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The British Columbia Retailer Apr 30, 1925

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Array  The British Columbia
Vancouver, B. C. addii       iooe       10c per copy; $1.00 per year.
VOL. XVII Ho. »       APRIL,     1925 Seventeenth Year.
The World's Finest Scale
Vt'urjt oi research mid progressive improvement have gone into the tusking of Um
DAYTON Computing Scale, A great international organisation has concentrated
its i.smiik-is upon tix* evolution "i a computing scale that would combine tlu* most
sensitive nceuracj with durability, convenience and sanitary safeguards.
The DAYTON principle of weighing is approved by science and recognised as tho
purree! principle to ensure the highest degree of accuracy for commercial weighing,
DAYTON SCALES
soon pay for themselves out of the money tiny save you.
DAYTONS may be purchased on month'y payments.
Liberal allowance made on your present scale.
INTERNATIONAL  BUSINESS  MACHINES  CO.  LIMITED
/■>)<■(•»    ,;•..' /',,),;' '"'■,,      \\ at   /."ivi-V. Onturt,* dujlniM Service •''-* Sales ''fo in till Principal Cities
\0
INTERNATIONAL
*>'<*«   RtCOKOIRI ILIOTNta  TiStt  IVITIMI
TlVI   I'm,,
(kieTRIC cioc.t mui»i'hii *a
DAYTON
computinu nana corrtt mill*
,.,.,.. .imihh Mt*T ••-'««"• CHltar cuttim
cninii    MADE IN CANADA    *-e*T iMo*»*»a**.a im.u k<um '    llllJI'H.IM«*OH
A True Statement
1870—1924
CAN-ADA is such a new country, it ii almost incredible that
paper bags have been made here for a period of over 50 YEAR8
—IT 18 nevertheless TRUE—
It is EQUALLY TRUE, that by no other policy than that of
maintaining at all oosts, the high standard of quality in our bags,
together with efficiency of service could we have retained the
reputation of being manufacturers of the most dependable paper
bags on the market today.
-3 GRADES-     ""•
STANDARD LIGHT KRAFT HEAVY KRAFT
J. C WILSON, LIMITED
Manufacturers of
PAPER BAGS.     WRAPPING, TISSUE AND TOILET PAPERS
for   Wholesalers and Retailers.
1068 HOMER STREET, VANCOUVER, B. C.
Phone: Seymour 781
A'
i
YOUR CUSTOMERS
APPRECIATE THE BEST
THE ROYAL CROWN SOAPS, LTD.
VANCOUVER, B. C 192.',
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
<t
A section or one of the
rem arkable Kel log's
All - Bran Advertisements ntnv appearing.
There's real
money for
the Dealer
who links up
with this
campaign!
Half tho world
io half aoloop
Can aucceas in life ba
undermined by constipation) Indeed it can. The
poisons of this diaaase tire
you out, wear you down,
make you listless and make
you lose interest in things
in general. Ambition is
most often prompted by a
thoroughly healthy body.
Kellogg's ALL-BRAN brings
permanent relief from con*
stipation.
thatd
that drag
roop
ALMOST every paper from coast to
coast carries this thought-provoking series of Kellogg's All-Bran
advertising. Everywhere people are
reading them and are beginning to realize the tremendous importance bran
plays in their daily lives.
Hundreds »»f thousands of p---*»i»lt* are seeing these
a-is saeh week, Some of them live in your district
•—near your store, Let them know that you stock
Kellogg's All-Bran—display it in your window, on
vour counter, around vour store, and like thousands
oi other merchants yon will find your Kellogg s
All -I Iran profits steadily increasing,
KELLOGG COMPANY  of CANADA
LONDON. ONTARIO
AIM   tuamiUtHinTfi   of   KaUogg*!   OorU   Flak'-s
KeDogg") (Crumble*, KeUogg*i Pep and Kellogg*!)
Mian Kluki-x ami Other Parts of Wlo-at
KNOW THE TRUTH ABOUT DRAN
',') W effective, bran fiber must go through
i ie various digestive processes without sub's ttting tn any of them. It must pass through
tha entire alimentary tract without its form
h iing changed.
What happens when a bran food is eaten)
After the saliva has acted upon it, it passes
• iirough the stomach and into the intestines,
t< here every-part which is not fiber is absorbed.
In ALL-BRAN the Quantity of fiber ia so
< reat that it furnishes bulk enough to prevent
>id relieve constipation.
In a part-bran food, the quantity of fiber ia
• small that there is only a puny amount to
••■.*■» a herculean task.
ALI.-BRAN brings sure results.    Demand it.
>ih hot cereals, put it in soups and try
(he recipes given on every package.
lure you get Kellogg's ALL-BRAN—
•\:inal and only ALL-BRAN—for only
AN brings sure results.   All grocers
Begin eating it today.   Served in
\j hotels and restaurants.
original ALL-BRAN—ready-to-eat
9% AII.RP2
ALL-BRAN
StUCVIS CONSTIPATION
iiMeaf^
AUBRAN
ttOWD.'RRUMBUD
»*ADY TO EAT
oM
0
2> THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
April
NABOB
BMAND
Saves you time when customers ask for Fresh Roasted
Coffee." That's exactly what Nabob is. The vacuum tin
leeps the flavor in—you sell it "fresh from the roaster.
Kelly Douglas & Co. Ltd.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
I
|   llr* DouCtAS A<-
VANCOUVfP"'-
JSU»'
'.IML ..^. ........... I.-J.-111!     ■'■■    ! i I.     m     '     iW I i li Wi »l IHWIJI.!'"
WILSON BROTHERS
Established 1890
Our Motto i» "SERVICE"
We cannot offer to sell you goods cheaper than any other firm is in a powtion to do. but we CAN
give actual facts to prove that it is
ECONOMY
to deal with us
Sart?: WILSON BROTHERS. VICTORIA. B. C.
Wholesale Grocers
■    ■
■«»•
mrnmm~'-i~~m**^m*
SHAMROCK RRAND
HAM, BACON, BUTTER, LARD, SAUSAGE, etc.
First Quality packing house product* put Up by V Burns & Co.,
Limited, which means they arc the highest grade, always reliable,
and without equal on this market.
YOU CAN RECOMMEND SHAMROCK BRAND.
P. Burns & Company, Limited
VANCOUVER
OALOARY
EDMONTON
om 1928
rHE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
ROGERS
f
GOLDEN SYRUP
.. JjmPHHPB^^^^^
,
■-aKV'-
—— ~
'*t i
ki
[■■•'' -*■■•*.« 1
0
■ami
"
h
Cm
Ifflsw
J*   *££
.A.
V
«*     i^*'*.*S>-^»i *:"*■
•t    , . -       ..-   - *           ■'
U.1
■•
of'.- .>■»•».«:».
*'
sj-' « 1ows,rMi*&
**. *^
i
"The End of a Perfect Day"
flMade from finest flavoured cane sugar, a special grade of which is imported for the
purpose.
fPut up in all sizes of packages to suit your customers' requirements.
Kin packages designed to beautify your store.
21b. tins, 24 to a caae.
Mb. tins, 12 to a caae.
104b. tins, 6 to a caae.
20-lb. tins, 3 to a caae.
Perfect Seal jars, 12 to a caaa.
The British Columbia Sugar Refining Co. Ltd.
VANCOUVER, B.C. i : i
I     \
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
April
Always Stipulate
CONTINENTAL
Ice   Cream  Pails
WHEN ORDERING YOUR REQUIREMENTS
RECOGNIZED BY DISCRIMINATING MERCHANT8
POR THEIR DEPENDIBILITY
Can be obtained with wire handles or individual bags for each pail.
The Continental Paper Products
Limited
OTTAWA. CANADA
Alao manufacturers of Paper Bags of every description.
Vancouver   j
SS.     SMITH, DAVIDSON & WRIGHT, LIMITED
Calgary        \
"Using a Continental Bag is Bag Insurance."
extensively advertised  throughout
the West
Brand
ned
0 TT  A II T? U   Brai
IJLJ AKlilX Can
iruit and vegetables
Quaker flavor is the natural flavor of fine fruits and vegetables grown in the
sunny valleys of British Columbia. Quaker chefs make them delicious and
appealing—fit for the most particular table.
Carry the full QUAKER line
Dominion Canners B.C. Limited, Vancouver
Trade Mark 1925
THE BRITISH COLOMBIA KKTAILKR
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Retailed
With which la incorporat*d the B   C. TRADE REVIEW.
Published Monthly.
SEVENTEENTH YEAR
OBNBRAL MBRCHANDISB
OROCBRIEB. DRYGOODS,
HARDWARE. FOOTWEAR,
OFFICIAL ORGAN OF B.C. BOARD
RETAIL MERCHANTS'
ASSOCIATION OF CANADA.
Secretaries,   Representing  tha  fa-Hewing
Branches R. M. A.
Armstrong W. H. Grant.
Cranbrook C. J. Lewis.
Kamloops J. Ratchford.
Kelowna A. Fraser.
Lytton B. Rebagliatl.
A MONTHLY JOURNAL published in the interest ot Retail Merehan
diiing end the Development of Commerce in Western Canada. Nanaimo N. Wright.
Nelson E. F. Gigot.
New Westminster	
a^.d Fraser Valley. J>. Stuart.
SUBSCRIPTION RATK. on*- Dollar Per year, payable in advance.
Advtrtislng Rates on Application
Publishers:  PROGRESS PUBLISHING CO. LTD. **^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Suite 101-2 Merchants' Exchange Building
VANCOUVER. B. C. Revelstoke R. F. Young.
Telephone S*->   3**61 Cable Address   Shipping-Ail Codes
Editor, J  8. Morrison W. N. Code, Bushsess Manager
Kn!t-red at Onawa al Second class matter
Vancouver.... W. F. Ing.
Vol xvu \., a
April.  19*25.
Vaneouvtr, B.C.
ARE YOU TALKING BAD BUSINESS?
Is there not too much talk on ihe part of merchants alum; business being ilull snd depressed, snd is
ii not ;i fact thai ihe continuous complaining of alois
i rn«li- is lending lo keep it so*>
It is true thai the man who la ill never gets well
hy everlastingly telling people aboul hi*- ailments nor
hv adopting b melancholy outlook on his trouble. A
cheerful attitude pven in the face of recognised ills.
will be a big factor in eliminating them   The state ol
mind is g*g Important QS any Contributing factor to a
satisfactory recovery.
What is true iu regard t.» one*s health is in a similar fashion true of business Business will not im-
prove through persistent ly proclaiming it to be bad,
The other day n merchant who is strong for a reason*
ably optimistic vicm of present eonditions tnhl the
writer that a man had recently eome into his store with
a stm-y like this He had eome down town that morning with the money to buy a new suit of clothes. He
entered n stoic ami approached a salesman with the remark, "Well, how is business today'" The clerk replied with a long explanation as to how really bad
husiness was "People ate not buying," he said "I
do not know  what is wrong, but there certainly isii t
anything doing!"
What was lhe result *   The customer who had on
entering the stun*, nil Intentions of buying a new suit.
decided that if I hint's were really as had as they had
heen painted to him. In* had better keep his money in
his pocket, ami he left the store without making a purchase,
Thus is revealed an instance ot' where the sales
man, the representative of the merchant himself, had
turned a sale from his store. Through talking loo
much pessimism he  had  spread the propaganda  that
will do more to keep conditions dull, than anything
else. Bad business is often a state of mind. Therefore,
.hy adopting a cheerful, optimistic attitude every merchant will do much to halt the growing feeling that
it is had
TRANSIENT   TRADERS.
The last few years have seen a great increase in
Ihe number of transient traders, bell ringers, as they
are called, who. with no other selling expense than
-hoc leather and living expenses, go from door to door,
competing with retail merchants, who are subject to
Dominion and municipal taxes ami besides that, eon-
tribute to the welfare of the community by maintaining
store premises for the convenience of purchasers.
The Transient Traders' Aet as it is in force in
l'anada. and the watchful eve of the Retail Merchants1
Association, have done a great deal towards lessening
the harm dom* by these transient traders. But despite
all that has heen done the evil persists aud it is gtOW*
ing. In the cities, men with a bundle under their
arm. will go through office buildings selling suit lengths,
hosiery and other articles of apparel, and it is practically impossible to stop them, Throughout the country the peddler with his paek sells pretty nearly everything the householder requires. Retail merchants
should wake up to the danger that threatens them and
the  lamatre that is actually being done to them by
these transient traders.
We must not allow this parasite to take a strangle
hold in Canada, nnd in order to restrain it the retail
trade must line up with those who are endeavouring
to strengthen the Transient Traders Act and let their
parliamentary friends know that in their opinion no
class of trailers should he allowed to operate without
paying their fair share of taxation in the form of lie
enee fees. THK KKITIK1I COLUMBIA HKTAIUW
A im H
GROCERIES & PROVISIONS
MARKET   REPORT.
Vancouver, April. 12,
Husiness continues good in retail grocery channels.
Wholesalers also report better husiness to date this
year than prevailed during the same period last year.
Const met ion work all over the province is taking on a
very healthv aspect, relieving to a very meat extent
the unemployed. Mining development in many dis
tricts. particularly the Alice Arm and Kootcnay see
tions. is going ahead on a larger scale than ever before
Thc lumber and logging industries, on the other hand.
are rather quiet and inactive owing principally to lack
of export demand aud a surplus of logs in the water.
This situation is, of course, only temporary and will be
adjusted before the year is out. Hudson's Bay Co.
and Woodwards are working night and day tearing
down old buildings to make way for new and up-to-
date additions to their already large buildings. This
indicates great faith and foresight in tin- future of.
Vancouver. We have also heen led to understand tin-
representatives of tin- T. Baton Company recently
spent the best part of two weeks in the city looking
over prospects for lhe future. Should the Hrm decide
to open in Vancouver they will have a chain of Departmental stores all across Canada from Monetion to
Vancouver. Departmental stores, of course, are a serious competitor of the legitimate retail grocer, but if
our information is correct, the retail grocer in Vancouver has much less to contend with iu the matter of
competition than has the retailer in Eastern Canada
Sugar—Since our last issue, the commodity has declined 15c per 100 tbs. making today's (April 12) basis
•1*7.05 for standard granulated in 100-lb hags. Raw market continues easy, and there does not appear to he any
cause for higher prices, at hast until such a time ai
the consumption should increase. Our advise for the
present is to huy as needed.
Canned Fruit.—This is a lim* than can he featured
to very good advantage at tin* present time. The
Ihousewife's stock of preserves, put down last summer
ns in most eases depleted. Fresh fruit is not yet available in sufficient quantities or at sufficiently low
prices to make it economical, with tin- consequence
that the canned product is not in great demand. A
weekly Saturday special on some particular line that is
reasonable in price has a strong appeal
Milk.—Evaporated milk prices were reduced 20c
per case on the tall or hotel si/.es April 1st. making today's basis on single case losts $5.25. This reduction
applies on all brands except  Nestles.      There is no
change in price of Condensed milk at present   ;i t«. I
Milk is also down \th- p<r case, which, after Inking Itll
consideration the manufacturers bonus of 50e make**
today's basis $5.10 per test for the tall site.
Price's English candles are again available at $2 i
per box of 120 caudles
Vegex.—The nets concentrated food containing the
necessary vitamin "\\." is meeting with gnat favor
It comes in several popular sixes
Vinegar.—The period for the sale of brown vinegei
which has been artificially colored, has been extended
to September 1st by the Dominion Board of Health
This action has been taken s*» ss So give wholesaler*
and retaili rs ample time to dispose of their stocks
Flour.—One nf the hardest problems the retailer
has had to contend with during tin* past few months i*.
to follow flour fluctuations Prccjlteol changes have
mad** prices eery uncertain The last change eff«ct**d
was on April ><th, when prices advanced 40c per bbL,
to $9 sn for 19 eotton
Salt.—I'i ices on some sixes of Canadian salt xho*w
a sli»ht increase, particularly Regal shaker Salt, which
has advanced io #*2 i»ti per ease These higher prices
will probably prevail until early in June, when the
tirs! boat shipment \ ia the Panama Canal m due
Bullen's Salad Dressing—This is a local lim of
merit, that is being marketed on a more extensive scale*
It comes in two nixes; 24 3 2 <>* bottle at ll,80 per
do/., 24 * ox bottle at $3,78 per dox
Canned Vegetables. — This commodity is moving
freely Retailers stocks purchased last fall are becom
ing depleted, particularly peas, corn and tomatoes    l!
is reported that corn is practically unprocurable from
the packers. The same situation exists on tomatoes
There is every possibility that both these lines will be
short before new crop is available this fall. Opening
prices on 11)25 pack canned tomatoes were named April
1st. ami show a reduction of Approximately 10 per cent
on all sizes ,\Vw spinach prices hase also been named
on the same basis as last yrar
Bulk Dates.   Bulk Hallow! dates have advanced
:,|C per lb, although local jobbers an- still selling at
the former basis of liC.e per lb. Hallow i dates this
year are of exceeding line quality, and at the present
low priees are in big demand
NEW SAUCE ON THE MARKET.
Messrs. \v. Clark Limited of Montreal are Introducing s
sauce which in meeting win-, very ready response* "Governor
Banc* i« ii rich condiment and li meeting with much totoi
on the Canadian market.
The fact that It l« packed In bOXCS, with 12 bottle* only.
makes it very easy to stoek, it Im popularly priced and will
retail in most lectlonn nt popular prices, The pfickiun* in most
attractive, 1925 THK BRITISH OOttJItttfA RCTAILKU
PHOHE FOE POOD    CAMPAIGN
d
Unusual Data Presented by Sales Promotion Committee, National Wholesale Grocers' Association, in
Connection with Latest Scheme of U. S. Grocers.
\V( have received SOme very in ten-sting information regarding the proposed "Phone for Pood" campaign sponsored by Cnited Slates grocers, and what
sliis campaign is expected to accomplish for the retail
grocery business there,
e** •
Some of the facts submitted by the chairman of
the sale* promotion committee of the National Wholesale Grocers' Association are indeed illuminating.
If they can be depended upon as averages, rather
than isolated Instances, the figures presented are almost
unbelievable
One of the strongest arguments is that the telephone trade keeps the business on   a   more   regular
basis throughout the day and week, whereas the counter stores enjoy mosl of its business from two to six
o'clock in the afternoon, and the bulk of the week's
business is done from Thursday to Saturday.
Charts prepare! show thai the counter service
store does about IV,. of the weekly sales on each
Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, while tin* other 85*8
of the weckV sabs are eonsumated on the last three
days of the week. Comparihg this with the telephone
service stole we find that about 00'i of the week's
business is transacted during the first four days, and
the remaining 4l»V 00 Friday and Saturday, lu addition, it is claimed for the telephone service store that
the business throughout each hour of the day remains
about the same, with the exception, of course, of the
noon hour
Another char! which the committee submits as-
Berts that it requires I *J(j minutes to handle a cash and
carry sale, as against 1 o7 minutes for a telephone delivery sab- It also coats .043 cents per sale, cash aud
carry, aud but  (lift for a telephone order.
hi addition the percentage Of selling cost of the
sale, cash and earn system, is given at 5MO per cent.
while the cost for a telephone order is only .84 per
ecu!. Another item of information offered is that a
cash and carry order averages SI cents, while a telephone order is placed at an average of $1,90, The figures submitted also show, baaed upon an investigation.
that the total sales by telephone represent a much
larger proportion of the daily sales, that the total revenue is much greater than from cash and carry sabs,
and that the value per item is larger for telephone or
dors and the number of items more. It is easily understood why the telephone order is larger than the
•■ash and earn order iu a store where service is the
rule. Doubtless thai is also true with reference to
stores operating on a cash and carry basis, excepting
as to Saturday trade, and there is no gainsaying tin*
fact that sales in cash ami carry stores are more or
hss fitful during the day. with the bulk of the business iu the evening.   It may be too, that the tele-
nhone store operates on a more even keel as to hourly sabs but whether thc grocer using service can
double his sales by reaching tint beyond the usual lines
nf a cash and carry store without increasing his expenses beyond the delivery eost feature remains to be
seen.
The committee has opened an interesting line of
»tudy, which will be followed with consuming interest.
Its contentions are contrary to common understanding.
"TPVE found out that the things people buy
X every week or so are about the biggest
sales-makers a store can have.
"Had a practical demonstration of it the
other day.
"Business was rather slack, and I had gone
at cleaning out under the counter, right
where the cash register stands. Like to keep
busy all the time—because it really does help
me get more money.
"Well, we had a lot of Palmolive soap
tucked away under there. A handy place for
us, in waiting on all the people who ask for
it in a day. But no one can see it from outside the counter.
"At any rate, 1 had it piled up on the counter, for a few moments. Two ladies, who were
buying something else, saw it and added
several cakes to their purchases.
"That set me to thinking. Evidently the
sight of Palmolive soap had reminded them
that soap was needed. So I asked the boss if
i might leave it on the counter for an hour.
"We actually sold more soap that one day
than we ordinarily sell in two.
"We keep Palmolive out in plain sight
now, of course. And we're doing it with a
number of other well-known articles that are
bought pretty often. The boss says that it is
giving us a nice gain in regular business."
soon
Palmolive is preferred and used in more
Canadian homes than any other toilet soap 1
2107 30
THK BRITISH CX)LTJMBW BKTAHJJR
April
Chloride of Lime
New Style Waterproof Package
Supplied by all wholesale grocers
in British Columbia
Manufactured by
CANADA COLORS AND CHBMICALS LIMITED
Toronto Winnipeg Vancouver
Agents:
STARK it STERLING
VANCOUVER, B. C.
GILLETTS
EATS DIRT
Profit is only profit
after you sell the
merchandise. A
large margin does
not put a dollar in
your pocket if the
goods set on your
shelves until they
are bespecked and
unsalable.
E. VV. GILLETT COMPANY  LIMITED
i
TO&OWTO    CANADA
KO*' ■( »■
GROCERY PRICES CURRENT
The following are priees quoted for principal lines of leading wholeeale firms.   Prices quoted are necessarily
subject to market fluctuations.
E. W. GILLETT CO.  LTD.
Royal Yoast— l>r caae
3 doc. pkgs. in cunt*     2.30
Pure Flake Lye—
4 dor In case  5!'.".
5 caaea     I 8,*,
10 cases, 4 doc.  In case ... . C 80
Magic Baking Powder—
4 oc. 4 doc  r, U
6 oc.  4  doc  7 lit
t oc.  4 doc    '.» 21
12 oc. 4 doc      12 BO
IK 5 case lots.
Magic Soda,  Caae  No.  1—
i caae (60 1-tn. packages) 5.SQ
5 (-as** cr more 3.4"
■l-Carbonate of Soda—
112 tl». k«'K«, per keg T.it
40(1 tt>.  barrels,  per barrel 23.7'»
Cauatic Soda (Granulated)— Per tb.
10 It». canister (100 lbs in rase)  16%
100   lbs.   iron   drums    J2'i
Cream of Tartar— Per dor..
% It. paper pkgs. (4 doe. in case)....1.33
V4 Ib. paper pkgs. (4 doc. iti case) ...t 60
•Vi tb. cans with screw covers (4 doc.
In osae)   3 60
1 lb.  cans screw covers  (3 doc.  tn
eaaa)    6 2*3
I It), square canisters,  ft doc. In
case)    tS'.i
Id tt>  woden i unfa
2.3 it) wooden palls
lit)   Tt».   lined   keK*
MO tb,  lined barrel*
.   At
till
KELLY,   DOUGLAS A  CO
LTO
Nabob  Products
Allspice,  No   3.  tin*  *l*>*
Making i'owder.   48   12 ok .  to*
puking Powder, 12 2S*. toi
Unking Powder, c 3*. dox
>'.itkiltfC  Koda,   60   In,   ca*c
CiikiriK Koda, 24  V»s, d*.x
flora x,   U«. doc
Black   i'epper,   Uns,   doa
Celery   Salt,   glass,   doc
\:iIn,Ii Coffee, small Uns, *--*«t*
Coffee, in lb.
Custard   I'owder,  dos	
«iui.M Tapioca, doc
•''hor-olate   Pudding,  do*
Chill  Powder,  small, doc   	
cinnamon. 2 oc. tin*, doc
Cayenne  Pepper,  3  tikm.  dox
cloves,  small,  doc	
Curry Powder. 4 OS. glass, doc
"'renin of Tartar,   1.
Cream  Ot Tartar,   *%S,   tins
Cream Of Tartar  'is,
dinger,   small,   doc. 	
BxtrtOtS (except vanilla) 2 oc.
Extracts (except vanilla) 4 oc
Pxtract-*** (except vsnll's*! ft no
doc
doc.
doc
Extract* (except vanilla I   If, oc   doc
; tJ*
2 it)
830
|| 1<1
:, N
,tjt
:t>
1 oo
I ••/>
M
1 00
I IH)
i oo
l *\n
) 18
I 2".
1 40
1 tt,
'.i M
2 IS
i ;io
1 in
2 Ml
4 7D
* ttn
17 00
Vanilla Kxtrart.   I  oc.  doc   »»»»»—*-
Vanilla Extract.  4 ot,  «*ios
VnniitA k* tract. I M. toi
Vaniiia Rxlraet, ll <>« <io»
Macs,   smntl.   do*
Nutmeg,  small,  dot
Paprika, small, doi
Pastry  Bplr-*,   3   tins,  do!
Poultry l»re»*ing. HaO*. Sav..r-»
Thyme.   Twmerlr.   ttn*    d<>*
Pickling Hpo-e. toe  Ko 3
Marjoram,  Mint.  Par*!-*-*
wtiiir Peppar, Um toi
CaatOt oil. 2 «>*   d.>«
»'aj»tor  oil.   4   o«    doi
Rpgom Knit*.   Ut, dot
mill  Colors,  2  ox   d>>i
tcings (Chocolate, Hose. Pink. Lemon
Vanila, \viiit«    tlmood, Onii**fe) to*
U'lu  Powder, tos
Lemonade  Powder.  dOI
Mustard,  is. tos
Mustard.    Ss.   doc
Mustard.   ****   toi
Mustard. 2/3 doi
Rulpbur, Ha. dox
Tea,  rlreen  lalxl.   -S«.  pOI   H'
Tea, Green Label, i*. per u>
3s,   tti    parknR<<*
6 Hi   packages
Tea.   tie  t.uxe.   Afternoon.   I   In
Tea dl t.nxe,   ,\fteiiio..ii   tyl per 10
Tea de I.tixe   w * pn   It.
Vinegar.    tloX
(Continued «»» \>w W
;   ■
i t
; **■-
\ Oi
1
1 it
i n
2 1"
2 II
8 t>*
4 I
} |«
•   I
li 1925
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
11
ihat a service grocer ean operate cheaper than a cash
.ml carry dealer, provided lu* Ice-dps his business at
iln- peak throughout tbe day. It is hoped to do this by
the aid on tin* telephone, which reaches out while the
.ash mid eary store is conhVml to its immediate surrounding territory.
Tin* rash and carry store cannot extend trade beyond fl eertain limit, but the telephone grocer would
appear to have tm limit. If he extends his business
materially however, he must naturally encroach upon
some other grocer, which may be a ehain store, an in-
dependenl cash grocer, or some other service dealer,
Will it become the survival of thi* fittest, ami will a relatively smaller number »>f stoles Im- able to handle the
trade more economically I   This also remains to be
SI'I'll.
Extent of "Phone for Food   Movement in U. S.
This campaign will be earrled onl simultaneously
«.\i-r the entire tl. * A, Seventy-nine Districts; the
endorsements of 100,000 retailers snd 3,000 wholesalers.
instead of 10,000 ehain stores dictating the basi-
!m vs policy oi 355,000 retailers the independent retailer will be shle hi dictate, Buying powers will not
solve the problem of the retailer bul selling will.
The tut.-tl eost of the supplier for nse of the re
tailer will be from $10 to $16, depending upon the size
Of the business. All supplies are obtained from the
wholesale.
The following ten reasons why "'Phone for Food"
is the better way are advocated.
SAVE TIME—
Change the shopping hour to a social hour
CONSERVE ENERGY—
no need to carry bulky packages
DELIVERY AT YOUR* DOOR-
rain or sunshine throughout the year
AVOIDS SHOPPING INCONVENIENCE—
no walking, driving or parking difficulties
SHOP AT ANV TIME OP DAY—
telephone us any time of day
COSTS NO MORE—
you get better values
QUALITY GUARANTEED—
on all phone orders
REDUCES STORK EXPENSE
enables us to do larger volume
COMPLETE GROCERY STOCKS—
available in the telephone service store
PERSONAL SERVICE—
wher vou nre known and catered to.
What's Wrong With the Retail Grocery
Business ?
Inexperience of Large Percentage of so called Retail   Grocers Responsible for General Outcry Against
Every Innovation in Retail Groceryq Field.   Experienced Dealers Welcome Legitimate Competition.
The large percentage of failures in the retail grocery business naturally bads business executives to inquire. "What's wrong with the retail grocery business?"
The answer is that there is nothing wrong with
the business; the trouble is with thi* retail grocers.
In no other line of business life is there so large
n proportion of untrained proprietors.
The average working man, who has accumulated a
small savings account, ami who happens to lose his
position, after a few weeks unsuccessful hunt for a
congenial job. decides thai he has a God-glv^n call to
••pen a grocery store,
The woman left a widow usually plans to open R
"store" before the body of the late lamented has been
laid to rest.
It doesn't matter in the slightest, that their only
knowledge of the business has been gained by casual
visits to a store to purchase food stuffs.   They see that
John Jones bas made an apparent success; well, why
•an't they?
The first point to be determined is the location ami
usually this is no determination at all. If he owns his
own home he moves the front room furniture to the
l*car or up-stairs, puts in a few fixtures secures a license (often on his wife's mime1 and considers himself
n full-fledged grocery-man,
No idea of counting the number of possible customers as divided between himself ami the other groceries of the neighborhood; no thought of proximity to
•l"' market; -,,**, estimating the possibility of transient
trade; in fact no preliminary survey at all.
If he doesn't own his own home he usually takes
a stroll with his wife, ami he selects the situation, more
with a view to the residential rather than the business
tit ness. Should bis wife notice several large closets
advantageously situated for housekeeping purposes,
the deal is closed immediately,
The logie is that a house with such wonderful
facilities for storing elothes must necessarily be a
wonderful husiness center: it must be. for his wife
says it is.
Particularly is this the ease, in new residential development. H«* entirely overlooks the fact, that in
Mich sections, most of his prospective customers are
buying their homes ou some Building and Loan plan.
The payments ou these homes have to be met
or the tenant is dispossessed; hence, if any payment
has to be postponed, let it be the one to the grocer.
Such a situation makes a cash business an impossibility, and renders a credit one a game of extreme
chance.
If von told this prospective grocer, that the big
ehain systems managed by groups of highly trained
specialists, would, before opening a store, have definite knowledge as to the number of people who daily
pass that spot, on which side of the street is the heaviest traffic, if they carry bundles or not; proximity to
street cars, markets, railroad stations, etc., our grocer
would likely tell you that he had no time for that
kind of bunk.
In his planning, be usually figures thai if he car- 12
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Apr;
ries a line of fresh meats, ho not only increases his
sales, but by giving a customer an opportunity to do
two kinds of buying at one place, he will greatly increase his patronage.
Splendid idea, but his experience in handling meat
has been limited to standing in front of a meat counter and ordering a couple of pounds of round or a
sirloin or a 3-cornercd roast, and with this degree ot
experience he feels perfectly capable of skinning a
dank steak or boning a ham.
He does not know that a properly conducted meat
department is a valuable asset, but unless properly
conducted it is business suicide in quicker or slower
degree.
He relies upon his recollection of table tastes
to decide upon the various grades of meat to purchase;
that is, he realizes that meat comes in more than one
grade.
Forgetting or ignorant of the fact that the profit
or loss on meats is made in the cutting, he saws and
cuts away, unable to judge the proper weight "t* tin-
most economical method of cutting.
When it comes to pricing, he looks at his bill, remembers what he paid last week when he bought at
retail, and immediately decides that that other fellow
was a highway robber, and so he undersells the other
grocer. Such unsalable items as bone, fat ends, etc, he
entirely disregards and never dreams of the more undesirable pieces that have to be sold at a sacrifice and
loss, thereby lowering his average selling priee.
Having settled thc meat problem to his own satis-
faction he is now ready to lay iu his stoek ui groceries.
The most popular method of selecting a jobber is
to notice whieh truck stops most frequently by his
rival's door. Of course, this is sometimes varied by
lhe leniency of tin* various jobbers' credit no u.
When thc jobbers' salesman arrives, and he tries
to give thc prospective grocer the benefit of his experience as to tin* quality and brand of goods usually
used in that neighborhood, he is usually met by a list
of goods prepared in family council This list, by tin
way, is usually a record of personal preferences ami is
selected, regardless of the consumer's demand for such
articles. Usually this list is an exposition of the Lit
anv. for thev have "left out those things whieh thev
*■   * a, r-i •
ought to have in aud put in those things whieh they
ought to have left out."
The order having been placed, and the fixtures,
if any. arrived, be awaits his stoeks ami indulges in
roseate dreams of his coming business career. Then
iu drops an enterprising specialty salesman. He
quickly sizes up the situation, rubs his hands with unholy glee, and proceeds to explain to the prospective
grocer that Sharp's Scralehem-up Furniture Polish, is
the one necessary article iu that community. He tells
bow many cases the man on tbe other corner handles.
and how many ears thc chain stores buy.
He dazes the new one with his eloquence and
books him for 10 cases. 4 dozen each with 1 case free,
and the collection of shelf-warmers has begun.
Now the goods have arrived, and that joyous indoor sport of pricing the articles has begun. In playing this game the novice generally rules that interest
on investment, license, heat, light, ice. telephone, etc..
have descended from on high, and the "overhead" is
a technical term used by college professors and economists to becloud thc issues. A few hoped-for customers are .summoned to give expert testimony, and
their line is that they can buy such an article for so
Lake of the Woods
Milling; Company
LIMITED
Makeri of
FIVE ROSES
• FLOUR •
The World's Best
Daily Capacity 11200 Bbl.
B.C. Offices end Warehouses
1800 Richards Street 1614 Btort Btrtei
VANCOUVER VICTORIA
It PA YS to Sell
ROYAL
STANDARD
FLOUR
It turns over faat enough
to rrive vou a nice profit.
Recommend it when you want Repeat Orders
Milled in Vancouvrr
by
Vancouver Milling and Grain Co.
LIMITED
Head Office and Mills:    VANCOUVER, B C 1025
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
13
inneh (so lHtle) money at such a place. "Ami, of
course, you as a new man ought to be a little cheaper."
To consult the bill for nn idea of first cost i.s a here-
>av seldom perpetrated.
The doors are opened ami the business begins, but
ihe three cardinal principles of successful business are
disregarded.
Aecounting. credit Investigation, and turn-over.
go into the discard. For now he's in business to sell
jimhIh, and nothing can turn him from his purpose.
lu the course of time a manufacturer's representative drops in with some up-to-date advertising mat-
;er. Naturally this has been prepared by well-trained
experts and executed at great cost, The grocer gladly
accepts, and promises to give it prominent display, at
his firsl leisure moment, This usually means on the
second Tuesday of the week. Should the representative be mow energetic than the usual man. and offers
;.i trim the window, he has to borrow soap, water and
rags lo make the glass transparent, for the business
man has little time to devote to such trifling matters
as cleaning windows
Incidentally bis windows are utilised as a surplus
ktoragc space for goods which he has failed to find
Lime to unpack and shelve Here, too, is the resting
place for the bill lib. For the beginner always buys
a lull file| Using it is another matter.
Tha! space just in front of the counter, that logi-
esl space for an interested customer to examine
goods, is filled with empty boxes, for empty boxes
show that you are selling goods, ami when the first
row is full it can be reinforced by a second row, until
iIn* customer is forced about three feet away from tbe
counter.
Laboring under such conditions, business does not
thrive, and an excuse must be found One la near at
hand    the chain stores.
The truth of the matter is, tlo chain stores are not
hurting any live. wide.awake grocer; the average grocer is simply using the chain stores as a means of committing suicide.
If he would follow the example of the chains—
clean stores, attractive windows, advertised prices, and
sabs effort behind the counter, he would become a
merchant, indeed, and a far richer man.
Hut what is the answer*
The large number of grocery failures, and the far
I'igcr number of grocer non-success is due to lack ot
training and preparation.
The fundamental fault with the business is the Idea
'hat anyone can own a grocery store.
It ought to be possible to secure the passage of B
law, demanding a certain firm of apprenticeship before
•i person enihl secure a license to open a retail grocery
-tore,
Vou can't be a plunber without a preparatory
fourse, because plumbing is of sanitary value, and
I'cnee an item in the health status of the community.
If you desire to become an electrician, years of
niactice ami an examination is necessary, for again
Intman safety is at stake.
Why. even if you want to be a barber, you have to
'■• looustrate your ability.
SttCh being the case, could not our legislators
s\v that, in the grocery business, the line of busi-
■■•ss which enters most intimately into the health, well-
,M >>-g and life itself of the body politic, Mint a term of
preparation shall be necessary before being given a lie-
pn*0 to open a food store"
rn
The world's most famous
baking powders
To the housewives they mean purity,
wholesomeness and reliability.
4
To the dealer they mean satisfactory
profit, satisfying turnover and satisfied
customers.   It pays to carry them.
Mode with cream of tartar,—no finer
baking powders can be produced. Order
from your wholesaler.
Made in Canada
It CMRtts
xnsnaitoaj
St. Charles
Milk
^P-ORATEDtf11,
Quantity
You ean as easily sell six tins as
one to   the   average   housewife.
Suggest   the   purchase   of   more
than  one  tin  and  get so  mueh
extra   turnover—and  profit.
^23*07ttaW&^ttW
Offices: Vancouver.
Condensary, South Sumas 14
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
April
Preparedness I
i
The steady and effective advertising of Shelly s 4X Bread
creates an increased demand
and willingness to accept 4X
Bread. Be prepared to get
your share of the business—
the buying public have confidence in the uniform quality of
4X Bread, And remember—
every customer who comecs to
your store for a loaf is a potential customer for other goods.
SHELLY  BROTHERS
VANCOUVER VICTORIA
NEW WESTMINSTER NANAIMO
:
A Quality Product!
IDrMiddletons ^^**k
RONIZEJJ
i iim mam M-.rtti.-o       mtm^m^
OCNUINC
Whole Wheat
FLOUR
A PAIR FIXED PROFIT
FOR -uABGE AXDSMAId,
IS THK POLICY OF
The Dr. Middleton's Food Products
Company Limited
Vancouver, li. C.
atatmwtaQm
(•.tTwamT SB
X2I»     * ***
GOOD!
NEW!
DIFFERENT!
Only onee in a long while dtie* i»vi»n
tin- best of Chefs produce a master
piece
i!nd$nna from its suecetw one hot
in < u produced in
CLARK'S
GOVERNOR
SAUCE
Sc'd  it*  boats ot   it, it  rttaltf *t popular  pritet »n4
hot met with • •tracr-dinary ftuccetf.    Order lomi ml
once and loi the Clack  K«Uht*i h«?p you  <0 larger
safes »r%0 more profit.
W.   CLARK   LIMITED - - - MONTREAL
EstabOehmenU    at    Montreal.    P. Q     St   R«mi.    P, Q    and
Morrow. Onl.
WAFFLE BRANO FANCY TABLE SYRUP
18 EXCEPTIONALLY 0000.
Note: We could not improve the eyrup »o we Have
Improved the container.
KeHy Confection Co. Ud.
1100 Mainland Street
VANCOUVER, B. C
L 1925
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
15
(Continued from page 10)
THE W. M. MALKIN CO., LTO.
••Malkln'a Beet" Product*.
Anowioot   I8t    Vincent)
ll 4 oo ctoe       p<w* dot    1 40
jj |  yg     per dot    2 "">
Making I'owder  (PUM  I'hoapbtte)
41/12 ot       l'*T SO*    3 W)
•,:, 2 *■••»»• ■ 'pot do*.    '* &0
l*.>i> P**f dOJt    IT 2j
12/4 «'» per dot.   B.T5
I   «« per dot, 11.OO
W o* per dor 21.00
W ot p«.r doz. 30.00
4.75
9.00
17.00
24.00
Hiking Soda
H/4  ni   ctnn    	
il i <>■   Hue
0mm.
;■« I  ••
CoffM   (Vi  OHin   t'ocltt
*. n>  Un*
CfttJN Ol Tartar iti'.-i  pure*
12. I M   etna
52 i* M   6tM
tl u Um
CMtAfd Powde*
4 M   OVttt
I ui   tlna
: •-.$ h>:r..'r.«•.
More i.  II * <>*
BMMI Haiti 21 * etna
Sulphur.  81 4 wt   elm
per dot
per ditt
p#f doa
tt,
to
'ilycerlne
IM o% bta,   .
53/4 M bt«
Monty
24,1  oj   Jiirt-t
24/12 ot. Jars
24 2*   Otis
11/40   tins   	
Jelly Powdtr* (all flavor*)
It/4 ot   	
per dot.
per dot.
Ml
IK
per -dot, 2 25
..per dot. 3.00
per dot. 4.SO
per dot. 9.00
per dot      .95
|M-r iJ«»*
jMff    III: it
pm <st>*
p<t doa
i*.■■( iioa
prr i!u*
imt doa
pot Jot
**-*-. 2
I <>-*>
4.'.
•,*,*
Kiimc-U
is.: ui
All othtr
v«niii*    Ptawa
per dM    J *>0 2 60
I.e-motLtde   Towder:
12/4 ot ctns  	
il, S M  CtBi
Muster*!
13/Ss Una
ll bo ot  lins
24/ta  tins     ,	
[3 I   (sn*   .
Hpk*«* and Seasonings
atispi v "JI/8 Una
l!}RO*USHM   II 3   Ons
CJOVM 12.5 tin*
Curry I'owder  12:3 Uns
CfelU   Poirdts*
«-Jinifcr  It/I uns	
M-..«. it/a um
Marjoram  12.'3  Uns
Mint  12 3  Uns	
Nutmeg. U/8 Uns ...
per dot
per dot
1.25
2 25
per dot. 1.50
per dot. 4 50
 perdoa ISO
per Hj M
Paprika 12/8 tine per dot. 1.40
Parsley 12/3 tlna  per doa. 1.11
Paatry,  mixed, 12/3 tlna .per doa. 1.11
Pepper, black, 12/3 tins  per dot. 1.00
Pepper,  cayenne 12/3  tlna....per doa. I.M
Pepper,  white.  12/3  Una per doa. l.U
Pickling  3plce  12/3 per doa. 1.15
Poultry Dressing 12/3 tlns.per doa. 1.01
Sage, ground 12/ tins  per doa. 1.06
Sage,  rubbed  12/3  tins   per dot. 1.06
Savory   12/3   tins    per doa. 1.06
Thyme. 12/3 tins  per dot. 1.06
Tumeric,   12/3   tins    per doa. 1.06
Whole Cinnamon,  12 ctns per doa. .90
Whole  Nutmegs,  12 ctns per doa. .90
Whole Pickling 12 ctns  per doa. .90
Celery Salt, taper tots per doa. 1.60
Curry Powder, taper bots per doa. 1.7*
Tea
10-Vts    Per  lb. .69
t0/%* Per lb. .71
K/lfl ami 15/%s assorted      per It). .70
II :,s    per  lb. .72
Vinegar
24 qts.
per doa.   2.40
To Serve tbe Cuitomer it to Serve Yourtell
Service to youi  customers produce! good will
which hi turn produces greater sales tor you—that's
hiftiral
"t'ivi   ihoiu  thf greatest  Oi  til   M-niri*    H«aMh.
Vou ran do u b> Bellini FleUcnmann's feast, tlie
fresh, simple rood that's morally amasUtg lo Its
effect
More customers everj de*j tnd Increased sales
will remit, because h»-»ith> appetites need more food.
ink*- advantage oi th«> demand ff**re creating by
our advertising ami •»«*' your share oi these cus-
lomers,
FLEISCHMANN'S YEAST
The Fleischmaon Company
SERVICE
Braid's Best
COFFEE
Braid's has a subtle tang
nnd the true Coffee flavor.
It pays to recommend it.
Wm. Braid & Co., Ltd., Vancouver, B.C.
per dot
per   dot.
pee dot.
per dot
per dot,
per dot
per dot.
per dot.
per dot
per dot
1 00
1.10
1.40
1.25
1.60
1.10
1.6o
1 16
1 16
160
Marmalade.
12/' litho Una
per dot.     7.60
Jams
Assorted  12.1   tins per dot. S.26
Apricot 12/4 tins  per doa. 1.60
BlACk Currant 12/4 tins per doa. 9.60
t^oganberry 12/4 tisn „ per doa. 8.50
Raspberry   12/4   tins    8.60
PAT A SECRETARY TO ADDRESS VANCOUVER
DRUGGISTS.
sir William Olynn-Joues. Secretary of thc Pro-
prii-tan Articles Trade Association of Great Britain is
touring Canada, addressing Druggists on the "Benefit^
of Price Maintenance." Sir William's addresses have
math' a good impression on Eastern druggists ami it is
certain thai a record attendance will be present when
In* speaks tu British Columbia dealers at the Hotel Van-
eouvcr on Mav 1st next.
PAT BURNS' SUPERINTENDENT  RESIGNS
iHihn Pevine was presented with a traveling club bag by
the retail employees of P. Burns & Co. at a banquet given in
his honor al ihe drosvenor Hotel recently. Mr. Devine is
ilie retiring superintendent of retail markets for the Burns
Company.   F, Dellvan (lore made the presentation.
Blake Wilson Jr., the new superintendent, was present
at the banquet On the programme was a solo by Mr. G.
Price a violin solo by Marvin Darrach. a song by Gilbert
Summers, a cello solo by H. (.low and several other numbers
with toasts to the Kin*; and to the company. More than 10Q
attended the dinner.
SWIFT-CANADIAN COMPANY TO ERECT NEW WAREHOUSE.
A contract has been let by the Swift-Canadian Company,
Ltd.. 17 Water Street, Vancouver, for an addition to the firm's
present warehouse, which will occupy the northwest corner
of Water and Carrall Streets, at an approximate cost of
140,000.00.
The newbullding be 60 by 140 feet in size, and will fill all
available space betweet the company's present premises and
the Carrall Street frontage extending bark to the C.P.R.
tracks. 16
THE BRITISH COt-ITMBlA BKTAILEH
Al
IX
P.  BURNS S CO. LTD.
Shamrock Products.
Ayrshire  rolled  shoulder*,  per  Ib ,8J
Bacon,  Shamrock,  6-8.  per lb ,   M
Baked ham. with dreswlng, per lb -<3
Creamery Butter, Shamrock, cartons to
Cheese,   Canadian,   large,   per   th .Ws
Cheese. Canadian, twin, per lb '$>
Compound. Carnation. No. S, '{•CftM 1*6.4*9
Compound. Carnation No. 3. 20-case W.M
Cooked   hams.   Shamrock,   per   It) .42
Dominion   hams.   12-1*8   lbs. M
Dominion bacon,  8-10 n»s.  per lb .W
Dominion bacon,  10-14 lbs. per lb .3«
Dominion shoulders, turned and rolled   .25
Dripping,  beef,  4-n>.  bricks 13
Hams.   Shamrock,   per   lb 34
Hams, boned and rolled, per tb > .38
Head Cheese, 5-lb.  tins, each    ,58
Jellied tongue, per tin   ... l.W
Lard, No. **>. 12 to ease 13.75
Lard. No. 3. SO to case 13.80
Lard,   carton.   15-lbs  24'a
Lard, No.  1. cartons. 3d tbs 24
Mincemeat,  kits,  26-lb,  net, per lb 14
Meat Loaf, per lb    .11
Pork pies,  per dot.  . 40
fork, roast legs with dressing. lbs*      .   .31'
Smoked flsh, kippers. Sta per tb 11
Smoked flsh, kippered salmon.  10s
and 20s, per tb K>
Bmoked Cod. 30s per Oj 16
Selected fowl, per lb SS
Selected Chicken, per lb.   38
THE ROYAL CROWN SOAPS. LTD.
Vancouver   Price   Ltat—F.O.B.   Vancouver,
or New WtatmlntUr.
Terme Nett SO Days.
"Ape*" Soap Flakes. 24 1 lb pkts. box 4 SO
"Apex" Soap Flakes, i: l tb pkt.«. bo* J 4»
A La Francalae Castile,   box  of 2S        4 OS
Blue Mottled, box of 20
Crown Oatmeal. 24 6s. box of 144
Climax  or   Montreal  (wrappedi   t«»\   2*>   MO
Golden West, 6s 1»»\ of Vi***
Golden West  I'owder. 3 lb   box of 24
Golden Bar. box of SO , *******
Klondyke   (wrapped)   box  of  %>
Klondyke   (unwrapped)   lw>x  of  N
Klero Glycerine, box of 14*	
Linen (unwrapped) box of 10O.,.«~~™,
Liquid Ammonia. 2 dot. <it». boi of 94
Liquid Blue. 2 dot   qts. box of 24 .
Mechanic's  line Tar,   box  of  100	
Mechanic's  Pine Tar,  box of JO. ,>.,.^
olive Castile, cakes. l*ox <,: 200
Primrose  iwrapped)  box of 2*»
Kxtra  hard  unwrapped,  bos  of M
Perfect (unwrapped)  b*>x of lOv
Write  for Toilet and  Hotel SCmpt
Special price* on I,  10, 2> and I'M
Ik> sea.
Pendray's Lye. box of tS
Pendray's  Powdered   Ammonia,   bW   24. 3 ti
Special prices *,>?> $, jo. ?s ami IM
Itoxes.
Pendray's   Wat«r  Glata,   ton  Pros#r**t™
!'a»os 24 tins per ease
Hed  Crown,   box  o  f!J  .
Royal Laundn   Finite*,  tt%, in t*t«u
(Special  price  on  contract)
Royal Crown loap ts 144»
Hi.y.il   QrOWa   I'cm.lr!     \,-i\   :t«   ,)|||]
Royal Crown Powder, ut-, boa of -so
Royal Crown Cleanser.  41 sifter tins
Royal Crown Lye. box of i* —
Royal Crown Naptha  box of too
CONNORS   BROS.,   LTD.
Black's   Harbour, N. B.
C3S
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4 10
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Royal  Crown   powdered   Ammonia  1   lb
White Wonder,  box of 100
White Swan «<w»p, Ss Ir»x of 120
White Swan Naptha. box of 100
While S-A»it» WasbUta Powder, Ih.s *.f :t
TMI  CANAOA   tTARCM  CO.   LTD
Laundry  Otarcbes—
Can«4a   !.* un.tr>'   J-iL»»<h    4Mb   l"n
Catutdn  wt-.nr <a.»«s.  s»- 'ottsjn
\cm* White <;!oss. sn> pka»
\„     J    White     |u©-tb   ke**
Kdwwrdsbura Silver Cthm*. ith pksj*
M lb
Kdw«rd«t»urg    Stiver    GUts*   •/••
fancy tin canisters. 41-lbs
fttwwrd-atnii'V   Silver   Gkaia.   1001b
Ut***  -"• ■
Celluloid   Starvh.   IDOBS0   Of   **»-p«S»
poi case)
Cotlnery  St**********--
Etaaaoe ■ C-alalwatai PPSfOWl Corn.
II it. )*.*<•*•  pas tt**
fan*.!* Cbrn ttStfOb WMb boxes- *,>«"
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ChAtlena*  Corn   Burth   4»-fb   •"»*«*«
per  tt»
Cnaeo potato n«»yr »»-ib bofcea, tt
Vaioia  Oil—
M«*..U  Oil    IS
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A SPECIAL PRICE
Make liniii.swiik  Brand Sardines your "urt-k-nnl s|»«*
ial." Feature« reduced price on i hall doxen tin*   rut
a full caae in Up window and some on lhe counter.
Everywhere people an  buying Brunswick Sardine* by
the doaen and half doaen,  Tin- special price i** a pe&\ at
traction.   Try it.
Vour margin on BrunawieR i*> ample t«» allow fo? thia to
duciion and thc l>iu* increaae in turnover will more than
repay you
BRUNSWICK
BRAND
SARDINES
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THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILED
Looking Up References
When Extending Credit to Newcomers or Increasing Salesforce, Much Will Depend on Comprehensive Nature of Questionnaires to Reference of Applicant.
-a.
xi
Handing aeroas the dexk to the business writer a
letter uaed iu consulting refereneea, the city merchant
Itnahed Tion hv grinned a little. ""That form letter
is not complete,M he aaid, *When we Bend it out, we
type three words at tin- rud i forgo! to include them
in my form letter, and did nol notice tin* omiaaion until
« sarcastic man up country mentioned it"
The three worda took up Huh* space Imt were
properly considered important.  They were, "I thank
you."
Must omissions in letters concerning references are
nol noticed in this fortunate way   They continue
and thc efficiency of the Inquiry letter is permanently
low,
There an* two principal situations in which a merchant is called upon to use refereneea,  An employee is
about to be added to sin* s|or<- oruani/ation-is this
likely.looking man ali thai he -seems?   A newcomer to
lown haa asked for credit and given the names of two
former stores dealt with in thc previous place of residence How shall the merchant write to references
supplied cither by an applicant for employment or for
credit!
if you have occasion to consult references often,
you can Use a printed or multigraphed form letter,    if
you "look people up" only seldom, then «<t up a
proper letter and keep n carbon copy of it. Bave
your stenographer write the same persona) letter aa
succeeding occasions arise    The letter should contain
tWO parts. These ean h<* on the main sheet by having the htter on one side, tin   return on the other.
The blank to be returned ean, of course* be on .*i separate blank sheet
The letter to the reference need not be a polished
literary product, but it should contain a number oi
points Tell tin* reference the information he gives will
be regarded aa strictly   confidential.   Bxplain   that
the party named is seeking employment with you. or
applying for credit, as tin- caae may be, and he has referred the merchant to the addressed party.  Say that
giving informalitiu will make the informant in no way
responsible Thank tin* reference and offer your as-
siatance to him at any future time.
Bj  all means, have a questionnaire blank for the
reference to till out This not only will increaae the
number ai prompt replies, boeauac i' simplifies the
labor of such, but it will more certainly obtain for you
the information you wish Where an employee is involved, the following sel of questions, which is used by
a bonding company and closely followed by various
large employers of labor, is admirable. A study of it
will reveal that with minor adaptations it  is suitable
for credit references
This sel of questions does more than one thing.
First of nil, of course, it provides specific information
on the stated questions, However, in doing this, it
illumiuatiuuly reveals how complete is the reference's
knowledge, Again ami again, references report a man
O.K. when their knowledge of him is entirely Inadequate for sound judgment.
The reader will note that such things as habit.
associates, Income, past record, are touched on.
Are you connected by relationship or otherwise,
with the above-named applicant.'   If so, in what way?
Is he well known to you.' Please state the period
of your acquaintance.
What knowledge have you of his parents or immediate family?
Is your knowledge of him such as to enable you to
judge of his character and habits at the present time?
What is the character of his friends or associates!
Is he. or has he been addicted to intemperance,
gambling  immorality or other vice?
What is his style of living, is he inclined to any
extravagant habits?
Has he ever been dismissed from any position, and
under what circumstances?
Was he ever suspected of fraud or dishonesty, or
of any dishonorable act ?
Has he any income other than the salary he receives from the above mentioned position 1 If so, please
state amount and source.
Does he own or has he any interest in any real estate or personal property? If so, please state its location, nature and value.
Do you know of any encumbrance upon his property?   Please state nature of same.
Was the applicant ever engaged in business on his
own account!   If so .when and where?
Is he. or has-he ever been bankrupt or insolvent?
If so. state if released, or what settlement was made
with creditors.
Please state in a genera] way whether or not you
consider him a proper person worthy of this company's
guarantee, and one in whom you would place contid-
ctiee aud recommend for above stated position.
Bj whom during the past live years has he been
employed '
It ean be mentioned in passing that this list of
questions is a very valuable one to have in mind when
considering an applicant for employment, apart from
references. While the latter are all usually required,
it is sometimes possible for a merchant to get all needed information right within his own organization.
Enclose with your letter and blank when writing
a reference, a stamped addressed envelope. Giving it
emphasis, be sure to include a sentence like this: "If
your knowledge of the applicant does not admit of
your answering tin* above questions, will you kindly
give the names and addresses of parties who may be
able to give? SUCh information?" Doing this little
thing may bring you success when otherwise you would
be seriously retarded.
In addition to references supplied by an applicant,
a merehanl by all means, should use. where there is
the slightest suspicion, a reference letter to a batik,
local credit association or other independent source of
information. \ common practice of sophisticated
parties it to "frame" references. A simple way to do
this, in the case of credit, is to promptly pay all bills
with one or two concerns over a long period. Naturally, these will speak well of the customer. At the
same time, the latter may be owing many other local
firms, being a dead-beat of the worst color, 18
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILS!
April
SECRETARY AND GENERAL MANAGER, RETAIL
MERCHANTS* ASSOCIATION TENDERS
RESIGNATION.
2.
E.  M.  TROWERN
Who for the past twenty-nine years has guided the
activities of the Retail Merchants' Association of Canada in the capacity of Dominion Secretary has tendered his resignation from that organisation, to take effect
on August 22nd next.
SEVEN GOLDEN RULES OF SALESMANSHIP
Real'te thc dignity and importance of rosl talcs.
manthip and determine to e*cel through tmcer
ity, efficiency and merit.
Be diligent in the effort to know good* well, peo
pie better, and younelf beet of all, in order that
your efforts and cuttomerdetiret may meah per.
fectly. This meant many tales.
Let the customer state hit wanta and do a good
deal of the talking in the hrtt part of the con
vertatlon.    Look!   Listen'     Then   you  will  discover which way to   direct   your  own   eaplana.
Pons, telling talk, and demonttrationt.
Never knock or run down a competitor or his
goods; much less be to crude at to appear cur.
ioue or to teek to ask impertinent quettions, Bt
ttratghtforward and frank. Sell your goods, and
let those of the other fellow alone to rise or fait
on the strength of their own reeordt of service
and worth.
Cultivate patience and courtesy even with the
mott deliberate of customers. Thu *s a part of
good salesmanship,
Never overload a patron. It prejudices futurt
busines*. Sen htm what he needs but don't yield
to the temptation to take advantage of a temper,
ary buying enthusiasm.
Smile »n a sunny, genuine monnor. Show real
interest. Smile when the interview is ended
whether the customer hat purchased or not. A
cheery smile—not a patron»«ing one, and a clot
•ng enpression of cordial interest and good wiU.
will leave even the grouchiest customer with *
good tatte in hit mouth. Tht chances tro strong
that vou will win in the end with that individual
Right methodt alwayt count sooner or later
5.
Send for Yours Today.
Only Six Copiet Left
(I
SHOW CARD
WRITING
A SPECIAL EDITION OF
Show Card Writing
By JOSEPH BERTRAM JEWITT
The Big, New 197 Page Cloth bound Book Containing 161 Illustration*
No matter whether you are matting show cards or not, the fact remain* that iho* card*
art the smooth path to successful sales. If you are now printing your »how cards thll boo* win
assist you In making better cards and give you sows Idea* that undoubtedly will prove worth
dollars to you. If you believe you can never learn to matte ehow card*, you have natar read
Mr. Jewitt's Instructions, for anyone who will just take the time to give thi* course of initrwc-
tions regular practice, will be aurprited how easily he can learn.
Among the many things treated In thia itaue are Included the following
Sent   post  paid   $2.00
Money returned if not
satisfied after three
day's examination.
Materials, Tools, and General Pointa of in-
formation.
The  First Steps.
Six  Key  Strokes to the  Egyptian  Alphabet.
Planning tht Show Card.
The Mechanical Method of Lettering.
How to Outline and Fill In.
Another Step In Outlining.
More  About  Outlining.
How Outlining and Filling In Is Adapted to
Port or Brush Work.
Modern   Pen   Lettering.
Old  English Stub Alphabet,
Flat  Brush  Script  Alphabet.
Show Card  Italic.
Mongrel  Roman "Upper Caae "
Mongrel  Roman  "Lowe**  Case"
Mongrel Roman "Lower  Caae '  N  to I.
Mongrel   Roman   Numerals.
The   Use of Picture* on   Show  Card*.
Single  Stroke  Poster   Lettering.
The Speed Lettering Pen.
Detailed Study of the Speed  Pott,
Easy  Stencil  Lettering.
The Silhouette Effect on Show Card*
How to Use Wall Potior tor Show Card*
Utlllilng Trade Mark* in Show Card Writing
BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Suite 101-2 Merchants' Exchange Bldg.,
VANCOUVER, B C I'V'.'i
THIS BRITISH COLUMBIA UKTAILEtt
10
INDIVIDUALITY   PREDOMINANT   IN   BATHING
SUITS FOR SUMMER OF 1925.
Many smart knitted suits depend entirely on their
color to lift them out of the commonplace, the trend
of fashion being decidedly toward the Spanish and
Moorish tones. There are bright Spanish reds and the
antique id*, thai verge toward terra cotta, Greens and
magentas are there too, and lovely dull blues and gold
.iipii'tt browns, Tin* new -sand tones thai are so popular are called bj such delightful names as "seaside"
; n.s "sjiiuI dune*' or arc named after popular resorts,
favorites liehis I«ido, ftiarriix and hong Beach, There
,ii«- **everal blue water greens, one prominent shade
among ih«-»» In-ini! »*aH***l Marmora,
\ni)ii«itt< <l bonds of silk tn* fibre silk used in many
*  l        *
no**..i effects fti*e indeed am«»uj* tin- outstanding types
ni tHmmino for tht knitted i»;« thine suit of worsted,
i»n tin- skirl oi n blaek suit bands of gold-colored silk
-, applied in a plaid «iT»-et The same knitted silk
handing <s used lo bind tin- round neck and tin* arm-
holes Suits with Interknitted libr«* silk stripes are also
:•((«.{    In these wtiii*- stripes on a   colored   ground
seem it» be as popular as black and white eomhina-
tions were last Reason, Green and white is a Rood hot
weather combination and for this reason a suit ot suit
i'imii worsted with wide and narrow interknttted
stripes of fibre silk is sun* lo lie popular at the beaches
an Hummer conies on, An unusual feature of this suit
is a surplus collar of the same green and white.
Some are Embroidered er Painted
Another method by whieh the knitted bathing
suit attains phie is by combining two tones of tho same
fabrics, Th.* colors may be near together In the chromatic scale nr they may be In -Strang contrast, as in s
clever little milt of sand colored jersey with trunks,
lie belt and deeorative bindings In bright blue, An-
other distinctive suit la of bright orange Jersey with
black triangle inserts in the skirt. These inserts sim-
nlatc the popular godel effect, but do not add unnecessary fullness.
The knitted bathing ensemble consisting of a cape
or long eoat to match the bathing suits is new and con-
sidered smart. One outfit nl* this kind that easily takes
Its place among the many intriguing novelties of the
season, has a trig little suit cheeked in all-over pattern
til' green and white with green cape bordered iu the
same cheeked design. A suit of terra cotta jersey has a
corresponding eoat of sand colored jersey with shawl
collar, cuffs and a wide hand at the bottom that repeat
the warm tone of tin* suit. Such beach wraps are praetieal as well as decorative, for no matter how warm the
weather a wrap of lightweight wool prevents many a
sniffle.
MANY NOVELTIES IN KNITTED GARMENTS
As knitted coats and over-blouse sweaters have become sn popular and correct in smart resort life this
season, so has the knitted dress come to bo accepted as
perfectly correct for informal occasions.
IVtr from being the shapeless things of a few seasons ago the knitted dress nl* the present season presents a well modelled and thoroughtty tailored aspect
thai is perfectly in keeping with the latest dictum of
fashion, Its lines are chic, the details of its trimmings
are smart and its coloring has a softness and a depth
uf tone that is a characteristic «>f knitted eloth. More
and more attention is being given to the tit. shape and
hand-tailored details of knit goods and there are frocks
knitted in fancy stitch or two-toned effects to meet the
season's demand for figured fabrics.
liven ii) the most summery nt* the knitted dresses,
long well-fitting sleeves seem to be featured, This is
particularly noticeahle in the silk and fibre silk frocks
in pure white that are being shown. These in the jub-
bed vam effects are fascinating in texture, the simplicity of their lines seeming to make the fabric all the
more Important
More and More of ths Peter Pan.
The Peter Pan sweater is another type that has
caused much comment, The revival of Peter Pan in
the spoken drama and its production in the movies
are responsible for this new fashion in the sweater
field. The short Peter Pan tunic with scalloped edges
and typical Peter Pan collar have been eopied exactly.
S«i attractive are these sweaters that one cannot help
wondering if, after all. Peter Pan himself did not originally wear one. Certainly they would have been
Ideally adapted to his needs. They come in his own
shade of green as well as tans and browns and many
brighter tones. Their edge bindings are often in strong
contrast and they are sometimes patterned in gay in-
terknitted designs, One model of tan fibre silk has
p figured stripe in green end red. The green tone is
also repeated in the edge binding. >HE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
April
m
i
■it
Ties Madam, vot have!
"Bathing suits that tic not heavy in the water or after
bathing—that do not dint too tightly to the body.
They are 'Monarch-Knit.'"
You can tell this to your customers when the demand
created by Monarch's great national advertising campaign makes itself felt at your counter-it %m stock
"Monarch-Knit." Order your requiremente now, nod
he prepared for easy sales created by the ttp»to-date
Monarch stylet and colors in bathing suits.
write for our representative to call  Cot In
~~"1~   tfll   it *"—"**' *~ A^--*"-   si m-^     -  hi n 4a   ^(alMlOMl
mwwoOISSOS   JwfoSS owttmww
*SW    Or^mOm^m'S^mOw**^mS •
OUNNVIIL8, ONTASia
(TO-0«»Ti» S.iUine.
gSAL-H-llii   -      ~
TSIal-H n« rtoto Oomon.
UJtV-OM ttAtma  taottio.
:Oi-VKS-Mm»iM4f Swi
r ASTHl *-U| N. CtMtofttMl ot.
i' ,~ .-.-       ;   i
**'..' "W**********************™*************************^^
Mthiru/Suits
Jioslerywd older garments L925
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
21
THE CORSET IS COMING BACK
Corset factories whieh. two years ago were running away below capacity, are now running full time
and some an- finding a difficulty in obtaining sufficient
material Tor their manufacture. It has gradually
leaked »>ut that girls who a few years ago discarded
these tnvisable means of support with such gay and
reckless abandon, now find that their figures are becoming nnmanagaWe, snd are onee again resorting to
a garni en I whieh for three hundred years has been in
continual use by the feminine sex.
THE RETAIL CLOTHIER SHOULD LINK UP WITH
"DRESS WELL AND SUCCEED'' CAMPAIGN
THIS SPRING
Move to have name "Corset'' changed
It has been declared by prominent corset manufacturers that if the word "corset" were substituted
for snme such appellation as "girdle" or "cienture
women would take to it more enthusiastically. They
assert that the word "corset" brings t*> their minds
tin* ihi type of tight-fitting uncomfortable garments In
rogue several years ago, and If women's minds wen*
encouraged to think of s new soft, restraining garment
answering all purposes for width such a garment is
meant, an entirely new era for its popularity antl sales
ui uld be created.
NEW YORK STYLES IN MENS SPRING TOGS.
Looter than ever sre ihe effect** nf spring style* for men
In America'* metropolis, Coats are eut loose with broatl shoul-
der iieHiKiis. trousers are baggier, but without (be bell bottom
•flare) they are now vide ami straight Few -rents are to bv
seen In tin. eoalH, ami lapels are broatl. As re-*'artls bats there
Is littlf change OOUcable from winter models, Colors, how-
ever, are brighter, antl brims a trifle wider, Formal <n*e«s for
evening wear is becoming necessary, sad the tuxedo, except
for purely informal wear, is no longer perralssable,
Need is imperative for some different method of merchandising to that which has prevailed during
the past few years.
What will be the main plank in the retailer's business platform for this spring season! Will he
continue to use the worn-out timber of special bargain
sales, or will he seek some solider and safer material on
whieh to base his business-getting efforts? The bar-
train sale plank is worn pretty thin; already it has collapsed under many retailers who seemed to place all
their faith in it; and during the present year it is quite
eertain it will collapse under many more retailers if
liny put any additional strain on it. But the retailer
must have something with which to lure the customer's
dollars into his store, he cannot sit back and depend,
on the necessity of men to wear elothes. This always
brings him .». eertain amount of business, but not
enough business. He needs more than this—so what
will be the retailer's plan for attracting a larger share?
During the fall season a number of retailers tried
out a selling campaign, based on the slogan "Dress
Well and Succeed." in the United States, the National Assoeiation of Retail Clothiers and Men's Furnishers
promoted this campaign, and in many centres considerable success was reported. In Canada an Association of manufacturing clothiers gave the campaign its
support, offering prizes for window displays and advertising and supporting it in some of their national pub-
lieity. In Canada the success of the campaign was entirely a matter of the success attained by individual
firms. Some firms who featured the idea ''Dress Well
and succeed" in their advertising report that they
were very well satisfied with the results obtained.
Kighty-fotir thousand lines of newspaper space was
used iu various parts of the country to promote the
idea of "Dress Well and Succeed." and numerous window displays were put in by retailers in support of this
same idea.
The "Dress Well and Succeed" campaign is a constructive effort to influence men toward placing a
greater value on apparel, tt is based on the sound idea
that good clothes are an asset to those who wear them,
and its main object is to break down the erroneous idea
that has gained currency, that it does not matter what
a man's clothes look like as long as he drives a good
ear. lives in a good home and displays other signs of
material prosperity.
Any merchant who determines to merchandise on
the principle of "Dress Well and Succeed," is bound
to benefit from his efforts, no matter what other merchants do. The very fact that he advertises this idea
to his customers, that he puts in attraetice window displays of new gOods-^gO0d8 that sell through their attractiveness rather than their price—the very fact that
he talks style, quality and the desirability of his goods
to his customers rather than their price, is bound to
help him. This consideration alone should make the
retail trade decide that they cannot afford to drop this
campaign for the spring of 1925. and if they did not
support it last fall, they will line up behind it this
spring. 00
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILEB
Ui
a re it
Our Advertising Covers Canada
Creating Prospects in Every Locality
coon    ta*Yi    in    11 m.x.    io\tr.'M*   i«  i \*m  ruw*^
2jl Cmttfd %07
~* at vay tncdemte cost
\   t m
tl*.   1     *M-       fl        ■**
t*mtma»satm Uasfa— •*«**•
fli
tT not** nuMMiiv. i»l BVBtNlvs. M   ANO > I Mini  iTtWW |*M-Bsmmi-««-
Dominion Linoleum
(,/r;« //////(//w,.//o(/;v
DOMINION
LINOLEUM
FLOORS
,
No matter who your customers are or when
they live they are bound to In- reached by
our   advertising   campaign,     Newspapers,
farm papers and magazines are carrying the
story of Dominion Linoleum floors into practically every home iu Canada, The result is
Demand—with sales and profits for the
dealer who sets himself out to supply this
Demand.   The extent of these sabs and pin-
tits depends entirely on the energy with
whieh you go after them.   Specialise on
Hake tin in tin* backbone of your floor covering department (live them adequate stori
and windou display, so thai people »i«-»ini•
and outside ean ace you have lhe goods the*
arc looking for. Dominion l-inoleum Plooin
are real business builders Beauty, 9 wide
range of patterns, quality, satisfactory mai
L'in ami rapid turnover have made Dominion
Linoleum Floors the best dealer protection
of their kind in Canada
DOMINION INLAID LINOLEUM
No longer need you imparl Inlaid Linoleum at high priees Dominion Inlaid
Linoleum is now being manufactured In Canada by Dominion Oilcloth \
Linoleum Co. Limited. L is made in a wonderful range of colors and patterns—the kind that sell on sight, Suit tu the tread, durable to th. point
of permanence and with » beautiful high-polish finish, you could noi handle
n floor Covering with greater selling appeal.
Write us today jot pallet n book and lull palliation of'Dominion Inlaid /.mo.'eum
lhe new 'Dominion moneymaker.
Dominion Oilcloth & Linoleum Company limited
MONTREAL 1925
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
23
STYLE FORECAST FOR FALL
A change In line is announced in the Style forecast
for fall 1924 issued by the joint style committee of the
International Association of Clothing Designers ami
tin* National Association of Retail Clothiers and Furnishers The fashionable suit for fall is lo be Wedge
xhaped, extremely Wide Shoulders and narrow hips and
overcoats will follow along the same lines. This stylo
report was named at thc January Convention of the International Association of Clothing Designers. A
feature that was brought out at the convention was
•he belief oi several representative men iu the clothing
industry that men oi today are paying more attention
ill their clothing than has been the ease for 80016 time
past and thai originality and novelty are big factors
in creating interest iu clothes.
The forecast also voiced the belief that, notwithstanding the increasing popularity of the automobile,
radio, and other amusements, the man   of   today is
more careful of his appearance than ever before. This
v shown l»y the ever-increasing demand for new styles.
both in fabrics and cut of   the   garments.   Among
b   id I
w a y
other thinu's. the forecaat of the designers' snd retail*
• i's' committee further said: "The tendency in young
man's attire is changing lo a more athletic type, with
the wide, square shoulders snd small hips.
The popular euat for young men will be the two-
button medium-form-fitting, close over the hips, wide,
• plait- shoulders, with peak lapel, antl baek finished
without « vent
"The mil  luitttm saek fill mi lhe same lines of the
two-button eoat is finding favor with the extreme
dresser,
"The double-breasted euat will prove to be very
popular with tin- young non for fall.   This eoat will be
two-button 2l.o., Inches long, wide, square shoulders,
semi ftirm-tittinj-, close over the hips, pnekets low. buttons spaced wide ami low, ami baek finished without a
vent,
"Tlu* popular overcoat will be the single or
double breasted Wedge eoat.    This eoat    is   cut    with
wide, square shoulders, medium blade, close over the
'"ips, ami no Hare: 17 inches long, baek finished with a
16-lnch plain vent, ami buttons and pocket low.
"Another eoat that will be in great demand will
be the Chesterfield, single-breasted, fty front, velvet
'"liar ll Inches bum. natural shoulders, semi-straight-
hack effect, ami finished with plain vent,
•The double-breasted Chesterfield will be 46 Inches
long, and will have the same graceful   lines   as   the
single-breasted coat.
"Tuxedo coats will have the same body effect as
the saek coats, ami will continue to be the young men's
choice for semi-formal dress.
"The full dress coat is again coming back as thc
proper coat for formal dress."
The joint alteration committee of thc retailers and
designers reported that most alterations were needed
in the vests, and that most other alterations were due
lo the loose eoats being large at the blade, humped on
the front of the collar, trousers tight in crotch, round
comers of saek coats and high waists. The merchants
said they had made fewer alterations during the last
half year thru for some time. Lesser alterations were
required, particularly in trousers. One said his alteration eosts average 2,V per eent of sales. Two members of the retailers' committee said 3 per cent and
another said 4 per eent. The need for outlets for dress
vests was spoken of.
WOOLLEN MANUFACTURERS HOLD ANNUAL
BANQUET
Hear Strong Addresses on Protection and Pass Resolution Asking for Discontinuance of British Preference
Tin- seventh animal meeting of the Canadian Woollen ami Knit (Hoods Manufacturers' Association was
held at the Queen's Hotel, Toronto, on March 25th.
with an excellent attendance of members from all, parts
of the country.
In his presidential address George A. Dobbie, of
Halt statetl lhat the output of Canadian woollen industry had registered a sharp decline during the past
year, while there had been a tremendous advance in
lhe imports. The importation of woollen and worsted
cloth from Great Britain, which amounted to 13,095.000
square yards in 1920, had attained a volume of 30.154,-
•hmi Bquare yards in 1924.
"Conservatively slated." said Mr. Dobbie, "if the
L700 textile factories now in Canada, which employ
WUIOO men aud women, were wiped out. and the $300,-
IMMl.lKMl worth of goods now made in Canada were imported from abroad, five nut of every hundred people
in Canada would find the source of their maintenance
mine (In the other hand, if the textile industry were
safeguarded, and the bulk of the $128,000,000*worth
of textile goods now imported were made in Canada, it
would employ about 40.000 additional workers in the
mills, who. together with their dependents, and those
who would be needed to supply their requirements
would add over 220.000 souls to our population."
The Assoeiation had as its guests at a luncheon at
noon, members of the Canadian Co-operative Wool
Growers' Association, including the President, Colonel
It. l\ MeKwt n. Speakers at the luncheon were W. A.
Drydcn, one of the directors of the Canadian Co-operative Wool Growers, and If. (J. Fester. Hamilton, the
representative of Labor on the Ontario Minimum Wage
Hoard. Mr. Dryden asserted tinting the course of his
address thai there was no reason why Canada could not
produce th" ftftj to seventy million pounds of wool
used annuallv in the Dominion. There was no question
in his mind eVut the country's capability of producing
high (pialitv sheep in vastly greater numbers than at
present, Recent winnings at the International Live
Sloek Show in Chicago had proved Canada's ability in
ihis direction.   Mr. Drydcn believed that through the 24
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
April
BUILT TO ENDURE!
The architect who tfeaioncd LIGHT.
HOUSE BRAND Overalls did hit work
well. He made them e*tra roomy to allow of easy movement He demanded
reinforcing at every point of -greatest
wear, and he specified the huskiest,
longest-wearing  fab let.
The  builders  who carried   the   work  to
completion did to with the utmost tit*,
uttng the famous triple stile* for the
mam tjamt.-a stitch that will not rip
or pucker. And they added those finish,
ing touches which Appeal to the practical
workman.
LIGHTHOUSE BRAND tatlt'y V** man
who Putt them to the moet ttremtout
tests.   They're   a   satisfying  One  to  sea.
LIGHTHOUSE BRAND OVERALLS
" Always on the Job."
ROCK ISLAND OVERALL CO.
ROCK ISLAND. QUE.
R. M. FOSTER. 3f>44-~12nd Avt  W,
Vancouver. B C,
5
W\AA<v^ •
efforts of the Cooperative Wool Growers much valuable work had been done in the way of improving the
quality of Canadian wools.
Mr. Fester advanced strong arguments in favor of
protection for Canadian industry, basing bis advocacy
of protection on the desirability of maintaining the
high standard of living in this country.
One resolution of public importance was adopted
bv the Woollen Manufacturers. It asked that tin*
tariff preference extended to the Cnited Kingdom,
largely at the expense of the manufacturers of woollen
and knitted goods in Canada, should be discontinued
as it bore so heavily on this indigenous and neeessary
(.'anadian industry.
The   officers   elected   were'.—President, C, G.
"Cockshut, P.rantford; Vice-President, J. A. Burns,
Dunnvillc; Secretary. Douglas Dallam; Executive,
Douglas Woods. Toronto; C. W. Bates, Carlton Place;
Bertram Davis. Toronto; Joseph Beaumont, Glen Williams; R. L, Baker, Toronto; W. W. Weed. Almonte;
1). C. Dick, Cobourg; II Barrett. Paris; C. II. C. Hunt.
Hamilton; James Hoodie, Hamilton; C. A. Murphy,
Gait* A. K. Craig, Toronto; 1). X. Pannabaker. lies-
peler; Boyd A. C. Caldwell, Perth, and William Mitchell, Kincardine. The following are ex-offkio members:—George A. Dobbie. Call; Richard Thompson.
Paris, ami 11. G, Smith. Hamilton.
Tin* man who never makes a mistake is either a
liar or never does anything.
AOVANCE FALL STYLES.
Witter trOtHterji tajM-iini? t«» tlo- *ho.«. are! WOTO **t'h
peadafs, bright ami rfvtd coknt, salti m dtNrijowd u lo %■'••
the Lmprestloa o( axtreme height In the weanr mill tool i
twxi fair<t jityU-* for. aocordlai lo advaaot modeli alreadj
displayed.
Just A  M.nutt
"Mlhtt Culyrm,' muimurwt th>« t>«l*s*•• mana$**r lo th»* Ilea*
Ofrapbtrr, "t tlon't want tn |»»* har»h Nothing lilt* that I
really tlon't "
"l,et « hav*- thr ongWOtt* Mid the dftSSMtl, tmnrhatontly
"What*** ions jrroag aoa f"
"I Ju»tt want tn a»k you not to writs your .voting UtSO
ing (nudaeai boan   Lativn »r»- »e« o< get mu»*«i   Hero *t***
iiiurb report wo ba*"- *!«'»t vm a ihtpm^al oi kvto ami Siwwi
iastead oi the *yb> Krtass they orderwi
TCEETEE
THC PURE INOOL
UNDERCLOTHING
THAT Wtll NOT SNKINK
^Points to consider
when buying Under****"
TMC MAKER
TMe NAME
JTMt TWADfi
MARK
Hiqhest
Qva/t tty tn■
UNDERWEAR
taws*
maoi »y
%fdui(L
%ȣ *#*K
or OAlT
/ IBS MB HI0TIKII COLUMBIA ItKTAlI.Kk
FASHION NOTES FROM PARIS
The early Paris opening seems to have established
1,111* met wry clearly, and thai is the desirability of a
itliiii feminine quality in the mode. The boyish, masculine line continues In sports aim country domes, and
unite rightly so as nothing could be better for praetieal sports wear than the present mode. Poll apparently there is now a growing teeling that this ureas
.should have its destined time ami place, and be relegated I" it* proper sphere instead of dominating thc
entire mode for town, for country, and frequently for
(he evening, as it has done for several seasons past.
There seems to lie some question as to the waistline.
Several houses have daringly placed it where nature
intended It. Imbed, Patau dtelares the low waistline
•-. thing of the past. However, stieh a radical change
would also mean a change in the present style of cor-
tiding, and it Is to be wondered if ibis will be eounten-
aiteed by the wise woman.
Suits, Dresses, and Coats hav,- a reminiscent masculine chic, but a general suppleness, subtlety, ami individuality herald a more Important and more feminine elegance However, there is no suspicion of fus-
vim -ss, the elegance lying in pt -rfeei cut and faultless
•It-tail Due tory smart creation of Ifolyneus makes
.is, oi beige kasha for the jumper frock, the skirt of
whieh tarries its fullness in front, in    the    form    of
pleats, ami she coal is of heavy printed blue and beige
crepe, lined with the Ix "ige kasha. Another of this
designer^ ensembles uses n printed crepe in neutral
blues and browns, which makes the frock and lines the
brown kasha euat An unusual note of this costume is
tin collar anil cuffs of liuht brown seal.
Silk st iu. nnd silk alpaea an* fabrics well adapted
ami often used for afternoon costumes  One frock by
IVcer is of black alpaea. with a   lunie   t iTeet   Opening
nver n while chiffon gilot, whieh is pleated from neek
A   OES1RABLE    EMPLOYEE.
A uncalled "big business man" of
our acquaintance was dlscusstag i
n«« man whom he hatl recently
taken into hia employ. "I hired
him.** he Mid, "because he said ha
could leave his old employer »« a
momenta aotlee and eome to me.
Thai lOUaded rather Btrsnge. Could
It he thai the man was more desirable because he bad the atfrontery
to leave hia old employer "i» the
lurch?" Hut, upon further question
oning, ti..* facti In the case came out II lemea lhat there
had been two prominent sppllcanta for the Job. The ansae-
restful man hatl explained »t some length his utier indis
pensibiiity io his old employer, "whom he could aot even
ihink or leaving upon a ahorter notice than a full month, aiace
he would require lhal much time to break some one else Into
the responsibility." The other num. who was given the job.
hatl quite a differenl  story  to tell,    "I have an understudy
who has been working under me for some time*" he said,
"Me known my work practically aa well la I tlo and he ran
take my work Up Just where 1 lefl ofT. Thai ta really the type
of employee the buaineaa world is constantly looking for. The
fid idea or the employee making himself ladispensible to ihe
job has resulted in making the Job tndispensible to him snd
'■» automatically cutting him off from many possible pro
motion*.
in ,"">l «f lhe tunic, alter the fashion of many of the
new gilets. Jabots are an important feature of the
present mode. A simple frock of silk alpaea, trimmed
with narrow inserted bands, has a long circular jabot
oi the popular printed crepe. Fine pleating is being
shown in the skirts of most, of the smart afternoon
frocks to give them that so necessary fullness whieh is
SUeh an important feature of the present mode. Fullness is not only shown by pleatings, but by godets, circular ents. and flounces, the outline, however, giving
the effect of slimness when in repose.
Evening Dresses still favour chiffon to the greatest
extent, this soft fabric being most adaptable to the
Mattering panels and flounces of the present mode.
White seems to be the smart Parisienne's favourite
eolor for evening. One frock noticed was of supple
white satin, slightly draped at the waist, and trimmed
with strands of pearls, while another frock was of
white georgette crepe, richly embroidered in crystal,
pearls, and strass. with flying wings, front panels, and
pointed sections ou the skirt. But the mode of white
•Iocs not hold full sway, cyclamen and geranium red
are also greatly worn.
Hats are practically all small, with rolling brims
'timed up in front, back or occasionally at the side.
However, large hats are going to be very popular, especially for afternoon wear, and these are all very
simply trimmed.
Shoes for street wear will for the most part be in
the brown shades, since this colour is seen iu so many
of the new eost nines. Browns, tans and beiges also
lone iu so well with other costumes iu the lighter, gayer colour mood of this spring. Brown calfskin shoes
are the best type for the masculine kind of tailored
costume, the double-breasted coat and English tweeds.
For the more formal costume, kid is the most adaptable shoe. A new material is being shown in the lighter shoes, a leather known as '"pigoat." This leather
is goatskin, grained to resemble pigskin, this last being
a leather that has n most effective grain, but one too
heavy for shoes. A combination of two leathers is
very smart this season, one shoe shown using beige kid
for the toe, end snakeskin for the back, heel and single
strap. Another shoe of patent leather had heel and
saddle-strap made of lizard-skin. Woven sandals will
be very smart this summer, as will also be a combination of white and coloured leather.
^aueM
Brit'ah Market Reports
BOOTS AND SHOES.
Large Output Despite Difficult Conditions.
Northampton, March 27, 1925.
Orders are not being received by manufacturers in the
same volume as during the first two months of the year, and
trade is rather difficult, it seems as though retailers are making an attempt to break the rising market, but they are likely
to meet with little success in this direction.
The Manufacturers' Federation has sent out another circular Intimating that in consequence of the continued rise in
the cost of materials a general revision of costings has been 26
rilF. HI
to
itTISfl COLUMBIA RETAILER
Ap
■
determined upon with a view to maintaining a due relation
between manufacturers' cost and selling prices.
Although orders are less numerous, trade cannot be described as bad. Most of the factories record a large output,
and with Raster near at hand t is likely lhat there will be
many calls, if small, for lines for delivery before the holidays.
While the position is not easy from the manufacturer's point
of view, the buyer also has his difficulties to contend with, and
one of them is in attempting to forecast a few weeks ahead
the character of the footwear that will be In demand for women. The mattet has been discussed in the trade of late, for
it is one which affects nol only the retailer but the manufacturer also. Generally speaking the plain and simple shoe appears likely to be the most popular.
There is a strong demand for good class footwear for
men. Indications are that brown will be more popular than
black, and the demand for shoes are increasing. Changes of
fashion in men's goods are so infrequent that buyers have no
need to hestitate in placing their orders. The districts which
specialize tn the production of heavy goods are not well off for
trade. For one thing, the weather has been all against them,
while the slackness of employment in the coal, engineering,
cotton and shipbuilding industries ts another restrictive factor.
More trade is being done with Ireland now that the supplies
which were rushed over before the import duties took effect
are becoming exhausted
HOSIERY AND  LACE.
Dumping of American Stockings.
Nottingham. March 27
The drop In wool prices at the London sales, though not
unforeseen, has temporarily disturbed the outlook of the
hosierv trade which, more, than anything else, requires stable
conditions. In the long run. however, provided there Is no
reaction, the effect must be helpful. The high prices which
have ruled for woollen yarns so long have seriously restricted
the market for underwear, and a cheaper basis of raw materials would encourage a bigger output and consequently mor»
employment.
it is far below what It would be if there were no enormous
quantities of "art" silk stockings dumped here by United
States exporters. It is admitted that the profit on these American stockings is almost non-existent and that it is part of a
policy to oust the British manufacturer from his market. The
price at which most of them are sold represents no more than
the cost of labour and materials in this country, without al
lowing anything for overhead charges, to say nothing or pro
fits.
Autumn orders for men's and women's underwear In medium weight stuff are very limited In slie, owing to uncertainty
on the part of buyers as to what may happen at the wool sale*.
An early Improvement In this section, however. Is probable.
The present day tendency for the knll goods trade to be
come more and more dependent on fashion is especially pronounced this season. The variety of designs In outerwear gar
ments is enormous, and this extends not merely to colouring*
and qualities but to style and shape. This branch promises to
be healthy for a long time ahead.
FOODSTUFFS.
The Tea Position.
On account of the heavy slocks on hand, the depression
which hangs over the tea trade is likely to last for some time,
but weight of supply is not the only cause of the recent fall In
quotations. The poor quality or the produce has had much to
do with it, and the Indian Tea Association's resolution recommending planters to improve the quallly of the 1925 crop by-
producing leas of a standard to meet present day requirements
expresses the unanimous view of Mincing-lane.
It is not so long ago that the trade organizations in London had to condemn the manufacture of coarse and stalky teas
and to Induce the planters lo restrict plucking in order to
save the trade from demoralization, and with the experience
of previous years in mind it is regrettable that the planters
should have departed from the policy of fine plucking, which
has brought their industry to a high state of prosperity.
The position at home may be seen from the official returns
as at February 2K: —
1925 1924 1923
lb. Ib. Ib.
Stocks   234,557000       lfifi.998,000       176.6*1,000
UNSHRINKABLE t
When j >u itll i man underwear be
expects more than a m«r«* SSf*8lblage Oi
wool antl  bul tout     lie expects dOBWttCt,
• as) ni and long and tatisfaoiorj wear
And ihi** i» what he g«-t« in Atlantic, lhe
pad iwe.li that uUsfiea
For some time the price of wool Isw
heen steadily advancing li will paj i to
lo order bow, for a further advance la
the price of wool win necessitate sa !*'i
ranee ia the pr.ee of goods
ATLANTIC UNDERWEAR, Limited
MONCTON, N.B.
E. H. WALSH & COMPANY
Montreal and Toronto
ttMaf Agents for Quebec, Ontario antl Witttrn Province*
5* 19® THE MUTISM COLUMBIA KWAILKH
If I Ran a Store on Main Street
General Manager of Large Departmental Store Relates How he Would Run a Store in a Small Town-
In This Article Readers Will Pind Ideas Which Have Built up the Largest and Most Successful
Stores in the World.
*k
By A. Lincoln l-'ilene
"li" I were t«» go back to tuning a store in a small
town—and I ean think of many worse fates—there is
one idea, gathered in a good many years of retailing in
;i large city, that I should take with me.   Briefly, it's
thi*: That ORS ean pfOpSCr and BJOVe ahead onlv hv
(telling better goods at better prices ami with better
service,
"The appeal to sentiment. ! ** community Loyalty,
is all very well; but iu the long run neither iimu nor
women buy from sentiment and loyalty.  They buy for
convenience, for price, for quality or for any one of
•several reasons 'Buy-at-home' weeks are all righl so
far ss they stir local merchants to better their methods;
bui it it is to leave a permanent impress the slogan
should read
** 'Huy Better at  Home
"That points tfee way U*r the nterenani in ine
small city t" •succeed, ami it is a path he can follow
Thc chief bogey men of the small city merchant are, i
suppose, i he mall-order houses, thc larger stores iu the
larger city whieh can be reached easily, the chain
stores ami the house-to-house salesmen. But these
forms of competition have their vulnerable spots,
"Other things being equal, the buyer would rather tin business st home than with the mail-order house.
for he or she would rather see the goods he or she is
buying The buyer «ill not make the trip to a more
or less distant town to buy what can be found as well
at home
Chain Can Buy in Quantity
"Tin* ehain store has the advantage of mass buying, but there 111* ways in which that advantage ean
be overcome The same thing is true ot" the house-to*
hiiti.sc {talesman, Not onl) does In* sometimes defeat
himself bv the verv "persistence of bis calling, but thc
local merchant can ftomotimes outsell him in bis own
field.
I have heard of cases where tin* merchants of
small communities have opposed thc bettering of roads
leading t-> larger towns on the ground that their customers would leave them foi the larger town, I can
ihink of nothing more foolish There is no such thing
ns a one-way road, and the same path that takes customers away can U used io bring them back if only thc
attractions are as great
l.et me now try to lie more specific in sppiying to
•i small store in a small community the things I hsve
learned in merchandising In a large city, tiet us as-
Ktime that we arc talking of a store In a town oi, say.
25,000 people, B store with annual sabs of, say, $100,-
IKK), Such a store would have a limited number of
salesmen and women besides the proprietor, who would
noi only be a salesman himself, but also its chief and
perhaps its only buyer.
Small Store is Hampered
"Ami right there is, l believe, one of the biggest,
'■ not the biggest, chance that wc have for Improving
small store methods.   The small store keeper in his
buying is hampered by two things; the smallnees of his
buying in measure of money, and his dependence on
outside salesmen for his knowledge of market trends,
stybs and prices.
"What is the answer? Co-operative buying, in
Conjunction with a group of other merchants who are
sumilarly situated It is a simple problem in arithmetic to multiply $100,000 by 100 and get $10,000,000.
and ten millions is a considerable buying power. If
I found myself back, owning and managing a small
city store, om* of the very first things I should do
would be to look about me for merchants with whom
I could form a strong buying organization.
'And I am not dealing in dreams. Such combinations arc already in existence and are working effectively. More of them are sure to eome into being. It
is easy to sec the benefits. The buying of staple goods
could be handled very well by such an agency, and
with the wide choice of a central storehouse the smalltown merchant ftould be able to keep his stocks replenished with a minimum of expenditure of money
and time, Moreover, such a buying organization would
bave the merchant more time in whieh to do his buying
of lines in which style is a factor aud in whieh his own
intimate knowledge of his smaller town and its likes
and dislikes will be ai great advantage.
Cant Afford Expert Advice
"*1 believe that such combinations of 50 or 100
small stores would develop very naturally other joint
functions than merely buying. The small city merchant cannot, perhaps, afford the best expert advice
on such matters as advertising and eost aecounting
methods. Let me state some of the advantages of such
co-operative buying:
"1. Cbaper buying, which means better service
tti the community.
"2. Better buying, which means a wider choice and
which also means better service.
'.'!. More time for the proprietor to devote to
the other problems of the. store.
"Co-operative buying would be better buying not
only on account of lower prices, which mass buying
would mean, but because of the buying skill which a
•iUi.oiHi.iKM) or even a $1,000,000 buying combination
could employ. Selling is a highly skilled profession,
but SO is buying, and a merchant may be a very good
seller of his wares, but not a good buyer.
This tendency towards co-operative buying is only
in its infancy. Some attempts have failed, There are
obvious reasons, The organisers may expect results
too soon, or thev may not be willing really to co-operate, They may look for some advantage for themselves at the expense of other members of the buying
group-  ;t Common cause for failure.
'Such movements as the formation of buying clubs
by retail grocers antl druggists are along the line which
I have pointed out as essential for the merchant who
hopes to succeed and grow in the smaller communities.
Another duty whieh such a small city store owner has 2*
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
April
Counter Check Books
Carbon Leaf and Carbon
Back Styles
The only counter check book plant in B. C.
Prompt Delivery Right Prices
B.C.
Phone: Seymour 1244
SALES BOOK
LTD.
CO.
1150 Hamilton Street Vancouver, B. C.
Agents   Wanted
J. A. TEPOORTEN
UMITED
WHOLESALE DRUGS
PATENT MEDICINES DRUGISTS* SUNDRIES
PHARMACEUTICAL PREPARATIONS
308 Water St.
Vancouver, B. C.
•raw
tjtsosotmtisi
••straws".-
Bruises        Sores
Rheumatism
Soothe the core muscles or ligaments by rubbing in Minard's Liniment. It penetrates, relieves and
heals. It eases inflammation and
restores the injured part to health.
Splendid for cuts and sores, tt
sterilizes and heals quickly.
Keystone School
Supplies Pay Double
There is double profit in Keystone Sehool
Supplies. Students like their good quality snd
generous quantity of paper The dealer's mar.
•/in is broad enough to make the line worthy
a prominent place in anv store
Individual os\es are profitable and Keystone
firings repeat sabs
Smith, Davidson ft Wriglt Ui
MANUFACTURERS   ANO  WHOLESALE
PAPER DEALERS
VANCOUVER
VICTORIA
ind it is an importanl om   H* musl work with the
community.   Me must take s part in the activities
he must help it to fro** snd i»» fro4* along wand lim i
Quite aside from his duty as n good ritiien, there is
ptlrely s- lti«h side in this.
''Morr and wore, ss Ihe means «»i * imunlestion
improve as mow towns ir-vi a»»«wl tosao snd mors m<
awn ear-., ss the telephone reaehes farther snd fsi
♦her, wt nhall find Ik nelUng radius of thc store im
(•reuses   It is inevitable that eertain communities m\\
become buying renters; snd the merehanl whom I hav*
in mind, tlo merehanl whom I -should try to be il '
ueie baek tt. n small city, is going to see thai his towi
is one of the* buying center*   In sll that i am Iryin-s
tO sav here I have in mind tbe man who is not going
ttt he Satined With sabs of 1100.000 a year iu his ntfl
but who went tO make the sales $500,000 or |1,000,00<
or more  -in other words, the man who has no idea
standing still
Must be Oood Town
Stores iii small eitlos bave great powers ol
pension, bul they can't wow unless thc town Is b !oUh
worth coming to,   There are all sorts of factors
making such *i town   Oood roads sre a primary nc<
Then '* nn use appealing !•» the outlying customer in
less you're going io help thai customer tf1"' 1° v"
Htore,    Bill toad* are nol all     You've    trot    to    •>■
rtoiuethiiiR worth coming to besides your store   «""
schools, community music, churches, good shop*, flu'''
hotel, moving nielure theatres    nil those  things i
make n town 'livable' will help **> wake the lowi
shonpiiu* center, for it's tr«»t t < * be a 'visiting rente!
well as a shopping eentcf. 102a
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
29
There i.s another relation to his community in
which the small eity retailer can play a bigger part
than the man in the big city—thai is, the education of
his buying public. Increasingly the men and women
who buy are going to ask for a knowledge of distribution. Mow dims a retailer justify a markup of 100
per eettf or more perhaps on some articles, while on
others it may be only 5 or 10 per eent, or even less than
actual cost? Can we meet the ery of 'profiteer' except
by education*?   I do not think so.
"At present the retailer is perhaps more a target
of suspicion lhan any other man in the field of business. The manufacturer is comparatively Immune. His
factory is out of sight, while the retailer is in plain
view. If he enlarges his store, the assumption is obvious; he has made a lot of money-, and to a large part
of his public it is equally eerlain lhal he has made
it by undue profits. Tin retailer must look to educating his buying public out of lhat slate of mind, and
no one has a belter ehaiiee to do this, not merely by
advertising, lull by personal eontaet.
No Mystery in Merchandising
"There is no mystery iu merchandising, although
theft is a great deal ol ignorance about it on the part
ri" tht nubile and sometimes on the pari of the merehan! himself.
"Most tif ihe things which 1 have so far discussed
have been Hillside lhe store. Lei's consider some of
tin things thai 1 should try to do inside the store if I
were to go back to a smaller community and try to
capitalise my own experience, It is inevitable that a
stiuly ttf one's own community and ils buying power
and nabifs ihould bad to a study of one's competitors
ami their points of Strength and weakness. With that
information to gtdde me, I should try to make some one
or two departments in my store known throughout the
town for their completeness ami efficiency. I should
want the woman who sets out for a morning's shop-
pine tti say t«> herself:
" 'I must stop Into Jones' for some bed linen, and
then I guess I'll look around for a hat."
"I tlon't tare whal thc department is—it might
be sheets, or shoes, or gloves, or pins ami needles; but
IM have that department the best of its kind iu town.
The advantages are obvious, (letting a customer into
your store regularly is a victory. Make your town
lakt* it for granted that there arc centain things they
an sure to find in your store,
"Thai doesn't mean lhat you ncetl to carry cxteti-
Sivi stocks, but it .Iocs mean lhat you must carry complete stocks, tf the specialty shoiibl be children's
shoes, it doesn't mean th.it the storekeeper of whom
we   are   talking   needs   to carry a gnat number ot
makes, but tloes n I to carry a full lot of sizes in one
or two lines. It means being ready to meet any reasonable request
Teaching the Sales Foree
"The small town storekeeper bus a line opportunity to make his store a success by bettering his selling
I think most retailers will agree with me lhat the lack
oi basic knowledge about merchandise on the part of
sales men ami women is one of thc most serious things
with whieh thev have to contend, ami that teaching
litem is one ni the hardest tasks. It's a task also that
does imt grow carior as the size of the store increases.
Any proprietor of a large store will. 1 think, tell you
thai the loss of personal touch as a store grows in size
makes harder the work of training the selling force.
"The merchant in the small city can keep in touch
with the nun and women behind the counter and can
teach directly and by example. There is more time
also. In most smaller communities the stores have
more low-pressure areas in selling than the stores have
in large cities tn some of these stores most of the
selling is on Saturday afternoons and Monday.
Such a state of affairs will make possible a
great deal of direct personal instruction in selling and
also in service-, and don't forget that if I went back
to such a eity an dsueh a store as we are discussing, I
should expect to learn a great deal from my associates in the store.
Can Capitalize Intimacy
There is oik* thing which the small store has and
which it ean make of great advantage; it ean 'capitalize intimacy.' in a large store the customer is less per.
sonal ami more a mathematical unit, a something which
figures in the store's reckoning as absorbing so many
pairs of shoes or gloves a year. In the small store he
ami she are "folks.' neighbors whose likes and dislikes
are known.
"That personal touch is a most valuable asset;
ami if I were back on Main Street, I should strengthen
il in every possible way. I should devise some plan to
give my eo-workers some sort of interest in the business, either through opportunities to purchase stock
or through profit-sharing, depending upon their relative positions and importance in my business. That's
a task upon whieh I should embark slowly. I should
make sharing or stock ownership a reward of constructive service. I should want, in other words, to
have my associates hold some stake in the business, but
not until I had proved them.
"Kven if I try to make my small store as definite
as one iu a city of 25,000 with sales of $100,000 a year,
1 find it hard to say what 1 should do about service.
Much would depend upon the nature of thc population,
ln very general terms. I should think that such a store
a        ~
as 1 have iu mind would be a service store within certain bounds— that is. it would not be a cash-and-carry
store. I do know this: I should make such service as
1 did give the very best of its kind. The small eity
merchant has here again the advantage of direct personal supervision over his service agencies.
Enough Room for Competitor
'"1 tlon't think that Ihe proprietor of thc small
city store need be greatly disturbed about the question
of branded articles or of exclusive agencies for nationally advertised articles. There i.s usually enough business in the latter to provide for himself and his eom-
pctitor. Thert* is one situation which he must squarely
face, ami that is the danger of carrying inadequate
stocks of too many brands. The wise plan is to pick
out a small number of brands aud see that stocks of
those arc complete,
"If I were going baek to the task of building up
:i small store in a small city—and that's what every
progressive is trying to do—I should take with me
the knowledge that the advertised brand will have to
face increasingly bard cotnnelilion in the future. Just
now it mav be true to say that national advertising can
sell anything; but as the consuming public gets to
know more about distribution, that will be less true." 30
Till, BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
April
Still the Leader!
Davidson's Premier Bread Box
«
^ranches:
the box with the roll cover "
remains thc undisputed leader.
It was first in the field and it remains first because it
comes up to the Davidson standard in every way. It is
a sure, steady seller.
Finished in white and French Grey enamel, with artistic
decorations, in three sizes   15, 17 and 19 inches.
Established I860
Head Office and Factory: MONTREAL
Toronto Winnipeg Saskatoon Calgary
Vancouver W2-">
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
31
tksai
HARDWARE, OIL w PAINTS
HARDWARE MARKETS AT A GLANCE
Sash Cord and 8ash Weights: Stocks arc filled for
the opening of the building reason; priees arc steady.
Screen Doors and Windows: Tin- retail call will
not begin on this line for some time but there is evident
a desire ou the part of the dealers ?•■» have stocks ready
when the demand starts.
Pishing Tackle: The demand is very good both
for Immediate and future delivery.
Radio Merchandise: Sales air dropping off aa
summer approaches "activity on "H'' batteries however is still good
Freesers: Spring stocks have been shipped in
manv instances lo the desiers; retail sales have not yet
started and prices are unchanged.
Olas and Putty: Sabs are at a fair rate with no
particular   Interesl   in   these items-, prices show no
changes
Rope: since the recent raise in prices rope has
been showing signs of remaining strong in price; deal*
. !s look for a good business in this line.
Paper: Red Rosin papers are beginnig to be ifl
demand ami stocks art well tilled; prices are unchanged.
Wire Nails: Orders have been satisfactory. There
has been a decline of forty cents a keg; stocks are in
good shape,
Wrenches;   Sales have been fairly good; stocks
arc in good shape and prices steady,
Seine Twine: Demand is reported to be satisfactory ami jobbers arc moving considerable stock.
Field Fence:   inquiries are coining along well In
'his line by dealers, stocks arc well Riled and prices
unchanged.
Incubators and Brooders: The movemeni is still
very active from jobbers stocks
0*\rden Hose: The retail selline. wsson has not
opened up yet but dealers have ordered heavily in an-
urination of a large business this soring, Jobbers arc
well satisfied with sides; prices ,-nv firm,
Lawn Mowers: Sales to retailers have been Rood
nnd iobbe.rs art* now busy delivering stock throughout
'bis territory.
Refrigerators: Interest in refrigerators has nol
shown much pep so far this war jobbers report.
u
Hammers and Hatchets: Orders have been good
and jobbers have ben successful in moving a considerable volume of business; stocks are in good condition
and prices show little change.
Linseed Oil:   The demand for linseed oil has been
light but a heavier demand i.s expected.
Roofing Material: All kinds and makes of roofing
material arc beginnig to move out in the wholesale market. Kach day shows an increase in shipments to the
retail trade*, sales on wallboard are especially good.
Bolts, Nuts and Screws: Prices on bolts, nuts and
screws are very firm; the present demand is fairly active; stocks appear adequate.
Garden Tools: Rakes are selling quite freely and
business in other garden tools is gathering momentum.
Garden Sets: Slightly more interest in garden
sets is evinced by the retail dealers according to the
jobbers here.
Automobile Accessories: Interest in automobile
accessories are rapily becoming manifest thanks to
weather conditions. Contrasted with a year ago the
difference in prices today is remarkably slight.
Paints and Oils: Sales have shown marked improvement in the past ten days. Retailers reoort that
they arc moving their stock at a fair rate. There has
been an advance in price on paints and sundry lines.
Builders Hardware: There has been a very fair
movement considering the season's building activity
--'ill U aheadt the prospect of a busy summer in this
direction is bright.
PAINT INDUSTRY FOR VANCOUVER.
For tho purpose of manufacturing fireproof and fire retard-
ant paints, fireproof cedar shingles and artificial stone and tile
nf all kinds, the Asbestosized Paint Products, Limited, is es-
tablshing a plant in Vancouver, similar to plants now in
operation in Seattle and Sunnyvale. California, where Edgar
Layton, well-known industrial chemist, is ln charge, and is the
originator of the processes to be used in the local plant.
NEW (*OODS
No [joak-0 Piston Rings have a 4o degree angle
grove full of oil botwen the ring and the cylinder wall
■LEAK®*
on
MAUNO .
oaoevi
TOONWNGt
whieh pulsates as the piston moves up ami down. This
pulsation keps a film of oil between the ring and the
cylinder wall. The groove tills with fresh oil and empties itself on each stroke,   Packed twelve iu a carton. •*1.»
32
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA KCTA1LK!
April
talk GOLOR
AND APPEARANCE
as well ar PROTECTION
AND PRESERVATION
for bigger PAINT and
VARNISH SALES
i
Property owners may now have their homes painted
and pay later by the Partial Payment plan. Paint
and varnish manufacturers will gladly supply full
details. Or write direct to us. This plan presents a
great opportunity to increase paint sales.
SAVE THE SURFACE CAMPAIGN
601 Reefer Building Montreal 1925
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
The Economy of Good Paint
Efficient Protection Eliminates the Risk of Decay
33
It has been stated by an expert autoority that a
survey of property throughout the country revealed
the fact that a surprisingly small proportion of property was preserved from decay by means of paint
antl that the majority of this property is being left to
destruction for the want of paint.
Common sense suggests that this position ought
speedily to be reversed. Think ol tin- capital invested in this large proportion of structural properly of the country which is being left to speed? tie-
a • f •
stiuetion by climatic influences.
Somebody has to pay. antl if it were the fire insurance people, prompt action would betaken to prevent tin loss, the property thai is unpainted is as
surely being iosl oa though it were now on fire, only
the process Is not sorapid.
Structural materials, protected by paint, will last
indefinitely as the wear and tear comes on the paint.
and this can be renewed as often as may be necessary
at small cost
Before the war the state of nn* resources in timber
and iron gave architects and engineers cause for anxious thought concerning the future; now these resources are immensely curtailed and much of whst was in
being has bean destroyed.
Timber may grow again in the COUHK! of years, but
iron, once destroyed* is h>st to us forever; it eludes
our grasp; it turns to dust, and is scattered over the
face of the world In particles too small for the hope of
recovery, This loss can be avoided by the use of good
paint, which is one of the best investments, and when
compared with the value of the materials it can preserve, it cost, reckoned as an insurance premium, is but
'rilling  ami while insurance only replaces loss, the use
of paint actually prevents loss.
Why, then, with protection SO cheap and SO eertain
is such a small proportion of perishable property in a
stale of protection against abrt enemies, corrosion and
decay!
1' is because propertj owners do not sufficiently
realise tho fact that, without paint property will rust
and decay snd become useless and dangerous, while
withr paint it will be preserved, and will remain useful ami safe for the purpose for which it is intended.
ion cannot afford to do without painting. Vou must
painl or lose your property.
All surfaces capable of being protected by paint
should be 10 protected as an economic necessity; it is
I ho only way from ap radical point of view.
Why lose that which is so easy to keep?
Why run risks when efficient protection is SO easy.'
The price of safety i.s the price of good paint. A
(food paint lasts three times as long as an indifferent
  find protects all the time.
With regard to the cost of painting, which is a necessary part of the upkeep of all structural work, a
statistical account of the yearly cost of this painting
ought to be made and kept.
Paints, if poor and inefficient, are hardly worth
the labor of application—in fact, entail actual loss. A
paint of a high efficiency and reputation under the
most adverse conditions much be used.
The charges for material, labor and scaffolding must
be calculated, and the subsequent duration of the finished Work) and then, reckoning painting as an insurance against rust, corrosion, recay, and general deterioration, it will be evident how the greatest efficiency
can be attained for the smallest premiums:
I.   Cost  of paint  per unit  (100 yards super)  of
area :
'J.   Cost of labor (moulding scaffolding, etc.) per
unit, of area;
•'!.    Duration of effective service dl' paint;
and divide bv the number of years of effective service
it will give, and one arrives at the cost of painting per
unit per annum.   The effective life of a paint is more
determinative of its economy than its initial cost.
Very few paints manufactured and sold as preservative covering for structural materials can fully
justify the claims made for them, although they may
pass the usual scientific examinations and tests under
which they art put. The reputation of a paint is really
of greater value: for. in accepting this, one is accepting the experience of others, covering a far wider range
of circumstances than those of the test conditions, and
one is gaining all this knowledge without cost, or. as
sometimes happens, bitter experience. The universally
acknowledged quality, i.e.. the reputatan, of any goods
is the greatest safeguard and assurance a purchaser
can have.
The qualities that go to make up a good paint are
the inertness of the base and its resistance to all atmospheric conditions. The base should not be capable
of oxidation by the atmospheric nor should it contain
anything injurious to the surface which it is meant
to protect nor should it have any harmful action on
the oil.
The quality of thc oil is of equal importance, for it
must provide a tough and durable film for a number of
years without losing its elasticity. A paint which
forms a flintv unyielding eoat which cracks with expansion or vibration affords a very poor protection to
tbe surface to which, it is applied.
lu order to get the most efficient protection,'it
should be remembered that with only one eoat of paint
then* is always a possibility of minute pinholes and im-
perfect'ions occurring, no matter how careful tho painter may be These pinholes may be caused by air bubbles, particles of dust, or brush marks.
It is therefore a true economy to apply two or three
coats, and it is good practice to make these coats ot. different shades, as by this method it is more easily determined where imperfactions may exist. 34
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
April
"RAVEN"   Manilla
"GARRY" uthtKrofi
"RUPERT" HootsjKrofi
Brands of Paper Bags
Represents the best in
QUALITY
SERVICE
SATISFACTION
PRICE ARE RIGHT
NORFOLK PAPER CO. LTD.
163 Water St. Sey. 7868
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Agents for B. C.
Woods Manufacturing Co. Ltd.
Winnipeg, Manitoba.
The Demand for
PERFECT SEAL
JARS
why it is so great!
t
\ x
moot
I'M
(*
v y
If tit* tprtrtg Utomii 'oo-**
when ih# long**- t« noi
It-clow %tot
*)*tt,t
turn thr ltd ami tjoir*g unit!
htng* i. brlow tt.t
mstwO
~S    A A-J
Perfect Seal Jars sell
because of thr great
popularity they enjoy
throughout Canada.
Of guaranteed quality
the Perfect Seal ensures sound sealing
with a minimum of
effort on the part of
thc housewife.
The illustration at the
left shows how simple it is to secure
tightness of the sealing.
There is sound busi
ness  in  Perfect Seal
and   Improved  Gem
Jars
-thm «*t top wife on ltd «nd
pull down spring •• utual
ORDER FROM YOUR
WHOLESALER
DOMINION GLASS COMPANY
LIMITED '•"»;»
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
<5
^mmaammm  maaaammm
HARDWARE PRICES CURRENT
Th. following art prices quoted for principal lines of leading wholesale firms.   Prices quoted are necessarily
subject to market fluctuations.
M
li«i K
I*   IM't
ii :*;
H.00
113
1i;
*. to
!> 4*>
] t>«j
t m
1 se
AMMUNITION,
leaded Shot Shell*.
Dominion:
Canuck.
:.* 0 I ''* I 5'* '*'
U o * tt i Mm *a*
imperial.
It O x tt x is* «»»
;.* x ':** x \\ «h *|H	
Amarlcan,
f   ||.C KitfO Club 11 H K St I I1* ch   UU
i'eters High Gun , M tt
U U C.  Arrow  11 G I fl I  S*| *h        . '»% IS
Peters  premier .    .   &*J5
Metallic Ammunition.
Dominion
tt atuitl  Hmotttl***
M  I., tus   Hmokeic-Mi
tt l  ft*ft** Stookaiesai
..*   L    lUll©   Leftltiofc
American.
H  Khoti  Smoke!***
22 l,*»t>g   *SjBOa*atttM
23 l«  ititi** Satoketee*
*UL   RI8e Lesmok B
ANVILS    Peter  Wright.  tStbe   to  119 tt>*» .
"■.. over in tt>* 88c
\Xt2S- -l*»ya' htm, 1% n>t* ttl.fl to us:o
toi : double hit »*■*••». unhendii-d. $5*£$ to
U8 *o tio* , hunters exes, S'2 00 dot. #u»gt*
bitted Hup*, unbundled. ItlSO to 11100 doe
BARS- Crow.  |ttoo per  ItW It>*
pelting ■■\jt*-*i. rawhide sides, tt to.
.--.it. S-16" nt II 10 per Iff tvl. \* nt $1W
• -   100 foot]  i|* at |t So prr  ltd real
BOLTS,  cakEIauetin   fun  paekefss).
\ and nwatler  tip to <-ln   long,  tmtt Si  l/t
■ ft  Um.  over  |U   in    J*H  off  tint    Not*   BSW
tiger, til j.-»«•>,'». ir** n off u*t  Koto ««•«
Um nricjH In eflWl
BOLTS, MACHINE  *% SOS smaller up to
i ■« tons,  teas 13 off Bat; ovn  l*la   less
U off list;  %   j:*-,  nnd    \    last    If   off
lift      Kots new  H*t  ft-fftMS  In Stf-SOt
BOLTS, STOVE   l^«.n ii off hut
BOLTS,  Ti it i:  Leas to add  to-;, on stl
holti for brokrn packsgSS
BOARD,  *Baavat   i*w 1.000 to s.wo r«*i.
Ill N  per   I DM  furt
BOILERS   RANOES   .;.' gate   $11.11 e*ch
WILDING   PAPER   Tarred,   Mc   to  t; :■«
* •■: roS   ,\<*. ordlng to Quality   Plata We to
• ■•■.   pgf roll.
UPTTS- tlAt«1, }»5, unOqai rvtpper and
lull bfttlS KSnUh *»t n* 31, jw-r ptlr St.-. IH
tS%  fwr jN»lr 5Tr;  t«^  t   i*$  p#r  p-jlr Mc
BUTT#—Wroiwrht »tp«-i   No  tjtt  j«*\iu
ll  I3   V*i   <!..!  ,   %%   \   Jt%   i; Kj   pot   ,\,,t   ;   |t,   x
'S   tt N p«»r «lo«
'■VIU'KT  KKI.T U Ot.,  M  0» .   |1M  roll
rATCIIISt,   I'lTlVHIU*   Old   r».t»pt.r   «n<l
■■•■til bran «ni»h  ittr.o jWf hundred
CHAIN—CWI ii. elociHc w«-M. .M«   lll.M
m ',,,', iba; li, 111 is p*r t**' it»* s->ii Hi tt
M  IM Rm
CHAIN —Loaatnff, |*1| x it is M saob; '-«
« i*. M TS w»oh
CHO|*f»RR8 PfiOD ■I'r.iv.-t^ni Nn B ttl.tt
'■ * nnlveraal No 1. tlT.Mdot; tlnlvarssl
**• I tttlSdni   nnlvorsal No I lt.1 tt dot
llonii    N-..    IS,    I2 3'>   Mt It.    Mom,-.    No    IS.
II ..'. mob
CHURNS, HAUHKl, No 0. no:-* asob;
/» t. tu irt Mob; No 1, ill *<* wich; No, 3.
lltTI  r>a, 1,
<*LKY1S, MALLRAHLK   Pat lb   t«V
.' I.'iTIIIvS  I,IN);   WIUH-  |Vr rnrtt.  So ft.
imlLLfl   in    Ktoek   sr. .*.   ..ff n»« h»-«
1 kirmUti ijin   «.*, -, ,,ff nrw  lixt
KAVTROUOH-  iv-    100   f.-«-t    Slit    tt-**!
"•to $1 50;  IM„   |: 11
PlLSS •Qml \\>M«on, '>:*r, <*tt Hot; Black
"«»iott,t If,-;  off  Mm!
'iVHHKS-    H08S- In    R" ft   lanfftbS,  un*
U'l.'.i. (,„• him it,K dellvory, lltt  Tartnlnal
u    l-ply.   S-ln   lift no.   S,.lti  |12 W;   **,-ln
j ""■ I I'b  Vm *n 00; Vm lis00; \-m
,"".   WIN   wound,    -H«lv   S-ln   $15.00;
• n  $i;oo,   ;>,,.(„  110.00;  CoiTUfnlsd,  3-t>l/.
in %nnn, nk.|n, n?, 00, »,-in llt.W
.J OUPLtNOS,   ATTA«*IIKI»    »i.   S.   *i.  *«"'-
' ^MK TRAPS    Victor,    pi-r    dOS     No   0.
,     1. 11,40;  l*i II 20; I, |1 <0. 3, 11.00
•1  * N.~do«. N«t   0,   || 20;   1.   18.00;   I's-
'"• -'• W0.M; *». tn «o
''""P-No J, p,,r ,,,„ MJ0, ,.ti $4 50; J,
>   10; 3,  I9J0.
•-"fffflSrf^JH   Wlra-HeaVy Mrap. t
7,.-    ' •**'"   " 70; 6-in. 18.00; 8-in. 14.7D.
4-ln   Km-, 6-irj  1130; iv-in |e,i«,; 12.sn 1125;,
HOR3E SHOES-olron,  Ne>». 0 to 1   19*5
p«f   100-IW;  iron.   Not,   2 and  larger'.  J9.50
twr too Hut
IRONft BAD, COMMON—Per 100 tos-
I tt.«   ars.l over SOc; 3. 4. and *> lltJt. 23c
inoN. BAND—Pw 100 Iba.—1%-ln. $4.50;
'.',-in    M.S0;   J-In.  14 50
lUf.N. BLACK SHEET—per loot*™.— 16
ausge 11.10; 24 grate $110; 18-20 ruaae,
if* tl; :« luaffe U (,0.
IHON, QALVAN1ZKD SHEET—Pw 100 ton.
tt rue-go Amartcan <>t Bngllth IT 65 24
Kutie f/tM; ll-M vuage $T.c>&.
KNOBS, HIM Im h»U- Japanned. 13 75 per
dor.
Lamp CHIMNEYS—A  par est** 8 dot,
I! 10 !**r dot ; A. per dot. tl,10; Ii. per case
<> dos   II 4'* j^r dot ; I'., per dot   $1.75
LANTERNS—Short or long globe, plain,
$14.10 dos,  Jaiwnned.   115.05  dot.
Lawn MOWERS—
Empraaa i:x5 blade $1160; 54x 5 blade
m;6. tfxi bbide 114.10; is s 5 Made $13.K;
21 1 :. blade HI 00,
STAR" Ma Wheal, I Knives, each. 12-ln
It ••■ •; 14 - in %%M; h;-ui $110; 4 kniveH. Ilia !"'.«•». M-in HO.tt; 51-4n lil.tw.
MATTOCKS   tick.    tSM    A<*t ;    Cutter,
19 10  dot
nails WIRE—Base 14At fo.h Vsnoou-
v«*r; fit, \soM IT,50 fob. Vtincouver.
i'it*Ks  CSmf, st Iba $s 10 dos
PINK TAil 1 gal 11.10 e»«<-h: «« gal. 33c
eat h;   **»   gal,   2*c  each.
PLASTER <'»•' PARIS   $1.10 per 100 tt>«.
R1VET8 AND BURRS Black carriage. &lh
butts ITc; No I assorted ooppered rivets
N«> s, 3i<- n> : sssortad copper rivets ami
burrs fid*1*; Ko, I sseorted coppered burrs
nnd bum Jlc per tt> No 8 coppered butTt
l?C   per   n> ;   CoppOfOd   rivets   26c   per   tt).
Coppered burrs life per n>.
ROPE -BASE—-Brlttob manila. baee, 23's**■:
pto«« bmuiDs best -T^c lb,
RADIOLAS—No. 111. 142*0 each; No   111A
|?4.00: No  x ISHQ0, subjaet to tt% dis.
p. vi>i<» SUPPLIES -Tubes. W l>. n I4.i*>0:
Loud ipeaker, No is2.*>. $S1.*W each; Brundet
i'!i..'-.-H |7 00 each, subject to 25rf discount;
mttarlea, No   TC, It C each; No. 767. 14.10
tat h,
SAWS, BUCK—Happy Medium. $16.50 dot
Happy id.a fi«5o dos; Dlsstons No, 6 fill!
dos
SCREWS-Bright Hat head 67 4 10 off
liat; bright round head, 13/10 off list; brass
flat head 37't 10 off list; brass round bead
55  tO off list
SfRKWS.t'AP    55 off list
St'HEWS. SKT--55 t«ff list
SHOVELS AND SPADES—OWs or Fox.
lUSIi per dOS   S» Jones or Bulldog $13 7S per
dot
SCOOPS Moose No 4. 117 10 dot : No. (,.
117,11 dox.  No   S, $tS 50 dOS ;  No.  10. $19 20
All sboVS In black finish.
30LDKR ■■■'s   x   %,   case  lots.   15c   per   lb;
l.-mt, (0c p< r lb
I7«   J>e:* tti
SPIKES, PRESSED—Per too lbs    >4 inch.
l\ .o   B it*, $s 10; 4-ln   $7,10,
STAPLES—Oalvsnlaed fence. IS.25 per 100
Ibi in full k.-irs; galvanlted poultry netting.
ISO 50 |i«>i   100 IbS   in full kcRs.
TACKS—Cnrpet. 7lV off new list
WIRE, BARBED—Per roll—4 point, cattle.
80 1,,I   14.11;  I-point bog, SO rods $4 OS,
WIRE PLAIN GALVANIZED Per 100
n»   No 1 M.10; No. ll. IM0<
WIUK O * A Per 100 \hx No 10. Ifi.OO;
No   11. I«". 10; No   12. $0,10.
WRINGERS -Ete.     1M.00    dDi;     Safety..
$9700 dot; Bicycle, isttio doi i aj«x. $j?i.oo
dot
WRENCHES,   PIPE   Trimo,   less   4,»   per
,,-nt off list.
wire CLOTH—Oul of stock. Vancouver,
$3 25 per too .mi ft ; totlvanltetl, out of stock,
Vancouver. 14.75 per 100 sq. ft.
WASHING MACHINES—Vslos water power. $*»* 7fi e«ch; Seafoam Electric. $76.00 each;
Snowball, $i"36 web; Patrlet, H9 oo each
VT8E-J,   WARREN   SOLID   BOX-
110 00 each; 50 tbs. $1*2.00 each.
-13   Ibi.
PAINTS AND OILS.
Brandram- Henderson
Per Gallon
B-H  "English" ordinary colore  $4.21
B-H  "English" white   4.10
B-H Exterior Oil Shingle Stain—
Ordinary colors, in 4 gal. cans  ...|11'
Greens and Greys, In 4 gal. cans lot
B-H Anchor Shingle Stain-
Ordinary colors, in 4 gal cans   l.Jt*
Grrens and Greys, in 4 gal. cans   I.M
PAINTS
Gallon
Ordinary colors, in  1 gal. cans |4.55
Martin Senour (torch paint  4.55
Martin  Senour  Neutone  white  3.75
Martin 3enour Neutone color  3.73
Martin Senour Moor paint .... 4.30
Sherwln   William**,   white  1.1M)
Sherwin    Williams,    color  4.55
Sherwin   Williams,    porch  4.35
Sherwin  Williams,   floor  4.30
PLTTV— Per  too  lbs.
Bulk,  barrels SOOIbs $160
Bulk,  irons 100  lbs    7.75
Bulk, lions 23 lb*    8.3U
Tins. 5 Ihs; per Ri    9%
Tins,   lib 12%
UNSEED OIL*— Gallon.
Raw.  1 to 2 barrels $1.55
Boiled. 1 to 2 barrels  1.58
LEAD.  WHITE IN OIL— I'er 100 lbs.
1.000 Ibs. to 1 ton  16.85
Less          17.35
Brnndram's  Genuine    11.05
TERPENTINE—
1 barrel lots	
VARNISHES-
Elastic. No. 1  -
Elastic.   No.  2     7.40
IV   Linoleum       6.80
IV   Marine   Spar „   7.10
IV  Furniture      365
IV Pale Hard Oil     4.65
Less 33 1-3 per cent.
I.acqueret  16.15 less 40
Automotive Price List
Gallon
 I 1.70
Gallon
...| 8.30
SHOCK—Float A Ford No
at
FOOT—Wireless   Ford
ABSORBERS
1 at  121.50.
ACCELERATORS
at $1.75 each.
ASSORTMENTS—Cotter pin 13c each; Cap
screws 38c each; Set screws 30c each; Machine !»--rew 75c each; Machine nut 75c each.
BATTERIES—Hot Shot $2.96 each.
ROOTS—Tire 4-in. $1.25 each.
BUMPERS— Hoover Twinbar,  $10.60 each
CAPS—Radiator. $1.00 each.
CARBORUNCLUM— Valve grinding 6-ot   $4
dos.
PARRIES—Luggage, collapsible $2.25 each.
CEMENT—Radiator,  % lb  Wonder Wo;k-
e*r 15.40 dot
CHAINS—Weed 30x34 $6.35 each: 32x34
$7.00 each; 31x4 $7.70 each; 33x4 $8.20 each;
.11x4 $9.00 each.    Less 30**r.
RID O SKID—30x3H $3.75 pair; 32x314
M.9& pair: 34x3H $410 pair; 30x4 $3 95 pair;
;i3x4 $4.50 pair. Less 30«:L
CLEANERS. WINDSHIELD—Presto $1.75
each:  Rain-E-Day. $1.50 each.
COILS—Spark single $5.66 each; Spark
double $11.00 each.
DEFLECTOR 3—Wind adjustable $15 20
pair.
ENAMEL-% pt. Jet Lnc $6.00 doz.; 5-ot.
Wonder Worker $4.80 dot.; Martin Senour
Quick Drying, 1/64 13c each: 1/32 19c each;
1/16 31c each; »4 5*,- each; % 96c each; Vi
11.70 each.
HORNS—Electric  15.73 each.
JACKS—No.   200   12.00  each;   No.   4  |2 25
each: No, 41 |6.00 ench.
LOCK3. MOTOMETER—No. 390 1265
each: No. 891 13.00 each: No. 392 |7.50 each.
MIRRORS-Rear view 11.00 each.
OIL—Monamobile, light |L55 gal.; medium
|1 60 gal.: heavy 11.70 gal. M     .
PATCHES BLOW OUT—Locktlte, No. 1
63c each: No. 3 SOc each; No. 5 75c each;
No. 6 17c each.
PLATES—Step  $2.00 each. ;....
PLUGS—Spark Champion 53c each; A. C.
ntan lie each; Hel-FI, We each 36
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
A i
TRAVELLERS WE HAVE MET
The above is absolutely the correct heading for this
"life" history, because if you have ever seen Clinton
B. Niekerson! it's a dead sure thing that you MUST
have "met" hint—no one has ever been known to
"Catch up" to hint yet.
Mr. C. R Niekerson is lust known to his friends ss
just plain "Nick" and il" you know him real well you
will resize that he represents both "Old Nick" and all
TIP8 FOR LIVE CLERKS
Keep Yonr Haste to Yourself, Friend Clerk
C. B. Niekerson
the rest of tht* family,   ll is perhaps natural or maybe
only a coincidence that Bro. Xiek Bells 'sulphur'*
that is to say "matches."
Wt* admit lhat thc Canadian Match Co. picked a
"winner" when they tied up to Bro, Nickeraou for he
is as full of "pep. pop and power" as anything thai
ever was turned loose in a prohibition country,
His record is so good, that backed up by the best
matches made in "this world." lit* has recently been
made "Supervisor of Western Canada."
The head office of the Canadian Match Company is
in Montreal. Que., and the factory al Pembroke, Out.
Donald H. Bain Limited of ihis eity ait- ami have been
their agents ever since the Canadian Match Co., started
on this market. •
'Nick" is just as live a wire whether In* is selling
or supervising the distribution of matches, or mixed up
in the activities of the Commercial Travellers' A.vsoci-
ation of Canada or the I'.C.T.. Vancouver Council Ko.
284, of which he is a valued and active member.
We congratulate both "Nick" ami his company
on his recent promotion, in spite of the regret that we
all feel on account of being unable to see him as often
as wc used to. and that means a whole lot as any one
will tell yon who has ever come within the ratlins of
his cheerful greetings,
MERCHANTS!
Isn't It  True?
That ths man who owss you spends hit money elsewhere? Let ut make the collection and you'll recover ths money, also his trade and respect.
NO COLLECTION-NO CHARGE
Own   Legal  Dept.—Agentt  Everywhere.
Phone or write ut for rate*.
Credit Protectors Limited
314 PACIFIC  BLDG.,   •   •   ■   VANCOUVER,  B. C.
Phone: Sey. 371
Our Motto: ''Collection!—or a Reason."
IV tt
It's within five minutes of closing lino    You arc
all set to make a quick get-away, catching the 6,05
for home   after which there is not another eai
twenty the minutes,   There is a step outside   .
belated custom** enters.
Maybe, it occurs just like ihis, or maybe in v
other way   say a customer Is to* your bands just sn
your hour for leaving for lunch eomei* round   Still
another occasion U when you see one of your pel pet
soiutl customer-* down   the   able   waiting   attention
You'«l like to get to him quickly for serviee, snd    •
the rapid swapping of personal news
In all these situations there is the temptation to
"rush" ih»- customer, tu b-i yum haste appear in v
brand »»f courtesy you deal out   ti is s«* vm\ to tiahtt
a       a m * " 0*> *•
up your rtpiits to questions, to glance St the eloek
the sin of sins   t<> i»o t *it-n further and out-and-out
hint to the customer that \%*o closing time    We have
even known clerks who went so fur as io mention *
Car they musl cat eh!
Of course, Ihe clerk's eonvanlenee b of minoi ii
lerest and e*»nst qu< mv to the customer   The cuiton
wants serviet    He is ready lo pay («>r it, and concel tt
the si*»re and if1* employees are established to minis
tit hin,
No elerk ean evince bis hash* to tfet rid of ?h-
lomer without penalising the store
There should be as much true courtesy ssi n nch
real respect for she cuhtonier's wishes the las?
minutes before closing tint's as anv other bout li
day,    So many customers at smh limes will '-v
'rush" themselves that •good saieatnanshtp in in
all easts is In COUVey th* Opposite nl« a    thai '
plenty nf iimt    This pleases the enatomet,„who
!i» see msnifcststinll of the store's t|t sire to $o
its way itt nerve him
Winn several people are ahead, waiting fo
trillion, the clerk equal to meh situation* develo]
nn.set'ininy ipeed   Rome customers at such timi t
"speed up" themselves, and others won't    wh<
the customer ih considerate or inconsiderate ol oi
his patronage is desired permanently hy   the
The ari is t,v sjH-tti the sail without seeming to *
in any obnoxious way   .lusi by httblini; oneself
from lengthy descriptions or explanations, by sbs
in** from personal conservation, the sales convert*
ean be pared down    And the elerk ean oft< n
quickly terminate the Kale and get to another eusl
by the simple device oi hot ping in motion.
Speedy service doesn't necessarily mean n
sniial service    The smile requires very briel !n
launch!   li takes no longer,   appreciably,   to
"Tom,- again, Mr. Priestly,*' than just plain. "<
again."  The lone ami bearing can be no lean coi
towards the customer
Clerks ean learn to give speedy wsrvicc as i!
enlisted Irom hasty serviec. Hasty s, rviee Is ■
.iustilied Tin-re are fewer easier ways ot sue"
good-Will than to plainlv show   to the CBStomei
wish to quickly i*ei him of! your hands, s,u,u
instead, that v<<u wish to serve him Intclllgcutl)
though it Inconveniences vou to tlo *<».
ni
er
Ml*
in?
>Ut*
ill!. t':,
TltK HI'lTlxll < OU*MJ*|.\ l{|-;TAILKk
The Evolution of Window Display
From Insignificant Factor in Retail Merchandising Window Display is Today Recognised as Most
Important Aid to Turnover.   Department Managers Pay Rentals for Window Space. Where Sales
Can be Doubled Through Attractive Showings.
3?
Prom a secondary consideration in retail merehan*
newspaper is fifteen minutes.   Traffic congestion in
.'wing, tin- store window now holds premier position,
its conception
Prior to the beginning of tin  twentieth century
window display was not considered an important medium for the promotion of Mail sales.   The greatest re.
nn tame W8S shown to the building of better and larg-
r window space.    Appropriations for forms, fixtures
.ud other mechanical aids were insignificant Items tn
thi advertising expense The man-power of the tie-
partment was a combination window-dresser and show
■ ani writer who was authorized to requisition the services oi a porter, when that dignitary was not engaged
in mure "productive" work
Ot late, the change has been striking Nowadays,
department store buyers are as eager for preferred position in the window as in lhe newspapers    Prestige-
building displays ar,- used with ever increasing frequency    Scrupulous attention is paid to details in the
planning ami decoration ««f tht store window, its light
inn effects, eolor schemes, antl background.  •
Merchants are convinced of the value of the window
display as i sales maker and good-will builder, and
ihcn are various ami sound reasons for this. It is
estimated that the average lime spent in reading a
newspaper is fifteen minutes Traffic- congestion in
ihi morning, ami movie-going in the evening have lessened the attention value of ihe advertising psges for
tthich the stores appropriate funds in such abundance.
iv be noticed, an advertisement must impress by its
sheer bigness,    It must throw itself into the reader's
line ->f vision.  People will not seek it. deliberately and
consciously,    Their sense of sight wants something
ore stimulating, more colorful, more dominating. The
window display supplies that need in many respects.
Persons who have not  the ability to visualize the
contents of a printed advertisement are shown a eon
")■!** picture of the merchandise in a setting that is
generally attractive antl satisfying,   To gaze at a win
'low requires a minimum of effort    The message car-
^ inatantancouxlv. ami the impression i* definite ami
•M!i\t     When department   stores are  located  >"  ;1
■ entra! district, ami in close proximity t«» «■•■<* another.
inpuritioii of values by window shopping becomes a
iinnle aet
ll"* window display is tin  initial Inwresaioil of the
'"■"' s tone snd personality tfnai as the advertising
oinger studies the trend of fashions, commodity mar-
in anil current events, so does the window display
'tmger study his field.
Window Display Classifications
lhe window display may In* classified as: (1) mer-
"'disc; (21 merchandise story; (3) institutional j (4)
'"•nil publicity, (5) public service.
' best- headings are self-explanatory, The mer
wdise window shows the merchandise of the season.
'•■■■•s to exhibit  the product, nothing more.    It  is
•"•is--t commonly used type, ami corresponds to the
"'•''• TOn of galea advertisements in the newspapers.
The second type of window display is the merehan
11 " Rtory.   Almost everyone is Interested in learning
how merchandise is matle. A window is prepared showing shors in the making or the evolution of cotton into
eloth. or silk-worms feeding on mulberry leaves. Or
Navajo riiv's being woven, offset by an Indian background. The effectiveness of this type of window lies
in iis educational value.
The third type of window is the institutional display, which corresponds to institutional copy in a newspaper. This may serve to portray in tableau form the
policy of the store. A cash dealing store may show thc
"Road to Economy," with madam customer wending
her way over :i road beset with stony obstacles labelled
"Credit Losses." "Slow Turnover." "Expensive
Book keeping." etc. The credit store may show the
"Convenience of a Charge Account," representing a
cart* ridden woman confronted with the necessity of
paying cash for various small itmes in contrast to a
complacent woman who receives a neatly typed statement in payment for whieh hut one cheek is drawn.
Service windows are also effective. A delivery window may illustrate the store equipment and give statistics as to the number of deliveries made, and miles
covered each day, A receiving window may trace the
movement of merchandise from factory to store. Reproductions of a unit from the store's telephone room
or mail order section may emphasize this phase of the
store's business.
The fourth type of window display i.s used for gen-
cral publicity. It does not show store merchandise. It
docs not aim to expound a store principle. Its object is
to attract attention. It is always novel and occasionally spectacular. Kxamnies of this type are animated
displays, models of public buildings and ships, and so-
forth.
The fifth type of window is the public service display used in connection with Dominion. Municipal, and
civic events
Departments are usually charged for the
window display they use. just as they are for newspaper Boace. Tin priees charged for window space is
generally based on location and size. A window on
ihe main thoroughfare is naturally more valuable than
one on a side street. Rental charges are known tit
\*,irv from |5 to 150 a window per day in a metropolitan shopping district The tendency of modern dis-
nlav is toward simplicity. Overcrowding the window-
is like overcrowding the printed page—it cheapens the
ouality of the merchandise and the tone of the store.
An appropriate background is effective, but it must not
be so ornate as to direct attention away from the merchandise proper.
Importance of Detail
The importance of detail iu a window cannot be
overestimated. Excellent displays have been spoiled
er matle to appear ludicrous by one small mistake.
Picture, for instance, a man's room with hunting
pictures tin the wall, smoking articles on the table
whieh also contains a copy of The Ladies Home Journal. In an exclusive store the use of price eards may
be dispensed with. In the pomilar-rniccd store the use
of the price card is considered hclnful Timid customers who are curious as to the price of sn article may SS
THE BRITISH eol.t'MHIA KKTAll.KK
Vll
refrain from entering a store because they dislike to
trouble a sales clerk without making a purchase. Price
eards should always be in harmony with the rest of the
picture. They should be small and of a distinctive
color, the numerals carefully printed or drawn, Interior displays are subject to the same general rules as
window showings. Counter, shelf ami ease displays
may play an important part in the store's volume provided that merchandise is arranged with an eye to
something more than orderly stock-keeping
TRADE NOTES
Alta Vista—
W. J. Greenslade reported sold out 10 J. E Maekiti (gro )
Bruce Landing—
Geo. Bruce reported sold out to McCall & Cerrard.  izvn
store).
Burnaby—
A. M. Green (Mrs. R.)~ Cotm-nced. (grocer).
Cloverdale—
W. Calkins (grocer), commenced.
Wm. Duncan Mitchell (dry goods)- Meeting of creditor*
held.
Cranbrook—
Crystall Dairy Ltd.—Opened branch.
Robert Eaton (bakery) sold out.
Enderby—
Enderby Trading Co.  incorporated,  (gen   store)
Fernie—
R. G. McEwan  (bakerv  and  confer)  business  advertised
for sale
Golden—
C. A. Warren reported sold out  to Those  King,  (grneen
and hardware).
Kamloops—
Puoco Bros. reported sold oui grocery business to Wilson
grocery.
Model Bakery (not inc.), reported sold out to Fuoro Pros
Kelowna—
Alsgard Confectionery Co. assigned.   Meeting ot creditor*
held.
Ktmberley—
D. Sutherland commencing, (jewelry).
Mayne Island-
Harvard  Bros   (gen.  store)   reported   sold  out   10   A   ('
McNeill.
McKay—
Walace Marketaria commencing,
Merritt—
Wm. SchmOck (meals) commencing
Nakusp—
F. W. Jordan & Co.—W. Q, M. Hakeman reported »'•* sole
owner, (gen. store).
Nanaimo—
A. Hayes assigned; Geo. S. Pearson appointed custodian
(confec. & Ash and chips).
tjeo. Gr'gor—Tenders advertised for purchase of stock, ele,
(Ladles' Wear, etc.)
New Westminster-
Marshall A Batienburj reported incorporating as Quality
Meat Market Ltd.
Port Coquitlam—
Richard Breaks reported suffered fire loss (retail meals).
Coquitlam Hardware Co. reported suffered lire loss.
Port Ellington A Haieltan—
R. Cunningham *  Son  Ltd   reported In VOlontar;    mU!li
ation; J. L Christie appointed liquidator (gen      .,
Prince Rupert—
s. Grata eoBU&enced (grooer),
Trail —
A  Milsl A Son (gen  Morel Mild out to VV C  Muru-- •. <v,
TranquOle—
\ Pttereoa (conic  etc) sold oat to Croptt) a \.
Vancouver—
surprise Caa<t] Co dlssolrod partnersltlp
Dtweya Frail Market commenced
R   W   Kvtrl'igh (meats) romtuttued
J, Harkness (grocer) removed so Latch k. Ial A*«
Hughes BrOt. Ltd. (Jewelers) to bv wound up v„
Edwin P. Baker appelated liquidator
\V  Q   Hughe* (produce) iomm»iotn«
imrie Kruu t'o reported discontinued
W. MrLouirhafs (dry gw»d*. Off ) COOittCOClOt
a i stmid»rt reported incorporating drj gooda 4
furnishings, CU \
w drown (grocer) reported sold xiUt
tl   M   Forhttn (druggUo reported iOtd ou*
I la Ming** Furniture Co Lsd advertised going cat oi I a
Beta
M   Martin (eOttfec | commenced
ICorril   ChOC-ola!**   Shop   |JHorrU   t'Uasmonei   reporlt '.
nui
Arthur J   Telffs) tdfuggi*n reported ROM OVl
n Williamson, (butcher? reported ostm est
Levis Mams (tattot I eonfai \ cowcaced
fro*» Grocer] -Auctioa *aie sdrertii*-d
t'urr-i OrOCfHT)   (t'wrrv 4  l"oi Commencing branch   i    . »•
Main S*
Mr**  i  ti   Foster  (r-anfftC   tit | commencing
m L Kaynci (hardware, etc > reported *«id at sat ■•■
Patisserie Parlsitaaf  Te-nd-sts advertised tot paf^btat
asset*
Sam Scott Ltd. (ho>** tio*  vir » reported diSCOtttiaUiej
Chas m Batbtrlaad (grocer) reported suffered Irs
^»m T Wallace (grocer) opening branch ai McKaj
ab> i
Geo Ayr*-* (meat) *ao&u&eacJng
"Plshero" (Jewelers) somtBeaetd
Hand) OrOCff I   BQiCbCf  (R   Slogan I  V   B   BlOttSl
mettcing
K. Pryke (Regal i;rtntr»«r* > eotatBtnelni
Shaugiui'ss*  Draper) Shop MdL, reported graatH cow
promise %
Vernon—
Robinson ** Keiiv (men's tornisttiags, etc.) report***"! •»*
continuing
Barris Caad) Kitcbcn reported sM-seeedtd i»> Hani  *- M*
lot-
Staples Fruit Co Ud   (a St tooad ap t/olantarili   '
Stephens appointed ikialdator
Victoria—
Hillside Pbarmscj sold «>ut to R C Sexsmlth (dins  A"'
stationery).
Parkers Shoe Store (Jo*   Talker,  I*rop ) BSnlfoed    '
Woilaston appointed coatorian; (B & s k Rep I
I', Stoddarl (Jeweler) creditors aieettoi held. Perc) • ""
sston sppoinitd trustee ,,
<:  C Watkina (Foul Bas Grocery) reported sold
s. c Anderson. ,*
F.tmtius Btore Lid. (La-Ties' Waar-to^wearl boalnt
out.
I'itkatd K Town Ltd   (tltv goods  PtC ) SppljflnH '"'
ol name io Pickard & Tuck Ltd (li,
Frinds Ctlvt-ri (men's eloihtttgt ***-ll****-r Ofl StOCS   '
conilnu'* i: basiftCSS . ,, if
Pickard * Toun Ltd tdrv »oods, milliner? •*«« ) To«
icrwi SOld tO W   A   Tack
IBMHMB THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
39
LABOR TURNOVER
There Is another kind of turn-over
which Interests the retailer and the
retail clerk     It  is  the turnover ot
ihf man on the Job, labor turnover
Kvery time a worker leaves one Job
and  goes   to  another,   there are at
least three labor turnovers Involved.
his own, that of the man who takes
his place and that of the man whose
place   he   takes      Incidentally,   the
latter sallies forth, in  turn to take
somebody  else's  place  and  so  the
. ndiotl  chain keep* on,    This labour turnover is a matter
o( leriOOS consequences nol only to the employers but to the
... *i themselves and to the country at large    The American
Management Association says labor turnover costs that coute
:.  m the neighborhood of f&OQ.OOO.OOQ annually    In some
industries   and stores St Is as high as 100 per cent, a year.
That means that for every hundred employees working on
Janaarj fir** (hew sre an entirely different hundred next Jan-
iisrj fir*r   It costs money to break a clerk In, even though
hi ma> have worked b«fore In several similar stores.   Know-
tng lite location ot good* on the shelves ia only one thing   It
i   much tnor    Important that  the new  man learn the new
'. % Ways and is* customer* and their ways    And he can-
»   aspect to be of full value to his new employer and hence
10 himself In proportion as he |« not fully conversant with
his new Job    Desirable a* quick turnover is on the shelves,
ia converse!] undesirable in the employees*. "They all look
. •■■•>! when  th»->  are far aw«>"    no matter whether the>   be
oasea in the deserl bathing girls oa the beach on new jobs.
THE PROFIT IN THE LAST SALE
Surel) >ou have heard StrefK vend
ers on the city streets call out:
"Your last chance" This ts the last
package we have of this wonderful
Corn Cure Who Ss going to get
it • . while all the time you feel mot
,^^^! ally certain tht) have a couple of
KJk ■'„mw**^m,., dOtta other packages tucked away
W^i*<222222-2^2*' »»>d hidden  Irom  sight     Th.* street
^jt^.sff&'l vender knows that there is big buy
Ing  incentive  behind  lhe  fear  thai
one may not he able to bu>  the last
Ol a supply, quite without  regard lor  lis  worth or quality
Hut    *h<-   at reel    render   know'*   something   else—thai
(1 at profits really \\v In the last two or three packages he
' 111    If he quits with them unsold, his day's work may have
consisted 0( merely getting back his capital Investment, not
making | profit     Hut do you realise that very thing. Mr
He taller; ami do you teach your clerk? to realise Iti   The
lendenc)  with the average retailer, boas or clerk. Is to tend
" Pal himself on the hack nnd consider that  he has done
mighty well when he has managed to sell atl but a few, re
isiaing packages ol  i  shipment,  while  the business may
really have only reached lhat point where It has managed to
*' t bark Its Investment in the stock and be only standing at
'* threshold of possible profits,   TO close out the remain-
i* packages al a eat price means lhal the business will In
'   ''■'■■ Ohlj get half Its legitimate protit.    And Id pttt tbem
'■"■ 8 buck shelf for possible sale "sonic day" only means to
1,1 taking profits which have already been earned.   It's the
1 '»!» of a race that counts most; and tl is the last few
'!"* oi a lot of mods which involve the mosl <»r the profits.
BUDGET AMENDMENTS.
Proposed.
It ts proposed to amend The Special War Revenue Act,
191 a. by providing for a better definition of cheque, bill of exchange, etc. It has been found that the intention of the Act
Is being evaded by the subsUtution of other documents which
cannot be rated as cheques within the meaning of the Act.
Special War Revenue Act
Resolved. That it is expedient to Introduce a measure to
amend The Special War Revenue Act, 1915. and to provide:—
1. That "cheque" shall be further defined to include
any document or writing, not drawn upon or addressed to a
bank, in exchange for which a bank makes payment of a sum
of money, except a coupon and a document used solely for the
purpose of settling or clearing any account between banks,
and that such a cheque shall be liable to the stamp tax im-
posed on cheques by the said Act.
2. That a bill of exchange transferred or delivered to a
bank drawn upon a person outside of Canada shall, for the
purpose of the value of the stamp to be affixed thereto, be
deemed to be drawn for an amount not exceeding tweney-flve
hundred dollars.
3. That no person selling foreign exchange shall for the
purpose Issue a bill of exchange drawn upon a person outside
of Canada unless there is affixed thereto a stamp of the value
of two cents for every fifty dollars up to twenty-five hundred
dollars.
i.   That the stamp tax imposed by the said act on money
orders or travellers cheques shall be similarly imposed on
money orders or traveller's cheques Issued by a bank or other
person.
5. That any bill of exchange or promissory note held by
a bank as coliatcrial security for an advance or other indebed-
neas and in respect of which advance or other indebtedness
stamps of the requisite value under this section are affixed to
the relevant bill, note or other proper document, shall not be
subject to the provisions of this section. If such collateral is
paid by a person liable thereon stamps of the requisite value
according to subsection shall before surrender thereof be affixed thereto and cancelled by the bank.
6 That a request In writing by a customer of a bank
asking the bank to transfer from the account of the customer
to another bank a sum certain for deposit only to the credit
of the customer in such other bank, and an advice in writing
by the bank to Its customer that a sum certain is placed to the
credit of the customer for transfer and deposit only to the
customer's credit in another bank, shall not be subject to the
stamp tax prescribed by section twelve of the said act.
7. That in the case of the first complaint to the minister
or any officer of the Customs and Excise against a person for
failure to properly stamp a receipt given by such person the
minster may permit the person to affix the stamp in the manner prescribed In section fourteen of the said act within one
month of the date of the permit on payment of a penaly of ten
dollars.
g, That subsection four of section nineteen BBB of the
said act as ameuded by section three of chapter sixty-eight of
the statutes of 1924, being the list of excepted articles not
liable to the consumption or sales tax, be amended by striking
out of saitl section three of chapter sixty-eight the words
•gasoline engines to be used in boats bona fide used by indi-
Managing  Director,  G.  W.  THOMPSON,   D.C.M.
Consultant, VINCENT C. MARTIN, A.C.I.S.
(Late Assistant Surveyor of Taxes
INCOME TAX SPECIALISTS
LIMITED
509-10 Union Bank Bldg.    8034 Board of Trade Bldg.
VICTORIA VANCOUVER.
Telephone: Seymour 1404
" TAXES "
NO SAVING NO CHARGE
EXPERTS IN BRITISH, DOMINION AND
PROVINCIAL TAXATION 40
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA HCTAILEH
April
vidual fishermen for their own personal use In the fisheries''
where they occur in lines twenty, twenty-one and twenty-two.
thirty-eight, thirty-nine and forty, and fifty-eight, fifty nine antl
sixty of said section three; and that the said subsection four
of section nineteen BBB be further amended by adding thereto
the following:
"Vegetable plants; lasts for boots and shoes including
rubber footwear and patterns for boots and shoes including
rubber footwear; goods enumerated in Customs Tariff Items
453e, 469a; articles and materials to be used exclusively in the
manufacture of goods enumerated In Customs Tariff Item.-*
453e, 469a; materials, not to include plant equipment, consum
ed in process of manufacture or production which enter directly Into the cost of goods enumerated In Customs Tariff items
453e, 169a."
9. That the bond required under the provisions of sub-
section seven ot section nineteen BBB of the said act to be
given by a licensed wholesaler or jobber shall be for an
amount not more than two thousand dollars.
10. That any enactment founded on paragraph eight of
this resolution shall be deemed to have come Into force on the
twenty-fifth of March, 1925. and to have applied to alt goods
imported or taken out of warehouse for consumption on ami
after that day and to have applied to goods previously imported for which no entry for consumption was made before that
day.
11. That any enactment founded on this resolution, tm
cepting paragraph eight thereof, shall come into force on the
first day of July. 1925.
ONTARIO RETAILERS MAKE DETERMINED EFFORT TO
CURTAIL ACTIVITIES OF TRANSIENT TRADER.
It is reasonably certain that legislation about to be enacted during the present session of the Ontario Legislature
will get rid of this long standing evil. Hitherto, the definition
of a "transient trader" has never been specific enough to b»*
able to collect a license from representatives of this kind who
go into many municipalities in Ontario and solicit special
orders for clothing. The Retail Merchants' Association
have already laid before a select committee of the Ontario
Government an amendment to the present definition of a
"transient trader" which will get rid of this evil entirely It
is proposed to add to the present definition the followting
clause:--"and shall include any such person who shows
samples of material and who takes orders for goods to be
made up therefrom for future delivery."
With this clause added it will then be impossible for rep
resentatives of this kind to solicit special orders in muniet
palities throughout Ontario without first paying a license foe
In Montreal this same representative was obliged to pay a
license fee of $250 before he could solicit any business at all
When the same thing comes into force in Ontario there wilt
be considerable letting up of this practice.—Prygoods Review.
The Text.
A young man had just returned from church His father
asked what the text had been and he replied:
"I should worry, the quilt is coming."
The father could not understand this until the chaps
sister, who was h little oldr. explained that her brother hatl
not worded It quite correctly and meant to say: "Fear not.
the Comforter cometh."
Plut Sales Tax
50 Envelopes
100 Sheets
P/lnted   with   your   name
and  address.
Pottage Prepaid.
High Grade Bond paper.
Hi*/..-  ii*:  with  envos  i"
match     Pour   fines   ut
type,  estch Hue not  tu ftX«
coed 30 letter*.    Printed
at top centre «>f sheet and
<>n ititp of envelope.
An ideal Kin.   Cash with
order
Nicholson Limited
Second and Arbutuc
VANCOUVER,   D.   C.
GOVERNMENT   CLERKS   RESTRAINED   FROM   SELL NG
MERCHANDISE  DURING  HOURS OF  EMPLOYMENT
Ottawa. A;   ||
Mr  \V. K Ing,
Secretary,
llrltish Columbia Provincial Hoard,
The Retail Merchants' Association of Canada.
122 Pacific Rulldlttf. Vancouver. B.C.
Hear Mr  Ing,
For sometime past members ol our Association has. , .,-,
complaints that they were compelled to enter into QO&peUUoi
with clerks In certain Ivpartntenl* of the Government »ho
were engaged in buying and selling merchandise dutlttK ih.it
hours of employment. We took this matter up with the Un*
ernmeut and are pleased to state that the following Ordei In
Council was passed, which we trunt will put a stop lo un
further efforts in this direction'
"His Kxcelenry the Governor General in Council, un th-
recommendation of the Right Honourable the prime Minister,
and in **»tew of the complaints recent!) rtottved from thi
Retail Merchants' Association in regard to the prarticr which
appears to have develops! In certain DfttUrUneets ol th<
Government where employee* are Using their time tn ni]
goods, is pleased to make, the following regulation and lhe
same is hereby made and established accordingly
Where any employee in discovered to be using »s-> >.**
his official hour* of duty in the (telling of good* 01 trad
ittg of any kind, he shall on the production nf evident*
proving the -Mild offence to the aatlefaction <«' «h«*
Deputy Head, bu- subject to immetitat »u«j»?. - <■
dismissal"
fOOtt sincerely,
I   M  TRnWKHN
llec re u i)
Dominion BXaeQtive tour
and Dominion Board
Read This Onr Fast
He (meeting girl in bathing suit carrying bStknA (H   m
"Hb. what wonderful  wonderful eggs"
She     "SIR*
Inventor. Take Notice.
Th» four wheel brake i» a wonderful Invention    So* Ihf
automobile ran slop on top of the jsttAosttiSS r«fh< t 'han run
over him
Show Her In,
Customer     Have you any ellk hose*"*
Clerk:    "Tes.  1 have  something  raj attract!*I  In iNk
ho*e."
A Straight Tip
A young *port who answered an advertisement offeriM
to tend dome upi so the horses rtc^ved tot bit SsMoi
with »|j|s advire un It
Horse* to follow    H. arse Home*.
Horses to back   Hobby horse*.
Horse* to put something on   Saw horse*
Horse* to let alone   Race Horsett
Your
Telephone Bill
Tin* iihim convenient ttsy lo psy
your Recount i* to until us a cheque,
MITIIH COIUMIII TtUMONI CftMMNV, LTD
A. THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
41
Mn. Hone's Marmalade
ORANGE
tilt AIM* FRUIT
FINE APPLE
X WHISTLE
Wrapped in Bottles
CROSS A CO. Vancouver.
CANADA STARCH
CO. LTD.
E, H   ROWNTREE. Representative
207  Mattings  Weil,  Vancouver.
Milne & MiJJelton
Limited.
Wholesale   Millinery,   Nottone  and
Small wares.
347   Water   Street
Vancouver.
QUAKER JAMB
Msde of frosb fruit and sugar; the
moot Ot Ingredients. Will satisfy
'be most exacting.
flOmmON CANNERS, B. C.
Limited
VANCOUVER. B. C.
PALM OLIVE
SOAP
Representative!*
Dean Armstrong, 1*934 Larch St
F. B   MARTNEV. 725 Pacific Bldg.
Vancouver, B.C.
MONARCH   KNITTING   CO.
Limited.
Menu and womens hosiery knitted
outerwear and hand knitting yarns.
Represented in British Columbia
8. 0. STEWART e\ CO. LTO.
318 Homer St. Vancouver, B. .C
ROCK ISLAND OVERALL CO.
Rock Inland, Quebec
M. Foster, 3544—32nd Ave.
Vancouver, B.C.
W.
PAPER BAGS
Paper bags, wrapping paper,
for all requirements.
COLUMBIA PAPER CO. LTD.
1038 Hamilton St. Vancouver, B.C.
Kellogg's Corn Flakes
Local Agents
L P. MASON <* CO.
510 Hastings West.
Phone Sey. 2908
THE   BRITISH   AMERICAN   WAX
PAPER CO.  LTD.
CONSOLIDATED    SALES    BOOK
AND  WAX  PAPER  CO.  LTD.
HIGH   GRADE   WAXED   PAPERS
AND COUNTER SALES BOOKS
Distributing  Agent for B. C.
frEalTRflE)
vJ Vfax Paper Specialist *s
1050  HAMILTON STREKT
vanCOUVCN.B C
1059 Hamilton St. Vancouver, B.C.
Phone: Sey. 3112
w
sSSLK
CANADIAN
TOLEDO SCALES
E. S. CHAMBERS, Agency Manager
424 Cordova St. W. Phone. Sey. 3911
Vancouver.
Curiiai Pasta Cereal Co., Limited
Head Office
Local Agents:—
McNEELYS LTD.
739 Hastings St. W.
Toronto
Phone:
Sey. 9337
Phone:   High. 3889
IDEAL CONE COMPANY
Manufacturers of
ICE  CREAM  CONES
Purest Made     Cost Less
335 PRINCESS AVE.
Vancouver.
B. C.   Distributors of
Messrs. T. H. Prosser A Sons Ltd.
London.
Manufacturers   of   Prossers*   Celebrated Line of TENNIS and
CRICKET  Supplies.
Associated Agencies
LTD.
615 Pender St W. Vancouver.
BORDEN'S
EVAPORATED
MILK
Vancouver Office
332 Water Street
STORE  EQUIPMENT
Scales. Sheers, Cutters and Cabin-
ets—New, Rebuilt and Second Hand.
Cash or Terms.
THE  SCALE  SHOP  LTD.
Sey. 2881
365 Cordova St. W., facing Homer. 42
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RKTAILKK
U   M*h
PAPER BAGS
J. C. WILSON   LTD.
1088 Homer Street,       Vancouver.
ROYAL CROWN
SOAPS
Manutactured in British Columbia
and guaranteed.
ROYAL CROWN  SOAPS  LTD.
PAINTS
MARTIN-SENOUR
CO.   LTD.
1505 Powell  Street,
Vancouver
IttOKU-HI
KNITTING CO. IIP.
J. J. MACKAY,
Agent.
804 Bower Bldg.
Vancouver.
HOSIERY
YEAST
THE FLEISCHMANN CO.
W. S. DUNN. Manager.
1168  Burrard  Street      Vancouver.
J. A. TEPOORTEN
LIMITED
WHOLESALE   DRUGS
308 WATER    STREET
VANCOUVER, B. C.
McCORMICKS
JERSEY CREAM
SODAS
McCormick Mfg. Co. Ltd.
1150 Hamilton  Street, Vancouver.
C. H. KENNEY, Manager.
SERVICE   TO   OUT   OF   TOWN
SUBSCRIBERS.
The British Columbia Retailer will
be pleased to furnish subscribers
the names and addresses of representatives or agents of eastern
manufacturers in Vancouver. We
will also advise where their commodities ean be purchased.
Glass - Mirrors
BEVELLING SILVERING
GLAZING
WESTERN GLASS CO. LTD.
Importers,  Manufacturers
Wholesale and Retail Dealers
158 CORDOVA   STREET   WEST
Phone Sey. 8687
Hams & Bacon
Swift's "Premium"
SWIFT CANADIAN CO. LTD.
Vancouver.
PAPER
BAGS     ANO     WRAPPING
Norfolk Ptpcr Co. Ltd.
1J6 WATER STREET
Vancouver
Water Repellant Clothing
i BEAR
R. A. S1ME, B.C. Distributer
Camahta ilwk m Uai
508 Mercantile Bldg.. Vaneouvtr, 0   C.
tatanmai Caatk a toa*m*i
GALVANIZED IRONWEAR
THE THOS. DAVIDSON MFG. CO.
LTD.
123 Powell Street Vaneouvtr.
REGISTERED.
CHIPMAN-HOLTON      KNITTING
CO. LTD.
E. H. Walsh A Co. Ltd., Agents.
318 Homer 8treet,       Vancouver.
FURNITURE
fir Furniture of Quality.
DOWUNO   MANUFACTUR
UtQ COMPANY
366  2nd Ave  B    Vancouver
UNDERWEAR
ATLANTIC    UNDERWEAR    LTD
E.   H.   Walsh   4   Co.   Ltd.,   Agtrtti
318 Homer Street
Vaneouvtr.
TIGER BRAND
UNDERWEAR
TW CALT KNITTING CO. LTD
Cah. OtUrw
" CEETEE "
Pure Wool
UNDERCLOTHING
TURNBULLS of Colt
T.  D.  STARK
F. W   STERLING
Ttlspheni
Sty. 6195
STARK <* STERLING
MANUFACTURERS'   AGENTS
1043  Hamilton  Street.
VANCOUVER. B. C.
Addressing
Mailln* Uala      Mti.tlaraptiind
**> actlmlU I *•*•*• ittf»   *-*.liilt»a. ale.
Direct Mall Campaigns
Itaniiltd Kfllrltnity
Wrig.ey Directories, lid.
ISS lla*tlii*» H S*y  M* Ihi ST. LAWRENCE LINE
PAPER BAGS
Made in Canada—from Canadian Papers
IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMItllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllliiiiiiiiiiniiuuHt,,,,,,,,,,
"SIMPLEX"    -   Ligkt Manilla
"MAPLE LEAF"  Light Kraft
"LION"      -    -     Heavy Kraft
HIIHtttltlllMltlllllUllttlllllltUllttMltUlllttlUttUltltllHItttltttttttHttllimtlllttttttlttlttltlUt
A Bag suitable for every kind of Merchandise—
Made by St. Lawrence Paper Bag Co.
SELLING AGENTS FOR B. C.
COLUMBIA PAPER CO. LIMITED
CARRY LARGE STOCKS IN VANCOUVER AND VICTORIA
<*». Jti",   *.
^ *a.. ., *
^..i.jgS^w-**1""-
mOtfiJ'-
A.2
wfflSl
11 . «nO   . . ..r
^*a *\i Spf: v
,r,Butter
The Brand of distinctive quality Swift's "BROOKFIELD"
Brand Creamery Butter To keep your customers satisfied,
you must stock a product that will assure satisfaction in every
degree. A satisfied customer means repeat business, which
results in more volume and additional profit.
When buying your Butter requirements, buy "BROOKFIELD,"
made from pure sweet cream, under strictly sanitary conditions.
Parchment wrapped and sold in one pound cartons. Sure to
please.
SWIFT CANADIAN COMPANY LIMITED Price
Value
Durability
^A (biiihumtioii Which Sells These Siockhigs
o
THREE EIGHTIES" offer you the
opportunity of increasing your women's hosiery sales appreciably. They
combine price, value and durability to a
degree which has earned them the largest
sale of any one style of hosiery in Canada.
Order a supply from your wholesaler. Display them prominently. Point out how the
three-ply heels and toes add longer life
and save darning.
For misses and women—sizes 4'j to 8'i,
%{/i to 10. Black, tan and white. Attractively boxed in dozens. Your wholesaler
can supply you
Chipman- Holton   Knitting   Company,   Limited,
Hamilton, Ont.
Af/7/s at Hamilton and Wclland
w {
tytmjtm!/
t7fosiety*fbz>*2Plis$es erWomen

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