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The British Columbia Retailer Mar 2, 1926

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Array VOL. XVIII., No. 6
FEBRUARY, 1926
Eighteenth Year.
Tne British Columbia
In the final analysis all merchants agree that KRAFT BAGS
stand out pre-eminently as the most economical.
The extra cost over Manilla Bags is more than made up by
increased trade from satisfied customers.
STIPULATE "ATiAQ"
ALWAYS
Recognised everywhere for their dependability.
THE CONTINENTAL PAPER PRODUCTS
Limited
OTTAWA CANADA
Vsncouver   \
B&      SMITH, DAVIDSON & WRIGHT, LIMITED
Calgary       ) ________
44Using a 4Continental Bag9 is Bag Insurance"
Vancouver, B. C.
10c per copy; $100 per year. WE MANUFACTURE AND SELL THE FOLLOWING
PAPER  BAGS
"STANDARD"   "MANILLA"
"BUCKSKIN"    "LIGHT KRAFT"
===== "HEAVY KRAFT"
Paper Mills:
Lachute A St. Jerome,
Que.
Manufacturers since 1870
THEY ARE
Actually Stronger, Tougher
More Pliable, Most Economical
Most Satisfactory
Be Sure to Use the Best -They Cost No More
J. C. WILSON, LIMITED
Manufacturers of
PAPER BAOS.     WRAPPING, TISSUE AND TOILET PAPER*
for   Wholesalers snd Retailers.
1068 HOMER 8TREET, VANOOUVER. B 0
Phone: Beymonr 781
P
Ji*
hi!
Bll
The same price
at every store in
our British
Columbia
Territory.
5
BIG BARS
FOR
25c
PROTECT YOUR PROFITS BY
SELUNG A MAINTAINED PRICE
LAUNDRY SOAP
THE ROYAL CROWN SOAPS, LTD.
VANCOUVER. B. C. \m
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA KKTAILKR
3
^KVARDSSOjtQ
\W*t
%$$
The
Consumers' Choice
Your customers ask for CROWN BRAND CORN SYRUP
because they like its delicious flavor, and they know its rich
food value.
CROWN BRAND has been Canada s best CORN SYRUP for
over twenty-five years, and Corn Syrup is admitted today to be
one of the most wholesome and digeatible of sweets.
Feature and Display it Now for Bigger Sales
The CANADA STARCH CO. Limited
MONTREAL ■I \
1
THK BRITISH COLtJM&lA IWTAII-KR
I'Vlitiiai v
W,
s *2
.S^'VVi
' '..•***.+.
!*Kfc>*JftiQr
*Sa a Jy.»4>
AM****
l»-*"
COFFEE
Saves you time when customers ssk for "Fresh Roasted
Coffee." That's exactly what Nabob is. The vscuum tin
keeps the flsvor in-you sell it "fresh from the rosster.
Kelly Douglas & Co. Ltd.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Nabob
HHANU
ANtOU •• W
m ljw——
WILSON BROTHERS
Established 1890
Our Motto is "SERVICE"
Ws osnnot offer to sell you goods ehesper than any other firm is in s position to do. but we CAN
five actual facts to prove that it Is
ECONOMY
to deal frith as
SSfS-i0" WILSON BROTHERS, VICTORIA, B.C.
Wholesale Grocer*
aaammmmmmammamimmaaaMmmmmaa
■M
SHAMROCK RRAND
HAM, BACON, BUTTER, LARD, SAUSAOE, etc.
First Quality packing house product* put up by V \uirm 4 c0.,
nd wii\Zlll!<mr\*yy "! ,hc hl«,,Mt «ra,,<?- a,»">"« **&&
and without equal on thin market.
YOU CAN RECOMMEND SHAMROCK BRAND.
P. Burns & Company, Limited
VANOOUVBI
0ALOA1Y
EDMONTON I mid
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
■^^"^
ROGERS
J
GOLDEN SYRUP
"The End of s Perfect DsyM
flMade from finest flavoured cane sugar, u special grade of which is imported for the
purpose,
f Put up in all rises of packages to suit your customers' requirements,
fin packages designed to beautify your store.
2 lb. tins, 24 to a cass.
61b. tins, 12 to a ease.
101b. tins, 6 to a caaa.
201b. tins, 3 to a cass.
Perfect Seal jars, 12 to a eaaa.
Tbe British Columbia Sugar Refining Go. Ltd.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
um * 1*.
isil
iii
in
1 :
li
m: 6WT1SH COLUMBIA ROTAlLEK
rVhnisi'S
NORTHWESTERN MUTUAL FIRE ASSOCIATION
OPERATING RESULTS FOR YEAR 1»»
INCOME
P»miums Written, $6,937,607.38; ^/^^~ % iSK
Reinsurance Premiums Paid less Dividends Received thereon
o 4,015,61190
Net Premiums 113,63973
Interest and All other Income _  - --
$ 4,129.252 S3
Total Income
DISBURSEMENTS
Lowes Paid, $1,690,707.10; less Salvage * WNW»       lMimll
Less Reinsurance        ^ 1JD1.W4.W
Operating Expenses of All Kinds 019.226 Bl
Dividends Paid Policyholders i.»i»«*m
Total Disbarments »■*»"»  *"*■«
NET RESULTS.
Excess of Income Over Disbunmeents
Increase in Unearned Premium Reserve
Increase in Net Cash Surplus
Increase in Policyholders' 8urplus, held for payment of future losses
ASSETS
$63*96682
$ 301842 89
I 168.76137
$ 471609 24
$ 340,10151
1143-104 IS
Cash in Office and Banks
Securities ...
These securities consist ol t* B, Government, state snd nuniefpsi bosss oss otaef
securities of the bigbesi gride,
Premiums in Course of Collection ,*1*' UT.1I
All accounts over 90 days old are excluded    This tapreWOStt   **   normal   SSMMal   ot
live current account* equalling only about 36 day it" Xtosa \*tmilium
Miscellaneous Assets 3414123
t'oiiKifitliiK of Interest accrued on bond-*, amounti due from other ln»uranrr rotrnfMifilvs. rtr
Total Admitted Assets Belonging to Policyholders
From these, assetn wo have excluded all furniture and flvut*■» automobile* printing
plant, supplies, premium aceounl* over !♦•' day* old. nnd all other ****'* rvnt quickly
convertible into cash.
LIABILITIES
Reserve for Losses in Process of Adjustment
Reserve for Unearned Premiums
Thin renerve Ik the full unearned portion of the premium held fur th* psjrattal of
any future lotou-H on policies In force.
Reserves for Funds held under Reinsurance Agreements
Reserve to Cover All Other Liabilities
This ix a reserve to cover taxes accrued, dividends seemed on ispfr-ed noUetei and
all other current li;*l*ilm*~  other than loHHen.
Net Cash Surplus
This being the net amount left after providing for nil reservei »« abo\e
Total Liabilities
13,11874407
Policyholders' 8urplus for payment of Future Losses.   This all belonis to nolicv
holders and is merely held for their protection *   J
Consists of the nol cash lurplus, together with unearned premium reservn iu,,..!
on average experience, Ibis Ih four time, the -.mount needed „,, | Z* „ ! I
lion on all pollcIeK In force. '  ' s ,0 **WtS
8INCE ORGANIZATION.
Losses Paid to Policyholders
Dividends and Savings to Policyholders
I   156JK76
2.093,546.02
4188760
119.39640
706,719.39
$3,118,76407
$2,799,26641
$11,942,966.77
$ 9,037,666.63 1926
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Rltaillr #r^
V
With which ii incorporate** tht R  C. TRADR RRVIKW.
Published Monthly.
EIGHTEENTH YEAR
OINBRAL MBRCIIANDISB
OROCBRIR8. DRT0OOD8.
HARDWARE. POOTWBAR.
OPriCIAL OROAN OP B.C. BOARD
RETAIL IIBRCHANT8'
ASSOCIATION OF CANADA.
A MONTHLY JOURNAL published in the interest of Retsil Merehan
disiug snd the Development of Commerce in Western Csnsds.
SUBSCRIPTION RATE: One Dollar Per Year, payable In advance.
Advertises R»tes oa Application
Publishers: PROGRESS PUBLISHING CO. LTO.
Suits 10U Mtrchsnts' Exchangt Building
VANCOUVER. B. C.
Telephone 8*r Sill Cable Address—Shipping—All Codes
Editor. J 8 Morrison W. N. Code, Business Mansger
Entered st Ottawa ss Second cists matter
Th> following represent B. M. A. Branchtt
in tht Prayings ef British Columbia;—
Armstrong A. Smith, Sec.
Cranbrook C. J. Lewis, Sec.
Kamloops A. C. Taylor, Pres.
Kelowna   Andrew Fraser, Sec.
Lyllon B. Rebagllati, Sec.
Nanaimo N. Wright, Sec.
Nelson E. F. Olgot ,Sec.
New Westminster	
and Fraser Valley. D. Stuart, Sec.
Revelstoke W. A. Sturdy, Sec.
Vsncouver W. F. Ing, Sec.
Vol XVI11. No ti
FEBRUARY, 1926
Vancouver, B.C.
HOW CAN BUSINESS BE IMPROVED?
This question hnn been receiving the earnest consideration of t'oth tit*' Dominion Government nn<l some st
our provincial assemblies. Kvrrythinj? look-* favorable
at the pri-M-nt time to a decided betterment iu luisi-
ness conditions, Imt it is felt that if some special line
of action eould be laid out, that would receive the
support of business uon throughout Canada, it would
help materially in hastening the arrival of Increased
prosperity.
It haa been suggested thai a MadeinCamula
movemeni might help, and preparations arc now being made by thc Retail Merchants' Association of
Canada to launch a campaign nexl month with the
object of encouraging  the sale of Canadian  made
goods in Canadian stores, and -stabilising retail trade
by the introduction of S fair trading policy. An effort will also be wade towards tho extension of man*
ufaeturora' and wholesalers' markets in foreign coun«
I lies.
LcmKiig manufacturers of I lie Dominion have offered I heir widest cooperation to thc K. M. A. in
order tO effect better trading conditions in ('anada,
realising that the distributors oi their products must
be permitted to fund ion with an adequate profit,
nnd be encouraged by a pric- which will assure sueh
a condition.
The SUOCOBfl of *1. T. Crowder, president of the K.
M. A., who has toured Canada in order to determine
the attitude of the manufacturer, wholesaler, ami re
tailer. regarding a fair trading policy, augurs well for
a Dominion wide reformation in present day trading
conditions, Reports are daily reaching this office of the
very e.'irdial, and enthusiastic reception tendered Mr.
('rowder. not only from Eastern representatives of
lllOSC trade seel ions, which here in Vancouver WCT0 re
sponsible for the president's campaign, but from those
distributors whose lines admittedly are not altogether
adaptable to the Maintained Priee principle, comes
the desiiv to co-operate iu this policy.
There is everything to gain from a fair trading policy, and from the independent retailer's point of view,
it is surely his desire that a friendly manufacturer seta
the price at which his goods be sold, rather than leave
the sotting to price-cutting competitors
The results of 1925 crop will go far towards better conditions iu agricultural communities. Something is needed to assist the manufacturing industries. In many lines of business it is claimed that if
the Canadian industries devoted to these linoa received but 75 per cent, of the business that originates
in Canada, they would be kept, working at full capacity. As it is they are working much below capacity,
and the money spent by Canadian** for theae goods
goes to contribute to the prosperity of foreign manufacturers,
All classes of business are interdependent. The
retaibr depends OU the prosperity of the farmer and
working man. The working man depends on the
prosperity of the manufacturer for his job; the man*
t'acturcr depends on the prosperity of all consumers.
If one of the different branches of industry ia not
prosperous, the other branches cannot be prosperous.
When the manufacturer is not busy, his workmen are
out of employment They cannot make purchases at
the retail stores, and this works baek again to the
manufacturers by giving them a still smaller outlet
for their product,
Anything that the retail merchants can do to con*
tribute to the prosperity of Canadian manufacturers
is a direct contribution to their own prosperity. They
are providing employment  for their own customers. T
HE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILBB
IVI irua rv
«!■
! \i
I ■'    ! •
Greater Vancouver Grocers* Section, R.M.A.
Hold Annual Meeting
Urr. Gathering at Oman Am.*. ^"^^IrWa^W^*^ **^W
The annual meeting of the Greater Vancouver (Iro*
eel's' Section of the Retail Merehanta' Association, held
at the Ambassador Cafe. .January 27th last, proved tin-
most successful, from an attendance point of view, in
the history of thc section's activities. The large banqueting hall of the Ambassador Cafe was filled to cap
acity. demonstrating that, in spite of thc secretary a
lamentations over an inadequate membership, there >>
an amount of interest taken in these annual gatherings,
which, if continued throughout tin* year, would go far
towards solidifying thc inteligcnt efforts of the • \*
cutivc.
Hugh Morrow, chairman 192.5, outlined the busi
ness transacted throughout thc year ,dcaling with
many important mutters coming in for consideration
by the board, and showed the financial status ot thi-
section to be entirely satisfactory, with a comfortable
balance in the bank to commence the new year's work
The speaker of the evening was IV A Kim ar. sec
rotary of the Seattle Retail Grocers' Association, who
in his address dealt interestingly with thc question
of grocer co-operation, emphasizing the necessity of a
united front if the many and drastic changes, uov
taking place in the field of distribution are to be successfully dealt with.
In the secretary's report, which follows, there i*.
a somewhat pessimistic note regarding membership enrollment, Such a condition is ever present in Irade
associations, but the proven value of past accomplishments of the H. M. A. cannot lightly !>»■ ignored by
merchants who are alive to the steadily growing menace of chain combines, and problems concerning Horn
inion or Provincial legislature, which can lie so readily dealt with by the machinery firmly established by
the association during the past thirty years,
Secretary's Report.
Gentlemen,—-We beg to submit herewith our report (or the
year 1925. It will only be possible, in view of the other hn
port ant business on the agenda, to very briefly outlln * the
many activities which have been Undertaken by thin section
of the Greater Vancouver Branch.
The year Just past Is one which we believe will mark lbs
beginning of a new era for lhe grocery trade, nol onlj e(
Greater Vancouver, but lhe whole of Canada. Man) se
tlvltleB have been undertaken by this section -lurli g the
past year, the effect of which In many cases will be fail In
the future.
It may have been felt by those who perhaps hav.. noi
been privileged, or may we say sufficiently Interested to
lollow the work of this section as closely as they mlghl
have done, that a great deal more might have been socom
pushed, but it must be remembered lhai In building for ihs
lulure one musl lay a sure foundation or the work must bs
done over again In order to obtain the results which have
been set out to complete, but we are satisfied that those
who have taken an active interest In the work of this iec
Hon bullded belter than realised, and the rewards of their
efforts will be seen, we believe, before the end of the nn
sent  year. l1
The officers of Ihis section elected at your last annual
meeting were as follOWS-Preildent,  11.  Morrow    im
president, W. Allison; 2nd vice president. J   McKav    Ir*..
"rr-r.  v.  m\;   (now  A.   Vigors);   secretary,  R   frjl,£ 11,
(now R, Orr). wnuwiai
tould
!  ir'
Ureal credit ntu»t t>«* si»en lo these nwts, •* itll ss toe
oihei members ol ihe directorate. <<» U* ipioodid wrl
and !"><*! sepport vMcb ihej have sites to the sssoeJaUoi
In lit effort* to protect She intermit ot thi- inrntbrra a*  »
whole    Altogether -I Bwoltats wai* **«"*** during th* jrosi
both genera), special sad etwuiits, an sttrsfs ot ona or
two iioeMts* a month    We   regret   to  report   that   the  si
tendeoce   outside ol ltw esee-allvs and dtffcMMi RMNMinga
h»* not  bees  **  »f«*Ml *"*  "   *t>"w!,l *>***"  SSSU   pr-aru.ih
the whole hMd Ol S*t»lSlStfallOB o*  ihU  nectlon  ba. fallen
uImui ti>«*  should'rn «>f  ** doses or  i*n nt  thr  tnrmtw'r* of
thU  section,  and  it   I*  hoped  that   UttM  1*0  big   i#»ue«  tt
■ *.»ke and which »tp now facing It* gf««*«*ry   trad* in     an
i.I.i.   Ihftl   ISO  BB»eti8p   iM*   fOOtf   »M   U*   more   target*   a?
I ended    H»*n»-tnb«T   il  ii  MUK}   to  **Wtw  I  wlllln*  hor«e  lo
death, sad lbs «inw< C0SSS1 «h**n >our  reprtsssitsittsi  troi
ml   [hps   .!•:,   h**tnit   oo|*>»»-»!   ttpOl     SIM   !?>*»:   •OtSMNHN   **i»*
aVv  »i  share  of  the  r»*«{.«>r,nlMlit-j
rtg in*  yew  levsTel  HWlti  feasts  outs  b*i»i  to
whlrh the  WlWS and friend* of  th* ro«-«tib»r»  VtfS  IttiUr-d
md which were verj  *urcr«.*»rui   Tbt r*»eutar annual pi«-
tor w,»* held »t Nanaimo   Ju!>   iSlh.  and »•# again * w*?M
attended ihoroogbl)  enjoyed outing
The nn tub*r«hlp Ifl  tin* tec tion I* onr of  tlw- thing*  Ova?
is K^iti* your esscviive olttcwn * grr*t ,\.*\ nt r*i*,\r**it
!■*•*•<> man)   demand*  arr  nude  in   slur  «o*if»* ot  a   }**ot  tnt
thia  mcIIoq  to do  *"ttt<*hjr,g    Rvery   StOWOt  om«t   fr»iu«-
lhal   in   ordrr   10  ftrfompliih   rvr«   the   *impl«*»*>   thing   *h*'
the oa* oaisisadlag requirement la oMsts asj rsaaMii i»
naateftesl ureagth The •{-■-- i* >-. thing u, •• the j»f«*«
ideni has »U''tn\t puitoni oqt. tn*t ti**- beaeils of th« ■■ «*rit
ol Uil* a*•»-.;••■• i«»,Ion v ', n-eetlon eSSSOt b* rr«tf|r',r*4 iQ W/OSt
!"!* oatj If thi* wets H Sff *r*< *4ti*Sr«l that VS "•out*'
doubts sad tr»*b|e off mi-mlxrrchip wiuwmt om gr»*t *m»«nt
«if eflOU a* tt. i* tonoiir hrr.rftt* )rIHSpietlVf "f whrthrf
the) ittpporl lhe sssoetaitoft, n»<»*U*> or ananfiall>
Croni Uslittq Servi««.
One of  the big  prittl-^ac*«   oti-*«*anding during  tbe   famt
im* bettn tu.* tr<*ijj{ ratios strvtes   Urmiwr* who wggs t»»*
Ing «« murh .«* |T'> for tlo* »*^r*»lfr «tottw>. ot** now r^riion
litll -ocnlre free of rharsn. the onl) condition bring that the*
be*orn<*   tni-trlf-er«  «•'   'hi*   \-*•««•*■«'l»«i«in     If   SOtttlRg   e!*»-   mn*
offered «* an lodse«asiii, thi* alone tbouid vtirs&l llu
membership of evrr> r«*tai) groett doing * rr*dit u«i*»»**« la
tin (Her Vanrouver Pro|M>rl) and Intrlttgrntl) u«" I a *«,
Ure ol thi* kind, ro*titig the grocer nothing but bl« wtntsot
"hip f«e   will »ave him tnan»  time. o*er, th<p amount of hi«
due*
Several cstnpiitai bavs b*««n put on to ssdssioi Is i*«
crease the membtrshlp and tntrrr.t th** mtotwrt  itsoo n»
the work if the SSSOetsUOSi with «er> uncrrtaln r*»«ull* An
organiser tl now .«• work escjaaivei) rndr-aiorlng IS build
uj» ihe membership, but the rtetpUon which he recr,«pii in a
number of r«»e« |« «n>thfr« hut flainrtng lo the In'rlli-enci
ol tin sverags frocrr W. are hoping that aa a r«*»ult ot 'l'l«
meeting lo-olghi •* large nsmbei of srooars *»i»<» ar.- la
ths doubtful cIbm will SfSalttlj make up their nilnda to align
themselves with ihs other rsprasenlaUvg gr«r*»rt who repr«»
tern tiiu saetloa
iHtrliiK ihe >i>ar ti„. DtNStslOS and Provincial CtWVt ntlo- *
were held In Vancouvei ami thi* saettos undertook tht so
lertsining oi the deltgsloi  lo Uu  dominion  Ooavtnllor
traieh took ihe form Ot o moonlight nruralon 10 lloweii ll
saa Agsla the stiendaaee of ihs atrrase gtnrrt m ihi*
important . v.i.l whs nn>ihing tntt satUfacton, noiwiih
waaaing this however, Um venture «A. sdml i ven noi
cessfttl from | social lUodpoiat.
our iai.- chsirmsn, Mt Rsrlinssfl »«• dsHifitsd •-» si
"»sa in important oonftrgsos in ouaws during Uta ssrl)
I'"" •»' Uia year, repreaomlng the firorrra' Hrcilon ul l«   »*
njan$*r*^t**x**ima* • 1026
m
■THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RKTAILER
9
He   was  also  appointed  official   delegate
grocers at the Provincial Convention,
to  represent  the
Early Closing Bylaw.
One of (lie unfortunate things which wo have to Include
In this report ia the rescinding of the Kuty Closing By-law,
largely due lo the lark of support received by those who
were endeavoring to retain this bylaw, from the rank and
nie. It Is a concrete case that nothing can be accomplished unless the grocers present a united front on these Importanl questions as Ihey arise This Issue, however, is by-
no means settled, and we anticipate that you will be hearing a greal deal more about this in the very near future.
Vour Special Committee have put in a very active year
in your iBtersstS. A large number of meetings have been
held with vaiiOUS manufacturers lu order to have them put
their products on the market on lhe Fair Trading basis. A
number of commodities which were formerly on the unpro.
lee ted list are now being protected by the manufacturers of
C. R. McTaggart, elected chairman of Greater Vancouver
Grocers'  Section,  R.  M.  A.
these products This Is a subject which could well lake the
form of a special report .which we hope to rover at an early
date We merely wish to draw vour attention to the fact
thai a (treat deal has been accomplished In this direction
by your merchandising committee whlrh Is only tbe ground
work of much greater thlnss for the future.
Price Maintenance Campaign.
We have already given you an outline of the progress
which In being made In connection with the national cam
palsn for Price Maintenance I' is not within the province
of this report io elaborate on Ibis Issue, eirept (o say lhat
as a result of the work being done by this section, and Its
officers dtittt'K tlie past several years, this campaign was
hnallv started and sponsored lareelv by the grocers committee of Greater Vancouver and When I ho final credits are
passed for whatever may b** accomplished In this direction,
your eiecutlve officers and directors will be entitled to a
full measure of such credit It Is only as a result of their
continued   efforts   that   this   national   campaign   wns   made
possible.
When this campaign Is successfully concluded, as we
have already pointed out. price cutting on standard goods In
Canada will be a thing of the past, and (or this reason every
man who hopea to continue In his grocery business in
Greater Vancouver Is obligated to support the work of this
association by -enrolling as n member of this aection, We
believe lhal every member of this section ia entitled to feel
well satlsSod with the activities and results which have heen
accomplished In the face of overwhelming odds snd opposition We are aatisAcd. however, that much more could have
been accomplished had the necessary support heen forth-
coming.
II ia not In lhe province of this report to go Into Ihe
general work which this i>-socialIon haa accomplished during the psal year for Ihe retail trade na s whole. We hope
lo prepare a report along these lines to be given nt the an-
(t'oiitinticil on paue 14)
Ths Case of
QUICK TURNOVER
Against
LONG PROFITS
Tritd before Judge Results
EVIDENCE  is overwhelmingly  in  favor of
Quick Turnover on every point.
It ia proved conclusively thst his rapidity of
movement simply mskes rings around old Mr.
Long Profits. This recorded in figures which
represent compound interest on every dollar
invested.
Mr. Long profits basea hia claim on the fig*
ure margin yielded by each sale. But his case
is lost through evidence given by super-efficiency experti who prove infrequent sales nullify this ostensible  advantage.
Judge Results finally rules in favor of Quick
Turnover. Hia aumming up atatea that consumer demand and multiplied sales, combined
with record breaking volume, wins. Long Profits is ruled out aa having no caae.
This little fable is very applicable to present day merchandising conditions. Profitable
goods are thoae which move quickly, with many
turnovers per year instead of one.
This keeps every dollar working, and your
stock flexible. Vou don't get stuck on products which won't sell. Vou're not asked to
gamble on consumer acceptance.
That'a why the alert, progreaaive dealer
concentrates on popular brands. He agrees,
with sales efficiency experts, that it's the
msnufacturer's duty to popularise what he
makea. The local dealer does his duty when
he acts an agent.
•   ♦   •   •   •
Check up on your aoap business, and
you'll find thst three popular brands are csrry-
ing it.   Of thsse, Palmolive ia the leader.
It'a known, liked, always satisfactory. It
makea frienda and brings them back. It's high,
est grade soap aold at popular price. It's
the combination which wins popular favor.
Billboards, magatinea. and newapapers tall
everybody, everywhere, the story of Palm-
olive. Every advertisement reminds old users
how thoroughly they're sold on Palmolive and
createa a host of new. Thst's the secret of
the gigantic increase in demand.
Send for Free Window Display
Vou want to know about the big vsriety of
gorgeous display material which is supplied
free to every Palmolive dealer. Easily put
up, it tells the world that you cater to uaers
of sll populsr branda while beautifying and
attracting  attention  to  your windows.
Drop us s line snd we'll ssnd you s window display to fit your window.
Hie Palmolive Co. of Canada Ltd.
TORONTO, ONT.
mr.fi 10
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
IMiruarv
Chloride of Lime
New Style Waterproof Package
Supplied by all wholesale grocers
in British Columbls
Manufactured by
CANADA COLORS AND CHfMICALS LIMITCD
Toronto Winnipeg Vancouver
Agents:
STARK o\ STERLING
VANCOUVER, B. C.
FREE
WHY ABE RED ARROW CRACKERS SOLD
IN PRACTICALLY EVERY STORE PROM
ALASKA TO PORT WILLIAM, ONTARIO?
Because they are the host Crackers—-made in
Canada.
Because they are carefully packed ami make
an attractive window display or liiseiiit Depart ment.
Because they are exceptional value.
There is a Coupon iu every larjre package of
Red Arrow Crackers. (12) Coupons entitle
Hie consumer to a Box of Famous llydali Choc
olates PREE.
National Biscuit & Confection Co. Ltd.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Manufacturers of Biscuits, Chocolates snd
Confections.
HAiiP
KAKINi-
The confidence created In
the mind of your customers
of your entire line of gooda
is appreciably Increased
by your recommendation
of articles that have been
proven to be of the highest
quality.
MAGIC BAKING POWDER
CONTAINS NO ALUM
W   GIL LE TT   COMPANY
Traditional Leaders
EMPRESS
FINE. FULL-FLAVORED
JAMS and
MARMALADES
Local Products with a
National Reputation
EMPRESS MFG. CO.
VANCOUVER 1920
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
ll
GROCERIES & PROVISIONS
OROCERY MARKET REPORT.
Vancouver, Feb. 12, 1!»26.
January business iu retail grocery channels was
no better than expected* Mince thin month has the reputation of being; one of the poorest months of the
u-ar from a business volume standpoint. However,
January is past »nd tf* are now well into February
with favorable prospects ahead.
Furth-r reports nml comments from Eastern fan
ada on Mr Crowder's campaign for price malnten*
anee on standard trsde*msrked articles continue to
eome in. ami are altogether favorable to the ultimate
success of his mission Wholesalers' manufacturers
■md retailers havi- signified their willingness to cooperate in every way for the adoption of priee main-
teimnee The success of the H. M. A Dominion president's efforts rest almost entirely with the retailers
themselves Tiny must collectively ami whole heart-
• *lly Ikj behind the movement
The trade will evince deep regret at the death oi
one of Vancouver'* oldest grocers in the passing of F.
Filion. who operated a retail grocery store on Carrall
Street for a great number of yearn.     Announcement
is also made thai the late Mr Filion's son. Arthur, eon*
I em pistes dosing out the business, to enter other fields
of endeavor.
Sugar—Since our Isil issue this commodity has
advanced a further 10 CetllS per LOO lbs. making today's basis 16.46 per ewt The market remains steady
anil no mat* rial changes either upward* or downwards
are anticipated   The local refinery are Introducing
n new package namely a 2 lb carton of fancy brown.
packed .V> to the ease, whieh on the present basis wi
eost lhe retailer Hi 75 a ease    The new package will
be   welcomed b| retail gn t% eliminating as it does.
the disagreeable feature of weighing out yellow sugar
iu bulk.
Canned fish.—Blue Point oysters, which have been
ithorl for some weeks are again available at a new
lower price No 1 tins are quoted at 18.46 a dozen,
ami No 9 nt •««>. Cove oysters are also slightly
lower in price (Quotations on dry shrimps arc lower,
one well-known brand being quoted it JBi dozen for
No 1 sire, as against a former pri it 18.80 per doz.cn.
The best brands of Norwegian sardines arc be ng quoted al 111.50 per ease This price will probably be advanced in the near future owing to the higher Norwegian rate of exchange Salmon prices remain h.-J
With everv Indication that the better grades w. Ih
short before the new pack U ready In August a, u
herring is again available packed 48 1 ovals at $l.W
a down. ,
0eieals.-Oricntal white beans arc being quoted Si
new low levels with 4e a pound being the popular
price     This price will probably be still reduced lit
Mareh-April,  when new «lwkf«%'
Speckled itavos will doubtless also be reduced in pint.
Sago ami tapioca are now being quoted at attractive
prices. Package cereals remain unchanged. Japanese
wrinkled green peas have attained a priee at which
they are almost prohibitive. Wrinkled peas grown in
It. C. from Japanese seed are available at SVjjC, and
are meeting with popular favor.
Soap.—Soap prices are steady with a firm tone to
raw materials.
Jam.—This line is moving well. Wholesalers intim*
ati* that some varieties are becoming short, especially
strawberry. With Ihe lust consuming months ahead
retailers should see to it that they have ample stock on
hand. M irmaladc is selling readily at the new low
pricey established early in January. Oood quality
orange marmalade is selling to the retail trade at from
$5 to $l>25 per dosen 4 lb. tins.
Pickles.—Eastern pickle manufacturers, including
l.ibby ami l.yttlc announced new low priees in January, showing a reduction of 10 per cent to 15 per cent.
all round.
Tea.—The present market on lea would indicate
that prices for package and bulk lines being; quoted
here, are entirely too low, ami higher price levels may
be expected between now and August, when new crop
teas will be marketed.
The egg market has become fairly well stabilised
again. Little change has taken place in prices for the
past week or ten days. Supplies are substantial but not
such as to cause any glut.
Tt is expected that very soon stocks will be going
into cold storage. Dealers report that so far they have
not put any into refrigeration.
Poultry supplies are steady with juat enough to
keep all needs satisfied.   Priees are unchanged.
Kgg quotations on a wholesale basis February 18th
arc 83 cents for extras, 31 for firsts and 29 for pullet
extras.
Prices being quoted to the producer are 28 for extras. 25 for extras and 23 for pullet extras.
RETAILER8 VISIT LOCAL PACKING PLANT
A large number of retail grocers, owners of deli-
eatcsscn shops, and other interested in the distribution
of foodstuffs, visited the local plant of Pat Hums &
Co., Win on Wednesday. February 10th. Thc visit was
arranged under the auspices of the Grocers' Section
of the Greater Vancouver branch R. M. A., and from
every point of view, was successful. Revelations of
the scientific methods used in packing and preserving,
and of attaining the correct temperatures in the various departments was of real interest to the many mer
chants, who for years have been patrons of thia well-
established, popular firm. The visiting merchants
were regaled at a repast, which, with the exception of
broad and Kquid refreshment, represented the product
of the plant. 12
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
February
:f
y u
Lake of the Woods
Milling Company
LIMITED
Makenof
FIVE ROSES
• FLOUR •
The World's Best
Dsily Capacity 14,200 Sbls.
B.C. Offices and Wsrshousss:
1100 Riohsrds Street 1614 Store Street
VANOOUVER VICTORIA
CLARK'S
MAei ie Caaaea
Quick Turnover-More Profits
The Ofteaer )ff>S tStO ones root itocfc, lbs more* pfSfgll
\ou make Th«-r»'forr ileal intul* -»hieh tWOtO qulrkl?
CLARK'S l'r»|'«r«o fw«l* »r>* quirk t»ltvfl SeBSSSl Imm ftwe
to eOMl iio-. «r<* kr»o*n for ihelr psCftDtBCf V**t * bolt 0*tO
un\ ibej !>»•*»«• been coaitiiwsltj idwrtisvd »n»l ti*«*ir quasi**.
is nt ihe tilfhetl
Keep <\ full aMorUStRl nt CLARK 8 I'rrjMi•?«•«! t\**\* *u
ihe- differenl Una* oimi* *»nt» thr i»<ti»|wn**t>u> l larl • l**-t*
snd Beiw, &ntp* ind Kvtetnis Steel dart*! Petea °* sad
Lunch Tomniti Palled M«a*« Canadian DoH*w| Nnnrr, Ik**-?
itetl ind Ontoni I *nii»ri«tt- Santas* Bseghfrttl •oh T«»«»*»,*>
Sauri md i beeM Qoveraoi Insee  Pasasi Belief aa4 Lent
III 'Si*
Let  thf CLARK   K.tcM"*  *«ip  fn
to    Urgtr   Mitt    »t*n    moro    |>r«At|.
W.CLARK
. Montreil
EtUbluh-mtnU   -at    Mor.tri«t,    P. Q    St. aim..    P. Q    o***
M*tt**m. OWL
GLACIER SARDINES
are now Packed in New ThteeColot
Counter Display Cartons
of 25 tins each
The«e drm, meaty little sardine., in pure olive oil, are packed in atir.«u..
d»pl»y carton, of convenient As* for th, counter (9*7 tSS« «,^«)    "
a'SKKSSL PUt ** °n y°Ur —•   **< •«— k _
Packed by
CONNORS BR08, LIMITED
Black's Harbour, N, B.
BACKERS OF THE FAMOUS VUOSWKX MAND SARUNES tn* THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER 13
Credit and the Retail Grocer
By A. SPRICE
Subjecting Mr. F. D. Bristleys Artieh in the Last Issue of the 'Nabob Magazine" to a Critical Analysis.
the Writer Tskes Issue With Several of Hia Conclusions and Opinions.
Whstever Our Readers May Think of the Ideas Bspressed in Mr. Sprice's Article They Will Certainly Agree
That He Has Succeeded in 'Taking His Mind Off the Cheese and Shoe Polish/' As He So Tritely
Expresses It.
Tho ercdlt retail grocer is rapidly evolving toward a iMmiiiim in the eeoiiomic structure of society
antilogous lo the position of tho craftsman during the
beginning of thf epoch of machine production, l,e.. a
pjtallon of more of less accelerated extinction,
The era ft smaii, building r wagon making shoes,
clothes, etc , by hand from start to finish in bis home,
in nearly totally extinct Only a few sporadic sue.
vivors remain, forming a queer contrsst to today's
n,i ilio.u and ore lining* remainders of an ceom mie
i rs gone by
The individual credit 'giving retailer is doom .i to
lhe same fate, having to give way to a new system of
distribution     The  11 oiiMtiiit at but of today's  retailing
system into another on.*- is going to I"* more rapid
Irom now un than in tin* past
Tin* distributive system is legging behind tin- pro*
duetive system and must rapidly catch up to it 8ev«
• rnl new distributive systems are already in a visible
evolution Tin* coming into being uf huge departmeni nnd chain stores which in turn further merge
among themselves, and i.i-j but not bast lhe first child*
iik. timid attempts of co operation among individual
retailers; tin* slowest to adapt themselves to the new
requirements A third factor will appear In theahapc
of nationalisation of the distribution of certain com*
modules
In order to b, nhlc to prove my arguments, i will
••it. only a few of ihe ehsrseleristle advantages of
the department and -bain stoics i*i *•> > far a-* they have
a direct influence upon the eredii giving retailer
Notwithstanding Una names, <uigge*tiug indMdi.il
control or ownership of Ihese Urge departmeni and
chain storca, their actual control Is in the bands of
tin* banks In many of tin* caaea the liotitloua owners
(Flsvelle, Batons, etc * arc al tb<' same ilme directors
in one or several banks Tims ihey tire enabled to
command at th.ir service cheap money in large
amounts si any time, withou* .■■>,> ni I hose numerous
vexations and handicaps that oilier merchants, need*
iiitf financing, sre subject lo by th*i batiks
I, t|H .' of m policy Inattei • :,'-'*\ ly other mer*
.bunts Iik.* for Instance, lhe 'Vi. • Maintenance Pol-
icy." to whieh Ihe deparlmenl -stores would not ugreo,
or not agree "in toto," These powerful antagon*
ints find it easy to exert effective pressure through
their bank** againat any miinufaetttroi. or wholeaaler,
who WOtdd Insist on a IVi>*« Maintenance Policy.
Cheap, ready ami plentiful money enables the department and ehain storiM to buy In the cheapest market* In large quantities nnd with contracts for future
deliveries. Their -infoe-AMii-un fa-ili bs enable thorn
to exploit the financial difficulty of producers and to
purchase at their own dHa'«nl prices, Their financial
power further enables them to conduct sueh extensive
and follow-up advertising that it suffoeatet tho many
efforts of the individual retailer, who Irles In focus tho
buyers' attention on his offerings, ami the former
can purchase the best executive and mercantile talents.
They can undersell and out-rival at all times their
unorganized individual competitors, chiefly among
them, the credit giving retailer, whoso -working capital
i. loaned out to his customers without security (no
lieu possible on consumable merchflidise) without interest, without tangible protection by tho law and
without thanks, but with prej'tdte and even odium in
exchange for the accommodation given to his custom
ers.
Grocery credit is Indefensible, illogical, wasteful,
unjust to the cash customers and the unhealthy offspring of nn insane competition, No bank would dream
of transacting business under such absurd conditions,
and since the department and ehain stores nre control
led by the banks, there is no prospect that these department stores will ever be so foolish as to introduce
credit retailing for consumable mereh,'.ndHC.
Tbe successful growth and the rapid expansion of
the department nnd ehain stores is beyond doubt trace*
able in all its causes and phases directly to easy financing Just as the great commercial and industrial expansion and the enterprising spirit in the United States
is fostered and made possible by the elasticity of their
free banking system.
if the individual retail grocer intends to survive he
must change very much indeed his individualistic outlook ami attitude. He must conn1 to tl.e conviction
that a close eo-operation is an essentia! condition for
his survival, a co-operation so close as to be akin to
amalgamation, to the entire elimination of selling for
credit goods which are consumable (on which no lien
can be placed), They must have in their own pockets
the necessary funds to carry on and thereby be able
to participate in any co-operative undertaking.
The retail merchants of Canada, who combined,
have such large investments, such great economic importance and sueh large financing in tho aggregate, are
entitled to a bank of their own. A truly Merchants
Hank, owned and controlled by them, functioning for
their own good and interest and wholly separate from
the other bank octopus. As nt present a large amount
of their own funds are used by the banks to finance
their strongest competitors.
The farmers will soon have their own banks. They
create the wealth upon which true credit is bated.
They will use the credit created by themselves for their
own good. Labor aud the municipalities will follow
suit. There is vital necessity and there arc strong
arguments in favor of the retail merchants' demand for
their own bank.
In conclusion. I beg to make an appeal to my fellow
merchants to some times take their minds off the cheese
and shoe polish and to interest themselves in the study
of economies.    They will be nnicli more useful to them
selves and their class ami mueli wiser in politics. 14
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RKTAILER
February
■
GREATER VANCOUVER GROCERS  SECTION OF
THE R. M. A. HOLD ANNUAL MEETING
(Continued from page H)
uual meeting of Greater Vancouver Branch, which will be
held in the near future, and to which at this time we extend
our earnest Invitation to attend when the date i« announced,
Time does not permit us to extend thin report any further, but we want to seriously impress upon all those pre
sent to take this message to their fellow retailers when tin*
opportunity presents itself, ami that is that ever)'thins that
i* don* by this section, or any other section, or tin- MSOCla-
tion itself, is being watched and catalogued by the powers
that be. no matter where or what lhat power represent!*
If you wish to hold the respect. conSdence and prestige
of the section, it is vitally necessary that you. by your mem
bers represent a majority and the volume of buying power
We would be negligent in our duty if we did not take thin
opportunity to extend our sincere thanks and appreciation,
on behalf of myself and the members of the office staff, lor
the splendid assistance and co-operation we have received
from all members of the executive and directors, during the
year. They have worked well and loyall) and have b..:i a
pillar of strength to the office in our work, and the thanks
of the rank and file is certainly their due, for th.-lr interest
during their term of office.
The real worth of any organisation is measured, no! bj
the big men In It. but by the absence of peanut soule,j petti,
loggers. One objector, one man who is not ready to pul his
shoulder to the wheel with the rest of the Kans, can offset
the efforts of a dozen who are trying to do Something Mas
some task been assigned to your committee? Are >ou at
tending to It? Don't pass the buck to th.* chairman -he <an'i
do It all. thai is all the more reason why you should K»-t bus).
A brief talk by provincial president .lames .1  Hark
ness, along somewhat similar lines, demonstrated the
THE OBJECTIVE
The student telephone operator finds this in
her instruction book:
"An operator's principal responsibility is
that of giving a service whieb is entirely satisfactory to patrons, thereby helping to secure
and retain thc good-will of the public."
BRITISH COLUMBIA
TELEPHONE COMPANY
Fleischmann's Yeast Rushed to None
*t^ff\^ 	
Alaika, with dlphtharla lerum laetwiSSr *?. i '""'
other record trio, tin* ,„„!", £^J"» »*,;"»''•»•«";
Fleischmann's yeaat. Thin iunniv ft . * 1"1"1 uf
Mat to a local mark,, In theft JPififf *"" h"m
No more HtrikinK pr«H,f of the vail demand f„, R-I.i. i
mniin'H Yeast could be died than thi«       •..    ''"K<1"
and hla husky dog team have taKn tSlr?!?-?!.1?^
of the famous Fleltchmann Se -vie whieh   .V ,','!, "urt
Any product which ,* ae much in        ,      ',    " ,
tHlnly deserves consideration from the I 1     t •   *'
mann'a Veaet i. „ real health tJn B ElJJ i>uHd5r?
FLEISCHMANNS YEAST
The Fleischmann Company
SERVICE
profound knowledge oi ihe ipeoker in mnth-r* imt
taining to present day merchandising, nml he com
imnted upon the deplorable condition In!» which the
grocery trade was lapsing ihrotlfh l*CH ut tip!ndo'<
methods, ami cooperation
Dominion Rcpresentstive han I II  Kent sullvened
iln meeting with s t*>lk on nibjects which are «**.«-r of
■interesl to tin* retail trade, Ultima! in.; bn( Ihe groc
i rv buaineaa, in particular, had rrcfived I grvnt amount
of attention from the Dominion sitetttim for it wm
realixwl lhal the problems ronf'-inliitg the grocer np
peered t«> be more dlflfcull nt aolutiOQ lhan those ol
any other trade section Mr K*Htt pointed oil! that
the presenl esmpsign for pri**.- iFobtl • »«n v. would,
vs ben brought into effect, prove tb«* Mlvflkm of the
retail grocer
The following ar. th. offi'fjri elected t«» guide tb«
affairs ni Ihe nee tion during 1§5W K It HeTsgysH,
chairman; T II White and <" r (Isrke, vie**«-b«ir
man; \V Kowii iressorcr; \V a Kobjn* lion, sseft*
tary. snd Wslti r r' Ing seeretarj
A NEW COUNTER CHECK OOOK PRESS INSTALLED
TN ItfSlI iriplM <*»••■ -roun'rr rhr«k tww»|** pit*** tOWOUll}
purcbatod bj lb* \\ • «**» rn -..*,:.•. Hook . »m|.«m Limit***.! h*»
Im.'H rr.ri-tl and It o«»* running »' blab ••}w>*tl prthtiitf rutin.
lOt eh**rk bOOkJ In variou* « t* * *nd •'*.!« * In on* «»r two f«l
or» With "hi** pr-na addr«l |<g ilxeir tm»tl*>m r^uipwrnt thr
WOOletO Sal.K lUxtk r<»mt»**n'** h*.\r nn** nt tbt» b***l H-JUlpp****!
pUuila ln I autda Rt&flBfa tftrtnS nil kind* of rotintrr Mir*
book* nn.| maolfoldlni tntm*
4X
Customer Confidence
Th.
r«*t«
with I r«> put at inn
If   gftttlMl    *»*$■*    of    U;«     (»ro(rr««i«r
rctatlPT   ti   tsjtOtOfri   by    triune   tntMl*
Sent vour ru»n»mrr» »•»», t% bokrty
prodacit and their «..* n,w-s.,.- in ,,,u «m
i'<- itrvagiStiuNl
Sh-lh >   i»   r.rojtniif,}   u   Itx   tofSSMti
aaarrj in the Provtac* -and «x Pndaeta
liav«. | r« |.utA!|on for Nipertor qtialllj «m|
fit!.'     'I.M,I
Thll  r.|.ut»f|oi,.  |,»rkr,|  Im   (SlOOSlVS  •«!
^•"iflinK, mtsm «x mJsc mmbs *>**%■ io
roa «;.t in loseb vttS gbelly'i i.mU>
ana h*vi< iban* ksep vou »uf»pin*<<l with
"'" eempitti nags of ix prtMiuetn
**i*t*naita,t*t
SHELLY'S LIMITED
VANCOUVER
NEW WESTMINSTER
VICTORIA
NANAIMO i !•!?•;
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RKTAILER
15
GROCERY PRICES CURRENT
Tht following are pricea quoted for principal llnee of loading wholooolo flrmo.   Prleoa quoted are neceooarlly
aubjoct to market fluctuations.
B.  W. OILLSTT CO.  LTO.
Repel Veeet—
I'er caee
1 doe   pkga   In  cam
  no
Pur* Fleke Lye—
4 Soa   In rate 	
111
1   caaee
IU
ta rae**. t dot   In eae«
Um
Mafic Sealng Powder—
4 oe   4 due   	
(li
1 oe   4 doe
in
• Ot   4 doi
t is
11 oe  4 d»t
11 to
t% I eaee Mi
Magic SeOe. C**e Ne   '-
1  rttao  **"   IH.    pat t*.agr*i
LM
>  fa****   or   m*oe
t, to
•iC era-mate •» Soda—
ii! n>  kff*. pat a*-g
: it
*'.».»    Hi      l«i»Mrl«      JHN     iMItlrl
:i ts
Cewelte Sade (Ckenutetcd)— Per n>
It IS   eaniater  tit* n>a in »***> ISH
IH   Ibe    Iron   drum* IS*-*
Cream of Verier— l>r  *i- t
% lt> taper pkf* v« d«* In »••«♦» I ii
|| IS paper pkf*. (4 d >t In nwi S 40
H Ib  eane with tcraw cuter* it d<>t
in eoee)     IIO
I  IS   none arrow coiar-a  (I dot   in
eoaai IU
I Ib   OQtiare ro met era.  H d >t   In
coeei UH
14 ft»   woden '*•>•«•• '"
li Iti   wooden p*ile II
iee it.  nnod k*t* MH
Me lb   ttOOd berrele J*
KSLLV. OOUOLAS A CO
NeSeS Rreducte
Allspice   Ko   I. line dot
Hakliiff Powder, 41 It ot. tStO
Hahlaf Powder.  II IH». dot
Itokiiw l*o«rdtr. 4 I*, doi
(taking Hode. t* le. «••••
Raking Hoda. 14 He. dot
Moras.  H*. doe
llb'k   Pepper,   "ne.   dOS
Celery   *alt. glee*, dot
Nabob Coffee,  email Una.  earh
Coffee,   la Ib
t'oeianl   I'owder,   d»t
(Juick   Tapioca,   dot
Chocolate   I'ud.lln*.   dot
null hoarder, email, dot
Cinnamon, t ot. tine, doi
Cayenne Pepper. I Una. dot
Clovee. email, doi	
Carry Powder, i os ai***. dot
Cream of Terlar, I.
Croani of Tartar.  •»•   line
Cream of Tartar Ha.
Ginger,   amntl.   <lot
Rstraiie. IH OS. dot.
I'tttncla.  | nt   >l..i
lUtiuct*.   4 oa   dot
K-jIract*.   I  ot.   dot
Hatred*   11 ot   •!<>■
Mara,   amall,  dot
LTO
I 00
J 45
1)0
n to
I SO
,|0
74
1II
1 (-0
11
*J
90
»0
.11)
1 •«
i :o
i tt*
1 40
1.00
ill
III
1 so
1 30
is:.
sts
■:'
%M
1750
lib
Nutmeg, amall, do« .... ill
I'nprikn.  miniII.  dot  1.11
Paltry Splae, 3 tlna, dot, ,  l.io
Poultry Dreeaing, s«k»-. Savory, Thyme,
Tumeric,   nne,   dox. . ..   115
Pickling Spice, dot   No. I li
Marjoram.  Mint.   Caraley    Ill
White Popper, Una, dot,    .              .   l.io
C'aator oil. J ot  dot  Ml
Caator on. 4 ot. dot   -110
Kpeom Kalta. %», dot „   .••
Fruit   Color*.   I  ot   dot  1.71
Iclnga (Chocolate, Hot*.  Pink,  Lemon
Vanila, While, Almond, orange) dot.   1.15
Jelly   Powder,   dot 10
lemonade Powder, dot    — IS*
Muatard.   la,  dot HO
Muetard.   H«.   dot      4,10
Muatard.   ***   dot  140
Muatard, : s do* bi*
Sulphur.   «%«.   d»t  W
Tea.  Ureen label.   He, I'er n» Tl
Tea,   tireen   l«abel.   U.   per tb.   . ••
3  Ih   tin«. >**
ie, n>. paokasai    •-   '*
& tti   |>a< ka«ee      *5
Pea,  '•>* Lute, Afternoon, 1 lb. . •   M
T.-.» de Luxe, Aftarnoon He pot n>        .17
Tee de Luxe, ■'*■** i»«-»  Ib ,***
Vinegar, <t<>« *•**
P   BURNS 4 CO.  LTO.
Shamrock  Product*.
\>mhli.«  rolled ehouldei*.   per l»> .St
llacon, Shamrock, tt j>er Ib  II
ltake<!  Main    Willi die**ing. per lb, 12
Ooameiy  Butter,  Shamrock, carton*   tt
CboetO,   I'atia.ltan.   l&TfO,   uer   Iti. 56
Cheeto, Canadian, iwln, \**'x lb. •'•H
Compound, Carnation, N'<»  I. li*ena»a 10.00
Compound,   Carnation.   NO.   3.   20 «a*e* 10 Oi
1.» >m>hI Ham. Shamrock, \***x li» *ll
Dominion n«me, it«tl iiw 30
Dominion Daeon, 1*10 iba. i>«r lb to
Dominion Bacon, lo-it n»e \m it* w
Dominion ihouldera, bonad »nd roiled st
Dtipplnf, beef.  t-lb.  brlcke    II
Hume.   Shamrock,   per   Hi •     32
iinme  bonod and roUed, pet lb II
Head t'lieeee, 51b lln* each -    55
Jellied tonfue. per tin   IW
Lard, Ko  '»  11 n> <•«•*«' ,*2&
Lard, Ko  1, :»» lo etaa , '2 •10
1 a 1.1. carlon, IS Iba ••Ml
Ijm.i   Ko  i. earlon* W Iba. 21H
Mincemeat,  kite. 1Mb,, net.  per lb   ish
Me.it i^>*f. por n> W
Pork plea, per dot        **
Port, rotat lei* with dreeelna. pot  Ib.    t)
Imokad Bah, klppara, 20*. per lb ion
siv..*»e.i neh. kinporad atlmon, io*
and !0*. per tt> •*   •••
ftmok.-d »'..d   S(>* |»er lb m   ill
selected fowl, por lb rt
Selected Chicken, per Ib 31
THS ROYAL CROWN SOARS. LTO.
Vancouver   Rrice   Llet-S.O.i.   Vancouver,
er New Weetmlnater.
Terme Nett M Deya.
"Ape*" 8o*p Flekee. 14 1 Ib pkte. boi 410
•Ape*''  SotP KlMke*.   11  lib.  pkl*.  box f.40
A Im Fimicnlee l^etlle. Ijox of II   410
Itlue  Mottled, box of SO    • 60
crown Oatmaal -t **;' ,M>x of H4 ioo
Klondyke (wrapped) box of 25  LIS
Klondyke (unwrapped) box of IS  1.10
Kiero Glycerine, box of 144 i.ts
Linen (unwrapped) box of 100  4.00
Ij'iuid Ammonia, 2 do*, qt*. box of 24 4.10
Liquid Blue, 2 do*, qt*. box of 24   4.10
Mechanic*  Pine  Tur.   box of  100 „ 5.10
Mechanic'*, Pine Tar. liox of 60   2.10
olive Caatlle. cake*, box of 200  4.75
l*rlmro»e (wrapped) box of 25   4.75
Itoyul Crown Lye. box of 41  3 35
Pendray'a Powdered Ammonin, Ijox 24    3.I'i
Special pricea on i. 10, 25 and 100
boxea.
Pendray'a Water Ol***,  Sgg  Rreeerver—
Caaea, 24 tin* per caae  4.10
Royal Laundry Flake* aa«;. in bbl*.   it**.
(Special price on contract)
Royal Crown Softp la 144*   540
Royal Clown  I'owder. b..x 24 only  f.OJ
Royal Crown I'owder, lib. box of SO  4.25
Royal Crown Cleanlier,    41 sifter tins   3.10
Itoyal Crown Powdered Ammonin. 1 Ib.   3.15
White  Wonder,  box of 100   S.SO
New  White Swan Soup.  100   5.10
While Swan Naptha, box of 100   5.00
White Swan Wu»hinc I'owder, box of 24 5.0ft
THE CANADA STARCH CO. LTD.
Laundry Starcheo—•
Canada  Uundry Starch.  40-lb.  box .01
Canada White Glo»s. 1-lb  pkf* 0114
Acme While «;io*». 1-lb pkf*     114
No   I  White.  100-lb. kea-s  IH
Kdwardebur-i Silver Oktaa, 1-lb pkga
to-lb — 1114
Kdwardeburg   Silver   Gloss   l/l*
fancy  tin  canisters,   41-lbs *   .Uta
hklwardsbuiv  Silver  Gloea.   ISO-tb
keaa  „., —  .1014
Celluloid Btarch.  (boxea of 41-pkaa
per   case) ' 4.11
Cuiinery Storcnea—
Beneon's Celebrated Prepared Corn.
40-lb.  boxes,  per Ib ,    ,11
Canada Corn Staroh 40-lb boxea par
Ib    IH
Challenge Corn Starch 40-lb boxes
per  Ib. IH
Caeco Potato Flour 40-lb boxea, Ib   .11
Maiola Oil—
Maiola Oil. 1*  T.H
•• ••   la   _ „ -... T.H
»   4s     ..» 11.11
••   |S   lt.ll
Corn Syrups—
Crown 2a. 24 to cnae « •!••*•
5*. 13 to caae  - M#
10* « lo ca*e  I'TO
20e. 3 to cane Mi
Lily 2*. 24 to case US
tm, 12 to ca»e  - - <*Jj
10*. I to cn»e  **W
Karo. 3* St to c**e  *•***
5*. IS to ca*e  - 4«W
10*. « to o**e  LTO ''    ■'■'   M.
16
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA KKTAILKR
|'\ lilllHl \
A Quality Product!
ronizeIJ
***** *»*m Ntatim ^gOsSm
GENUINE
Whole Wheat
FLOUR
A FAIR FIXED PROFIT
FOR LARGE AND SMALL
IS THK POLICY OF
The Dr. Middleton's food Products
Company Limited
Vancouver, B, C.
3
Peter Rsbbit Peanut Butter
Costs No More But Sells Fatter
THE TOY PAIL DELIGHTS THE CHILDREN
DISPLAY A CASE,   IT WILL SELL ITSELF.
Kelly Confection Co. Ud.
1100 Mainland Street
VANCOUVER, B. C.
HELP YOURSELF TO HEALTH
Eyes That Betray
arc IfOltHoltlftf «••»•**     Y,s«* with cirri**
un.!/ r them «",p» ihat are iBStffiSSI
iiii   ilkA«   rf*»«al   *?h«*   driattatlnf
effect**   ol   mankind »   dtrr   *n*m*j    Oi
ttlpallOB
ron
V«m   .Mr   ilrocer   r*n rerali the ttWom
nt   ha|>|»tl , .■ ■-.   Into   (Im>«i*   brtraiinf   *"$*■*
Vou  SSOl   'hai   KtUOSS'l   ALLIUMS   I*
'he   sut**i   *tt,|   n»«***   {.l.-aMnt   vtj   ui
jH-rmatien! reNe*
sun ran make bovine** • bi •ellinf
Al.LlillAN for ir, mi <t**»in« >„n arhiri*
a doSbil OttotA >nu iti»jtire conSd'nre
QMOd u|>4)r« a p**ttss*WO\ »erik* and fOS
indQCO protporll) b> |»u*hm« « nation
ally adrorttOOd food i*-rmltjr» of r*--,n\r
l*"'|'tllartt)
Ht»lp other* Iii health and >our*ell to
proflll hv «'.,. knit and rerummendina
KPllOSS'l ALLIUMS the onl) *Mr* re
ll«f Thi* tnttft ad«rrti*ing r*ni|>aifn.
Jum mm Mariinit. *m hole ron cr-*th
«• As11 is HOW
Mad? m London. Canada. «n<| told by all
dtaiara
0*99*
9 ^     ALL-BRAN
Tlit original ALL-BRAN—ready Us a*sl
AlW   M.nof.cturar.  of   Kt||ifi,t  Cofn   r|#||M
Kromblag, Bran Flak*, and PIP. 102(1
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
DOMINION PRESIDENT 8 TOUR IN EASTERN
CANADA
Price Maintenance Discussed st Cornwall snd
Kingston.
An aceounl of tin* enthusiastic reception given
Dominion President J, T Crowder, who is covering
tin* Busiern Provinces in the interest of Price Maintenance, hss been received st the provincial office R
M  A.
b'ollowtnfl a well-attended banquet held in Ottawa,
an Interview was arranged between Mr. Crowder and
.Mr 0'liars, Deputy Minister of Trsde and Commerce,
Dr King, Minister of Public Works; Mr, McGregor,
Registrar of the Combines Aet, and II. II Stevens, ur
ber for Vaucouvor Centre.
Accompanied by .1 C Campbell, secretary of the
Kastern District, R M A . Mr ('rowder and a number
nf grocer members of that section ntt ended a dinner
at Cornwall*, Ont,, on the following day. where th**
Dominion president discussed fully tin- question of
Price Maintenance Mr Crowder's address resulted
in an »inamiii..iis resolution supporting tin* plan, r .1
Campbell, Cornwall, was the chairman of the meeting,
where nn opportunity was taken to launch sn extcn*
rive campaign for membership
Proceeding to Kingston on January 211th, a ban*
quot was held at which \v V Mills, president of that
branch, sated an chairman. An «we. lirm programme
wss provided after tin- banquet, and .Mr .Mills dis
cussed tlo- activities <*f the It M A . ami urged all
Kingston merchants to affilisto Mr Crowder let out
clearly nnd concisely the resson for adopting tin' principle of maintained price on standard trade-marked
articles Regrets were forwarded from Mr McCien
agh&n, M P. ami Mr (loulet, MP, president and
vice-president of the Kastern Ontario ami Ottawa district of the H M A, who were detained from being
present owim? t.. Important sessions in the Dominion
parliament
A number of prominent wholesaler! were in at-
tendance nt thin meeting, and the applause which followed .Mr Crowder's addre.vs. clearly demonstrated
the appreciation with which his remarks were received,
Mayor AgllCW, when called upon, gavo his full
sympathy lo Dominion President Crowder's plan of
Priee   .Maintenance   nml   stressed   the   necessity   for
Kingston merchstui organising to the fullest extent, in
order  that   lhe  City  Council   may  deal   Intelligently
with the merehants' grievances,
A  not  altogether unusual cntertainno-nt   iu these,
parts, a visit to Kingston Penitentiary, was undertaken
toi the following day by Messrs Crowder.Douglns.Mills,
ami .1 C Campbell The warden impressed lhe visitor* with the remark that although they were mil un
like in appearand- to other visitors whose stay at the
institution, wan iu the majority of eases, extended
over 11 long period, he fell assured thai they would
have  no difficulty  in  regaining I heir  freedom, ami
after signing thc register, without going through the
formality of tinner print impressions. Mr Crowder
ami the other members of the party wire permitted
tti leave lo catch their respective trains.
For the
Customer:
Quality and Satisfaction
Because of their steadily main*
tained superiority Royal *3aking
Powder and Dr. Price's Cream
Baking Powder have heen stand**
for over a half century* Both are
made in Canada*
For the
Dealer:
Prompt Sate and Fair Profit
Because of its Reputation
ROYAL
STANDARD
FLOUR
Just Keeps on Selling
Milled in Vsncouvsr by
Vancouver Milling and Grain Co.
LIMITED
Head Office and Mills:    VANCOUVER, B. 0. 18
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Figuring the Annual Income Tax
l*Vbi ti.tr \
By A M BURROUGHS
ear when the
If there is anv time during the entire year when the
retail merchant wishes that be had somehow maintain-
ed a definite set of store records, it's at income tax
""Vhc Government wants a lot of figurca that are
hard to dig up all at once. Of course, the merehanl
who has. throughout the year, kept a set ol accurate
records   and   kept 	
them up to date, ean
supply the figures in
half nn hour. But
the merchant who
has paid little attention to his bookkeeping may spend a
good many days and
nights figuring out
his tax return, and
then not get it accurate.
A return that isn't
accurate cheats
either the merchant
or the government.
And neither is very
good business, because there is always
the possibility that
some day an internal
revenue officer will
pop in to verify thc
report and go over
the merchant 's
books. When that
happens — well, all
we can do is extend
that particular merchant our sympathy.
First of all, on thc
income tax blank,
t h e government
wants to know thc
"total income from
business." It wouldn't be so difficult to
approximate that fig.
ure. The merchant
can say to himself.
"Well, let's see, I
made about $5,000
last year." But the
government isn't sat-
ised with that. The
government wants
to know right down to thc penny.
And then as the merchant proceeds, he find* ih,,t
I   s necessary to itemize the "net income"      ..'a
busineaa in order to show just how the figur  Z J"
rived at    There arc blanks to fill |„ slL ng   0t 1
aales for the year, coat of goods sold bawd on in ■ n
tory figures, and last, hut by no ...cans 1, ^m
iscd account of the year's operating expenses
Annual Profit and Lou Statement
COST OF GOODS SOLD
Previous Inventory
Merchandise Pureha tot
Total Merchandise Handled
Leti Presenl Inventor}
(out or Qoods Bold
INCOME FROM SALES
Bales
Ia*** Cost of Qoodi Bold
Grow Profit from Sate*
EXPENSE
Kent
Light, Heat and Power
I'ostnjo-. Telephone and Telegraph
interesl Paid, Disc and Allowances
Salaries
Tax** and Insurance
Repair*, Ilulldlri* and Equipment
Delivery Kspemo
Depreciation
Donations
Cent-rat KxiM'iiK.-
Total Expense
Net ProSt From Sale*
CAPITAL INCOME
dihcouiiIh Earned
laterSSt Received
Miscellaneous Income
Total Other Income
Total Income
Lell Had Debll and Loi**ei Charged off
TOTAL NET INCOME
Nos that statement      lending a* it doe-* to the
"total net Income" ligure. ih nothing more nor Uass
than a special form «»f profit and bow statement go,
naturally, the merchant who has maintained adei-uut*
records and »•• record* an adeOfUtl that do not tip
ply the figures for a profit ami b**vs statement ami,,
niatically has tin  figure* he mid* for hi* tax rr\*ntt
He   may   Herd   IQtti
assistance   in   inter
pntiiig      thr      UlS
blnnk.    bill    he   enn
*tippl) Ihi* figur** * iv
thirty minute*" time
The profit and Iom
statement      contain*,
rvcry figure lhat the
government      want*
It \% a complete, *nm
martfed   hUtory   of
the eniire year'* bu*
in«M,   ami   the   final
figure tin th<* Mate
ment. "total nei in
riiim*,"      leJU      tb<
whole story     Thai
•»m figure lell*
win ther the year ha*
DOSS a atieee** or A
failure
The merehan1!
nei'di that figure, Hot
only for hi* tn\ re
turn, but for hi*
QWH information in
pulling hi* htmin****
on a profitable big-fa
and k>. jnog it there
Me ought to prepare
an    accurate    profit
ami  Iom  statement
of IcJW r lhan onee a
year %•• lhat he will
know whieh way hi*
hu«inewt i* beading
lu order to do
lh.lt. he must keep
Iwi'ik* He doettn't
mei I to aet Up nil el
ten-iive system thai
lake* n lot of time,
but he doe* heed a
system that will give
him a definite record
•.•wi, w «,. °' ""  M*  revenues
?«q expenses.   Then, when the end of the year comes.
i      i       "     ,  "* •• »•"" rim III   hit  vmr rwiiiv-n,
»onas only to summaHic those figures take an Inven-
wry, and he has the figures all ready for thc govern
*****   HO has an annual profil nnd Um statement.
sin.on 1!TmUt\ " **!",uhrA f"r«» •»' Profit smJ im
wermtnc ihe mat of g,„„u mU* iUiHnu fhr pnn\ yvnr
(Continued on pa* 23} 1926
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RKTAILER
19
Drygoods and Clothing
TWO PIECE SUITS AS POPULAR AS EVEB. SHOE STYLES AMD OOLOBS P0E 8PBINO, 1926.
Pasliiou forecasts for spring place the two piece
doth lailb-ui onee wore in the foreground of Inter*
< si .and mniiy fascinating m w i |cls arc in evidence,
The material* mosl prominent in these descriptions
are kasha eloth. oxford cloth, fine tweed.s ami cash-
mere homespun The colors cotilorm to those whieh
an- being mentioned everywhere as the prevailing
shades for spring wear chartreuse, mint green, lighl
j»r»y and pastel tints, bota tie row* and other allied
shades.
While it is claimed thai the ensemble version of
the mode in suits will stilt retain its universal appeal,
those two piece tailored models will certainly not lose
any of their old rime popularity for street wear. There
are to be seen in a great number of models tendencies
to lite masculine style* of the past two years. In some
eases these tendencies have been carried even farther
than before. Added to thc short eoat and high col*
land tailor*d blouse, worn with mannish tic, is an
extremely brief skirt which has an inverted pleat
down the front and attached to the shoulders by means
of long braces or ususpenders " which are worn outside the blOUte and are buttoned to tin- exposed belt
of lhe skirt
NEUTRAL TONES IN SPRING H08IERY
There is no tendency in spring hosiery shades to
revert to blaek. ami even the gunmetal whieh showed
a popularity Inst fall ami winter is giving place to a
lighter laupe shade The very pale shades, which
have ha«l sueh a decided run during thc past year or
two, nre not being shown to any extent among spring
offerings. Nude appears to be the only one whieh
is again mentioned for spring wear.
Among those shades given first mention for spring
wear are laupe. rose taupe ami rosita. a rather light
laupe with a suggestion of rose in it Aluminum, a
silver grey shade, is being shown to combine with thc
darker nml similar toned leathers in shoes. Ciivas
sian. tille. hoggar chare, blue fox. nml rose blonde
belong to a group of indefinite tones, some of whieh
border on lhe tan and sand shades ami others on the
liu'bt taupe shades, They have, for the most part, a
silvery npearance ami none of them are very bright
or deep in shade This places them in thc pastel elass
and this is the prevailing tone in all this year's colors.
Along with nude, naturelle. cinnamon and banana
provide Ihe champagne shades for this year's fashions.
Itanium is n very interesting shade whieh combines
champagne with n dull yellow to give a deeper tone
than has been attained before in this line.
Chiffons arc counted on as being Ihe lending B©11-
eiH, although a medium weight of thread silk has been
ordered extensively by some firms. Thc full fashioned
ehiffon hosiery has won a place for itself which it
should hold for some time to come.
With the new neutral tones in hosiery, shoes which
will be worn this spring comprise the following.
Parchment.—A warm, creamy tone which will replace white for white, and pastel-tinted costumes.
Opal Grey.—Provides matching shoes for thc increasingly smart grey suits and frocks.
Sauterne and Ascot Tan.—Rosy shades which give
interest to thc blonde range.
Mauvette. - A striking new color similar to castor
brown with a mauve base.
Bois de Rose.—A popular color in shoe leather. In
its deepest aud richest tone makes for costume harmony with all the lighter shades of bois de rose, and
rugby tan.
Thc now spike heel is to be worn this spring for
formal wear, ami it is quite possible that this style
will also be seen in afternoon nnd street wear. These
spike heels arc very striking when studded with colored stones, ami many dance halls have been brighten*
ed this winter with their presence A new spring
model, which it is claimed will be popular for street
wear this spring is the laced oxford with a spike heel.
Contrasting and blending leather trimmings will
also be seen on the smarter models. Both strapped
sho«>s and pumps will be shewn nnd there seems to be
no indication that either of these styles will outdo thc
other.
CREPES WILL BE EXTENSIVELY WORN FOR
SPRING AND SUMMER.
Wholesalers report that every variety of crepe will
be in popularity for spring and summer, and there is a
keen demand for these dress materials.
Printed crepes will undoubtedly be a leader, and
Ihey are this season shewn in a greater variety than
ever. The marked tendency towards brighter colorings is reflected in the new showings, and among these
are Chartreuse. Absinthe, Chevreuse and cinnamon
pink. Greys have made a strong comeback, and plain
blacks art* in as strong position an heretofore.
lu the printed goods, a change in design is seen,
the popular demand apparently being for patterns of
a larger nature than formerly, and most of these patterns show a distinct trend toward futuristic design.
Then1 is almost a total absence of the old floral designs, except inasmuch as they are shown in cubist
patterns Oriental figuring* arc seen iu large num
bers. Por thc most part these have been executed
in color combinations of several hues. A striking example is n sunburst effect combining stripes and circles of tangerine, brown, turquoise blue, grey, sand
and black on a hiege background. Thc individual
patterns are very large and thc colors, though many,
are combined in a harmonious melange of tones that
Is * very pleasing. Exaggerated cobweb effefeta are
another design that is given prominence in the new
range.   These nre usually two-tone combinations of 20
'PI IK BRITISH COLUMBIA RKTAILKR
I't -brunts
dark stripes <>n a lighter background. Spot effects
predominate in many colors, the spots usually being
of varied size and in alternate colors ot) a third colored
background.
Flat crepes have also enjoyed a fair demand and it
i.s expected that these will be sold more widely this
year than ever before. At hast this is the opinion
formed by the heavy buying for spring trade Bordered crepes too are being shown, mostly in ">4 inch
width,
Tal'etas, judging from advance showings are due
for a comeback in 1926. This material has suffered
in the last few seasons but present indications are lhal
this will be a good taffeta dress season. It is expected
that taffetas will be popular for summer suitings
Georgette crepes have been accorded a fair men
sure of support although there is not the same demand
for these as in other crepe materials.
Crepe prices will be much lower this year than
formerly, This is due principally to the adverse e\
change situation in France where the depreciated
franc has reacted to allow more favorable purchases
for the Canadian market. Manufacturers arc pro*
pheeying a shortage of crepe materials before the end
of the season has been reached, A goo.l quantity of
these materials have been imported, but owing to tin*
bad season last year and the decreased quantity of
stocks purchased, wholesalers have been loth to buy
too large a stock. Deliveries from France are at pre
sent short, another factor which suggests difficulty iu
filling late orders.
PASTEL   SHADES   WILL   CHONTINUE   IN
PROMINENCE DURING 1926
The popularity of delicate pastel or crayon turn."'
is firmly established and the coming year will see these
tints in a variety of coloring entirely new
Many of the new colors bear names reminiscent of
the Louis peroid, of which thc following are freely
shown: ha Vallicrc, a livery mauve like faded I'alma
violets; Marie Antoinette, n grey rose; l*olignac, a variant of thc pop i" ir bois do row *h.v\', which tints at
laupe, nlnng with - - • ud r »♦•• easts; Joaephlne n
definite  tan ami  rose   combination\   Maiiiteitoii  am)
Chevrense,  earning this rang*!   *tut>* the  ^wunhm
pinks over to the pinkish brown-
Some of the new shade* ar* tuned after fauiOU*
Fr.neli watering plices, such m Viuntilly. a *ilv. r
totted green; Peotslnbleu  I toss laupe, Verwille*, .*,
pastel l»lu«*. UoitgshstnpS, fsWU shade* with a rose tasi
Ili.s. appear i«. bi the most popular
Among tin* blue* in tin- If. .t  «ol»r card oi th
Textile Color Card Association, are HotUICtl ami Mr.',
ittersnean, clear green blue*. IUti<* l*avender la* h
come one of the moil inccessful shades on ihe li*?
and Cath.dr.il blue, a bl> tiding *>l vititd in* a.»d ami
ihvsi nf wonderful tone
Other colors include Phanton Red, Cbrystal gr»\
Metallis |rcy, Hunrsy, i golden shads, Horida g>>M
Ponce d< 1...01 liatmsisoo, Psrchmont, Oyster, Coral
pink, ileponies, Cherry   bloeaom,   Rose of   Heartl)
M«"s   pink     lissplw rry    glaee,    "Id    \V»n«     t,*.v» bir*|
green, etc Woollen colors hav. the same chars I *»rii
tie colon as the silk* There du*ty overtone* in *o
chid, old hlae. and Italian bin**, Chateau grry, Cone
a greenish blue, Wood rosi and Hluih t*»*e nnd deep
roaj bcigcit, add further vsrictj lo lhe l*o»* de t***>
tang.
M1LUNERY STYLES, 1926
Th<* small shapes that were f*calitred last sssshm
will again Im in evidence thi* >»*ar The n«wr*l mod
els being shown ,ir» th. Mogolo, and tb«« Charleston
bul sin.*, neither of th.*. ar« adaptable lo ihe present
iiio.I. ni hair dressing, it »* not to PS *np|Me*«d fbn'
tloy will find popular favor in tin* country Th-
siiiiil! off (hi fscc hat   i* to  br   the  |.ader  in  spHnS
buaineaa, bring ihe shape mosl suitable f«*r th. bobbed
hair enthusiast     Tin re i*   ;„,•.*, v. r   some talk of lb**
more favorable reception of the larger HHsdels and an
increase is noted in the number nf ihese *tyb* who?
has. made tin ir appi seance
ror later spmg lhe block, d model »* etpeeted t«
THE STANDARDIZED PRODUCT
Not long aim tii.-n- wai even mon
cause of lhe completion of lbs IQ tm
whether tba world would ever live i„
you would have laughed mi the very
teitlmony lo th.- value of the iumd
Heary Kurd li pcrhapi the mute
lean the wisdom ol i ilmpllfled line
Iihk not brought iodic opportualti |
has wisely ohOIOtl tO "hew u, i|„. ||
gardi a popular-priced automobile on
t   ..   - models, day In and day out until now
lually has no competition in this chosen Held    lit* ,,.   u
Rather they argue to latlgfy on delivery date*
If more business men manufacturer! and retailer*
until the gooda they make or Bell are lUndaV It wJuld
Ford la a pan. master in the art of effectlni Quick f
cakes   han to make a greatly diversified line of ca  fan i
Is ambitious for profits does well who patterna his  ,,,
ardlsed goods on the dealers' shelves have lhai   ...
ized motions In the factory have. H""u "*bo
Get a reputation for selling known values Mr nu.it,.
your door, whatever its location, '    '  Bu',nMl
•■mo-h IClltrll)   around  <l».*  Kurd  fn.lof,   Ih...   ,».,♦*!   b*
llWatB lorn tot   || .onx.h.Ht,  U*A a*kr,\ *,nU In >r«r. oa**
te* ihn« tnan, far* nf „,„, nuhn rfrtsssslti vttteai ri»*nf*
wet   inn note n i* as lecempUstuaeat sad .>t.*ium»
irdlsa dprodacl
i •■■tstiipi.. oi A „UI1 mh„ ha# ,l„,ri>r,,r(, im^nm h#( hiM
o broadening oui «h, font group of r.r*   Hut Mr  Pot*
ne,  *o io ipoajt, „, eoaessirati bll • tini-* r„,,f, », t*.
Bis oae ear, om |(l „ri.«i» tmuttd number «f b.Mi»
»n million of li boot boss maauraciortd   t«m|M so Hi
"'•• standard   Hli desicn do not *rs.,, i,» *ni >*m
^vsatir blue1 *"r'h °' •,M,r",H,,»,« "' ■ ■elee.e-il «Hd
"uinTiiiM." ,,r,,,".r" f° m*h,, *'"- «* *»• w W»» "ot
i me Hoi* ;MM,> W?1 ,h,,> "•"   A'"« "» nKstler «b«
. a ia      wul ",mi,,,r nnm "' ** reslstsass, Stand
wserltj whin, ....ko, for <|MI||( llfonill IUJ #,<imlilM|
MSB, and the eoatwmeri will wear the pr»*rrbl»l |«th «t» l!»LMi
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RKTAILER
21
nib* supreme, and will be miieli in evidence for Raster
trade,
Colors,
Regarding colors of the new models the range is
so  wide  that   lo  list   the  same  in   tllCSC  columns  WOllld
be impossible    It i* predicted that red with its nml.
tiferous shades will prodomiuate,
^•nPHEMODE^
"       As Seeini By
t at X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X XX XX X X XXX X X X XXX XX* XXX XX it)
•lust as th. silks for Spring
ami Hummer wear show a d.
eid.-d  tend towards  the gnilv
prinied ami brightly colored,
so the woollens show a tendency to be SUlxlUl'd, ibp.'l', liny oil
varictj of weave for distlnc-
lion As predicted, tweeds, or
tweed like fabrics, will he the
last word in lhe Spring mode,
Introducing not so much the
mannish I weeds, as those of
more deiicste wesvc and intri-
cate pattern Plaids checks, diamonds, and ribbed
designs an* *l»own. but in such small all-over ps I terns,
that th.) nts* the appearance of plain
Tht   combination of silk and Wool, whieh was first
Introduced last Call has evidently proved its worth,
for thi* spring nil tb. eminent hYench houses sre fca*
turinj*? it to a very ureal extent Artificial silks, as
well as lhe combination Of eotton and silk, ate also
imheativt of the present trend of materials.
*
Both side* of witin crepe are being used by several
I'leueh houses in their afternoon ft<»cks, one side for
th. both* of the frock, ami the other for the trimming.
Velvet Is still marl for one*pieee or two-piece frocks,
with  the delicate  relieving  touch  of dainty  laee or
crepe de Chine collar snd jabot
In printed silk*, the geometrical designs of last
s.ason will In- replaced!  by  floral designs of roses,
tulips ami butterflies, ami another feature of interest
will be the revival of dots, both |*o!ka and square, in
small, regular, nil over patterns .in -irregular distribution, ami as a ground f«»r floral motifs The transparent fabrics, chiffon, georgette, crepes" and silk gntiso
will be more popular than t ver. as well as lhe heavier
silk crepes, while taffeta will have a decided return to
favour.
One deeided feature of the spring mode will be the
two of the two.pit dress with «•*'»' to mateh, usually
■ .-..     ,,i    ,,,,      , ,, ,i   i,,, , ,•   ,|| , r»-,    •»«>,,    ......    •  *
with the eoat ami finely pleated skirt of wollen mater*
Ial, and blouao of erepe de Chine, hand-drawn or fag-
oltcd.   The turn -piece dress will also be treated In the
same way. lony eoat tn match, thus continuing the en
Komhle introduced geveral seasons ago, although vary
••■it considerably from its original conception
Hut it is still a little early to give a larger and more
definite Idea of what milady shall, or shall imt, wear
this spring, or what colors will predominate, at least
iml this month, while she still huddles in her furs.
•i\ueM
PRICE MAINTENANCE WILL IMPROVE SHIRT
TRADE.
The shirt business has for some considerable time
past been the price-football of the men's wear trade.
Retailers have, in many cases, been apparently under
the Impression that the only way they could sell shirts
was to reduce the price, ami every now nnd again,
when tiny desired t<» make a little extra stir, they have
put on a big price sacrifice with shirts being the principal thing sacrificed. Of course a halt must be called
to this stum' time, ami riirht now appears to be thc
most opportune time that has yet presented itself. New
attractive goods are appearing every month. There
is a hit: revival in public confidence and business in
the hit; key industries shows a marked improvement.
If linn cannot be induced to buy shirts now without be-
ing offered a special price inducement .they never
will be. and it is entirely in the hands of the retail
trade as to whether they will be given this opportun-
Ity,
At tin present time the Retail Merchants' Association's campaign to curtail priee cutting is being watch-
• il with interest. This campaign is directed principally
ot maintain price on standardized trade mark goods.htit
in im line of business is such a reform more necessary
than in the nun's wear business. It is true that apparel, except iu some few eases, cannot be standardised' nor is ii desirable that it should, but retailers
should tvlizc the futility of priee cutting. As soon as
a retaibr starts to cut prices, he is becoming involved
iu an endless chain, lie cuts priees aud his competitors do the same. He cuts still further and thc imitation continues. Mis customers buy at a lower price
ami deelde that this is the only fair price to ask. It
is harder for him after this to obtain bis legitimate
profit, but he reaches a point where it is absolutely nee-
essary for him to do so.
Price cutting is not to thc advantage of either the
irade or the public. If a merchant is losing on one
line or making no protit on it, he must put an extra
profit ou other trot ids ,or go out of business. If he fails,
the whole community suffers, so that the maintenance
of fair price is in the best Interest of all concerned.
MEN'S HOSIERY
Prices in hosiery arc in about thc same position,
as in the ease in underwear. They are practically the,
■same as last year, except in the ease of some silk goods,
which show a slight increase, owing to the fact that,
silk has been steadily advancing during recent months,
ami shows nn inclination to advance still further. This
advance in the pure silk is somewhat' neutralised by
the great amount of rayon, or artificial silk, now being
used, nnd which, while it does not compete with hi«h ->•>
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RKTAlLKR
I'.l
H ll.ll
grade linos of pure silk, does operate to keep the price
of pure silk goods within bounds,
In fancy knitted goods .prices show no Change Irom
a year ago. In these lines, of course, comparison ol
prices is obviously impossible, since practically the
whole demand is for novelties, and new goods an* be
ing constantly produced, ami these are priced to bring
them within certain well defined price ranges. However, it is stated by mill men that a worsted sweater
coat of equal weight and manufacturing cost to one
made a yen ragO would sell at the same price.
Mill men believe that the stability of prices now
existing, coupled with the optimism towards 1026 business, exhibited by all members of the trade, will causa
retailers to anticipate their requirements for all staple
lines* of knitted wear to a greater extent than was the
ease during the past few years, and that this will bring
about a better manufacturing condition, inasmuch as
it will enable manufacturers to effect many mueh de
sired economics in production.
1112b is expected to be another year for fancy half
hose.   Retailers and manufacturers alike belive thai
the fancy goods arc the life of their business, and Can
adian manufacturers particularly would be very sorry
to sec any move towards plain hosiery.   With  th*
fancy hose the demand is for something new every lit
tie while.   Some manufacturers advocate that retail
ers never repeat on their fancy numbers, and this applies to sweater coats and golf hose as well as to faiiej
half hose.   They point out that the retaibr should endeavor to have something new to show all the time,
and that thc retailer's best policy is to buy small quail
titics of the new patterns and then, instead of repeat
ing, switch to something else.   This policy has worked
out very successfully with a great number »>f retailers,
and its advantages to the Canadian hosiery mills is
(|uite evident.   They are right on the job with new de-
signs all the time, and thus are abb- to secure business
that might go out of the country if more staple lines
were iu demand.
One good method by whieh the retailer can boost
■■Produccd-iii-Cannda" goods is to push the sal- of
fancy hosiery.
MEN'S WEAR.
The p,-ist four years have been times of decided
stress for the clothing and haberdashery Hade in Can
ada. There has been a big hoiise-cb aning in tlie trade
and many of the methods adopted ill cleaning house
have been justified only by the dire necessities of thc
times. These methods have been calculated, nol to
make a profit or to build business for the future bill to
keep business solvent, and when the *»n*i. ' • i* which
made them necessary have passed, their lust if) cat Ion
vanishes.
It has taken four years to tear down the artificial
business structure erected during the war years and
during the post-war boom. The time has now arrived
to rebuild on a more solid ami enduring basis
If business in the men's wear trade is not good dur
ing 1926, it will be very hard to blame it on general
conditions. General conditions are so shaping around
as to give encouragement to all business In the cloth
ing and haberdashery trade ihe opportunities are as
g™t as in any other. People have been underbuying
and now thc time has arrived whim thev will have
more money to spend.   They will spend their money
as
ua aas been Bald tint*  ami ll  again, (or (he thing
that make the greatest appeal to them The trade'a hi
problem during IW8 !a tO «**« what they have to m\\
sn highly desirable lhat it will receive llmt consider.,
lioll trom purchasers
There is DO business wherein soma effective ■ystetti
of price maintenance is more urgently needed than i
lln  clothing ami bain rdnshcry bttslflOM      The K'-ta-
Merchants' AsSOCfUtioD is proposing it* plait only for
sections of retail trade thai desire it.   If a worthwhii-
number Of  representative dealers  wish  to make  ar
raiigeim nts whereby priee maintettaiH'e will be guar
anteed, the Association i* offering it* leifieca for oi
gatiisation purposes <>n hi* tranaeontinsutaJ trip, \i
Crowder is holding meeting* of retail merehanl*. in
which merchants in all retail line* are invilrd, ami '
these he outline* the proposal of hi* organisation
CANADA 8 PROMINENT POSITION IN KNITTED
WEAR
up. ning pru.s on knitted *** .«■*. fur ItfcJti «bow litV
if an) change from those surreal during ltri**i   It i>
trii*  that cotton goods arc on the whole n lit lb" «'h " «{
er. but this vvh.r.   it OCCUfS, I* HOI •tlffictriit lo atU<
the retail s«!ling price     Wool go-H|* are firm at  \'f2
levels and all prospects srs for stability In the price el
knitted WCSI during 1126
Praeti.allv rv.-ry |m< of knitted *a«ar mold in th
men's wear store ean t>» produced, ami t* Im ing pit
dueed by Canadian mills    t nder wear, from lhe Unrnl
Slid   lightest   Of   Wool*   to   th"    iron   eUdft  of   lhe   lllin***
jaek. fine cotton* to heavy   (IccSS lined   ami VarkHI*
combinations of *ilk and wo«d are matle in the Catu.t
i.hi mills, ami their quality i* m»t exceeded bj the pi
duels of anv country
In hosier), all classes of goods are made, ami bir
ing the past COUplfl of *ea*on* the mill* have turnr-! '
tin fancy pattern* iu Vogue with roiutpietion* Mien •>■
A remarkable feature of the Inmiery trade is that dor
ing the pas? year a Canadian mill e% purled *i!k km
icry to England
In fancy knitted wear, mieh a* »weater eoal*. ami
so forth, the Canadian mill* have imt lagged Mum! i
any reaped    In the*-« goods the qualit) of the mat. r
ials  ih.y   have  u«m.|   ha*  always   been  teviral  step"
ahead of the   products of most other   eoiintnes, ar
where Imports have been matle, it bat not ken berau*
of quality of material, but rather because of dteapm
"f price, or some particular pattern that bad not b«»
seen in the home market Hut the Canmllan mill* its*
»'«'t depended on «|uality alone They have belli plo»
students of stybs and hav.- ijuiekly followed .*>"
'hanging styb- turn, anticipating public tante iu mm
•••stances, ami showing ranges of foney pattern* t).
do not need to take second place to those shown so*
where.
Prices Steady
The closing month of the year saw wool almut on
P'>r with its average priee for the previous six month
"•hi (his is a price that user* „f wool believe to be I
Keeping with other commodities They cannot *
h<»w anything enn force the priee lower, nml while a
extra active demand might lend to fores it up. lli
"»«] advance would be resisted bv mill men, who full
[Mills how pri,.. advances curtail the distribution •
their products, 1020
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
23
Fleeced Goods are Lower.
With cotton goods the opening prices reflect the
lowest price at which raw cotton has been purchased
for a number of years past, Fleece -lined underwear
shows a slight reduction, something around 26c a
doieil, but in OOttOO lines where a good quality of cotton must be used, there is little, if any change.
FIGURING THE ANNUAL INCOME TAX
CANADA 8 TEXTILE INDU8TRY
Brief Review of 1925 Conditions.
A. 0, haw son. vice president ami managing director "f Canadian Cottons, Limited, remarks in a review
of llu- situation in the textile industry, that so far as
the woollen mills iu Canada are concerned, the year
1925 varied Utile from 1924,   Importations from other
countries were in large volume, leaving only a small
percentage of the total consumption to be produced
in thc Canadian mills. The situation was further aggravated through the fall of the French franc, which
made tht   competition suffered by the Canadian mills
much more severe, It is expected that the balance,
sheet* of the woollen mills will reflect the unsatisfactory conditions that have prevailed in this important
industry for several years back
The situation of the eotton mills has shown tome
improvemeni during the year     While considerable
curtailment of production has continued, this has not
beeti evident to the same extent ns in 11124. A serious
shortage of water in reeenl mouths iu some of the
southern States compelled s large number of eotton
mills tti close down, either partially or entirely This
resulted in a heavy reduction of stock iu a number of
leading Hues, which thus have not beCU offered as freely in Canada as heretofore,
Mr Dawson adds thai the British competition has
continued without abatement and a large volume of
the product of their mills has been distributed through*
out the country,
Priees for both eotton ami eotton goods have ruled
somewhat lower in recent months, ami this doubtless
accounts to some extent for the larger volume of business being done. All the Indications, in Mr Dawson's
opinion, point lo a fairly prosperous year for the cottons mills of Canada .
^pntf?
ICE
THE UNSHRINKABLE UNDERWEAR
THAT ATTRACTS THE
HIGH GRADE   TRADE
limlu*%^
(Continued from page 18)
Thia ia simply a matter of adding the cost of merchandise purchased during 1925 to the 1924 inventory, and
then subtracting the present inventory. The inventory,
of course, should be taken at cost, not at selling price.
Tbe nexl step, whieh consists of subtracting the eost
of goods sold from total sales, gives the merchant the
gross margin between total sales ami cost of sales.
Expenses for the year must be figured next. These
include all items of operating expense; rent, salaries
(tither than proprietor's), delivery expense, supplies,
taxes, insurance, heat, light, freight and express, depreciation, repairs to building and equipment, interest,
paid, donations, etc. The merchant should not tail to
include sueh items as taxes, depreciation, interest paid,
ami donations, since these all affect his income tax.
Most taxes on business and business property are
deductible, Depreciation of store fixtures nnd ,>per-
afing equipment is considered part of operating expense, and should be included as sueh in the profit and
loss statement. This is usually written off at tbe rate
of 10 per eent a year of the original invoice cost of furniture ami fixtures. Depreciation on automobiles for
delivery equipment is higher, and is usually figured on
a three year basis. Some merchants do not figure depreciation at all. but this is obviously wrong since this
practice does imt show them their true profit. Interest
paid on business indebtedness and donations are both
considered expense items, and as such nre deductible
from thc tax return.
Deducting expenses from gross margin gives the
merchant his net profit from sabs. To this must be
added sueh items as discounts earned, interest received
ami miscellaneous income, giving him the total income from the business.
There is one more important item to consider before arriving at the total net income for the year,
ami that is bad debts and other losses. The reason
for considering these items in connection with the
profit ami loss statement is that they affect the net
income from the business and also the income tax return. Subtracting these from the total income, ?»ives
the merchant bis total net income, the amount on
which he pays the tax.
Hut, as I said before, the merchant who did not
keep adequate records covering his business transactions during the past year is going to find it pretty
difficult to figure bis income tax properly. There is
very little he can do about it now. His onlv course
is to go baek over last year's business, figure his total
revenue, his eost of merchandise sobl, bis total operating expenses, and get them as nearly accurate as
possible. «    ' •'
What he ean tlo is to install a system now that will
give him dependable figures for this year. The retail
merchant doesn't need an elaborate system. Just a
few simple records that ho can bring Up to date every
day. The few minutes it takes him will pay big dividends, I ansa it will enable him to operate his business more effectively, and more profitably.
Ami next year bis Income tax figures will be ready
weeks before the government asks for them. 24
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA BETAILEK
l-M
mi i
COMMERCIAL FAILURES IN CANADA  IN  1925
From R. C. Dun 4 Co/a Trade Report.
conuneroiai  failures in   Quiada  daringjhe  year Jjjll
closed number 2.371. with liabilities of ^WT.» !*•• J*
ures contrasts with 2,174 similar defaults In  1924.    *i
$61530 975.   The  decrease  in  number  this  year  Is  olmosi
entirely in the Province of Ontario, where there wer, 6 *
failures In 1925 for $9,267,750. against S17 defaults In 19.1 fo.
$30 403,976.   Some very heavy failures in Ontario in manu
facturlng lines during 1924 were the occasion of tbe   ar*.*
liabilities reported for that year    There was al«o a fSjlUai
off In the number of trading failures last year In Ontario, in
comparison  with 1924. and a decrease in  Indebtedness ra
ported for trading defaults, but this reduction was not near
ly as large as in the manufacturing division.   Manitoba like
wise reported fewer failures In 1925 than In 1924, and a reduction In liabilities as well.   The other Provinces show an
Increase in the number of defaults In 1925.     The Increase
both In number and Indebtedness, in the Province of Que
bee was quite large, the number 956 contrasting  with sm»»
for the preceding year, while the indebtedness reported wai
S26.926.S21 in 1925 and $21,551,846 in the preceding year    In
the Province of Quebec last year there were more manufai*
luring defaults than in the preceding year, and the liabllitie*
show a heavy Increase over 1924 In cons.-qu.nce of some
large failures.   Trading failures last year in the Province of
Quebec were also more numerous than in 1921. and the In.
debtedness shown was heavier.   For the  whole of Canada
there were 563 manufacturing failures for $24,046,514 In 19:f>
against 625 manufacturing defaults in 1921 for $36,512,6!*-*
Insolvencies in  trading concerns In  1925  numbered   1,693.
owing $19,514,049. against 1,720 with an  In debtedness of
$21,324,089 for the preceding year.   Default* among aicent*
and brokers in Canada last year were less numerous than in
the preceding year, and the Indebtedness Involved was very
much smaller than in 1924.   No banking defaults ocrurr.d
in Canada during 1925.
In the manufacturing division, practically all of the lead
ing departments of trade represented show f.-wer failures in
1925 than in 1924. and as to several of the manufacturing*
divisions there is a considerable reduction In the amount of
Indebtedness reported The most notable Improvement la«t
year, at compared with the preceding year, relates to cloth
ing manufacturing where there were fewer failures In 1925
and a considerable decline in the amount of indebtedness re
ported. In lumber manufacturing fewer failures occurred
last year and tlie liabilities reported were only half of the
amount included in the return for that division In 1924. In
the manufacture of shoes and leather imods. the number of
defaults In 1925 did not vary much from 1924. but. some law
failures In that division dining 1925 added to the amount of
Indebtedness reported for that year Trading failures, as
noted above, also show a decrease in number last year and In
the amount of liabilities reported as compared with the pn
ceding year. Many of the Importanl divisions in the tradlr-K
class making a more favorable showing for 1925 This In
eludes general stores, dealers in clothing, in hardware and
In drugs. Liabilities were very much less in 1925 lhan In
1924 in the class embracing general stores and dealers in
clothing. On lhe other hand, there was aa Increase last
year lo failures of grocers, dealers In Jewelry aid In llmior-
and tobacco, The liabilities reported for drv goods deal
ers Also show a considerable Increase In 1925 over 1924
The Canadian fltrures for two years are compared below
Province! U125 1924
Number
Ontario, ,  625
Quebec    9515
British Columbia   127
Nova Scotia     91
Newfoundland     3*1
Manitoba   220
New Brunswick     B4
Prince Edward Island     6
Alberta     9K
Saskatchewan   160
19
M7
114
70
29
262
54
5
92
145
Liabilities
19.267,750
26.929.S21
1,981,932
987,200
363,400
3.089,274
594.429
43,000
947,503
1,558 61«
Canada  2,371
1924  2,474
2,474
145,717,825
64,530,978
LIGHTHOUSE stum.
BUCKSKIN cloth
SPORT JACKETS
H«M* lhe i.|.*| )4, *,.  for  *Vi U.g   fk*'ln«   IftOl
Jho*t»>S a"*!  all OaHj-XN  OUt%WaOt     Tlie   «lmt ,*(**»'
'''"','1' *mih*,,i Buckskin ri„n, u ,|»,wt,ir am.h   n>r
laoir Inside and OQI W.*»,, o* »..|| M .hanioU an«l
J*«»i roneidemW) i.-.. w,ie ,m net* bund. r»r«
i*amaa« ttotk »IM,i ribbtni Rates button Niks
lire longer ».*ar
"  Jaektu saali ptrfeeU] vltboat rttrtnklsi
"'   'M-Ing their *htn„    T|..> fee** nut wind and cold,
urni gi»« ,„,,,,.,, ttoomtm m novf*«ai
M«il.< In llich- t.r .Urk km-*,   rhruwtii  dark tan IBS
fin-leer   breWfl        AISO   mud*   In   ...... kit.**    eloth
CM**-***, red aad) black, loituco ami i.u.k nm sad
BlSeS, ami |,ro»n and blark
•s"e ihern at „,„ Ko<N, wm*t m^. ^ntr
Rock Island Overall Co.
ROCK ISLAND, QUE.
Rtprssantatlvst
W-M. FOSTER, 3M4».J2„a Ave. W„ V-ncouv.r, i.C 1920
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
25
TRAVELER8 WE HAVE MET
If you think the accompanying photograph doesn't
represent ft member of "1>K4" V ('. T, just take -mother look, It won't In- necessary to make a guess because
there aren't very many merehants thih side tit' the
mountain* that do not know our ohl frieml Qoor-zo
Wall
George, who. by the way, is a native son of good
old It (', was horn in Victoria, ami he can number
friends and acquaintances in the provinee in* the hum
tlivtl
Twenty three years in tin- hardware business han
given lln». Wall Mime very valuable experience, He
started in the retail with Ralph Morris & Ella, then
went to ihe Cunningham I In nl war. Co.     His many
qUaKfleations then appealed tn the Mel'liny Mfg. Co.
where he remained for fourteen years, leaving them
i n
to accept the management of the house furnishing de*
part ment of Mcl/ennnu, Mel-Velcy & Co, Limited, one
nf Vancouver's old time hardware establishments now
handling heavy hardware, shelf hardware, sporting
goods, range* and kitchen supplies, auto accessories,
paints and oik fthip chandlery snd logging equipment
Prom a "lr C T standpoint George has much to
lie proud of, in that lie is largely responsible for the
faet that this progressive firm is represented in the
"I* C T " bv over twenty of their travelers. Thin
large number from one firm is somewhat unique, ami
not only Vancouver Council but both the (.'rami and
8upramo Council are very proud of this record,
While George has been known to indulge in both
hunting ami fishing, the "old timers" of '"284" know
him as a wonderful "auctioneer."
RETAILERS   TROTH COUP ANY 18 OPERATIVE
The long projected Retailers' Trust Company, for
whieh thf Saskatchewan Branch <»f the Retail Merehants' Association has held a charter for many years,
is now an actual fact. At the last convention the executive was authorised lo pul the company into oper*
ation, ami at a meeting in Deeember, 0, A. Maybee was
elected president, W I. McQuarrie (provincial Bcere*
taryV being managing director and secretary. W. W.
Cooper, Swift Current, vice-president, other directors
being fl, Garfield Wray, Reg-ma; Ralph Miller. Prince
Albert ; |«\ C. Hoatl, Saskatoon, ami N. S, Smith, Ro*
gina.   The head office will be in Saskatoon.
The company has as its purpose the prevention of
business failures among Saskatchewan merehants, and
is authorized to perform all the functions of a tust company, permission being granted by the Local Government Board to sell 500 shares of stock at $100 a share.
This company 'is formed to carry out the following
services: The Administration of Estates of deceased
persons, lunatics, minors, etc.; Administration of Estates under the Hulk Sales Act; Administration of Pi re
l/ossei, Loan and Investment Husiness; General Trust
Company work, including thc looking after transactions of a Trust Company nature between retail merchants and other parties.
It will be seen by the above list of activities *hat
tin* larger the amount of capital subscribed the greater the scope of the company's activities will be and the
itonger its position and influence.
It will be observed that this Trust Company is
starting with a very powerful Hoard of Directors tak*
en from thi* most successful business men in the province, and they are moreover all men who have taken
a very great interest in the building up and consolidation of the Retail Merchants' Assoeiation. The man-
airing director is at present Provincial Secretary of
the Retail Merchants' Association, and the Trust Company will from the outset receive the advantage of his
intimate knowledge of the retail trade whieh the Trust
Company is formed to serve. While the Trust Company will be operated as a separate organization it will
have the great advantage of being operated for same
years at least from the Provincial Offices of the R. M.
A . and this in itself will make for economy and efficiency of management .
A NEW VANCOUVER INDUSTRY.
One of many reflections of Vancouver's steady and
successful growth is seen in the recent incorporation of
the Hart ram Paper Products Co., Ltd., a pioneer organization west of Winnipeg devoted solely to the manufacture of high quality paper bags.
C. M. Bartram, president of thc Hrm whieh has already established extensive foreign connections as well
as a fast increasing home market in two months operation, is guiding the development of the enterprise after
spending almost thirty years as an executive of the E.
H Eddy Company Limited.
With the aid of thc latest types of paper bag manufacturing machinery and special research into the
grades of paper produced at thc coast, the Bartram
Paper Products Company Limited is making bags with
a special paste manufactured on the premises.
"Bartram Hags" arc 100 per cent. British Columbia
products, Paper is produced in thc province and even
the twine and ingredients of thc paste are products of
the coast.
The plant at 1280 Homer Street is equipped with
facilities for the expansion that is looked for by Mr.
Bartram in the near future. Seventeen employees arc
already on the payroll.
With Canada's supremacy in supplies of pulpwood
mhI pulp, thc Pacific coast, an entirely new Held, possesses the advantages for both extensive home and export trade,
Since the plant commenced operation inquiries have
been received front India. New /calami, Mexico, and 2(1
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
I'Ybru
even Peru, which point to the potentialities iu a foreign
market served from Vancouver.
In the home field the Bartram Paper Products Com
pany Limited is thc only manufacturer of paper hags
west of Winipeg.
Difficulties well known in producing kraft, manila.
and white sulphite bags sueh as the gumming and folding, have all been given considerable attention by the
management  They declared that by rigid inspection
of bags as they eome from the machine  they have iv
(luccd thc percentage of flaws to a minimum.
The Norfolk Paper Company Limited. 136 Water
Street, Vancouver, has been appointed exclusive selling
agents for British Columbia. A merchandising pro-
gramme for other western districts will be decided upon later.
P. J. Briee, plant superintendent, of wide experience
in both Canada and Cnited States, supervised the entire installation of the company's equipment,
Thc officers of the company are: C M Bartram,
president; S. (J, ("Jourlay. vice-president; Karlc S (Jour-
lay. secretary-treasurer.
TRADE NOTES
Bella Coola—
Chrlitenien, A. C. A 8oa—"Reported sold out branch at
Hageasborg to A. Peterson (0.8.)
Chilliwaek—
Burgess,  J.   A.—Reported  commenced   (K-rorer)
Kerrisdale—
Harrison. A.—Reported sold out (ronf. and baker)
Ladyemith—
Walters and Akenhead.—Sold out to Fred  Spencffr of
Victoria (dry goods and men's furnl«lilngn)
Nanaimo.—
Parisian Cloak and Millinery Co.—Assigned   ;  W   He
ments, custodian.
New Westminster—
Gordon ft Walters.-~C. C. M. T. A   appointed trustees,
Tenders advertised for purchase of stoek.
Thomson. Clarence ft Co.—Sold out to Hallowav A Hum
pus.     (Flour and feed).
Prince George-
Peck ft Gillis, Ltd—Applying  for Change of  name  to
Peck and Primrose, Ltd,
Vancouver.—
Auiomiive Specialties, Lid,—Reported acquired Radio
Corporation of Vancouver, Ltd.
Brunt, . J.—Reported sold oul (dfUggill),
Coullng. Harry.—Commenced (grocer).
Crane. W. H. — Reported   sold   ut   to K.   A    Brlgbi,
(grocer and meats).
Huesken. Jos,  —  Reported   succeeded   by   s.   living
(grocer, ftc.)
Jack Bros.—Commenced (fruit and produce),
Roberts, J. S.—Succeeded A. A, Green (grocer, &e)
Trainor, John.—Reported sold out (grocer).
Langtrey, M. ft Co.—Bailiffs sale held (tailors).
McDonald, Robert—Opening branch on Seymour HI
Peppard. M. 0.—Sold out to Marshall Forrest
Ames, Holden Tire ft Rubber Co. — Names changed lo
Canadian Gooderich Co.
Balrd, G.—Reported succeeded by C. E, Borihwlck (eon)
Gregory Tire ft  Rubber Co.. Ltd.—If. C. Warner appointed receiver; assets to be Hold by tender to bo
received before February 28,
mills, K. L.~-Incorporated an iinii; Fur Go. Lid.
Stanbrook, 8. A.—-Reported sold out io T. Attrill (baker)
hey, Joseph.—.Sold out lo Wm. Baker (grocer),
QUALITY AIMS PAYS
BUY
Western Made Counter Sales Books
*mmm&
SAUSBOOKC
WSJ
WESTERN SALES BOOK CO. LTD.
>*)i.«»s*,'iii trail' VANCOuvt*. a C
Phone Seymour SZ65
mm k r. x k-xx a x x xx x ji x n tuutn *nt*ataM*xms*m.
TESTS
That Protect
Ye*
Tht   meter   IHet   regtattrt   tin
eiecifietljr yew wm ie ae ac<w
ate aa • watch.     UnrJor tin*'
Oemimon     Government    regu'*
***** metert ara letted at Mm
eapente  ef   tht   company.   W*
***** a iartja eteff of men SSO
•Unity   «t   mark   letting   yew
•"tiers linger government tup*'
vtiitn, aittirtng  yen of corrtc
billt. If ytu have onst cempie'«"
lo   make   about   your   bill   *f*
would bo %iaS lo have you lode
it at the ntarett office.
^SWB®!»!~to
VANCOUVER
XyXXXXXXXXXXXXXWCXX) 1920
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
27
HARDWARE, OIL w PAINTS
OENERAL CONDITIONS
Dualneas in the hardware tiade is moving along in
fair volume, nml ihere hai bun in pereeputbls ulaek*
ening off gg is frequently the ease during the o|iin*u^
months «if the year
Thoac Instance* «#f stock-taking roaultg whieh have
coma io our notice vary it, ■•» grvat extent. Some nor
chants show a handsome ptofi; over the pervious year,
while other* indicate that the effect of the alack per*
iod of 1925 waa not altogutber overcome during the
remainder of the year
Retail hardware non, however, arc looking to 1926
to recompense them for onprofltahh seasons, and with
the amount of large ami una!] building projecla many
of which at present under Way and the increased sue-
ceai in mining operation* their optimiani doe* not appear to Ih* out of place
Among good* selling in gf -I'e-r Volume are builder*' hardware, garden tools, poultry nettinsr. wire
eloth nnd window glnr-wt.
Fibre Markets
Krpt.ru from Kaatem Canada state that Manila
tihi'e has advanced slightly in world markets, which
WQtlld  Indicate  that  hither prices fo.   Manila  rope
would lake effect     Foreign compel*.;. n. however,
from countries with depreciated currency, in holding
priees nt a steady let el, nml recent despatches ; mieate
that even lower prices may be forced.
While it ia somewhat difficult to determine the
tendency of binder twine prices for 1926, we an ad*
viaed that present prices will hold, with thc possibility of n recession
Sheet Metal Market.
The nhcet metal market continues strong, but prices
have remained unchnnged, nml the expected advanc
in not likely to lake plae. according to local distribu-
tor* T S prices show a tendency to stiffen, but this
will have little effect OB the market since com-
petition is too severe Iti permit of advance,
Jute
There is no indication that jute prices will show
n decline during the present year Calcutta advices
estimntc that the shortage this year will not be cover etI by the next crop, ns there is only sufficient seed
for a normal yield.
Resin and Turpentine.
The trade expects an advance in realn prices; primary mnrkels in the Southern States arc showing decided strength, willi paler shinies scarce.
The situation in the turpentine mnrkct is very un*
eertain. with future prices depending on the London
mnrkct. There is said to be n shortnge of 15,000 bar-
his at Southern U. 8. ports nml stills, and a surplus
of 21.000 excess barrels of this product in London, Mn*
til Ihis is absorbed there would appenr no possibility
of n decided ndvaiiee in southern markets.   To-day's
price i.s baaed on supply and demand, and price changes will only be slight in character.
HARDWARE MARKETS AT A GLANCE
Painti and Oil
Linseed Oil.— Prices nre held at recent low figures.   Sales arc fair.
Turpentine Advances.
New quotations show advance of ten cents a gal-
loll.
Paints and White Lead.
Call for paints has held up very well. Interior
decorating work is now the main interest with the
dealers, Stocks are being ordered for thc coming
year at fair rate; priees show no change.
Putty.
With somewhat mild weather sales of putty by
local jobbers bave been fair, priees nre firm and unchanged.
Garden Hose and Lawn Sprinklers.
Kuture business continues to be placed in a most
satisfactory volume.
Field Pence.
Prices unchanged. A good volume of future business is being placed.
Automobile Accessories.
Sales arc showing a very satisfactory volume for
this time of year,
Copper Rivets and Burrs.
Prices are unchanged, nml the demand is very sat*
isfactory.
Wire Nails.
Sales still continue fair; prices are held at the recent low level.
Radio.
Radio is selling in good volume, and priees seem
well maintained, Sales are liable to fall off somewhat with the advent of spring weather,
Automobile Tires.
The recent ndvanec on automobile tires nnd tubes
has become general, and these goods are now quoted
from ten to fifteen per eent. higher.
Garden Hose Priees Finn. ■
There are strong indications that garden hose pric-
es will stiffen considerably. THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RKTAlLKR
IM.
runt,,
Rope.
Tin* market is holding at  recent  prices ami sales
are good.
Sash Pulleys.
The demand is fair with prices firm,
Lawn Mowers.
Sales since January 1st have shown some improv
ment.   Prices an- unchanged.
Roller Skates.
Orders for spring delivery are being placed  very
freely.   No change in price has been made.
Files.
Tin* demand is normal, prices an* firm
Ever-ready Storage Batteries Lower.
Storage "A" radio batteries of Bver»ready lim are
lower in price.
Binder Twine.
.lubbers arc   booking   considerable   business for
spring shipments.   Priees are (inn.
Batteries.
Tin* demand continues good ami the supply is plentiful and prices are firm.
Step Ladders.
These arc firm and moving fairly well,
Builders' Hardware.
Building is holding up well at this season  Prices
are steady with few changes.
Galvanized Ware Advances.
Galvanized ware advances; a general advance of
ten per eent. is now recorded,
Saw Sets Decline.
A slight decline is noted on the line of mw sets.
Belting Advances.
An advance of ten per cent, is now noted on belting
Pyrex Ware.
Sales continue oil n satisfactory Kasis.     Prices an*
unchanged,
i.i   \ A  ' 1Mc,,,rei'v>'- manager in Vancouver for c'ranu
Ltd., of Canada, for the past seventeen and a half rears  ,ai
been promoted lo .he mana^'i-nlil,. oi the firm'   Han Vo,
clBco branch, the larac. operated by „„. oon.pn ,    „   .1
Pacific roam   Mr, Melllreevy came to Vancouver from
Seattle branch In I9.,s ,« , „ lhe Cnm > ' "    '    '
here, and since then haa been an ou.„.a„di„K naur       ^ '
Ineaa circles in Brltlah Columbia. u
The staff of McLennan, McPeely k Co   Llmltnrf
talned at an enjoyable dance at Leiter Cour i   vI,
last month,     supper w«h lerved m 370 Z1       !'v,'r
live novelties were distributed during in dm   V.,il • *
the whiat drive were presented to ,.,e' wl?,gfc MM!  C
Martin, managing director. '    r "  c*
B. C. HARDWARE CLUB  MOLDS ANNUAL  MtCTlNG
nn. hundred and ""> ',■,•»', tard'WU'ieeea t.f n-.-i- . •
„.iui..» star*} in niendaae* si IN aaaaal eoaveatfoe ot ia« ,
t   Hardware ■ tub baW tti Vaaeeavei    t*%*o i««« bseow
isarh event el wniWeFsW*"*1 o>t»r«**' to tm* tf»«i» «>t <»„■ j,.
vine*    Katl»f acton reports ••,,,' "oibmntwl <>f Hi* i*** ).4;
doings   li was <*h<>**'\ ts* IS* fftintnu pfwatdeai Qmai tim,
tlt.it Hi. i>* lut'l ***en SS lOCrSiSI tit obtslil S prr r*n«   In in. tt,
bershlP    Heelings h*«l b«'«*t» ■«'ll *Mi*i»tl«»«l   nml moal nt ife
problenui thai luitt devt i*n»*\ darlas !«**• latetft noatfea bi
h.«ti unlcabh willed Relaitoaalilg beiwoaa lb* irt*n«'r« ,»
wbolcfah booses wai al lbs iwsl Mtndb rh*r»«-u'r  *-.,i
rioter working artaiiaeaieai Iim*»i b**-n *iri»e»t al i*-t» •■«•'-, <•.
!w,i itde-t 1 ban bad pcobaWj evai -tanw eajaysal in me oat
Gordon M  Keami  Vane-cavei   *■*»* etocud peatMeni   •
the ensuing >eei    Hooarwi io»**»i«ifutt •eta   -Hf  ll  v.*>
Princeton, ttn* )otn*** Huron   CWlltwael    Miai vte^ix***
ii,ti! »•!.'.-»••. 1 ttns Ha'?"- k>-'..i   seemed ■H*** |w**ol**l#iii  s   \
Brown   irtmiurei **\  1   fttearwaa  rw#le<»«»«| »mi a**et*"j.
m.ism li ii Margrvaves
BUSINESS GOOD IN WAXED PAPER ANO ALLHO L'NI *.
I'or ibt   I 1*1  IWO jr-V-af!   i.«-»,riE«' Hrll*«-   ■ ttO tms* •»*•#■«-•   '•
dletrltntttoi  0   producl! naaalaetafesl 0*   Th* CmuietMlatni
s<tii-*> iw»i* .»■ ! w.»• Paget i*swm0) Llsalle4 el ll»i»mm*.
Ontario bat t*-*' r^ade-rloi * ?*■■*•> lefwlee 10 '■*9«, relall Era4i
no* I-** built «!■■ * iimaa *.>»*-.»-•«-i*»n la ifc* pvwvtiiee fn*-
product! ol in* < ot Mtlldaied ****!♦•« lw**>i »n4 *»v»i i'«iw*f t,'tm
\)Ai,s   1 ,.-.••.»' ■'-.£  •!-..■  |lrllt*tl   Ktttrtitoti Was  Ptgwf  Vo    \.''.
and ibc 1 tore In loi  Kale** li •*>'* * on**aift}   l.'.l   hati b*-*"  0*
..;..,( upon iquAiot K*t«t* <.i>,.\*-t •>•*?«• m*nagtiMI aitewlafiliii***
Mr    I.    M     Kpp ■■■■:■'   o• ,.  n|   •?■,,   boat   lin«»»e   i*i«*»   tmrnik   *
** ... .    J>*»l**'I    t09*    '''■    ' n   I   ' 001   '
<i.«)ric«* \l« |{<i.> i« rredlled *t'h lbs ''4ft«"t*K laki »►' wai'
lunch rnti« in Drlilili l olonWa    T»»«-*»*r **»tu ur m*»v m< s *
packed In VinewutPi    Thli real * ^*'* bitten. t**u otattsts
1* Ik-i-.k dutrlboted ijqob| ih* 11 **!«*  **> '*iiut*"*t 'h*« oal] a •
•be-et > 11 0$ • • leaated *' * Haw vot) *%* SawtMuS  >*> ISM pwtt
ns*- i« inch th*t ipeclal taachlfM^r) i» boHig maairaeiad
ntakf up i|i«»r ja« *itf* lOUMMtlewIt}
tia* ii ;.*i 1    1 1 madlan nrm *ri<! »ajeii * to* 11 St**-r*> *
pairoaag* ■   •    ;•..  retail iradft
ILUCUM
OILET
ISSUE
Is   1  high  grade  Bathroom   ret|tibdt(   erhleh
shntud l». in . verj home
It is made from grnaim N"o  I Manila <r-i*'i
In Ho softneaa ol nbl linen by the |n«.t» pro
e. ss
It is easily aolubli in water ,lt„| «,n „„t dog
drains
I    it Wll.i, si.i.1, itski.i' if DigpMTBD
MAhK IN it r
for
SnUi, DandsN I Wrigi, Ui
MANUFACTUHtm ANO WMOLtBALI
PAPI* DtALIM
VAKCOUVU V10T0IU \m
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
2!)
HARDWARE PRICES CURRENT
■ubject to market fluctuations.
irlly
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AMMUNITION.
Loaded fthot ghatl*.
Dominion:
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Imperial.
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American.    I
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Metallic   Ammunition
Oomlnlon
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IJ    iot.g    fttllokrlroo
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ANVIL*    1'eter   W light.   IMM    to   li*  It'*
,HU     OtM   ' V»   !>»»    St.
a\ih iwir«* Aa«.«. is tt>« iitM io tuts
.«,.»      <}«nil>!«   It    **»»*•      iiih*.' IU.1    |:; ;..   |,>
NS IS tea   bontaee • ••/■•  |ti<w i ■•    itn-fti
billed   a it a    onhandtod,   |S< :•>   to  111 M   !   I
im n* < **<***•   in w i*r $-■» Um
OKI   US'.     !-»<*.   f**htdo  tUlr*    l| ff    |  il
I u ..• ir ti pat IM feel   s *t i: if i-*r iv»
'».(     '|   rt!   it V->  t•«-   '**"  1**'
llnl.lS.    CARRIAOB    tin    full    \-».-*atr*<
%  •»-.-t tonalier  up t«> I In   I'd   le»»  JI  I  '
it un  evar ih m  sts ..ff tut  Not* »•*■»
larger,  atl l«i|-i.i   Um :•> off lictt   N»t« n#«
i.tt |,f;,-#» In •ir**. t
it'll tk miiiiim:    s aad •-• *■■** "i> t»
I in   long,   law*   S>   <*lt   ll*i     «>t»r   im    •#•••
U • cf Set    s  :.: -,  and  \ kera   "■* ofl lui
N   Ir   »>rw    llal    ptWOO   I"   fllt«'l
imi.TU   ifOrC   Lam ii ■>* llal
H'i|.TS   TIRE   !.♦*•  io a»w   io",  an  ait
tw.ltt f<>*  broken  pmraagaa
RftARD,    H*a*e?     N»    LOW   lo   tO**)   ta*l
Ul 00 um*  i too tamt
DOIUtRi   KAMCIHi   *l»gati UlWeorh
lll'ILMNO   PAPER    Tarrod %>U   »..   I   i'i
Mf  r-11,  •■/•■ending  |o <j*.»aM> |>l*in  TJ,* to
MM por roll
PtfTTf riotorf. Nl, iRUeue eewet sad
f-'* HmtM amah !«# a is p#r pair lir    ••'.,
*is par pair IT'*. <•*-» • ts pet Is*"" tm
lO'TTM   tVrt>t»tt.t  •«#»<    V"   t I    ItytltA
II tj r*. t t   's * IH li «• ps* dea   ts »
tS   It N por <t»t
• 'AHPirr r-Ki.T • is «i  win. ti :t roll
fAifinta   rr rim-»iu»  OM wmw *»»«t
•i.iH i,.ju fini«h  %iit*o ptf ihtMiaand
CHAIN   Call R   elwHHc weM, » K   IIIW
r»r i«m n>t  H. iii «> |x*r tm n>« 1*11 Iti M
par   tt*t\ tha
cutis  t astsjttssi in * J" l»« saea; S
I ♦   It H  »,,h
HIOPFRflp FOOD t*ni*«.»»,«i v.. ft Itste
461 t*nii».Mi Srt i ij: M <1..# 1'nlvawal
vn > pi«« ,i..$   ifaivareal\Ha j Ml IS doe
llnma    Vrt    t*    fl I**   ait'h     l|onn<     No    li
II *e  aatl,
niriiNs  luniirt.  No  *  lie ta <-«<•*
*s'*>   t. Ill II Mfh.  So   1. lit II *•<■*>   HO   S.
ItlH    OOrh
I I.I'VIH   MAt.l.lMIIJ*    I'or  tt<    i«S«'
< t/»TMKS I.t Vi:   WIHH   for ro. h. So ft.
ti is San    ivMt   l« 1}
i»»ui.i.m  im   oi.M'ii   n i   <a «»w llal;
tAm kamutt s in   Si i off nf** li»t
»" -»\ rriitii tjn   iv?  mo tvi i*in   NW
10 li< .   l»  •»•    I Md     |T «I
Ktl.KI   Oroot Woolorn. ll** off IUI. I«t«<k
tMomnn.| 11% off Hot
•UllliKV     HOMK    In    »<»  ft    long!Iio    un-
•ouelo.1   Totmitutl ri«>*. S-'n  '* 3 *W< •" ■"
vin « j piy fn ao, tfiirs bound S"> * •
ei)*. lu flj vitt t I t»iv, |i«^ eorruiatwl.
'tin  * 1 plr. litrs, s-m   » i ptr. l'< "i;
in
» ' M). Ill l
% <,<>t'H.INtlH     ATAfllKI*     S •>.     S I" •
\ In . lie o Ml,
. HAMR TRAP!   Vtrlnr     |»or    t\**t     No   0.
»'■•.  1. II IO;  \\k Uld. |, 14.40. 1   WOrt
II   A   M»a..a   No   0,   RIO.   I.   |l Ofl,   IS,
I'M. I. intie. i, una
Jump-No   |. |^r As   fi 10.  IS. It 10. I.
1.00;
IttONt.   BAD,   COMMON-Pgr   110  n
IH't.N   BAND   iv.*   lOO-IOa. is-ifi   I
I't in II im. i-m   it on f
[RON, HUACK HH»;KT~per I00n.o- ]|
f/'?rJ       '   :"   »"»'*<'   MIO;   18-20   gungo.
inns, OALVAN1ZBD 8HBBT—Ptr mo n>o
i* k.mi«.-  Amorkan oi   Rngllah,  IS.tO:  :»♦
gatlfO,   !«■.•.    It-fO K-lllKr.  it .m
K.S'n|!H, KIM DOOR- Jupannoil. |j T5 por
sot,
I.AMP flMMNKYH -A. por <;.oo fi dm,
I! Ifl por do* ; A. prr <l*.i |] 40 |l p*.r n,SP
* 'loi   IS t'l |»rr doi .   It.  por <lo«   il Tf.
i.ANTKRN»- xiiort   or   long   gloh«,   i.i,,in
lit lu   <l»i     JaiMtnur.l,   |J| «;   dot
invs* mmwkms
KmprwM Itwi i.u.i,. us :<>, 14 x * blade,
tit-Si   ns*', i.Uii<- iti in   is*:, i,|4l,i,. i\".-,:2
Nil   »-!..t.*   |l« (fl.
xtmi  l*ln  whtal,   3  knives,  oach,   i:-in
!»'••   14.in H.lt   ia-tn   UM; t knlvea If-
in IS 7<>   14 ni   t!" it,   ifi-tn . id <m.
MATTOCKS  it* k.   |*Mo   doa:   Cutter,
NA11A wini; Bate Itll f.o.b Vancou*
ror  r-r bna* it '* fob Vaoeouvar,
i-ii'KS  Clay, it n.« |t to .tot
ItN'i: TAB t i.t tl 10 oorh. S gill 36c
rch    S   ffit*   Ji."  om-h
rt.AHTKK <»K I'AUIS    It «0 por 100 U*o
Rivera and purrs .Rtecs .orriogo, lin.
bttm   STr     N.»    I   amuirlrtl   coppered   rlvolo
Ro   I.   Jl<"  W> ;   aotM.rto.1  copper   ilvotn  nnrt
bum Ho; No  *   »»oort«>(i   coppered  burn
*ni|  hurro 31c por ft>    No   I enpporect burm
lie  por n« :  coppered rivot» tic  por tb
i"»fi|w>'o4   hurra   1~<*   por  Tb
lI'ilT.   i«\Si;    Itniioh   iiuihila,   Ivstx.-    IMS'*'
miro ttidiiiu beae   UM
radio m>'i:iviN«; sins • The new
fhertnlodrne TPI lui,*.".' i.-w* w per cent .
n>«- \r* Thertnlodyna TFS. 1114.00 u***). sn
percent Algonquin* USN leai M J-3 Ti«nn
utenlk it*; vi iom xj 13. Premier Wssain*
i,if tts ioo* rt it
i'.rt> "ii-r.vKiMts .'<in.« type Jewell, 1*'*'
', •« jo \*.r ,,'iii Sutter Speaker Console,
tt::.» Iom j»»   lloin., 11? i««M S"
RATTRR1RS    No IU, ii,48 eech; N«> T«T.
It ',0 ,.,•»»
MWAD I'lii'S'iiH      Prandei Superior, IT,
I on* jo |ht cent . Mm "Hi  l,; I. "•" 3i>
MW<   Ht'i'K    llnppv Mo.llum   111 SO floe
Hoppr M'« l'.*-'° dot; PUMons No. 1 tn 10
.tor
SCRtSWS Itrltflit flut hmd TO 10 Off
li»!   I.riitlil roiih.l I..-.I.I. l»T   1 "10 Off lUt    bntM
*">! '.-ti *' 10 off tt-ut: braai round heed
iti  in off ll»l
SCRKW*S,CAP'  !»S off tl»l
hi'HKWH nvrr  :>(, nit n»t
gllttVKt.S   AND   BPADWU-Oldl   or   Foi
• 11 *•>> |M-r dm s Jon.* or iiiiiiiioic 11,1 ^ par
.lot
Si'itnl'**    \|,■.,»••   No    I 111,10 iloi :   No   fi,
is; 1.1 ,toi   No *. iis"*i dos.; No  10, lit* to
Ml •»»•«%«. In IiIai-W  flnlah
>. .l.t'i'.i:    *-  x  ';.  raw loto.  4?o  por lb;
t.-,» :,;.  por 11.
SPIKKS   I'MKSSK.lt   Tor 100 tins     % Inch.
II rn   f,  it 11 10   S-ln   17 SO
sTAi't.Ks -Galvanised fonro. ts aa por too
n.«   in full *i"W*   gnlvnnito-1 poultry netting.
tlrt •« no' t'*-0 tbo   I" full kogo
TAPNS«-Cgenel  PWi off now Hot
WIRR HARHKD- I'or roll-l point. CattlS,
so i,.,i  ».*t'•"   4 iM.mt it"-*  lo roda 14.40.
WIRR   PttAlN   OAUvANlEKD—Par   10«
tt,   *)*\  «  II **■ S<*   il  **'*
W'lKI' ** *t V ''"' '"" ,,,!* No I'1, l'» '..">;
\,,   11    |*. (^',    No    If    !.'. Ti.
w ihnoi'.ks i't* U**U *in*. Oxford,
noils; dot:   Bicycle,  i»* to dos,;   aj«x,o
|t*W! *,!*   Aot
iiiiKvr'ins PIPR Trlmo loee 6« off Hoi;
nenulne Blill*«t« io«o tr. por rout, off u*t
WlRK rt'tTM   Oul of Mock,  Venconvor,
tj por ioo "i  ft 1 Galvanised out or uto-rk
Vanoouver, !♦ M per '0(> »u u
\vis*t|N«l Mtt*»llNKS--Voltts welor pow-
a* It* tf* **t*tl' Sortf00m FSePtrlr. 171 flfl oech;
Snowball   IITH eech;  Katilot.  Ill 00 each
.VISttfl—O'Uary Ht»ii.i itox, M lbs., 112.00
each; 70 i»im. Ill 00 ««t*h; 100 iba 122 out-h.
PAINTS AND OILS.
Brand ram. Hendereon
Per Qelloa
I'll  "K'ngllah'' ordinary colore  It tl
11-11 "Bnfllgh" whim  4.10
UU  K-ttfiior Oil Shingle Stain—
Ordinary colon, in t gni. cane ft ae
<;ieenn nnd (lioya,  in 4 gal. cana  I.M
HH Anchor Shingle Stain—
Ordinary color*, in 4 gni cana  Ml
Orrens and Oroya, In 4 gal. cana   Ml
PAINTS
Gallon
Ordinary colors, in 1 gal. cana  14.40
Martin Senour poreb paint  4,to
Martin  Senour  Noulone  while  3.75
Martin Honour Neutono color   3.7i
Martin  Honour floor paint  4.11
Sherwin VVIIIlana,  white  4.76
Sherwln  Williams,  color  4.4«
Sherwln Williams, porch  t.to
Sherwln Williams, floor  , 4.11
i'lrrt- Per  100 R»s.
Hulk,  barrel* gooiba Hit
Hulk.   Irona  100  Iba    7,71
Hulk. Iiona 36 lb*    ISO
Tlna, i tba.  per tb    t%
Tlna.   lib 11%
I.INSKKI) Ollr- Gallon.
itaw, 1 to 2 barrala fill
Rolled, l to 3 btirrola   1.S9
I-BAD, WHITE IN Oil/— I'er 100 R>e.
I not) Iba.  to  1  Ion 11-8 25
baas   . 17.J5
Brandrant'a tienuine    ll.li
TfRI'KNTtNK- Gallon
1   barrel   lot* I   1 no
VARNI8MK8— Gallon
Klaallc, No. 1  | 1.30
Klaatlc.   No   2      7.40
IV   Linoleum        lift
IV   Marino   Spar       7.10
iv furniture    Ill
IV Pata Hard Oil      I.N
Loa* 33 1-3 por cent,
t.acquorol  II15 leaa II
Automotive Price List
ARSORBKRS SHOCK-Float A Ford No
1 at |il 50
ACCELERATORS FOOT—WlralOSS Ford
at |1 75 each
ASSORTMENTS—Cottor pin 13c each; Cap
acrew* 31c oach; Sot acrowa 30c each; Machine »row t&c oach; Machine nut 71c each.
IUTTKRIE8-Hot Shot |2,»« each.
ROOTS—Tire -t-ln   fl 26 each.
RCMKERS   H.H.vor  Twlnbar.  f 10 SO each.
CATS -Radiator. |l 00 earh.
CARRORt'NCLt'M-Vulve grinding l-os.  |i
dot.
CARRIES-Luggage, rolltpilbll 12 26 each.
CEMENT-Radiator,   M R>  Wonder Woik*
or IS to doa
CHAINS—Weed SrtxJ'j fC 35 each: 3!»iH
IT DO oach; Slit 17 70 each; 33x1 1120 each;
Itxl 19 00 each     Loaa .1H"r
RIO O SKIO .tOx.O*, 1375 pair; I2ti'»
l.19t> pair: 3tx.1*H It 10 pair; 30x4 |3 95 pair;
33x4 It.50 pair. Loaa 10%,
CLEANERS. WINDSHIELD-Presto 11.74
each;  Rain-EOay, f 1 60 oach.
«>»tI.S- Spark alngle 16 66 oach; Spark
double 111 00 each.
DEFLECTORS—Wind adjustable 115 10
pair.
ENAMEIr-H pt. Jot Ijic || 00 dos ; 5-oi
Wonder Worker 14.10 do*; Martin Senour
linlck Drying, l/ll 13c each; 1/33 tic each:
I'll 31c each; ti Sec each; U Wc each; U
11 70 each.
HORNS-Etectrlc 15.75 ench
JACKS—No. 200 12 00 each; No I i2 IS
each; No. 41 fl 00 each
LOCK-t, MOTOMKTKtr Na NO NN
each; No  301 13 00 onch; No. 3« ft.10 each.
MIRRORS   Roar view fj.00 MOB,
oilo-Monamobile. light 11 55 gal.; medium
II SO aal.: heavy 11.70 gal.
PATCHES PLOW OUT Locktlte No. I
|»0O doi; No  3 N.00 doa; No  fi, W00 doa.
PLATES- Stop  1100 each
PLt'fJS Spark Champion Mo each. A. I*.
Titan ISO each; Hoi Fl. 66c each. T
HE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
I'VIt nm ry
Northwestern mutual Fire association
President's Office.
President's Annual Letter to Policyholders.
Gentlemen,—*
"Twciity-fivr years ago this year, the -Northwestern Mutual Fire Association started at thc
bottom of a list of about '-TiImi other fire insur*
anee companies. It has now passed % ptr cent-
of those companies both in volume of buaineas
and in cash resources, while it has paaaed nil
of thfiii in the amount of underwriting profil
it is making from prevailing rales.
Men- bigness, however, doea aot in itself
constitute real success. Has your Aaaoeia
tion rendered a real service! That is the true
test of success, Let tis see: During the five*
year period. 19111-1924 (1925 figures of other
companies n<»t available), yiitir Association has
returned to its policyholders in cash dividends
on their insurance premiums more than tin*
entire underwriting profil made by any other
fire insurance company in America, stuck. Mutual or reciprocal, during the same period on
prevailing rates. In addition to the amount
returned to policyholders in five vears, v.»ur
a • • •
eompany has added (1,355,310.00 to its res. rves
and surplus all of which  belong to  policy
holders.
Why has this been possible! Because of the
Mutual carefulness of our carefully selected
policyholders. This is an achievement mi tin*
part of policyholders of which you as one of
them have reason to bo justly proud.      Your
eompany has now returned  ■••■ t|l;m #l.'i:l7,*
(ififi to its policyholders as illvidcnda,      This
large amount represents a saving in fire waste,
Much is being said these days concerning
Canada's disgraceful lire waste, but it can be
truthfully said that the policyholders of the
Northwestern Mutual Kite Association, through
their combined Mutuality and carefulness, are
actually doing more towards reducing this
waste than any other one organisation.
Thc record of the last tweiity.fivc years has
conclusively demonstrated that the Mutual
carefulness of our selected policyholders can
be counted upon to produce an insurance cost
Central Building, Seattle,
Kebruarj 4 \9*U
, i* lion. J"i lo  I" I*" r relit   !«• lhan ll"* SOS\
for I"****.* .md expense* »i eowpaiilsi o|».r.it
im: under tin   prevailing  *y*iei»<  where nil
elaaaes of pSQph ur*- grouped together to share
each otlnr's lo****
Must fire* are til. r. suit ni mtt \0W*a*iMil **»»ii
sftpit■ntly. the human element is th.  l/i« fnrfor
in fire Insurance I? i* not lb* property "hat
is insured bul the preptHj swttet who i» i«*
mired against th. joss on his property   it is
th,   purpCMH  of the Northw.Ht.ro Mutual Kir**
Association not onlj lo select eareftal pfopk lo
sluir.* tach other's i<iv.« s hut thereafter t»» ren
tier auch policyholders every poasdbla amort
anee in preventing fir. nod then lo in*'" loan
the Inii.tits aeemlng from ih.ir own earafttl-
iu ss by reluming t<> eaeh the unttMo po-rUon of
his insurance premium aflat paying nil momi
All liuturanet is etMiperalre* in thai all pol*
leyholders, i*»o] tht ir litsti ranee premium* i»*
«h,rir. inch other's (omasa |oi? ecHaptratkin U
not necessarily Mutuality Tr-ttc Mu?u •*■.!»'.*»
necks to benefit all pAr'i*"* proportionate la
th.ir niiithhutii.il lo the resullS attain***!   V»
company has .. right lo espatH a maximum oi
carefulness oh the part of its policyholder*
without returning them lhe fruit-* ibara-of Th*
policyholder*! of tht Northwestern Mutual Wre
Association knoa that In the din.l.n.U rriurn
• d to them tiny will if«-t the juit fruit* of ihfir
Mutual etHtperallon and earefulneai
The r.snlts of the year are *h forth in fig-
ur. s t,n another page of thi*- Imrm rt> n**
give this financial itatement your eareful e„n
Mil.ratiuii and  ?*•*, I  fr.,   to write ut r-otit'ern-
Ing anything you may noi fully andarstand
Wi thank you moal lunrtily f..r lhe pnrl you
have hatl in making the yenr juat endod th«'
most successful in the history of vour Aa*0<
o *
'lation, Your offiectl nrr here Iti servo you
i'i this yrent eonaervalion work Only by
eternal .xAgflane*   ean  th,   fir,   doioon   I*
thwarted."
Yours miitiinllv,
e   |
(Signed) l\ .1  MAUTIN.
President 1920
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Hiring the Office Clerk
31
Ity. H. H.
One work test is worth a hundred hunches, That
is the opinion of practical!) all the office managers
this writer has recently Interviewed. Host office
managers admit that they take other things Into consideration in employing a new office worker, hut tho
outstanding value of the work test iii revealing qualities to be ascertained in no other way is generally
recognised*
How m&H| readers Of Ihis ever gave an applicant
for an office job a work test excepting the many
tests involved in giving the applicant a week's trial at
actual work?
Nol many, Thnl is no reason why Investigator*
are so unkind in their comments on tie- efficiency of
the average r»*i«iI store office We know of one met-
chant whose Introduction lo the business was as a eub
i.....kket pt r Probably, if more retailers had sueh an
introduction, their office*, when Ihey have achieved
iflailing auceoflS, would reflect th. fact The merchant whi began ns a bookkeeper has a wonderfully
. ffielcnt offiec.
Mo*i retailers, however, bave never had special
training in any pha*e of of tier management, They
have a gnat many tint ies nhoiit tin store to at lend to,
moat  of whieh may stem  more important  than the
office If Um office will "keep going" when (coy
are absent imm it for a few days, they quite humanly
feel ihey have achieved a great deal
Still, there an things iu office management which
th. mature mind of a successful merchant can grasp
ami then apply much more readily and sui isfully
than many oilier people eould apply them   Merchants
.•tight iti study more the office management methods
of big sueti-saflil stores, eVcll ihollgll tiny  lose Q little
lime from I heir studying of merchandise,
Chain Variety Stores Use Work Test.
Chain variety stores, which employ beginners at
#9 per week, ami frequently ust a grade of help many
merehanta would nol permit behind their counters
are not unbusinesslike as one might think In their
selection of employees You se.* in tin* "live ami ten"
stores girls who impress you as dumb lulls, but before
they have started work those girls have passed work
tests The work tests, while simple ,ha\e showed
that the girl* have ability I" do the necessary arithmetic ami other things required "f lemeenMtore employee*
Work tests are nn economical system for learning
many thing*, before an applicant has been actually
hired, whieh, ill the past, have only been discovered
after employment Naturally, the tests wive a great
deal of time. Kverv applicant can be given them A
waiting list can be "kept at all times of graded applicant h
1'V office workers, irrespective of what work W
going to be done, work tests iu rending, arithmetic,
spelling, eopv. and other things are given,   it may
seen, odd to'the merchant to appear in the rolO 01
schoolmaster, but when applicant for the offlcc are
being considered, thai role is a mighty effective ono
to adapt.
SIMPSON
A work lest in spelling consists iu reading twenty
words to the applicant and deducting five per cent for
each word misspelled Don't hunt up tbe hardest
words in the dictionary. On a list before the writer
such words appear as pronunciation, uncontrollable,
achievement, emulation, acknowledgment, publicity,
receive.
For a .reading test, have the applicant read a
couple of pages of text in a book or magazine she
should understand, then have her write out a short
statement of what is in the material. Note how much
time was consumed in reading, antl grade further for
understanding revealed in the written composition,
ami for grammar used antl for choice of words.
Nothing very difficult is required for an adequate
test iu aiithmctic. One office gives ihe applicant two
columns of figures to add down and across. The numbers in all eases are four figure ones, and there are ten
numbers to a column.
Itesitlos this, there should be a sum in multiplication, ami another in division. Have the applicant
multiply 872,622 by H'M. Have her divide #189,342.00
by 11.16.
Kate tho arithmetic test by accuracy and by the
time consumed iu handling it.
Another lest given is the eoyping of a complicated
order.   The rating is for accuracy.
Another general test, for imagination, is to require
the applicant to describe, briefly, an Kskimo igloo, or
some other thing he ean know about only through his
reading, In some eases, the test 'is to describe some
artiele of merchandise in a manner to interest thc
public.
Another test of intelligence is to compile a group
of numbered "reasons" why the store is the success
that it is. Some reasons put down are sound ones,
sueh as the policy of guaranteeing satisfaction, or the
convenient location, or the skillful, courteous clerks.
Others are ridiculous, like tbe fact that the store has
a tin roof, or faces a mountain. The applicant for the
office jub is asked to cheek the reasons whieh have
matle the store the success it is.
Another test, for concentration, consists in giving
the girl a sheet of mixed capital letters, arranged in
lines, about twenty-five to the line. The test is to go
through the mass of letters, crossing out the letter
"A." The applicant is not permitted to return to any
letters which have been skipped. There are one hundred A's. One per cent, is the penalty for every one
missed, two por cent, the penalty for letters-wrongly
marked. A further penalty of one per cent, is deduct*
ed for every five seconds over ninety seconds, the
theoretical time which should be required for the task.
Specific Work Tests, too.
Additional to such general tests as have been given,
big offices have standardized procedure for work
lests for particular tasks. A typist will be required
to eopy a letter in whieh there are quite numerous errors, correcting the errors as she goes along.   She will •I-
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RKTAILER
I't ll!t>
I
I
\
I
lu* marked for time taken, neatness, ami nrrangemenl
of work, and for correction of mistakes.
If ti bookkeeping position is involved, special Imok'
keeping problems will be presented,   A stenographer
will be given actual dictation and required to read
hack.   All employee on whom w ill devolve actual coi
rcapondence will be given several situations lo cover
with letters,   Adjustment situations nre usually given
the correspondent, inasmuch as eapaeit) for handling
such are a basic qualification,    Kor example, a ship
ment has arrived short,   The new applicnnl is asked
to tactfully request an adjustment with proper credit
rn' the jobbing house A collection letter must Ih1 writ
ten Mrs. Jones, who is two months behind in a prom
ised series of payments to clear up an old hill    This
will test the applicant's understanding of collection
principles.
Turnover in office help is expensive, and it is - ecu
more expensive to continue with the inefficient employee. Work tests furnish an accurate method of
determining intelligence and general ability, without
tin* disadvantages of actual trial Bt the job
Personal qualities, sueh as appearance, cheerful'
ness or otherwise, persisii*!ice and other things are
very importanl. too, These are not mentioned hert
for the reason that mosl employers of experienee consider them with greater or less skill They are seldom
a satisfactory substitute for work tests, however thev
should be considered as additional important things
TIPS FOR LIVE CLERKS
A CLERK S SIX COMMANDMENTS
UK ENTHUSIASTIC. Nothing so quickly per
Buadcs a store visitor of a clerk's sincerity in recommending goods as enthusiasm tor them Enthusiasm
is contagious. It communicates itself to, aud colors
the attitude of the inquirer, There is another "scent"
respecting it- it can be trained and developed in tin*
clerk.   If you doubt ihis. jusl watch in action •*•> e
of the specialty salesmen  who call,  and  who bttbblt
with enthusiasm even after a pom* dinner or a mom
ing of poor sales luck. They have learned the Pick
of automatically becoming enthusiastic as they begin
a sales canvass. Vou can develop the same power, if
you will set out to do so.
There are degrees of enthusiasm.   Thc clerk who
Bruises       Sores
Rheumatism
Soothe the tore muaclei or ligaments by rubbing in Minard'e Liniment. It penetratei, relieve! and
heals. It eaeei inflammation and
restores the injured part to health.
Splendid for cuta and sores. It
sterilizes and heals quickly.
can make his own  brand  stand nlt-oie  that  ».( ,.••
retail sale* people has r valuable pemossl sdtsnti
i-,i; liuol) Hi UO-RKP        Bin rj   Hlth   whii.*
erauky part) will appear   then s always om in aim ,-
so m.in\ eustoiners    Homebody one.   m a whih   ni
• !i,io*,t  in so mao>   word-, disputing  vour tfttrnieitt
(•Jill   I'OU   ,i   ll.H        I.,   (in   t..   k.ep   *4«.Ur   s|||rt   nil.   f|||«|   |
S|M||,      M.t\l"   N'Mi ,i!«   Relisitivfi   and its hard  to
ih .-t  sn. 11-*. uith  .1  maont r   which does  not   ire i  '
I,. ,tt ihem    Still k- ep yom shirt nn
Most people haven't sny Wle,    tun though *
m<ih io have, ni'l ih< good-humor-ed elerk Ira no* thu
s horth     lh<  muni efiirl*iil elerk knowa how t.. | •
along not onlv with Ultf kltol nt *tort   i isitt.r*. lot
kinds, and good humol is Ihi BltiWrf
I'd*'. T \i 11 I I     Here cowr* an opinionated i* i
s.ai    Tftel permit*) th»   gentleman lo sir some «»' >,**.,
\ i, v.i wiih whieh lhe elerk lodieatei h« ,* io mmplel
.*!•(,. ho'Ii!     Tht   opinioii.it. «1   priWitl   l*iH,it   Iti   *•
pleasanl .tnd favurabh dis|*-w«l   *»> mueh so Ihsl b«
aeltialH sgrt ■ •*» with Mtl< t arguments oi th. elerk
i»u\s his vm.hIs    ||,r, cunt*■» „, bargain huuti i    |Wa
Ihf eh rk otfi-r lir-si m nrtielf with Iht     prti«•" .»?'•
iionf   Hi doesn't    H* knows 11»* nniinmt will wU!
t,i „, <• si wr il brftin  h«  l»u)*  and b.   htd*U hark '
mosl Iik. h i>ii> ring
l|.*!f eotios a prtifrMNtoutl titan who i* always i
hint*-.     I•>.*.» h :ii,   e\**tk  maki   inrbilttt   rrfrwit
lhe nexl nt hie tie ronlrstl   \**t *»*'   II. alteiwla lo ll
customer with .« step in rhwhto with the pr»il« %»t*>
man s mood
ItK IMM HTRlOl H    h- em hrbng lo Ihi     \
ton ought to ,,r !.. s«.to.- athletic o-rganltsllon or hn'
soiui   hobb)   whieh will k.»p yt»u  to phynlt al tm
Rverj stori In, i?s   rush'' prHknli and nothing pt<  •
es tin  trade   and the bosit   hk.   | «|«rk who i* gft aw
lightning nt iretting around     iinlv tlo man or won
who do. s something to i**\* in trfn «*«n miinil.*? I*
p. r ernl  • ((.. i« inv at th.   'nub" hours
\N hat do yoU do when the tpin t hmtfW tttitn ' Find
scmcthing to do!   Ih.nt wait (or tbt boss lo nig***"*'
Homething   h<  may U  t.M. bus)    Suits?**! aotnethii
yourself
I'I'. l«OYAt<    When you **»***" i,» ban ronfl I-
in ami respect for your stun, it \ lime to gel OUt     I
you hav.' a grievsnee don't talk about it t.. ottlsbl
ami toother employe-en, ink. »t io y«»ur i^mployet
J. A. TEPOORTEN
LIMITED
WHOLESALE DRUGS
PATENT MEDICINES DRUGISTS* SUNDRIES
PHARMACEUTICAL PREPARATIONS
308 Wtter St.
Vaneouvtr, B.C
• W>
'l'"l*: BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
'!'»
•hi
Mn. Maine's Marmaiade
ORANGE
GRAPE FRUIT
FINK APPLE
2845—Ith   Ave.,   West.
Phone. Bay. 133
PALM OLIVE
SOAP
Representative:
Oean Armstrong, ISM Larch SL
Vancouver. • C.
Phone: Bay. MIL
OAVTON    SCALES
Meal    Sneers.    Meat   Choppers,
Coffee    Mills,    Cheese    Cullers,
Broad Sneers.
INTERNATIONAL   BUSINESS
MACHINE   CO.   LTO.
f. C, 8TRICKER.
Local Representative
60S Seymour Si.   Phone:  Sey. 2S3
CANADA STARCH
CO. LTD.
E. H. ROWNTREE. Representative
207 Hastings West. Vancouver.
Phone:  Sey. 59
IMIOJUCK* COMPANY
tiMiTIO
Whoi#Mi»  Tf a  and Cefttt Mtrchants
"■OAio-a osst • on* "Tuoon"
I PIANOS
I0M Hamilton at,       Vancouver.  0 C.
Phone: Seymour J744
QUAKER JAMB
DOMINION CANNERS, B. 0.
Limited
VANCOUVIR. B. C.
Phone: toy. SSS2
Our Wholesale Department Carries
a Complete Lino of
CROCERIES A TOBACCO
HUDSON'S BAY COMPANY
Phono Sey. 5131
VANCOUVER. B.C.
MONARCH   KNITTING   GO.
Limitsd.
Mens antl wotufiis hosiery knitted
outerwear and hand knitting yams.
Represented in British Columbia
S. D. STEWART A CO. LTD.
318 Homer St. Vancouver, B. .C
Phone: 3ey. 752S
ROCK ISLAND OVERALL CO.
Rock Island, Quebec
Representative:
R. M. Foster, 3544—32nd Ave. W.
Vancouver, B.C.
Phone: Bay. S030Y
Paper l»mt». wrapping paper,
tor ail requirements.
COLUMBIA PAPER GO. LTD.
tOSS Hamilton St. Vancouver, B.C.
Phone: Sey. S822
Kellogg's Corn Flakes
Local Agents
L P MASON A CO.
510 Hastings West.
Phone Sey. 2908
NORTH WES IERN MUTUAL
FIRE ASSOCIATION
FlroPrtvsnUon Inturancsj
736  GRANVILLE   STREET
PHONE   SEY.   1539
Head Office:
CENTRAL   BLOC,   SEATLLE
CANADIAN
TOLEDO SCALES
E. 8. CHAMBERS, Agency Manager
424 Cordova 81. W. Phone. Sey. S911
Vancouver.
WRITE YOUR OWN
Show Cards
8HOWCARO WR'TING is a book
of 198 pages elegantly bound in
battleship grey cloth, with over 200
illustrations.. Send for it today.
Prieo $2.00... Money refunded If not
satisfactory
Progress Psbbsiiif Co., Ltd.
101-2 Merchants' Exchange Bldg.
Vancouver, B. C.
Csaadiaa PesSm Cereal Co.. InSd
Head Office
Local Agents:—•
McNEELYS LTD.
739 Hastings 8t. W.
Toronto
Phone:
Sey. 9337
^"V.         Phono:  High. 3889
yy IDEAL CONE COMPANY
Y$|fe/         Manufacturer* of
■TTj
H        ICE  CREAM CONES
u    Purest Made    Cost Less
f         335 PRINCESS AVE.
\j                 Vancouver.
Dmi| ■ Rig
BORDEN'S
EVAPORATED
MILK
Vancouver Office
332 Water Street
Phone: Sey. 8383
STORE EQUIPMENT
Scales, Slicers, Cuttere and Cabinets—New, Rebuilt and Sscend Hand.
Cash or Terms.
THE SCALE SHOP LTD
Sey. 2881
385 Cordova St. W., facing Homer. m
tm
fr
34
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA BBTAXLBR
IV I,
PAPER BAGS
J. C. WILSON   LTD.
1088 Hcmer Street,       Vancouver.
Phone: Sey. 781
ROYAL CROWN
SOAPS
MatiuTucturori In llritish Columbia
aud guaranteed.
ROYAL CROWN  SOAPS LTO.
GLASS  JARS
"Improved Gem" A "Perfect Seal"
Local Representative: R. G. Moore.
Doaiaios Glass Coapiiy Ltd.
510 Hastings St. West.   Sey. 5138
B. C. Distributors of
Messrs. T. H. Prosser 4 Sons Ltd.
London.
Manufacturers  of   Pressors'  Celebrated Line of TENNIS and
CRICKET Supplies.
Associated Agencies
LTD.
815 Pender St. W.        Vancouver.
Phone: Sey. 131
WATCHES,  CLOCKS,  JEWELRY
Western Wholesale Jewelers
Cordova and Cambie Sts.
Phone: Sey. 2765
PAPER  PRODUCTS
MANUFACTURERS
CONTINENTAL    PAPER
PRODUCTS LTD., Ottawa, Ont.
Local   Representatives:
Smith, Davidson 4 Wright
Davie and Homer Ste.     Sey. 9585
McCORMICKS
JERSEY CREAM 80DAS
McCormick Mfg. Co. Ltd.
1150 Hamilton Street, Vancouver.
C. H. KENNEY, Manager.
Phone: Sey. 3412
SERVICE   TO   OUT   OF   TOWN
SUBSCRIBERS.
The British Columbia Retailer will
be pleeeed to furnish subscribers
the namee and addressss of repre.
eentatlvee or agents of eastern
manufacturers In Vancouver. We
will elee advlee where their com.
medltles ean be purehessd.
WESTERN GLASS Means
PRICES RIGHT
-SERVICE   FAST  A
-QUALITY
POLISHED PLATE  GLASS
MIRRORS    ::     WINDOW  GLASS
Western Glass
Co«f Ltd*
15*9 Cordova Steret West
Vancouver. B   C.
Phone Sey. 8887
Hams & Bacon
Swift's "Premium"
SWIFT CANADIAN CO. LTO.
Vancouver.
PAPER
BAGS    AND     WRAPPING
Norfolk Psper Ct. Ul
ISS WATER STREET
Vancouver.
Phone: Sey. 71
SPRING ANNOUNCEMENT
Fsncy Silk Hose for Men st
the   Right Price ."
Write for sample*.
i BEAR
f a>
R. A. SIME. BC Distributer
TNS  BLACR  MANUFACTURMe  CO.
318 Homer St.       Vancouver, B.C.
GALVANIZED IRONWEAR
THE THOS. DAVIDSON MFG. CO.
LTD.
123 Powell Street Vancouver.
Phone: Sey. 4858
RCGISTCRCD.     *
CHIPMANHOLTON      KNITTING
CO. LTD.
E. H. Walsh A Co. Ltd., Agenta.
318 Homer Street,       Vancouver.
Phone: Sey. 4858
GILLETTS
LYE
L   Macfariane. Representative
Behms Bu>idmg. Vancouver. Be
Ptte«e Soy. HSS
UNDERWEAR
ATLANTIC    UN08RW8AR    LTD
E.  H.  Walsh  4 Co.  US.  Agent*
VO Homer Street Vancouver
Phone: Sey. 888?
TIGER BRAND
UNDERWEAR
J. J   MACKAV, Agent
804 Bower Bi#g.   Phone   Boy- •*•*•'
Tie CUT KHITTWC CO. LTD
Csk.
41CEETEE "
Pure Wool
UNDERCLOTHING
TURNBULL'S of Coh
Local Office   US Hamar Street
Phono; Sey, rSfS
T. 0. STARK
F. W. STERLING
Telephone
Bey. Sit*
8TAIK ft STERLING
MANUFACTURERS'  AGENTS
1043  Hamilton  St root.
VANCOUVER, B. C. DIXON & MURRAY
SHOW CASES
STORE FRONTS
OFFICE AND STORE FIXTURE MANUFACTURERS
] GENERAL CONTRACTORS
OHICt tat r.cloiy: 10M DUN8MUIR ST.
I
ram            —»——««********     " ts*****—-———»—■——«^—,
hi mmmmmt**       w    '             ' «^.
VANCOUVER, \m*C.
****
t
■""••  ,*i*Z7*fl
Bro
okiidd
Bra««
A\(rt»mrfy
Bulter
i •fi
The Brand of distinctive quality-Swift's 'BROOKFIELD"
Brand Creamery Butter. To keep your customers satisfied, you
must stock a product that will assure satisfaction in every degree.
A satisfied customer means repeat business, which results in more
volume and additional profit.
When buying your butter requirements, buy "BROOK
FIELD," made from pure, sweet cream, under strictly sanitary
conditions.   Parchment wrapped and sold in one pound cartons.
Sure to please.
SWIFT CANADIAN COMPANY LIMITED WHEN mothers ask for warm
stockings for their children,
just place a pair of M Little Daisy "
Stockings in their hands. Once let
them feel the warmth of thc soft,
silky Australian lambs' wool from
which these fine stockings are knit
and the sale is made.
If you do not handle this celebrated
line, or if your stock is low, get in
touch with your wholesaler immediately. He can supply you with
"Little Daisy" Stockings for children of all ages—in a wide range of
dainty colors, and black. Reinforced
toes and heels.
Chipman-Holton Knitting Co., Limited
Hamilton, Ont.
Mills st Hamilton and Welland
Ta;:'
LITTLE DAISY
■7/osnn/ Ksrlnimts oQiiUn-n

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