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The British Columbia Retailer Jun 30, 1926

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 a
The
British Columbia
Vancouver, B.C.
VOL. XVIII, No 10
ll imc   1 Q9£ 10c per copy; $1.00 per year.
June, l^o Eighteenth Year.
STRAWBERRY PACK
NOW
READY
First Quality British Columbia
Strawberries and British Col
umbia Pure Cane 8ugnr
Quaker
*J*mW
Packed in Vancouver under Hygienic
Conditions.
tl^AWBERRY J^
QUAKER
QUAKER
QUALITY
NEVER
VARIES
BRAND
Be the first grocer in your neighborhood to supply
your customers with these fine flavored berries.
They will appreciate your enterprise.
WIDELY
ADVERTISED
THROUGHOUT
THE WEST
*
Dominion Canners B.C. Limited
VANOOUVER WE MANUFACTURE AND SELL THE FOLLOWING
PAPER  BAGS
"STANDARD"   "MANILLA"
"BUCKSKIN"     "LIGHT KRAFT"
"HEAVY KRAFT"
THEY ARE
Actually Stronger, Tough or
More Pliable, Most Economical
Most Satisfactory
Be Sure to Use the Beet -They Cost No More
Paper Mills:
Lachute a St. Jtromt,
Out.
Manufacturers since 1870
J. .C WILSON, LIMITED
Manufacturers of
PAPER BAGS.     WRAPPING, TISSUE AND TOILET PAPERS
for   Wholesalers and ReUilen.
1068 HOMER STREET, VANCOUVER, B. C
Phone: Seymonr 781
The same price
at every store in
our British
Columbia
Territory.
5
BIG BARS
FOR
25c
PROTECT YOUR PROFITS BY
SELLING A MAINTAINED PRICE
LAUNDRY SOAP
THE ROYAL CROWN SOAPS, LTD.
VANCOUVER, B. C. Il'ilj
TIIK BRITISH COLUMBIA RKTAJLKU
si
■ 11
SaTJ^i
#••
i
OU*
wW*^
t»l*'
■**•
dieaflasi
It wont stay long on the Grocer's shel, because its
not only the recognized Salad Oil for making delicious
Mayonnaise, but it is also one of the best oils for
iking—an*/ now is lhe Salad Season.
cool
Qhe SALAD md COOKING Oil
THE   CANADA  STARCH CO. LIMITED-MONTREAL 4
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
nun
COFFEE
Saves you time when customers ask for Fresh Rotated
Coffee." ThiVe exactly what Nabob is. The vacuum tin
keeps the flavor in—you sell it "fresh from the roaster.
Kelly Douglas & Co. Ltd.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
i^*^*mi^tpvs
NABOB
up
Hl'A\[j
I
WILSON BROTHERS
Established 1890
Our Motto if "SERVICE"
We cannot offer to sell you goods cheaper than any other firm is in a position to do. but we CAN
five actual facta to prove that It la
ECONOMY
to dial with ua
SUhjEX WILSON BROTHERS, VICTORIA. B. C.
Wholesale Grocers
uuaaaa^uaauatsuatsaaauuaaaautusaaatamaaaasasauuuuuuuuuuuuuuuwuuu^
%
SHAMROCK RRAND
^^ M    M Wmmmmmmmmtm
HAM, BACON, BUTTER, LARD, SAUSAGE, etc.
First Quality packing house products put up by P. Burns k Co.,
Limited, which means they are the highest grade, always reliable,
and without equal on this market.
YOU CAN RECOMMEND SHAMROCK BRAND
P. Burns & Company, Limited
VANCOUVER
OALOARY
EDMONTON mm
102«>
THR BRITISH COLUMBIA RKTAILER
•i^MiniwimiHnveTCiBiai
ROGERS'
GOLDEN SYRUP
The End of a Perfect Day"
IMM. from finest flavoured cane sugar, a special grade of whieh is imported
for tbe purpose.
IPut up in all rises of packages to suit your customers' requirements.
fin packages designed to beautify your store.
f.lb. Una, 24 to a caae.
Mb tlna, 12 to a one
101b. Una, 6 to a eaaa.
201b. tine, S to a caat.
Perfect Seal Jars, 12 to a caat.
The British Columbia Sugar Refining Co. Ltd.
VANCOUVER, BC. THF, BRITISH COLUMBIA RKTAILER
ItUlfj
•'-Vv,
■v-s==
famous
SARDINE
MEALS
Here it is Again
The only book of its
kind ever published
m
Forty * ght selected sardine mead Bi
prepared In th. leading kitchens of
America anS printed in an attractive iii
teen page Sank. These tatty yet prat
t cat recipes fwrnish tempting awggci
tion. far ecenamical meals.
A new supply af these Saako <• now
ready far dletribwtien. Ali requisition*
will be ailed in the erder received. Writ*
ai anee ta the addreea beiew, Hating how
matif families yew serve. One beek for
each family will be mailed te yew abac
wtely free.
*■*-
Z<Y/,7Z .
am**Jj****mm*  •*•
f^oix-*:
mk.
I USX* *£**
\*~wz£mj?
\gRo*S? ,
! "ZcA ■
r*~ *** . .
tmm **,
connori moa.. limited
Ulach's Narbawr, N. B.
Largest Sard ne Packers in the Brit-i'-.
tmpire.
PAPER
BAGS
Light Kraft
Now that the highest grades of Paper Bags are being
made in B. C. be careful to always specify
"WESTERN" Manilla Quality,
"PACIFIC'-UkM Kraft Quality,
"OOaMT"—Henvy Kraft Quality.
"HITONE"-\Vl.iti. Sulphite Quality,
Manufactured in Britiah Columbia by
Bartram Paper Products Coltd.
VANCOUVER, B. 0.
Heavy Kraft
V
Sola Agenta for Britiah Columbia:
The Norfolk Paper Co., Ltd.
138 WATER STREET VANCOUVER, B. 0.
Light Mamia Phone Seymour 7888 and 7880
UraoO atrlpt
wnite aulphitt I92G
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
1
tmfeu BRITISH COLUMBIA ~
* RtTAIlXR t*W
With whlrh la incorporated tha B   C. TRADR RRVIBW.
n
Publiihed Monthly.
KKJIITKKNTH YEAH
gfNBIUL MMCHANDI1E
OROCIRIM. DUTOOODi.
HARDWARE POOTWaUR.
OmClAL ORGAN Or B.C. BOARD
RETAIL MERCHANTS'
ASSOCIATION OF CANADA.
A MONTHLY JOURNAL published in the interest of Retail Merchandising and the Development of Commerce in Western Canada.
SUBSCRIPTION RATE: Oa. Dollar Pit Year, payable In advance.
Aieerttetag Ratee oa Application
Publishers: PROOREtl PUBLIIHINO CO. LTO.
•wits 1014 Merchants' Exchange Building
VANCOUVER. B. C.
T»!-*phooe Sey. ilCl Cable Address--Shlpping-All Codes
Editor. J 8. Morrison W. N. Cod*. Dullness Manager
Entered at Ottawa aa Second class matter
Tht following rapreaent W. M. A. branchaa
in tha Provinee ef Britiah Columbia:*-
Armstrong H. S. Armstrong,
Sec.-Treas.
Cranbrook C. J. Lewis, See.
Fernle  Norman Suddaby,
Pres.
Kamloops A. C. Taylor, Pres.
Kelowna Andrew Fraser, Sec.
Lytton B. Rebagliatl, Sec.
Nanaimo N. Wright, Sec.
Nelson „E. F. Gigot ,Sec.
New Westminster	
and Fraser V alloy...D. Stuart, Sec.
Revelstoke W. A. Sturdy, Sec.
Vancouver W. F. Ing, Sec.
Vol  XVIII, No  HI
VANCOUVER. B.C., JUNK, 1926
Vancouver, B.C.
The Adoption of Price Maintenance in
Canada Depends Upon the Retail Merchants
As pointed out repeatedly hy sponsors of the Main
Uined Priee FoRey, Um retail merchant haa it in his
power to make thia iatue out fraud luccees. 8hould he
show a lack of intereet, and fail to impreaa upon tho
manufacturer his wfaolthaartad deaire that auch a pol
icy become upnivereally adopted in Canada NOW, the
opportunity may ntvtr occur again, and the evili of
price cutting will continue to haraaa hia endeavors to
obtain a fair profit from hia huaineaa.
The following article from the pen of T. Johnston
Stewart, -Mercury of thc Waehington Retail Orocers
and Merehanta Association, Inc. and editor of the
Northwtattrn Merchant" deala with the lethargy on
the part of the independent retail merchant towards
the Price Maintenance movement in a masterly fashion,
and will prove of intereet to thoae of our readers who
have decided that auch a policy ia the only moans or
obtaining fair play in present day business—Editor
'We're Juat as anxious io m a real Maintained iMeo
applied by nil manufacturera aa any retail merchant
wi bo, but we restate, whal wo have said again ami
"gain, that's atrictly up to the retail trade. A lukft-
u"'i" attitude on thr part oi too many of our mem-
tars toward those manufacturera and wholcaalora, wno
taHeve in the Maintained Prleo Policy will Inevitably
I '"*«ii Ita withdrawn!. ...      _
Thorn nre two auocosaful methoda of marketing a
Quality lam- of Food Product! In a large way. mo
flN method involvci heavy oonaumor udvortMiiiBj-
II •" nation at a well nigh Irroalatlblo demand for wo
good* ,„„| „ vary limited margin to the dealer ioi
handing them across the counter.   The second way in
volvea a fair working margin for thc dealer, ns a primary proposition, and a modest amount of money invested in consumer advertising, or consumer demand.
Now hen's thc point    Thc manufacturer marketing his goods the first way is not disposed to worry
ov,*r your problems*   Why should hcT   He has sold
tho goods -paid a high price for selling them—and
you're going to stoek them and hand them over even
suppose you deliberately try to conceal thorn from your
customers,   On the other hand, thc manufacturer who
places a high estimate on your selling ability is not liable to invest any excessive sum in general advertising.
Ami he capitalizes the faith that's in him by allowing
yon a spread that will do a little more than blanket
yonr average eost of doing husiness.   As a matter of
fact he maintains the resale price at a figure that re-
compcliaoa you for a real merchandising service and
lie's not at all backward about refusing to sell the
dealer that cuts that price.
We have something akin to real admiration for thc
unselfishness and perhaps far-sightedness of thc manufacturer who adopts and fearlessly adheres to a real
Maintained Price Policy. He quite evidently believes
that the independent retail merchant—particularly thc
merchant operating a service store—is a permanent
factor in the distribution of food stuffs. He not only
believes that but he actually backs his belief with a
handsome fortune every year and that fortune is rung
lip in varying small sums daily, weekly nnd monthly
on your cash registers.
You  probably haven't given much thought to this,
M 8
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
•lun.'
but it will pay you well to reflect on it Suppose
"A." tlie manufacturer of a quality article, ia a Main
tallied Price man. Suppose the sales of this quality
article total $3,000.(100 a year. Let's say that your
apread is 20 per cent. That amounts to $li(MUHM) a year
paid to the retail grocers for scrviecs rendered. Now,
if you grocers arc doing yonr best to earn that $IKH>,.
000, ".Vs" business will develop in conformity t" general market conditions. Hut—if you're not rendering
a service worth the money then "A" is going} t«> be
forced to revise his selling methods. He is probably
investing a modest amount in general advertiaing nay
2 per eent. of his gross sales or $i»0,l>00 a year. Ami
that $(iO,0<IO is creating eonsumcrs demand while the
$<iOO.(XMi paid to you and partially paid for the same
purpose is not creating consumer demand. What is
"A" going to do about it?
He might do one of several things bul he is almost
sure to reason this way: "Thc grocers don't seem to
appreciate a real maintained priee policy. Indeed it
would appear as if they preferred insistent public de*
mand to a reasonable margin. Therefore 111 ent the
margin 5 points ami add those 5 points lo my advertising appropriation for a few years Might as well
make hay while thc sun shines."
Now. Brother Grocer, if "A" should weary of your
thin support he might do something very like that.
And $150,000 a year added to his already modeal ad
vertising appropriation—the total invested judicioualy
—would create a demand as resistless as the tide Sell*
ing expense is selling expense, it does not matter how
yon catalogue it. Vour margin is just a part of the
manufacturer's selling expense. His goods are not sold
until they arc in the hands of satisfied customers And.
between friends, itis immaterial to whom the manufacturer allocates his selling expense as long as he gets the
business.
To repent: Those manufacturers who hav, stink to
a real Maintained Price through thick and thin arc
absolutely the best friends the retail groeera of Canada ever had or are ever likely to have, lint the day
if* approaching very rapidly when they may woo ami
win a greater volume by the adoption of a less altruistic selling policy as far as yon are concerned. They
certainly would be foolish to hazard their fortUliea by
adhering too long to an idea which many of yon seem
to have rejected.
In brief: The Maintained Priee is at the bar.     Von
retailers are presenting the evide    That evidence
is being considered daily as it appears on the sabs'
sheets of yonr friends. The final verdict cannot be indefinitely delayed. And it will be your verdiet absi
lutely in nceord with yonr actual desire in the ease."
ISO-
8UG0E88 OF PRICE CONTROL IN BRITAIN
DURING RECENT STRIKE.
London, May 12th.
During the strike the food industry was virtually
under Government control of the kind wnlch it exper*
ienccd during ihe War, with the difference that there
were on this occasion voluntary arrangements as to
maximum prices instead of the statutory orders and
regulations of the war-lime Ministry of Pood.
Directly Ihe strike began the Food Department of
the Board of Trade had a consultation with the com-
mittee of the London Provision Exchange, at whieh it
was unanimously agreed that all market priees estab
lished on Friday. April 30, for all kinds ..t Inn,.,
cheese, bacon, ham. and lard should be maximum pHei-a
until further notice This decision had the approval
of the London Divisional Food Officer. The Ten Huy.
ers' Association appointed an emergency tea eomnifo
•doner to arrange for the even distribution of u«n in,
porters', planters' and wholesaled1 maximum priees
being those ruling at the last public sale befon llu
strike In the distributive nee tions the Multipt* shop*
Association undertook to maintain the priees ruling wi
April 30, and the secretary of lhe federation -»i Uror-
eis' Associations advised alt the affiliated orgnnUa
tions to take similar action, adding that any Individual
east of price.raising Would be dealt with nt once
All these steps were successful At lm tilix durin--
the strike was there any scrioiu dislocation iu (hi >li«
iribution of essential foodstuffs, and the arrangement*
iu respecl to maximum priees were pverywhen rigid!)
observed When lhe railways temporarily Mopped
working the extension nf the road transport mm*.,
was carried out smoothly and expeditiously
With the general return to work tin Ml Ual ion in
daily becoming better, but nl lenM another fortiughl
must pass before it ean be said that things are normal
at the food wharves and warehouses    During ihi dis
pule, when the COUVOy system was in Operation "nb
the main commodities were handled One rctrull n'n*
lhat large quantities of other foods have he, n lying
at the docks, and in some Instances green fruit* for
example going out of condition It is feared Ihfil a
considerable quantity of Colonial produce has miffi-ml
in this way As tin supply position is natiafaelnn nn
material advance in values has followed the return i«
normal methods of trading
QUAKER
CORN
FLAKES
With  ihe  guaranteed   fine
flavor, ami the world-famous
quality   of   Quaker   cores)
products,
The    Wax     Wrapper    preserves
I lu-ir     Crispnesa     nnd     Kin vor.
T^C Quaker Qits ComPany
8aakatoon Peterborough 1926
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
9
BUYER'S  WEEK
I is annua! event promoted by the Wholesale I'm--
,,}lll „j the Vancouver Hoard of Trade is no new move.
m ni It originated a number of years ago in the lu
jl,.(| Mtatcs, when- today thousands of retail merchants
li, ,,ji sections of the country avail themselves of the
opportunity of becoming personally acquainted with
lli;,imfactunrs and wholesalera with whom th«-> do
lidMincKS More particularly is Buyers1 Week popular
when two or more distributors are competing for the
iuutu Icrrltory, and large sums are annually expended
|l, u I natured rivalry to provide the utmost in enter*
Inimneill ior the visiting merchants
Competition of thk nature i* not so unite in Van
roiiver, mo- is it upon this ground that lhe idea origin
died lure Several years ago a number of firms hit
Upon the idea as an excellent OHO for meeting their ens-
turners, and showing them around their warehouses,
hut it was not until 1W-4 that the ftrsl "Buyers*
Week" was held in Vancouver
S<. satisfactory were the results, that the expert*
luciil was repented in the following year, and it is imw
tli-Mined to become ail annual event of much interest
In lhe trade generally
Invitations are ibis year being extended to retail
merchants in Alberta, and the provision for rebate of
tm veiling expenaea is so generous that retailers from
tin sister province should not overlook this chance of
visiting Vancouver
The period chosen for "Buyers' Week*' coincides
wiih the dates chosen for tin Vancouver Bxhtbltlon,
when it is a practice of merehanta from outlying dis
Iriets to amtnge I trip tO Vancouver    They are thus
enabled to combine business with pleasure, with the
added attraction that if goods purchased from Van-
eouver wholesalers or manufacturers reach a stipulated
•oin>. transportation is refunded
Service I'lulis in Vancouver are interested ill the
movement, and it is expected that they will be hosts
to the visiting merehanta at luncheons during the week
at th, Hotel Vancouver-
\ dinner dance and fashion parade h to be staged
Bl the same hotel during the week, and moonlight cv
'iisjons will also be n feature of entertainment.
Buyers' Day at lhe exhibition will be Wednesday.
Attgttai  nth    From every angle "Buyers' Week '
offers a real Inducement tO business, and should ro-
•■ive the support and cooperation such a movement
ih si r\ es
VOTE POR $1,600,000 REM188I0N TO AUTO
DEALERS PA88E8 HOU8E
A vote of 11,690,000, "required for thc remission of
' tolse tax paid on automobiles remaining in the hands
ef dealers nnd unsold at thc time when such tax wns
repealed by order in council of December IS. 1920,
Pnaaed the House of Commons in committee oil supply.
Hon. George Bolvin, minister of customs, told the
House that the average loaa to each automobile dealer
•>nd been $33„38 nn 7f»0:t cars    ll was in the nature
"f compassionate allowance and tho amout wa« largo
'""lgh to Include interest accumulated. Thc dealers
■>«d a claim in equity and justice although not in law.
:,"d tho minister said he would welcome opinion as to
whether or not interest should bo paid,
Certainly You Must
Advertise With
Window Displays
THEY'RE THE INDISPENSABLE LINK
BETWEEN ADVERTISING DONE BY
LEADING MANUFACTURERS TO POPU-
LARI2E THEIR PRODUCT AND YOUR
STORE. PALMOLIVE 8HAVING CREAM
IS FEATURED IN A STRONG SELLING
CAMPAIGN * • • TIE UP WITH IT. WRITE
* * • WE SUPPLY ALL DI8PLAY MATER.
IAL  FREE.
Every line of telling publicity featuring a product
you handle it ae valuable to you ae If you paid for it.
It't whet send* cuetomere Into your etore asking.
It's the reaton for effortless salee, quick turnover
end multiplied profits which are the basis of modern
•c-cntiftc merchandieing.
All you do ie * * * tie up your store with this na*
tional advertising which means so much to the retail
trade.
It't good bueineee * * * the moot efficient form of
local advertiting * * * not, ae some druggists seem
to feel, a favor to the manufacturer.
Palmolive Shaving Cream is popular, and It's con.
ttantly getting more popuhr becauee of tht salts
effort put behind it. We're not content with slow
growth J ' ' but out to command the market.
We're telling the man who read national magailnee
and newspapers WHY Palmolive Shaving Cream Is
the kind they've been looking for. We offer tht proof
in the form of a free t*n-*ia*/ tube.
What Coupon Returns Prove*
Although this offer hae been in force over since
the introduction of Palmolive Shaving Crtam, coupon
returns are undiminished.
This it attonithing, since man do not readily fall
for free stuff.
The ten free thaves prove conclusively to tht tritr
that he's found what he wants.   After that • • • a
regular customer for some wide-awake dtaltr.
As for the man who ntvtr acctptt tht frtt samplt
but who buys direct, window displays art his guidt.
He looks in your window * * * comes into your stert.
Endless chain sales begin.
Write for Free Display To*Day.
Remember it only takes a fsw lines on your letter-
head to bring you the latest Palmolivs Shaving
Cream window display, carrying charges pre-paid.
Use It • * ♦ It's) good advertising, plus tht attrac
tive window which promises an squally attractive
store.
When eomething good is offtrtd frtt, bttttr
accept.   Order today.
The Palmolive Co. of Canada, Ltd.
WINNIPEG
3223 10
THF BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
•hine
Chloride of Lime
New Style Waterproof Package
Supplied by all wholesale grocers
In British Columbia
Manufactured by
CANADA COLORS ANO CHEMICALS LIMITED
Toronto
Winnipeg
Agents:
STARK A STERLING
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Vancouver
Sell the Conscientious Cook
WILD ROSE
PASTRY
FLOUR
and Satisfaction is
assured
Milled in Vancouver by
Vancouver Milling and Grain Co.
LIMITED
Head Office and Milla:    VANOOUVER, B. 0.
WARM
WEATHER
has «»ci in early llii* year, creating a Iii---  m
for lee ('ream and Sufi think*    Htm is \. ,•
supply of
Ice Creim Pails
Sods Straws,
Drinking Cups
Paper Pistes, etc.
Wi   have complete stocks and can fill your
orders promptly.
\\Y are al yonr mi vice
Smith, Davids* I Wrift Ud.
MANUFACTURER! ANO WHOLESALE
PAPER DEALERS
VANCOUVEI
VICTORIA
When They Ask For
EMPRESS
ORANGE
MARMALADE
Be Sure to Serve EMPRESS
Subititutu will nol taliafy
EMPRESS MFC. CO.
VANCOUVER 1(1%
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RKTAILER
11
r.-»
GROCERIES & PROVISIONS
Grocery Market Report
Vancouver, B.C., May j:>. 1926,
lhe reiail grocery business continues satisfactory,
\ Mcady Increase In volume in reported from all sections ni ihe provinee, Wholesalers also me enjoying
better business lhan they have for some years past.
,;!■•* with a continuance of steady market conditions a
fair return on Investments stems assured for both
wholesalers and retsllers, No doubt the building ex-
paimiiili in Vaneonver. combined with the i>nm\ crop
t.jiots from ihe interior districts, makes conditions so
it*, arable
Sugar. 1/ticnl Mailers will be glad to hear that the
Hiigar situation locally is on a sounder basts than it has
Ihi u inr wiiiic lime. • sperm II v (mm a price statu) |toint
IV'in this date, all jobbers price*, will be identically
tin  Mime to everybody, the large retailer getting 110
concessions whatever, It i** no secret that in the past
et-rtaln dealers were gelling special inducements on
this staple commodity In fact one jobber announced
Rem*rally n range ol prices eonsidrrsbh bclo*s the re*
fillers printed K*ts    With pries newly adjusted as
lhe)  are.  eneh  merchant   will  klWW   that  he  is pur
< 'basing bin SUgar on lhe same price Imsis    Further the
local wholesalers have agreed to discontinue handling
foreign sugar, which generallv speaking did not prove
nl together sallsfsctory ior household usi
Sugar remains finti with higher priees prevail
iiiu' on raws in New York Notwithstanding a firm
market, the local refinery reduced priees to n basis ol
* * tP*X I
th*o for Itsi poiiml aaek, 4nee our last i-wu Oeniers
generally feel that thin reduction wns brought about
ihrough the arrival of several large consignments of
foreign sugar.
Preserving season in now in full swing, and stocks
•Efficiently large enough to lake care of the extra dc*
i,"l during this period ahould I"' carried.
Jam.—New prices on 192'i crop pure jam have hecn
"ained, Strawberry is the name as last year. |9 per
'""n, for 4 Hi. tins, white other varieties are slightly
'■v* New erop gooseberry and strawberry arc now
! -'ly for delivery. It is predicted that there will be
sufficient supplies of strawberries to take care of the
'""••id for the coming year. Tins results from the
' "uiericH paying the growers 12 cents per lb., which i*
"'«' than limy receive for crated berries from  the
re
<h fruil markets.
Canned Fruits snd VsgsUblss.—The past month
1 ,s ahowii nn increase for these lines, consequently job*
1" ■'* stoek* are running low in some varieties, partic
ularly the No. Ki size tin, which is used extensively by
the logging camp trade. No opening prices on 1921$
paek have heen named as yet, although no material
changes arc expected, with the possible exception of
tomatoes, which probably will bo higher than Inst year.
The tomato market last year was opened with an exceedingly low price, on account of the keen competition between the canners. The amalgamation of a
number of canners was announced in our Inst issue,
therefore price competition will  lie eliminated to a
LMViit extent,
New season asparagus is now available for delivery
ill prices ranging ahout ll) per cent, lower than last
year.
Singapore Sliced Pineapple is enjoying an enormous sah, owing to the lower prices, effective through
the reduction in tariff. No. 2 tins are quoted from
|5.10 to $5.85 per ease of 4H 1'ins.
Hawaiian Pineapple, new crop will be ready late in
July, l/ocal stocks arc becoming depleted. Owing to
ii severe drought in the Hawaiian Islands, this year's
pack will probably be curtailed to the extent of a million cases, ami higher prices may be expected.
New Lines.—Cheese snacks, 24 packages to eas?. at
$:?(M> per dosen. Very dainty, with a distinctive cheese
flavor,
Matches—Iv B. Kddy Co. announce a reduction on
Owl matches '1(H>' to $8.15 per case, and Red Birds 400'
u* §12.95 per ease,
Dried Fruita.—Evaporated Prunes arc steady in
price, with seme sizes becoming short at the source of
supply, Evaporated apples can be bought at concessions, Peaches and apricots are still out of night, no
lower pricis possible, until this year's crop is ready,
aboul October 1st. Choice white tigs arc also higher.
Present quotations are JM-je, as compared with a former
price of s,m* Ralsina remain high, bulk Thompsons
having advanced during the week to Hie. Seeded varieties arc practically unprocurable. Thc present price
of T'jc on hulk Hallowii dates is considerably below
replacement costs.
Soaps.— The different manufacturers seem to be
competing with one another in putting on deals of one
kind and another. Lever Bros, are offering Lux, with
a special advertising allowance of 50e per case. Fair**
hanks are offering 75c per ease advertising allowance
on Oold Oust and Fairy Soaps. [
Vegetable Shortening.—The cottonseed oil market
has advanced heavily during tbe past month. Manufacturers of vegetable shortenings are consequently
faced with the necessity of advancing their priees,
which will probably effect such lines as "('risen"
•Kasv first, "nnd "Cookit."
3! 12
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
nine
THE TEA MARKET
No evidence that any lower prices will be quoted
within the next few months is forthcoming, lu fact
the opposite is the rule with Ceylon, India and Japan
teas all pointing higher.
Japan tea market opened at advances approximating
10 to 12rJ from those prevailing at the opening a year
ago. Cables intimate that the first crop of Japan teas
will, owing to frosts which did much damage to the
early growing sections, be only 70 per cent, of normal.
The perpendicular rise of 10 to 12 per cent, in prices
is not, however, based on the size of the first crop,
which, in the case of Japan teas, i.s the poorest <>f the
three that are harvested, but is almost entirely due to
a jump in Japanese exchange from 42 yen to 47 yen.
equivalent to a rise, of 10.7 per cent. Besides intimating that the first crop of Japan teas will he ahout 30
per cent, short, due to injuries resulting from frosts.
cables indicate that the quality of the first crop of Japanese teas is fair. Actual transactions in tin* new crop
took place at the prices mentioned. The opening of
the Japan market this year is about a week later than
it was a year ago. Unfavorable weather conditions are
expected and may affect the later crops of Japanese
teas .and some* in the trade look for shortages in the
later crops of about thc same proportions as is being
experienced in thc first crop. The better tone iu hon-
don and the Far East has imparted more confidence to
buyers of fermented teas, who are reported to be oper-
sting a little more freely all around.
Chins Teas.
According to cables from Colombo. Ceylon, the torn*
of the market there was strong with last prices fully
PACKED IN
CEYLON
GILLETT S LYE
EATS DIRT
Profit is only profit
after you sell the
merchandise. A
large margin does
not put a dollar in
your pocket if the
goods set on your
shelves until they
are bespecked and
unsalable.
E   W   GILLETT  COMPANY'LIMITED
TO'-MNTt*     ' * A N A 0 A
*   a m  * 11,
PRICE
MAINTAINED
I!
A StcnJarJof CM'/-/ which hrn mamma* lhe toodwiU of lht m„cAan< ^ ^^ Mt
WholmleDiitributon:
DICKSON IMPORTING CO., LTD.
Vanoouver, B.C.
317-321 Columbia Ave
Established 1807 19*21)
TIIK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
13
tip-
lim
Itinl
Th-
taiued, Intimation*-* .hat lloochow leas wouW
much higher iu the Shanghai market were eon-
,1 hy private cables whieh stated that Hooehow
opened 12c a pound above the levels of a year ago.
quality, it develops, was decidedly favorable. That
luwrr pricea for the general run of black teas arc un-
likely i** the opinion expressed generally. Leading
primary market points are all strongly maintained, in-
rhlitiiiK bunion. Colombo and Hatavia The Indian roar*
Itet, i! is expected will open very soon when a good
li,„ should he furnished mi tlo- general outlook for
bin**Vc teas f<»r the coming season,
coffee
\r*,VH from Central America confirm! that the
drouth which has heen **o harmful to the crops in Col
otnbia and Venezuela, endangering prospects fop the
im vi Reason, has al*o affected the crops in Guatemala
aidl San Salvator Much harm has been done in the
latter country by a plague of locusts Then is tittle
iloubl that Central American crops will he materially
smaller next season than this. The present Nicaragua
prop u Hai<l to be 230,000 bags, about 24.000 hags of
<»'({(' having heen deslroved by volcanic disturbances
The Haiti crop i* practically finished. Heavy rains
have at last fallen in Colombia and conditions f<»r ship-
l»mg on the Mafdalena River are improved. Ahotit
J.'.mikhi |t«^s of coffee, which have been retained ill
llu1 interior, have been released. The stocks of these
growths here are very small and. therefore, the delay-
"I arrival of so mueh coffee iu consuming markets may
nol i \crt nny material pressure, if tody because the
demand for mild coffees, compared tu that for Brasila,
wems t.» be on the inerease everywhere on account of
tlnir better quality and the greater care which is given
lo their preparation
ti>«« 1* iiunm company of Qslfsrr, ha* purehseed outright
thi psaklsi I'lant nt QaUafher -Hoim-an Co., ot Winnipeg,
which now mliln • .»tth district to Hie otm served by the
Burni latereeta, sad complete! aa organisation which covers
\V.m,rn Canada Other plant* of tho company are at Cai-
**i). Kdmonton. VsseOSVer, Prince Albert and Itcgina.
NEW LOCAL INDUSTRY REPORTS PROGRESS
Thfl proprietors of "Grays iiaim." riic Gray Remedy Com*
pw»jr, l.lintird, of WmIit Street, Vancouver, announce timt thin
i*-"l*>an»ilan him Ukc-n well with the public, nnd isles are
RhovtBI * slesdtll growing volume Put up In attractive
•«r»otts, ntad« m Vancouver, "Gray's Palm" In essentially an
*nodym, aaUaoptte, counter irriiant ami heeler, ami llluitra*
Ure ot the popularity already seblved for thin preparation,
nrdpri have bwn shippi*! m India, Ilrttlsh Guiana, New /ea-
!">*i sad tin- DrIUsh lalee, in atlition to ihlpmenti lo Eastern
''insds nml California
"QUAKER" WEEK IN VANCOUVER
The spmtal "\Vw>k" put on recently bv  the Quaker Out*
"U-ait)  demon-orating ••Quaker Corn Klakes. with a guar-
ftnieed flavor:' In window dlaplav ami special sdverUsuig wan
• wlnoer for the oompanv
tiroeoni are particularly  Inti'iwtcd In the special wrapping pror<*aii or thi* commodity, which ensure! tin' package
r**ChlH| tho consumer with Its orlslnal flavor Inlaet.   After
",n" Vare. the ri-ewrh department of the oompany  haa
' '■■'veil « doubly wealed package as perfect as modern BOtence
',h,l Invention can attain, which anils favor with consumer* of
"lls popular eeresl.
"VANART," THE NEW FLAVORING EXTRACT
ViinwN,' 'he new extract put UP by the W   A. Jnmleson
' nf^ee Company. Is a new Jamics.nt line which Is meeting
 war favor with the housewtvee of British Columbia.
SUB-STANDARDS  MUST   BE  MARKED
An acl of the California Legislature which was fostered
by the canning Industry of California provides that the grade
of all canned apricots, cherries, peaches and peara ot a quality below standard shall be embossed or lithographed dl-
rectly Into the tin of the top or cover of th© can ln letters
not less than quarter inch high. The new law becomes er-
recUva with the 1925 pack, and no fruit of the varieties and
grades covered by the act and packed In 1926 or thereafter
• an leave the state unless properly embossed. Fruit packed In  1925 of  previously In not affected.
The description of the grades In the law corresponds exactly with the description of the Canners League of California grades, which have been in effect for years.
Following is the wording required on the top of the can
for all second quality fruit, that Is, fruit of a grade below
standard:
Commercial Grade Name Mark.
Seconds (In not less than 10 per cent syrup
going   In)       Seconds
Water  .,  Seconds without added suger
l'lo   Seconds without added suger
PRUNE PRODUCTION EXPANDS
According to the California Prune and Apricot Growers'
Association: "There are over 190,000 acres of prunes and 120,-
000 acres of apricot trees in California. The value of the
combined crops In 1924 was in excess of $21,590,000, which Is
one«elghfch of the value of all fruit crops produced In this
State that year. The prune industry has grown from 1898
with an annual production of 90,000,000 pounds to an average
annual crop of 269,000,000 pounds. Of the 190,000 acres planted In prunes, only 145.000 are In bearing, so that It seems a
most conservative estimate that within the next f«*aw years
there will be produced as much as a 400,000,ooo*pound crop of
prunes The aprlcote industry, while heavily planted, now
has an annual tonnage of approximately 140,000, a very large
percentage of which goes into fresh fruit markets and to canneries."
SUGAR.
Now that the Cuban Congress has passed the law restricting the present Cuban crop 10 per cent, It Is generally believed that the trade will shortly be stimulated to renewed
activity, especially as It will not be long now before proB-
pectl for the next crop begin to assume a greater Influence
on price fluctuations. While the Cuban crop restriction has
served to create a fundamental shange In sugar market conditions, reports of decreased production at other points have
also served in influencing opinion. There will be shortages
in the Mauritius, Santo Domlngan, Surinam and Demerara
crops. The London market Ib reported as unsettled owing
to the strike. Cuba has refrained from offering forward
shipment to United Kingdom since passage of the control
law Havana cables reported three more centrals completed grinding; the Ondrolta. with outturn of 159.900 tons,
against estimates of 170.000; the Canta Catalina. with 159,-
000 tons, against estimates of 170.000 tons, and the Fuerto,
with 26,000 tons, against estimates of 30,000 tons.
ROAD CASES SIMPLIFY EGG COLLECTION
With the necessity of properly Identifying each producer's eggs In order that graded payments may be made, many
country merchants and gatherers are Introducing the "road
case" system for collecting eggs.
The road case Is applicable only where producers have
sufficient eggs to be gathered In case lots. A quantity of
cases, varying according to the slse of his average shipments,
are allot ted to each producer. The producer Is then given a
number, which Is entered In (he merchant's receiving book,
aud this number Is painted on both ends of all his cases. This
does away with the necessity or tagging or marking the case
with Ihe shipper's name, and in addition to saving time helps
to lengthen the life of the case.
Now cases are used for shipping, the road cases serving
merely for collecting purposes. Painting or lightly staining
lhe niad cases will help lo preserve the wood.
i 1' 14
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RKTAILER
'•nn*
Lake of the Woods
Milling1 Company
LIMITED
lUkmof
FIVE ROSES
• FLOUR •
The World's Best
Daily Capacity 14,200 Bbla.
B.C. Of flees snd Wsrehooase:
1M0 lishsrds Stmt 1614 Store Street
TAKOOUV1I VK7TOEIA
Phone Back Home
when absent on a holiday.   The long*
distance rates are lowest after
8.30 p.m.
BRITISH COLUMBIA
TELEPHONE COMPANY
Only a Few More Days ! ! !
to make reservations for your Convention at
R0CHE8TER, JUNE 21st to 24th.
Ask your local chairman to count you in.
Compliments of
The Fleischmann Company
FLEISCHMANN'S YEAST
SERVICE
Benefit trooi CLARTS
Ut the Clark Ktkktot help ytm."
For nn apjietixinR hors-
d'oeuvre take a half tin of
sardines, mash to a imimo
together with two tablespoons of
CLARK'S
TOMATO
Ketchup
Spread tm thin ****** ~w*a* «rtf h frwlnl
tot*    cut   tn nortww t***tra Omtmtos*
• Ith prntalay oe tmjmn    Omrao teml*mm
th* wup
thlt to «nhr **** ot the many t
osmd ran***-* And too that i
ratttSmmtt.
.sjs-BSsrttKa
*m*Mw*«*nI
Take full idventigi
ef the jdvf vng
we've been doing lor
mony yoott \o m«k|
Cl *rh*» Prt|i-rtd
Foods known t0
your   customer,
A diepUy of Ciirk'i
Product! in four
•tore or in yogr * n
dOW linkt up with
Clark's advert %,n. j
end ht»pt to rr-.iKf
your customer buy
Clirfc'i    Prepared
toon*
Lei Ihe CLARK
Kile hens help you h
man)* tnat* sales niul
,U*M     tygete*tsf.h
FEATURE
SHELLY'S COMPLETE
4X BAKERY SERVICE
AT YOUR STORE
Cnn-ciif shelly advertising will draw
attention to tbe large variety «»f IX
Bakery I'rodtiela now to be obtsined
—Breads, take-*, Cookies, Maear«
oon.H. Jelly |(„HV ,tc
Me remlv io meet th,. demand tin**
advertising will create ami keep
atoeked with a complete range of
Shelly Products,
SHELLY'S LIMITED
VICTORIA
NANAIMO
VANCOUVER
NORTH VANCOUVER
NEW WESTMINSTER 1926
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RKTAILER
15
GROCERY PRICES CURRENT
The following ire priced quoted for principal lines of leading wholesale firm*.   Pricea quoted are necessarily
subject to market fluctuationa.
e   w.  OILLETT  CO.  LTO.
« >•
v*»it—
i    i<kK»
in  «-*•»«•
P.<
■Mj-J
I
Flake Lye—
i   in raw*
i.r*
ioo*, i SoS   m •"*»**
BtMng  Powder—
>  i del
,i  i it*.!
| 01    I   .!">«
>  i doa
'..     ,**■ U>la
w«gc %<■■*». Csm No. 1-
■ ,*r   t4ft   Alt    |>m* k *,«•■•.
,iift  i»r   itu»r«
li   *. »*t>o-i«te of Soda—
III tl:   tag*.  |>«r  art
I'M  ft     Vtfitti    |-»#r   barrel
vr i aaa
MO
5 91
«* •
iio
I »*.
**■    « *
I   t •*
9*JS
I to
N .In i(C   mii.ill,  dnZ
I'tifinkn.  small,  'tot .  .
Ptetry  apli S,   3  tin*,  dot.
I'oiUlry DreatfBS- Bafti Savory, Thyme,
Tumeric,  tin*,  >i<>i
l*i' ktlriK  8pl< "•.  Ant    Ko   *!
M,tl).t'itfil      Mllit,    Parsley
Whits Pepper, tin*, dot,
I'sinti-r  ml   2 ot   Ani
i ,i*l<*r ' '.i   I ot   Am
lipSOttl    <itA*     't*    iio*
Prutl Colors   *- OS   Am
Uiut* (hoeotaie, !!"»"'   Pink, Lemon
Vantu, While, Almond, i>rance) do*.   1.15
Jelly   Powder,   Ant      80
  1*15
1 35
110
hytne,
,   115
,9J
  1 16
    130
  1.11
  2 2<)
.60
 l.tl
|,f ,lnifi;i." *
\l iMnfil
Mustard
vi iktard,
|i   *|.-s
I^H,      ll"*
Vi*     1.1"*
Sulphur, m*
l<r 10
Ic
. p«r it»
JX'I*     III
ish
Wa
Ciwtllt  ttcia  lOrsnulsteOi —
*  •*«hi»t'*r t\**> itw Is t*aa*)
I Ihs   lorn drum*
C"r*m ot Tertsr*— |»*i  do*
,   b   paper v***   n *i**s   in • <»•* *     L.SS
<: Ik  f mwt pkg*   it ««<••»  In »■••♦»
II'    I ..ll»   with
1 111
Ib
s eo
r*w eaeae* (I *****
tn   MUM)
lb .«h» acre* ocreefi *» «<•••
i S SS  — ■■ ■■"•-"-■
III
a Metna.   **   <>■•»    O*
''•    "tun1
. hi i
II.   WiMMlen co***
Ik   wooden  polte
Ik  lined kt-a*
.    II.   Uned borrele
KILLV. DOUGLAS 4 0..  LTO.
Nskob Pradutte.
I   »|»K-«    No    J.  tin* d«»*
iSWOM   ]'„<a,it*t,   «l   II  OS.   *****
i *kini i.m.trr. is Ilia, sea
i   I ini   Piomlrr.  •  5e. do*.
. • *  So.)*, tn  \o   "»•*-
i  king s.«t«. si S-M A<*
i      ,t    \a .   «|os
Itlsek Pepper, WS* dot
< • li r)    **.Al.   al***.   dot.
I   b Toff**, email tins. OMOk
flee,   |« ||,
iViffw  ia Keheb IS
'■■msid   I'owder.   dot
■yulek   Tapioca,   dos    	
1 horetata Pudding, dos
ill PowSer-j *m«n dot
ti(»in.m. ! wt   tins, dot
' lytena ivi»t»*r. 8 UBS *•*
I'lnfea,   tntiill.   dos    .
'irry I'owder. 4 os. glass, dos
-"resm of Tartar, 1	
■'rerun of Tartar,  to*, tin*
'Vesro of Tartar H*	
'•infer,  small,   dos   	
Kilrscts,   \X*, i.s .  dot	
litrscts, I ns,  dOS '
' itrsete. 4 os   doa. 	
I'y.i-sfts. 9 ot  a«s .
Ki tracts.   II OS   dot
Msce, small, doe      	
no
«v»
'77;
tt
A0
l\*i
%:
dos
.   Aot
i.*<   i-.ip.n Label,
fl |    «',r«*<*n   IjiIw!
I  1V<    nnw
Ji.  tb.   pnckit|[*«
1 1t^   r.*''kafeii
Tea, de Luxe,  Aflernoon
Tr» Af Luxe, Aflernoon *^» i>«-r
Ti-a  A* LuXt    \» -fur  U>   .
Vinffir.   dot
P   BURNS 4 CO.  LTO
Shamrock Products.
Vyrshiri? i"i!«''l shoulders, i>»-i* 11)
|L^«..)\   SUiOIUok     I   I    I'll    lb
Ikiked Ham   srtth dn tslet i"'1
lYeamery  Bulter,  Bhxmrock,
• hose*  (**Hn*dUin. tarns  i»-i Ib
i'ii.,..   i*.u,sdlan, i*1"  per lb.
<  N'i s, ll*casw
2.2:
8.50
'.,10
2 40
1.40
,18
.71
.69
.M
((
.65
15
.87
99
2 40
lb
cartons
,-,,n>fv.u!i.i Cnmaiim
CarnaUon  ^,' :5* *"
k, va lb
Slwiiitn*
Cotti pound
C*ooked H.'">
ii.ui..  ti 16 A***.
Dominion Ham*. *-
Dominion i*'<"«* '*10 lN
I .IfM'H
pei
Ib
lb
j 0»)
: ti
t) 3D
14 10
5 30
in
.  w
. i.u
.   it*
*"•
63
t-l
M
..   ,H
..  iM
I W
. l :o
. 1.10
. 1 4*»
.. : oo
} ftS
: 55
1 30
... 1 10
. 1 35
... 1 75
516
. 9 60
1760
  1 66
Do ion Bacon  V  t* «* P"
, inkm  Idem boned ami rolled
beof, l*lb  brtoks
k. i" i  lb
uiiu-A tnd ro»l*e  i"*' "'
HsadChef-ae, a-tb Una eMh 	
i rowmf per "n
Urd   v..  :■   H lo <**
Urd   Ko   »   •> »• ;.	
cartons,   IS   in*
«  .to lbs
::,-n>. neti
ii,
per lb
Drlppini
Kama* ahamrw
Hami
tUn<l
Isllln
i t.iii"
l-u.l.
Ijii.I   N
Mincemeat,  klia,
M.ui  Loaf. i"!
Pork pl*e* **-
Vi>r
Ib
.:•*!
I!>
.40
.22l»
.23
10.00
10.05
,41
.37
.42
.42
• m I
AM
,91
.49
.55
1.S5
1255
\ 2 fi"
.22^
,11
M-u
19
.40
16
Klondyke (wrapped) box of 95 6.10
Klondyke (unwrapped' box of 95  .5.9s
Klero Oiycerlne, box of 144 6.78
Linen (unwrapped) box of 100  8.96
Liquid Ammonia. 2 dos. qts. box of 24 4.00
Liquid Blue. 2 doz. qts. box of 24 4.00
Mechanic's Pine Tar, box of 100 5.46
Mechanic's i'lne Tar, box of 50  8.76
olive Caatlle, cakes, box of 900  4.16
Prlmroee (wrapped) box of 26   4.70
Hoyal Grown Lye, box of 48  6.W
lindray's Powdered Ammonia, box 84   9.11
Special prices on i, 10, 86 and 100
boxes.
Pendrsy's Wster Glass,  Egg  Preeerver—
I'naott, 24 tins per case  ,  4.10
Royal Laundry Fluke-*, 8«-7c in bbls.    .13%
(Speclsl price on contract)
Royal down Soap 6s 144s  5.46
Royal Crown Powder, box 24 only 6.6©
Royal Crown Powder l-lb. box of 60 .... 4.00
Royal Crown Cleanser, 48 sifter tins .... 8.70
Hoyal Crown Powdered Ammonia. 1 lb.   9.11
White Wonder, box of 100  6.85
New White Swan Soap, 100 „  5.00
White Swrii Naptha, box of 100   4.90
White Swan Washing Powder, box of 24 5.50
THE CANADA STARCH CO. LTD.
Laundry Stsrches—■
Canada  Uundry Starch, 40-lb,  box .09
White Ciloss.  1-lb. pkgs „.      *
Acme Gloss. 1-lb. pkgs   .....
No. 1 White, 100-lb. kegs	
Kdwardsburg Silver Gloss, 1-lb. pkgs
40-lb	
I Mwardsburg Sliver Gloss 8/6-
fancy   tin  canisters,   48-lbs	
ISdwardaburf Sliver Gloss, 100-lb.
kegs   -
Celluloid Starch (boxes of 46-pkgs
per  case)   	
9tt
.914
t\%
,m
.ISH
m
• 4.10
Culinary Starchee—
Beotum's Cvlobruted Prepared Corn
40-lb.  boxes,  per lb	
Canada Corn Starch 40-lb. boxes, per
Ib ~	
Challenge Com Starch 40-lb boxea
per lb,
.11
914
.914
Catco Potato Flour 40-lb. boxes, lb.   .1*
krt meet tag* «** ^.Mb      .*«•
smoked flih, Slppera, I0x, r-r w■ ••■
ZZ*i aaa  Kipperad ml**** 1€
• n<t 10a, P*t n' '*"   14
P wed Cod. IPaPjr   - *  '    " 27
*i„ led to«\  I""' l1,     ' ^.froioa   .94
g.locled chleken pai  >»'   f,<,!"
THE   ROVAL  CROWN  SOAPS  LTD.
, ,.i-F 0.0.  Vancouver,
*«• :7.x..^.
Terma N.« 90 Oeya
,...,., u 1 lb, pkta box • *-70
Maiols Oil-
Ma sola   OH. is
•' 9s
o           " 4s
..            " 8s
7.95
.7.45
.18.60
.19.85
Corn Syrui    ^_^^
Crown 8s. 84 to case
6s. 19 to case
10s « to case
80s, 8 to case
2s. 84 to case ....
H, 12 to case ..
10s. % to case
Lily
•Apr*
Soap
niu« M-«"'*''* u" of
n-owaonta lM«"«'
Imix  of  X*  .-
nt 144
4.40
g.s'i
490
•9.51
,.- 4.10
.... 8.79
.... 9.M
...14.01
.... 4.ie
 4.80
9.88
Karo. 2e 24 to case  4,0
5s. 12 to case      JW
10s, • to case 	 16
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
June
Of TDC You sell good goods at
O wiXaCe reasonable prices
DI TT What kind of bags deliver
DV 1   the goods ?
A Bag can make or break a sale
CONTINENTAL 100% PURE ATLAS KRAFT
BAGS will guarantee safe delivery of your goods
and are the standard of comparison everywhere.
The Continental Paper Products
Limited
OTTAWA
CANADA
SMITH, DAVIDSON & WRIGHT. LIMITED
VANCOUVER,  VICTORIA,   EDMONTON.  CALOARV.
"Using a 4Continental Bag9 is Bag Insurance91
^tOMOCNCoH*",?
^*^--~C22^,^*.
•Ocnfati
EAGLE BRAND
Since 1857 the Soft infant food.   Sslee
greater then all others combined.
Offleee, Veneeuver.       cond.n..ry, south sum..
Peter Rabbit Peanut Butter
Co$t$ No More But Sells Faster
THE TOV PAIL DELIGHTS THE CHILDREN
DISPLAY A CASE.   IT WILL SELL  ITSELF.
Kelly Confection Co. Ltd.
1100 Mainland Street
VANCOUVER, ■. C. iwe THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
VITAMINS IN THE FOODS WE EAT
17
Llsl of Foods Containing These Vital Elements May
Be Used With Profit by the Retail Grocer
ma ***** m,mum n i m
I•..!• 30 years sri-eniists hava l>'---n working on thoie
pll in p.,riant but elusive things in foods called vita*
ij ii . Though nobody han yet nieccoded in icparaliug
,,.,. food materials s chemical substance which hi* can
l„,iul in an pOW vitamin, five distinct vitamins MO
known lo exist because of lhe effect each has in pro*
mutiny health and preventing a eertain disease op un-
desirable physical eondition. Some foods have been
found to be lourcss «f one vitamin, some oi another.
iu comparing tbe «»ff•«*«• t of one of these foods with
,v oi her wIh-ii used in an experimental diet, something
lit)* been found out, loo, About tin* relative value of
: is as Bourcee nf the different vitamins,   So the list
oi foods known to contain tin* different vitamins has
inrresscd along with the facts about the functions and
properties of ihr- vitamins themselves.
Th** intelligent person seeking to apply this aewe-r
knowledge of nutrition lo hie everyday food habits con.
mquently wants to know whal foods to eai ao as lo
obtain a good supply of all these vitamins    He has got
Ih yond the point where ii is enough lo say that a eertain food hss vitamins What vitamin, be asks, and
bow does tltis food rank as n source *-i this vitamin?
Thc most reeent table prepsred Hsts about 150 foods
aecording to ihi-ir vslue as sources ofvitamins A. B
and C Data on vitamin?* I) ami B ire still sh ineom*
plcte that it wa* not considered advisable lo include
them,
Spinach, eg}? yolk, whole milk, butter, cream, cod
and other fish -liver oils aw indicated as excellent
ttourcea of vitamin A. one o( the growth*promoting
vitamins Fish liver and no at liver range from good
to excellent sources of this vitamin. Spinach is also
an excellent lourea of vitamin C. The beat sources of
vitamin It, often called the antlneuritie vitamin, wide*
i> distributed In many common foods, are spinach,
tomatoes, pons, beans, asparagus, okro and whole*grain
Vitamin r. the antieorbntlc vitamin, is more easily
octroyed by cooking than the others; hence foods eon*
taiuing it ahould be eaten raw or cooked as Unit** as
possible, It is found in greatest abundance in citrus
fruits, tomatoes, cabbage and turnips The outstanding foods whieh should never be neglected as sources
of vitamins in tho diet arc citrus fruits, cabbage, green*
■* -tt vegetables, tomatoes, whole milk, butter aud cream,
NEW NUT DISCOVERED.
Sraitnan Product to ta Available to Soap Makers
Tlia UtiittUiin iiniinnsu Corporation hss been Incorporated
'""i'i* Uto in«N of Delaware     The company will import
bsbessaM inn*. •» newly discovered Brasillan nut, which In
unusually heavy in vegetable oil.
iiabsaau kernels, which srow in an exceedingly hard shell
nboul the f«t*o ami shapo of a lemon, analyse 60 pei| cent
^notable oil, Thaj burn like a oandle. Their utility was
*** discovered until lhe war whon. due u» the shortage of
***** *boio babneau nuts were used as fuel In Braslllaa war-
■•bit ami roam itssmsra,
r'U»itai boo Wn fofareited in bsbaasu ea aceounl of the
^railing ihorlate of oopra, Dabssau oil analyses In toss
table oil .nUrely equal to cocoanut oil,
For the
Customer:
Quality and Satisfaction
Because of their steadily main*
tained superiority Royal Baking
Powder and Dr* Price's Cream
Baking Powder have been stand"
for over a half century. Both are
made in Canada*
For the
Dealer:
Prompt Sale and Fair Profit
i
A Quality Product!
IDr MtdclUtceisJI^
RONIZEjJ
I mn mm mummo       OSSSW
OCMUINC
Whole Wheat
FLOUR
A FAIR FIXED PROFIT
FOR LARGE AND SMALL
IS THE POLICY OF
Ihe Dr. Middteton's food Products
Company Limited
Vsncouver, B. C. 18
f
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA KKTAILKR
Mill,.
A Big Forward Step
in Meat Chopping
A New, Strictly Sanitary Bowl
with Five Improved Features
and a Motor Specially Designed
for Meat Chopping Service.
THE NEW DAYTON ELECTRIC
MEAT CHOPPER
Furnished in I 8, '•_■ or I h.p. sixes. All
models can bo famished with ppdcstsl
or Counter Hase as desired
%
THE NEW SANITARY BOWL
The greatest forward step in the market*
ini* of chopped meat sine,- -,t chopping
machinery was firsl invented.
The tun vitally important parts «>f n t\|« at Chopp.,.
an the howl nnd the motor.
The    NOW     DAYTON     Metric     .Meat    Chopper    is
equipped with a howl thnt marks a tremendous .ol
VailCe     It has five big exclusive feature-*;
1    No w reft eh or tool is required to adjust, ehaugi
or remove knife or plate, because iio* threaded end
ring is done away with
m    No clqgjrSng between knife and  plate, It-ccaus-
cutting surfaces of knife ami plat* ii iv always In
proper adjustment
•I   No threads to wear or jjet crowed, whieh eliuiln
ntes mechanical troubles nml insures durnhiHtv
I    I'eed worm cannot hind, ho thnt all thc power
tfoei into the cutting process
• »     New   e,instruction  makes  it   easy   to  clean  Slid
positively sanitary, insuring clean and wholesome
meat products
An Extra-Powered Motor
The motor iu the New DAYTON Blectrlc Met
Chopper is si laity designed for meat chopping acr-
vice,   it is tremendously powerful for its size, ami
runs smoothly ami efficiently.
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CO. LIMITED
Factory and H<aJ Ojjlca    West Toronto Ontario      ^Olfe.        v
INTCRNAT.ONAL flfflKl      &mkt ""*' Sa,« °0™ tn alt PtincifKil dtlst
Tim ■leonoiM
Tim iruw
aueraw tmOSns
eooa iuoihm
T**UTM" ******   MADE IN CANADA
OAVTON
mmpvtim ecetee       ••»»■• mite
m»t tkieeee emeee ottrtooo
■■*T wwmi wee* tMSSSS 1926
TIE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
19
RICE MAINTENANCE CORRESPONDENCE
id. table numlM-r ot letter* luoe been received at the
, iln- H « Hoard Retail Merchant*' **UsoclaUon in
,,    »nh tbe Price llsintessoee movemeni     The
,\w indicative ol tin- attitude ol manufacturer*, -nn-
nample «»f lhe r«*plle* ix-1'*!-; received in i\u. retail
ROYAL   DISTRIBUTING  COMPANY,   INC
tOO Eeel 42nd Street. Ne* York
Dealer! <n Producte of Royal Bak ng Powder Co.
\l    VVaiKH V luit. Seueini). M.i\  iv ]v>,;
j;,      i  \\. M hull'*   At)mm latum nt i aiuda
i   luiftc ituinvng. Vsseosver, it <
;    • Mi inn,   Tlt»« writer h»i* )u«t read *iis« a uretii deal
.-• -.nui letter ol M«> li. no* I anonr um that i nhttll
■A-  i treat deal ot pliMnure in observing tbe progreati made
i,v <,,.,* Aaaoetsttoa in their *At it',** to maintain ■ fair and rea
i • margin ol t»roftt on ttn* looda sold aad distributed bj
ii i mberi
I     otiall) I on bi-io dh in accord with jtIm malniensnt«
■ *..: m *deh etforta arc ■«!.»•'< u*«j n\nnm < Morrti lln**  t <W)
,    in. vo ■ v/ii<i'h  in on** price toi nil      I Im!*.*.**.*,' there
i     ' t«< m tenaoeaW* lasnrta or differential ae-oordlng lo
it, ami service (wadered
u.m ids eaeafsaca ol my appreciation ot >our having
r m u» tee b**g 10 r»*nuln.
mnceittj *mi cortUall'* your*
tSlgn.dt V \* RRJ8TLKY
V*|w !•;<   'ili'ni.
LEVER  BROTHERS   LIMITED
Toronto, Canada
il i»,iK Qroet ry
'".' Uiit.il tints,  \\i     llutnnhy. V-*
\**a:   Sir.    \(!«»him!  fWSS Mlei  Ol   Mnj   v
it*   *lwi »!• «r»- In lull n>tn|mtb> with alt)
Wa*. \: mn
i. •*<
HillH'l
Would
made
Trade tor iht bspioveaieni ol conditions nitdei winch
our gooda are handled. We believe that the succesa of 8uch
a movenienl win necessitate the cooperation of a large majority, if noi all, of the wholesale and retail trade, and when
'Iii* is given ho that evidence of the desire of the Trade In
general in manifest, we shall be most happy to actively co-
operaie,
We have In lhe tmst made many efforts to have our price
maintained, but have only been partially successful, because
in a large measure the Trade, as a whole, were not -particulate Interested ia such a movement. We feel, therefore, from
pail experience, that it Is necessary for any organisation,
which would successfully accomplish this objective, to receive
lhe supporl or the entire grocery trade.
We wisli \ou every success In such a movement.
Yours very truly,
LEVER BROS. LIMITED
It. K. (Iracy, General Sales Manager.
STANLEY PURE PRESERVE3 COMPANY
Manufacturers of
Marmalades, Jams, Lemon Curd, Salad Dressing, Ac
Vancouver, B.C., May 2, 1926
The Secretary,
Provincial Board R.M.A., City
Dear Sir.—Since We saw you. the writer haa called upon
upwards ot 100 retail grocers, and Is happy to advise you that
one and all realize the importance of the movement, and seem
resolved to put It over.
The) quite appreciate that If they fall now, another chance
is hardly likely to occur, and thai a real movement now will
bring hi very many at present "sitting otv the fence," particularly among the manufacturers.
Faithfully yours.
STANLEY PURE PRESERVE COMPANY
H. Stanley.
MEMBERSHIP FORM.
Retail Section, Cansdian Fair Trade League
Plesaa enroll ne «« » member oi Uw said League for winch I enclose a re*
mittaaea ol tho \»lue nt Dollars, namely, live dollars for
* a* n ol th«» huhi*-* owned bj no
(Plesse give address of each *'*>i* oa thq back <>* this form),
!   I (we) agree not tu sell any eriteto on lhe list ol ihe League below the minimum piice» to b« h\.-d by the Manufacture! with the approval ol the League,
i <•*•*> agree lhal the gtvtag «i «*>> d«s cum rebatt  bonus, free goods, or eon*
cfsstoo, in cash or kind ofl ibe «1h»\. prices st lhe time ol ■•ale or subsequently
"hall Ih- treated «» nn Infringement   ll <h<* llllei Ol the Lc&gUC,
1   I (we) agree that what) asked fei as irtlete on the llat ot the League, I will aot
make any attempt to sell any other article In i's place
I nn Name
M taager
Streel 	
Province
hate 	
'■lease mark "X" opposite the folowlni Item sltowtm your present statua:-
i have paid 18.00 to this movemeni
Tbil w«s paid to Mr
I < neloia |6,00 Membership Pee
(with exchange) . , . ,„„u,,,,.1i ... ihA
Make remittance pavabie ,«, Canadian Pair trad, i «gue »    g^JJ*to tin
s-n*et«ry 0( the l\o\*Ji\ Merchnta' Association ol Canada in you. Provinee,
NOTE,   In ease ot ohsques, phase add sufficient to com*, exchange, average
II eenta),
Kor further Inform ill on awl) lo ilia Serretar) ... .he Retsil Merehanta' Aaao-
'"♦■lon of Canadn in your Provinee 	
Reproduction of membership form for lhe Retail Trade of the Canadian Pair
Trade League.
WANTED
10,000 Members
Al Once.
Memberahlp forms for tht Canadian Fair Trade League are now being
circulated by the executive of that
body, the one for the retailer being re*
produced. Separata forms will be
used for wholeaalers and manufacture
ers. Tha usefulness of thia organize-
tion dependa not only upon immediately gaining eome thousanda of mem*
bars, but alao In those members rigid*
ly observing the conditions of membership as outlined.
Members are being urged to study
the products of different Srms and
to concentrate on those llnea oold
under tho fair price policy. To help
towards thia and a letterhead has
been printed by the organisation llat*
Ing the manufacturers who have join-
ed It, and merchants are asked to fea-
ture theae particular lines.
Primarily the auccesa of the project hinges upon how merchants sign
up. Naturally interested manufactur-
era are desirous of seeing what support they can count upon before taking out membership. The quieksr a
heavy enrollment Is recorded, the
earlier will price maintenance become
an accomplished fact.
Send in your name and subscription
to your Provincial Secretary today. 20
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
HMM
AMBEICAN GROOER NOT SO EFFICIENT
A8 ENGLISH.
New York Man Telia How They Differ—English
Stores in One Family for Generations—
Describes Chain Methods.
Thc English grocer may be behind hia American
brother in some respects, but individually lie is m -re
efficient, is tho opinion of George l>. olds, jr., general
sales manager of tho Hills Hrothers Company, New
York, who has recently returned from England, after
spending several months in that country. Mr. Olds
is quoted in a recent interview in the New York Times
as saying that while thc English storekeeper has been
slow to adopt systematic advertising and to exchange
irade secrets with his colleagues, his individual tratli-
Hon and craft pride make him in many respects more
efficient than the Ameriean retailer.
"Thc individual English shopkeeper is more etfic
ient than thc individual American storekeeper/' said
Mr. Olds. "On the other hand, iu the distribution of
manufactured foods the English are less efficient than
we arc. Thc individual grooer in England understands
merchandising better than the individual grooer on thin
side. I noticed that whereas the American grocer
tends to push staples, sueh as coffee, tea. sugar ami
flour, where there is a small margin of profit, thc E-ig
lish grocer tends to push specialties or fancy groceries, where there is a high margin of profit.
"However," he added, "thc American grocer is
gradually adopting this poKey. On tho whole, I should
say that there was a more easygoing tone about the
English grocery business, although tho English arc
approximating more and more to American nut hods
and are watching them very elosely."
Merchants—Maintain Fronts
Do you mark up your profit on vour laid
down cost and ESTIMATE vour cost of doing
business on your TOTAL SALES.
IF SO, YOU ARE LOSING MONEY.
USE OUR NEW METHOD CHART FOR
10 DAY8 FREE.
If not satisfied, return the chart.
If you sre satisfied, mail $1.50.
CLIP COUPON AND MAIL TODAY
NEW METHOD CHART
Date „	
0. C. Frood, Box 627, Dtindaa, Ont.
Please send mc New Method Charts
for quick and accurate pricing of goods. If
satisfied with it I agree to mail you $1.50 per
aet within ten days or return charts.
Signed 	
Address
In One Fsmily for Generations.
Then* is one tremendous difference, Mr. Olds ntids
between thc grocery trade here and in England, ;.v
that ia thc stress upon what may be called tin- grocrv
tradition. In England tin* grocery business has ,,,1,,',
times bean iu one family for two, three or even four
generations, and there has grown up a spirit of *u:,i,
in the business. There is nothing like that h Wr.
lea, A largo percentage of the grocery busim-Mes
change hands every year iu the United Stales Again,
he says, the grocers in England are all English |(l
this country they inny he of any nationality.
"As to tho American methods of business/' wtlil
Mr (ibis, "there is n growing tendency in England la
watch them. Hut so far as the food trade is concerned, I should say that the average English business man
does not notice them There is no hostility merely
indifference One of tho chief iHffrrenees between
English busines-" methods and ours is the seen ;
their methods m opposed to the pooling of ir/i mwtiiili
and experience which is prevalent in American W-i-
ness. An American busine*.-* man will no* hesitate t>>
diseuss with a trade rival the whv and wherefore of
his profits on a certain lim- of goods, the Engli h
tradesman would be most unlikely to do so "
In one respect he finds that the EngKsh mm. r is
far behind the American Compared with American!
the English do not indulge in the science *>i nutrition, food values, vitamines and similar subjects which
are almost everyday (able topics jo I ills country. Thll
is duo, he says, to the educational work of American
food advertising, ,un! the relative aitseiicr of it in Kngland
(Continued on page 38)
Like Having Fresh Fruit
& Vegetables all Winter!
^*WSWtt**W-"'
sBeauty
f-r-M-
.Service
and
Mety
In offering to your customers Haiti Atlai 14 Pro-
•trvlng Jar* and Jtlly OlatMt. you combina BEAUTY
SAFETY and SERVICE.
For 15 yaart sold by tht Wholatalt and Ratal!
Iradt In B. C.
AGENTS:
Campbell Brokerage Co.
VANCOUVER, B.C. THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
21
Fashion Trend from Frances Capital
.. — a       m      fJ_11   .-J   U7inl»     WatAriol   itltmOO   \\s\tl\t  Illtfl   fi
.  ****** T»ff«u u Vorru. for Summer, Fall and WinUr-Material Comw Back Into Strong
Pi,r" Ha°C Tai1*5 UlM^«m«3rt 'IM P.p«larity-B.ig« i. Color top, with Bfcribou
Favor Aftor Ton Toon oi uoocun ,   ^^ ^ fa ^^
,,   ,,.v*,vnl of tho rt*. 'or latteta is lomolhing
, u'. .lUeuMod in rronoo by l«tDo manufaoturer. ind
akow     BvelMlw I'nri-i droojmakon aw not
rSrin. laffoto for th«lr ....i fohonablo frock.
;„,,„. f„r dinner ami cvcnta**-* dr***. 00*1 tall and ra at
""|.W „,, vcan, taffeta h»» I ■ ■*»* J* »"?*
„J lurt II nnw waa. it w»» wpplantod bj the crop*
ii!"ItWll othor vari.,.., torn of .rop. which wore
introduced Into tho tcatile field.
Btratfht Ham Caoaod Fall of Taffetaa
Straight, lUnder lb" for on. ^d^if™
,,„,,„iI bun. PMhlon.nduOrtj, with uiutoi-
:„„, ,„ t..*.,ly. mm « tlbri. wh.*-h did no  Mt  lh«
,„.„„,. of tf., Hiyic Ti.i« jprfni, iter ;;;*;",,
„.;,„v .ilk ,n».mf.o..,ren*. it kUni «   * ol'*
, Ur(« part "f their l»l»r« t« th« MlkN "(,»"'"
virioill ■«clu»lvo I'nria .Ir.Minnk.rs ,
Spring HlylcH .ml tb. alyl-a which ar, |, ,..•;•
h} ilm di4m.k«i tor n.xt wtal.t•«. «* •
hthti Mil tho hill. Tl»- wW. hi. r*W oftho now
frock i« Min.tUng for which Utt.t. •»•»■•'• »J '"'"
He lhan anv othor form of lllk, l'»"' •>'*»'*,",J*
Taffcli, wiih it. -tiffnc-*. m»h,Mh. Art rini ;«
l,v UU," m Mile. U«. roprMontln, DmwH, ' ^;
making Ml.blUhm.nt at 21 Ro. do 1" M* '"l',r'""1
Narrow Skirt Ooln* Out of Vogue.
Speaking for Ihe bouse of DontH. MUs.Uo«jW
lha, the narrow skirt of the airolghUinc dm wtt on
of vogue,   A vear ago s dress eould be ma    °u
Ihn a Or four vnrds of material    Now. she pointed OUt
Kix or seven yards aw « L   ^^s"\T\Z
declared,    measure    four   yards   rounu
and   next    winter,    she    predicts,    the J|
whirr still,  and  may  measure even  a*
sn   vnrds   round  the   bottom.     I onse pI .Hl>    »•
explained, more yardage is ^f1*""™ which will bo
- i ut in vogue this summer for the dress juuen
In vogue next fall than it waa a f*M or *° "^ tho
Kklrts measured little more than one yaraun
bottom,  Doueet haa a silk factory at Wllo mniong
Iftffeta exclusively for-it. ,        .      mii* nnd
Other dressmakers have factor^ both J        ■
nl Lyons busy turning out exclusiveif^"';   o)aD.
The taffeta tnnnufneturod today ij often t.ar
anta in its design than the taffetas «^«U,J .)lain
nnd fifteen years ago.     While an »»«im J ° of
Inffeta is used there are also taffetas thonuM
'-Id metal eloth. or lame, have been woven,
Colored Taffetas Are Popular.
Colored taffetas, with designs of gold metal woven
through the fabric, are shown by all the fashionable
dresmakerss today iti Paris. Each big dressmaking
establishment has it own design, originated by its own
artists, worked into the fabric, in cither the gold or
silver thread. (Jold thread, however, is more popular
than the silver. Hut, while there are elaborately designed taffetas, plain taffeta is used for the majority of
dresses.
This summer, beige is the color which is all the rage.
Hut Doueet predicts that next fall violet and burgundy
will be the predominating colors for taffeta.
At Haul Point's establishment, at 48 Avenue, Victor Emanuel, it was predicted that lavenders and purities will also be popular next fall.   While taffeta is
used this summer for afternoon frocks, it was declared
at Haul Point's.it will not be used for afternoon wear
next fall or next winter.   It will, however, still remain
the vogue for evening wear.   Not only did thc repre-
Bcntatlves of the Poiret establishment predict the full
skirt, with its demand for more yardage, but there it
was prophesied that skirts would be longer next winter   "Prom two to four inches longer," wss the pro- '
phesy.
Taffeta Coata Being Shown.
Not only nre taffeta dresses predominating in Paris
this spring, but taffeta coats are being shown. These
eoats are interlined and nre padded, aud it was declared by Mile, Loo, of Doucet's, taffeta coots thus padded
will l»e warm enough to remain the vogue during the
tally fall days on well as for cool summer evenings.
Hatpiin. at :1 Due de la Hnix, is not only exhibiting
dresses for adults in taffeta, but bas on display a number of dainty frocks for small girls. These tiny frocks
with many ruffles running halfway up the skirt, show
(vcn a wider demand for taffeta, and another way in
which the taffeta rage is demonstrated at thc big dressmaking establishments is by thc use of taffeta for tho
making of <|uilts nnd comforts for the boudoir.
Marobou as Trimming.
Polrel shows one quilted robe of pink taffeta, edged
with ping marabou. Marabou, in fact, is used frc-
(piently to trim both coats ami taffeta dresses this season, ami is usually dyed to match thc color of thc
taffeta.
Various dressmakers have their taffeta manufactured exclusively for them by their own manufacturers, in different widths.   Hut at Douecfs it was de- 22
THrt BRITISH COLUMBIA RKTAILER
elared that the taffeta which is most popular with the
leading dressmakers is a yard and a half wide.
The cost of the taffeta, too. varies. Reckoned in
dollars, the eost of taffeta iu Paris ranges from fJ a
yard for the cheapest, flimsieest grade to $10 a yard
lor the more elaborate fabrics.
ing the knee; fine silk slocking* matching th.
•*ilk or lame shoes, and a bunch of artificial flow- h* ,j
thc waist and in the hair, well describes the costui h ,!•
tho moment.
oaoaexxxaxxxxxxxixXiXXDC^
n
^■ipHE MODE
^      As Seen* By
Je&Hadtte
IXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXJCXXXXXXiXHXiXX;-*'
Correspondence from the Riviera tells me of morning styles iu milady's costume, when the elegantly
dressed woman is clothed iu an ensemble comprising a
jersey skill in mauve, blue, yellow and sometimes lime-
tree green (a new color, hut unbecoming to many complexions), over which is worn a white knitted pull
over in silk, or silk ami wool combination. This is
trimmed with the same shade as the skirt. The ensemble is completed with a cape or eoat, madi* in
blanket molleton, embroidered or embossed, ami v.ith
heavy wool fur cuffs, collar and hand down the bottom, plain or with colored motifs.
In the afternoon the costume is similar, hut the en*
soluble is of cropede-ehine. or toile de soic, with a eoat
in kaisha. white or natural shade greges, Elaborately
pleated skirls ,,rc correct, will, big ami small kicks
equally featured, but godcts are no longer seen The
blouse is of the name material, in Iwo shades rich iu
openwork, or else it is a one pi dress, with coat or
ape to match.
Evening Wesr.
The straight line is still preserved in evening wear
and pastel shades are very much in evident,.. The non,,'
lar colors ore lavender, mauve, Kky blue peach ai I
quite s lot of white, the latter worn with pi *?t or
broidcred shawls. A fairly low neek, sleeveless of
course, and with fluffy skirt very short; bZyZm.
Lingerie.
Rayon has supplanted eotton ami lish knitted
tlerwear, and. for the business girl this newer fabric
makes » practical ami beautiful garment    Real   ilk
and grove silk, will, however, always be popular an   * i*
Ihosi  who ean afford, and must have ultra PXelusivi
liess 111 tin ir lingerie     Lingerie lhat  is trimly made
conllmiea in demand, and we shall see no departurt
from this mode until tin* skirt shows nn inelinatin
resume more intimate acquaintance with the at kl*
There have hem recent showing* of envelope ehoi ise
style* iu glove silk lingerie, bul they have noi pr    !
altogether attractive, the bloomer ami step-in slyl *
trimmed very simply with net trimming, or contrast ii •
shade  binding! of the  -mine  mnteiinl,  proving  ,; • <■"
supremacy
Millinery News.
During the summer mouths milady naturallv Inn *
her attention to millinery comfort, and the knowledge
that the ever popular felt* are to give way to km"   '
ami pleated straws, will be received with interesl
It is declared, however, hy Parisian millinery e*i
lishmcntS that, although feltl will disappear dun
'he hot summer months, we shall see them again in '
Pall and w Ini er
I'lie    new    straws    are    small    and    of    a    ver}
line  weave, thfl   belter  grades  being   imported   I"
China and Japan, although  local manufacturers ,r
busy with imitations of lhe foreign -article,   It is well
that we are quick to learn the names of materials usi
in our toilettes, sii nch new straw has a dlstinctiv.
name.      Among these are VlaCfl,  whieh comes  fpnti
Japan, Djembn from china. Remaillo also from Jap»"
Beiltal, Picotine. |»nille. JotljOU, etc. The most oxclti
wvo of them all is the Mental, whieh has much the ap
pearanee of Panama straw, nml. with the same stiff
ness, makes more shapely models. It comes in ",,,s
exquisitely delicate colors, and is eorroet for weddings
matching the bridesmaid's dress.   Mental is said to he Itto
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RKTAILER
23
|v in«'i
I mil hi
licalc
mine
On.
|s   tl    '
Irinu ■
decree has gone forth thai the lis! must exact*
!i ihe dress it is worn with    This may cause
in ihe millinery department, sinee lightly ,|e-
pflstel shades predominate in this acason's eon.
u ry chic model noticed among the amaller liats
i„Hne shape, turned up at the hack, which is
d, nnd with drooping brim in front.
Milliners are io emphasise tin matching of ImN to
»ho< *. and hiils lo hits.* , lik< wise hags to shoes and hags
in Itoac, ami the plain eolored coslumea ill vOguo are
will adapted (0 this idea, for tin* two tone effect looks
Unit   Rlriking in ehoes and hags and hats
T**%L*t/E
DOMINION  CONVENTION
We Twenty-first Annual Dominion Convention
of the Retail Merchants' Aaaociation of Canada,
Inc. will thia year be held at Kott William.
July 12th to 15th.
What's in a Horn*!
nareaee,' »he ruiiwi n, Hopped tot <*»r and leokfd
* round
1 »»> not aoenstomed lo r»u mj chauffeun i»> ihelr fli*!
hii!* Clsresee   What i* >our ittrasmeT"
'"»rllna. madam."
'Mvi on. Clarance"
Tahaa Soma Cracking.
1x1 Hi-h rioae of th«* reading lessee, iio- teseher was qtiea-
111 'ai her etsss on the mhjaei nmiier thereof, "Whal IS»»
"* ','t,*' ihe anked
Plesae, miss," replied u»e bright boj «»( the class, "Its
''     * **b ami half a nui."
«4~-
Por Mail Only.
It's a wonderful ililna for the WOttiea,
The popular permanent wave,
Now Mm up to some alrusallne Inventor
To Ret oui ii permaneni ittave.
WIDE COLOR RANGE MARKS LACE REVIVAL
Tin- present revival ni lace finds a special type for
•very demand of fashion, according to a report from
the Paris representative of lhe American Laee Manufacturers' Assoeiation, 111 Fifth avenue.
Hold ami silver ami all the colors have extended
far beyond the limitations of the old blaek and white
lace without, however, superseding them. It is definitely recognized that while laee wedding veils sound
well, plain while tulle is nearly always more becoming
and laee is made today to be cut ruthlessly into thc
required shape. Its use is widespread. There is practically no garment that could not use it in some capacity, except, perhaps, the stricter sports dresses.
"Older women are rejoicing in the softening effect
of laee collars, jabots, rovers. Whole lace drosses vie
with lace ami georgette and other mixtures. Black
and white laee. nevertheless, remains the smartest
among all the lace fashions.
"Most lace is probably used on evening dresses.
Heavy black Spanish lace may be sewn together with
black chiffon, keeping to the straight, simple outlines
of the moment, but having a very high superficial effect, Black chiffon is also used over petticoats of
thick black lace, which appear rough and below it.
I.ner is not only flounced in the tiered dresses, but is
pleated «s well. In the latter ease it is of cobweb consistency,
"Thin lace and thick lace are used together. Very
spidery white lace is sometimes' pleated very slightly
and worn over blaek laee, Tho faint linos of the pleats
cul agreeably across the patterns of both layers.
* I'or the average person laee comes in most usefully as an accessory, The collars and cuffs, the
scarves, thc return to sonic extent of tho mantilla, the
very long revel's of the thin cream lace, often pleated
nil plain black dresses opening over a -shaped lace vest,
tin lace tunics under blaek. bolero-like bodices—all
help to make very distinetiee drosses."
SACRIFICING RAYON PRODUCTS THROUGH
BAD MERCHANDISING.
Several manufacturers of rayon products declare
that bad merchandising in first and second hands is
bailing to a needless sacrifice of profits and is causing
serious injury to the development of the fibre as a permanent feature of the textile industry. They point
out that many small converters and some others have
been offering goods at reductions as great as 33 1-3 per
eent under actual cost. This is leading buyers of anything in rayon to think that they are being cheated by
houses that the holding steady and merchandising their
lines with some degree of mercantile judgment.
Buyers who purchase printed rayons are coming to
the point where they do not regard differences in
foundation fabrics of any consequence, yet the differ-
encos iu cost may be as great as 50 per cent, based
wholly upon the character and construction of the
cloths before treatment. Apprehension that this very
thing might happen kept some of the largest printers
from handling the goods in a large way for the current
season and their intuition or judgment appear to have
been warranted by recent sales.
While it is admitted that there was a vast increase
in rayon fabric production in recent months, the stim-
morc'popular than tho silk hats we have been so accustomed to at smart weddings. 24
THE BRITI8H COLUMBIA RETAILER
.t
un,
ulus eame from lhe coiilideiicc buyers for wholesale
and cutting establishments had in lhe samples whon
they were first shown to them and when orders for
the manufacture of the linos were laid down This
confidence is now being broken by constant offerings
of petty |,ii.s in u.ivs lhal most merehants consider in
bo little short oi" a reckless M'-iinndcring of converting
capital Tho one bright spot is the added (Irtnae**
maintained by houses lhat have Mold rayons foi x.m.
than a season or two.
Women's Summer Shoe Styles Involve a
Bevy of Seasonable Displays
By ERNEST A. DKNCII (Special to the It (' IMniler)
There are many classes of women, taking in the
working girl, tbe professional and the well-to-do, who
like to have a pair of shoes for every custuuie. My
this we do not necessarily mean a pair of shoes for
every dress. We refer to thc different occasions--
morning, afternoon, sports, and evening. These four
divisions can be divided into several subdivisions.
For morning, there might be tho boudoir slipper,
thc comfortable house shoe, or the white shoe for our
of-doors. For afternoon, there are shoes for calling.
shoes for tramping through the woods, For sports,
there are bathing shoes, golf shoes, tennis shoes, etc.
Evening slippers might mean simple slippers for dinner, or elaborate ones for the dance.
Do not get the wrong idea, that intensive salesmanship is not needed to sell to the girl demanding -styliat any price. She is just as susceptible to window displays that "hint," as is her more economical sister.
Speaking about the woman who wishes to economize. Even here the house shoe, the walking shoe and
thc evening slipper is needed.
You can't expect any woman to wax enthusiastic
about your shoes, if you advertise ami display them nn
"just shoes." You should give your wares lhe appearance of romance or adventure. Send out an SOS.
call to all the girls and women who want something
different, and you will most assuredly reap the bene
fits of your ingenuity.
Displaying Bridal Footwear.
The idea of displaying footwear for the summer
bride and her maids so as to give the bride plenty of
time to match up the shoes with the different colors,
and get her biidal array all ready, was done by It. II.
Fyfe & Co., Detroit, Michigan.
Thc display was thc work of F. K. Whitclaw, display manager. Hanging at thc rear, ou the panelled
background, was an oblong, bevelled plate mirror, the
frame of which was finished iu blaek polychrome,
Caught at the upper right corner of the mirror was a
large pink satin rosette, from which silver lace draped
down one side, rippled over the floor, then up over
some pedestal at the left. Near the mirror, also on the
right, was a tall bridge lamp, whieh was kept lit day
and night. At thc extreme left corner, to balance the
lamp and its silvery drape, was a large bouquet of
bridal roses and lilies of the valley. This was caught
on a pedestal, with the trailing ends of white satin rib
Jbon and lillies of the valley reaching to the floor, To
"the light of the bouquet were a series ot pedestals hold-
ing brocaded slippers, some on foot forms and others
alone. Nearby on the floor was a heart-shaped cushion, upon which wns another pair of white slippers. Sil-
ver slippers for the bridesmaids and white brocade ones
for the bride were displayed on the floor ami mi ! ,t
stands     White felt cotcrcd lhe floor.
White Shoes for Warm Weather.
Wlon the warm weather arrives, women rush lu •:<'.
white shoes to wear with their summer outfits
The Morse Heektnan Shoe Company, Pasadena ''..!
ifornia, g«»t ready for this rush in an ariisclic ntsiinci
The floor was covered with a soft green material lu
the centre was a pyramid made of latticework painted
white Over this trailed garlands of peach blossom*
About the bases of the pyramids were whi?> nl m *
while a paid of stocking* on a small |H*des(al add**-! |«
the effect Two potted ferns nt either side completed
the late spring like decorations
Shoes for Tennis.
Tennis, like dancing, must be done in proper fool
wear.   Mrs Pearson, of Pearson's, Keighhy. Kngland,
arranged a charming display lhat gave just the rijflil
hint to those fond of the sport.
The floor was covered with green paper, with ulalr
colored curtains draped across the glaaa panels ai lhe
back.
Across the rear, about half way from the ceiling,
was a frieze showing several young couples, properl}
attired, playing tennis.   A tennis racquet ami -1'
balls, placed in the centre, gave the right touch of local
color.    White shoes of all Styles, suitable for tctinii
* t
wen  placed on the window floor and over the  ' »■»
shelves.
Tbs Sea Setting.
One could almost smell the sea after viewing ll"
display by II. .1. Farnsworth, Verdun, Canada, tie.
ed to shoes suitable for the seashore.
At the extreme left was a seashore scene, ihowii
a lighthouse in the distance, a moon and a storms m
At the right, through clever lighting effects, tin* nun
was shining, a light -flashed on and off from the li''
house, with the refleelions on the water. This pain'
set piece (about 2 feet by 2 feet) stood in a slanin
angle at the rear left corner.
While shoes for sports wear wore gathered tog-'ll
or in tho centre, some of the shoes in pairs oil the gt
green eovered floor, with others forming a pyrami
like effect with the aid of pedestals.
At the extreme right was a Utile side issue show
ing a tiny table set for tea, and an armchair holding
small doll.   Itaby shoos were grouped annul the small
table,
High up above tbe while sports shoe display, on '
shelf, were several pairs of rubber bottom si A ,"1 \m
m I
I92i)
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RKTAILER
26
OKF
mt*:'*i
II
w
m
m\#t
7
asW*
W*
0M
u/0*
%lndermr
WW*
AT,   the   aicN
•     THE    t
jS
'\i \:•■} Snug Fill Tfnderwear
CEETEE
ADVERTISING
is read
by your
Customers
Not onlv that, but they are being
toM that you handle "CEETEE"
gndcrwear like all other good dealers. Newspapers and Magazines
froni ^ end ot Canada to the otter
caM.y the "CEETEE" story. YOU
know all about "CEETEE" qualit,. and value, and WE arc telling
the public.
How's your stork!   Ih it sufficient to meet all demands!
acrcr
v    ■ V
The
14
'Mill     |  *L,
»*»
• '   p.   J^.4.,1,
r*i sv     IT* T. **»*-?•
'^   r* **. ******,
^** ••« .... Il_ , "•»••
W«.*ll  UM,,,,,
Made in Canada by
UURHBOLL CO. OF 6*11 ltd.
Curt for yiw—Fret
Help along your Soles
by ttllng our dealers
helps, colored cards, si^ns,
folders, otc, also oleatros
for your own advertising,
which wo will supply free.
Find out about these.
PURE
»|0<
&V 26
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA KKTAILKR
'im.
tennis.   These were grouped with two Canadian flags
ami several tennis racquots.
Featuring Colored Shoes and Sandals.
The Royal Shoe Co., San I'Yaiieiseo, California, had
a very beautiful "Rainbow" window that featured col«
oretl shoes. At the far end of the window was a high
pedestal, on whieh was poised yards and yards of satin.
of many shades. As the satin fell in drapes from the
pedestal, it widened out in a beautiful rainbow effect,
each eolor separating and draping around a smaller
pedestal.   (Mi these pedestals, all of different heights,
were groups of colored shoes and sandals of a shade
contracting with the satin.    In the very centre was a
high pedestal, upon whieh stood a statue of Venus.
White Footwear Trim.
The Mahley and Carew Co, .Cineinnati. Ohio, made
a very interesting window display of white footwear.
High on the baek wall was shown a water fountain,
a modeling of a girl's head with water flowing Irom
the month. Beneath this was a beautifully carved
basin, into whieh the water flowed, (Iron foliagi in
profusion was grouped all about the basin and rear of
the display, giving a cool, sylvan appearance,
On a platform built around tin- fountain (covered
with a material resembling stone, and tin* nsemlfcovered with moss), were grouped five different style-, of
white shoes on wire stands of different Initfhts Stock*
ings of different tints were draped on the floor
On the rest of the window floor white shoes trimmed
with eolored leather were displayed, together with cob
orod canes to give a swagger tone to the trim
Portraying the Der.irt.
Potters, Cincinati, Ohio, showed an interesting way
to display summer foot wear by introducing a bit of tin-
desert atmosphere.
The entire length and depth of tin* window showed
a background of a painted desert scene. This scene de*
pieted hot sands, vivid sky and cool green trees. Also,
immediately in the background-* was a large camel foi
lowing some invisible path, while at his side walked a
white costumed figure of an Arab. In the dhtatic,. the
Pyramids eould he seen.
Two large palm ferns wcro placed at ,-ithcr side of
the window, while white sand covered the floor. Interspersed on thc sand were colored sandals and bright
stockings.     Some of thc sandals were displayed on
stands, while the others rested on low racks.
LINENS AND BLANKET8 EAGERLY SOUGHT BY
AMERICAN T0URI8T8
Canadian merchants arc counting on a bigger year
than ever in the tourist linen trade. It has now be-
eome an established fact that American tourists spend
uich of their money when visiting in this country on
'median linen. They believe that the quality ni the
median linen and thc price is of far better value than
diet is generally bought in the Cnited States, and. in
many eases. American tourists carry home their quota
of *100 (dollars) worth of goods in linen. American
tourists do not buy the same type of linen that the
Canadian woman does. They prefer novelty Hues nnd
eheap damask rather than thc better grades which anneal to the Canadian shopper. They ask for colored
linen in table cloths, something that Canadian women
LItiHTHOUSK bband
BUCKSKIN cloth
SPORT JACKETS
Ideal for (toll
Idol toe for tvtfy outdoor sport, for they IN
roomy, comfortable- and alio* porfoct freedom <>'
movement. Made of a durab'e double Snieh bucks-*"*
cloth wh ch looks, and wear* like chamois Wmi
bands »r* Pmmjn'i elastic wool ribbing.
These ).ic»<tti wash perfectly without shrinking
or losing their shape.   Made in light or dark g">
chamois, dark tan and reindeer brown, as well *t «•
mackmaw cloth chocks, red and black, lettuco and
black, grey and black, and brown and black.
Seo them at *ny good men's wear store.
o'L'l
Rock Island Overall Co
/ ROCK laiAND. QUE.
Representative:
R. M. FOSTER. £8 Water atroot. Vancouver, B. C. 192ft
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
27
om demand.   They want novelty designs nml
ver) i*1 "io
In rue  ■/->'**
I,, this reason, the general reports throughout the
liaiPU trade are very good. Canadian merchants have
l„.,■„ ti< mantling a large summer stock, and orders for
,!,!,-,, i\ <m June 1 were heavy. This American tourist
,1, in.,,,,I is notel not only in border towns, such ns M«ni.
i,,,,| (i.inanoipie, and those OB the St l-awrenoc route,
lull ii -lit across Canada and in Vancouver and Victoria
iliii. i> a special demand by American tourists for
in .oursc, this husincMM has not eome to Canada
without some effort on thc part of Canadians to get it.
('otixtatll improvement in the road system and tourists'
camps the eonpletlon of the mad from Vancouver to
H.iiit* and the direct route from l*i* Angeles to Van*
eouver have had a great deal to do with bringing
Am. ii- an tourists to tins country. It has remained for
Canadian merchants to show the l»«»itcr quality of tin
linen* which are sold in Canada
Sol only tablecloths and tabic limn are bought, but
jjotni linen towels arc in constant demand from theae
i mi rial* Woollen blankets have received special at
lent ion from American tOUlistS, and the reputation of
stimt »i tin* Canadian line* is growing, One Canadian
retailer has made a specially of featuring these Wan*
kels for the loiirist .and ha* had an excellent response
Th* demand is spreading, and this year many linns in
ihr .U'hhoriug town* are *toeking up with woollen
blank* is for the visitor from aeross thc line,
Hes in the fall. These colors include champagne, atmoa-
Phere, French nude, black, dove grey, fox blue and
grain. There has been more stability as to colors dur-
nix the present season than in years, and the hosiery
industry is in mueh more prosperous condition than a
year ago,
Fancy soeks continue popular for men, and it is
also expected that these types will remain the favorites in the fall. The white stocking and the white sock
seem to be almost out of tho market. At this time last
year thc demand for white stockings and socks was
heavy in all parts of th nintry, with thc result that
the amount! sold increased from fi to 18 per eent. of
all the hosiery sold in the country.
COURTAULD'8 1925 PROFIT £4,411,413
Brtish Rayon Concern Makes £530.669 More Than In the
Previous Year.
Piofii, totalling £4,411,-113 or £530,669 greater than those
realised In 1924. were reported for 1925 by Courtauld's
Limited. Orest Britain's leading rayon producing concern, In
Ita annual report.
Tin* increase in last year's profits over those of 1924 was
calculated after allocations of £500.000 and £200,000 had
been made to tbt* pension reserve and the Insurance ae-
roum. respectively, as compared with an allocation of £600,.
no for these purposes In 1924.
Ordinary dividends were Increased by five per cent, on
die year's business to a total of 25 per cent, tax free. This
dividend was declared after allotting £400,000 for the preference dividend, as against £200.000 assigned for this pur
posfl In 1924. and £1,000.000 to the general reserve, letv-
Ing to carry forward £ 1.047.007 sterling as compared with
£ 1,034,694 brought in.
HOSIERY NOTES
Lengthening of Skirts Will necessitate Minor Changes
tn Hosiery Manufacture
Since the mode han changed in I'ariv longer -kids
will -shortly return to popularity in thin country, but
ihi rhange will noi entia-e much worry to hosiery manu
faelurera, except thai they will find it necessary to pro
utter stocking! with longer eotton tops in time to meet
lb demand for such types of hosiery mat will come
as the skirt* an* lengthened All indies tions arc that
Ihr rolora riOW in Ihe grvntcftt demand will be the favor-
INCREASE NOTEO IN TEXTILE EARNINGS
Return to more normal business is indicated in the annual
tniioiiUI report of Canadian Cottons Ltd.. for the year ended
March 81, 1926. Sales amounted lo 99.606.641, as compared
wlih $8,649,897 In (he preceding twelve months, an Increase of
o\er ft.ooo.ooo. These sales practically correspond with those
nf tin- year 1923 1924, showing a return of conditions prevail-
iuk (luring that period.
Profits realised, together with income from Investments,
resulted In » showing of nearly 9 per cent .on the $2,716,500
of common stork outstanding, after deducting Interest charges
and dividends on the preferred stock. This compares with
sos prr cent, in thO preceding year, snd 10.31 per cent. In
19231924.
THE FOLLOW THROUGH
-The great human >earnln| to hit the ball." says Oranttand nice, the writer on snorts, "and
to knock the cover ot It Is target) responsible for most of the poor timing tn baseball, golf,
tmsss,sssssssssssssssssm*sm*m      MA „,„,,,„    K,.m „„. miing t„ hit  with anything like r rve.   It Is rather a caae of blasting
II     with all the power «t hand.   The overpowering eagerness to hit with full force -means a
r%i  W     Ught..no* of thr ImiKinani nomclcs ahead of lime and a lark of powei for tho point of Impact.
PP^Isf11     F,w „„. t.nmg .0 wall for ihe swing. 10 wall with deliberation and then to hit on through.
rJT to hti through the object, rather than at tt"
Am, ,„„rr |, „ big lesson there, tew. for the merchant who would succeed.   One of the
ifcfwM whirl, the average business needs and need* badly Is proper timing.   Most of them
1 in* enough    They exeeute their punches and swings, their offenses and selling
!JL.   Z «h. v give little thought  to the vtoiyot timing of them, so timt they will attain
' . wmpalgn without thorough conalderallon for synchronisation
maximum sMstsnsy, To artttmrilj ptsa    • »ng ^^^.?, J"o knock tbe eovor ofr a baseball with one mtgbty
with mm eoadlUoa outs.de ones 0WS 0*t^**Z   ddl £we   behind ll of aeasonableneas, of manuf.ctur-
Nl unw,., wnllop.   llu. to .0 ^^J^? ,   ,,,„ the added ,*wer of "follow-through" methods.
m advrrl.alng and a hall do.cn other II el   ^ ^ ^
When the might,  n«bc Ruth swsu he ba , It . 1 v r in a j or
Mined thst It has UIS deliberate swing ™^%™ *™ J Mi   mL ihrough on your sales wallops. The
snd arms, and which hits through .he hall, ss it ** ns, a
Wlfef must; ihr merehan. should
I 2*
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
I Illle
COTTON.
Normal Conditions Retur.ilnq
Mamh. «*,«•. Jut" -J. »?♦*-**>
Though hampered by the cosl trouble, the rutin, trade Is
well advanced upon the road to normal rendu loin, or rather
the conditions which prevailed Immediately before the an Ike.
At one time May shipments were In jeopardy. Kxpoi'It»r» were
hIiaid that they would no. be able «o get bill of ladhr in May.
•nd ilu.. in consequence they would either be penalised for
late delivery, or would receive notice lhat their orders were
cancelled.
During the s.rlke .here were hopeful enquiries from sev-
eral Importan. markets for considerable quantities of piece
goods, but not mueh business was done, owing to lhe necessity of Inserting strike clauses In contracts b*at now that difficulty haa |Msaed. soaie Improvement Is looked for
Supporters for a Control Board for lhe regulation of the
Industrv find encouragement in an official report to the effect
that the Control Board which Is In effect In Belgium, has
found very useful a form of combination which not only buys
raw material, and sells finished products, but also allocates
specialised work among the amalgamated Arms
Both employees and workmen have now appointed representatives on the Joint committee to Investigate the present
slate of trade in the American spinning seclon, with a view
to considering any possible means of Improvement, and thi-*
unusual experiment will acquaint the operatives with the
difficulties of buying and selling, and Is expected to foster
harmonious working.
DRAPERY ANO CLOTHING.
Season's Business Prospects.
June   llll
Retail Irade, taking It as a whole, Is making a fairly good
recovery from its setbsck, bul demand Is below normal. In
addition to labor troubles the weather has been very unfa
vorable to sales of wearing apparel a. (his time of the year.
when business should be most brisk.
While a certain amount of early "Jobbing" Is sure to lake
place because of the Inclement weather and the lessened demand due to the general strike, suppliers of some lines hold
the oplolon rhat marking down should be delayed for a week
or fortnight beyond the customary date. This applies, for instance, to the costume trade, where May 20 is the agreed dale
before which "Jobbing" of regular merchandise shall not be
gin. Several houses have decided that May 25 or June I Is
sufficiently early this year to commence clearing stocks. They
it out that demand for two-piece suits is by no means sat
, and that although fixtures which were empty when
port was withdrawn became loaded with garments by the
of last week, all this merchandise could be disposed of at
regular prices.
Those wholesale clothing factories where work was curtailed or suspended through withdrawal of current are again
well employed, but there is likely to be some easing of pro
taction In most establishments during the coming months
Some firms will experience little contraction of demand, while
others who sell mainly in the mining and big Industrial areas
will suffer considerably. There Is a general slowing down In
factories and wookrooms concerned with the women's trade,
but some Improvement Is looked for short I v.
BOOTS ANO SHOES
Curtailed Operation!
Northampton, June 6th.
Boot manufacturers are now hoping for a quick relura to
something approaching normal facilities for the dlapatch of
goods. It was not altogether Impossible to get goods away
during the railway stoppage. Although not comparable with
ihe ordinary volume a considerable number or parcels was
handled.
With Willi sun tide close al hand trade Iiuh suffered ser
iously, There has not been the usual rush for good* ,,, \\u.
holidays .and the outlook Is far from promising In ,,*-,„.
centres the factories thai closed during ihe general gtriki «m
no. reopen un.il af.er Whl.aun In every boot-trad.* «*, trlcl
short time Is being worked in many factories in compliance
with the Federation's recommendation that this course ahould
b.- adopted to conserve coal (n lhe hands of Lhe pOWet etna
panics, and even al Northampton, where the Km.-rg*-u, . ■*,„„
mlttee of the Town Council and the Coal Officer are of opin
ion that the position o (ihe power companies Is ao strong Hut
reduced hours of working an- not necessary. vcr> fei manu
faelurera have bwtt able lo ket*p their work* gotta* si more
than half time.
MANUFACTURERS
on ths
OFFICIAL U8T FOR PRICE MAINTENANCE
Thomas Seeeham Co.
II St   Helens 8.reel. Montreal. que
Blrmingham Food Products Ltd.
Bond Building, Toronto. Onl
Canadian Milk Products Ca. Ltd.
347  Adelaide St   Wmit. Toronto   Onl
The S. F. Lawraeon Company
(Snowriake Ammonia i. London, ont
Interlake Tissue Mills. Ltd.
51 1 nlverslty Ave. Toronto. OBI
I. X. L. Spice 4 Coffee Mills Ltd.
Uindon, Ont.
The Nestles Foo-j Company
Mott'real. (Ju<-
The Monarch Mfg. Company
187  l-og-W  AVenSe, Toronto,  lint
Phenia Cheese Limited
Montreal, gin-
Rowntreo A Co. (Canada) Ltd.
10 Wellington, St   K. Toronto 2, OtH
F. J. Whitlow Company (Flit)
1*3 laiffeiin St.. Toronto, (int.
Suprema Polish Co. Ltd.
UTI w. Georgia st. Vancouver, B c
W. . Beaty A Co. Ltd. (Flytoa)
32i»  Howe Sirei-t.  Vancouver.  B   I'.
Oeo. Payne'e Tea
Dickson importing to  Ltd
317 Columbia s«. Vancouver, n. c
B. C. Canners Ltd. (Quaker Soups).
332 Drake Street, Vancouver, B  C,
Dr. Mlddleton Food Products Co. Ltd.
xr>2 Hastings st  k. Vancouver, D.C,
Novelty Mills Ltd. (Beaver Pastry Flour)
Hamilton Street   Vancouver   II. c,
McLaren's Ltd. (Jelly Powders)
Toronto. Ont.
Broder Canning Co. Ltd. (Royal City Brand)
New West minster. II. C.
Royal Crown Soap Works
(Witch llax.-l ft White Swim Soaps)
30H deorgia Htroel Kaat. Vancouver. B.C
Stanley'o Pure Preserves Co. (Marmalade)
Alia Vista, 11, C.
Supplementary Lists win be added as other manufacture
become affiliated wllh the Canadian Kalr Trade League ■!■■• 1
i,  i
192ft
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
29
HARDWARE, OL w PAINTS
HARDWARE MARKETS AT A GLANCE
Copper.
\, w York market repotia indicate an Improvement
i„ foreign business, bul producers ate not inclined tn
mflX,. any concession in price for unlets offering at
lower figure* Domestic Mil.-* nre «|tiii«• limited; how*
,\*t a li.ttct Nciitiincnt seems to be developing.
Ptf Iron.
I'i.; iron prices at Pitt*lutrg remain firm ami while
slight eoiieetariona have tain msde at Buffalo mills
th. n is a (air amount of l>usine-vs offering Steel bar
jiri<*. •**, have advanced (3 per ton nt Pittsburg, bul no
ehange hss been made in priees here
Electrical Appliance Sales Oood
That hardware men nre taking advatitagi  of the
import unit tea offered by ihe tremendous development
..I N.iler power, t» shown liy the sales of electric appli-
slices The large m-w areas lhat are receiving electric
nerviet mean mueh for hardware trtorea sates oi electric
iron*, eteetrie percolators, elcctrie wsshing maehiuea,
electrie vacuum cleaners, etc. Wholesalers report
lha! tli.it* sab-* of elect rie appliances lo lhe retailer*
it. uti the Increase, and splendid htlidttcaa is being dune
id U|im   titles I lui vent*.
OasoUne Advances.
Another advance of one cenl per gallon on both
gaauKnc and conl oil wju stinottuccd reeeutl) lln**
sdvance ii i» claimed la due io the higher price .»t* erudi1
oil and ii sceiita tpiiie probsble that during the nexl
three months la»ih gasoline nml cosl oil prices may *o
•*t\\\ higher, although even prior to thi-* most recent
rhange, local employees of the larger refineries main*
lainctl ihai the next change wonld he In lhe nature of
*• reduction It is estimated lhal the consumption of
gasoline thia year will exceed that of last by approximately twenty-live per cent
loe Crc*n\ Freexers
m
The  UMInl  opening   tip  of  the   ttaile   in   ICC   tW*
fret iters ia reported by local wholesale hardware hoiia-
l'" who statu thai sales are bigger than last year iii
•hi* line, ami that they are very likely to show roil-
lituied improvemeni throughout the summer months
Just ahead,
Hatchets, The demand is fairly good with prleea
Ml maintained.
Olasa and Putty.—Sales are fairly good, Prleea
11 '•' unchanged.
Files.— Prices nre unchanged Th.* demand m
Mertdy,
Chains.—Prieei are unchanged   A normal volutin'
"' buaineaa is reported. .
Batteries-\ alight decline has been noted in (le-
11 ,,,»d. and particularly as regards radio bnttetiea, nut
"" the whole is fair.
Tin—As with sheets, there is a slight slowness in the
sile o ft in. Stocks are we 1 tilled prepared for a hi'sv**
ier demand.   Prices arc unchanged.
Torches.—-Retail sides arc showing sonic activity
as building work progresses. Stocks arc full and prices
steady.
Paperhangers Tools.—Itrisk demand continues to be
made in these lines.
Sheet Metal.—(inly moderate demand exists for thia
line,
Solder.— Call is fair with ample stocks on hand.
Priees have not changed.
Pyrex Ovenware.—Sales are normal for this time
ol year.   Stocks are tilled and prices unchanged.
Wire,—Sales are fairly good in all lines in this pro-
duet. Stoeks are ample for the call. Prices have not
changed.
Screen Doors and Windows.—Demand is showing
si;*ns of increase as is usual at this time of the season.
Storks are well tilled and prices show no change.
Carpet Sweepers.—('all is fair with stocks well as-
sotted,    Priees have not changed.
Lswn Mowers.—Trade has started in a very satisfactory manner. Stoeks arc well tilled, and prices
show no change,
Paints snd White Lead.—Sales are going strong at
present with outside painting ami decorating well un-
der way.   Prices arc firm,
Paper.— ('all for building papers is good with,
stoeks well filled.   Prices show no change.
Fishing Tackle.—There is a good demand for all
kinds of fishing tackle.
Oalvsnised Wsre.—There is a heavy demand for
pails, as usual at this season.
Steel 8heeta.—Sales arc fairly good. Priees show
no change
Nails. — The demand is quite satisfactory, and
prices continue on a tirm basis.
Hinges. Prices are unchanged. Sales nre satisfactory.
Barn Door Hinges.—More activity is noted in the
market for barn door hinges.   Continued good business
is expeeted,
Rubber Hose.—Sales have been very good throughout the district, Prices have continued firm and stocks
are apparently satisfactory.
Sash Cord.—The demand has been very good and
will continue satisfactory as long as building activity
keeps up    Prices generally lirm.
Freexers.--Jobbers declare that orders for frcosors
are heavy, and indications point to an increase over a
vear ago,
Automobile Accessories.—New prices are out on A
ti spark plugs, which show a moderate decline. Otherwise automobile accessory prices show little important change. The movement of goods out of jobbers
stocks is fair.
Builders' Hardware.—Const ruction is considerably
ahead of a year ago in all sections, and builders' hardware is moving out well.
3 *
Hi I
ii   1 30
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
•I llll**
Automobile Tires and Tubes.—The market continues quiet, with prices somewhat unstable. No changes
recorded as yet. ,
Oil Hasten. — Demand is good, due to the cool
weather prevailing.   Stocks arc well filled and prices
steady. ,        ,,  ....  ,
Bolts.— Demand is fair, with stoeks well tilled.
Priees show no ehange.
THE PULLING POWER OF THE WELL LIGHTED
WINDOW.
Thousands of After-hour Shoppers Are Persuaded to
Buy Through Evening Window Presentation.
It is surprising what a difference in sales the lighting of display windows will actually make. People
like to stop in front of a store that sparkles with light,
they admin* merchandise that is properly displayed and
properly presented to them.
Poor illumination docs not always mean underlighting. A window is poorly illuminated thai is full
of displeasing glare or uneven "spotty" effects, ami
one does not need to be an illumination engineer to see
thc decided contrast in effectiveness ami drawing pOW*
er between a window that is lighted in accordance with
proper illumination standards and one that breaks
every principle in the calendar.
Thc most modern tendencies in store window light
ing are covered by certain broad principles which if followed by any merchant will at once increase the effectiveness of his window displays.
The first principle ia to conceal all Hght sources to
avoid glare, and resultant distraction and annoyance.
In general the only lamps that should be visible are
those of very low brilliancy used for decorative purposes. All lamps should be fitted with efficient reflectors to get the maximum light on the goods for the minimum expenditure of power.
Reflectors should be chosen which distribute lhe
light in such a manner as to illuminate thc display uni-
formerly. A high, shallow window obviously requires
a different type of reflector than a low deep one. A
window likely to have a high dress should be lighted
differently from one in whieh the material is always
close lo the floor.
All mechanism of lighting should be hidden from
the observer by some sort of screening device ami it is
also advisable to use a background of dull finish to prevent reflections of light sources causing a distracting
confusion to the eye.
A light-colored backing makes a window appear
brighter with less illumination than when a mahogany,
walnut or similar backing is used. Warm grey, nOU*
tral buff, cream or ivory have been effectively used as
backing.
Color Lighting.
The use of eolored ahow-window lighting is some-
thing that hss been coming into vogue of recent years
but extreme csrc must be taken in thc selection of proper colors to set off the eolor of the merchandise or
other goods that may be tin display. It is rather dangerous for one who has not made a study of illumination to sttempt color displays.
Thc modern expert display man spends mueh lime
in arranging his merchandise in such a manner that the
completed exhibit forms a pleasing picture.   He then
paints thc picture with light.   Thc show window is ji,
reality a miniature stage, and similar methods »»f (;.:)lt
ing apply although the possibilities of pleasing i t,,ts
are not always realised by the merchant until h,  \m
seen an actual display.
A very effective display «»f wicker furniture **,,,, ,,n
exhibit at the convention of Lighting Sales Bureau and
Lamp Manufacturers in Atlantic city recently The
object was to allow thai the future of window display
lay in the use of color effects, and that all window .lis.
plays could not be treated in the same manmr, bul inch
picture should receive s|H-.*ial attention.
The furniture was arranged like a summer porch,
ami the combination of lighting which gave tlo mm
pleasing results with thia particular display eon-stated
of green general illumination, a low Intensity of unmodified footlightiug, table ami floor lamps ami overhead
spotlights equipped with purple ami orange screens
The effect was very striking, ami if put into effect in
any furniture store in Vancouver it wotitd stop everj
passerby,
It does not require any very elaborate Illumination
system lo produce .some very striking effects, an.I in
many eases it requires little or no change in the syxiew
of wiring that is already in the window The r. Milt
however, is mi effective in attention value that ft is
strange more merchants have not realised tin- wonder
ful opportunity that is right on (heir own premise* of
pulling dollars from the pockets of pa mm rs by into their
cash registers.
NEW 00008.
0**t*ittO »•••
The Latttt Invention tor Handling Sana*
It is ilon.ll by drawing two handler- together that slid*1
length wl»e. on upper and lower J*». rhmlna the teeth down
on Hi* block, holding thr |aw« tight with mouth Open so >ou
ran -olmlnlntet medlrlnr through hole
Thi- I Hunt rat Ion* nhow thr Instrument and how to operal"'
It
The ntory now going the round* about lite "mpsr*sale*s»*'i
who ttotd a lull with two pair* of panta to Ihe widow »h<>
wanted a null In whlrh lo layout her deceaned SPOUSC, n
inlii'lii ihe Old Haleiman about thr lime apalr of pan la »'"
altered for a onr legged man and Ihr rualomcr than neglect"!
to call for I hem. They wrrr eventually disponed ol to •
dealer who upeclatlird in mlafltn
One day he waa aaked: "Old you ever gel rid of Ihoae on*
leg pant*. Abe'"
"No." he replied. "I though I had- a customer for tlient
one day, but when I allowed him the panla I found Hut II
waa the wrong leg that had brrn cut off,"
Flral  alenog    How do you  like your new  bona*
Second  Htwnog.-~'*Oh!   purdy  good,  bul  he glvea nn- s
lolia extra work.—he don't know nolhln* aboul grammar or
spellln* or  punctuation  and  his  pronouneln'  ia  something
fierce."
Her Huaband   If a man sleala-no mailer whal ll ll—h*
will live lo regret It.
Ilia Wlfe-Ourlng our courlahlp you uaml lo al.nl klnsei
from me,
Her Hushand-We|l, you heart! what I said. US THK UHITISII OOLUMSU RKTAH.KU
Restrictions on Sale of Firearms
•**•*«» *■§*■ frfl*1** •*J«Sf H. UUU TnMU- M * ******** ot Ortm. Om-
...dtna waaarntma*  a. u *. ttk* Slron* GxctpUon to DnuUo RtitrleUoiu ImkodM ta Ntw
M
till'
Mri«
\\      -he ohj*~rt si amending the Criminal Code of
Canada in surh * **> thai th. Maportstiott, msnufac
and  not  of  firearms  lit  this  country   is  t,
• ,, a niinimutu Senator \   A  llvlcourt, of (Hta<
mtnwlured a Itlll which has pax-*..I the Senate,
,,,1,1  ,ii«:in*» deidUtr-d  to   l**ooUu   law    l>en mint    tKt
i»e\l
Thi Mature of the 1-Hlt is pn»vision for tin control
Ir) tli. Minister of Justice ,,r his authorised agent, of
„i| it:..*.* r'-ition transportation, manufactun- ..r vile of
mi) nil- gun. rcfolfgf, pistol ,ir other tin nrtn ur any
air *•un .lev ice* for muffling or concealing the sound
„r flash of the -.iisrharg* of a tin-arm, etc The amend-
taenia providk a few «*p*-eific r\.mptions, such as mem*
\o't% oi the naval militarv. air or militia forces, Royal
Canadian Mounted INdicc. price officer, public officer,
itBiaigmtioS officer, who arr allowed to ha\* upon t'u'ir
pefwm   >.r in their pMMM&M any weapon which they
Regulations
MA'S
Ml
• an
i  ■  -    * —       —. » "*• t
lit bj Saw j* rmittesl or aut honied mi to ha\e or |*os
s% V aifioe can have in his possession or on his \» r*
it a sheath knife or rlasp knife A Itritish subject
..ii have a riflr or shotgun whieh he owned on July I.
1125 tnd ha* OWHied continuously since without coin
ait ting an offence A pcrvm i* permitted to have on
bis pn mines an ehsoUtc weapon tail uisable for its pur-
poses iii.I merely kept as a sou*, irir «»r war relic with-
(Sit rattling offenee Apart fnuu these few exemptions,
boS/ever the pmpotals are very drastic, requiring I
liceiww lo import, transport, manufactun-, or deal 111
an) ot the weapons mentioned . nqutring a permit for a
js rum to have on his \** num or iu his posaeartiou any
• f th« articles meat-kmrd, unless specially exempted,
sml "instituting it an offence for anyone whether hold*
ISg a permit or Wrenst or not. to sm 11 to. barter with, or
I'ti.l any. of the weapons tnenliom-.l to a person who
hws not a permit therefor.
Retailors an required to keep records ss under the
former legulntlon. Permits granted by the suthoriied
agent of the minister of Jistlee are to be good only
withm the limits within which the person granting
them hai jurisdiction or power to perform and exer
«w the dntiss ef his office. This would greatly restrict the usefulness of permits snd make it necessary
for sportsmen who cover Urge territories to secure per
miu from a timber of sources
• he new weapon permit proposed, provides for pet'
■imdun being given io persons to have weapons upon
laelr junior, oC in their potMcssHHi. whereas the form
*** in use given permission to "carry" a weapon. The
■■"" limit of the permit ami territory in which il is oi
tl* is also imtvidcd for on the proposed form
'■■-   proponed  regulations on firearms have been
hfniight forward ostensibly to further control the dis
Iriliutlon of weapons With the object of keeping them
"J"  ' the hands of dangerous or Irresponsible persons,
1,11 proomt regulations on the subject have, however.
'"''" iriven very can-fttl consideration and have been
,Mn' ,s<d in their effect from time to lime so that at
Pit -ul they make it almost Impossible for a weapon
,0 l' I into the hands of an Irresponsible or dangerous
l*,s"'- through legitimate channels of trade,   There
would, therefore, seem io be little need for any change
In regulations on the sulijcet,
Protection Already Adequate,
The present regulations give adequate pnitcctton
againat sueh ftrcarms gelling into dangerous hand*.
while at the same lime making possible thc dislrtbu
lion of such arms for legitimate and useful purr*w*ev
Many hardware stores do a considerable business h;
such firearms, selling to banks, trust companies ami
other concerns whieh mv allowed to have sueh weapons
for en-tain employees and watehlmen. ami wiling rifles,
to sportsmen These stores also sell Revolvers to private persona, who are allowed to have them for lhe prv>.
tectiiiu of tin-it- homes Thc suggested legislation would
make it more difficult for firearms to be sold for legit
imnte purposes, while making it no hanter for w-eap
mis to be brought into the country for illegitimate purposes, In other words, it is placing the peace-loving
private citizen, or the person who has interests thai
must be guarded, more than ever at a disadvantage
compared with an armed adversary, in respect lo the
sab* of revolvers, and Ihe proposed regulations would
Ih a blow to sportsmen. It may be quite inie lhat the
majority of holdups and munlers an* committed with
revolvers or pistols, but imt with weapons which are
procured under the present airtight system of permits
in force in Canada They an* committed with weapons
which an' easily procurable in the underworld, ami
further regulations will not pn'vent them Wing used,
Tbe Retail Merehanta" aVssocmtioo of Ooaoda has
taken strong exception to this measure, realising the in*
jurious effect such amendment would haet ipoo tho
business of the retail hardware merchant^ mora particularly in ths rural districts, and ths foUowing resoti*
tion hss been passed by ths Hardware Section of tha
Ontsrio Branch of the Association, protesting such
amendment
WHKKKAS it ha« Wen brought 10 our attention that rille**,
shot sum*, and sheaih knlvwt are Included tn « BUI Introduced
to n'peal Section US of the Criminal Code, which wtll make
It Dcocssarj to have a permit to buy or to have In one** |»oa
seaatOB, a license to aell. barten with, lend, or give any esaa*
of ftrearma, saeepl tlau tm one who la a ttrlllah suhjeel, and
ha* liad a rifle or aholgun eoMlnnonaly In hU |to«ae«»lon alne,*
the 1st July. l!>25. i» aot nsiuiml lo take oui a }*rmtt;
ANH WHKHKAS theae flriuarnta and ahenth knlvea are
used h> isttlers, hanlera. trawer* ami a|a>rl*nten;
AM> WIIKUKAS the Act will nol only have a tendency
to reatrlei tt>o aale and uae of theae armartna, but will be
verj grievous ami vexatious In Ma ot**railon*;
ASH WHKKKAS we an' of Ihe opinion thai ahot suns and
ithealh knlVWI an« nol Offensive or (tanseroua weapon*;
THKUKKtlKK UK IT UK8t>I.VKI>. that we an- o|»|a»aed to
hsvtnr rifles, shotguns and Ihesth knlve* lnelud.sl under
provision (S) ef aubaeellon * of aeclion I1H, of the proiwainl
Act. bat we an* In favor ot any practical n»alrhlH»na which
ma) be I'IswmI upon the aale aad use of revolvers snd pistols,
and lUCh other offensive wenpons." 32
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
mil-
TRADE NOTES
Brookside—
(rank, A.*—Reported sold out to Slowln & Font (kio.)
Cloverdale—
Staler, C. J.—Commeaced (Baker)*, etc.)
Kamloops—
ROSS, T. 8.—Commenced (bakery).
Langley Prairie—
Teeoe, H. A.—Commenced (sro.)
Nanaimo—
Woodiock, A. C—Cominenrins (remit meats),
Nelson—
Noxon. A. T. — Reported acquired Nelson Agency of
Helmsman & Co. (jeweler**).
Now Westminster—
Kirk, H. T.—Sold out lo Mark Humand (hardware).
Morris, ('.—Commenced (Queens Park Market).
Port Hammond—
Ilareluys Cafe—Reported burnt oul.
Lei I ner. P. J.—Heported burnt out (meat*)
Princeton—■
Kostad It Hume—CommenritiK (M.K.
Mae Dona Id   llros.—Added   men's   furnishings   (It.   ,v   S
Rep.)
Vancouver—
Ilarrett. Alice L—-Reported Hold out (Qros.)
Hay view Meat Market.-- Reported discontinued.
(Jolley. Christina—Sold out tn (iaribaldi V. Siurley  (eon )
Mitchell, M. K.—Reported *«ld out (groc, etc.)
lilue Ribbon Cafe—Commencing.
Itoiiyn. John—Commencing (Qro., etc.)
Kerfoot. Ceo. H.—Discontinued (D, 0. D, and S )
Lange, J. A.—Tenders advertised for purchase of assets
tailor).
Victoria—
Know Hon. Minnie J.   Selllns oui to Ceo   Peacock d-m
etc.)
Ccneral Warehouse (Fred Spenrer)    Incorporate,! (|j ,;
furalahlnp, etc,
Hwyer J. \V. Estate- Assets #old to l». Herman (gro iimi
tneats).
CHANGE IN LETTER RATE OF POSTAGE
The kui .ra I rale of pontage oo letters addreimed to off In*
in Canada, lulled Stale* and all other plale« on tlie North
American Continent, mid llritiah tiuUim. will be changed
(non 3 rents to 2 rent* on the lm July. IS2S The general
rale of poHUite ou lettira addre*»ed lo office* in Great Hm
on and all other pleee* within th| llriflnh Kmpire (mn in
eludins the North American Continent ami llrltlwh Guiana)
will he i hiina.-d from 4 eentn to 3 cent* on the lm Jul)   \tU
Sura Did*
A  minister  -SllOSe  hobby   wan  rolled Ina  butiet'11.-  was
•-noting a part)  of  women on a walk throuah the « I
The-, iante to o filream where nut o a»herman
The anherman abnerved the minister's butterfly  Bel, ami
not underHtanditift. inquired
"Catrhinx minnow*, mlnier*"
"Sir. I'm a Usher el men," replied the mlulnter
"Well." remarked the Awlo-mot. kUikins «• 'he rlrh    \m\
got (he pr.ipet bait, all rishl."
GROCERS' PICNIC
The Grocers of Greater Vancouver will this year
hold their Nineteenth Annual Picnic at Nanaimo.
on Wednesday. July 28th. Tickets may be
obtained from the Executive Council.
'THE WONDER HEALER."
A tsAtmlt taatyat tticotk ttuotot ****** tsa\ *****
Oi-t-n»ionall) an artiele of outttinndlitf merit
make* lln debut, and » pluee Ini publlr savor
seOOlS to bSVS been awaiting It, it Klipi. Into
Ihe front ttnlen rank no naturally.
Aro  you gttting  tho  Intro  Salt* and  Eitra
Proflta from tho steadily mounting demand for
Gray's  Balm, "Tho  Wondtr   Healer." .
Aok Us Now!
We (Both IX***
MORE
BUSINESS
Proparod in
tho laboratory of
GRAY REMEDY CO., LTD.
SPECIAL WEEK FOR GRAY'S BALM, JUNE 21   M
12  Walor  Strool.
Vanoouvor.  B.C.
J. A. TEPOORTEN
LIMITED
WHOLESALE DRUGS
PATENT MEDICINES DRUGISTS' SUNDRIES
PHARMACEUTICAL PREPARATIONS
308 Water St.
Vancouver, B.C.
Bruises        Sorts
Rheumatism
Sootho tho sore muscles or ligaments by rubbing In Mlnard's Lin*
mont. It ponotratos, relieves and
Heals. It eases inflammation and
restores the Injured part te health.
Splendid  for cuts and  sores.    It
storlliies and heals quickly. 1926
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RCTAILE1
33
AMER1CAK OROCER MOT 80 EFFICIENT A8
kV* EN9U8H
(Continued from |m»e Jn
Tells of Chains sad Co-ops.
Speaking of Uw organisation of ihe grocery trsde in
frulind Mr. Oldl says that they have the Independent
jroeers, thr chain stores, ihe multiples, whieh some*
\\m*s lias, as many oa 1,1**1 "branches" and the eo-
opfistivi stores.. The miltiplc Stores have a standard-
„,,| form of shop, a atamlardi-ted tin. of merchandise
ami I laansfef ***» standardised that In- aimply taken
what i*- tfiven him to sell ami Mil* hi* customers' de-
utiads •■i" best he ean.
|h, ih.tin slore. on the other hand, adapt [ts *hop
tu thc |» • tlliar demand* of the locality and leaves the
ittRitager large discretion in selecting hi* slock and
Using his local policy    t'ricc-etitting i* not a hal.it
while *•'*-'-' grade apeeinltie* imt ohtainalile in multiple* ar- featured
The inoperative attires are tending toward a
higher grade of gooda," he *aid "Tin manager* arc,
.i psrtieulsrty intelligent lot Their good* are not by
ui) means always the lowest priced, and for that peg*
via ihey have In'eii loning members There i* some
difference between the 'psychology' «»f th.* private snd
ihi ro ")h raiive More The private shop lends to make
ui'lmdnnl customer m»n* of a feature than dom th.
(iwjperatlve, the pergonal relationship l***-tt%tr far more
*(i!|ih,-isi/.-l    | might al*o. add that although tin- Kng-
!i*b retail grocer understands little about efficient
aimlos trimming, he ta a mauler of Interior store dis
J.lilV
Canadian Manufacturers   Association (B.C.) Division
Electa President-Executive is Raised to Thirty
Kdwitl Tomliii of Vieioria, wan elected president
a! the It t' diviaion of ihe Canadian Manufacturer*.'
Association at the annual meeting of lhat organisation
H> lhe Hotel Vane«oi\er. alieeeedilig .1 II MeOonald of
mm Westminster Mr H R .lamie*ou wan elected
'h'*' president
Due to IneroasQ *in the membership, whieh now
Mauds st 388, or *i*ty eight more lhan last year, the
executive wan incr-cnacd to thirty members, Including
laf president ami vice president
Victoria represents Uvea sts Messrs U. W Mayh.-w,
*  A  Vnrrow ami W. A Jamieaon
' iniian of trade sections are Messrs .1 <• Tod
,,,,l!" H IV Clowe, il It Russell. A t% Stevens, C, D,
Hunter, l< It gharpe, W Q, Humphries, A lt.nn.tt.
A M«Kelvle, .1. Pnrftti. K W Irani. W II lM.nl. I.
11 N' l.ok.n and I) Hoekctl
Oilier executive members are Messrs .1 Ii Thomson,
'  NV   I   Johnson, T. S Dixon..I II  McDonald. II  Mac
Ul" W V. Meriinioek. W, II. Leekte, Geo R, Hnrrl*
v,n '   H Hell, J. K. Hall. J. II. Uoaf
Another One oo Them,
tort   UW Rf,°Uwi»n *aa visiting Niagara Falls in the com
JJnj     SB American friend.    A* OlS] watched ihe great ruah
01; •";•• ibe letter said!
tierai a story thai If you throw a penny i»i<> lhe full".
7" l"lag you lurk."
1   that ao?" inquired lhe Scot  He considered S moment
,'"» a«ed hopeful). "||a' ye a bit oMrlns*"
!ECVU^TJ0N 0F CU8TOW8 DEPARTMENT OF CANADA
A. TOURISTS' AUTOMOBILES, OUTFITS AND BAOOAGE
A non-resident of Canada may enter his automobile for
o. ing pngoae. ,„ Canada by complying with the require-
mema of the following summary of the regulations of the lie-
psrtment ot Customs,
Temporary Admission—Twenty.four Hours
Automobiles may be entered at any Canadian port or Cus-
lotna for touring purposes for a period not exceeding 24 hours
n ihe owner surrendering his Slate license card, which Ih
handed to him on his return Journey,
Temporary Admission—Two Days—One Month
Automobile-' may be entered at any Canadian port of us-
tems tor touring purposes for a period o rone month, by All-
Ing In a prescribed form (K. 50) made out in duplicate; one
copy kept on file by the Canadian Custom* official and one
top} retained by the tourist. The original and duplicate arc
rom pa red when the tourist makes his exit from Canada .
Temporary Admission—One-Six Months
Automobiles may be entered at any Canadian port of Cus-
iotas (or touring purposes, for a period o rone to six months,
b> rtlling in ihe name form referred lo. depositing $25, and
signing a boml in approved form for double the amount of
the estimated duties on the vehicle, or secure a special bond
«l an Incorporated guarantee company authorised to do business in Canada
The automobile of any tourist not returning within Ihe
iinn- limit Is liable to seiture. Should an unforseen delay
occur, prolonging the time of stay in Canada beyond thai
mentioned in lhe tourists' permit, the Custom Department,
Ottawa, should Im communicated with at once.
Tourists' Outfit.
I Persons visiting Canada for a limited period of time,
(or health or pleasure, may bring with I hem such guns, fish
uu* rods, canoes, lents, camp equipment, cooking utensils,
mutics) instruments .kodaks, etc., aa they require while In
Canada tor their own use and nol for gain or hire, upon reporting same to the Customs officer at the port of entry and
depositing with htm a sum of money equal to the duty on
such articles, and the money thus deposited nay be refunded
if the articles are exported outwards and Identified at the
i ustoms port where reported inwards, or at another port,
within sli months (rom time of entry; provided the articles
are produced and their Identity attested to before a Canadian
Customs officer at the place of export or berore a Customs
officer at a place outside of Canada.
I The tourist is required to furnish the Customs officer
at ihe port of entry with a report or invoice of his outfit, In
duplicate, Otta copy of which is to be returned to the tourist
wh.-n signed by the Customs officer, with the amount deposited marked thereon,
3 All moneys received from tourists as security for the
return of their outfits ahull be deposited and held In a special
account lo the credit of the collector or sub-collector for return to the tourists on es portal Ion of heir ouftta. In order hat
Mich deposits may be returned to tourlss without delay—except In th-» ease Of default to export heir ouflts wthln six
months sub collectors receiving same will make remittance
thereof to the chief port.
I Camera outfits for taking motion pictures of Canadian
landscapes and Industrial activities may be admitted as tourist outfit provided the operator from abroad makes a declarator, to tlie satisfaction of the Customs collector at the port
of entn to the effect lhat the camera outfit ts for use In taking pictures of Canadian landscapes or Industrial activities,
and tbat the outfit and all the pictures taken thereby will be
exported within six aionths from date of entry.
Canadian Tourists Into United States.
A tourist  bv automobile from Csnsdn Into tbe United
States must firsl secure a permit from the Customs officer a
»   Canadian port ifom Ml) and sign It. In order to return
SEESttStl duty. Then, al Ihe Customs port Is
United Slates frontier, he must secure a permit ent til»g him
0 ou- .or one month. Should he desire to re. al.i fo U
month! he must furnish a bond of an spprlved fmtMm
Saw Of the Cnited States, for double Ihe amount ol duty,
bui, no deposit Is required.
-   : 34
THK BRITISH COLUMBIA RF/fAlLKU
WESTERN CLASS Mtans
-PRICES RIGHT
-SERVICE FAST 4
-QUALITY	
POLISHED PLATE GLASS
MIRRORS    -WINDOW OLASS
Western Glass
Co«f Ltd.
158 Cordova Steret West
Vancouver, B. C.
Phone Sey. SM7
B. C. Distributors of
Messrs. T. H. Prosser 4 Bono Ltd.
London.
Manufacturera  of  Proesere'  Cole*
brated Line of TENNIB and
CRICKET Supplies.
Associated Agencies
LTD.
SIS Pender BL W.   Vancouver.
Phone: Bey. 131
SPRING ANNOUNCEMENT
Fancy Silk Hose for Men at
ths "Bight Price."
Write for samples.
■dV-AC/f
i BEAR
»/>
R. A. SIME, EC. Distributer
TUB BLACK MANUFACTORM* CO.
S1S Homer BL      Vancouver, B.C.
Pomuttoo Sates Company
433 RICHARDS ST, VANCOUVER
Distributors for:
Fairy Dyes Ltd (Fairy Dye)
Creotona Ltd  (Meat Pastes)
Plaietowe 4 Co    .(Confectionery)
0*Poe*Chee 4 Co.
(Popcorn 4 Wintieo)
Robert Wateen ....(Confectionery)
National Chicle Co. (Count lines)
Hunts Ltd (Funny Faces)
Martha Jane Products  (Bare)
Nicholsons Ltd.
(Blueing anj Polishes)
Phone Bey. 7121
VANCOUVER
T. 0. BTARK
9* W. BTERLING
Telephone
Bey. lite
STABK A SmUNO
MANUFACTURERS'
AGENTS
1043 Hamilton Street
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Phone:  High.
IDEAL CONE COMPANY
Manufacturera of
ICE CREAM CONEB
Purest Made    Coot Loee
335 PRINCESS AVI.
Vancouver.
DtMi*a«s
Scales. Slicere. Cotters and Cabin*
etc—New, Rebuilt and Second Hani.
Cash or Terms.
THE SCALE SHOP LTO.
Bey. 2SB1
34$ Cordova Bt. W., factnf Homer.
SERVICE   TO   OUT   OF   TOWN
BUBBCRIBERB.
Tho British Columbia Retailer will
be pleeeed to furnish eubecrtbers
tho nemos end addressee ef rtprt»
eentotlvee or agente ef one-tern
manufacturtra In Vancouver. We
will aloe advise where their
medltlee sen bo pvrebeeed.
Manufacturers' Agents
(Vancouver, unless otherwiae stated).
(Insertions under this heading are
charged at the rate of $1.20 a line,
for six months, payable In advance).
  DRVQOOOB
********ihi—mii■■■ SmmmWtm UHUOUt«**a****m**,i****^,*mmimiaim*ta*mi■»».whm ■■> mmtm**m
Monarch Knitting Co. hid.. 31S
Homer Street— H. I), Stewart 4 Co.
1.14   Phone Sey, 7526.
Rock Island Overall Co.. Rock  Is-
land. Que    It M Foster. 2K Water SI.
The Black Mfg. Co.. Seallle.-R. A.
Slme, 3IK Homer Slroel.   Sey. 1633.
Atlantic Underwear Lid.. Monclon.
N.B.-E, H. Welch t Vo. US., 318
Homer 81 reel.   Sey. 86S7.
The Oall Knllilns Co. Lid.. Oall,
Ont.~J. J. MacKay, got Bower llldf.
Sey. 3091.
C Turnbull Co. Ltd.. Oalt. Ont.—
8, D. Stewart 4 Co. Ud, 318 Homer
Street.   Sey. 7526.
Penmans Ltd., Paris, om i j
Thompson. 615 IIbsiIiiks Went Hey
7377.
ihipman llolton KiiittitiK Co i.m,
Hamilton. Out-K.  II. Walsh I  r„
I.III..   SIS   Homer   Street      Me>     v ,,;
GROCERIES.
Canada Starch Go. Ltd, Montreal
—K. II. Rowniree, 207 HaSllQfi W
Sey. 69.
Hello*** Co of Canada Ltd. London,
Ont.—I* P. Mason A to, 610 lltn
Inss West.    Sey  290*4.
Canadian Postum Cereal Co I.M,
Toronto MrNeely'* Ltd, 739 ||4,t
loss West    Sey   9337
Palmolive Company of Canada \M
Toronto. Out.--Dean Armstrong. IS3i
Urrh Street,    llay. Soli.
Canada Colors and Chemlralu Lid.,
Toronto Stark S Sterling N*'3 Ham
lllon Street    Sey   1196.
Ukr of Ihe Woods MHIIiik CO I'I
—1300 Klehards Slr-wJ      Se>   ItSI
W. Clark Ltd, Montreal. Qur- I
P Stark. 133 Hamilton St    Be)   :•>«>'
llorden Milk Co   Ltd        Montreal
Que.—Loesl offire, 332 Water s in-i
Se>   S123
MrCormiek Mfs Co Ltd. Loadd
Ont I/»eal of flee. II60 Hamilton $*
Sey. 3112
K.   W.   Oillett   MfS.   Co.   Ltd    I
McFarlane. 600 Ileal ly Si. Sey. ISH
BTORE  EQUIPMENT 4 SUPPLIES
International Husiness Machine*
Co. Lid, Toronto—Local office. MS
Seymour Si.   Sey. 2S3
Canadian Toledo Scales Do  I .Id
Windsor. Ont -K. 8. Chambers. 50*
Smylhe Street.   Sey. 3911.
Continental Paper Producls. Mil.
Ottawa. Onl Smith. Dsvldson i
Wright.   Sey. 9646.
J. C. Wilson. Lid, Uchule. Qu«
Uical office,  1040 Homer St.     B«>
7S1.
Hart ram Paper Producls Co. Mil,
12S0 Homer Slreel.-Norfolk Pspt•'*
Co. Lid, 134 Waler Street. Sey. ,88S
and 7S49.
SPORTING QOOOB.
Prosser. T. II. * Sons Ltd., London
Ens—Associated Agencies. 615 P«'»
der 81. W.   Sey   131. The BEST VALUE in
Toilet Tissue in Canada to-day is
Interlake
Wi- guarantee 700 sheets per mil.
Kvery Interlake roll is of the same
Koft, almorlMMit quality, and made
from fresh stock.
Interlake means a minimum of
wiling talk. Your customers simply sty •*Interlake,H and the wiles
talk is completed.
Interlake is sold in most stores
at lor a roll. Then' is a profit in it
for you, as it is turned over in accordance with the policy of the
Canadian Fair Trade League.
Ask your wholesaler or write
direct to tis.
Is^ee****^3Xf.si,e Mflls **
54 56 University Avenue, Toronto 2
Mills st Merriton, Ont.
if
v*Z^
>*e*
/
«•*■
SWIFT'S PREMIUM
SUMMER SPECIALTIES
For the Picnic Basket
*  *
Now is the Season to stock a good full line of
our Summer Cooked Meat Specialties, including our Premium" Cooked Hams, both round
and flat style. Your trade will find any of
our Summer Specialties ideal for Sandwiches
and other Picnic purposes. Ready to serve.
Absolutely delicious and satisfying. You will
find these products a winner with your trade,
and a profit maker for yourself.
ALL OUR PR0DUCT8 ARE GOVERNMENT
IN8PECTED.
'    SOs*. jf***^H tb ■'
SWIFT CANADIAN COMPANY LIMITED I
.KOLINE" Hosiery for women
has a large sale and has been a
)opular and steady line with a great
number of retailers for years.
" Silkoline" is lustrous and durable
to a very high degree. Knit from
special two-ply silk lisle yarn. Lustre
and softness are retained throughout
repeated washings. High spliced
heel; double sole; reinforced at the
heel and toes. Made in black, white
and popular colors.
Order this popular seller from
wholesaler. Carry a complete
Chipman-Holton Knitting Cq
Hamilton, Dnt
Milts st Hamilton s

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