &*!«* at I? to per ioo feat; V nt 116*6
i»»*r too fttt; *"*."* »i W M r^t ISO fat!
BOLTS, carriage un full packafas).
*» ami smaller up to 6-in lonf, kMM 33 5 I
oft Slut; OV*f Itt 10 57*»s off llwl Note new
larger, alt length*, le*** 2'"" off lint Note new
h»t prii-pi in affect
P'U.TS, MACHINE \ snd smaller up to
tin   Ionic.   lew*   *>  <»ff   lit»i:   over   tin    leaa
JS  off   liat;   *%   IT'-i   and
lew*      li
iff
lift     Note new b*l prtOM In effect
BOLTS,  stiiVIv-I^m  *>* off Imt
BOLTS,   TIHK -Leaa   Ifl   add   JO**   on  all
boltn for broken paCk»Kaa
BOARD,   R*»v««-    Pot   l.OOO   to t».0OO  feet,
$M 00 per 1.0<Mi feet
BOILERS   RANGES   >■«■*. i*   IlLVB each.
BUILDING   I'AI'KH   Tiirtci,   tU  to 11.10
I • ■• roO, acoordlng to Quattty; plain 73c to
***••*• pnr r<>ll
BUTTS   Ptatad, Ml, sntiqae copper and
•!'<ll hrttm Rnlah 24  I 2><>  per pair 3*«    M|
vl'i  per pair 3T< ;   4U,  *   4H  Per pair *■***■<'
BUTTSWrtmtht steel No S04 !U,*2U..
U «j per (|<»» , t% \ SH 12 It per do* . I't *
IS-  I* M  per  do**
CARPOT KELT   i« oa., M H>„ W.M rofl
PATCHES, CtfPBOARO--OKI eoopar and
-lull bntM Oitlafc, fit J>o per hundred
CHAIN—CoU R eWtrh- welil. 1-16, 119 f>rt
per too n>»: 'i. |tS 10 per 100 iba. t>.\<>. till'*}
\trr  IM It.*
t'HAIN t.rHtfior. 6-10 t N, 13 00 enrli; \
x 14, M II Mtch
CHOPPERS WX1D-—UnlTtraal n-1 ft 122 !rt
t*»OI :   t'niveriMil   N*>    1.   117.00 <1"» .   l"n!ver««!
v-<  2. 133 M ,1,-,*    t'nlv*-r««l No   |, HO 10 dOI
iio'i't*.   No    M,   12 30   rt.h;   Home.   No    S3,
J2 "f> rnili
CHURN&  MAHUKt.   No   o.  HO.M  each!
?*0. 1,  til 50 rarh;  No   2. Ill SO rjuli;  No   |,
t*2'.', each
CLEVIS, MALLEABLE   Pat tt-  i'">V
CLOTHES LINti WIRE- t'er emit. M f ■
M fift dn* ;   J0O ft    ff, M
DRILLS Hit atoek M *> "ff no*t list,
''nrttamlth w-ln  r«.*i I oft aata Uti
EAVTROttOH—Per ioo r.-,<t. Slit |I.M;
!ft*»n |«S0:  12-ln   |T 96
PILE.! Orent Wwitern. r.'.^ off lift; Blaek
Diamond U% off lint
HARDEN ROJBE In 50 ft Itnftha, tm-
"ii'te.t. for Hpi-inR delivery, IIM Terminal
'i'v. 3-piv, i*.in |io.OOi S-ii> H2 W; -\-'n
IH.M; iph* ts.|„ Jut,00; S-ln lUkOOj %i"
H8.00; wire wound, i-ply V-» H"m1*
'■»-iii lit no; **,.|ii t2ooo: Corrugated, 8«pr/i
S in $noo, %.|n, $,if, oo, "»4.ln 117,00
coupuNos, attached—Hi h« a»- "*>t
OAME TRAPl Victor, per dox No 0,
♦110;  I, $2 to; Uv $4 20: 2. M.40; 3. 11.00
H * N dm No 0, M-.I0; l. 18.00; IHi
»*M; 2. HOW: -i, $h to
lump-No 1, par do*. 13 10. l'». H«W| li
»•!"; 3. |9 9fl,
KIKQES— Per dor. paint—Heavv strap. 4
In.   |LM;  :>Au    M-tO; «-in.  $3.0it;  S-in.  $4.75.
CORRHOATED TEE—Per <Sozen pair*—
4-in $3,60; 6-ta. |S.30; Ha 10.00; 12-in $i2.r»;t.
HORSE SHOES—Iron, Non. 0 to 1, $9 75
per lOS-lba.; iron, Now. 2 and larger, $9.50
per ioo ffm.
IRONS. RAD. COMMON Per 100 fbs _
6 t1>w   and ov,--r 20,-; .*?, 4, nn«l 5 tt»«. 23c
IRON, HANI) I'er lo0 !!>«--l>i-ln. $150;
l'^-in.   $4 50;   Mn.  $4 50.
IRON, BLACK SHEET—par lOOIba.— 16
auate IS.S0;  21 tunge 1-sio;   ts-2o guage,
$6 if; 2S guage Ifi.fiO.
IRON, GALVANIZED SHEET   Per 100 B)«
--2s K'tJige Ameriean or English $7.63; 24
guage  |725;   13*10 guage  $7.05.
KNOBS, RIM DOOU-Japanned, $3 75 p«r
dox
LAMP CHIMNEYS—A, per ra«e 8 doit..
$1 20 per doz ; A. per ilor. $1 40; It per ease
I dot   $1 40 j>,-t* dot; B, per dor.. $1.75.
LANTERNS .Short or lon-g globe, plain,
$14 i»i doa.; Japanned, 144.33 doa
LAWN MOWERS
EmpreM Ual Ma-*!*- 113,00; Ms E blade
H3.1t: llxl Mada in >. **> ** >"» blade $15.25;
M S S blade I1S.00,
STAR 6-ltt   wlst-fl,   3   knives,   each.    12-in
is 00; 14-ln 18.18*3 I3-ln 13.60; i knives. 12-
in M.W;  H-tn $50 25;  l«-ln |tl.00,
MATTm.'KS -IVk, M-30 doa; Cutter,
$■*> 10 dot.
NAli~->\ WtRR—Baiw 14.30 f.o.b. Vancouver; C*lL Ixiite $7.6© f 0 b. Vaneotivor
PICKS—Clay. f>-7 Iba, $s 40 don.
PINK TAP-1 gal 1! 10 each; % gal. ISc
aaeb; '» a»l. Mo each.
PLASTER (*V PARIS -II 00 per 100 t1*s*.
RIVETS AND BURRS Black carriage, 61b
buns r,7r; No. s assorted coppered rlyeta
No t, sic n> : aasorted copper riveta and
burrs 6tc; No. 8   aaaortod   coipparad  burrs
and burrs Sic p«-r tb. No S coppered buns
37e rKT tt* ; Coppered rivets 26c per lb.
Coppered hurr» Mo per tb.
ROPE BASlv--lhtti.«h tnanila. l»ase, 23'*sC.;
post' manila W*«i' UT1*!* Tt>,
RADIOLAS —NO, UL Mt-OO <*a,,,-: N*° 1,1A
$7too, Ko  N $:;2f> 00, subject to Kft iti.*.
n\»>t*' BOPPLIES—Tubea, W. D, U 14.00;
t.oud Hp.',ik.*r. No 1325. $35.00 each; Prandes
phones,  ILO0 each,  subject   to 25rr discount;
Batteries, No 7,66, $1 St each; No. 7«j7. $4.10
each,
SAWS, BOCK—Happy Medium. $1*8 50 dox.
Happy Idea  $1-8 50 ih>*;  DlaatOOS No. 6 $18 80
doa
SCREWS—Bright Hat head 874/10 off
Hsf bright round head. 85 10 off list: brass
flat head IT% i*1 Oft list; brass round haad
55  io off list
BCREW8.CAP—M off list.
SCREWS, SET   S6 "ff list.
BHOVELS AND 8PADES— Olda or Fox.
IU.3I per dOB, ***» Jones or Bulldog $13.78 per
SCOOPS—Mooae Ko  t. $1710 doz; No  3,
$!7 8:. dOS ; No. S. 613.50 doa; No. 10, $19.20
All above In black tltilsh.
SOLDER H x ,*-*' ,'a!'1* !*>ls' "c P*r 1,,;
less 50o par tb
SPIKES. PRESSED—PW 100 tt»8.—% Inch,
|g po   :, \,\ $^ 10; H-ln. $7.60,
i8T VPI.KS -Oalvanlsed fence. 16.36 per 100
lbs In full kegs; galvanised poultry netting.
$1050 par 100 iba In full kegs.
TACKS—Carpet, 700 off new list
WIRE, BABBED Per roll—4 point, onttte.
sn red, 14.13; I*POlnt hog. so rods $4.66,
mm PLAIN QALVANIZED-Per 100
n,   No  I   63.60; No   12. $8 80
Willi' V*1 a- a i,,,r 10° !,,s N,v 10* " '
No 11. 16 10; No 12. 13.10.
WRINGERS Ese, $31.00 -doa; Safety,,
$97oo doa.; Bicycle, isieo dos.; Ajax, $1.1.00
^WRENCHES,   PIPE   Trtmo,   less   45   per
,',.|it   off   list ,       ,. i„
WiRE t'l.oTii Oul of stock, vanoouver,
j-15 pe!* 100 -"i  1*1 : Oalvanlsed, out ol atoca,
V'^smNt!^y:M.NKSS\*lxwa,;Tpow^
«r $23 75 MCh; Seafoam Klectric, $78.00 each.
Sno^llr 117.36  each;   Patriot,  $19.00  esch.
VISKS.   WARREN   SOLID   BOX—35   lha
$10 00 each; 60 lbs. $12.00 each.
PAINTS ANO OILS.
Brandram- Henderson
_ „    . Per Gallon
B-H    English" ordinary colors  ..$4.25
B-H  "English" white         4 60
B-H Exterior Oil Shingle Stain—
Ordinary colors, in 4 gal. cans  $1 $r
Greens and Greys, in 4 gal. cans 3.W
B-H Anchor Shingle Stain—
Ordinary colors, in 4 gal cans ..,_ i.tt*
Grrens and Greys, in 4 gal. cans   1.61
PAINTS
Gsllon
ordinary colors, In 1 gal. cans $4.30
Martin   Senour porch  paint  4.30
Martin  Senour  Neutone   white  3.75
Martin Benour Neutone color   3.75
Martin  Senour floor paint   4,15
Sherwin   Williams,   white  5,75
Sherwin   Williams,   color 4.30
Sherwin   Williams,   porch     4.30
Sherwln Williams,  floor   4,]5
PI TT1— I'er   ioo   tbs.
Hulk,  barrels SOOtbs $8.60
Bulk,   irons  100  tbs    7.75
Hulk, irons 25 lbs    g.30
Tina, 5 ths; per lb    9U
Tins.   lib.   .„..  12*44
LINSEED Olty- Gallon.
Raw, 1 to 2 barrels  $1.55
Boiled. 1 to 2 barrels   1.58
LEAD.  WHITE IN OIL— Per 100 tt»s.
1,000 lbs.  to 1 ton   16.85
I-ess     17.35
Brandram's  Genuine    _     16.03
TPUPENTTNE— Gallon
1 barrel lots $ 1.70
VARNISHES— Gallon
Elastic, No. 1 | 8,30
Elastic.  No.  2     7.40
IV   Linoleum       680
IV   Marine   Spar      7.10
IV  Furniture    3.65
IV Pale Hard Oil     4.65
Less 33 1-3 per cent.
Laequeret  $6.15 less 40
Automotive Price List
ABSORBERS SHOCK—Float A Ford No.
I at $21.50.
ACCELERATORS FOOT—Wireless Ford
at $175 each.
ASSORTMENTS—Cotter pin 13c each; Cap
screws 3Sc each; Set screws 30c each; Machine screw 75e each; Machine nut 75c each.
BATTERIES—Hot Shot $2.96 each.
HOOTS—Tire 4-in. $1.25 each.
BUMPERS—Hoover Twinbar, $10.60 each.
CAPS—Radiator. $1.00 each.
CARBORUNCLUM— Valve grinding 6-o«. $4
doz.
CARRIES—Luggage, collapsible $2.25 each.
CEMENT—Radiator,  % tt> Wonder Worker $6.40 doz.
CHAINS—Weed 30x3*-. $6.35 each: 32x3'-i
$7.00 each; 31x4 $7.70 each; 33x4 $8.20 each;
31x4 $i» 00 each.    Less 30r'r.
RID O SKID—30x3V; $3.75 pair; 32x34
$;: !>f> pair: 34x3>B $4.10 pair; 30x4 $3.95 pair;
r,x4 $4.60 pair. Less $0*%.
CLEANERS, WINDSHIELD—Presto $1.75
each;  Rain-E-Day, $1.50 each.
COILS—Spark single $5.66 each; Spark
double $11.00 each.
DEFLECTORS—Wind adjustable $15.20
pair.
ENAMEL— % pt. .let Lac $6 00 doz.; 5-oz.
Wonder Worker $4.80 doz.; Martin Senour
Quick Diving, 1/64 13c each; 1/32 19c each;
t/16 3tc each; & 54k* each; % 96c each; %
$1.70 each.
HORNS—Electric $5.75 each.
JACKS—No, 200 $2.00 each; No. 4 $2 26
each; No, 41 $6.00 each.
LOCKS, MOTOMETER—No, 390 $265
each: No. 391 $3.00 each; No. 392 $7.50 each.
MIRRORS—Rear view $3.00 each.
OIL—Monamoblla, light $1.55 gal.; medium
$1 60 gal.; heavy $1.70 gal.
PATCHES PLOW OUT—Looktlte, No. J
6ta each*. No. 3 30c each; No. 5 75c each;
No   It  17<-  each
PLATES—Step   $1.00  each
PLUGS—Spark Champion 53c each; A. L.
Titan 63c each; Hel-FI, 5»c each. 36
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
PSYCHOLOGY OP THE RETAILER
A course in psychology would be of great advantage
to every merchant To have some eomprehetision ot*
the workings of the human mind, to know that the
mind under eertain conditions acts in a eertain way, is
of inestimable value to the trained salesman. This has
been recognised and advertising men, merchants am!
salesmen are turning to ihis study in increasing numbers. Below we give a few examples ol tin* part mentality plays in business.
Many merehanta tu* storekeepers have hutdneta
eards printed whieh are given to the clerks tu lu* in
turn distributed to the customers. These eards bear
tin- name of the clerk who uses them iu building up
a clientele who will ask for him by name when they
buy at his store. Customers are proverbially careless
about these cards and most of them are hist or mislaid.
To overcome this lost motion, a eertain clothing *tor«*
proprietor has devised a unique plan tha! Is said to
work to advantage.
He has the eards printed as usual with the name oi"
the clerk on the face of tin* card. In addition to this
however, he has a picture of tht* clerk printed in the
back of the card. So, if a customer does loae the eard,
the identity of the elerk is impressed on tin* mind by
reason of the faet that people retail faces twenty-three
times more vividly than thev remember names. The
ear has but one nerve eent re and the eye has twenty-
four.
In a recent test made hy the research director of H
well-known retail store, it was proved beyond a doubt
that people will go down two or more steps ?<» bay
more readily than thev will climb up out*, also that a
• i a
ramp or inclined plane will not net as a hindrance
nearly as mueh as a step. With these facts in mind,
.a certain large store built on a sloping street took out
the steps whieh led from one of their buildings to t»tIters and put in ramps. The result was that people just
naturally walked from one building to another when,
before, the short steps whieh connected the stores aet-
ed as a stop gap to shoppers.
For a long time it was the practice for tin- sales'
man of a wholesale grocery house to leave a self, addressed envelope at the plaees he ealled and where he
did not succeed in selling on the spot. The idea was
io induce the grocer to send in orders direct, Some*
how or another, not all the envelopes found their way
home, whieh caused the salesman to investigate ami do
MERCHANTS!
Don't " Write Them Off"
If your debtora move away or won't pay, don't drop
the accounts.    Let ua help you get your money in.
Agenta  throughout  Canada   and   U.   S.
NO COLLECTION—NO CHARGE
Credit Protectors Limited
314  PACIFIC  BLDG.,   -   ■   .   VANCOUVER,   B.  C.
Phone: Sey, 371
Our Motto: "Collections—or a Reason."
a little thinking. Then he had his return m ,|„ .
matle of an extra si/.e and of bright led paper wthat
first they could not be mislaid on account of thi ir si'!
and secondly, by reason of the bright nd eolor thev
were a vivid reminder to the retail grocer   hi eonJ
t|Uenee, almost HHi per eent. results w. iv obtained
Upon application from the It. ft Hoard of the R<
tail Merchants' Mao-elation, the l\ .s Departmeni ol
Agriculture has supplied a series of   Piv.-  Talk* ?,,
.Meat Dealers," by Lawnner A Adams AaaiaUnt Marketing Specialist, whieh we are reproducing for ihe
benefit of i ur butcher readers,
HOW DOBS YOUB STORE COMPARE WITH
OTHERS'*
Comparisons— Snppoac yon had lived alone on .
dessert island for as long as y«»u eonld remember, mil
you had never seen another human being Vou *»<tt»l<S
not know whether you were a giant or a pigmy. y<m
would not even know trbethe? you wetst normally fura;
ed Kven though you wets crippled, you might think
it natural, for knowing no other person theft would be
no one with whom to compare yourself. It u only l»v
comparison that you can barn the complete itori oi
yourself
Compare and Learn.— Com pari ion i*** a meal natural
instinct As a boy you compared youraelf with other*
The comparison culminated with wrestling, tret climb
ing and Rghta lo net tie the question of iwperioritj v
now compare your houae with the houae of you! neigh'
mom yon? automobile with the automobile of your
friends But do you compare your itore with the stores
of other meat oValers?
Comparative Figures—The beat way of comparing
one meat store with another in by comparing figures
rather than Comparing SUeh things as s'itv and np[>
anee,   Por example it has been determined lhal com
and ram stores operate on a margin of about r^*'!■'**
per eent    That is, for each dollar taken in. 20 rcoti»
to meet expenses and pay thep roprletor   Compan
your own figur-* for gross margin with this    C-ompal
laona Often point thr way to improvements    l! noVM
one elae 1ms found i more eeonomica] way ol wlHnf!
meat, perhapa you ean learn a lesson from him
Wage* Expense— Wages   contribute   aboul   \tn
thirds of the expense oi operating s meat s,,,!
to meet expenaea and pay the proprietor   '
least for wages   There appears to be a certain rffje-
iency whieh a stop* of given *i?e may reasonably nt tain
In one-man shops wages are computed Rl  '■' I*'!
eent,  of Hales.
in two-men shops, wages are computed at '-'. F
eent of sales.
In three.mt-u slumps, wages are computed 0\    ■ 1"'
eellt. of sab's.
Iu four-men shops and larger, wages are com]
at  Id per eent   of sale*.
It must be remembered that these figure* ">'
ages, and the most successful stores usually ha1
ll res below the average.
\ct'-
to 1925
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
The Legal Viewpoint
"In Full of All Claims"
37
Questions are often asked regarding the law in
connection with a cheek marked "in full of all
claims." Husiness nun seem to think there is a trick iu
ihe thing which indeed in some eases theft- is. the tlan-
•**r being that we may inadvertently accept a check
marked "ifl ftlM Of all claims" when it really isn't all
;hc debtor owes us.
The general law OU the subject ean be simply and
briefly stated.   If a creditor and a debtor agree that
ihi debtor owes lfc200, and the debtor, trying to put
something over. Sends a cheek for $150 marked "in
full of all claims," the creditor ean accept the check
;.ml collect the remaining foil without anv difficulty,
Hut suppose on the other hand the debtor and the
creditor have been arguing about what the debtor
owes. They haven't been able to agree. The creditor
nays it is $200, the debtor says it ia 1150, Finally the
debtor sends a cheek for $175 and with it s note sav-
lug: "The ineloaed is sent as full payment of my ac-
count." The check is also marked "in full of all
claims " If the creditor accepts this he is gone as to
anything none because the law says that the tender of
Kuch a sum in full, accepted by the creditor, constitutes what is called an '""accord and satisfaction."
that is, a settlement of the debt.
The law won't allow a debtor to slip anything
over his creditor if it can help it. and always insists
<-n full proof that the payment or settlement whieh the
debtor is insisting was in full, wasn't a trick, but a
real intended settlement «>u both sides,
In a recent cas*- a dealer in hides sold a batch to •*»
customer for about $."*■*,;ri(Mi Tiny were delivered and
the buyer paid .-f'J.INMi on account.    Later he sent  a
check for $2,542.27, and with it s letter stating, "we
herewith inclose your statement and check for the bal-
Slice due you on your recent shipment of calfskins.
The statement referred to was a statement of account
showing the quantity, quality and price of thc hides.
What happened was that the buyer in reselling the
hides allowed his customers some concessions he said
because of the poor quality of the skins which lie then
deducted from his own debt to the original seller. This
deduction amounted to very nearly $1,001),
The original seller accepted the check, but when
he demanded the balance the buyer said, "Why no;
we tendered you the cheek for (J2.542.27 in toll of all
flakis, ami your acceptance of that prevents you from
netting any more." There was consult 'ruble plausibility to this, for the check was certainly scut as a full
•'■d final payment,
The parties were unable to get together, and finally the seller Sited for the    balance.    Ill    the    lower
cuurt lie got ;i verdict for the entire balance, which the
Appeal Court affirmed. The court said the following
interesting things about the principle:
The ease is distinctly limited to the inquiry whether the acceptance of the defendant's check in connection with their letter and statement had the effect to
discharge hem from further liability in he transaction,
lu asserting the accord aud satisfaction, the effect of
whieh would be to relieve them from the payment of
the whob of the plaintiff's demand, the burden is on
the defendant to prove such a state of facts as clearly
produces that result. It is not sufficient that a creditor
receives Jess than the amount which he claims with
knowledge that the debtor denies all further liability.
When* one seeks to establish accord and satisfaction
payment should be tendered in full discharge of the demand and he accompanied by acts and declarations
amounting to express notice that the payment is conditional, and if accepted must be received in satisfaction of the claim. Our eases are all to the effect that
the debtor's intention to make the tender final and conclusive of the creditor's demand must be communicated by express notice or by thc equivalent thereof, and
also that the payment tendered is conditional on its acceptance according to that intention. There was no
request that the check be returned if not satisfactory,
or notice that the acceptance of it by the plaintiff
would be treated as a satisfaction of any claim which
he had growing out of the sale.
Here is the whole thing ill a nutshell: When a
debtor whose debt, according to the creditor, is $200,
sends $150 to settle in full, he must tender that in a
way that will sav substantially to the creditor.   "I'm
tf *M.      . tt
offering this $150 in one way only—as a full payment
of all I owe you: not on account. If you don't want
to accept it in that way. please send the check back."
Unless he does something like that, the creditor can collect the balance, even though he accepts the check.
The subject isn't free from difficulty, and there are
so many different phases of it that the average business man can't safely decide for himself whether he
ought to accept a cheek with a string to it. When a
cluck comes in that way. better get your attorney's
advice right away, before accepting it. If you don't
want to do that, send it back, if you aren't sure, provided the maker is financially responsible. If the maker
isn't financially responsible, and you are afraid to sent
the check back, you will have to trust to luck if you
don't want to consult a lawyer—that it will turn out
all right
CROSS-WORDS.
"What's a len<letter Word meaning a 'hold-up.'"
•Ill bite.   What Is it?"
"Suspenders!"
A BIBLE LESSON
Johnny: "J>»d Moses have dyspepsia like what you've got?"
Dad:'"How on earth do I know?   Why do you ask such
a questiontM ..   , n .
Johnny: "Well our Sunday school teacher says the l-otu
gave Moses two tablets." 38
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Mat
TRADE NOTES
Aldergrove—
J. Dobson £ Son (general store), reported sold out.
Brinhouse—
Mrs. M. Wilson reported sold out to BL C. Glenn (grocer),
Burne Lake—
G. s. Wood (drugs, etc.). reported moving to Prince George
Courtenay—
Graham ft Moncrieff (hardware). 0. t), Graham deceased.
Creaton—
Beattie  Oatway   Ltd.   (drugs),  change   in   ownership  re
ported; R. K. BeatUe deceased.
Cowichan Station—
H. I). Hadden Smith (butcher), reported discontinuing
Duncan—
Wm. Mitchell (dry goods, etc.). slock and fixtures taken
over by mortgagees and being sold to .satisfy claim.
Fernie—
Prentice & Johnson (grocery), commenced,
Goat Harbour—
Smaby Supph Co. commencing.
Kamloops—
Vernon Styles (confectioner)), commenced,
Kimberly—
E. H. McPhee  (electrical  supplies)    opened    branch at
Cranbrook.
Ladner—
C. H. Griffiths (grocer), reported sold out
Ladysmith—
Michael Charlier (confectionery) reported SOW interest to
Justine Charlier.
Nanaimo—
Kenedy Drug Co. Ltd. -J. It  llodiclns interest reported S€
quired by A. W. Kennedy.
New Weatminater—
F. Brenchley (meats, etc). reported Kold out.
Mrs. Haworth  (grocery and meats) re-jHirted aold out  to
J. P. Hobson. Jr.
Bryson & Sons—.1. S. Bryson deceased (hardware).
North Vancouver—
F. W. Patrick (confectionery and tobacco), deceased
A. L. Ronald (confectionery), bailiff's sale.
Port Haney--
Chas. Skeiiy (men's furnishings, etc.) reported commencing.
Port Moody—
E, Elkington (bakery), reported sold out to S. Beretford
Refuge Cove—
Donley Trading Co., reported sold out to R. Anderson.
Savona—
A. Styer (general store), reported sol out,
Shawninan Lake—
R'-cinaid H. Carter (general store) reported selling out lo
J. D. Fraser.
Vancouver—
Geo. II. Wooding (boots and shoes) reported sold out Ihe
Ith Avenue store.
R. H   Rover (drugs), reported sold out,
Grandvlew Jewellers,  dissolved  partnersulp.
Pigglv Wlggly (British Columbia) Ltd,-Opened branch at
5)77 Granville street.
siemon & Ellis (grocery)  reported dissolved,     W. It
Ellis continues.
Vancouver Drug Co.. Ltd., opening branch at corner Hastings and Abbott Streets,
Canadian Dry (ioods Co.—Changing name U> Novellv Clonk
& Suit Co.
Hastings Shoe Co., SUfgfered fire loss.
Geo, B. KerfOOt .men's furnishings) creditors meeting held
reported seeking extension.
Frank H. Miller (confectionery), reported sold out.
Ray view Pharmacy —Co-partnership registered.
L, D. Crimp (grocery and meats) reported .sold out to L
L. Mitchell.
peter Wright Est, .furniture, etc), reported told mn i
W  U. Orr. I0
Win.   Dempsey   (kioi er>)   reported   negotiating     ,;,. 0i
business.
Geo, Peten (grocery) reports sold oui.
(has   M   Sutherland   (grocer)). discontinued
W   l>   Kett  (bafcer>). sold out to H«tcllf$e & Ho,
Ladles' Dalnt) Wear -Dtsaolvad partnership.
HukIi c Lee (grocery) resorted sold out to uno* itutitis
W   H   Owen (-hardware) commencing
A. t* Wcberg (druggist) reported sold oat
Ja.» whtti (men* famiabtaga)i reported ntffered Rr« loai
Whyte'i Groc*i\ iM«r) M winte), eoounenciiii
Victoria-
Albert Btasle) (grocery) sold oat o» J it Bsmea
p. Btoddart Estate (Jewelry) auction gain ol stock isd
fixtures
B Kefi.d> (grocery)i bosfaeM dtscooUnued.
T  11. Kent (lltuebud Confectioner)) iuiUI out u* Mr* t* |.,,
Parker Shoe Store K**t     Stock and flUti?"***. |Q$d bj '•: !<
R. a. Brown A Co (crockery( bar-aware, etc.), dtoeoa
Uonede
Robert Spouse Incorporated as Robert Spouse & .*>-.-■
Ltd. ttifih dealer)
Victoria and Duncan-
Page g tisnsdeil (battery) diso)?ed    Page coatlnuiog ai
Du;tr;tn -f I l..»tiii|« if |u Vietorla,
V«mcn~~
Okanagan Grocer> Co   ■ Incorporated.
Yahk —
Peterson ft Mabaasea (staat and bakery) reported «h»-
lolved partfiershlp
POPULAR SUMMER WINDOW FEATURES
Sports w«ar of every description will be in iresi
demand from mm on throughout the summer   Teams
boating, fishing, cricket, swimming, golf, and all
form of outdoor sports are starting, or bave started
It space permits, it will be found profltabh *
vote an entire window to feature Sports wear appropriate for some particular lim oi sport, using s mil
able Setting  for the oeens'oll
\n a suggestion along the*** line* let na laai an*
of the moal popular game-*   tennie     l)re\s up am W
your wax figure* with a full outfit of tennis apparel
flannel  IrOUSeiH, white  Mick** and  shoes, outing MUn
and tie. straw hat and bhMMf ewtt, if you happen tn
stock all theae Items Poae tin figure in i natural
manner and place n tennis racquet in tin* band. Tae
introduction oi a tennis net and tennis bails will, ,,:
course, add inter, nt to the setting Different atyieaol
tennis apparel ean be taste fully arranged its ihe an
piny, and a neat show card will be appropriate
Manv other arrangements can be carried out
the various games and sporta, and *t diapla)
nature means something, conveys the right Idea -11"'
cannot fail to attract attention
To cover the il * of the aho*w window wltli i
tion grass is s simple and practical metnod ,i1 pm«a •
ing an appropriate setting tor any tine ol &p°i
vacation apparel,   Arrange an awning tot.'»backii
this sehelMe,
When bathing suits or beach wear nfc h*-mgs
Sand ean In- substituted for grass on the nOOl
setting as mentioned could be naed through!
summer with a few minor changes, Another P'
setting is a scenic background In place oi the •
This may be painted with a background reprcst
swimming pool, with tennis court, Rolf courx
depicted in thc distance, and could be used for
for almost any line of summer apparel
tii*'
•tics'
nine
ins;!
etc.
h ing [925
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
TIP8 FOR LIVE CLERKS
39
THE CUSTOMER S CHANGE
Think not of your, the store's, convenience, but of
ih.- customer's- 'Imt is the fundamental principle applying to change. The average customer is a docile
person, It is not difficult to "work ofT" on him a surplus of pennies, nickels, dimes, silver dollars, or other
coins. You may know when handing him change that,
were you in his place, you would be displeased Still.
also, you know that though effort you can rid thc rash
register nf about anything. Including foreign currency,
KUSpicioUS coins and so on,   Admitting this, it is good
policy for you to tlo ani
It is not, Do what a store will, annoying accumulations of certain coins and shortages of certain others.
ate certain to develop. During a rush period ut the
store, they may develop unexpectedly. In such cases,
lhe clerks may haw to offer the customer objectionable change. Always iu such eases, he should apologise,
. splainlng that the Btore is unavoidably tint of other
change,   A better process still is to ask the customer
if In- has any objections to the change you must give
hill..
Begin putting thia question to customers before
yon arc at the point where you have no option. Or
be prepared, if the customer replies alTirmatively. to
obtain the sort of change he wishes from a friendly
neighboring store.
One «>f the ways to fill in otherwise idle few minutes at the store is to trot around to the bank, and exchange caah register currency for a better assortment,
The safe, simpb way to count change is start with
ihe amount of purchase and add change up to the
nmount tendered.
If a customer haves change, call him back.  Every
uttie while, some absent-minded person will hand you
a bill or coin requiring change, and, his mind on other
things, walk away without waiting for change. Once
away from the store, he may remember his oversight,
ami anyway, you want him to have the amount due
him.
Watch carefully for bunco games. An old game,
worked for years, repeatedly makes its reappearance
here aud there. Slick changers work it and the whole
basis is to st) confuse the cashier by change requests
that the bunco artist gets much more than is coming to
him.
The minute a customer begins to make such requests concerning change that you are, even in the
slightest degree, confused, sit back and go mighty slow
one step at a time.
The customer may, or may not, be deliberately
striving to confuse you. Hither way, your view is to
go mighty slow knowing exactly what you are doing
ami that your calculations are correct.
King up each sale as made, wholly completing thc
transaction. Do not, on any account, ever leave money
*'on the marble,"
Every clerk should learn how to make change
rapidly. Learn to concentrate while doing it. Suspend the conversation, keep your mind on change and
nothing else. Do not make change so dapidly but that
you are sure of yourself all the way along.
SOUNDS REASONABLE
Teacher was telling her class little stories in natural history nnd she asked if anyone could tell her what a groundhog was.
Cp went a little hand.
■Well, Carl, you may tell us what a groundhog is."
"Sausage."
HIS ENTHUSIASM WAS WANING
The  worried countenance of  lhe bridegroom disturbed
the best man.   Tip-toeing up the aisle, he whispered:
"What'* the matter. Jock? Hae ye lost the ring?"
"No." blurted out the unhappy Jock, "the ring's safe eno\
But, mon. I've lost ma enthusiasm."
THE OPPORTUNIST
It has been said of Edmund Burke, that remarkable thinker and publicist of the
eighteenth century, that he was "wise ahead Ot his time." The phrase suggests
three headings under which all men of consequence may be classified: Those wise
ahead ot their limes; those wise behind Ihelr times; and those wise of their times.
These classifications apply In the world ol merchandising, in which we happen to be
Interested as well as to any other. Which is the more commendable and of which
class should we strive to be? There can be no dispute as to the relative undersir-
ablllt) Ol any man who Is wise behind his time. He is a lias-been and has seen his
best days. In the world of politics, of leading people into new ways of thinking,
Uteri* can be Hi He doubt ot the desirability of the man who is wise ahead of his time, in spite of his
occasional Impracticability. Hut in our world of merchandising, of. making money, we are certainly not
dealing with the past or the future but with the present and In it the man of men is he who is wise
ol htS OWn limes. He is never very far away from contemparaneous events, fads and practices since
the latter effect the public buying of merchandise far more than any influences of the past or future.
He Is the merchandiser who reads his newspaper with his eyes open to suggestion, who tnuu-s conversations with his ears open lo opportunities and Whocashea in on both here, now and today. He lives
neither In the past 01 the future bul very much and intensely in the present. He is the Opportunist of
It "day. 40
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
May
SMALL ERRORS THAT QUICKLY MOUNT
Investigations show that forty sales persons in a
certain establishment made 157 errors in addition in
charge checks in sixteen weeks, ranging from one cent
to $18,
The oldest salesman in the house matle errors which
amounted to $8,32. The average error amounted to
two cents a sale although in many cases the average
loss per sale has been estimated as high as seven cents.
Taking two tents as a conservative estimate a salesperson who makes eighty sales a day will in a year
make errors amounting to $500.86, The errors on
charge checks were the only ones of this sort of which
account was taken in this particular case, but undoubtedly equally numerous and important mistakes are
made on cash checks which can never be corrected.
If the salesperson gives the customer too much
change, that is a loss to the store; if he gives too little
the purchase] is irritated and may be a permanent loss
as a customer.
Additional causes Of losses because they  waste a
great deal ol time in the auditing department were
found to be failure to specify the date, illegible writing, omission of clerk or department number, entry of
wrong amount on the sales check or index, A wrong
address, for extmple, may cause exasperating delay be*
sides the cost of a second delivery and the time of
someone who must look up ami correct  the address.
In a period of sixteen weeks of observation a total of
1.11"» such errors occurred among forty salespeople,
These figures indicate the gnat importance of thc
dry goods and department store merchants teaching
their sales force what it means to the lino's chances
of making money by greater eare in making out the
sales slips.
DRAFT SETTLEMENTS MORE POPULAR
Compared with a few years ago there has been fi
great increase in the draft method of sett liny accounts,
It used to be that merchants considered the receipt of
a draft a reflection on their financial ability, It was
generally returned forthwith, with the curt statement
that the bills wen- "always paid by cheque."
But during recent years the value of settlement
by draft has been appreciated by mote and more dealers. It tells him when bills are din* and relieves him
of a great ileal of work in issuing cheques, So mueh
business is now being done on this basis that it is eon-
Plu» Sales Tax
50 Envelopes
100 Sheets
P.-inted   with   your  name
and  address.
Pottage Prepaid.
lUvcli  'Jrsnli'   Bond   *.,i|.i'*.
size  0x7   with   envoi   t"
II Bti li PoUr       lillfK      of
i>'*[»••*. each im,- nut in ,>x-
• ••••-•I   SO   letters      Printed
sit top centre *>t iheet nnd
mi tide of envelope
An Ideal Kift.    i'simIi with
order.
Nicholson Limited
Second  and Arbutus
VANCOUVER.   O.   C.
aidered about tin* easiest and   fairest   syxteu    ti
prompt aecptanee of a draft that is correct helns tin
Credit Of tha merchant with his bank, giving him i bei
tcr credit-rating generally, in addition to enabling him
to settle his bills in the simplest way,
AN ACT TO AMEND THE MEAT ANO CANNED FOODS
ACT.
Hi* Mnje«itv, by and with the tdvtct and eoassui ol   s.
Senate and HottSS S\ OOflUftOOi of Canada, tOAtll as folio*]
t. Section two ol   n»«- M**»t and Canned Pbodi Art; u
further amended by  addlnit the foMowi&g a* ptrtgrptJ] (tin
t hereof *
"(mi iC&fUlSg] food*' Include* food* tha* hav, n.,;; tm*
heated, cooked, preserved, eonden-j-cd. (•vaporsn-d. d-*
hvdrated   dried. Of  otherwise   pfOCeeStd or preptftd {or
food, atid ar*- placed la anj eloted can, bottle, package n
or container **
2   gfCtklO   thlrlef**, of  the  *«td   Art  a*  crafted  to   (rttlphtf
thirty one of the sta&itss of llll, i* amended by sddtng fa
following M iObtectton 121 !h»-r»-fi(
•*(l) aii eased frail or vagetabtei or ptodttets iteree! *■
any food or food product! which ma> he named by th* •>••-*
ernor In Coanctt, *■'*#*!< h«* offered for late oat) tn such i u
or other eotttatners a* it*r OoeefBOl Ifl t.'ounrll tiioy b)
taHon* pr»'**.'rlb«\ and »urh ran** Ol OffiBtahteri sou*' (*
the <|MalMv quan'ny or wrttht {sfe**,rrib»fd hy tb<
i :
I*-gill A'
Esptaoaiory Notes.
The fir*!   "trm-ndmer.f   li  intended  h> give  j  definill
ii-
ii.ui:
h*
Idered   rsi
what   -tu  the  j.iif-jm
ned Roodi
'it.,- teeond uiientimeai would |tw tntbority to th* Goi
eraoi Oeaeral to preeeribe the quaiu>. dlmeaslooi si I caw
octet ol cans or oPh««f eoataffiert In waicti ennntpd troll ■***
etitbieit »r other prodncts most he offered tot *Ab'   II a'*sl
providti for ihe oontrol of Use <ju*ih*< and wttgbi ol weft
prodttru offered in smh container*
whin- regntatleni have aet! passed eovntai the dimes
iloni 0( trartOOi Ijfpei Of run* and container*, the ht\ Ot I
pretent doe* not gi-.e tpedfic power io eonirol l«w aoiiiui)
or weighl ol prodaei la Uwes cans or eootntntri Toi* **s
led tc confn*foo and in nana cssus, to onfalrnesi rw pi *
posed amendment i* intended to remedj (Ms ittnatfoi
HARD TO FILL
A  Southern  colored   woman  rail*  to-r  Utile    bOJ      P"'
lertptton "
"Ulmt  ax  odd t ante.*   lomeoni  **U\  tO h<r      "Why «t<>
vim call hint lhat?"'
\h emits him dat, becaaas si !»*,»« inch hebd wors soti
him ailed"
No Need to Call
at Our Office
The easiest way to pay your telephone
bill is to mail a cheque.
MITISH COLUMIIA TELEPHONE COMPANY, LTO. THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
41
Mis. Heine's Marmalade
ORANGE
GKAPE FHITIT
PINE APPLE
2645—4th   Ave*,   West.
Phont: Bay. 133
Brunswick Brand
Sardines
CONNOR   BROS.  LIMITED
Black's  Harbour,  N.   B.
PALM OLIVE
SOAP
Representative:
Dean Armstrong. 1834 Larch St.
Vaneouvtr, B.C.
Phont: Bay. SOIL
DAYTON     SCALES
Meat    Sheers.    Meat   Choppers.
Coffee    Mills,    Cheese    Cutters,
Bread Sneers.
INTERNATIONAL   BUSINESS
MACHINE   CO.   LTD.
F. C. STRlCKER.
Local  Representative
668 Seymour St.   Phone.  Sey. 2S3
CANADA STARCH
CO. LTD.
E. H. ROWNTREE. Representative
207 Hastings West, Vancouver.
Phont:   Sty. 59
Milne & Mtddelton
Limited.
Wholesale  Millinery,  Notions  and
Smallwares.
347  Wattr  Strttt Vancouver.
Phont: Sty. 162
QUAKER JAMS
DOMINION CANNERS, B. 0.
Limited
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Phont: Sey. 8862
MONARCH   KNITTING   CO.
Limited.
Mens and womens hosiery knitted
outerwear and hand knitting yarns.
Represented in British Columbia
8. D. STEWART A CO. LTD.
318 Homer St. Vancouver, B. .C
Phone: Sey. 7525
ROCK ISLAND OVERALL CO.
Rock Island, Quebec
Representative:
R.  M. Foster, 3544—32nd Avt. VV.
Vaneouvtr, B.C.
Phone: Bay. 5030Y
Paper bags, wrapping paper,
for ail requirements.
COLUMBIA PAPER CO. LTD.
1038 Hamilton tt. Vancouver, B.C.
Phone: Sey. 8822
Kellogg's Corn Flakes
Local Agents
L. P. MASON & CO.
5<0 Hastings West.
Phone Sey. 2908
THE   BRITISH   AMERICAN   WAX
PAPER CO.  LTD.
CONSOLIDATED    SALES    BOOK
ANO  WAX  PAPER  CO.  LTD.
HIGH   GRADE   WAXED   PAPERS
AND COUNTER SALES BOOKS
Distr.butmg Agent for B. C.
0
Vtox Paper Specialist ^/
1050 HAMILTON STREET,
VANCOUVER.OC.
Phone: Sey. 3112
CANADIAN
TOLEDO SCALES
E. S. CHAMBERS, Agency Manager
424 Cordova St. W. Phont. Sey. 3911
Vaneouvtr.
Canadian Postum Cereal &., United
Htad Off let      - Toronto
Local Agents: —
McNEELYS LTD. Phont:
739 Hastings St. W. Sty. 9337
Phont:   High. 3889
IDEAL CONE COMPANY
Manufacturers of
ICE  CREAM  CONE8
Purest Madt     Cost Last
335 PRINCESS AVE.
Vaneouvtr.
Dt.ignRtf.
B. C.  Distributors of
Mtssrs. T. H. Proastr & Sons Ltd.
London.
Manufacturers   of   Prossers'   Celt-
brattd Lint of TENNIS and
CRICKET  Supplies.
Associated Agencies
LTO.
615 Pendtr St. W.        Vaneouvtr.
Phone: Sey. 131
*gS^^
I    BORDEN'S
EVAPORATED
MILK
Vancouver Office
332 Water Street
Phone: Sey. 6383
ll/Wi'«'
kiggga
STORE  EQUIPMENT
Scales, Slicers, Cutters and Cabinets—New, Rebuilt and Second Hand.
Cash or Terms.
THE  SCALE  SHOP  LTD,
Sty. 2881
365 Cordova St. W., facing Homer. 42
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILEB
M;
IV
PAPER BAGS
J. C. WILSON   LTD.
1068 Homer Street,       Vancouver.
Phone: Sey. 781
ROYAL CROWN
SOAPS
Manufactured  in Rritish Columbia
and guaranteed.
ROYAL CROWN  SOAPS  LTO.
GLASS   JARS
"Improved Gem" 6\ "Perfect Seal"
Local Representative: R. G. Moore.
Dominion Glass Company Lid.
510 Hastings St. West.    Sey. 5138
mciKU-ui
KNITTING CO. LTD.
J. J. MACKAY,
Agent.
Phone: Sey. 3081
804 Bower Bldg.
Vancouver.
HOSIERY
WATCHES,   CLOCKS,   JEWELRY
Western Wholesale Jewelers
Cordova and Cambie Sts.
Phone: Sey. 2765
PAPER   PRODUCTS
MANUFACTURERS
CONTINENTAL    PAPER
PRODUCTS  LTD.,  Ottawa.  Ont.
Local    Representatives:
Smith, Davidson & Wright
Davie and  Homer Sts.     Sey. 9565
McCORMICKS
JERSEY CREAM  SODAS
McCormick Mfg. Co. Ltd.
1150  Hamilton   Street,  Vancouver.
C. H. KENNEY, Manager.
Phone: Sey. 3412
SERVICE   TO   OUT   OF   TOWN
8UB8CRIBER8.
Tht British Columbia Retailer will
bt pltased to furnish subscribers
tht names and addrtsses of representatives or agents of eastern
manufacturers In Vaneouvtr. Wt
will alto advist where their com-
modlties c*n bt purchased.
Glass - Mirrors
BEVELLING      -        SILVERING
GLAZING
WESTERN GLASS CO. LTD.
Importers,   Manufacturers
Wholesale and Retail Dealers
158 CORDOVA   STREET   WEST
Vancouver.
Phone Sey. 8687
Hams & Bacon
Swift's "Premium"
SWIFT CANADIAN CO. LTD.
Vancouver.
PAPER
BAGS     AND     WRAPPING
Norfolk Paper Co. U4.
136 WATER STREET
Vancouver.
Phone:  Sey. ?S6S
Water Repellant Clothing
■eLAC/f
•BEAR
9*
R. A. SIME, BC. Diatributer
Camalata *Sma aa must
SOS M« re an tile Qldq , Vnncouvtr, 0   C.
tmtttmai €•*»*■ • taatmma
GALVANIZED IRONWEAR
THE THOS. DAVIDSON MFG. CO.
LTD.
123 Powell Street Vancouver.
Phone:  Sey, 4656
REGISTERED.
CHIPMAN-HOLTON       KNITTING
CO.  LTD.
E. H. Walsh o\ Co. Ltd., Agents.
318  Homer  Street.        Vancouver.
Phone:  Sey. 4656
Penmans Limited
Manufacturers of;
UNDERWEAR,   SHIRTS,
KNITTED    GOODS
Paris. Ontano
UNDERWEAR
ATLANTIC UNOERWEAR LTO.
E. H. Walsh 4 Co. Ltd., Agent*
318 Homer Street Vaneouvtr.
Phone. Sey, 858?
TIGER BRAND
UNDERWEAR
J.  J.  MACKAY    Age*?
804 Bower Btdg.    Phon*-. Sty. Ml
Ut GALT KNITTING CO. LTD
Gsll, Oatsrit
"CEETEE "
Pure Wool
UNDERCLOTHING
TURNBULLS of Colt
Locai Office    3'S Homer Street
Phone.  Sey. ?S25
T.  D.  STARK
F. W. STERLING
Telephone
Sey. 6195
STABK <* STERLING
MANUFACTURERS*   AGENTS
1043  Hamilton  Street.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Addressing
M»ill»t l.ltl*       Mu.iM'-*P,""ti
tai.lllllU I allata   tt'Uliiii. ' •'
Direct MmlCtMtpfliai"
iNrtiirii Rfflettatly
Wrigey Directories, lid.
IM IMtthia* W Stty  1*1* The ST. LAWRENCE LINE
PAPER BAGS
Made in Canada—from Canadian Papers
lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllfllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllHIIHIIIIIHHIHHH
"SIMPLEX"    -   Ligkt Manilla
"MAPLE LEAF"  Light Kraft
"LION"      -    -     Heavy Kraft
itiitttiiitittuiHtiuiiiuiiiiiiiitiiiiHiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiittuiitttmiittitiiitmiiimiitittiuumitiui
A Bag suitable for every kind of Merchandise—
Made by St. Lawrence Paper Bag Co.
SELLING AGENTS FOR B. C.
COLUMBIA PAPER CO. LIMITED
CARRY LARGE STOCKS IN VANCOUVER AND VICTORIA
The Brand of distinctive quality-Swift's "BROOKFIELD"
- Brand Creamery Butter—To keep your customers satisfied,
you must stock a product that will assure satisfaction in every
degree. A satisfied customer means repeat business, which
results in more volume and additional profit.
When buying your Butter requirements, buy "BROOKFIELD,"
made from pure sweet cream, under strictly sanitary conditions.
Parchment wrapped and sold in one pound cartons. Sure to
please.
SWIFT CANADIAN COMPANY LIMITED m

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