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The British Columbia Retailer Oct 31, 1924

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 m British Columbia
SSJEMV   OCTOBER, 1924
20c per copy; $2.00 per year.
Seventeenth Year.
-.1
Double Protection
for Your Store and Stock
« 'J
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Th<- ptJSfl you JaliM to pro I
i«-rt    >o«rjn**lf    and    your?
tesijMMs  daring  Un-  daj
b)  Sit^uu of accural-.- ma- j
*-h.!;•••.   for   *«*'!i;lfii«*g   your
lC«od*    *Ft&0f**Ull| taut ttSmu
toi    ClsmfSpt    ttwtMam0t2kam%  I
;:..**kir;.j:  uj» your  arrouns.-
DOI   "•.;&»<   pftpcUff  **M}»  to
gftanj jfo-si itoft aiui stack   \
aa- at th* sight
International Recording Lock
:£-.\,-*,      1 *Uf      full       |>?Ot«*l    II   '*
1     ■
Otri
hj    th-
:    |r*OtU    iUfCC,    ■ 4-h   and    Valuablee
•:  bi ',■■•■  man  complete   tit..! effective
tps ",■•.]  fo   this purpoM
Five *8tf Features
I   <HH   •    I   to*?S   ttttlOM  '%.*■••■   -«!;*.■!   rj  ,,•     Winti.ni
r   .«    N      i   •    *•     '.*>!>' !*.«■• I
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*•     «*••'    ••» ■'    Mj;    , ;,„ K    Hhiili   ,.;,.-,?,.,    ((,,.    |q£|
RR     H   »l       *.   "*   Ol   )    Ul   *•>!<>>«      Kt|   ,(,-,-n i(!,>   tjiii-
it win tut! a  lift  tlini
i' Ota   *   "'     * ;   ah   «!i--s   Ibe   lUnr .ind   llu-  t'lfCt-
)   ;<■*-■'*■     • itock - |  jrottl   dooi   lit -it,.   um»>
■'■•'■i from uiuqm auapteien it remove* the
n frn •■■ employe-ra t> --=,.,>. ttnaotho laed *.i!iii»
• i ■ i •   i • •. ■   . i I. • (  ttoura
»   *. iur   rueton i  r   bj   Inturlnx   rtfffulnr   oimrIm
- n ot n n,** ;•• >   ■-,.,■.    i)nn i. ,v... a| ntght, ami
. lui rr-ttfii '••■ full I n «■
How the Record io Made
i .f ix,- prt»prl»t*ur'a private p uu.it r»cwd bmi **
11loi il  Ittt-ortllni  i.o.k (t »'   wn ><h tbj i>*ft      \
.  -.*« ii  tn«li)-itc  how   ■ «'u:|i'«-t<*  li  ih«   ;ti! rnttitloti
u ahowa HI What tltQc otsO ••-» v*'it»>»t hia •*»{.» «• [a op9ne<] In
ih»- i ttrnin* <«> What llw-c ind *m wh tn it i* c)u4nm] at
(niti-.t IS) *."»!••• .«!tr!- hia at •*'■ aftw budn-NM houra, and bom
(oim bi rt^tnain* tb»r* <i< Mo* often and .it what time the
** itrbmat iHw h ■» d w (4) *yaaur<M hltn avwj other ent ran «-
ami i . ;■.'*. f-.v-.«..i !.,*f.i.i.- ih« tont ikam e-oultl be locked,
I '■.-.    -    •  n .!*>■ iiiist.-.i on a Mil > i papw lajw om Inch wide
■n the  I * K  i-*.*!f
'» VOUR »tor-» ,)» ful'y tirot*ct»t*l at It should bt *
We will h-> fli**** to tend voi on renuett an itHu-
trated -*old*r oivi-u » full d-im-lot to <•*•*■ of thi In.
t#rnjiUonal   Recording   Lock.    Writ*   for  It   today.
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CO. LIMITED
ItNtf Office id ficttry: 300 fAMPBtll k% I0F0NI0.   Smke ud Safes Offsts ii id PriKifil Cities.
We  alio  manufacture tht famoua  DAYTON   Scale*. DAYTON Meat Slicers. DAYTON Oceie Cuttera, International
Time  Recordera,  Money   Time  Recorder*.   Time  Stamp*,    ^nd  Hollerith  Electr c Tabulating  Machines, "Standard" Paper Bags  3 grades
We Manufacture snd sell
the following ' SUndard'"
Paper Bags
Paper Mills:
Lachute & St. Jerome,
Que.
Manufacturers since  1870
THEY ARE
"MANILLA"
"LIGHT KRAFT'
"HEAVY KRAFT"
Actually Stronger, Tougher
More Pliable, Most Economical
Most Satisfactory
It Pays to Use the Best   They Cost No More
J. C. WILSON, LIMITED
Manufacturers of
PAPER BAGS.     WRAPPING, TIB8UE AND TOILET PAPER*
for   Wholeialen and Retailer*,
1068 HOMER STREET. VANCOUVER. B C
Phone Btymoar 781
YOUR CUSTOMERS
APPRECIATE THE BEST
ROYAL CROWN SOAPS LTD
VANCOUVER, B. C. ' 1924
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
.1
Grocers Sold
15 Million Tins
last year and more this year
What better proof that  BRUNSWICK  BRAND Sardines lead the
market tn every respect?
Otepiay them in your windows, stack them on your counter, put
the price on them.   They'll sell themselves.   There's a good profit
and what j turnover!
Ws
** '-..■"■ an**-
*•%-.--*-.
Coiiii^'
BRUNSWICK
„-****«
^-WL.
*"
■
oms**^ ■•■.:
BRAND
SARDINES
GOftf-tOftS BROS. IIMITKD
Otma-. Hmtimm,. M
Canned
C4
QUAKER 5£22i
Tomatoes
Best Repeater and Leader of its kind in
Western Canada. Stock up well with this
nationally advertised superior B.C. product
Order from your wholesaler
Dominion Canners of B. C. Limited
Vancouver THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RCTAlLKR
Get
o  .. *
Tell them to
"Use it
wherever the
recipe calls
for milk."
Encourage Customers
to Buy St. Charles Milk
in Quantity
YOU can readily sell six
or twelve cans of Borden's
St. Charles Milk to a woman
when she asks for one.
Suggest that in addition to
purchasing her supply for
daily use she should buy a
few tins to keep in the pantry for emergencies.
Every extra tin you sell
means extra profit to you.
%^ctdm/d.Jlmited
Vancouver, B. C.
Factory at South Sumas vm
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
ROGERS
f
GOLDEN SYRUP
"The End of • Perfect Diy"
f Made from finest flavoured cane sugar, a special grade of whieh is imported for the
purpose.
fPut up in all sizes of packages to suit your customers' requirements.
fin packages designed to beautify your store.
2 lb. tini, 24 lo a cue. 1Mb. tint, 6 to a csss.
Mb. tini. 12 to a caae. 2Mb. tint, 3 to a cue.
Perfect Seal Jan, 12 to a caae.
The British Columbia Sugar
VANOOUVER, BC. TIIK BRITISH OOLUMBIA RKTAII.ER
«
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ii...
• •»•♦•
-..    •«♦•••
*«i*«..
Hill  tl
BRA*
■MMMIttl •
J?3f^»
• •■•■
Uf-UAH
Constipation
breeds 40 disease!
Bian m   _   .
r* I       *?».•*- *.£?£** «•*«--*
r*J*
UI*ci'i*»**''H
Iinmimi*MII
«*—»«•
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• *«*«*• RtOsff •
•*!• Is mmmm Os
•*■►   "'"nftl t>  %)- utOx   Smt  <m^^m   W^k  <
**-™et^' * W^fci   moaot
They tried it
a last resort!
• Mil.I,,
•iiiii.ii
fiii.i...
♦ •»I II I
v. til.llll.
...li.it.I
- •.#♦•.!♦-....
>•••«•..*«ii»
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-*T ','.***"1 *** "' *** •» ~*"~'".* '_" '* ?   -"*
•*■	
I ==T-   *"•'-§ J* i»ams  ^mm*t* fcsnSi*'Wl**il
hS,:wi/Sl^* ^       "V *-l,,*» mmZF '
I ^umW- - -'*•*• *T^ ■'- •       iv*"**-—''
i bfi p «tfs MM ll •**•*
■4NSIS 1 VM *MHft I ****
taMta ■».*.   fc-»- • mm  23  l^-**,*-** ,-7*^ "*, "','*
.^ I ii 1   wlf Mn«. ■ ■      M      H . W»w^m*   .-.'-   — -
U>I|||||,M,.
•••■■iiiiiiir
'!"••■••••,
'••.■....-
••in
Kellogg Company
out to Increase its
Large Bran Market
»f thi Dom n l    v"f Kr»°»M ^^. in ail atctl    1
ing the So!* *# »8Pi?!111 F«*nm*» in cam
HHAN^h, MbRr^Wf   »"»-»hwh   h   Ai.!.
manejit relief   j « » i! . ' ?f »uar*r>^^ *» -five j - -
WWkly newsnVt» r V   ar*" bfin,r u^t! tn the daily »n4
K«UoiViBnS **f   pmph m° yiiur *torr r'
Mt readlM^tiwf!! feA^ infl w#.nk hf week neor*?**
Md on yoUr ,*oJ!r "H Mbjfsr'* in your windo»
Kc'I!'»^'.h Kran     I: im   -     lk* know lh*1   VnU   *fl
greater profit m**n   *»»crea»eU   trade   an.i
^^^BRAN-^a^ibeof
■M 1924
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
®f>.
BRITISH COLUMBIA
KPAILLR
With **M*h It inrorpnraiiid th* It   C,   TKAOK UK VIEW.
i'uMiahrd Monthly.
SEVENTEENTH YKAK
OBNKRAt. llf*JlU HANDISB
OKo< RKIKfl. DRY-BOOM.
HARDWARE   FOOTWEAR.
OFFICIAL ORGAN OF B.C. BOARD
RETAIL MERCHANTS'
ASSOCIATION OF CANADA.
A MONTHLY JOURNAL published in thc interest of Retail Merehan-
dining and the Development of Commerce in Western Cnnadn.
j*t BBC&tPTtON RATI  One Dollar Par Yatr, payable In advance.
Adftrtislng Rntsn on Application
Pwbiishtrs   PROGRESS PUBLISHING CO. LTO.
8-witt  \0t 2 Merchants' Eichangt Building
VANCOUVER. B   C.
Tvivphon** St»y UU Cabin liMraas Wtilpplnt  AR Codes
KdHof. J  I Morfitwn W N Code, Business Manager
Kwipr-wi it Ottaws u 8»eoad-cla*f naltef
Secretaries.  Representing ths follswlng
Branches ft. M. A.
Agassiz W. A. Jones.
Armstrong 0. H. Smith.
Chilliwaek A. Knox.
Cranbrook J. L. Campbell.
Kamloops ..a. H. Muirbend.
Kelowna , a. Fraser.
Utton ...B. RebagllaU.
Kerrttt C. J. Mills.
Mission  F. C. Ughtbody.
Nanaimo ...W. F. Norris.
Nelson E. F. Glgot.
Hew WestminsterD. Stuart.
Revelstoke J. P. Home.
Vancouver \V. F. Ing.
Victoria C. Straker.
White Rock E. H. Hardy.
a rn, m imwwwwTa^t^ay-wuw
rss wsww
mm «»i'iiuHw«ii.i
V«l XVII Nn I
(MoIm r, l!»24
Vancouver, B.C.
Rumoured Increase in Taxation
Decline in Excise and custom* Receipts Worry Pederai Officials—Sales Tax May be Increased.
If (heft i*. *»n» thins which annoys Ihe business and
commercial world won than ?h» Balei Tai and it»
Replication, «i- should Ilk-? s«> host ot o
Rumours noi have it that thi** metamorphie para*
site ui vmnm* r*nn! life i* \,ry liable in tin- near future
to be increased t*» meet tin* deficiency which faces tin
Federal government thi* yea?
Tin* continued sharp decline In Excise god Customs
collections which hai already taken place will promt
ih« government to find some meant of rectifying the
condition, and if forecast* oi those experienced in the
machinations of government finance mean any shine,
the (tales tax if due for i boost io meet this deficiency
Tin changes in the tariff announced Inst April ap
patently allowed f«»r i falling off in revenue of some.
i'2\ »*MMXH»
Unfortunately as the end of August there was s
deficit oi 128,000,000, siV month of August alone showing a decline of 08,O84«924< in comparison wish August
1923   Expenditure may be reduced to a certain i \
tent,  but  the |*M»H.Hihiliti«*H in that  direction BIC  very
limited, in view of the approach of a general election,
and tin- fiscal polity of the government allows little
prospect of increasing revenue by adjustment of tariff
rntrn. in fact •niilt further cuts in custom *a duties mav
be demanded by a certain section of tin- House with
income tax higher in this county than in tin* United
States, it would be !>«»«»»* policy to add to tin* disparity,
esoeelally at time wnen tne country in looking for «*«pi
tal to develop it
Tin* government roust Hud some way to make both
ends meet, and since no large or Immediate receipt
from other sources appears available, there remains
only the Sales Tax. whieh it is rumoured may be in-
ervasnl beyond the live per eent status whieh now obtain-.
Kvery change made SO far in the Sales Tax has
worked disadvantageous^* to the taxpayers. Under
the Act whieh eame into foree January 1924. only
wholesale houses whieh sold fifty per eent or more of
their t'**tal to licenced manufacturers were eligable for
wholesalers' licences, with the result that many firms
whieh could  not  qualify under this provision  were
placed at a disadvantage in competition with licenced
wholesalers because they were obliged to pay Sales
Tax on their Importations or purchases in Canada,
and to make claims <»n the government for refunds in
respect of any gOOda Bold to Becncod manufacturers.
This naturally resulted in complaints from drygoods
houses, and the Aet was amended to allow any bona
tide wholesaler to he licenced, subject to his furnishing
a bond or guarantee as a security for payment of the
tax on sales to others than licenced manufacturers.
Thev now have a tax-free stock, and are not required
tO finance the Sales Tax to the same extent as hitherto.
On the other hand, licenced wholesalers are compelled to (Hive guarantee bonds, and to keep their
records oi sales in greater detail than is necessary in
the case of unliecmvd dealers. The tax is payable on
the cost of goods to them, exclusive of freight, or on
the duty paid value, and records must be kept in detail to show thc value on which thc Sales Tax is
chargeable. s
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
• *
Should the Sales Tax be raised the licenced wholesaler will lose out Apart from thr inconvenience ol
obtaining refund <>t' Sales Tax on sales t<> licenced
manufacturers, it seems tn he an open question
whether the advantages in the status oi tht licenced
wholesaler outweigh the disadvantage*
Many  wholesalers  who Itocked  up  hcavQ)   with
goods prior to January 1924, in ordi r ?»> n
difference between the old Sales Tax rat* of 2l: \
AA)       '
X* T
iv m\   iv,n?.$!;«■< *  prim
In in the Aiftt ttttot [p
of   j|ei •    i*  |u  tniusv
ph \ |ott«iJl   - ■ *:, . ■
n i * int oi s il« i Tai
»' i  *ulTrrr#t i4*rc-j *
H*it*ml   *.{};«.'   JlnOOO,t\    I
*
\**   dropped   hy   m
i*oh i 111  ami i hi
i i ijr    h.»u%* •%       >» i. >,■'
•».. u
It    »■ %|*r $$**•#      |f|
\ rl
GENERAL CONDITIONS
Retail grocery business continues to improvr   Seasonable lines of fresh fruits are just about finished and
the retail merehanl is getting back lo more bofs
stcadv conditions, making plans and preparation* for
Thanksgiving and Xmas trade.   Markets in R-caeral
continue very firm and advances in many staple coa
modifies seem to be the order of the day    The b'oib
priees for Fall and  Winter wheal  have during  "a*
past few weeks been reflected by very msteri I
vauees in the price of f'oiir, which ba- ri ached I ' lg I
level of $9.55 per barrel for forty-tuni  pound bags
Flour being the bade product in a great many otl
lines carried bv the retail grocers, will naturally tend
to create other advances in prices.
The practice of one local wbolesah house operating
or controlling an increasing number of retail stores in
the city of Vancouver and suburbs is becoming B ti -ry
serious factor and one that should demand the immediate attention of the legitimate retail grocer Tht
prices being quoted to consumers by these particular
retail stores an* in some cases b-ss than tin- whoiessh
priee and the surprising feature of thc situation is thai
the firm in question continues to enjoy the patronagt
of other retailers who are in direct competition.
Sugar. Tin* trade locally were more or leaa hj
prised to receive notice »>f a reduction of 15c per 100
Ihs. on all grades of sugar on October Tth   The con«
dition of the raw ragar market did not justify anv
reduction at the time it is   then
change locally was in the nature
f'nha	
leroior*
assumed   ihi
"; ;:n   adjustment
Cub* "ems to control Thea^Lhl        ^^
^arandasneweropsuMn*;;   il    KUppl>   of
"•" until the middle of d/ «>■;« on the mar.
tions are looked CCber,nofl,rt^r «due
Sardines.   Tbe fiwH   \ ■
Oscarbrand M^ferf""»«*  Ki„g
month.  Th, markel I,,,-, I ' ,"""*" "'"'*>' 'I'i**
Thepricoia, i,|„,.,  .   " **« ••<"* for mm ti,,,,
•«-♦"*■ ..♦M.w.p,.1;!':: ;»;,vii;V"—■■ ■
T.nhctA» v ...      ... i l*na.
F„„.
em-**
.Mil
fl
Campbflli Tomato Soup
. i. *..
Anothrr Hrm Product
Ei
i im iti ' h i
■ %
« ' *, M   *
a   i.\   *
Tea
Shelled Walnut.*
P of M       . i
foi Xm is ii   |,    ,*
'■■>'".'•   -7    • ■ .,   ,
lie- in ( him
Walnut diairii \$
neefion   i«%  i
fl
,  p
:i*» %' ?
\\
1U U f 4   SO | i I             '■■ '■ AI! **
\ [ 1
i i  . run *]
1 1%.
II              l    •**', tW  '■'.'    *>■    a *
itKrj around i
.1           ll    J*   fj          |        #      ,  -;   ,     »
' r <l* IV,,
ity -•■■.
'. f. *    *
Mi it .   -
ori<
ir i i
*     i
.-'*•...      ..
*      It**'
Canned ftgftablai
mi
X,* *«
,H,,n "Oi.jnt-t,.,}
"V* ilia orb     i
|On   set ii „   f      I
i    '1 ■    t   H
larlj i   ■
'" arm w.,.,
i
l
tei
parinm  *n|    J ,f,irt*»,M %
ir'>    nvoriMi    eontlltiotirt
1,; *- imed l»«t ih. onl
.Hifi not la       ■ \$   u '
>ii,:i|»j»..i(l*j5jife. parti* ii
\h fling j,r,«.r, ,»n „». |   |
("?''iu/(ts f0J ,. ,    ,n> »n the t«trti»ti>    Thej an #l (Cl
Wai ibnBtitehuT^^s^rd       I rCloldr.
le inii
Dri,ttl Fruit      Ull  ,^	
^tutttalia bas ra-v.' '.,''   r""* "w trr.v BnceHsin
':     Hht-r.-|,v i»„, ,'    ,   "   '^"^   ;'^'f lent   With <*ai
Lo-K-j.: rT' , ",,s"«i"" i, tin*     - *u    •! ,,,i „„-.,,; .■""'"■ *- **>»,...,,.,.,. »m *...,
»!'■ mm.   iPElr%Br,nd loI»t« h now on        ''  '' «»» OaS ,"V"    " m ,,"'i"" '
v-wm,mot;*:wivvv;'''''1--'-''    is?* »«2:.;;vv:v;",!"•'-•,ri,l;h
^ ^muiiditieTwril I ^•■"i-. 1»-I ,.r..-., on
r li!!^ "f'Ined frui^   ""' coj'f«*Po»dln«lj    ail
m,» nre very firm
dozen for 14,s.
»W *2.40 per dozen for 1/
•"•    v and 14.40 per !?»24
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
SUCCESS OF   'WITCH HAZEL" SOAP SELLING
COMPETITION.
lu the September bans «f thin publication mention
was made of the setting competition sponsored by the
Local Branch of the R<*t«il Merchants Association,
when prises were offered for the highest aggregate
sales mad* during a stipulated time of 'Witch Hazel"
**»ap, a product manufactured lornlly l»y the Koyal
Crown Soaps Limited
There i* no doubt that the event was a big meceas
from every point of view, and the manufacturers in
annomie&Bg the award*, pay tribute to the method in
whieh the competition wm conducted   hy   the   local
Branch of the Association, ss the foUowing communication (o the trade will prove;*—
THE  ROYAL CROWN SOAPS LIMITED.
Vancouver, Canada
t**-*r Ssf or Madam
It i» « t»l*o*tJt}fip ins *%tmn tbr Ihaahs ot Thr Ro>»l Crown
Roajta Ltstfted for th* ptsstiea] latersei «nd aales aetivttj
displayed b» Um retail trade Is tb«* recent fries*-!!} "Wtteh
iui«-i' -sosupetttloa
\\> oim «}*h un eoagrsttttsta the Rsseattfi ol the Retail
Mffcihaati" assoeJatlop ssos the ongtaslU] Mid wysalsstici
tut tht** sasiast u i* am opsntor th**. although she aetsai
win -"otumT h*» not sees t*r-««•*. there i* aa doubt that the
retail uad*-- m « *ho!»* iaaMmstrsi***! 'bat « aasupalga o? thia
linA ata t**1 m*«tr- vtf) iseeessiai tnd«**«*d whss tun eo-opeft?
Uon  l*  t«-<ur«-*d
Th*- wtaaef ol thr tint, i*ru»* (flfteea }ewe] Watsham
W*?rh>  mud"   *  remarkable showing,  and  h«'*r».y  congratu
j»'*j..r.» a-?*- «i-« t t«««i ut Mr \v \v *UcK**n. )feDoweU*i
(iftM-o-fi Ml OfeaetUe SI Th**** winner ot tha aacoad prise
(Saves J"*«*i Admiral watchi s* m?   M  S  Phillips, West
Knd   l*rug  Htorr   Ud    *>***■   tinman   Street    whom   we*  also
aoagrstaiats and think
Thr *sssspetttlon is atsf, few ws aaraastl) reaseei 'hat
>o«  BStStStil  >«»ur  Interest  in  Kojal  Crown  Witch  Han!
• tl  C   Product     Wo, «•» mSBSlSflSTIirii will do our part in
rnalntatntn* thr i*»lto   of  o Of A minimum retail price (or
lour peotsetlos
Your* faithfully.
The Etoysl Crown Soaps Limited.
(Signed) J k BUasoa.
Sale* Manager
Braid's Best
COFFEE
You Can't be too en
thuaisatic about Braid a
—It a the beat by teal
Wm. Braid & Co., Ltd., Vancouver, B. C.
* fi   v /&//&*
1
Out with a spoon?
—Qet a tubl
T •>* raining profit* every day—for the public must
havr food, soap, and the other necessities a grocer
carries,   Arc you out in this rain with a spoon?
Are you selling one turnover brands? The unadver-
lised. unknown kinds? Folks don't like to eat or use
products they never heard of before. Because they're
uncertain of the quality. They can buy brands oft
which they are sure for just as low a price. Many
years of national advertising sold thc well-known
brand* to them Demand is sensational. Thc torn-
over 1 are many! And of course tht bigger tht turn-
wet tht more frofili tht grocer gets.
Ths* is the very simplest, and most successful, of
bosinett methods Hut some grocers cannot sec it.
And they are losing money every day! It's raining
profit* and they're trying to catch them with spoons
instead of tubs — with long-mark-up, one-turnover
products—instead of quick-moving brands that give
mony tor not ers.
Nationwide investigation among grocers revealed
Ihe amastng fact that /5^r of the average toilet soap
stock is msWtt
Of the 8 to 17 soap brands carried. 3 bring in 85%
of the husiness. These 3 turn over many limes yearly.
They are tubs in which to catch real profits!
The other 5 to 14 soap brands turn over once yearly.
With them you're trying to catch thc rain of profits
in a i^eeal
You can't get profits with small demand. Instead
you lose money—because they cat up what you make
on fast sellers. Cut out seldom called for brands that
eat up profits. Give big display to well-known advertised leaders.
More than one-third of thc people in this country
prefer aud use Palmolive.
It is your best, biggest profit getter in the soap line.
not 10
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA BET1ILEH
(Mo
V
VACUUM PACKED
COFFEE
Saves you time when customers ask for fresh Roasted
Coffee." That's exactly what Nabob is. The vacuum tin
keeps the flavor in—you sell it "fresh from the roaster.
Kelly Douglas & Co. Ltd.
VANCOUVER. B. C.
WILSON BROTHERS
Established 1990
Our Motto is "SERVICE"
We cannot offer to sell you goods cheaper than ont othar ft™, u i
ECONOMY
to deal with us
-K WILSON BROTHERS. VICTORIA. B. C.
Whol«ale Grocers
Send in your
mail
SHAMROCK BRAND
HAM, BACON, BUTTEP  uon  c.   ~       "
,tK' LAW). SAUSAGE,
fint Quality packing house
Limited, w1 ' *
and
etc.
Y0U CAN  ""■■»  BH^ock  BU„D.
VANOOUVEB
r Burns & Comi-ny, Limit
CALOAEY
ed
BDMONTON 1924
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
ll
The Certified Grocer
Washington Retail Orocers Association Favor Enactment of Law to Determine Status of Legitimate Grocer.
Retail grocer* in the State «»f Washington are making n determined effort la hate n» Act embodied in
tin* BtattttC l»«»«ka of that Stale, whieh will eventually
bar any Inn rcrtinVd grocer*   from   operating   retail
grocery establishment*
The proposed Aet Is lengthy and comprehensive,
detailing not only the statu* «f On* grocer himself, luit
that of the grocer*i clerk, and ths grocer's apprentice.
RftgMrttrtS Appr«-Mic«.
The proposed Act provide* that any rHlien of the roumr>.
or any cillten who haa declared his Intention of Incoming a
rititrn of ihe ssaa&fi ma> »ppi> too * certificate of qualifies
tion to act an • grocer'* apprentice, which certificate ihatl
entitle the applicant, for a period of not more than three
fSSrSt IS lout SS *urh eeitiflesle *ha!l remain In force and
unrevoked, *»d **> long a* he «haii pursue the cesriei of study
praaerthed for grocer'* a-psvcAtieas, and #haii be emtlaaoas)]
employed aa » grocer** apprentice, to be known a*, antl to
wear a badge, or other identification prassifbafl h> the mates*
tor Of HcsSCeS) indicating* that the holder of »urh a certificate
»* a fegUierHJ gtowV apprentice
Ctnm#a citHt.
Hee | aa| Billies 04 <h«« t"Riled States or anv person
who ha* duly declared hi* intention of becoming »uch cltlten.
residing in «he o\ssu< of Waahlngion. b*'ltm over twent> on*-
ftJtktO of age an dof go**.! moral character, and who ha.* Wen
en*»ged in selling article* u***d for human food for not tSM
than three fear*, ma? apply to th** director of license*, upon
a form to be prescribe*! for that purpose, for examination
and for the iwwanr-e to him of a certificate of qualification to
acl a* a grocer** clerk, and SB| »uch applicant, upon sur
rr«.»jfnn* pasting 'he etaminatfon provided for. shall he la
*««-d tha eefttfteatS applied for. which certificate, *o Ions
a* St *haSI remain fn force and unrevoked, shall entitle the
holder thereof to be known a*, an dm wear a badge or other
identlSratlon prescribed h*» she itrSCtOf ol UeeaSM indicating
thai the holder of #uch certificate i* a "certified* grocer's
clerk **
*H*c S It »haH be unlawful for any person, firm or corpora
tion. other than the holder at the certificate* provided for In
thi* act. to a»*nme or use the title or advertise or aaa any
word*, letter*, or figure* to indicate that the person using
the *«me i* a re«istercd grocer** apprentice, or certified Kroc
rr * Staff or certified grocer
Her 7 AH application** for cr-rtificate* of registration as
grocer* apprentice*, or rertlfirate* of authority to act a* cer
tlfled UOeail' clerk or certified grocer*. *hall be filed with
the *tate treasurer, together with the required fe*» to be paid
In advance for such ecrtlfiratr or examination, and- it shall
be the duty of lhe »tate treasurer on the next business da>
after the receipt of an> *uch application and advance fee. to
transmit the application accompanied b> hi* duplicate receipt
for the fee. to ihe department of license*, and to dSPOStl in
lhe state treasury to the credit of the general fund the hai
ance of moneys received aa advance fees under the provisions
of thin act. on hand at lhe close of the preceding day, after
making all corrections an drefundlng all over-payments. It
shall be ihe duty of the secretary o fthe department of lie*
ansae, upon the receipt o fany application, for registration,
certification or examination as provided in this act, accom-
panled by the treasurer's duplicate receipt for the fee. to
notify the applicant o fthe day an dplace of the next examination applied for. an dall certificates authorized by this act
shall he issued or revoked in the manner provided by law for
the issuance an drevocation of licenses by the director of licenses Any person who shall fail to comply with, or violate
any of the provisions of this Act. shall be deemed guilty of n
misdemeanor.
Sec. It Is specifically understood that any certificate granted under this act shall not be transferable.
Sec I, All certificates issued hereunder shall date from
the passage of this act. and in no case shall be retroactive.
It stipulates that "the director of licences shall enjoy the cooperation of the supervisor of food, feeds,
drug* and oils, and the supervisor of weights and measure* in the department of agriculture, and the supervisor of purchasing ami the state dietitian in the department of business control, to. and from time to time,
establish an dprovidc for courses of study in the subjects of food and food values, commercial English,
commercial arithmetic, elementary bookkeeping, laws
relating to pun* food, and sanitary methods of handling aame, methods of business, ami such other kindred subjects as may be deemed expedient, to be pur-
med by grocers' apprentices ami applicants for certificates as groccn ami grocers' clerks, the governor of
the State to appoint a board of examiners consisting of
three grocers Of ai least five year's experience, who
shall hold written examinations of applicants, at least
semi-annually, The fee for applicants for apprentices
certificates shall be five dollars and that of grocers and
grocers' clerks ten dollars.
The Act is devised t»» take care of reputable grocers
who have already been in business in the State of
Washington for at bast three years. Such grocer shall,
Bpon stirvessfullv passing sn examination be issued a
certificate, and he may then advertise his business as
thai <>f a certified grocer, but "no person, firm or corporation shall be entitled to receive and use a certificate or be known as a certified grocer, until all the
employees of such person, firm or corporation engaged
in setting articles for human food, shall be certified
grocers' clerks or registered grocers' apprentices.
.:,-:".M;
IF IT STICKS THIS WILL MEAN HARDER SLEOOINO FOR
MAIL OROER FIRMS.
A brand new and entirely unique method of fighting mall
order house* has been uncovered in South Dakota The following from the bulletin of the South !>akoia Retailers' As
sociation I* a new idea that appears worth looking Into At
least, the experiment WtU be watched with tremendous Interest all over the country    The bulletin sav*
"Heeehily Montgomery. Ward # Co  shipped a carload of
catalogs to a distribution point in Boots Dakota,   Oa their
arrival  Ihe assessor  placed a  valuation on  litem of  nearly
five thousand (15.000) dollar* and taxed them on that basis
"The catalogs are as much the personal property of the
mailorder house as a merchant's stock Is his personal property, and every merchant has to pay a tax on his personal
property. There is a question as to whether the tax can be
made to stick, but the case is interesting and worth looking
into.
PEAK FREAN BISCUITS FOR CANADA.
Announcement is made that the Harry Home Company,
of Toronto, have been appointed supervising agents for the
well known Peak Prean Company's biscuits In Canada, and
Mr Home, together with P. J. Hook (export manager of the
company, from London. England), was recently on a coast trip
arranging for distribution of these biscuits. 12
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
ti
Some National Advertisers Who Used
u
is
During the Past Year
Ford Motor Co. of Canada. Ltd.
Palmolive Company. Ltd.
California Packing Corporation.
Holbtooks, Ltd.
Heinz A Co.
International Business Machines Co. Ltd.. Toronto.
Canadian Toledo Scale Co. Ltd., Windsor.
National Cash Register Company, Toronto.
Caandian Postum Cereal Company. Toronto.
Kellogg Corn Flake Company. Toronto.
Royal Crown Soaps. Ltd.
Dominion Canners B. C. Ltd.
Borden Company Ltd.
Fleischmann Company.
P. Burns & Company.
W. Clark, Ltd.. Montreal.
E. B. Eddy Company.
Carnation Milk Products Co. Ltd.
E. W. Gillett Co. Ltd.
Beech-Nut Company o fCanada, Ltd.. Hamilton.
Swift Canadian Company, Ltd.
McCormick Manufacturing Co.
Lake of the Woods Milling Co.. Ltd., Montreal.
Connors Bros., Black's Harbour. N. B
N. K. Fairbank Company.
Hedley Shaw Milling Company.
A. Macdonald A Co., Ltd.
Tuck A Lightfoot. Ltd.
Canada Starch Co.. Ltd.
Thos. Davidson Manufacturing Co.. Ltd.
Canada Colors A Chemicals. Ltd.. Toronto.
Gurney Foundry Co., Ltd.. Toronto.
Meakins A Sons, Hamilton.
Dominion Oilcloth A Linoleum Co.. Ltd., Montreal.
Brandram-Henderson, Ltd.
Martin-Senour Co., Ltd.
Beach Foundry Company. Ottawa.
Minard's Liniment Company.
Canadian Paint, Oi! & Varnish Manufacturers' Aim.
Dominion Cartridge Company.
Marshall Wells B. C, Ltd.
Peerless Underwear. Hamilton.
Chipman Holton Knitting Company, Hamilton.
Monarch Knitting Company. Ltd., Dunnvtile, Ont.
Circle Bar Knitting Company. Kincardine, Ont
Atlantic Underwear, Ltd., Moncton. N. B.
C. Turnbull Company. Ltd., Gait, Ont,
Penmans, Ltd.. Paris.
Continental  Paper Products,  Ltd., Ottawa
Interlake Tissue Mille.
J. C. Wilson, Ltd.
Woods Manufacturing Co., Ltd., Wlnnipao
Northwestern Mutual F.re Ins. Co., Ham,Hon.
T1* Recognized Medium for
cove„ng British Co/JTa*
*** and tnetkt*'
Ignorance
Not Always Bliss
leeti its ttnwA Kttpp-Ut i bj gtj$a** - -    ki
■* -' ■•*'  i' data Bat eitfofty -.:.    . ,$.,
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W -****^^ViBI»fW(^iKW!*»MI^^ I
ABB YOI   II.VMh.im;
RAMSAY'S
"QUBRN ROYAL"
LM Of
,      CREAM SODAS
I 3l,-to.-A , w
* ■* f «*    i - -i    IMlAtt    M I
!",t    U*.***;;*        I- '      "        '      :'' * *   deHckMaa   #$'|3*e«lt
.-'■-,       , ' * * * *' '""*' 'Mir  •" "4 *»t»ttf* ff     A«*
ii .,. v,      '' t",",1t paa ****» »«■» pn *fHf m
'     '•  * M  .     4 » ■ | I •• ^
* 'rial tifi at
Let «*# pratt
Ramsay Bros. & Co.    Ltd
—     °U^R  B C VICTORIA. B C
Yon I
• Ian
Three Timet a Day-They
Make the Choice
,,J|i,        ,'     ,       *''"'-   '    **0   ttStSfO   '!)*-,    pOfit I
;■,*..... f'.'. |   j* "';i* MiM sitmwiw **<
''* ' an i| , |     ,.,,...'„,      '* '" ■",n Stfvsataas •**
' si Mm  tu'fttM
r*n>ouj Utile r,u.'.* .    '. '   '   '"*ih  *aat'i  m  is*
Walrh all • I  ■
"';'      **'"  Kin*
"   ****"      r«mt g      f *|      ■ 11*
uasaa'i   tnont   ^ui
FLEI8CHMANNTS YEAST
,h* Fleischmaon Company
SERVICE 1924
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
The Passing of the One-store Retailer
Bsstern Visionary Fort-sash Otter Annihilation of Individual Retail Merchant.
13
A writer in nn Eastern publication han uttered a
Warning BOtl to thi retail trade, u herein In- %vvs a four-
cornered fight for the busim** of tin- country between
th« big ehain system*, the mail order bouses, live.ami.
ti it Mori h, and a new octopus whieh is slowly rising
above ths borisouths ehain department store, in
this fight whieh he believes is coming be contends that
the ehain departtn< tit store occupies th» beat strntegi-
eai jMmitidti A careful reading of this writer's* arguments bOWCVtt reveal* hi* ignorance in that partictl-
lar regard     Take for instance, the GSM of groceries
Vi tv few ehain department stores ean jm-11 groceries for
tin profit bas been {Strand inadequate to cover thc
heavier overhead under whieh they operate.
Nevertheless be prophesises the doom ol the little
retailer before this vsal aggregation of capital, and
forseea the time when the fight for business will be
iH-tueeit ihe big corporation* with th<*« independent
retailer cither entirely eliminated, or occupying such
sn unitaportan! position is ta be entirely aegllgaHle,
ft* uvi
*
"Fifteen year* ago the {ffOCCries, ubocs, clothing,
drug-*, an«S other csatntiais that we buy from day today wiri* lotd l»v earner stores, owned bv uon whom
mn knew or knew «iw»ut, «r alas at department stores
whaat owner! were stfll prominent dtiiens iti thc local
community Today ws buy them foots million-dollar
eorporatiaiis operating hundreds af norea just like
nut's in a hundred Other cities
"During the last ten year?* a revolution in retail
letting has taken place, squalling in importance ths
growth of the corporation, aild the trust ts thc man-
ufscturing field, whieh occurred during thc last cen<
tury It has been mueh the same story. The individual
OWHer of the individual stori* is being liwept aside before thr greater economies, the larger profits, and thc
Increased efficiency of large concerns, owned by thousands of stockholders operating an a national scale
"Tlo   battle of big corporations against  the tittle
<*?f»ri keeper is well under way to lucccaa   While the
small store* still do business in gnat numbers, there
is hardly a city, town or village in tin* country iti whieh
tlo corporation retailer is not interested.  The contest
whieh has still to bi   decided is between the big cor
porationa themaelvcs    This struggle is not merely
between rivid eoneerns lighting  for markets, but  be
tween different not hods of silling goods represented
by groups nf big tirms Tlo* ehain stores, five -ami-ten
eCttt group, the mail order houses and thc department
storen. are engaged In a battle royal for supremacy.
In comparing the department and ehain specialty
Stores the following contentions are probably correct:
"The weakness of the department store in comparison with the chain specialty shop is due tO absence
of concentration    This is felt iu several    directions
Tak* purchasing for example   While i departmeni
store may do a total business of ^10,000,000 this volume
is split up into perhaps one hundred departments, each
handling a differenl lim* of goods, which means that
purchases of a single kind arc retimed to $100,000
each    Tin* chain specialty store concentrates its en
tire purchases in a narrow field of goods. The advantage is obvious—both in price concession and overhead.
The department store has, on the other hand, the
advantage in several directions over the Specialty ehain
store. The well established department store haa
built Up a good-will ami reputation that a ehain or
specialty shop will take a long time to attain, and must
needs go through an expensive stage of development
operating in high-priced street floor locations. In addition, the department store has a relatively large
volume of business which permits of advertising on a
scale whieh the limited business of each city's ehain
or specialty shop cannot well afford."
"The past fifty years have seen the growth of the
single department store units; the next fifty years will
lee thc consolidation of these many units into large
powerful groups."
True there is a menace and a very serious menace
from ehain store organizations, but it is somewhat irksome tn read the meandering* of "space writers" who
from tissue of fact evolve an elaborate fantaey without
truly analysing the fundamentals of the case. His contention that the chain stores arc going to clean up the
individual retail* r is unpremediated absurdity, and if
our gUCSS is cornet, thc chain department stores have
almost reached their limit. They cannot go on increasing
their overhead ami get away with it in competition
with the smart individual retailer, who has learnt how
to specialise in i few commodities, in preference to
carrying a diversified line.
As we look at the future, the chain department
stores arc going to have a hard fight to maintain
themselves against thc aggression of the specialty shop,
whose rent is lower, and everything entering into overhead less in comparison.
The big institutions with vast sales have not the
earmarks of a solution for the merchandise problem
of the future Because the small store has the best of
it from the basis of overhead the chain department
store is going to have a difficult time in crushing the
dry goods dealer who specializes and knows how* to
buy
Also, how arc thc chain stores going to whip the
11 tail grocer who is banting to get his business on a
proper basis with low overhead.
if good management, plus low overhead means anything, chain stores, department or otherwise, including
mail order houses, will have to watch their step if they
an* to survive the one-store dealer who knows his
business as he ought to know it.
DAVID SPENCER  LIMITED  BUYS VICTORIA  BUSINESS.
One of the most important commercial transactions of the
yi-ar took place at Victoria recently when the firm of David
Spencer Limited purchased the house furnishing* bu»lne»s
of Weller Hros The consideration li reported to have been
in the neighborhood of $250,000.
Hoth firms are pioneers in the commercial life of Hrltlsh
Columbia, having been established In Victoria In the early
days of the province. 14
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
t *
Chloride of Lime
16 oz. Package
Supplied by all wholesale groceri
in British Columbia
Manufactured by
CANADA COLORS AND CHEMICALS UMITCD
Sueoe-e-dSng
THE JOHN B. PAINE CO.. LTO.
Toronto Winnipeg Vancouver
Agents:
STARK & STERLING
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Prices
Greatly
REDUCED
MAGIC SODA
Our revised price Hal effective
Sept. 27. 1924, iKowa an •»•?•
age rrdvKlto-n of
Over $2.00 per case
Push MAGIC SODA     o\ Us
thr quality thai «ril) Mt-kff ftttst
cuttom#fa
[. W. GILim COMPANY IJMfTCD
TORONTO M<mtrr*l
W
mnipeg
 — ■wwwwwBMw<iwMMssswwssswM>wMWBMw *wwswisswiwiMwsaasssBssBsssssMaBBBaaai
GROCERY PRICES CURRENT
9 are prices quoted for principal Iimji of leadi-MS ■*>■*—»**■■ **—
. "*ni «= „L„.vr.      "•*■ — ■■■ m
RAMSAY BROS. & CO.. LTD.
10c Assorted Sweet Biscuits, packages,
per dozen
15c Assorted Sweet Biscuit*, fancy car*
ton,  per dozen
Chocolate Bars, assorted kind*, 2 doz
to a box. per box
Cream Sodas, 2s.  tin**, each
10c Cream  Sodas,  packages, doa
15c Cream Sodaa.  packages, dos
family   Sodas,   pkgs..   per  '!"/.
Queen Royal, Cream Sodaa, per n*
Queen Royal, tins, each
E.  W.   GILLETT  CO.   LTD.
%
I (fl
14
71*
! 2o
! tt
'7
I
Bi-C^rbcn-iU of j^™
C»««k   60d«   *Gra„u,„.,
■■"
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• fl ft.
Cr"m of Tottof
ti,
rt.
I *;
! n
• 1    la
Royal  Yeast—
3 doz. pkgs. in cane
Pure Flake Lye—
i doz. in case 	
5 causes   	
10 case.". 4 doz. in raff-
Magic Baking Powder—
4 oz. 4 doz	
6 oz.  4 doz.	
8 oz.  4 doz	
12 oz. 4 doz	
%% o case lots.
Magic Soda, Caae  No.  1—
1 case (60 l-?tj.  packages)
5 cases or more
!*.
I   < not
r Di
t ts
tt,
It.
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1 71
.. 9.25
3-2 it
5.20
- 6.10
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Bak'»»l Powdtr   ii *
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Baking Soda  14 -"  ' <*'"
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THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
ASSOCIATION N0TE8
13
>rovincial Secretary Makes Tour of Interior Branches.
In line with Irishes expressed by delegates to the
Bit-rrit Convention ths Provincial Board ol the KM.\
pas made arrangements for Provincial secretary
[Waiter V lug to visit brioches of tin- Assoeiation in
various part* of tin* Provinee.
Thaas arorogemeuta Include tbe appointment of an
bssistaat in the ioaal otSBksj to take aver the routine
work, ami J A In* has tor Rams weeks being acquaint-
itt|f hinoM-tf with details of tlo work in tlo* position of
assistant secretary,
Thi* wilt relieve tht* provincial secretary of a number of minor d«Htatfa, ami enable him to devote considerable lime to the problems of distant members. It is
hoped that members in tlo* points visited wilt meet
.Mr ini; with question prepared pertaining to their
particiitar difficulties, and with suggestions whieh they
nay consider necessary for servlee tmprovenient.
Pbe following live issues atv smong those to ba dl*
msaed bj ib* provincial secretary, snd other otBeiais of
lh«* Association, who may SCOmpaay him:**	
Priee Halntaituut^e, -Dredit and Collection Service
liOgiea) Service of th»* fjoeal Branch llsecufff-e,
IfcriiS of ts regularly held Stylf shoU
Personal Property Ta**. etc, eta
Ths following schedule \s mi advance notice, subject tu minor changes, local branehea reviving definite
advice by letter a» to d»t«* and arrswgessents;
|j*ave Vancouver, Monday, October I ith
Arrive Revelstoke, Tuesday, October Hth.
taave Reveletolkf, Wednesday, Oetabar 15th.
Arrive Neieon, Wednesday, October loth
(irsvti Kelson, Friday  Oetabef 1"
Arrive Cranbrook, Friday, October I*
Leave Cranbrook, Saturday, October is
Arrive Nelson, Saturday October IS
Leave Ndanu, Saturday, October iH
Arrive Pmiicton. Sunday, October I'1
|*eavc Penticton, Tueadsy. October il
Arrive Kelowna, Tuesday, October 21
Ijeave Keiowna, Wedneaday, October 82
Arrive Vernon, Wednesday, October 22nd.
tjeavi Vernon, Thuradsy, October 28.
Arrive Armstrong, Thursday October 88;
Drive to Snderby * *
i.M>\. Artaatrong, Friday Bvenlng, October -M
Arrive Kamloops, Fridaj Evening, October 84.
OROCBRS   CONCERT
Oreater Vancouver Orocers Section R  M. A. Holds
Successful Whist Drive and Concert—Prises
Awarded Winner in    Witch Hase!'
Sales Competition.
With tin iitia of encouraging cooperation be*
tween ths manufacturer, wholesaler and tin* retail
Merchant, s soda! evening, spousorad by the gro
eers section of the K M A. to which leading local
distributors, manufacturers ami their ladies were i»>
viti-il. wns held st the Manufacturers' Building,
Granville Street, on Wednesday, October 8th last
The whist drive passed off imecesfuliy under the
able direction of    Mr. White, Well known Vancouver
The world's most famous
baking powders
To the housewives they mean purity,
wholesomeneas and reliability.
#
To the dealer thev mean satisfactory-
#" at
|>r«»(it. satisfying turnover antl satisfied
customers.   It pays to carry them.
Made with cream of tartar,—no finer
baking powders ean lie produced. Order
from your wholesaler.
Made in Canada
Lm,
poser, ami visitors taere not backward in expressing
their pleasure st the varied programme which followed s welcome buffet supper.
During tin* proceedings T. IV McDowell, who is an
ardent supporter of the Association, addressed the as-
sembl*J upon that popular topic "Maintained Price,"
and handled his subject in an interesting manner.
Hugh Morrow, chairman of tin- Vancouver grocers'
section, acted in that capacity,
It was at this social evening that V. T. Sehooley,
local  manager for tin*  Roys] Crown Soaps Limited,
took occasion ta award the prize offered the winner in
the "Witch Etasel" soap selling competition, the first
prise going to W. W. HeEwen, member of the staff of
T I*' McDowell, grocer, Granville Street, who was the
recipient of a handsome gold watch, he having made the
largest number of sales.
Mr Sehooley COUgTStulated the executive of the
H M A upon the manner in whieh this competition
was managed, and predicted that such i scheme, now
the experimental stage was safely passed, would find
Increasing favor among manufacturers
Gatherings of this kind do more than any one other
thing to engender a spirit of cooperation among the
various factors Of distribution, and should be eiieour-
Sged on all possible occasions. It must, however, be
remembered that this special display method of furthering sales of dependable merehaudise which is
arousing BUCh interest, is not confined to Vancouver,
but effori* are now being made to enable all merchants
in the province to take advantage of the scheme, ami
it is proposed that it will eventually become a Dominion wide practice, sponsored by the executive of the
Retail Merchants' Assoeiation of Canada. 16
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RKTAlt.KK
Repeat it —
MjcCORMlCK'S present mi-
vertising ts after the rr
peat orders reminding thou
sands ol housewtws from coast
to coast to place another order
with you today for a package
oi McCormtclts Jersey Gram
Soda Biscuits
McCarmuk'n produxt* well
displayed
Bnng  in bt$ profits   and
item trade.
7
Mccormick mfg. co. umited
Branches   Montreal. Ottawa. T
oronto, Hamdl
Vancouver
Onto no
toi*.
B«g* to satisfy—that's all
RAVEN" ,««„,*•„
GARRY" l*k4>
RUPERT" •/„., Kn„
<»»•'  b«, fAMktZ tL   *****   *"  *'**♦  * SH
s *eiMMry la c*»»»4-»
M •■ «o turn nut hi„.   ,
,h h»* fee* 1,25     <,W•M, " *'***' **•*
•Mfftttini ■„, ,    *y, '• 5* '• sac Meat* m
■ u,ina <».« 5JsT qw*,t'1' M ^# *M "*•
  ■**"*-*--* bt BJad ,. .    ^
NORFOLK PAPER ^; LTD.
*»7««     VAMC0UVU.BC
A««»U (or B 0
od» Manuficlaring Co. Ltd. m
m
m
^SHH^BBH   T,,K BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER   H|HH
(Oeatiaasd ffSBI paf* IU l»nif »im<fr»*s Mint 18/3 Uns  per doi. Ill
bd  (CTMSOlSta,  1U«*.   tin*.  UMM ls,,r]|),    „/4 ot p«r dox        76 Nutmef. 12/S tins per do*. 1.60
[Vanilla. While.  Almond, urn***-,  <W, S t*. K|MB(|1>   ^^  JJ/4 —   ^ fi0 Paprika 12/3 tins  per doi. 1.40
H!v   1*,.w,Uir,   tltto. N Sulphur. J2 4 ox  cms p«r dot        «0 larsley 12 3 tins  per doi. 1.16
tiimna-l* MwStt, «l«< 2 21- Pastry,  mixed.  12/3  tins per doi. 1.16
|»'**«»f4.   tS,  *M * tS Ktlnut*                                 Vnnllla     Klawl Npptf, black.  12/3 tins ... ..per doi. 1.00
lustaid.    Wja   ■**                           —. 4i» J3 ,  iit                   ptr *tffl 3*0             2 50 l'fcpper.  cayenne 12/3  tins per doi. 120
tttfttard.  «%•   <!■ ■ i 4'- tS/4 <M                   per Set US             4 75 tapper,   white,   12/3  tins per  dot. LIS
WPner,   Ha  SOS t) ,   „t                       perSM 11 M>            9.00 IVkllng   Hpice   12/3 per dot. 1.11
JW   CntOmtt  tmXomi,   H»   POt  H* 4T J(;  ^                        p#r «1..« 2100            17 00 I'oultrjf Dressing  12/3 tins .   per dos. 100
r-w. OrSSS 1*»«!. ta t«* ft tt ,    <a                              (11I *<Mit(           UQ0 Sogo, ground 12/3 Uns  per doi 1.00
3*    J|,    pwkaSSI *3 Sage, rubbed 12/3 tlr»  per-dox 1.00
|  r»    p* iwnfr* *1 mjr-fwine Skvory   12 3  tins  per doi. 1.00
Mi.  iS Luxe.   •SnsraSSSi  I IS ** II 2 Ot Pt*              ... . per dot.    I?* Thyme   12/3  tins .„- « per dot. LOO
iV* *»«■- lm*   MOt BOM SjS pi* tt> -to li/4 oi his   per dot.   3 2* Tumeric   13/tlna per doi LOO
ft„a.  4* taOMO  **• I8*1"  IS ***** ss », W hoi»» I'innamon.   12  otn» per Sot, .90
S««*«*r     «*"* I •**•**• Whiik   Nutmegs,   12   OtOft      ,    per doi. .90
:* * "*   **'* straw,   2 25 Wh„,e ptpitung u clnj|  per dot. .»o
THi W   m   MAV.HI-S CO. LTD. M  ".S 90   ittta pmt do*    3 00 C«Icry Halt,  taper tuts per dox. 1.50
"Batata's  S*»l*»»r**wct* 2» J.   UM per doi    4 50 «*urry lewder, taper bots.   .. par dos. Vtt
\t\towroMi tot   vmcem. *J «• »■»• per do*,  l.oo
*   Ot  <'sn*.                                j.*r ,J=..| 140 JmUy   t*am<iTt9  (a!|  fkkvwui T**
|H                                       j**d*i j:> loo/i,  p^rtb. .«5
M     „               ,         ,„       ,   .   . Cd/H* perlb. -87
.          % , ,„, Un»«n»*l#  tv.«,',*■*• 30/ls and  20/*** aitsorted  , , perlb M
.,   ,*.v,                                           p,     Im U| 52  « os rf«t               . per dox    1,21 lS*U P«r ">• -6»
U  V                                             m,   ;.» |fJH U * SS MM .    ptrSM.    2 2S
"* VtMpftf
HsStaf tsls MwtarS                                                            34 qts  per dox 2 <o
ll   t   1*}    f*,t*                              ptt  Sttn 4i II  Se   lim per  »k«t     1 5*>
ji  I   ,.|    m. «                           W  4-« 09 II  M  M  IHM per dos    4 60 Marmalade
... ;;;:;..*:: p;*';: -3 •»-"»**■«-
Hpir-es csftd **#*«»<»«ing* Jams
r•**.«**   <•>•»,-**»• , iggi,0  J; j ,.. j (J(jjt    . (K, aMSTtM   12/»   tins ...   per dux. SJS
' ttftato..*-.   I)  I   ItM (:»<-r   do*.     ■ 10 ,\pru*ot   12/4  tins pvr* ds>x. 8.&0
*>•*#» *••* Tsrtai  iSttH  p*w*f| *l.rt,!.« ;j j «a-t<* prw <*}<*.-t    i 40 Mb..-k i'urrant   '..2/4  Otm .      per dt.m. |*S6
*;   1   nf   B4;BS                                       '•   '■* - CWTJ   rw»4»*i   U S unn p«? »Inx      K 25 «kM«»»«lHTrv   l*"*5   tins*                per dot. S 5*J
IS/1   -«   rtM                            I**   ' ■' ; '"■, null    tNmdw i#f «l.<      I.*6 !*s»n»**rry   12/1  tun    .    .     per do*. t$0
U   •-,   «:«*                                    *    *o* - ' l         *      l-** J-iK*ch  12/4  tins                    .    per dot. 10*
^ nistw u * om pm *»   no i»imn 12/4 tins tx-r do* :.r»
"   *"■*' * * '"*" **                           t.   . s . ., %Ut*s*  ti I ' •'" p*r tlo*    Lit j:,iss*u,-:ry   Ll 1  t.ns                          . S.S0
J J ^JJ                            p« Sm i** tf»r) raw U i Um pe* *M    1.11 ((.'nt-.tliuii-d on pogi is)
Customers
Confidence!
r^KU-lNCl SHELLY'S tX
^ BREAD, whieh bath th«- sd-
^"^ |i r atld Ihi Huyir k»i»»» ?.«
Im- i»f »\n ■ptioisal in«rit. tunk****
KStUfltn] Stic! p^ttnaR-Pitl custoto'
vr*.
|K(ti«rs know, front having
hi.Mii ss many ut 1 h»ir mstomiafs
praise It that SHKU.Y's -x
BREAD sh always uniformly xoo*\
T h •• dlaalar a ba handles
SUHU.VS t\ BREAD in eertain
of sn\v* and profit auf effective
sdveiilsing will create s willing
ness i.» accept stll-.l.l.vs tX
liliKA1 * niul. iriuiiiihri every
person who eontes In for s loaf
is s possible customer for i»tin*r
Roods
D
SHELLY  BROTHERS
VANCOUVER VICTORIA
N€W WESTMINSTER NANAIMO
WAFFLE BRAND FANCY TABLE SYRUP
IS EXCEPTIONALLY GOOD.
Note: We could not improve the syrup to we Have
improved the container.
Kelly Confection Co. Ltd.
1100 Mainland Street
VANCOUVER, B. C. IS
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
-OWf
(Continued frora page 17)
P.  BURNS S CO,   LTO.
Sdamr-otK Products.
t
•i..
pot
■ tb.
«
a
{win pel
« N ■ |
■n   N.     3
pei r
bom
brh
•r tb
lied,
pel*   It
Ayrshire - •■' • (boukK
Bacon, Sh;imr*,« k. •'• I |
Baked  ham.  wilts  On*
CreuMry  Batw, EQMdE
Cheese  Canadian, largt
Ch«ese, Canadian,
Compound, Caraatl
Compouod, Cxraatl
Coi koA bams .-*•".,*
Dominion turns, It-
Dominion Bu oa, I-
Dominion Bacon, I
Dominion Sbouldera
Dripping, beef, I-&
Hams, Shamrock
Hams, boned sod i
Head Cheese, Mb. ..
Jellied tongue, per Un
Lard.  Xo. S, 13 to case
Lard.  No.  3, St to esse
Laid,  carton.  iE-ths
Lard, No. 1, cartons, tdtbs
Mincemeat,  kits.  1Mb,  net
Meat Loaf, per Ib
Fork Pies, per doi
Pork, roast legs with di
"Smoked   fish,   kippers.   1
Smoked lish. kippered I
and 20s. per lb
Smoked Cod.  t&t  per It
Selected fowl, per lb
Selected Chicken,  per tt _
THE ROYAL CROWN  SOAPS.  LTD.
Vaneouvtr   Price   Llit-F.0.8.   V«nce*jv»r
or Ntw Weitminittr.
Term* Nett 30 D»ya
^Apex ^Soap Hakes, 12 l n> pkm. tv»* : <
*> H
♦ tt
..H H   ^^^^^^^^^^^^
*,  • ••.■hkr  (arrayped)   baa  si  J&
KJero t»iw***f.* i    b »  el  M
Urven   * :.*.!•■ wrsti'S'**!     ;«»    ■ ■!    ', *'
A,   \*-.r.*:.:. i    3   *)t~<f    nt*    U--t  v
;«'.j;,-.i   ICw*    J do**   *jt#   I*1'-*   t*f S*
U*«eMsisl>i ii»* ftar,  Ml   S  IS!
ttachaale * PttM T»"   baa   ti <
OBirs Casta*, takea  *•»   * M
*    ■*..*?   w mpped • bei  *** H
*••» ..'if J*
f St
per ri
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Write f.*r T»M **
■'■■>•. i: i*\. t*   f, 5
t.» > j 11
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'ttrt   a***-*l    'i'«*Wt)i
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tmS cawao* s*a»C*e CO i?»
t sassSy •*•*«*•#*'"■
i a <k*a*  t«a4WkSrf   aia^wfev   la. lb   ., ;
V   HM   *»*4S«,;S#   *,*.f«9»ai»,    |-. |b>   f.*0*
S*      |    WSii.**     tsmA%    a<oa
Hb *
Smm*oss$m1m&n    Slitat    *J**a»    * *»
Smmp|   *s»   -4-##ii»*i»***,   aa.iaa
i;«**a(*.#'*ia»»--s  UMftna  mawaa * I #%-»
swf -»■***   m ta
assaafSsama •SSS'is *sasas  *aava
> «i.. i.-«.-.-4    #».,#«**.,       '*«i*j   art   OO'pmtt*
f»*»  Mia)
a
k
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'..*t.-»-.« •   ('.*;m&0totmS   t**>*aafmtw4  CV»«
'»«»*..■** t"t«ra a****** *** 9k i»»**«a $«■■
ts
11 ■ |   |§ ta   ba ♦«f
tV.**    *»■ »    l«rKt*a    S
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is
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•boa of ti
* UM
A La Francaise f*a.it!ii
Blue Mottled, ttox of 2"
Crown Oatmeal, 24 to, l>ox
Climax or Montreal  (wrapped)
English Blue ...ottled, !->x oi 2
Golden West. Be boi Of *..' -
Golden West Powder. 3 tt:   bos
i, w   sta«*#*
■wt **-»',*►
C na tystippi
■■"■X
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flmu    i :.,   tux.
• ■-. ■ ■ ,■    2. " 2 '."
•   * .
*,
APPRECIATION.
The "Window Display Week" ides iasagarstt I bf
the V'aricouvi-r Branch of the Association is proving
attractive, and the number of local wanafsetnrcn Is
take advantage of this method of popularising their
products is increasing. The following communication
from the Supreme Polish Company Limited, is sn .Hp*
preciation of the efforts of Secretary Wslter V Ing
and is self explanatory :-
i»
* !**,' t*t * *  .. *
**. *. i i f. rf n^m
■'*  I   h«    .*««.
S*»   S  Sat mum
•   5:»    M m   ■*.,
**   *5  '    mom
l •'*  ■* ' * i **»
'''**    I   la   •'**#»
" :   '   **   *»  ta   •-*«
SS   If 11   .-**»
"-*    I -N     «••
°"8h Cof"Pany L.m.ted
Peodi
vaacoiiirer n  •
^'(Nnsir,,. u    ,
a    1   lit
Vati
The Retail Merchants' Association of Caoads
Greater Vancouver Branch,
744 Hastings Street Went, VaoCOQVer, ii. C
Dear Sir:
re "Suprema Polish Week.
Attention ol Mr Walter f inx
We would like to thank you and tbe OrocerS* .-"tion (
your Association for your kind, effort! 00 our bebal! in alio
ting to us a "Window Display Week" for our prodecU
We wish to thank in particular Mr, Walter F [oj for hi
valuable advice and supervision.
Through  his assistance and  <
n of
I
'essftU  in securi g Zera f"a  eo^st»tlpa  *„   .
111 waore than
Assuring you of
•Su"r«'ma PoiiHh "
w''^^SiX2Zi
! Ill
t if
**  t!
I    ' i
i :,
», JS
I * t
I :.
«n
■  .
I 'A
I "■
i   'A
I m
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
19
tp-
I I
DRYGOODS and FOOTWEAR
3PRIN0   FABRICS.
Indies tions from fashion centres point to voiles as
•>lllg firs? of i*\\ [{) Spring WSsh fabrics    Cfepe usually
bines second snd linen third A washable rayon is
pe nest addition to th. cotton family sod printed snd
Imtfu.it'l patterns sir* strongly featured Artificial
Elk ginghams in small cheeks snd stripes snd 8 greal
pany novelty plaids appear A oen eotton georgette
shown in Pranc-* fot nest Spring ami buyers from
|\n,*< riea ar* quite enthusiastic snout it.
Then1 arc  f«*-wer oi tl»«* creamy snd unbleached
pitrkgrounds than last yesr, -;iiiln*uyl« they bsve been
lined tor liie prints in thi old I*1'!* century style,
lea sn mueh in favor   Theai arc represented by
hriM*n i»t %*.:■'.'.* tt A |»<ti}i|)Ail«Mir roses garlands of wither
■arm  dses or liny paste buds disposed in r»>w k or in
group*
HtaggfciflioRs ««f plskl patterns rather than the regn-
Ifai -i«*s*j|»ti ;«'■. seen in many prints
( ?^v. Kflteb embroideries •;*»t*m* make some stirs©*
ti< patterns t^ high iiands «*i» voile or erepc, snd col
ton < h« odh h n*wd i*» rclievi several prints ami vm>
brOHK nCS
I" »■< [nti h Ming '" u*''** 'b^l -» !*ri*ii! number of pat
'•■rn**. titr m,*d«   "O a  ,*..!,,?.,{ hai-ki'rouud     l*astel ami
':«!■ r blur snd pink} wim Br** thorn** most often
wtccte<     [tight bishop purpl* «- b nen <*ontriimtion
*   nl «-»4»-rs in rut ion novelties
THE LENGTH OP YARDAOS IN PIECE 000D8
i m qui ition of tie length ot yardagi in piece goods
s. oik of growing importance to tin- drygoods trade
inufncttteera, wholesalers, snd perhaps more especi«
a\\\ retain 11
Tin complaint is mads that ysrdsge is too bun* tor
the i*h:myin« pstterns eolors snd styles, snd it is cvkl*
t»nl ihnt manufacturers will have to put their goods up
m inuilli r rntls tn meet this change
Country merchants will I** sble to buy more pat-
t< mn in ;« line when thev esn bu*. s 20 or -•*> yard end
liuttesd of a id to 80 van! cud, ensbling them to »"i^-^,
tit* ti customers s greater variety whieh they no* d<*-
msnd If Ihej esnnol get it they will t*o to the larger
rent res where they ean see tlu* larger variety This is
hsving m»«« effeet i«» tl»«* country than perhsps tin*
11 sup \s iwsrc! of
Tin shortening n\so ui th** drj goods terms is an-
other good resson for "Shorter Knds, so it is up to
the wholessler to get thi* msuufaeturer to meet these
eondition* The manufacturer v\ill s*!l just as many
yards as usual, bul it tfiil be In smaller ends. It is
alsn up to the retailer to Kelp in brlngtns aboul thia
mueh ctetdred end bj asking for '"Shorter Efnds "
Tin* wholesale trail** is heartily in geeord with tin*
idea of having manufaeturors cut staph* fabrics in
shortor lengths than is at presenl tin* case. As one
wholesaler itatod it would lu* much better in these 'lays
to cut tin-si* goods in lengths of 25 ami 30 yards, rather
than 50 ami 60 yards as is at present the ease. It is
agreed among the wholesalers that if the merchant in
the country is able to buy shorter lengths, he will have
more variety to his stock, ami thus give his customers
opportunity for better selection.   The suggestion has
been msde to manufacturers that they put up a certain
number ol pieces in short lengths and a number in the
regulation lengths. This applies to prints, ttanncllettes,
sheetings, pillow cottons and wrapperettes,
OSTRICH STRONGLY FEATURED ON THIS
YEARS WRAPS.
Some of the wraps worn at a recent showing carried fringes of ostrich at least eighteen inches deep,
Many af them had this repeated on the shoulders and
arms Dresses are trimmed with it and hats have it in
profusion.
A clever feature of the new mode is the use of OS-
trieh in several shades of the same color. One beautiful grouping is that which begins with white, deepen-
ini! with each strand that is knotted on. to a deep rose.
Aiiuilor is the range that runs from cream to flame.
Ocassionslly white merges into blaek. This is true ol
fans »s well as trimmings.
Marabou is selected quite often and seems to have
a particular place along with such furs as seal and dyed
squirrel. Too mueh cannot be said ol other feathers as
will, from the soft downy ones to the straight severe
ones so appropriate with the season's high hats.
Tie littb- lace and painted fan which has been attempting to return is noticed in several smart collections particularly in those which feature the shawl, for
these two make a combination as quaint and as truly
feminine as the modes of our grandmothers about
whieh the male sex speak so much. The time has come
when they are to be tested and tried as to whether they
would like the k'ii'l of today to return to the ways of the
-k'irl of yesteryear.
KASHAS   FLANNELS   AND   REPS   POPULAR
MATERIALS FOR THE WOOLLEN SEASON.
The    vogue   in   woollens for midwinter ami early
spring is forecast us follows:
Soft materials of the kasha order.
Mixtures of camel's hair z.ybelliue or camel's hair
and crocodile weaves.
Hep weaves partieularlv in navy blue ami black.
Kitten's ear eloth of the broadeloth type, but with
less sheen.
Flannels of all kinds from the plain ones iu soft
tones to those with the hairline stripe and stripe ami
check combinations iu contrasting colors.
Kashmir eloth of the duvetyu order,
Plaided cloths for school ami college wear.
Klamiguou. a new pile eloth in fancy checks.
French wool challis cloths in a variety of sports
tVsigus. so
TI]K j;]>|Tisii COLUMBIA RKTAII.KR
n    ....
s ^tm., PtwO
H—tliawMi €*■
W-wmmm^mwo *mmmrm^mw*m^mmlJf m\ as^t^-
' Fsssssv* On
There's a Double Object in
This Monarch Color Page
^r,*J?pi?,I,>l"^?B **'P*>*»m.*tnunc tk*l*>*L
toUmj the cl,,Ur.a wh« their tttnMtao»h7LJrT.l£
«n«»«ycuitoiMr.   ■^^mmltm>*'*m*iSmptja»t*
MONARCH'
„ was
I   .... hosiery andoutergarments
.
m7 il!»24
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
21
MALE CLOTHINO STYLE8 FROM NEW YORK.
The KriU of 19*24 has brought more radical changes
in style to men's clothing than has taken plaee in the
last six yean The form fitting suit has entirely disappeared ami looser draping of both eoat ami trousers
is most marked These changes in styles do not apply
to young men's clothing alone, but to that of the mid-
•lb aged man, who i* demanding more snap and style
to tin cut of his garments Then- has Wen a departure
irom the old standards of coloring and several new
shades srs In-coming very popular    No decided change
has cone in materials, but many new novelty weaves
• 0
have beofl introduced
Fall showings run rather strongly towards the
softer fabrics, though there is i good showing of suits
of harder finishes    Scotch cheviots, serge cheviots, Vel-
our rheviou, unfinished velours, unfinished worsteds,
tuna worsteds, day *«-rge worsteds and clay serge are
among the showing*
Faint Stripes And Plaids.
Heather mixtures In both plain awl fancy weaves
«re shown iu all Stores and the herring bone pattern
is ai*o having good display Few pencil stripes an- to
be seen, but taint plaids and stripes are shown every*
where
Poudrt blue has received much advertising as the
popular Fall coloring, but  this color is more favored
by tin younger men ami Iks college trade   Several
modifications „f jmtjdre bin* arc being offered, "crush-
id bhn" bring shown in many shops Tin former color
is somewhat lij*h?«r and the latter color darker than
th. r«[-cognised shade of poodre blue The darker blues
with lighter colored strip** catering to the exclusive
trade, is well gg the popular priced StOTCS Standard
browns an«l grays are to I** found in all stores, with
the grays predominating Plain blue serge, while always a Standard coloring, is not in as great demand as
formerly, according to all stores interviewed    The new
color London Isvender, has made its appearance, but
is Wing (*hown more extensively in the higher classed
stores
Tin two button SSck eoat with wide shoulders, soft
html ami long, notched, rolling lapels is the popular
coat this Fall This garment is cut considerably looser
than formerly and is from 29»*j to :\0 inches in length
Vents, when used, an* from seven to nine inches, and
many coats are BO constructed that the vent can be
closed, should the customer desire,
A striking model of sack coat for afternoon, semi-
• It.ss wear is bring shown This coat is slightly form*
fitting ami is made in Oxford gray coloring The
edges of the collar ami lapels of the coat are trimmed
with narrow black silk braid, as are the collar and
front of the vest Thc pockets *'f both eoat and vest
.tie edged with the same material, and there is a single
band of braiding about two ami om* half inches upon
the cuff
The double-breasted coat is coming more and more
into favor and is being extensively displayed in all
shops. The two-button coat, with buttons set rather
low. is the popular model, although the three-button,
with two buttons to button, are also shown.
The blunt-finished bottom to the vest still continues
to lead in most models displayed, though there is a tendency in all shops to show both styles. Five-button
vests showing slightly above the coat, lead over all
other styles. The knitted vest in Scotch wools promises to be very popular. Attractive designs are to be
seen in brown and grays iu stripes and broken checks.
These vests have plain edging and pocket trim.
Trousers are considerably looser draped and run as
high as twenty inches around the bottom, but this
measurement is intended more for young men's styles.
The regular cut is around eighteen inches. Thi" waist
lim* is somewhat higher, but the extremely high waist
of English clothing is not being shown. In the young
men's trousers the fitted waist with small tucks showing to two inches below the vest and allowing considerable fullness over the hips is being patronized by
college trade.
While thc four-piece suit was primarily designed
for the golfer, it has found considerable favor with
the motorist. A very strikim* suit is heing shown in
poudre blue cheviot in solid coloring in coat, vest and
long trousers, with the golf knickers being made with
a plaid design. The buttoned bottom is shown in this
model, while in the single golf kniekers the strap bottom is largely shown.
PRINCE OF WALES COAT THE NEW SENSATION
1? is some years since a real sensation in men's
knitted coats has appeared. The ordinary golf sweater
in tan or Oxford grey had become almost a staple. It
was a real stroke of business therefore to get the attractive photograph whieh has been fairly well dis
Iributed, of the Prime of Wales in a new model. Manufacturers are making this a real turning-point iu tin*
men's sweater trade. Thc coats they are making very
closely resemble the one he is wearing in the picture—
a pullover, in Navajo design with the stripe-- running
erovswise across body and sleeves ami the neek in V-
style Some of the color combinations shown at thc
Exhibition and in different knitting mills in Ontario
Me* brown, sand and orange. Km pi re blue, taupe and
brown, black, paddy and orange—ami so on. forming
an array which should make the girls quite envious.
R M A TO STAGE FASHION SHOW.
If plans of the It. C, Kxecntive. R.M.A,, materialize
according to schedule. Vancouver will witness next
.January, one of the most comprehensive sprint; fash-
ion shows iu her history. It is at present the Intention
of this body to invite the delegates who will attend the
Merchant Tailors Convention in Seattle, ami to have
them bring to this city a vast ami varied display of
mens' aud womens' garments from that gathering.
These will be displayed in Vancouver in conjunction
with displays of footwear, millinery and photographs
and at the same time a conference will be held of association members from all parts of the Province. Secretary Ing states that wholesalers ami manufacturers
will be asked to co-operate to make the affair a success, 22
THE BRITISH GOLUMBIi RETAILS
ra-
Many clever Sport Costumes have been fashioned from the few
material— "Bouclette."
KNITTED FABRICS
STIMULATE   TWEEDS
Knitted fabrics that resemble woven textures arc featured in New York a? the moment
Blocked and plaid patterns, its
three   or   two-toned eombins-
tions. are favored for thi   de-
Velopjit'til   nf   coats.     Cheeked
designs   and   monotoned   sur*
fsees an- also seen
One-fnece frocks sre designed in a Slide variety ol fabrics
which answer both the sports
and  the  street   rear appeal.
Jersey plays sn important role.
with trimmings lending a distinctive    note
epaul
dottei
fabric
fold.
iunt ut
msde
which
may
Pleat
pocket*
i Klier
bodi
at th
"& 04**1* If        C***?        *»/•:*•»    t
t*-. *?.--j *< *>|     na     %>.*"4*4
Out-Door Wt
ear
for
Fall and Winter
SILK AUD WOOL f01
SWEATERS
ft«   gin
I
s n
e«
ces
*eng
tailored
to th».
I i    front  nltt ■'*'■
■ :  bs   ■ ■ id h
unit mlifurf ui stli ii
I ■>.,»
lori* i hig hoiht *■ ho-*. |
*   I »•» tot. mtetl fo   ||
*      '       -«      I'M thi*   i{      hi* I? V''.
*»*-*«U art   ** lliiij,-  nnd  wtii
■    *      -      *.  ,7h.  >    tj.'*
\\ j.-.. .,»- *  ttrial i im of \o
'tin*   ts    fitn     %i»H«i     i ' •
long mandarin hi* . •■
givi ti mmo  ptomim ne* '':
• wis is a Ioosm gsrmint s
uttona, and has *l« Vi - *
iJ   i"  usually   th tt iow d
»hades and i- urttj cml"
contrasting silk*
►im r garment Ihi I Is otpt*
Jul   mioh  popularity   **•=
tvhieh many  new   * fft i ts
'*. had a noved crinkled *$<
m 1924
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
23
lt-.iiuil.ir to the chappie coat of b»«*t yeitr arc promised
lunch favor for winter sports wear.    Among thc leading colors in knitted wear an* titiau, tokio, tan. navy,
honey   fawn, silver, dawn and turquoise,
MEN 8 WEAR STYLES
Hen's Naek suits will he cut on straighter linen than
formerly    Tiny will have wider shoulders, the front
will be well rounded, the pocketl will be placed lower
the 1i*|m is will Iw   wider and the collar longer,    The
backs will be slightly f<*rm fitting and in a greal many
rases will b» made adthout vents    When* vents aw
shown ill the back they will be ijuite short Double
breasted eosts will Im a feature The two button mode*
*v11 h pockets b»w snd buttons widely spaced, wide
shoulders, small luj»s and finished either without fl
tent or with a short vent, is expected to be a popula.'
nl **» |f
lu Tu\edos there ari tw*» distinct models, one is in
,■,»•*.
na»i
loui p ■-■ fteei on the lines, of the sack eoat, whin
the? is a slightly -shaped eoat    In sports models
eotus rvativi ? )■{*•■* ftrv ls?ing show,,.  Some diffei
Me, -posts only in having patch pockets; others
knife pb*ats OVCf the shoulder's and are particularly designed tor golbng Some half licit* will Ih-
nhown ind th, rangt will include models with yokes
. nd so all I*1, :7. i ftt tin
Vents will he cut straighte? across the bottom but
mn in the extremely straight line ol the so-called
r, ms**- styles   The test having short, rounded points
to  ""■•-*   ffOttt  will he  fa-Hi-rcd, and  with a number of
dels oi sack coats double •breasted vests will be
... ?*.«»» n
Trousers will be cut slightly fulbr than formerly,
but not with the extreme fullness that has been worn
by the '*Caki caters1' In N*w  York, and other A inert-
ran cities \ ifMneh knee and a lb1., or IT inch bottom Hiis i»e the young men's style, and in some cases
models will show small pleata at the waist band
So far as ean u learned* clothing prices for spring
wiis !»« practically the same as shone for fall. Prices
ot English fabrics have advanced, and exchange is not
as favorabh as it was siv months sgOi but it n neces*
nary to have clothes sell at recognised prices, and garment*! tO ti? In with current prices will be supplied
Top Costs
In top coats for spring it is i xpeeted that an eaay«
fitting <next**rii« Id in both single and double breasted
styles will be the favorites, 41 and ■*}."» inches in length
ami made up very plain Box coats will also be shown.
Bud Home few models will haVC Raglan sleeves. Light
colored fabrics as expected to be a feature for both
sack coats and top coats for the spring trade. This
means that material OU Ihe tweed order should have increased favor riothlng makers say that they expect
the spring season to be a good one for tweeds, ami that
this la partly the result of Ihe increased number of men
vho golf The number of golfers who weir special
suits for their game just about doubles every year, ami
when a man gels a suit, with knickerbockers to match,
II tweed Is the logical material.
MERCHANTS who started to
handle Atlantic many years
ago still stick to this line because
they know it is a line with which the
purchasing public are thoroughly
familiar; a line that gives genuine
satisfaction in comfort and long
wear; a line that has built and is
still building up a worth-while
trade for men's wear stores.
Be prepared—order your supply of
Atlantic now.
ATLANTIC UNDERWEAR, limited
M0NCT0N, N.B.
E. H. WALSH A COMPANY
Montreal tad Toronto
Sttnaf Aftats for Quebec, Ontario and Western Province* I
V
24
TliK HiUTlslI COLUMBIA KKTAILKU
Or
to the front and a contrasting bsnd ngb       •-
(,u,m,nt   Soft brushed effects very tf        to J5'
i „ o'l-wt voarare promised much fsvor for
ehappic coal ot last yeat on pn mi
wfaS, sports  wear.    Anton,   the  tesding  C^OW ta
knitted wear are titisa, tokio, tsn, nsvy, honey, fswn,
silver, dawn ami tnr*|Uoise.
ARTIFICIAL SILK GROWING IN POPULARITY.
We have, in the columns of this journal referred
to the growing popularity and use of artificial silk, particularly in thc production of lace and hoiacrj There
are today whole classes of feminine apparel in which
artificial silk bids fair to become the dominating tV
tor, and the movement in this direction is especially
noticable in England, where processes have been so
remarkably improved with regard to dyeing and finishing, that the cdulosc product is becoming immensely
popular, not only for stocking?, but camisoles, jump.
ei*s. combinations, knitted costumes and innumerable
other garments. So far as the lace trade is concerned,
thc first use of the fabric on an extended scale was tn
thc manufacture of dress nets, which OH account of
their wonderful luster, are now known hy the generic
name of "radiums." So lustrous were they if first
that their vividness was rather a drawback, ind step*,
had to be taken to counteract it. Some wonderful
creations in mixed "art" silk and cotton are nuv, produced both on the leavers and iu the curtain machines
It is yet too early to determine what the prospects
arc for the ''art" silk curtains, hut with the improvement in thc fabric and the lowering of the priee, any-
thing is possible.
FELT LEADS IN FALL MILLINERY
The foremost fashion centres of the Barf fcatnn
black for autumn millinery. It is used in the isrgi
dress styles, small feathery dress types. MIlit|l mi*
square erowns. and suit hats.   The trimmings for the*
include glycenned mounts,  peacock, ostrich    mi
brightly colored ornaments, ribbon bows, lac !tn,| J
course flowers. The Directoire influence is seen bi the
new high squarish crown, .-ailed "postillion" It
makes itself felt. too. in B ,M)kl. cffwl ^ ■    ,
THE PURE WOOL
UNDERCLOTHING
THAT WILL NOT SHRINK
Highest
Quality tn a
UNDERWEAR ~
WHCN
MAOE »V
but CUt SSraj  sharply behind     (»# (he•-1.S0t} bffau
gilt a? >■'■   .:«'•  its I feaMiivd UOtf    The ggfl a.-
> • jh ibo  good,  aksosi   resHafcitog a tug c*aY< i it
times    Vhw Utile felts Are- |*»|»-siUr  «i*u«iUy foppt,
for sdonuneots on fsoeifs ot **-!f faof-fe    wheri
JU* ,ir,   . ,- .   mfd   thi   ■"tfViMtttits of felt and  tt    • •
stands atpftf *   ptpeeiatlj  where *mr HMItefial s*
,,\h,\ in  , ■/   tspotm   fashlOB  iff!  the  other     life
eon I silk is geed i steuslvfty snd hue lalle and s   il
Ud fof df*"** hat*     P-ntm  |wirjd»-  and the  n**w  |.      t
tunes an* fr^tiir«ti  tohlo  f*og»* -and kindred *h-#4"' i   I
rich bras bi *ss steU
MILLINERY
The  ord* r <«f iw\*>?- li        If*  Sflfafetftf--**-  io *tr**    f
■rncrslh to bv I itbrr*  Hhbwn, tot  tnri*t    lltsrl lm
the     bfSt     ro{or   r\ftyn b* ?i     With   •*•*'**-** i       ti |>h *.».**   -
given • ■      orangi and itsnsr   s«»t»r iv*?**.*.-*.-. *
signers hi sritahw  mewss *i!h «■-•*•**» Mas*
tions ol -several tones of lat sami wwii **wl tht« !
)',<!t found i's -»$** into houv-t »>?> tht,* **■<!*••
of mstrriith   b '" ',1 bi  tot th*  ^■»i* n*»*»  -and »*
it   j-,   tit    -*"-"   fo* ih* at* at ihrw •"" Vm
>i   }>     J ■*        J». . '      * ■» jjj     f  i!(    s.. A . i, T»       It, J.    i -.    J    - .
•-MJ ": ■•-.* ui lb*  "*•»***    *?*>   ivn  i*i.s
eOlltl
Weeks,   ?
grosgrA;
CORSETS AND LIHOERtfc
.j*   .:-..■■■ v.. .*.:-. r...-.s..:
Tb   leading  istonrs gtrtsr-rslli rsttfvsa thr osioi
thai aroe
tn i-   i**i,f *
holdii | ** ■
lhat    i*   --
*ttn s nsntis
g
Had staunchs-nt-d lis  wwasl -*?"*   ' *
in    Tl j n is * *p*f*\ e-mM *;»? \b< -i5
* m«Hj**U   .t»|*}'*?«*Jif IH*-  td«** IS *♦<'"'-
ill)   b*ti\t   hmoght   m\      Tfct   -
billlltj    I     '   "    »|'l|>   Otu\   l*r i If $»■»»*"    '*""
1 H; fif
flan
"iv. pb-iitio^ t* ptrnmififnl *>*t
tnd lets crape roraeiai sad ffgw us
■   *        M-M.-   ir-.vb   fArtnrlllg   (IH
ind sppthfitf -sorl
..' ■   * -
WOOLLEfs IMPOSTS Sm0W  0*0* IH  SAW   MATtSsAt |
''   '    I |MI
1 I ,
' • . I
SSSfN    'or     |||f     Oral     ImtOO    mtSO
IS] *    IMhW   In   <h#   i'.*n*<ii-»*fl   Ws>
'■''   '        'hrf*      *ftt   a   *«-ri    he*'-'
, ''   *   '■'   '**   liVfUh   *r,   b*   motSmtOttOP
,..,.  . ' f^xJ* tnoA*  h%   wmkrta «l>m*4   o*<-r *
tit SSd ISH     thr- »jn«h«i« nl***** •!*«•• th
( "    too   HMl^ftlll   h»*r   **».H»rirr»|   thr   I*-*"'*"
I  wrwtn*   !»»»«.   -irrlinr*^
WOW CUSTQMtaS AS!  LOST
llill>   ,
11
boA
IS I
•i.
'*":' |  I44NI to  thr  aoWa  aloft  om   d**   S
rj-ptmitoti roi ttM wm% Un**! h»*r u> «l« Th'
"»*»M.*r by mte tjnabtr to onawrt ISSN '
'.';'"*'-"* |  o|  ib*.  gfotpSStlVS  titi*»«'»      **i*:'
^ * v.    .t«.M bi Infi-rtor ntfflBSnalrtg »t»*ts ?
*"*  »*   4r»<wjr  window  4iit»|»f      A,l*rf»l»ln«  *
- Ism MKliMtoo] and lis sSetn ess hs *
•to *.,„, ui»f>#it*f«r or *sropHetoi    Bsl
•wsesi (nil *>jiu«-#   j. -mtmot hs eoationtd 15*24
THE BRITI8H COLUMBIA RETAILER
25
FOOTWEAR
The reeommendations of the -Joint Style Committee
of the United States for October, November snd lb-
c>ember selling nppi-ur below Tin- report does not pic
ssge nny radical changes in colors, materials, or pat*
term from th« styles previously   recommended   for
early full selling, There arc points, however, to which
the shoe merchant will do well to pay Special attention.
It in noteworthy that the committee, iu dealing with
women** welt shoes f»»r general wear, recommends
black calf and kid. tan leather and patent tin the
lightest weH const met hat) in the order named, ami
adds the suggestion that merchants should watch tans
ai a style clement that is growing in favor. In turns
for genreal use and informal wear, thc retailer will
note the (Jlctum that medium toes will prevail, with
continued tendency toward shorter and broader effects.
The concensus of opinion appears to be that wider toes
and shorter vamps    are    increasing    in    popularity
throughout the states.
Nothing startling is predicted in regard to the
trend of men's styles. Young men are expected to
buy oxfords and boots in the ratio of 75 to 25, while
the general average is placed at BO per cent, oxfords
and 4(1 |x-r cent boots. The recommendation of the new
short full btogue will cause the retailer to keep his
eye on the developments of that particular style. The
committee again urges that blaek shoes only should
be sobl for wear after ti p.m. and the tan shoes should
be ci nlincd to clay time wear.
Mens Styles
Shoe* tor Oonorol We*r
TYPES
YatiftC moii StytfS   *S {MS B*8t os*ofd#. 2S pet Stilt boots.
»W» o poaaibt* SVtfSgl Si -SS p**f CSBI otforiln, its per
ocsit boats   H**e ititn vttght oxfords throsgfc Qetoher,
iImmb he prepared with hsavlit type affords),
lasts
French. Stogon sad ass *h*w *«h Stags**, cosservsttve, and
HK-KLS
|| k«*r|>Jnn  With llStS     No rlun-jf'-R
COLORg
Thr<f«" *h«4«--* ic (IS  **Hli a -Minns: !en*4«-nr> tOVSTOl lifibter
ion IhSdeS
iiurh itrooget
UCATHRRg
llifhti  ft;-4i*»}-ir*4 rati
Unaided |*ltirnt^ SfSSght esll
Qrtii toothers
ItlArk   kid
Patent  leather
Hf-OWS  Md
%ho*0 tot Informal tLnoruoq Wear
\~\ 118
V'w tight weight boots sa4 bmsBwb strifehi osfordt
LASTS:
Cuatam.
("lose trimno-tl brogues of narrow type.
HBRL8
Clone trimmed, shapely heels.
l.KATHKHS
Black calf ami patents.
Shoes for Formal Wtar.
TypSS
Oxfords
Well*
Turn*
(Plain toe*.)
LASTS:
Custom Sad medium brojeue
HKKLS
Low. lots trimmed, shapely beets.
MATERIAL:
Patents
Shoes for General  Sport Wear.
(Thc sport shoe* you now have will sell during this period)
juvenile Styles
Shoes tot School  Wear.
PATTERNS
ilrowlr.* Qtrts
Plain and brSSSM StfSrdl   SlrSSS, Southern eHertu
Boots ta BMsStrailaa
vino and OfcUdrae
1,-ar-*-* and blurher bool*
Plain and bfOgSS DSfOrdl
Strap"
LEATHERS
Orowtai Qtrts
Tan calf
Patent
Klk
Tan and brown ihsdss lesdlSI
Mines and ehttdrea
Tan call
Itfown and colored elk
Patent
lllark rail
PATTKHNS
Oxfords, mocesstas, i»<*«*»'»»' Waeast ih«»«<*
l.KATHKHS
Tan
Brovn and smoked elk
Crepe  soie.s  in  moderation  with  elk and  Russian calf
uppers.
For Orets Occasion*.
PATTKHNS
Straps.
Oxfords
LEATHERS:
Palest
Satin.
Illack suede
While buck.
AISO satin and suede with patent and dull trimmltiK
t.ace boots tor semldress.
Patent and Russian calf with colored top for misses and
children.
NOTTS: There Is a tendency toward sofl toe boots and oxfords
tn patent    Russia calf and colored elk. both with tips
and plain toes
Growing Girls
„. ri.low thc trend of tin* women"* styles recommended, both as to patterns and materials.
Growing girls' shoes sill rows iai irons
Hull i,,th.. or Bovtrad, froa M to on,
Ustl wlil» medium round iocs. THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAlLKR
I If!
Dominion
Linoleum
Rugs
-*•
NOW you can sell them at specially
Reduced Prices
Here is an announcement that will gladden the heart of everj Dominion DeaWr Dominion UnoWan*.
™&?*2v ok*-*-*"0-***. »* PtaOj reduced prices From now until the end o( Wowmb-er lh.y ar. bring
advertised to the public at bargain prices What a ionic lor yoar Boor conring d-martmtnl »<*-»»
papers, magaanes and farm papers are broadcasting the -.tory througboat Canada   .v.rv woman wt!l
No " Postponed" Purchases This Fall
popular "LsaLZtem Check no ^V„ T«" P"»i , 8Un no* ** °"'"lB* » *«*-*• •*** •' *•
SeL. Run Sntooleum elects in ™rf 7"" flW dUpl,,y m*,CTUl »ad l**' « -**■ •"-*
Oct everything ready ^^SL^tSM^SS *""' " " "^ *•» to •""* '"***"
ion Linoleum Dealer P      d **" tb' P™!*** ln Tour town that you ar. a Domtn
called to this fact WSj^tit^T V" S*! * * *«*• •' * I-** * «•«
i ««1BM MwttMMll now app.wing throughout Canada
Write today for sugge.tion.-, and mi,,n.|
to boost your a%m thi., Fall
Oilcloth & linoleum Company, limited
MONTREAL
"ForE»«y Floor in Every Room." 1924
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Ins and Outs of Window Display
rt
By II. It Simpson
The display wasn't put in to m II books— some-
thing, indeed, far different, hut it Included aa part of
the display idea several books seottercd on the window
iloor m-ar I hi* trout
U>amd hy the ImioU an dstatiom-ry store, Ohm
hook* included  fiction,   travel,  biography,  etc.     Some
were on their *ub •*. otkors bad iheir backs up, slightly
opened U) KIM* stability to the jtosition
The window display happened to lie a good oitr.
ll itoppodf I WIS informed by the man who put it in.
i little better than one in five of the people who passed
She window He made accurate eheek twice in tlm
forenoon, again at BOOH, and twice in the afternoon
Thi* ehap ta of an observant and investigating turn
of mind Aa he wa* looking at the display, two or
three day* after it wa* fiirM put in, it occurred to him
to open the hook* This he did---placing them close
to She -window pane and laying them flat open at an
interesting point
"At j«.*t what I* that book opened!" That seemed to bs the prevailing question inspired by the open
hook* At any rate, the number of passers Stopped iu-
Cffiisd Ut a little h-etter than one tn three.
Such little thing* make or mar window displays
ll<re the mrfr opening of a few booki inerras*-d the at"
tentlon getting power* of a display over 50 per eent.
And the incident wa* by no mean* unusual In fact,
M the merehanl. having put iu a display, will stop and
«*k hiuoolf "What can I do to improve this*" there
are "real good" chants that something will occur to
him
Motion a Great Aid
Cm he add motion*   The possibilities in motion
oeeur ttity In the window display indent's training
set it t* surprising how few displays use il     A bust
ling voungster of our acquaintance    sou oi I merchant
took  a  correspondence  course  in  window   display
tl»s wa*. relatively, a small tOWH     Thirty miles away
was a eitv of 250,000
To thi'* once a week. Utc young hustler went to
look at the window* Hi cohered th. entire business
district window -.gating . .
Incidentally, it was | splendid educational idea:
but the point 1 *Wl t«» make is one of hi* discover!.-
Some weeks he discovered not a single store using
motion, among the hundreds h.   passed
Motion i* far from overdone,  partly, perhaps, be-
moss the merchant must go Ut urns pains to seeow «,
bot much more. Wi* believe. Ih enllse he nail) taB»«*
appreciated what it would do The closer the tie-up
to the produet* displayed, the better but anything
in motion wilt attract attention Some manutaeturcrs
wil.h progressive advertising departments, will get u
MHition device* for the dealer who asks for them. M
ingenious local eleetric man ean be called on
Then there is eolor Ureal masses or orange or y I
low ^t in M nn afterthought crepe suspended tfom
the ceiling to form s background have raised a w« -
dow'* eflfeelivenes* twenty live pel* cent ( olOf sete, n
eos, little do VOU Use th,*,,.? The store * M h 1 *. »*£
lighted by the odd eolor has thi      edge     ott Its III tgll
,,0r(«urious little trick* will make sn otherwise mcdi-
oere window into a good one. Giant figures, for ex
ample—'*12 OFF." 1/3 OFF." etc., ou great cards
Of different colors, cut and made to look like tags, and
stood upright in the windows, are strikingly successful, all the more where the colors of the merchandise
are inclined to Im* dark or somber.
A human object in the window, demonstrating, is
often so successful that companies keep such demonstrators on the road all the time. Nor docs the demonstrator, if a woman, have to be pretty. Ralph Barbour
tells of a window demonstration which was a failure
using a "French maid." but a success using a "plain,
ordinary1' type of woman. Harbour suggested that
this was doubtless because onlookers just naturally
associated the French maid with things not in their
elass The window stopped them—but they didn't go
in to make Inquiries or to buy. With the plain type
of demonstrator, they did.
A company which "borrowed" a pair of two-year-
old twins for its windows, simply blocked sidewalk
traffic, that was all.
Some of the best window displays, judged by results, am* simple, requiring little time to put in. One
feature they always have, though, some dead-sure
method of attracting the attention of passers. A display which doesn't get attention falls flat on the first
qualification of an efficient window display.
Probably onlv one in several thousand retailers ever
cheeks his displays by the number of people stopped.
The operation is simple—-ten minutes when people are
going to work, ten in mid-forenoon, ten at noon, ten in
mid-afternoon, and ten when folks are going home
from work, give a complete check. On a piece of paper, each passer is represented by a dot placed under
"stopped" or "not stopped." Twenty per cent is a
modest mark to aim at. With practise, a mueh higher
percentage, can oftentimes be reached.
What Do You Display?
A phase' nf window display which has not received
a fraction of the attention it deserves, is the proper
choice of merchandise to display. I do not refer to the
subject of whether the dealer should use his window
in an endeavor to move stickers—though that still
often is done—but to skillful determination of what
things sell b-st through the individual store's windows.
Occasionally, I tind a store progressive in window display, putting "stickers" in the window-—but then
onlv rarclv and as a minor factor of the display.
It is quite generally agreed that the merchandise
which should be displayed is the kind whieh is high in
salability.
Now. the remarkable thing is that merchandise
which may sell rapidly from Jones & Son's windows
may be stagnant, though equally well displayed iu
the window of Carlson Brothers, in the next town. In
successful window advertising, that is to say. more is
involved than the window arrangement -there is first
of all. the selection of the goods. Competition, nature
of passing traffic, season of thc year, are three of the
factors which affect the sum of sales actually made.
It pays the merchant to be a ceaseless experimenter.
When he finds a line which   "goes well"   when dis- 28
played, he has a valuable piece of knowledge
stores have carried their investigation! is iht  point
when* thvy only infrequently make a display whieh,
CHE BRITISH COLOMBIA BSWIUffl
TRAVELLERS WE HAVE MET
I I
in advance, they do not know will surer*.
When a displsy falls fist/'give it t^ ^
it oufc-is the sdvice of nesriy sU veten    a   sinu
display.   In thLs connection, it mishi W ' ,n.n
,    •     rt     i,  ,/t ..nil al onee  1 probably w
that ii a display uoesn I pun ai ow ■    i
liicillloUi o
I) I
pull at all.
Truly, window display is a broad sui. -*•    »■*•■ -^
windows, the merchant pays vastly wort
other ^al span- in his store     1 behoovca Hi
study the "ins" and "outs" of wndn sdvertWng
TIPS FOR LIVE CLERKS
STOPPING THE LEAKS
By-John T BartletS
How many different articles       *to* :     ■•}  ':■
store-  Vou don't know exactly, bul you knos tl i a
great many~-so many thai your employer, 11
chant, can't know all he -would lik*  ! > snos snout
each.
An employer, probably pretty much Uk« yon
told me a story the Other day which i*. mmm  . uA-^h'y
valuable tip.   Vou can Uicreasi yoUl efficient > IS
ways than salesmanship.   This is the Itorj I m ' ■ V*
Joe Sparks.
"Nothing pleases me more than to hm\ a clerk spot
ting ways to broaden sales or stop leaks   I *     put
right down, usually, that that member ol '*••   fore*
needs little watching- he's earning his money snd
growing   more   valuable all the time    l-v* inatsi
young Billv Sweet just uncovered a situation down in
his corner of the store
"The juke was on me, but hos in tarnation ea
merchant know the facts about everything- unless hfa
clerks help?    Anyway, Billy GSHie to me arc! put  i'
right up to the Old Man.
"'Mr. Sparks, what's the use of stocking two
three or four of the satin* identical article, dtffei '
brands, when no one ever calls for the th'uuj: by thi
brand nanoV   Isn't one brand enough   especial!)
Calls arc few?'
"'Young man.' " I said, " *il sounds like you   *
uttering wisdom.   Let's go down and look ' "
"1 walked down with Billy and. sure ,-n,
had uncovered *seven differ
carrying three to six timt - ,
any necessity to carry    I*
accident.   I've   always   benevwi m a good, complete
stock.   But, duplication in   ilow mo vera!    \ ■
doing, when the public doesn't force as toi"
The curious thing aboul it is thai jiml su.-b b
such drags on turnovers  are aot *., i.   ,- , \   .
even the prosperous store    The merehanl who
freely is apt to buy freely.
Of course, of article.-, j nhesvy tab    ...-,,.
ally-advertised goods an* Btronir. ii
■ v, hi re w< '>>.>!,
stock as there s as
or IcsK bv
tpiM'lU '1
may v, •■!] i„.
"   .'•■■,.
business to have the many brands
dom or never called for by brand \mUi"[\Zwx
elimination of duplicate brands is om/flf I '
ways to reduce investment in stock LJ     "?
turnover. ' '!i"   " »I*ed
ti
un
I***,rv-M-.*  will fv't-ugiiiiti1 the fti-componying
crioh id VJr  John DrvtlM   MM »»( the !«.**! k^
.   ,.  ,„.[kM I  I - mta m ol  IBS     I nstof    * ..<• ;
llll" .       ,     ' '
■j-., ,,,       i       \ ind al-*»» ?*h« l'*.ii»in*jrreiAi I
b'trs AMKNfiation oi ' anad!
\Vhj|,       J.»hn      itOiSti*!   mil   l«   '  href'
m\ ows pertly tt*M *ll lis w Is **• knn *»** Hmm s
t**im    ©**»** i * •
II*
-I   » mp.-- ■ ■• ■
M<l, not iiig mn I   s il
at  no  * s,'. ■. '*.■:.
9\9
p..5
il
' '.
•NTERlST.se.   PREHSTAT.OH    AT    ASSUAI     Mil-
I   w  C ll««1 c
*.*.   -.
'*!.'« '■ i A
I     *
ill
ompnetM Prsssot **•*>••;«# a»--u*<« <» I**-* *r***
'■■'■' aiisiafj'i "■' its •■ il
"*&*'■ **5-jft-qi*»! m«**tinf st thr
■ on intn *sj *h«- MNsyaai '"■
I■'*"■ *•' -m■•< mtm ll bsM   -**"*!-
H - . .-.j   a-    ,-     ,-,.s,v,T a|^r   ?{sr>M "
'"'   Mt)o«m«| io -m  Msfiabti Hsll  w
4*»r;<»«* mtKiMist ,,-., mftr ofow#*A ntsA
■
-,-,.'    ti     y^  *S**UlOi   *'«-**       aflfl   M»*   rlrellon   0<       *
/',. ,..,,..',*';'*'" N^stdsai «<* itM nNSpasi i,f*'*"
' '' i        '■ df-atf
*h«. »ord<    i., ■..
B tCi
otpktfno)    Tmoon Ntttosi fs' '
>»lttl*ftg  fh«-   rr*.«tj|»#ri,> *«   itiWAAi^s A-:
Utrti   nt4 staVf oat) Is wst"
'*   ;* *■!?"•?'» nt a*ttire  nt  rovh  f^Ctptel '
?»'<-*<w* 111tt*«..t ii«j"-,n» f«» itrvtec
"*«'    -eari      lhirl«    *..*•    ■■rutin    IWkH    *<
fltn-i-n *>,,, ''•Sll    »i»iri>   for   •cftirr   tfOSl
*  *t*ty tot mrrtei ?frm« a»r »» tn, ^.-Ar* 1924
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
The Housewife-Shopper Rebels
Sales, 8ales, Bales, 8ays She, Are Arousing Her Suspicion; And She Longs for "Old-fashioned" Selling
st Regular Prices.
29
Ity Kuth l.eiirh
I wa* baying I pair of shoes, while hui-kskin. sjMirt
oxfords
Are ihew reduced?*' I asked the saleswoman.
'No. madam They're our regular slock We
always have thete at ten dollars''
"Witt your advertisement in last (tight'a paper mid
it  WM « mmtS   ' "
'"Well" a bit notipluww d "they're for special
silting     I mean a spreial ihoe event "
"Hut if yOU always s»\\ them at len dollar*, what
m-ftkes this tt. NpecUl »«|i**"
The girl looked offended; and I regretted my per«
Kintenee
"Well." she *ai«l 1 don't know what the advertising department means I'm sure All I know is that
shew nre our regular ten-dollar stuck."
t let it go at tha! After ali, that particular sales-
H«(tti»n couldn't US blamed *>»r the act.,?* of the stun*
management
What I wa* getting at in catechising that -girl wan
simnlv thi* Whv should Ihis afore, like ntanv another
itore create a "SBC-da! sale" when the event is neither
special nor a (falsi Why should store*, otherwise
truthful aud reliable, deliberately deceive their customer into thinking that they're getting their money's
worth!
Speaking for the shopping public. I believe thai
there are entirely too many ssles   In fact, ss I read
the newspaj-wr advertisement.* nigh! after night. I !«
gin tn feel that ordinary retail selling has reused to
» ibi) Kv ery thing Is a "sale." everything is "special."
iverythtng is a "wonderful event,*1 Kvcrying is
laiuted
Alld when I gH shopping I gO sdth an attitude that
really is negatlvi I dioobt if It's wis* to buy a given
article m»w For I wonder if maybe todays t-e-gular
merchandise   if any   will nol be tomorrow's bargain
Why buy DOW, whin I can wai! and save money *
Wait    that, set I hold, is what the storee are teach
Ing ns to ihe wail for '*stles " I pick up last night's
newspaper and what do I find? "A Special Purchase
of (Hove Silk iingerte*' A Stupendous Sale of
Printed Crepe dr Chines" A Special Presentation
of Men's Tine Bathing   Salts"   "-V   Notable   Sabs
Rvenl in Kim  Coats and Wraps"    " \ Special Sale of
BUmketa"     A Reduction of High-Type Apparel"
\ Special Selling o( Wardrobe Trunki     but why go
further*
What's the matter with stores'      Don't they sell
regular priees anv mote'   I know all these "sales
make me feel    ft little breathless ami dated     All these
KDecials" and "announoetnonta" and "events'  are
(peso (assy, sn flamboyant, so hysterical, that I !«"»« for
calm .moderate, sensible, old*fashloned advertising
something thai will tell me the facts about the goods
without Irving to make me believe that   I'm yetting
something for m*\t tO nothing
Speaking as a shopper, I don't know  the cause of
this sale business; but I do know its effect on me and
on niv sister shoppers    It's arousing our suspicion
1 know enough about business to know that a mer
ehanl can't give away hia profits and remain in business And so, as a shopper, Vm beginning to wonder
whether he's lying in his advertising or selling inferior
goods. When be talks about a "stupendous sale Of
printed crepe de Chine at $1.48." it can't possibly be
as good, 1 feel sure, as the printed crepe I bought last
week at his store at $1.95. Or, if it is as good, why
should I have hen charged the higher price?
Oh, I realize that there are occasional bargains. I
know, for instance, that if you wait until the end of a
season, you can buy dresses and suits at nice low
prices And in buying furniture you're likely to save
momy if you buy in August. Hut how is it possible
for stores to be staging these sales of theirs every day
in the year*
.lust as we're tired of sales, sales, sales, and long
for regular merchandise sold at regular merchandise
sold at regular prices™so that we might know what
we're yetting for our money—so arc we tired of this
constant, hysterical crying of "finest." "best." "most
wonderful," and "stupendous." Everything in store
advertising today seems to he exaggerated. Everyone
talks in superlatives. As I read this hysteria that
passes for retail advertising today 1 think of the actor
who shouts and declaims ami gesticulates and prances;
and 1 remember how much less effective he is than the
actor who speaks his lines sincerely and straight-for-
wardly.
Modern -day retail advertising. 1 believe, promises
more than the store can fulfill. Perhaps it isn't deliberately untruthful, but it's so badly exaggerated that
the effect is the same. What's needed. I suggest, is a
tittle restraint If an advertising writer would prepare his copy in the regular way. and then, go through
it ami cross out the superlatives, his thoughts would
register better with Mrs. Jones.
On various occasions. 1 have been present when
women friends, typical housewives, were reading
store advertisements.
"Well now." says one, speaking the mind of the
Others, "I wonder what's wrong with those table linens
that they're selling them so cheap."
Om* day recently I rode into town with a neighbor;
and together we glanced over the advertisements in
the morning paper 1 was carrying.
"Look." said she pointing to an advertisement of
blouses "Kmproidered crepe tie Chine suit blouses
for |5.95, reduced  from    111.75.      (loudness,    that's
cheap,"
I agreed.
"Hut," she remarked, "I wonder if the blouses are
worth any more than $5.95, You know that store
isn't in business for fun."
Do you sec how the public draws conclusions?
•"Don't believe all that the stoics say about goods,"
counsels Mrs. R ...»a business-woman friend. "You
know thev're in business for profit."
And there you are. Between tin- sales and the comparative prices well, is it any wonder that we're be-
ginninir to lose confidence?
1 talked this over with Friend Husband. 30
T1IK BRITISH COLUMBIA RKTAILBR
•■Well/' he said, trying to look .--  ■-     -
women force the stores to talk sales   lm *m   .
sdf that you're always hunttuf *        ,
"Yea" i countered, "but that s tjceauw
chants have taught us to expect th   i
"Nothing of th« kind   said hi    I'
lh(. demands of the public and in puttu goa       -
t,,.hants aw merely giving   the   public   wl
tu
 ■
Dublie, • ml
wants."
Well, do you believe that a inn M* M
vou sincere in your conviction that sn , tin public, **am
to be ssled to death' If yon really bclwv* thsl the
puhlie wants to buy, to be forced to buj " rough the
constant artificial stimulation of sales, you'n sffong
1 make this statement, and *hiy anj    *   bant lo
contradict:
Tho puhlie of today is mi tired ot "sale*" and ol tht
ja/.zing-up of merchandising that it would welcome
the opportunity to buy good, regulsr merchsndtsi
fair prices.
I saw this happen in a stun in N«vv York
A customer wanted a spring east    "Something
simple and moderately priced, in navy blue," I V
her tell the saleswoman. On a nearby rack over which
hung a sign, "Special $39," were rows   * navy blue
coats that answered the customer's deseriptit
After trying one on, surveying herself u*. *h» sdrrot
the customer remarked: "Well 1 dott't itwt ilki the
material of this coat-, it seems to be a roar-si twill "
"It's a wonderful vain-- for the price, madam." the
saleswoman assured her **\V, V, sold hundreds ol
these coats at this special fignre once Ifondsj
"Are the coats reduced*"
J. A. TEPOORTEN
UM1TED
WHOLESALE DRUGS
PATENT MEDICINES DRUGISTS' SUNDRIES
PHARMACEUTICAL PREPAR AI IONS
308 Water St.
Vancouver, B. C.
fawSsffl
"'•^uwsiinco
The
Old Reliable
MinarcTs Liniment
Co. Limited
Yarmouth, N. S,
v   iuni Kpeeiais   Bit! moudkifktl v*tu*
Will   I think ih»- 'jWAtity Is loi efctop
t ni* • ii
tt*Uf   trtf\
\u\l u-<' %.'tu-   rwn*K v	
j-k, ml onrott in Indieatetl soot-kef nek il
4»n   - Special n«un«-l Coats MAO.4
\ •/'•.?   like   tho-a*    .-t^!% *"  %h»*   pb |
hinj,' ,-ni  a  *- butt       ' rl*nn«-J'%  all   Sh*-   Ftp
M*tlt
I gain ib< en*!*-   ■ * **■■'<•"■* K> t. h*»-**«|       v
a frjfuV- '        I c-wsai in i dark otthnt   Wtsat
nt
w >
tnd
•      |   -      *j4
f |   |
sell   h
spe«
I
I .*-■-,»  |i
' will m
Ihi ild    ^
. . i   '■ 111 ... *
!h«*     dt*-*rU-*N*i*a*»   uns!  m*.  *r '
ilj with r** hwtai is  limed l
*   *.-  :  '■   -    f mntl 'I r  html u*f >-.-.**  ■
hlrnl    ilbntralrd    |wa titath   i?-
-  ,* prr«rnt da) tartrls#n*li*iiif
lha" *ah iU - ■*. - fi  W***SS lO t*j*%r  hrf-fi * |
' ii  their  ftp*! duly   lo rtrrii   cttafc*
"• goiaf    mrr-rhandi-w     l.»«t    -a.*,-..
J:-..'   ind igaln sn my 01ait permm-i
-  - •'    'if.■'.' rv *|   * ?, *»'.    *,:SBt*-    M'ual^i't?
■'   *, -V "v- ;-.    •   ■%.-•-■■ x nf*. n.*l |iK»|i#*y
*f;-i'      J-»dj'*M     I   J?*,, s"i's**!!,-     J*   t|*»p-«H   " ;■
* M      ,*.-.".-,      1.7     * * - 11     ?*-r *|*r a* \\%ti-     f* I'-'
*v     -*■■•*    |**-Sft*.    iV    * Vr    if'-' J.
■ **Mrj;5 »liE»Ify ?*»» st-n-alii!
' *  .7.   ':.   it   *jfjt **«*tr*$'   *.!s-*i--S|**^f;-4*   -=V   -;
iM   *g   thai k^ji wit>jpft,r-<l fbi j
m m- :,- ro *n*si.f tt.* «*««■ ♦lm**1.-
tht*    «-*M»t    r      :V-  -:*       1    SSttpp*    I
Tillicum Pays
Its Way
Hi H nt  Itih> Juib *   tt'**t:-
bllild   frwn   f  a  p**vrAt»>id    «.td   -a   |»
«v  }
|tr'|rt-   fi«-k
I torn infii :■*-*-*- •
MJ!"'      --' '■■■»■ ipin-klv  Ihis blfh -s>r"
p.tjw r   pttt   up ln  ?itg  H.4tlf f*»»und  ?-
■'■'--•    People Uk* »u innsoai
ind '- * |.m,.
Thm Tbn Com* A,*in for Morf
Soil, Davidson I WrigK Ltd.
WANurACTURfWi   AHD   WMOliSALI
pAotR or.Ai.cns
VANCODVER nm|U !924
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
31
rack marked *»"19 ami looked at tbe blue twill coats.   1
knew that 139 looked like a highly moderate price.
One glance told ths ttoty; the soats wen worth $39 -
ur lev*    Surely nut n rent won     Thev were cheaply
made, skimped, trimmed with poor grade fur
My reaction* n* I examined that &t*» eoat, was mm
of a*ioimhinent 1 WSa Standing in a hiuh ela-*****-*, store
.■n Fifth Aviinic, New York, n stun- that for VeafB has
itOOd*, iu »nv intntl and i.. the minds oi thi* public, »h «
*aa, %ti»rc( stocked with merehandhw <»( cieeltent quality t'uiiJd it os possible that thi** store wa* descend'
ing, ihronfh Un lure of bargains, in selling bw*frsdc
stuff*
It was And I earns away wondering why I wondered whal enuld be wroni if the- store was "slip-
ping " ii its management was desperate; if tin morale
m bs crumbling
Wi th* public an Kuspldons \V« v* suspldlotts,
.*..». nf the "'bargain-*" »»f hl|tfa*ffrsde store*i   We've
route 10 resttlf that tWO and two, seen in retailing,
a I nay* mnk** fmir „ that i ran tboosjh p*rerarieators may
Ant) the adveiiksements business i* a matter of sold
.sn?hnn-!»c    jijh.I fifforr* <|<»n't lie
A10EIITA   SAS*»   SALES  OF   EXTRACTS.
NSW Rt*j«* at ***»*■• nt L*qmr Control SaorO Ptof b*x Rtu*t Sale
#1 LSSSSS Citrael, tic
1 PrnOt ISt0latl0O9 tt-K-rnU?  j.<m*#-^t| b? tbe- Alberta Liquor
I ■■- imt |ki*fi| retail *.ai«- a' rV.tM'xa am| ultnUAf |>r«"j**r»!son*.
** srosHrittd withm tha ptf-eftses lot ttw nittowtaa pr-ftsu
iiloot, stsSe aseonttss is Iks formats oi Um Brl-titti Pbar
MfteOMWlS
Any combination of alcohol with ether, Tincture of Bitter
Compound Tincture of Cardamoms. Compound Tincture of
Lavender. Tincture of Lemon. Tincture of Ginger, Orange
Wine. Iron Wine. Wine of Iron Citrate.
Preparation-* prepared according to the United States Par-
macopopla are also banned, theae being*.
Any combination of alsohol with ether, Tincture of Bitter
Orange Pest Tincture of Sweet Orange Peel, Tincture or
Cardamon. Compound Tincture of Cardamom. Tincture of
Lemon Pcci. Tincture of Ginger. Spirit of Bitter Almond.
Spirit of Juniper. Compound Spirit of Juniper, Aromatic
Kllior.
Thin restriction does not apply to the sale of such preparations by Government liquor stores, or by persons holding a license to keep and sell such goods In accordance with
the regulations.
Another section of the regulations also prohibits the pos-
SSSSkm and sale by retail of extracts of lemon, orange or peppermint, except by a government liquor store.
It is staled that the Liquor Control Board has received
information which proves that these extracts are being sold
in large quantities as beverages, particularly in the north
country, where unscrupulous dealers sell them indiscriminately to Indians and half-breeds. It is also stated that If
further investigation shows other extracts are being manufactured and sold as beverages additional restriction* will be
Imposed by the Government.
Arrangements have been made with the secretary of the
Alberta bran eh. Retail Merchants' Association, to obtain particulars o! the stock in the hands of the retailers and In the
meantime It ts essential that these three products should be
removed from the shelves, crated and segrated until such
time as the stock can be dealt with.
VISITS VANCOUVER.
Major Max- Fleischmann. president of the Fleischmann
Veast Company passed through Vancouver recently remain
ing the night Sn the city and leaving for Banff and other
Kock>  Mountain resorts tlie following day.
F
Progressive Merchants
have learned that
Better Quality
Bags
are really the most economical
Write for samples
and prices ol our
beautiful    assortment Tea and
Coffee Bags.
These quality bags
create goodwill
and speed turnover.
The Continental Paper Products
Limited
OTTAWA, CANADA.
Vancouver
SSL ! SMITH, DAVIDSON & WRIGHT, LIMITED
Calgary
•i. THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
^ »»*%
s>:.
■ ■   ..
We put it across J
f
WVH. I goess -sn pot 5* -.* toss j'- good mlyl
The nminent I lan  that '■» a  F^nrmilrV Bread Hoi OUt bl th* faH*>fy I Mi!
myself,''There** jMtutet bins a i '•■.-'■m,-*** trtemkl * sal lest-H-*
I M»]<i 5*n«..i«t on tht '** v
real Ides bi bind it • mi ■■ i along It
Ides bt bind thst     i ** v *
15" IT snd Iff \    j a n n • |
The saint thing appli* (0 >\\ it)
behind every srtielt Ml ton hi
windo* snd the*}'
ufh *   snou lbat wh-cft msm^tbios '*"'-'* *
■an'l ;- |p ott* ■ ding    -Wl t &■*•*?■*■ **.* i "i
n id •*•* ibim I      kfittk   bl   ibre*   *
■ : ■ .* »«f it »!'V*i» *4binif it **il '"''
Ih
***    }%p»tttW*l"* * fv
'ml  -ji di*-|4a*t  «»f lh**»
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"7/t<* 3wuif Sd/*>*tA"
y
{Branches
Toront(
W
%- Jtc&t-m&K K/aCrt/^M
Sstablisbsd IM
Head Omce and factory    MONTREAL
Calgary
Saskatoon
Vancouver THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
3J
HARDWARE, OL -w PAINTS
HARDWARE MARKETS AT A GLANCE
Builders   Hardware Active
Builders' hardware is m strong demsnd st tirm
iirje.«»   Stoeks aw fair and the demand for but?*, U
particularly b«hh| in thi** -tu-ctiou
Bock Saws
Buck assvi are active at Rem priees stoekaarc Brm
Paint* and Varnishes
Th*. rr ts %iill s good demand foi paints and supplies
■ao*. prii ra holding well
White Lesd
\ tdeady mak of white lead .ontinu. 0   The priees
established lomc limt ago remain unchanged
Sporting Goods
Local jobber** h-p«»rt lhat   with   advent   of   tsM
»rather drman-4 for snorting goods ot all descriptions
m «*m*h
Rope
A falrii good sale of r»*»pe fo reported locally   The
*imi which have been filing foi noun lime are un-
ged
Emery Cloth
v reduction has bc*eu madi ol approximately Bve
nt on etnr-n cloth
I*. r   11
«rti»W.»L*.l»M*W«W*t'
Game Trspi
There an eottafdtrafcli amount of game Irapa being
H4»14 loeally     PriiHfl remain unehanged.
Cattle Chains
Tin n is an actlvi movemeni in cattle eJhalns at the
present   time    The   p!"i<"•   remaiittt   tinohangod   at
levels which have W« o ruling for SQ8IC time
Steel Tanen Advance
Steel measuring tapes of Ihi poeket variety bate
ih sueed slightly
Turpentine
The turpentine market continues to be ftrm, with
loesl quotations tmehanged
Handled Axes
Tint, in a v»ry uoml sale st the present time for hand-
h il axea in the different grades
Linseed Oil Market Stead v
The linseed oil market Is steady and without any
indications of 1 change In price
Cocks and Watches Move.
With the shorter days then is 1 considerable im
provement noted in the Hale of   alarm   clocks   and
watches.
Washing Machines.  '
Dowsweil l-rfCa' and Co. have issued new lower lists
on their line of washing machines. The reductions run
from 5ih* n» |L00 on the different patterns of machines.
Canada Plate.
Then-  continues to be sn  active sale of Canada
plates and It,cai distributors anticipate a good business
in theae goods during the coming months.   Priees continue steady and unchanged.
Lanterns and Globes.
With the Fall and shorter evenings, there is a good
volume of business being done in lanterns and lantern
giotsss.   PHccs remain unchanged.
Stoves and Airtight Heaters Move.
The cooler weather has stimulated the sales of
Stoves and airtight heaters. The sales on stove boards
snd sundry lines are quite noticeable and the volume
of business at this season on this line is reported good.
Sash Cord.
A tb dine on sash eord is now recorded.   The latest
quotations show a decline of ten per cent.
Range Boilers.
New quotations on range boilers show a decline of
about ten per eent both on standard boilers ami extra
heavy,
Cutlery.
Distributors here report that cutlery sales arc on
the up grade goods for gift purposes and particularly
for Christmas gifts are one of the main features of lhe
hardware market.
Sales of Fire Arms and Ammunition,
(luns and ammunition are reported as strong, seasonable sales here at the present time.   A quantity of
business is reported in all parts of Province, volume is
well up to thai bf previous year.
Oakum.
A slight advance on Oakum prices is reported, the
new quotation amounting to approximately fifteen
cents n bale
Weatherstrip.
Activity In the sale in weather strip   is   noted   in
this locality at   present,  practically all  varieties are
moving In good quantities, prices   have   shown   no
change.
Lawn Mowers.
Hooking price for the season of 1085 has now been THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Niebff
mmmimmm hm
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
35
Issued by the Taylor-KorU-a lawn mowers    There is
[no change from tin prins ruling for the past season.
Spring Door Hinges
Hooking   orders   for   screen <loor hinges are now
bring taken for 1925, the price remains unchanged for
this year
ADVANCE FORECAST IN BRASS AND COPPER
GOODS.
Metal Lath
The metal lath markel is good, trading being fairly active Quotations here am* unchanged
Sheet Iron.
Hheel iron market oontinues to be strong, prices
show no change
Electric Heaters
Cool evenings aid the sabs of electric heaters and
nn placing *ueh good* in strong demand
Nails
There continues to be a gOOd volume of nail order's
r*»'rhed locallv    There ar»- n«» ehsttgCS
Auto Accessories
It** tat 11" rs have BcgUO tO plaec orders fur tire chains,
••n which the prices are the same a* in effect last spring
Act'fsaorics and tires aw moving in fairly good vol*
linr
Lawn mower prices issued by the Canadian manufacturers for the coming season show no change in
price from those ruling this year. The American lawn
mower manufacturers have issued their prices for 1925
and show a decline in priees of ten per eent.
There has been for some considerable time in the
Cnited States price cutting on bolts and nuts. The
mills have made an advance in their prices on bolts and
nuts of ten per cent and while the majority of thc jobbers there have nol made this advance effective, it is
only a matter of time before they will do so. There
has been an advance iu the price of solder in thc United States of 006 eent per Ih,. while the ('anadian
price has been reduced two cents on some grades and
one cent on others.
The copper ami brass situation is showing more activity Price of Copper is said to have been too tow.
producers were aware of the fact and have now advanced their prices three quarters of a cent a lb., and
a  further advance would not  be surprising,    (roods
manufactured of brass and copper are very likely to
stiffen in price.
«HblW«U«.'«l
Selling Surface Protection
By <i   V. White
In CVCT}  branch of lhe hardware bus ine*.*, changes
have been more rapid than i* realised by those who
hav, grown and changed wt?h it    t»it ean** and bunches
of T ami strap hinges have disappeared from the ci il
Ing, hay fork**   shovels and rakes from  the doorway
nn*\ cheap plated Of ptWtCI cake baskets, casters nnd
pick!* dishes from the showcase that sat on the front
counter The day when '*painting up" wp considered
sn extravagance has also passed ami with its passing
th» paim department of the modern hardware store
has eome into its own No longer are the "Paints and
<>»U" kept  iu the back of the stor.     or in the shed
across thc alley and much of the mixing done by hand
but many dealers gh« their * Paint ami Varnish l>«
partment." as it is now  called, tlo  most conspicuous
and valuable IpOCC in their store     Often it  is at  the
eery front when the lighl i- good and shades and corn-
binatiom show off at their proper value
There in more than one reason for this change .»'»<!
possibly increased prosperity which requires and calls
for more beautiful sarroundlngs in thc community snd
the hoUSC has played its pari. but. to my mind, the ed
Ucntioii of people  along economic tines has played a
larger one   Advertising and experience combined have
taught that paint and varnish not only beautifies but
protects nnd that when you "Save thc Surface" you
nave it all As you dri\e through the country the
farmer with the well painted house ami barn impresses
vou as thrifty and doing well and you judge B city
hoUSC bv the condition of the outside If it has mi ITered
feom lack of proper protection from the elements it is
safe to surmise that the whob* structure has been tteg
leeted and your opinion of its value and of its owner
unconsciously made.
Preserving Historic Buildings.
|Yu more attractive or forceful advertisements
have ever appeared than that series issued by the Save
the Surface Campaign Committee showing illustrations
of sutnv of the grand old historic buildings of the country and telling of the Important part paint has played in preserving them. The merchant who fails to follow this up and impress the local applications on thc
members of his particular community is losing a great
opportunity. Almost every man and woman is a prospect for paint or varnish sales—nearly everyone owns
something that would DC the better for a eoat of one or
the other, call this fact to their attention insistently
through iiewspsper advertisements, through window
displays, through persons] ami circular letters and by
hsving an attractive department presided over by one
who understands the different lines thoroughly.  There
a»i* few lilies in which the manufacturers are so generous in the quality ami quantity of selling helps they arc
willing to furnish. Counter eolor books and large
color cards, window trim material, mailing circulars on
paints for every purpose and material are freely furnished 10 those willing to Use them.
All Year Business.
Remember your paint department is an all-year
round department, ami each season has its own particular line. In the early spring there are auto ami carriage paints   then house-cleaning and brightening up 36
THE BRITI8H COLUMBIA RETAILER
Oet-M
requirements, floor varnish, varnish stains, wall finishes' etc. and then the spring house cleaning is on. Ytmt
eitv salesman should have already furnished vou with
a iist of new houses, and old ones that Will require
painting up. and these should be gone after by your
representative, or yourself personally, and a copy ot
the list mailed to 'the manufacturers whose lute you
carry, who will be only too glad to mail them color
cards'and other information—but it is up to you to
close thc deal, ln the summer, screen paints. Rummer
cottage, yacht, canoe and similar requirements, ami
then, thc fall house painting season is on again After
that, stove pipe enamels, and adding a few Inside
touches to make thc home ready for winter, Floor
paints, floor varnishes, varnish stains, auto, carriage.
and wagon paints, enamels, etc.. of course, are all year
sellers and can be featured at any time.
Add Name to List.
As soon as a new cellar is dug in your town you
should add thc builder's name to your mailing li*l and
never let him forget that you sell paint—the best paint
—till you have his order for what he will require. Keep
the good-will of the painters, remembering that they
should be far thc biggest individual customers, If you
arc not getting their-husiiiess it will pay you to Snd out
thc reason—some one is. It is a good idea, I believe,
to stock two grades of paint, one to sell on ""quality"
and thc other on "price.'' hut do not get the tWC mixed and try to convince yourself or your customer that
the low-priced paint is a "quality product," or that
your quality line can be sold at a price to compete with
low grade paints—it is'nt necessary.
You will find the argument "poor paint i» *hnr t{
anv price" a great sales talk in pushing your stands*]
line but H .v"sl tod your customer t* influenced by
nothing but price, you can turn to   the   other   wii
•Well, then- is nothing better than ihi* si the monej
and you have hint both ways
Ilon't neglect ihi windows  put in at ba-%1 four b\g
special lispbiys during the year    more if po-wihb   w
in their arrangement keep tn mind lhe fart lhat ladies
are large buyers, especially fof ihtrrmr BOSS    If t* well
to havi | special mailing for them only snd from ?!
to time send a personal letter, color cards ftl . OU l If
ttish stains. floor tarnish and **av and prmtde chairs
for their use wh»-n uniting your store    linuhe* should
always be kept in thi* RCCtion lOO, and not in SflOthcf
par? of thf store
This should i*- the best mason yel foi thi progirr*
sivc handler* oi paint* snd varnUh
pacific coast pHOTocsAPMins row* assoct
AT JO*
V" •:,.- •«-«•.*.-.* *■;••.■!.{•»; ,*^m«*m;.m- m '&*<  \.,n'.h»«-**-  i*:-*,-
tto&bnttt asssetsites-j Cossotalstfos *** ihs  Paeift*  Korts
vtat, «md the PhimgrasherS assodstios «*■ CaUf-aftiia ***
ratified   and  th** ortanlMtlon  &**•»  t««"li*4#*  f>?■#§»«.   Wit;-
Ingles   CaHfOff.t*.  ,S>*»4*    *n«f    HfftlwS    tV*f« flats!*.     **■*
on th'- (aterssitsssj Platogrssaars IssfKitsiIti
l* S  Itoitss. pmiA<o:7. &-t ih* VnMmntOi ofi*»fti**f-
{kres^ut*^ th*- aaUtortsailes af ht* grass Rn las (snassShtsti i
*u4 Bsrj Mais oi Has Ifirsacfsec N&ftaaJtj m*i**-4 ihs ssvt)
erettiHj PadSc misv-ffitilsaal rh«?**i?*i*h.<-*?*«   ,u-*»**t*i!os «»
hold th-rlr Itltl (in->rUfta $te Baa ftom^lmnm
Ctarsses Ht»ra* pi**ku*\* >7 • •-*-,*■ v**(»?)*s i*^'*** !■■*$> **■.<■•■*
aSOdS-UOS.     *f'-'tl    it    thoUltSOn    A.;:.-f;     Mr    tn»iMt,tO<'.U')?i
• iii. r-nr,**-.!;■*'»-..■-.•-   Af.,i  .vit,,fr4  th*   ptimripml   a .Jd **>■««   Oi
(Ia*.
SPECIAL FOR
FALL SELLING
JX response to numerous  requests uv  have  deckled to rencst our
tormer  combination   offer  of   One   No   108   Dmi»r   f,„    \
finish. One No. 108 kW Ivory or ^hit7En«7el Sff £3
dresser 18-in. x 34-in. top; 20-in. x 24-in. I'.ritish Plat.- Mirror
Two Kitchen Tables with drawer. Si
same table 24-in. x 36-in.
se of top 26 v 16 or two ot
Price for the four piece* ai above
$38.00
To secure prompt delivery,
place orders early
DOWLING MANUFACIUIUNG COMPANY
266 Second Avenue East
Phone: Fairmont 2723.
VANCOUVER, B. 0 THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
HARDWARE PRICES CURRENT
Tht fo.low.n, trt „r.ot. quoted for principol li„M of (tiding wboleoai. firm**.   Prion quot.d ar. necaenrlly
•ubjoet to mirkit fluctuation^
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if ll
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Sol  fetOM Vt% II off Ual. OfOM round bond
HI* off UM,
^**«KW»M\U».. M off Hal
n«*ni;\va SRT--4* off n*t
SHOVSXS   AND   SPADSM-Okto  or   Fo*.
|U ♦« pet doi  s loon m BofMof us ti tMi»r
OM
IRi»N. IfANlv--r-*r IM Tba- m-in Ml**;
■7-a  -n.    llV      i'i*,    III*?
raoK, black snrjrr~-M»f tSMbo.— t«
gtt*f*   M.M    N   gu*««*   1*1".   i**^51   guag**.
14 ||   M giMUW M M
IRON. UAl.VANtr.RD SlfKICT    I'tr IM tbt
}»   guagt    \«*.«"'!t-.aft   of   llngtiah   IT JS.   1-1
-f.V3.-fr   fT •»     :i  JO   c t-VK"   IT rtS.
lo^TKira- Mn«M No i sit ts Soa: No «.
lit SS Sot    Mo  », BUS Ms.; No   jo. litlo
Alt noon tn biacte flnlab
i*«-«i,t»*-:n mn **** tot*, tie jM»r tb:
Um Mo r*x to
st'!Krs rn wis ten r#r m m* --14 mm.
MM   HI   M.M; H to  !'****»
ntTAl*t,r.*i (UtranlMd fanco. IT.TI j-^r nvi
n*o   In Mil **t*s   ga)-rant**d ff.jitr-r natltng.
M M so* Mto Ibi in foS life-*
T*r>f|»   Tarr^i   TM <iff ntw litt
WIHR PARBID   l**r roll" I potnl. i*mHla.
H r*.«l    nt<*'    l*OOlnl   h-.».   •»"•  r««itt M M
wmn   rt.Ats*   oai.vani7.ri>* r»r   m
xx.   v,-, 1  MM   No  II  M «ft
Wtur*.   n *   A    I'i"  t'W Tt'*   No   U*>. II*":
Ne 11  1* 11  ton '.7 1* M
\vt>'N*oi7n** fir |.*i *>« dog; Safety..
f-*."  v   ,i,>i     llMirSr.   MB M <b»I i   Ajai.  1171 0«
On
WASMtNQ MACHTNM6 -Voln watac pow.
at Ml II noS BnMons BntrtOi l"* M pach;
Snowlotl   |?tj*5 tmcti   Pnlrlot.  I1S.M *ai-h
\ i»K< wiiMtKV sot.tt^ DOX-41 tba
HIM niS; M tba |8S»M **i*"h
OAINTS AND OILS
Scanli-am • Handaraan
Par
Hit   * rn«li*h*"  ordinary   .-«>t.><**
|l It   "RngtMh"   white
Hit  ftnartor Oil flhtng!t Stain  -
OoSlonff wrtorik tn ♦ t*^ ***n*
tlraon*  and  Oraii-a   In  I gal   c*»a
fi II  Anchor ShtngtK 8utn-
r>rd|nar*»*  colora.   tn   4  gal  cana
Orr«na and Oraya   In 4 gal   cana
PAINTS
OrStaary ontero  'n I *»i <"*f,«
Mnrttn nanuor powli polal
\l«r«n  Heitour   Neutone  wbtla
Mart in   iotdOUf   NlUSOOO <*okir
Martin  SoWHIf   t\*+or  t"«tnt
Ottt'-'i'
l«o
11 •■*
IM
t *»*>
III
Oallon
1130
ISO
I »'.
S7J
111
Sherwln   Wiltlamg.  white   „  4 11
8h«rwln WlllianM, tststor   410
Hherwtn   VVilllama.   potrh  4.10
Hherwtn WIUMma. floor ...  411
I'l'TTf- Pop 100 Iba.
Bulk,  barrala lOOIba   «  MM
Bulk. Iron* 100 Iba   „. ".   1.71
Hulk. Iron* M lb* _.....„   no
Tlna. 1 lb*; par Tb ,.. , ....    fu
Tin*,   lib „     .11%
lUw.  1  lo 2 barrfln  f US
Boiled.   1  lo 2 barrela .   1.31
T.KAI*.  WHITR IN Oll^~ P*r 100 lb*.
1,000 lb*,   to 1  t,m 114-10
Un Kio
Hrnndram'* 0*nuln«    „.      11.01
Tt-RPRNTINE- Oallo*
1   horrtl   lota  11.10
VARNISH KS— Gallon
Kla»!»«-. No   1 ....  , I ISO
ElaMti?.   No   2 ZL  V.„.   T.40
IV   Unoleum         „   110
IV   Marina   Spar    ,    .        . „.„.„   7.10
IV  Furniture  „T.„,   |,M
IV Pale  Hard Oil     4M
L«*« 11 1-1 per cant
Uequeree M 15 tea* 40
MORS   LIGHT   LIMITED.
Price* to dealer*
l-amp*   for   .^_«^-^_^ ,....„..     MOO
t«anterna   for   . ..   .  ,„..„   ||.T|
Junior mantlea per do      .71
COLEMAN   QUICK.LITE.
Umpii.   p«rh *.♦&
LtUltnOO.   e««--h 7.10
MoatkWi   down M
Automotive Price List
A!«S<>!IH*KH8 SHOCK—Pint  A  Ford No
I at 111 lo.
ACCBLBRATORS FOOT-Wtrelm Ford
at It II each.
AiuoiRTMBNTS—Coltor pin lie nch; Cap
*fw SSv eaoh. Set acrew* 10c each; Ma*
rhlne wrew Ttc each; Machine nut 71c neb.
liATTBKIBS-llot Shot 11 H each; Dry 4i
iu Sic each.
BOOTS—Ttfl «4-ln. |1 IS each.
BUMPKRa—Hoonr Twinbar.  |t0«0 each.
CAPS—Radiator. |1.0*> each.
CARBORUNCLUM—Vahn grinding l-oa. M
do*
CARRJBS—LuffOfa, rotlapalblc 1285 each.
CRMKNT- Radiator. \% R» Wonder Worker ffc40 dn*
i'HAINS Weed 10*14 MSI each. MsSH
M.M nob; 11*4 17 70 each. 13x4 II10 nch;
Hxl M W each     l*** 10*%.
R1I»  0  SKID-MxIH   M7S  pair;    11x14
II M b*lr; !4xS4 II lo pair; 10x4 Mil polr*
13*4 II SO pair   !-**» i$%,
CL.HANKRR WlN't>SIIIRI.t>—Prnto St 75
OOChl  U«tn-K-Ihiy. 11 50 each.
nott,it--Spark alngle ISIS «ach: Sn«*S
double 111 t>0 each
DRFLBCTOIW—Wind adJuMaN* 111 10
r>air
BMAMBtr-H pt, Jet lac II 00 do* ; S-o*
Wonder Worker M »0 do* : M»rtln Senour
Quick Prying. 1 14 lie each: I'll lie aaeh;
1 tl 31c each; 14 i*v each; 14 Mc each; H
It 71 each
HORNS   Btectrle II71 each
JACKS-No tm no© each; No 4 IIM
each; N"   41 II M each
LOCKS, MOTOMRTFR-No 110 II IS
each    No   191 13 00 each; No   IM |7 10 nch
MIRRORS—Raar view M.M each.
i>lI^-Monamoblle. llgbt HSS gal.; medium
H M «*»! : heavy It 70 gat
PATCTfBS BLOW OUT—I^cktlie. No. I
*%" each: No 1 10c each; No. I 75c each;
No   4  !7c each
ri.ATPS—Step 1100 each
PLUGS- Spark Champion Sic nch; A. C
Tttan Ml ench   Hel-FI. Hv nch
POLISH, MKTAIr- Klondyke. 4 Pt. IMS
,!„•     u m   M 10 .to*    int. 14 10 -A**
PUMPS—Tin An H76. nob; Crown it M
each
IM'I K   Robe No 117 »0c nch
Fabr'c tire*, univeraal non-*kld tread: Mi
ju   «»*no
TIIU9S—Oord 10x14 B1M neb! fabric
30*31, 110 M i-iii-h; Cord 32H4 119 »5 each;
Fabric 32*4 !»«!•<> each.
Tt'HKS --Orey: 10xl,-s    H-W    0M0'*    l}r*y
Mxl 17-45 nch. 38
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Oil
Bakery, Confectionery and Ottering
•f*
i
i    i
i ■
Shortenings Used by the Baker
A Practically Written and  Instructive  Article on Ingredient*
By .Initio .1  Roche, It Sc.
The term "shortening" when used in bread-msking
refers to fats and oils in various forms. These may Illiquid, semi-solid or dry. Vegetable and animal OUS
and fats are compounds ol carbon, hydrogen snd
oxygen, whieh are found naturally in all plants and
animals. The word oils is generslly applied to the
varieties liquid at ordinary temperatures, and fats to
those solid at ordinary temperatures. Oils ami fats
are chemical combinations of glycerine as a base with
the so-called fatty acids. The thro* most common fatty
acids are olerie, palmitic and stearic acid Two or
more of these fatty acids an* generally present in all
fats—mixed, not chemically combined. They differ in
their physical nature. Olein is liquid at ordinary temperatures and whenever this acid predominates the fat
appears in the liquid form as in olive oil. Palmitin is
semi-solid; it predominates in butter and lard and is
the largest part of the human fat. Whenever stearin is
present in a relatively large amount, thc fat is a solid
as in suet and tallow. Besides these three predominating fatty acids, several other acids are usually present in small amounts, and of course the characteristics
of the shortening material will depend to some extent
on these acids. For example, the common fat butter
contains a small amount of butyric acid, and when but-
ter becomes rancid this acid is set free; it is this scid
that produces the well-known disagreeable odor and
taste. Likewise, other acids are set free in other fats
and oils when they are decomposed.
All oils are lighter than water. When pure, they
are colorless, but most commercial oils an- yellow, or
even of darker color, due to impurities. Oils and fats
are insoluble in water, but are readily soluble in either
benzene or arnyl alcohol. If kept from the action of
air. light and moisture, oils and fats will remain un-
affected for great lengths of time, but on exposure are
liable to absorb oxygen from the air and become
rancid. When an oil or fat is onee ram-id, no treatment will restore the oil or fat to its original soundness,
and when used in bread the disagreeable odor will remain even after baking. Oils and fats should, therefore, be stored in closed containers at a low temper-
ature, in order to avoid rancidity.
Lard—Pure lard is made from the fat of ihe hog
and is a white fat of somewhat pleasant taste char'
acteristic odor, and of soft consistency. The fat of
some portions of the hog is much harder than others
consequently the fat of the abdomen, if melted down
separately, gives a much harder lard than do other
parts, or than would be yielded by the fat of the whole
animal. The harder lards are found to contain B
larger proportion of stearin than do those of M,f,<T
nature Urds srs si tee pfesent tfnii sitsost pow
fats; thi % no-it into » liquid whieh Is »*-tfh#-r pvrfi -v
clear, or only ulightly lurfoki dtt^ to ih»* pirnrtti"! •»( i
minute qosntlty ot onsepsrstsd tissue
Th*- following grsdes   srt   generally   ?**-*•--* *■
on   the   AmeHean   Continent     (!)   JaWtrsl   isr
from    the    h'-tii    oi    I for    i*t#     rrfjitrml    betSH"*
40   (li-ffrv-ri   and   tot   t\vsptttSS   *       tottfahn    s-s|-   I
02*1 \*r ein? itA*    i&*.t\    i«rt«l».    SonseUttir*   *IIvrI
into one and two grad*-*   Centra! lard Ho  l ** pi
pared from ihe b'ni   Centra! Ji-fii Ho 1 Is ptvpsr
irOIS lm hstw  fat        Th*'  leaf }•* th*-   jwr'SMh  a.f>t*■"•••■■■.'
ing tlo- kidney* slid bi**»**|* j
(2) ijcsI bird rmdrf*****! from the r-rt-kltir left fl
the neutral Isrd bj *■■• in stmt nnd pre-wuir-
■.{   rV.-.«-s  k*-'-1!.   •*« ntirr«'*t 1*1*1 r-en*i»* *■•■■■ d in **t«-a
pocketed op**n kettles trots portions oi lea! ind ' i *•
imt us* d for neutral tafd
\    V
lm
A* ,ih.     h,\o..[    r, ?i,«|e rn|    Iv*    aft-^u-t    from
" ■'   b*?ad, heart snd ntsafl intestines    t? maj -
eontahi fai from other psrti
Urd Defined   Lsrd b the readetfd tmk fat I
bogs in good health st thc [imt of slsughter; b ri
trei  from rancidity and contains, nevt^wrllj  ln<
porated in Um process ol rendering, f**»! Mow Ikai ■
per eent of substances other than fatty And* and fat
kesf Lard \m fard rendered at moderately high lei
Ihrattms fr.»m the internal f*t ,»f aMiwmmoi the h«>s
excluding thai sdberent to the ,n«e,!»»r-. «n*i )-.**
iodine number not grenter than ii«»
Neutral lard in Urd rendered at ion temperatui
MamLrd primt   Mean hrd nhatl b« stibU  th.   pi
''»■i ,,{thi trimmings and the fft? jiAft of the beg i
ocred in tanks by th. direct sppilcatlon oi items
wtiftoul nuhseqnent change in the um\n or ekaraeti
2 «e use of igilsion or other machinery steep!
wen change msy unavoidably some from the Irsi
iM'rf»"-"   it inuat hav. pn^i 80^1 flavor irym
I"    m™*** tee keeping, and Ofl material whieh h»<
>**« »*ited must be Included
Urd compound b mad. by Ihirkenlng cottons*
w wtisioleo stesrine, or with other itoarine h mad
•»    pr.HMu,  ,     f Mw      VeWe.«lde H.,«»in.,.  or  h)
7   V'/' • f,,i,*v Uv WH,,,li'» pltcs of ol*o stesHne
u« substitntes   Mixtures o! lard or lard stearin,
^jwjw' »«tton stearins, sottoMesd rtstrtns, eoi
"•llSeeil  ui     ciii-ii    • i
••   "o, peanut, sesame, cocoanul snd pslm
t
nut oils
linttt-
n
' J Hi. dean, non-rsndd product mads b
5,^J»»fy wanner the fat of fresh or ripene
omm mto a mans wide}, n\so contains i wtsl \m
THE BR1TI8H COLUMBIA RETAILER
49
jHirtioii of the other milk constituents with or without
nalt
Benovsted butter Proeess butter b the product
made bv melting butter ami reworking without the
addition or uss of chemicals or any substsnees except
milk, cream or salt, and contains not more than sixteen p**r cent iliitiv water nnd st leant eighty4wo
nih\ flvedenths per eon!   ***-"»'. | milk fit?
Butter substitute Ol«*«»margitn- The oti'omargar*
no of i-ommeree hi composed "f refitted oleo oil usually
churned with neutral lard, milk and a small amount of
nQfl butter, tin* whole Iwdug salted and sometime* col-
rul to rvMinlde butter   Cottonseed oil and other vik'
. table oils are a!-*1 aaed lo some extent   Oleo oil is pre
pared from the fat of cattle
(Vitioiwnl o»{ It*-fined eotio-aseed oil is « pale
villow or yellowtsh-brown oil of thi«*lc consistency,
possessing s bland though pleasant ta-§ie ami miur It
ranaiats ol the ityeerldes of oleic, stesHd palmitic, and
tinoleie seitds     The-   method   of   manufsetare it* a*
follOWS '.•™*
The seeds ol the cotton plant (Clossyplam barbae*
• <tm! nn* crashed iu a mill, and ihe im-al in heated in
iron kettles as 75 degsrees lo IK) degrees V snd pressed
in elotns under ;u«»m .«*•**» Iba per asnare inch The
press calts b sold »*» aatt$r food The oil, after settling,
i% refined by being healed with a solution of caustic
vrtb   fo  -w jwfftte   the   fos»f*      The  nr-dinsHtt   of   "foots
mtshtinji lye, coloring mattei and albomlnoiis bodies,
settle to the bottom Th.- foota" are w**^ far soap
I"'.. eottonseed oil ** clarified by filtration Oo stand
log or by chilling bekr*  12 decrees ft lb* palmitin
Stearin    in pari rrysUSH***** aw! are removed t»y
pressing    ThU   solid   fa?   b known ss "cottoimeod
Lake of the Woods
Milling: Company
LIMITED
M«k«i of
FIVE ROSES
• FLOUR •
The World's Best
Daily Oapadty 14.200 Bbla
BO. Of floss and Warehouses.
1800 liohards Straai 1614 Store Itrasi
VANCOUVER VICTORIA
_^1-^mmmmmmmmltm^uamm
stearno" and is used in making oleomargarine. The
chief grades are crude, refined, prime summer yellow,
and Ideaehable.
Coeo-nut cul. Coco-nut palm oil, Cocoanut oil—
i* a white, semisolid, larddikc fat. which possesses a
mild taste snd pleasant odor. The oil easily becomes
rancid hut is seldom adulterated, The oil contains besides palmitin and olein, large portions of myristin ami
Inn rim It is manufactured from the coco-nut (cocos
nucifcra) the chief commercial supply coming from
India. Ceylon, and the South Sen Islands. The fresh
meat of the nut is pressed* ladled in water or heated
with solvents and lhe oil extracted. The method of
purification employed is filtration. Thc chief grades
arc erode, refined, eeylon. cochin and manila.
Peanut Oil. Araehis Oil, Karthnut Oil. ({round-Nut
oil is a bland pale yellow, liquid oil which possesses
a distinctive nutty odor and taste; the chief constituent
is the gyceride of arachic acid. It is manufactured by
pressing peanuts (Araehis hypognea). The pressing
is carried out in stages, the temperature being increased at each stage. The initial cold press produces the
Ins? edlbile oil. the second press gives eilibilc oil of
poorer quality, the final press at high temperature
yields oBa for soap. etc..
Corn oil i Maize oil]-Corn oil is a pale yellow
liquid, whieh possesses a pleasant odor and taste, re-
sembling in flavor fresh ground grain. Nearly all
the oil is contained in the germ of the seed, the oil constituting lu i",,J oW 2i» per cent of the germ. In man-
ofacturing, tin germ of common corn (Indian corn,
Zea mays) is removed from the grain and pressed; the
method of purification employed is filtration. Corn oil
consults chiefly of the glycerides of palmitic and oleic
A Panomalt Loaf
Sells Faster
The quality of your loaf is the big factor affecting the quantity of your sales.
It is hen* thai Panomalt proves of most value.
Because it improves every feature of your
bread it also improves your sales, and adds to
your profits
Bread math with Panomalt is more nutritous.
It has a better llavor. a finer texture and a more
uniform appearance.
Order Panomalt from your Fleischmann man
and give these qualities to your loaf.
Canadian Diamalt Co. Ltd.
PANOMALT
The Fleischmann Company
DISTRIBUTORS.
jVWgjKjjJJgjgffi
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^m 40
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA KKT.UI.KI-*
Oct,i.
acids. The chief grades are crude ami refined OotH
oil is an excellent shortening material in which to fry
doughnuts. It has the advantage that is may in* used
many times without developing an undue burnt taste,
and it is not absorbed to any great extent by the cooked doughnut.
Olive Oil is obtained from the fruits of thc olive
tree, (olea europaea U). The chief constituents Sit
olein and palmitin. The oil is obtained hy pressing the
pulp of the fruit of the olive tree. The best comes from
fruit not quite ripe. The crude oil is washed and filtered; the cake is subjected to further pressings and tin-
ally solvent extraction, a lower grade of oil being produced each time. According to the chemists of the
New York Produce Exchange, commercial olive oil
should not contain over 2 per cent moisture or sedi-
ment. and not over 7 per cent fatty acids   oil sold as
TICKETS AND   LABELS
MADE BV SPECIALISTS.
A specialist. In any calling. Is on* Mutpped to pr«~
Sue* results promptly, satisfactorily ana economical!*.
This is where our plant differs from th* average printing office. We carry in stock many tons of colored card
boards for Immediste use. At one operation, with our
modern specialty machinery, wo print ti ket* in two to four
colors on front of ticket and on the back: number each
ticket the same or consecutively and perforate sheet
both ways; or we can print your tickets end re«w*n<l
into rolls to suit, each ttcket numbered con»eeut!ve!y
and correctly. We make bread labels In two eo'ars for
the price of printing on« color, in quantm**. and pat
up Into rolls of 5.not) We make th* ticket* for the
B.C.E. Ry. by the millions; for the North Vane«u*tf
Ferries; for the Government, and sll kinds of theatre
tickets.   May we not be of service to you.
NICHOLSON, LTD.
Phone: Bayvlew 371
SSI tnd AVENUE WEST VANCOUVER.  •   C.
\i-How mill! bi strict!) yellow, ami not reddish in i
oil suld as ereeu HMMfl be n true green lu eokoi
i,itjst not turn brown when I rested With S SOtlegtVi H
solution of sodium hydroxide, * es of the to] *,
being sdded t« I'* yam* of nil
Artificial   IVi's   S?al»l»-   fstS   Sfl   -saturated
while nook? ol 'V ph/t ip unstable oils in ttosti .
IkmIicx   ftrsrsirh rhetnists hsn dsseovered thai aluoi
al! liquid oils < -.■   11 • hsi (fed tO hard *!ald«- fits bl "
setion of hydrojp tt on the ou m tb*- presenet of i hi
slenec railed i catalyst, a** niekei The oil h d«»*- . •
in the proeess I" is di-flletju! nr m-.|**i***»iM«* ?•> u-lt rl
the original oil srss iflef bsrde*nift$   Setae of {he ski
popular fats used by the base! ar*- RUrai ttstm m*\\n
seed «»i! .;uui h*idrt.*»tt*»'0 hj this proce-as
The ESffeet of Bhorti nlnjj ■■ Th*- main ft-sfposi
ti-**i"iif 7..o''o-\oo  .,-.  K.'-.-.t»|  no»kinisf  t**  tu impfott   *
textur»- and keeping qualitj** of the \*»&t    Shwririit»
arrtiinplUl i - t.Vs.  r****u!t* by !tm! af-tintf a,* an Ultt "■
Inbriesnl foi *v> doofii ireomll) bj fortaltig i ||
ui shortfnins srowod -arh lit11« «**rtt toi sflutriv sthi
prevents "'■• evaporation of Ids mist mbsJ keeps *
lost fresh snd ibifdi)  -*h"rt»nma gsttses a aseehai
dtspennon of the (tinten is tin  ilotijth   iiroiliseii ,,
tendernrSN ind **•''• to* *,». h% thc l*»af    IMboeffttlsi^s *'•
pan tht ifin'rn. tfeeref&ft  wriil
ltr«- •**•..-', ftiosX '*Hot|l*J \w n<t,v7.
* ..o.;t,\ hy i i Itina doe i l
ins s* v ' ■  lhe  itti&trr sit' * *■-
h ea iirawpd to mt\ itxt 8 mo
■)),,■'   |m  fn :jii,{  if| *irtelojiir*%*   ll
--  rU%ti-."it>-   thus tftfiiue -d
(N; **  a   *.*! i^s I*-'a.   * oo ■
SOS?  ir: ;«.'-.»'iy  *m ;
Th»   Imt*  pr*ulli
shorteiun-jf Slid sn
other inamiients d
lime   Ths prii irj
Sfluti-n   \>y   o.   ;   o
I I L* h    ttO ■'* ' i    ' '      •
X
Lower Night Rates
For Long-Distance
Conversations
NEWnight rates for long-durtanee ,,-,-v ila„. been LwUtuted
fortong-distoe calls between the n „f m p.m. tnd
I a.m., on thr basis <d annrottimfltAtv »«,.        i
■^^etaues.thedayperioiCatl U.W, thTda^. X
VANCOUVER to VICTORIA «Stt! JJ!*VR*1*
VANCOUVER to NANAIMO Sfcllt S f   "!"
VANCOUVER to COURTENAY 80   ! S °r3mln
VANCOUVER to CHILLI SSffi JK*
^%Wffi Uv""-
«»« (lers on request
"Try This Service Tonight."
BRITISH COLUMBIA TELEPHONE
COMPANY !I
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
41
• t
Buy in British Columbia
m\j. tttWtX j mm MOnQC
ORANQE
CRAPE
FRUIT
PINE
APPLE
X WHISTLE
Wrapped  in   BotUee
CROSS 4 CO. Vancouver.
PALM OLIVE
SOAP
r  s  nartniv.   HsfrsssnUUvs.
fmo PiSHSl  1'Sf, Vancouver.
CANADA STARCH
CO. LTD.
E. H. ROW-NT REE   Representative
W  Hastings  West.  Vancouver.
Milne
td Middelton
Limited.
Wholesale
Millintry.   Notione   and
Smaiiwares.
J47   Water
Street          Vancouver.
QUAKER JAM8
Mad<« of fri-ah fruit and aunar; tho
tmrrst of infrsdlwta Will satisfy
tin* moat -a-tartlng.
DOMINION CANNERS. B. C
Limited
VANCOUVER.  B. C.
MONARCH   KmTTINO   00.
Limited.
M"i\o and womens hosier) knitted
out«*rw**ar and hand knitting yarn*.
RspeSSSatSd In British Columbia
S.  0.  STEWART.
318 Homer St. Vancouver. B. .C
L Ckryital & Co. Ltd.
Saeh.   Doors.   Store   Futures   and
Alterations
IOS Georgia Street E.    Vancouver.
.* ,-*.,
NABOB
PAPER BA08
l*op*t ba*#. wraj»i>tns l»atM?r.
for all r*<«qulr»ra<mt«.
COLUMBIA PAPER CO. LTD.
10SS Hamilton St. Vancouver. B.C.
Kellogg's Corn Flakes
Local Agents
L P MASON A CO.
SIO  Hastings  West.
Sey. 2*08
Phone
(TEQlTRflE)
V-l Vis* toper Specialist -w/
toso Hamilton ameer
•MMCOUVIM   •  C.
FOR GOOD
QUALITY ANO PRICES
ON
COUNTER   SALES   BOOKS
AND
WAXED PAPERS
WRITE
JEWELERY
Complete     stock     of     diamonds,
Watches.   Silverware,   etc.
WESTERN    WHOLESALE
JEWELERS    LTD.
Cor Cambie and Cordova Streets.
VANCOUVER. B. C.
CANADIAN
TOLEDO SCALES
E. S. CHAMBERS, Agency Manager
424 Cordova St. W. Phone. Sey. 3911
Vancouver.
(audyi Postal Cereal Gi.. IMM
Head Office
Local Agenta:—
McNEELYS LTD.
739 Hastings St. W.
Toronto
Phono:
Soy. 9337
Phone:   High.
IDEAL CONE COMPANY
Manufacturers of
ICE   CREAM  CONES
Purest Made     Cost Leas
335 PRINCESS AVE.
Vancouver.
We have been appointed Selling
Agents for the "BEAVERPUF," a
leather compact In  many colore.
The   fasteat  selling   Powder  Puff   on
the Britlah Market.
Wholesale only.
Sey. 131
Associated Agencies
LTO.
615 Pender St. W.
Vancouver.
BORDEN'S
EVAPORATED
MILK
Vancouver Office
332 Water Street
STORE  EQUIPMENT
Scales. Slicers, Cutters and Cabin-
ots—New, Rebuilt and Second Hand.
Cash or Terms.
THE  SCALE   SHOP  LTD.
Sey. 2881
365 Cordova St. W., facing Homer. 4*2
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER <
::   Buy in British Columbia   ::
PAPER BAGS
J. C. WILSON   LTD.
1068 Homer Street,       Vancouver.
ROYAL CROWN
SOAPS
Manutactured in British Columbia
and guaranteed.
ROYAL CROWN  SOAPS LTD.
PAINTS
MARTIN-SENOUR
CO.   LTD.
1505 Powell Street,
Vancouver
M CIRCLE-WR
KNITTING CO. LTD.
J. J. MACKAY,
Agent.
804 Bower Bldg.
Vancouver.
M«i-ro*t*
HOSIERY
YEAST
THE FLEISCHMANN CO.
W. S. DUNN, Manager.
1166 Burrard Street     Vancouver.
J. A TEPOORTEN
LIMITED
WHOLESALE    DRUGS
308 WATER    STREET
VANCOUVER, B. C.
McCORMICKS
JERSEY CREAM
SODAS
McCormick Mfg. Co. Ltd.
1150  Hamilton   Street,  Vancouver.
C. H. KENNEY, Manager.
8ERVICE   TO   OUT   OF   TOWN
8UB8CRIBER8.
The British Columbia Retailer will
bo pleased to furnish subscribers
the names and addresses of representatives or agents of eastern
manufacturers in Vancouver. We
will also advise where their commodities ean be purchased.
Carnation Milk
B C. Representative:
OPPENHEIMER    BROS.
IM Abbott St, Vancouver.
Hams & Bacon
Swift's "Premium"
SWIFT CANADIAN CO. LTD.
Vancouver.
PAPER
BAGS     ANO     WRAPPING
Norfolk Psssr Co. Iti
tits WATER STREET
Vancouver,
Water Repcllsnt Clothing
fcUVOf
i BEAR
+ **
R. A. SIME, BC Distributer
506 MertanM** Bi-tf-g.. Vancouver. O   C
tattHatti *jaam a jjedsjf
GALVANIZED IM
THE THOS. DAVIDSON MFG  CO
LTD.
123 Powell Streel VihfR
'v Vancouver.
REGlSTE»**rsV      \
CH,PMAN.„oLTOEN"-«0-1T^
CO. l.TD.
JWHWISF Street,        Vancouver.
FURNITURE
fir fumitttrs ol QuUily
DOWUNO   MAHWrAOTUl
WO COMPANY
J6$   Jnd kte JL   Vsaoos-rtr
UNDERWEAR
ATLANTIC    UNOIRWtAR    LTD
I    m    *t **  A  Co   Ltd.   AfeiHs
I'i  Htxmot  Streat
VBSMNNNSfi
C. H. Jones & Son
Ltmx%n4,
ManNffactwrtra
PIONEER    BRAND
TENTS,   AWNINGS.   FLAGS   AND
CANVAS GOODS OF ALL HINDS
'at-fb-ere  al
SjtSl  Medat  Camp  Fvr*ttwre
Cottm dw-tk. au *Mttfce e-*d **e«gMa
28   WATER     STREET.
Vancouver. B   C.
T, D. STARK TeiepH0««
fc W. STERLING Sey. till
8TA1K A 8TERUKO
MANUFACTURERS'   AGENTS
104)  Hamilton  Street.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
nutro INStntAHCE
ALFEBD W MeLIOD, LTD
Vaneouvtr snd
Now Wsstminstsr ^Ti
lhe ST. LAWRENCE LINE
PAPER BAGS
Made in Canada—from Canadian Papers
MIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIItlllllllllllMllllMlllMMiiiMiMiiiiii,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,„„„„„„„„
"SIMPLEX"    -   Ligkt Manilla
"MAPLE LEAF"   Light Kraft
"LION"    -   -   H,
Kraft
cavy
titHtituttttttttttttttttttttHtttttttttttitttttttimttttHttittttittittttmttitttttHtmttititttiiittmttt
A Bag suitable for every kind of Merchandise
Made hy St. Lawrence Paper Bag Co.
SELLING AGENTS FOR B. C.
COLUMBIA PAPER CO. LIMITED
CARRY LARGE STOCKS IN VANCOUVER AND VICTORIA
Swift's 'PREMIUM' Hams ft Bacon-Quality Unequalled
ALWAYS UNIFORM
To uphold your reputation as a
"Quality" dealer and assure your
customers of absolute satisfaction,
you must naturally handle "Quality"
products. Therefore, when buying
your supply of smoked meats, stock
SWIFT'S "PREMIUM."
ta
Swift Canadian Company, Limited A Line of
High-Grade Silken Hosiery
That Sells Rapidly
TT is a line of exceptionally lustrous ami durable staking*.
* It is knit from special two-ply silk lisle yarn it retains
its lustre and will not harden when washed   It haa high
spliced heel, double sole and is heavily re4nforccd tl thc
heel and toe.   Made in black, white and popular Coloff.
Make ("Silkoline" one of your staple  lmc%.   Stock  it.
Your jobber can make immediate shipment.   Order now.
IlIlJOlIS

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