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The British Columbia Retailer Mar 31, 1924

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Array ANNUAL SPRING NUMBER
The British Columbia
VOL. XVI. NO. 7
Vancouver, B. C.
MARCH, 1924
20c per copy; $2.00 per year.
Sixteenth Year.
Is a many-armed  Octopus
sucking your profits ?
■                                                                      .:    jl
J    THE BEST IN THE MARKET        |g
rm\W^''*\^^^^\S^^^^^^^^^^^W^^'^^^^^^^^^^m^r^mmm^                       mmW f
i F'-L.' f* **ff%     " m WlW ■ ■■ Jm                 v £■!          Hi
If* IBWL.^1 ...J Wl j
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i It pf' W\m1
//#l ■■ iTjal
fen]
Nb^vtcn        m
Th Greater Djyto*   with electric features
i onslanlly ./ tvertising your husmess.
Am >ou allowing your profits to be sucked away, copper by
copper, Ihrough little overweights? Does your scale give you
the   protection   which   the law demands that it give your
Customer?
Your scale mm not give you the accurate service today that
is once ilii'.i All scales deteriorate in time—some more quick-
!> than others. Constant improvements, too, enable you to
gel better service today than ever, with
The New Improved
DAYTON
Computing Scale
The DAYTON was the pioneer computing scale, it has always kept a pace in advance in Introducing improvements and
extra features. Its basic principle, endorsed by scientists and
governments everywhere, is now embodied in the world's
finis!  Computing scale.
The growth In your business maj demand a more complete
and Impressive scale than was available when you bought
vour DAYTON many years ago. You can bring your DAYTON
equipment up-to-date bj taking advantage of our allowance
plan ii you do nol know the dayton advantages, lose no
time In becoming acquainted with them. A card to us will
ensure you a demonstration without obligating you.   Address
Dept   U.
DAYTON  cylinder and fan type Scales are sold on
attractive monthly payments. Discount for cash. Generous allowances on your old scale.
International Business Machines Co., Limited
Bead Office and Factory: 300 Campbell Avenue, Toronto, Ont.
A. R. DeLong. District Agent, 230 Cambie St., Vancouver. B. C.
Service and Sales Offices In all Principal Cities. f*^"^**—a*mmmmmmammama
IT
"Standard" Paper Bags—3 grades
We Manufacture and sell
the following: "Standard"
Paper Bags
Lachute d St. Jerome,
Paper Mills:
Que.
Manufacturers  since  1870
"MANILLA"
"LIGHT KRAFT"
"HEAVY KRAFT"
THEY ARE
actually Stronger, Tougher
More Pliable, Moat Economical
Moat Satiafactory
It Pays to Uae the Beat—They Coat No More
J. C WILSON, LIMITED
Manufacturers of
PAPER BAGS.     WRAPPING, TISSUE AND TOILET PAPERS
for   Wholesalers and Retailers.
1068 HOMER STREET, VANCOUVER, B. C
Phone: 8eymour 781
MAKE BIG SALES BY FEATURING
CROWN OLIVK
Manufactured
in British
Columbia and
Guaranteed   by
'^#.!||!i}gffi5
"The
For feci
Toilet
Soap*
THE ROYAL CROWN SOAPS, LTD.
VANCOUVER, B. C. THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which ll Incorporated the B. C. TRADE REVIEW.
3
A square deal slogan—
" We protect our customers by using
Toledo Scales—No
Springs—Honest
Weight"
The Toledo Principle
Guarantees Honest and
Dependable Weighing Service
TT'S a comfortable feeling to know that you are
A getting every cent of rightful profit—that your
scales are not robbing you of profits due you—that
a pound is 16 full ounces no matter what the
weather nor how old the scale.
No justification now for the attitude—"Oh, I guess
the old scales are accurate enough." Your net profit
lies in the last 4-5th ounce of each pound you sell.
An error of even l-5th ounce means 25% of your
profit gone!
Safeguard Your Trade
and Profit
Don't gamble with this slender margin of profit
—or with your customers' good will. Toledo Scales
weigh with absolute accuracy always. They contain no springs to change with changing temperatures, or through long-continued use. Toledo Scales
weigh by gravity alone—and gravity never changes
—weight balanced against weight—honest weight
alwavs.
The sign in your store-"NO SPRINGS-
HONEST WEIGHT"—means a square deal on
both sides of the counter. Your customers know it
—and appreciate it.
Write to us for full details about models, prices,
our liberal allowances on old scales, and easy payment terms. i
CANADIAN TOLEDO SCALE CO., LIMITED
WINDSOR, ONTARIO
SALES OFFICES AND SERVICE STATIONS THROUGHOUT THE DOMINION
VANCOUVER   OFFICE   -   424   CORDOVA   ST.   WEST
TOLEDO SCALES
NO SPRINGS - HONEST WEIGHT m
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which is Incorporated the B. C. TRADE REVIEW.
March
Tie ST. LAWRENCE LINE
PAPER BAGS
Made in Canada—from Canadian Papers
***ii^*%'m^i,»■*-, 1,1^^1,.,
MIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMMIIIMIMMIIIIIMIIIIIMIMMIIMMMMIIMMIMIMMMMMMMHMMIMIMMIMIMMI
"SIMPLEX"    -   Light Manilla
"MAPLE LEAF"   Lirfkt Kraft
"LION"    -   -   H,
Kraft
eavy
IHIIItlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllHIIIIIIIIIIttUIIUIIIItlllttUtlltlttlHlHItlttlttltttttUm
A Bag suitable for every kind of Merchandise
Made by St. Lawrence Paper Bag Co.
SELLING AGENTS FOR B. C.
COLUMBIA PAPER CO. LIMITED
CARRY LARGE STOCKS IN VANCOUVER AND VICTORIA
G
Orange Marmalade
A very old recipe and skilful cooking have been so happily united in
Quaker Brand
Orange Marmalade
that this lovely sweetmeat has a wide and growing popularity.
Dominion Canners B. C
Limited
Head Office:
VANOOUVER. 1924
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which In Incorporated the B, c. TRADE REVIEW.
ROGERS
f
GOLDEN SYRUP
w
The End of a Perfect Day'
IMade from finest flavoured cane sugar, a special grade of which is imported for the
purpose.
fPut up in all sizes of packages to suit your customers' requirements.
fin packages designed to beautify your store.
2 lb. tins. 24 to a case.
Mb. tins, 12 to a case.
Perfect Seal jars, 12 to a case.
104b. tins, 6 to a case.
204b. tins, 3 to a case.
The British ColumbiaSugar RefiningGo. Ltd.
: i
H
IS
n
VANCOUVER, B.C. Ill
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
with which is incorporated the B. c. trade hkview.
Man-1
SECURITY
The principal question to be considered, in regard to your insurance covering, is security.   Here are
some of the Companies we represent.
Est'd Resources
American Central Ins. Co. of St. Louis, Mo., guaranteed by the 1863            7,856,699
Commercial Union Assurance Co. of London 1861         100,793,997
Eagle, Star & British Dominions Ins. Co. of London, Eng  1843         100,971,290
Olote ft Rutgers Fire Ins. Co. of N. Y  1863          60,109,794
Guardian Assurance Co., London, Eng. 1821          48,379,460
Insurance Company of North America 1872          46,193,767
London Underwriters, London Assurance Co., of London, Eng. 1720          47,089,496
Phoenix Assurance Co. of London 1782         163,326,416
Royal Insurance Co. of Liverpool, Eng. 1846         170,143,605
Scottish Canadian Assurance Corpn., Toronto, guaranteed by General Accident,
Fire & Life Assurance Corpn. of Perth, Scotland 1885          22,243,630
Ho   do these compare with your present insurance covering?   The best is the only REAL insurance.
g*0  ^^rwi^ -u
^\mmmm\SsW^^mnsmaim%m^rMm^ ^*V*J»
Established 1899. Incorporated 1917.
A
Profitable
Line
Folks buying Pacific Milk gei tin- best evaporated milk that can be made.
And customers who arc satisfied with one thing
feel they have found a satisfactory store with
which to trade.
Pacific Milk Co. Ltd.
328 Drake Street
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Factories at Ladner and Ahhotsford.
NATIONAL
BRAND
SPICES
Attractiveness <»f package) freshness
and quality <»f goods, profitable trade
prices and a sendee t<» merchants
that is quick and oourteous, These
points are offered you m the Nation*
al Brand bines.   Write for pr n
nnd full information,
NATIONAL CORE I SPICE CO.
1280 Homer St.
Vancouver, B. C. 9iii
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
tt Ith which is Incorporated the B. C. TRADE REVIEW.
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Retailer
Published Monthly.
SIXTEENTH YEAR
GBNBRAL MBRCHANDI8B
GROCERIES. DRYGOODS,
HARDWARE. FOOTWEAR.
OFFICIAL ORGAN OF B.C. BOARD
RETAIL MERCHANTS'
ASSOCIATION OF CANADA.
A MONTHLY JOURNAL published in the interest of Retail Merchandising and the Development of Commerce in Western Cansds.
SUBSCRIPTION RATE: Two Dollare Per Year, payable tn adrance.
Adfertlttns Ratee oo Application
Publishers: PROGRESS PUBLISHING CO. LTD.
Suite 101*2 Merchants' Exchange Building
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Telephone Sey, SSfil Cable Address—Shipping—All Codes
Editor, J 8. Morrison W. N. Code. Business Manager
Entered at Ottawa aa Second claws mailer
Secretaries,  Representing the following
Branches R. M. A.
Agaeate -W. A. Jones
Armstrong q. h. Smith
Chilliwaek A. Knox
Cloverdale A. J. Burrows, Pres.
Courtenay  F.  Field
Cumberland j. Sutherland
Cranbrook j.  f. Scott  (Pres.)
■J"***" L.  E.  Helen
Eaqulmalt h. E. Pickard
Grand Forks 8. T. Hull
Hammond A Haney....A. j. Scott
£am,0°P« A. H. Muirhead.
Kelowna A. S. Wade
[**ntr"trr A. W. Bull
Ladyemlth J. McCormick.
J**0": B. Rebagliati.
Merr,tt G. B. Armstrong
(Pres).
Mission ...F. C. Lightbody
Nanaimo W. F. Norris
Nelson E. F. Gigot
New Westminster D. Stuart
Prince George  C. C. Reid (Act See
Princeton Ac Sorenson
Revelstoke J. P. Hume
Trail T. A. Robley
Vancouver W. F. Ing
Vernon D.  Fernie
Victoria ...J. Wallie
White Rock E. H. Hardy.
Vol XVI  Ho, 7.
MARCH. 1924,
Vancouver, B.C.
PROFIT RATHER THAU VOLUME.
Retail merchant* in Canada will this year consider
seriously how ean they direct their efforts so ax to do
a profitable business, irrespective of the sixe of that
business. During the past year too much effort wax
expended towards beating oul the gross figures of the
year previous without sufficient thought as to whether
any protit was heing made on the goods sold. It is a
business truism that B certain amount of goods can be
sold at little or no protit. ami their sale will help to
increase the profit by cutting down the selling cost on
the goods that do make a profit, hut there is a limit
to whieh Hiis can he carried. A profit must he made on
the majority of the goods sold and the smaller the husiness is, the bigger musl be the proportion <>f profitable
sales,
Business now for some time past has heen experimenting with selling Price, and has not found that it
contributes either t<> profits or prestige,   It must now
take advantage of every opportunity that presents itself for executing a ri^'m about face and selling mer*
c hand ise for the value that 18 in il rather than the low
priee at which it can be ottered.
During 1923 business had a great deal to contend
with.   Public confidence in the banking institutions of
tlie country received severe shocks, and husiness operations were curtailed by a tightening up of credits, ami
also by the feeling of uncertainty induced by the new
sales tax. Throughoul the latter part of the year there
Seemed to he a general impression that everyone should
"go slow," Manufacturers did not want to buy much
material until they would find out exactly how the
sales tax would operate. Retailers did not wish to buy
Roods in any quantities for the same reason, and the
puhlie,   guided   to some extent hy the delayed cold
weather was very shy about making purchases.
But now the husiness community knows pretty well
where it stands with regard to taxation, and the retail
trade* knows that the public has money to spend, if
they can offer the proper inducements for it to make
purchases. It has experimented with the price inducement and found that it is not good husiness.
More Statistics Wanted.
There has heen much controversy regarding the
government's action in sending out questionnaires
from the* Statistical Bureau at the instigation of the
Minister of Trade and Commerce. These questionnaire have heen broadcasted throughout the country in
order to obtain a detailed census of trading estiblish-
ments during 1923, and the retail merchants of this
province are awaiting advice from headquarters of the
H. M. A. at Ottawa before filling in the information
blanks.
The* Retail Bureau of the Vancouver Board of Trade
have vigorously opposed this measure, deprecating the
expense involved to the department at Ottawa, and
also the added burden it will involve upon the much
harrassed trading community.
This information is very apparently requested for
the purpose of ascertaining whether the trade is con-
tributing its just share towards taxation revenue, and
it has hecn pointed out to the department at Ottawa
that such information can he obtained from material
already in their possession.
The Retail Merchants' Association of Canada have
long hecn desirous that the government take steps to
compile a record of the amount invested in the retail
husiness of Canada, and in order to do so, such a questionnaire may be necessary, but it is doubtful whether
other branches of trade have made a similar request,
and it would appear that the desire of the Association!
is heing enlarged upon to the confusion and indignation of trading establishments generally. THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
with which la Incorporated (he H. C TRADfl REVIEW.
Ms
" Merchandising "
Address by Mr. W. H. Malkin, Delivered at the Vancouver Board of Trade.
WHKN your chairman asked me to speak to you
at your meeting, I asked him on what subject
he wished me to speak, and he stated "Merchandising." I must say 1 do not like the term, although perhaps it more or less conveys the idea of husiness. I would prefer "Science of Business Building/''
"The longer I remain iu husiness, the more I realize
that it is becoming more technical and more scientific.
Merchandising is no longer trading and trucking in
the ordinary meaning of the word, hut it is buying,
assembling and selling, with a maximum amount of
efficiency in administration, all of which requires a
great deal of technical knowledge acquired hy years rd*
careful study and experience.
There are some common principles which can he
applied to every business. In a business successfully
conducted over a long period, you will discover certain outstanding principles, and I will endeavor to
name them in their order:
1. Ability in management.
2. Pursuit, of a definite purpose on the part of the
principals.
3. Close attention to administrative details
4. Scrupulous observance-* of the conditions of contracts between buyers and sellers, and between employers and employees. In other words, common
honesty.
How Profit is Secured.
How are we to carry on business at a profit! In
every well-conducted business there are five main operations:—
1. Administration.
2. B living.
3. Selling.
4. Accounting.
5. Shipping.
Some merchants may consider sales of most importance, others buying, because goods well bought are
half sold; but I am beginning to think that administration is the most important part of any business,
large or small, and that no business can prosper to its
fullest extent unless each of these operations or departments receive equal amount of attention and
control.
X think there are three principal foundation stones
on which a business should he based if it is to he permanently succcsful:
1. Integrity and honesty of purpose.
2. Industry
'd.   Knowledge.
Taking it for granted that a man is honest and industrious, the next most important thing is that he has
a thorough knowledge of the goods tie is going to
handle, and the best methods of interesting the consumer in those goods, and of the actual cast 0f operating the business/In other words, he must know the
cost of his goods delivered at the consumer's door.
But it is usually the lack of this systemized knowledge
which is the most common cause of the failures and
wrecks strewn about on the business highway. Many
of the merchant;'s troubles have come from a failure to
understand the cost of doing business.   Credit experts
tell ust here is no other one thing which causes so many
business failures, dust so long as there is a merchant
who does not know his cosl* with a fair degree of gp.
curacy, just so long will there he a disturbing business
condition in thc community in which he moves
More thought should be dtVOted by llu merchant
to effect savings which will be reflected in reduced
costs, by eliminating credits, and to give a service to
each particular customer which will tend to make
prices a secondary consideration. To realize lhat ft r
vice will attract customers more effectively (han pn«*
cutting; price-cutting is usually the refuge of the ig.
norant business man. An intelligent knowledge of th,.
cost of the business in which so many unseen factors
enter, is the greatest safeguard against price-cutting.
Let competition he in service rather than in price, nnd
sii'*e< w is usually the result.
W. H. Malktn.
Discussion   amongst   merchants.   SUCb   as   we  an
having today, of problems which present  themselves.
cannot  fail to he useful     Many  new   conditions and
problems aiv facing the modern husmess man. and IW
man who wants to Im* successful ean afford to Ignore
them If he does he is 1'abb* to wake up some day and
find himself in difficulties, whereas, if he had taken
the    trouble    to understand these new conditions b\
thinking them out beforehand instead ol guessing at
tlieni. he would probably have avoided failure
Do not be afraid fo analyze everything; by this I
mean analyze everything as you go along. Keep your
figures always before you, and bo quite sure of them.
Do not be afraid to dig into every detail of your busi
ness. Keep your eye off your competitor, and never
flunk of him    Vou will never su< «•'! by watching
your rival.   Keep cool and take time to think, and do
not be tempted to take short cuts. Vou know tbe old
laying, "If your competitor talks about you. put him
on your pay roll.'' 192(1
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which is incorporated the B. C. TRADE REVIEW.
9
Those Overhead Expenses.
Reverting again to the all-important question of
, uSls. How many merehanta know exactly what proportion of their cost is made up of overhead expenses,
risks'salaries, deliveries, the additional cost which
the business bears by reason of buying too heavily,
thereby turning tlie stocks over too slowiy. It is most
important that stocks should turn over rapidly as possible, and a merchant should know exactly how long
ins various stocks have been on hand, and he should
have some system which will show him if any portion
of his stock baa become unsaleable immediately, llow
many merchants could tell today if they were asked
the question, "What portion of their stock has been
mi hand sixty days, thre<» months, six months, nine
months, and even longer than that?" "What is thc
difference in the cost of selling a keg of nails and a
dosen high-class penknives, or the cost of selling a
*ack of sugar and a ease of 'pate de fois gran.' or tho
cost of selling a bale of cotton ami an end of silk?"
A merchant should never forget that immediately
goods are in the warehouse he is working for the goods
and the cost of these goods is increasing every day they
remain in bis store. Therefore, the more rapidly a
merehanl can turn over his stock, ihe lower his cost
of doing business, ami tbe better position he is in to sell
at a low prne,
Tho question of pushing goods that show a good
margin of profit is most important. The average clerk
is spt to go for volume regardless of profit, This should
by guarded against by tbe close seruting of thc manager. There are many 80-called clerks of today who
arc order-takers. Thc average customer likes to be
waited upon by a man who thoroughly understand**-}
the goods he is handling, and a salesman of this typo?
• an always interest a customer in goods which he
knows carry a fair profit if he will only take the
trouble.
Scrutinise Expense Account
To smaller firms let me say this: Scrutinize your
expense account daily, and only draw out of the business what the business can afford. Be content to grow
Rlowly from your profits, and do not try to overtrade
md do more business than your capital will stand.
Better to take a few years more in establishing your
business on a firm foundation, than to risk the wrecking of it by overtrading.
To young firms I would also say: Guard your credit,
and remember credit is often more valuable as an asset
than capital, lie frank with your banker if you have,
to use him. and keep your promise*** in connection with]
payments. Credit is a very delicate asset, which will
rapidly melt away and disappear unless carefully
guarded, and if your credit is gone, one* of the prittJ
cipal underlying supports of your business goes with
it. Allow me to suggest to you that you understand
your business thoroughly, and make yourself its master. Never allow your business to master you. If you,
run your business instead of it domineering and running you, life will be much sweeter and a good deal
more comfortable. After all. there can be a great deal
ni harmony and pleasure in business. Husiness is al
great game if wc approach it and engage in it in the
fight spirit The man who thoroughly understands!
every detail of bis business, and conscientiously analyses them as hegoes along, is like the sailor at sea, who|
knows, no matter how dark the night or how rough
the sea. by looking at the compass just where ho is
going. The man without a scientific knowledge of his
business is like the captain without his compass, and
disaster will some day overtake him and he will find
himself on the rocks.
Insight into business
1 have referred at length to the necessity 0f having
a thorough knowledge of the cost of doing business,
and all the details in connection with your business,
but over and above this knowledge, and perhaps exceeding it in importance, is a certain quality of imagination and insight, which every man must have if he
is going to be really efficient and successful. Know*
ledge of goods, costs, and other economic factors, will
not in themselves bring success, but this knowledge,
combined with insight and imagination, is irresistible.
Imagination without knowledge is worse than knowledge without imagination, but combine the two and
success is inevitable. Clutivate, therefore, this spirit
of imagination, and this imagination (perhaps I ami
using tho word which is a little misleading, but I am
using it for want of a better) will enable you to turn
the drudgery of business into a pleasure. I maintain
no man should remain in business when he finds it al
fearful drag and a great worry. Business is and
should be one of the great pleasures of a man's life. As)
1 have before stated, the only way in which you can
make it a pleasure is when you are sitting back driving it and directing it, and keeping it well in hand
and doing your bidding; but if you are carrying it, you
are of all men the most miserable, and you had better*
get out of it.
There is no room today for the pessimistic business
man. What we want in business is optimism, and,
mark you, efficiency is tbe quality which goes hand ox
hand with optimism—combined they are irresistible^
Relations between employer and employee
In my remarks I have referred casually to the relationship of employer and employee. This is a subject, I think, for discussion by itself, but I would jusK
like to remark that the relationship of employer and
employee is a most important factor in the building up^
and conducting of a successful business. There should
be perfect understanding and hearty co-operation and
sympathy between the principals and the employees:
Well-trained employees are not always easy to obtain,
but a well-trained man, who combines knowledge with
tact, and who puts everything that is best in him into
the business should be well paid. To create a spirit of
co-operation in a business, no matter how small, there"
must be very liberal treatment given by the employer,
and some incentive to increased energy.
The longer I remain in business, the more I find
there is to learn about it. It is not the simple thing
which it looks on its face. The larger the business the
more dependent we are upon those whom we employ.
Therefore, a careful selection of employees of the right
stamp is most essential. Groat care should be exercised even in the employment of a boy, because in that
boy you no doubt have the germ of the success or failure of a strong, intellectual, virile, useful employee,
or a weak, unstable, unsatisfactory, unsuccessful man.
1. am a firm believer in giving tbe preference to boys
from good homes and of good education. Every time
vou take a man into your employ who proves to be nn4
satisfactory and a misfit, or for any other reason not
suitable for the job. and you have to make a change,
vou lose money. I think if we were all more careful m
the selection of employees we should build up better
and more efficient organizations. 10
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
with whieh la tMerpemtsd thf u i' tr,u»k kkvikw
.V
GROCERIES # PROVISIONS
' ;
GENERAL BUSINESS
Tfie retail grocer has passed through whal we hope
will prove f<< he the quiehsf period of l!*lM.    There is
no getting away from the fact that February was a
poor business month ami.    while the early    part of
.March seems to have gotten away to a better start, if
is too early in flic month to make any predictions as fo
just how business will turn cut,    If the present spell
of spring weather continues, it  should have a very
beneficial effect on the trade.    Wholesalers report an
added incentive to out of town buying, particularly
from the mining and logging districts.   It j* assured
that the logging and lumber industry will be much
more active than it was in lit'2-I.   Press reports recently have kept us posted on several mill and timber limit
transfers of large proportions that speak well for fins
industry.   British Columbia contains the best and one
of the last stands of commercial timber in the world,
and it is only natural that the eyes of lumber financiers all the world over should be turned towards this
province.
Many old friends of Rithets' Consolidated Limited
of Victoria, British Columbia's oldest wholesale grocery business will regret to hear that they are closing
out this part of their business, and iu future this firm
will confine their activities to the insurance anil liquor
end of the business.   This marks the passing of two of
Victoria's old wholesale establishments, the other being the old Simon Leiser business, which was recently
taken over by the A. Macdnnald Company.     These
changes would indicate that all is not "roses and sunshine" in the wholesale end of the grocery business. It
is also rumored that other changes contemplated by a
Vancouver wholesale firm will have a material effect
on the retail trade.
Sugar.—Xo further changes in this commodity have
taken place since our last issue, although the New
York market has eased off slightly. Authorities on
sugar predict generally firm prices throughout thc year,
although they are careful to state that during the next
few* weeks thee may be some slight revisions downward,
but no big reductions. Today's quotations remain at
I10.20 per hundred pounds.
Beans.—Market remains steady; present prices rule
from 4 to 4% cents per pound, according to quality.
California limas, on the other hand, arc unreasonably
high, being quoted at 15 cents per pound.
Claims.—Saanish clams packed on theSaanich peninsula near Victoria, have advanced 50 cents per case
to $7, owing to the higher cost of pro-ruction. Cove
oysters are short at present and supplies in transit
will be considerably higher than previous shipments.
Domestic sardines packed in Xew Brunswick also advanced Marr-h 1st to the following basis: Brunswick,
.$'6.10 per case; Jutland, $7M per case; (jlacier, $0.05
per case.
Prunes.—No change in price.
! i '
Apricots.—Pr ee* up again t«» a bail**
per pound and 81 cents for choir-*.    The I■ *
apricots was a heavy one  .*.«.*? opening
accordingly named ven low, »** Muffing a b n
cr quantify of the fruit going il 10 cm*  i ■
Raiiini.~~\<» materia! changes in Import
though wholesalers are offering noro* * on  *■*
move stoek.
Dates.-—-*»o.»ij quality dates »*rr i,'r-» firm ata
lo secure,   ,\ ren fine shipment was received
jobbers about March 1st.   Owing lo higher c< *i
are gojng fo the retail trade st I" epfiU tot 11
and T'- cents for Saint,
Honey.—* A shipment of So. I Light, Ontario
received via thc all water route is receiving I •■-
the retail irade; -I |l» tins coating IS p« t doiei
this commodity cheaper than pure strawb' •■"
and consequently ts going tote consumption t\\
Syrup.—Local prices on Hog-en strop were
upward February 30th to th« following basin
$£.40 a case; 12 .** nt *K>,J*> a ease-; 8 I" at H v«
3 10 at *M.b7i a ease,  tins advance being ill
with the sugar changes.
IMPORTANT SUBJECTS TO BE DISCUSSED AT
R. M. A. OROCERS CONVENTION AT OTTAWA
Trade Section Work to be Developed in Practical
Manner Throughout All Sections of Canada's
Retail Trade.
Following a recent decision of the Advisory Conn
fee of the f-Jfoeers' Section of the DominJOQ Hoard B
M. A., many important questions, relative to the
irovement of the grocery trade are to be discussed *
I
111
wii-uirin in  uie jfrorery iraiie are JO oe (|1H*||SS
.Meeting of retail grocers, which Is being held v
Chateau Lauri»*r Ilofej, Ottawa, Mar--!t LN 25.
Immediately thep rogramme of subjects ban been
'•ided upon by the meeting, fl programme that will m-
with the approval of the retail grocers ta every pr
vince. if is t)^> intention of the committee fo recoi
nw.ii.i fi...« >. f».»...;.,..... ,.;.i. , *.... i.   ... i _i..i	
%
■&•' ■
H
nee. u is tt^e intention "t ine committee to recoi
mend that a Dominion wide rampaign be undertaker]
make the same known In all parts of the country. Slid
to endeavor to secure the support of every retail g''" '
ii) Canada, in an endeavor to place the retail grocei
business in a more satisfactory position than it fl •
present,
A request from headquarters that each province
represented af this conference by one or more deb
gates was taken full advantage of. and grocers from fl
parts of Canada are taking pan in these discussions.
The following is a copy of draff memorandum
some of the subjects fo be considered af the convention
f. Consider our present position in regard to that section
of the criminal code respecting restraint of trade.
2. Consider the question of manufacturers and wholesaler*-'
selling direct to the consumer, and the consideration of
the exemption of certain institutions. 24
■THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which is Incorporated thc B. C. TRADE REVIEW.
11
io
f11
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
Consider the qutttlon of manufacturers and wholesalers
selling to cooperative societies, farmers' clubs, chain
stores, civil service organiiations, etc.
Consider the question of manufacturers and wholesalers
giving extra special discounts to mail order houses, chain
stores and others.
, Consider the amendment to the Food and Drugs Act to
provide that no dealer shall be prosecuted under the act
when ht can establish a guaranty signed by the wholesaler, Jobber, or manufacturer, residing in Canada, from
whom he purchased the goods.
Consider the question of fair retail sale price adopted by
manufacturers on trade marked goods.
When we find that the trading policy of a manufacturer
or wholesaler it in mutual accord with the views of Retail Grocers who art members of our Association, consider the advisability of making the name of such manufacturer or wholesaler known among the trade.
Consider making provision for the members of our Grocers' Section to obtain through our Association an analysts from the Government as to the quality of foodstuffs.
Consider the policy of tome manufacturers regarding the
sale of branded goods, who, after a demand for the goods
has been created, cut down the margin of profit.
When goods art told to the retail grocery trade at a fixed
selling price, which telling price is too low, should they
be made known to the trade generally?
Consider what action should be taken by the trade when
Retail Grocers whose names are on the manufacturers'
preferred lists, sell goods to the public below the legitimate profit of the average retail grocers.
Consideration of tht overhead costs of doing business.
Consideration of having a registered trade mark to be
placed by manufacturers on goods and sold to our members only.
Consider if there are any advantages to be gained by cooperative or syndicate buying.
Consider the advisability of asking manufacturers to discontinue the giving of coupons.
Consider the question of securing a fan* margin of profit
on tea.
Consideration of tht custom of
vance for such goods as canned
jams and jellies.
Consider the advisability of requesting travellers, when
they quote prices to the retail trade and refer to margins
and percentages, to quote the selling cost.
Consider the question of the milling companies selling
Sour and cerials through orders taken through Womens'
organiiations, whereby the said milling companies give
such organisations a bonus on each order taken.
Consider the advisability of manufacturers who operate
under a fair trading policy.
Consider the position that Wholesale Grocers occupy in
the channels of distribution.
Consider If there would be any advantage in making provision on tht labels of packages and canned goods for the
marking of the prices.
Consider legislation to permit the manufacture and sale
of oleomargarine in Canada.
Consider an amendment to the Maple Products Act to
permit tht salt of table syrup.
Should the weight be marked on packages and boxes
when goods art bting weighted out by shipment by
freight or express.
Consideration of an amendment to the Root Vegetable
Act to permit cabbages, string beans, spinach and bananas to be sold by weight.
Consider the Egg Grading Regulations.
Consider legislation to have the name of the producer
appear on the wrapper of dairy butter.
Consider the advisability of having a legal definition of
"Retail Groctrt."
Consider the advisability of having a sign to be given to
our members to display in their stores for the purpose of
promoting more efficient retail food distribution.
Consider the advisability of adopting measures to develop a higher dtgrtt of tfficlency In grocers and employees
through careful training In all branches of the business.
Consider a proposal to educate our customers on the importance of tht Rttail Grocer in the community.
Consideration of the Cost of Living Reports issued by the
Department of Trade and Commerce.
Considering and endorsing a form of questionnaire to be
•ubmitted to the manufacturing and wholesale grocery
trade.
placing  orders  in  ad-
vegetables, fruit, fish,
Speed Up Your Turnover
With a Fast Seller
IT is a well known fact that some items
of a dealer's inventory eat up their own
profits because of a slow turnover. These
are the curse of your business. Other items
—usually only three or four in that department—make up this overhead and
yet show a clear profit.
In your soap department statistics show
that 85% of the sales are dependent upon
three brands.
The usual soap stock consists of from
eight to fourteen different brands and
with the exception of the three leaders
the rest of this soap is but so much "dead
wood'' gathering dust-—taking up shelf
space and eating up its own profit. That
is supreme waste—inefficiency. "But"~
you say—"All customers must be satisfied!" We agree with you.
Satisfy them with a brand known the
world over. And satisfy yourself with a
profit that repeats itself seventeen times
a year. Palmolive is the soap leader that
will turn the trick. The public knows
its high quality.
Concentrate your sales-forces upon a
nationally known—and profitable-brand.
2126 12
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which is Incorporated the B. <\ TRADE REVIEW.
Borden Products Turn Over
Quickly and Profitably
5ICHA®L£S
It's a great satisfaction to know that
every time you sell a Borden Product
you are making a profit on that sale
and paving the way for a sure repeat
order in the very near future.
Marc
i
%e> TftmUn/ Gy.a+Qmtied
Vancouver, B. C. 1924
THE BRITI8H COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which Is incorporated the B. C. TRADE REVIEW.
13
BRITISH COLUMBIA 0R0CER8 TO BE REPRE
SENTED AT OTTAWA CONFERENCE
\s representative of British Colombia grocers, Mr.
r|f,nn»H HarkneJn, chairman of the Greater Vancouver
(jcnofra' Section of the It. M. A,. »* proceeding to Ottawa i" take part in the discussions relative to the
present sit nut iott of the grocery buaineaa of Canada.
\h Harkness will place before thi*. convention a re-
rominendation 'hai a "Fair List" of manufacturers
, drawn ttp and distributed to all grocers in the
country, this '•*' *° mende those manufacturers who
i ham from making a practice of stocking op retail
stores with their gooda and then cutting the bottom
,,ii of the market by jobbing quantities of the same
•foods when found expendlent. In ihis regard, the
reputation of manufacturers who have recognised
the right of retail merchant* to a fair profit while
handling manufacturers products will he favorably
cnnsidi red.
British Columbia will also t4ke the stand at the
conference that the wholesaler in an asset to the bus*
inesM community, and thai tin* practice <>f manufaci
hirers selling direct to retailers should not be encouraged, since >' tends to endanger thi* existence of the
wholesale merehanta* Mr. H.vrkuc*-* will maintain
that sales should be from tlu» manufacturer, to wholesaler, to retailer
Favorable consideration will be ask«*d for the suggestion thai Joint action be taken by grocers across
('anada in putting «>n simultaneous window displays
of manufacturers' products which come onder thi ir
Haumfication <»f fair traders,
Thr discussion on oleomargarine in the federal
House will nui in» interfered with by thi* retail trade
if the p<»!iey whieh It. 0. grocers will recommend, be
adopted, Their attitude is that the li. M. A. should
not 'liter the dispute, luit let oleo inatiiifa*'turers and
dairymen   argue  their   ease   before   I   parliamentary
committee, and let the members of the House decide
thr question on it** merits.
The above recommendations are the outcome of
n meeting of grocers whieh was held in the office of
the It. f. hoard H. M. A. on March 12th last.
INDICATIONS OF PROSPERITY.
Many retail establishments in Vancouver's shopping
centre being remoddelled and enlarged for their
new tenants.
Walking tip Granville or Hastings streets, one is
immediately arrested by the number of alterations
which   are   being   made to retail premises, snd the
The Road to Health
"T**->lnv ni) Ktxiuarh tfOUbl&l tWIt '•<" <>"**' MMSl*WI «»«
lWy, unit QIJ »kOl «*l*»l»tl«>ii ii ttHUK **t U"'" I""** thank*
I"   ih,*  !t*nuirkiilil<<  «>fT«"i*t»« of  KM* turnout n   YfU.Ht
Ami tha whole traiutformnUon »**»» ridioulourty easy:
Into ia',.,, „t Ki,-i-*.hnmnn « YmXtA a tmvg toi u period ■>'
three itn-nth**'"
Tho tiltovi* ui,* *»xliitt*t*« htMII two of th«* ti-Mttnuniinl.** Wfl
atr   uitliiK   In   OUT   I'iK   IMM   Vi*uhI   -for-lira It Ii   iel\Vi tlxltiK'
mmiMtgn Do yon »<*■■• *U»« uwnwidoui t"",*»i,*<1"i,s '"
your own notthborhood if you advocate to your mutton*-
*'•**   tlo*   Mttng   of   Kt«<l-*»»miinn'r«   fefttt-fot '-Health'
The Fleischmann Company
YEA8T SERVICE
Changes of occupants in some of the better class stores
m the community,
It appears almost to have reached the dimensions of
an epidemic, and is an unmistakable sign of awakening prosperity.
Among those who are having, or who have already
had their premises remodelled to their taste so far this
year are the following retail houses: The Hunter-Henderson Paint Company, Thos. Foster & Co. Ltd.,
I) Miami's Blouse Shop, Famous Cloak & Suit Company, Cuthbertsons' Ltd., Calhoun's "Smile" Hat
•Shop, B.C. Tailors, Tisdalls' Limited and others.
If it is in order to suppose that these changes are
being made in order to obtain larger accommodation,
it would appear that the retail trade of Vancouver anticipates a brink season's business, an attitude already
notieable in other phases of commercial activity in
British Columbia.
COMMONWEALTH GOVERNMENT TO SUBSIDIZE
CANNING PLANTS.
New plan should assist fruit industry of Australia.
Word has been received from Australia that bounties involving $650,000 have been provided by the government of that country in order to foster increased
production and higher grades of canned fruits, and
soft drinks.
The government's plan provides for a bounty to
canners ou all fruits canned and a further bounty for
all canned fruit exported conditionally on their pay-
in}? stipulated minimum prices to the growers. The
government assistance will be for one year only to
enable the industry to pass from governmental control to self-management. The plan provides that growers shall receive from the canner not less than the following prices at the orchard: £10 ($49 at par) a ton
for apricots and pears. £9 ($44) a ton for cling stone
peaches. £7 ($34) a ton for slipstone peaches and £6
($29) a ton for pineapples. The canners are required
to purchase fruit suitable for canning in quantities
equivalent to the capacity of the factory and must undertake to can only such varieties and quantities of
fruit as the comptroller general of customs prescribes.
The export bounty will be payable only on fruits
packed ami graded in accordance with commerce regulations and approved for export by a commonwealth inspector. The government is to control export
and may limit shipments of various classes of fruit.
Soft drinks will be made from the fruits that are
not canned.
ARK YOIT HANDLING
4*
RAMSAY'S
QUEEN ROYAL"
LINE OF
CREAM SODAS
Packed in largo and small tins. A delicious appetizing biscuit. It will appeal to your customers. Ask
our representative to show you this line or write or
phone us order.
This biscuit will give every satisfaction. Let us prove
this by sending you a trial tin at once.
Ramsay Bros. & Co., Ltd.
VANCOUVER, B.C. VICTORIA, B.C. g—
14
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which Is Incorporated the B, C. TRADE REVIEW.
March
>B**W^
Coffee
NOW IN STOCK
The New Key Opened Can
WILSON BROTHERS
Established 1890
Our Motto is " SERVICE "
We cannot offer to sell you goods cheaper than any other firm is in a position to do, but we CAN
give actual facts to prove that it is
ECONOMY
to deal with ns
ES?XZ WILSON BROTHERS, VICTORIA. B. C.
Wholeiale Grocer*
-  —— ii        in
____———
SHAMROCK RRAND
HAM, BACON, BUTTER, LARD, SAUSAGE, etc.
First Quality packing house products put up by l\ Burns & Co.,
Limited, whieh means they are the higbeat grade, always reliable,
and without equal on this market.
YOU CAN RECOMMEND SHAMROCK BRAND.
P. Burns & Company, Limited
VANCOUVER
OALOARY
EDMONTON THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which b Incorporated the B. C. TRADE REVIEW.
How Salesmen Can Co-operate With
Retail Trade
Are in a position to render aid and reduce chance ol failure in retail stores.
15
Failures in the retail grocery business are generally
recognised an being much larger than in any other line
of retail endeavour, antl it has been argued that many
of tin in COUld lo* avoided if there were some co-operative influences to rentier aid ami advice in overcoming
difficulties, which in many instances ar.* merely temporary.
Because there is no direct agency reedy to five a
helping hand la largely responsible for tie number of;
fairures reported from month to month.
There is no reason why specialty salesmen, for in*
stance, could not render valuable servic* along tins
Une Going from store to *»?e*re. these salesmen observe
certain fundamental weaknesses and by i a ere suggestion as to how some other dealer handled s * ertain similar situation, pitfalls could be provided for
These salesmen know all about the retail grocer's
average coat of doing business, and with the various
items of expense in mind could rapidly sec wherein
the grocer was exceeding the average f<o- rent, clerical help, delivery, etc., whieh prevailed in the successful store.
Armed with this information a specialty ralesman
could r»*nder no better service that to have s heart
talk with that grocer and show where he wa* not as
efficient as he might be.
Jobbing salesmen even better equipped.
This educational service could be rendered to bet*
ter advantage perhaps by the jobbing grocery sales
man. because of the fact that be comes in almost weekly contact with the same retail grocers. His information being of a more personal character because of his
closer contact with the retailers Bhould place him in
a premier position to offer suggestions, Moreover they
would be taken with better grace perhaps, than coming from a specialty man whose acquaintance is not
usually very personal.
Tlie jobbing grocery salesman has perhaps more at
-•take than the specialty man for the reason that his
bread and butter depends upon the independent retail
grocer remaining in business, and for this reason
should be vitally concerned in building up his custom*
ers. He knows that a grocer in a healthy state of business will Continue to buy front him. when as if that
grocer fails it   is necessary to dig tip another retail
buyer to replace the lost one.
The grocery salesman too because of his frequent
visits, known when a customer is beginning to slip, and
realizing the situation, finds his opportunity to check
this backward step at its inception before it he'omex
a serious matter.    Retail grocers tending to get into
hoi water, or who have already reached that stage do
not as a rule realize the full extent of their predicament.
Would reduce failures.
This is where the jobbing salesman could step in
and offer bis council.  He has been noticing a change
taking place if he is at all observant, and because of
l»is friendsehip, is in a position to talk the matter over.
Grocers as a rule are inclined to shy at inviting ad
vice, feeling that they can weather the trouble alone,
though only the most obstinate would refuse to accept
well-intentioned council from a salesman whom he
knew well and who was also aware that things were
not going as they should.
If there were a greater interest shown by wholesale grocers' salesmen in cases of this kind it is believed many would be once more redirected upon the right
road, and the number of failures reduced materially.
.Moreover it is claimed a policy of this kind would generally increase the efficiency in the retail grocery business.
Every now and then one hears of some wholesale
grocer who displays that kind of interest in his customers. Sometimes it is the credit man who visits the store
of a grocer who is beginning to weaken, or an association of wholesalers have a man going from store to
store sizing them up and pointing out where some improvement could be made.
Has "First Aid Department"
These efforts are however more or less sporadic,
whereas the greatest good can only come from concentrated effort. The position of the jobbers, because
of their absolute dependence upon the retail grocer
would, it would seem, compel them to exercise a more
general supervision over their customers in order to
keep, them moving along successful avenues and their
salesmen could readily serve as the intermadiary to
bring about this helpful aid.
A ease in point where a wholesale grocer took an
old customer in hand, comes from Eastern Canada.
One of the large wholesale grocers there has estabs
lished a new department known as "First Aid to Retailers' Department.'' It is described in a letter by
tin* Canadian Wholesale Grocers' Association as follows:
One of their retail customers who had been dealing
with them for over thirty years came in and stated he
was closing his business, as he was losing trade and
unable to make any money.
"The head of the firm did not want to lose a customer of smh long standing and paid a visit and saw
at a glance the reason Why this retailer was losing
ground. Opposite his store was a bright clean up-to-
date grocery store and a short distance along the street
was a cash and carry store recently opened, while this
retailer's store was in a condition that repelled a customer. His windows were not clean, no attempt made
to properly display goods cither in the store or in the
windows and thc store generally had not been kept up-
to-date in any particular. He had however, a very
strong asset in having been located in this store for
over thirty years and practically knew every one in
the district.
Jobbers take charge.
"At the request and adv:ce of the wholesale grocer,
the retailer went away for a week, and left his business in the wholesaler's hands. They selected from
their staff four men, expert in their particular line: one 16
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which Is incorporated the & C. TKADB RKV1EW.
Man!
j   .
J       '
*       \
TUDOR
A
TEA
" The Tea With a Pedigtee "
I      Is being sold by 369 stores and grocers in
|                       British Colombia.
The most profitable package tea for the retail
trade.
THE PRICE IS NEVER CUT.
n
Blerxded and Pocked by
1TCK&LICHTF00T **■
\fen\couvepJVC
EDDYS
MATCHES
Assures
I
good profit
1  »
quick turnover
^P
satisfied customers
mW$7
Canadian Clean Through
A.
Since 1851
1
The E. B. Eddy Co. Limited
Hull. Canada
"Let the Clark Kitchens Help You
to More Sales and Larger Profits."
Help
the Bride
When she eotnes shopping
tell her about CLARK'S
Prepared Food* which are
so praetieal ami save her
much work giving si
slight cost delicious and
ready to serve dishes.
Your juiggeHtion* will be
welcomed m CLARK'S
were probably used in her
mother's home.
W. CLARK, LIMITED, Montreal
SaUblithmtnta at Monti-**!. Que-.  St.  ft«mit Que., ana
Marrow, Ont
WAFFLE BRAND FANCY TABLE SYRUP
18 EXCEPTIONALLY GOOD.
Note: We could not improve the ay rup so we have
improved the container.
Kdy Confection Co. Ltd.
1100 Mainland Street
VANCOUVER, B. C. l:.'i
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which is incorporated the B. o. TRADE REVIEW.
17
I*,,uu their accounting department, one from their advertising department, one from their merchandising
or Kales department and one from their eredit depart-
meut.
They immediately got to work, cleaned the store,
displayed the goods attractively, both in the store and
windows, wrote business-getting letters to all retailer's
••ustomers, priee cards and advertising and generally
-organized the whole business.
That retailer returned to an up-to-date store and
with his big asset of personal acquaintance and knowledge of the district, has not only won back his old
customers but has shown a remarkable increase in business and profit."
CANADA'S GROWTH.
Authorative statistics show remarkable progress.
in 1900, with a population of 5,371,315 Canada
h*.ted 1,7*32,832 gainfully employed. In 1911 with a
population of 7.2(MJ.(¥H» the nation's gainfully employed totalled 2.72:i(ti:t4. On the basis of the l!»ll
figures, with an approximate population of 9,000,000
there are today approximately 3,3600,000 gainfully
employed* Canadian government figures are not yet
available and this figure is an estimate.
In 1916 th** estimated wealth of Canada was $19,-
iHMMHMl.tXK). Four years later. 1920. the estimated
total wealth leaped to $22,500,000,000. An Increase
of three ami one-half billions of dollars!
Tbesa figures prove that "average wealth" was increased,
Now let us look into savings to see whether the increased -wealth has led to extravagant living.
In 1901 savings bank deposits in Canada wen* $221,-
824,664, or $41 per capita. In 1923 they were $1,141,-
1364278, or $1:10 per Capita- an increase of 21 *> per
eent.
And what has been the progress of general bus Hess.
In 190*8 Canadian bank clearings totalled $3,997,-
969,665 and in 1923 they totalled *ri7.:U7.277.r>74~-~a
333 per eent Increase**
Between 1901 and 1921 tho value of field crops increased from $194,9"»:*},420 to $9.51863,670 of live
stoeks from $268,661,164 to $7M.720.0OO: of the fish-
eriea from $*2f-»,737,l">4 to $49.241..'W9. and of mines ami
minerals from $fi">.797.9ll to $172.:12.7.."»S0. The pro-
duets of manufacturers inreased in value from $4S1,-
053,375 to $r..4">f\0*{f>,97-"»; the wages paid from $1W,-
249,350 to $f>29.790,'>44. and the number of employees
in manufaturing alone from 339,173 to 678,837, The
chartered bank deposits increased Irom $849,480,000
I" $1."SI,749.790, the total of tire insurance from $1.
038,687,619 to $5,987,358,067 and id' insurance from
♦463,769,084 to $2.9;14,H44>S.
Thus the value of farm ami animal products has increased nearly fivefold; of live stock threefold; of mining products threefold; of manufacturers sevenfold;
of wages fivefold; of bank deposits fivefold; of lire in*
BUrance sixfold; of life insurance sixfold, and of foreign trade sixfold.
Since 1901 Canada has increased its export trade
by 400 per eent, ami now ranks fourth among the
world's trading countries.
HEA08 ROTARY CLUB
R. W. Ward of Shelly** Limited. Calgary, has been elected
president of the notary Club of that city for the year IM-t.
HERMAN NEILSEN
Taking office recently Mr. Neilsen, at president of the Greater
Vancouver branch of the Retail Merchant*' Association of
Canada, has assumed a large share of responsibility in that
organization's present campaign to prepare Vancouver retailers for the summer's tourist traffic.
ON BUSINESS AND PLEASURE TRIP.
A. G. Canuthers of Western Wholesalers Jewelers Ltd.,
who has been connected with this firm for fifteen years leaves
this month Tor an extensive buying trip to manufacturing
centres In the East and also to Europe. His wife will accompany him. and while in England they expect to visit the
forthcoming Empire Exhibition.
FED UP.
On a farm in Northern California Is posted this sign:
"Trespasers will be presekuted to the full extent of 2
mean mongrel dorgs which ain't never bin overly soch
able with strangers & 1 dubble barelled shotgun which
ain't loaded with no sofy pillers. Dam If I ain't tired of
this hel raisin' on my property."
1
I
>*:>
■i
4
■ i
H
2
8 18
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which is Incorporated the B G. TRADE ItKVIKW
Mar el
R. M. A. to Start Drive for Increased Membei ship.
Preparations have been made by the exe.utive of
the B. C. branch of the Retail Merchants' Association
to launch a campaign for the purpose of increasing
the membership of the Association. It has long been
felt that efforts should be concentrated more closely
in this direction, for although the present membership
is sufficiently strong for active and protective purposes, the moral effect of a larger roll would be advantageous, and the co-operation of the new adherents
would naturally stimulate, ami felicitate services already rendered.
The value of co-operative action will be demonstrated by teams already selected, and calls will be
made on those merchants who arc not as yet register*
ed on the sercngth of the association.
Photographers Section Formed
Organization work is proceeding in the formation
of a Photographers' Section of the R. M. A. To date
fifteen members of (Greater Vancouver have been enrolled, and a meeting will be held shrotly in order that
officers may be elected, and the constructional work
of this new section commenced.
Victoria Branch Plans for Additional Membership
Joining the province-wide movement to strengthen
the membership of the Association, Victoria is to organize a drive in the near future which will embrace
a large portion of the southern section oi the island.
At a recent meeting held in the capital city, provir
cial secretary W. F. Ing found that retail merehanta
were earnestly desirous of becoming affiliated with
thc R. M. A., and steps have been taken to have provincial organizer E. R. (jordon, who has received a
very cordial roception at Courtney and Cumberland,
to proceed to Victoria, to carry on the work of organization on a much larger scale than has heretofore been
attempted.
Announcement is made that II. 0, Kirkham. president of the Victoria branch will personally tak- charge
of the two weeks drive for the (Jreater Victoria organization.
Kelowna Branch Active.
At a recent meeting in Kelowna it was found thai
twenty-four retail merchants in that city were enrolled
as members of the R. M. A., and that tin forthcoming
season will see the membership in Kelowna 100 per
cent, strong Much good work is reported from thii
section by A. Fraser, who recently visited the Van
eouver offices.
Thc  following  were  elected  officers  for   1924-5.
resident, J. Hall; 1st vice-president, R. -I. Gordon*
2nd vice-president, J. Hunt; treasurer. VV. V,. Petti-
grew; secretary, A. Fraser.
TWO  SOURCES.
"Where is the Island of Cuba situated?" asked the teacher
ot a small rather forlorn-looking boy.
"I dunno sir."
"Don't you know where your sugar comes from?"
"Yes sir, we borrow it from next door."
Buy your milk
with your groceries
Your own grocer sella pure milk-Carnation. Why not look to him aa the regular
source of your milk supply? For cooking
and baking there is nothing better than
Carnation. Serve it instead of cream with
coffee. You will find Carnation convenient,
economical and absolutely pure. A recipe
book containing lCf tested recipes is waiting for you-sent free on request.
THIS reproduction   from  one  of the
series of Carnation   advertisements
scheduled to run in British Colum.
bin newspapers thia season   shows how
Carnation boosts for the grocer.
Tie your store up with
this advertising by displaying Carnation prominently.
It will sp-ed up your turnover.
Made in Canada
Carnation Milk Products
Co. Ltd.
134 Abbott St Vancouver, B. C. <r>\
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which In Incorporated the R. C. TRADE REVIEW.
19
YOUR COMPETITOR
It is a mistake to suppose that you have to tight
vutir competitor*. Nothing was ever permanently
gained by lighting. For lighting of any kind is pure
destruction. Your competitor does not have to be
\our enemy. He can be your friend. Competition does
not kill trade; it builds trade, stimulate-* trade, and
makes new trade.
This is based Oil the natural law that no one person
.an suit everybody. No man can get all possible busi-
ness in sny community. His personality attracts some
and repels others. Wherever there \% a lot of business
fur one man there i» business*for somebody else.
This is proved by tbe fact that in any big city business houses in the same line group together. We find
uok* of the piano bouses in one part of the town. Most
..f the automobile eneerns are strung along a eertain
nee tion of Broadway. New York. The silk merchants,
the hat manufacturers ,ainl so on. each nave their district. This prove* that iu the practical working out
of business it pays a man to locate in the neighborhood
of his competitors
It is not true that there i** just go much business
to be had. antl that a rival cuts your trade in half. As
.t rule, the nior«' tradesmen the more trade. A good,
lively competitor will inerea.se your custom.
Don't knock your competitor. It sounds bad. and
il i* bat),   lie a good sport.   Play the game.   Keep good
natnred.
Beat your competitor if you can. bui remember
that the surest way to beat him is to sell better goods,
give prompter service and have more courteous workpeople. Don't fight by cutting prices. Keep your
margin of profit fair.
If your Competitor lie** about you. or uses underhand methods to harm you, don's worry. He is cutting
otT his nose to spite his face. He cannot fool all the
people all the time. Straight business ami good nature
win out always in the long run Your competitor will
do you a deal of good if you keep your eyofi open. Ih'
will keep you from slumping. He will make you energetic, careful, more attentive lo business, and altogether will be a good tonic for you. if you know how
to use him    There is business enough for both of you.
WHO PAY8 THE ADVERTISING BILL?
Most  grocers have had ••ustomers complain  over
the ittrgc advertising expenses of producers of some
foodstuffs. Tbe average consumer seems to think that
he is helping pay the advertising bill, that it means
just so much added to the cost of his purchases. It is
worth while to take a few moments to explain to these
captious critics, making it clear to them that if it were
not for advertising, they would pay more, rather than
Icsx, for the goods they now know ami buy its a result
<»f publicity
A typical example which explains even to the
dumbest consumer, is the ease of Kellogg's Corn
Flakes, original) made tO retail for 1"» cents in a package much smaller than the present carton. By advertising sales were increased until it was possible to make
in sufficient quantities to afford a profit with the retail
sale price set at 10 cents, and the size of the package
increased materially.
In a recent interview the head of the Campbell's
Soup Company stated that when they first began marketing soups the expense was 714 per cent, and the expense for advertising was 14 per cent, a total of 21 %
Iter cent for distribution. Today, as a result of years
of good advertising, the salesmen expense is 2 per
eent and the advertising expense about 3 per cent, or
a total of about 5 per cent. This cut in distributing
<osts is due to the tremendous volume of business secured by advertising.
These aud plenty of other examples show clearly
enough that advertising pays for itself and leaves a
margin for distribution. Grocers ought to be familiar
with these conditions in order that they may on occasion combat the somewhat prevalent notion that the
consumer pays the advertising bill.
WANT CANNERS NAME TO APPEAR ON
PACKAGE LABELS.
The fight to place the name of the manufacturer of
food products upon the labelling packages ''packed
for." is again in the limelight as the result of the introduction of a bill in Congress. The measure was introduced by Congressman Johnson of Washington and
is an amendment of the Federal Food and Drug Act.
Under its provisions, if enacted, it will be necessary
to indicate the name and address of the manufacturer.
• aimer or packer. l.t proposes to amend Section 8 of
the food and drugs law and with its enactment food
would be declared inisbranded if the name and business address of the producer is not plainly and conspicuously marked on the outside* of the package.
The amendment would not prevent the placing of
the name of the distributor on the label as well.
AS OTHERS SEE US.
Every merchant, be he a baker or a grocer, is likely
jo get into a rut. By following his vocation day in and
day out in a certain routine he is likely to lose his vision, and very often miss ideas antl suggestions, the
carrying out of which would mean added satisfaction
on the part of his trade and incidentally greater profit
to himself. For that reason he is a w:se grocer who
frequently invites the people "on the other side of the
counter" to give their views, and he will find that very
frequently things that might need changing or correction, and which in the rush of business have escaped his attention, will be brought to his notice. Some
of the most valuable hints that have brought success
to grocers have very often come from customers—the
people on the other side of the counter.
CORN STARCH INDUSTRY GROWS.
Tlie manufacture of com starch has grown to such proportions in the United States that the industry now consumes about 50.000.000 bushels of America's great crop each
year. From each bushel of corn the average manufacturer
makes thlrtv-three pounds of corn starch, and in 1921 the ten
largest concerns made nearly 1.650.000,000 pounds of this producl. which was more than 90 per cent of the total produced
that year. This Industry which began in the United States In
IS44. has been increasing greatly in recent years. By 1880
the factories had reached a productive capacity of 230,000,000
pounds, and practically all of it was cousumed here. By
1921 there were nearly fifty plants, and $6,000,000 worth ot
the output was exported. These figures are from a report
recently made by the Department ol Agriculture as a result
of an Investigation.
-8 20
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which Is incorporated the t% C. TRADE REVIEW.
Ma re I
Advertised
Bread
U R extensive advertising
creates a willingness, to purchase Shelly ?s 4X Bread—because
they know it's unifomly good.
Every customer that our advertising "pulls" into your store to
purchase a loaf of bread, is a prospective customer for other lines.
□
SHELLY  BROTHERS
VANCOUVER
NEW WESTMINSTER
VICTORIA
NANAIMO
GILLEtTS LYE
I   few.        EATS DIRT        ^|
*r«
Profit is only profit
after you sell the
merchandise. A
large margin does
not put a dollar in
your pocket if the
goods set on your
shelves until they
are bespecked and
unsalable.
E. W   GILLETT COMPANY LIMITED
TORONTO.   CANADA
• 'NmMc
-atQ-tT -»l*i
TIPS FOR LIVE CLERKS.
SUGGESTIONS TO THE BOSS.
In things of detail, sometimes in big things, a
clerk often knows how to "run the store" better than
the boss does. The clerk is on the firing line. He
talks with customers, hears what they ask for, what
they have to say about goods, prices and services,
sees how they react to displays. If anything is wrong
with store policies, the clerk learns it first. If anything is wrong with store system, he seees it, and maybe the thing to do to correct it. Put a business man
in charge of marly any retail enterprise, and provided he has executive ability, he can run it at a
profit—with the aid of a corps of clerks who make
suggestions.
Some merchants, appreciating the value of sug-
•pstiOBB, offer rewards for all those that are adopted
a dollar, several dollars, apiece. These are wise
erehants. Bui every merchant, speaking as a general proposition, will do the saint* thing, whether he
makes the offer or not. He will take care of the
clerk who makes valuable suggestions, trust to that.
Every place of any size in the country has its
clerks who have risen to important positions via the
suggestion-to-the-boss route.
A dealer introduced a new cheek system in his
store. It was used by a big store with prestige in a
neighboring state. The clerk on a slip of paper wrote
the letter signifying the class of goods, his initial,
and the amount.    The customer took  the piece of
paper to the cashier, passed the *l*p over, and r.
reived change.   The cashier put die: k on a spindle.
A loyal, wide-awake clerk suggested immediately
that the system had a big hole in it, because the clerk
had no duplicate of the transit tion, A customer
might walk out without paying the system wouldn't
show it. The cashier totalled a but.it of slips at onee,
in a rush, and rang up a grand total.    Another lode.
A dishonest cashier could easily separate slips and
destroy, taking the customers' money for same, but
not ringing up. 'Tut mn in that cage f<»r » day,
without a cent," the clerk told his bos., "and I'll
guarantee to step out vvdli tlo m my pocke-ts, and
you won't kimw where I got it."
The boss made the changes,
'This is what I'm thinking of ordering of Stone
•lobbing,"   said   the   Moss.     "Is   there   anything   else
needed, Henry?" Henry, who had served the local
trade for several years, looked the lisj over, lie
said, "Why an* you buying such-and-such. .Mr. John
iOnf"     He    explained    why    and  how he  knew  it
wouldn't sell locally,   lie recommended things thai
he knew or believed WOtlld sell which the BOSH
hadn't included in the order. A competing store,
which bought the items Henry objected to, on the
strength of a salesman's persuasiveness, still has most
of the order in the garret, so to peak.
Merehanl make money by giving the public what
the public wants.   The clerk knows public demand
when it develops.    He Can help by separating the inquiries for goods not met of negligible importance
there   are   such from    the inquiries which suggest 1024
THE BRITI8H COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which is Incorporated the B. C. TRADE REVIEW.
21
goods which should  be stocked, and reporting the
latter at once.
Anything which will help the store to greater
efficiency »s » retailing unit—that is what the Boss
in eager to get. Kest assured that the clerk who understands suggestions as a part of his job is appreciated everywhere.
TRAVELLERS WE HAVE MET.
The last meeting of the l*nitcd Commercial Travel*
tera of America was held March 7th, 1921 This was
the annual election of officers.
Fnuik  Henley  was elected Senior Counselor and
ts supported by a splendid lineup of some of the most
active travelling men in this jurisdiction.
Frank represents one of the most progressive whole-
sab fruit ami produce houses in the West, The F
It. Stewart Co. Idd. He is probably one of the best
known of the Fraser Valley travellers. Prank says
that the Ajax" brand of hams and bacon, the
'•llollybrook" brand of butter. "Perfection*' cider
and the " Elephant" brand of oranges are leaders ami
arc ui great demand bv those who know.
Frank has been with P. R. Stewart €o. for the
past six wears, previous to that he was selling biscuits, having been on this territory for almost fifteen
years.
The IT. C. T. are looking for the biggest year in
their history under Frank Henley's guiding hand
and have adopted the slogan "1000 or bust, by March
31st 1925" so it speaks well for a real active year.
Frank Henley is a real busy man. In addition to
his business, which he never neglects, and the many
fraternal duties, he is also prominent in the "U.C.T."
Concert Party that has made quite a name for itself
during the past two years.
Frank is one of the "Hig" men in "U. C. T." now
and we predict that in the course of a few years he will
he heard from as one of our "Big" business men.
CANDY MAKERS ATTENTION.
Important Sales Tax Regulation.
The following ruling in connection with the* manufacture of candy will be of interest to retail merchants engaged in the candy making business.
"Retail candy makers must take out sales tax
licence and pay sales tax of 67r on 40% off the
retail selling price regardless of the amount of
business they do. They pay no tax on their
supplies and can secure a rebate on the material
they had on hand on January 1st and upon which
they paid a tax."
This ruling makes a distinct change in the regulations covering the manufacture and sale of candy,
and eliminates all exemptions as far as the amount
of business is concerned, and places every retail
candy man, making any quantity of candy, on an
equal basis with every other store.
NECESSITIES FIRST
Jake was a worthless and improvident fellow. One day he
said to the local grocer: "I gotta have a sack o' flour; I'm
all out and my family is starvin'."
"All right Jake." said the grocer.   "If you need a sack of
tlour. and have no money to buy it with we'll give you a sack,
liut see here Jake, there's a circus coming to town in a few-
days, and if I give you a sack of flour, you're sure you won't
sell it and take your family to the circus?"
"Oh no." said Jake, "I've j?ot the circus money saved up
already."
E-Wfc'&'dfi
8aves you time when customers ask for "Fresh Roasted
Coffee."   That's exactly what Nabob is.   The vacuum tin
keeps the Haver in-you sell :A "fresh from the roaster.
Kelly Douglas & Co. Ltd.
VANCOUVER, B. C
NABOB
Ullli BRAND
I
iv5um
p^d
|||pl^.DoUGLAS*Cf°
VANCOUVER B 22
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which Is Incorporated the P   C TH.VDE REVIEW,
March
NEW WESTMINSTER AND LOWER FRASER
VALLEY BRANCH HOLDS ANNUAL
MEETING.
The annual meeting of the New Westminster Branch
of the Retail Merchants' Association, took place in the
St. Julian Cafe on Thursday evening, February "iStb,
when reports of the past year's activities were read, ami
officers elected for the present year. The evening was
voted a success from every standpoint, and the addresses scheduled for entertainment and instruction were
fully appreciated by attending members. Harold N.
Moore, state secretary of the Washington Retail Merchants' Bureau, Seattle*, was thep rincipal speaker, his
topic being "Cutting Distribution Costs Through Asso.
eiation Activities." Hen Benwell, Vancouver, spoke on
direct mail advertising, and provincial secretary. W. F.
Ing. gave a short resume of Association activities.
The following officers were elected* president.
James Hyslop; vice-president. (J. 11. Jacobson; treasurer, A. McDonald: secretary, D. Stuart: Hon. Secretary.
IV Stanley Ross.
President J. M. Hyslop in reporting the work under,
taken during the past year, cited tlie following as some
of the items of interest to members*.
Gentlemen:
Oriental Exclusion.
Early last year a general meeting was held in the Hoard
of Trade Rooms to consider legislation which was then before
the House at Ottawa on this question. Resolutions from that
meeting were sent to provincial Office and Mr. McQuarrie at
Ottawa.
N. S. F. Chtquet.
On several occasions during the past year your Association
has been instrumental in bringing to Justice a number of
people who had been practising this iniquitous habit on sonic
of our members.
Daylight Saving.
Was not recommended this year owing to neighboring
cities not having adopted same.
Longshoremen*' Union.
The longshoremen of this city were endeavoring to establish a local here which would give them the right to work
on boats coming into the Fraser instead of hiring men from
Vancouver. Towards purchasing this Charter your Assleoa-
Uon contributed a sum of money, it being necessary to purchase this charter before a local branch could be established.
Road Signs.
Working with the Auto Club your Association erected
sixty, mile post signs along the principal roads leading to this
city, and also placed two large signs on lhe Pacific Highway
advertising the camping grounds at Queens Park, the expense
being borne equally by the two associations.
Direct Extension.
During the year districts outside the city were organised
with a view to forming the Lower Fraser Valley Branch In
Vluding Port Moody, Coquitlam, Haney,  Hammond,  Clover
lale and White Rock.
Grocery By-law.
A new by-law was drafted and presented to the City Coun
eil asking for enforcement of closing by-law.
Window Lighting.
Through the efforts of your Association tbe members are
still enjoying special rates for this purpose.
Provincial Convention.
Mr. A. P. McDonald and Mr. B. 8. Ross represented this
Branch at the Convention.
B. C. Products.
Acting in cooperation with the Board of Trade a successful advertising week was held of products manufactured
In this Province
Credit Rating.
A new system of Credit Rating has been Installed In your
office which enables the Secretary to give accurate credit in
formation on a moments notice
Addreesograph Machine.
Direct mail advertising at a minimum cost is now posMt-,!.
by the installation of an Addressograph machine for the ben,
fit of members.   (Set acquainted with this phase of our work
Mutttgraph Machine.
A need was apparent among the member* lor a machln*
capable of doing circulars, etc.. for mall advertising.   Thi* la
the latest equipment added to strengthen this form of j*ui>
llcily.
Dollar Days.
Successful Dollar Days were held at tarlous time*  Tbwn
special sales being the means of bringing many  people *•■■
town.
Farley Lectures,
Arrangements were made with Mr. Farley of N  (\ H
to address this Association on Busines-* Methods.   This
was worth a years dues.
Personal Property Tea,
The Retail Merchants' Association has always been
active towards the abolition of this tax.   Thia year the? hsv-p
accomplished something worth while, which proves that or
gatiixed effort Is the surest way to obtain retail*
Santa Claua and Xmas Trees
Considerable comment was heard in favor of this work
from those living outside of the city We hop** lhat nexl *,«•«*
the efforts along thi* line will be bigger and better lhan eteet
Collection Department.
Vou win receive irom the secretary*! report neme idea ,*
the work being carried on In ihla department. We have I be
lleve one ol the most advanced and up to date systems In use,
and we get results
Co.,
talk
V ,'■! i
Chloride of Lime
16 oz. Package
Supplied by all wholesale grocers
In British Columbia
Manufactured by
CANADA COLORS AND CHEMICALS LIMITH)
Succeeding
THE JOHN B. PAINE CO.. LTO.
Toronto Winnipeg Vancouver
Agents:
STARK A STERLING
VANCOUVER, B. C. I
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which ia Incorporated the B. C. TRADE REVIEW.
23
Sell
B. C.
Products
I^SMSW*^
Sell
B.C.
Products
Wild Rose
Pastry Flour
MADE IN VANCOUVER
Vancouver Milling and Grain Co.
LIMITED
Hes-J Office nnd Mills: Vsscoew, B. C:
6 TO 10 MATCHES ABE CON8UMED PER CAPITA
Year a cost of production s said to reach $200,000,000
The world uses enormous total of 4,500.000,000,000.
A reeenl Dotation in the United States of a large
loan for the purpose of enlarging the activities of tin;
world match manufacturing Industry has ted the Trado
Record of the National t'ity Hank of New York to a
mtud) of the world's output ami consumption of match*
es ami it estimates that the people of the world used
leal year 4,(i7.V»fiO trillion matches for which they paid
approximately *2(hi,ihs).ihk).
This estimate «»f the number of matches used and
their cost t«» the "final consumer" i* based upon data
supplied by high authorities in the match industry oi
iio* world. Figure! recently published by a high authority in London put ihe average per capita consumption of matches by the people of Europe at from ti to
10 matches a <fay, and estimates by an equally high
authority in the match Industry of the United states
put the average per capita consumption of the whole
World at about seven matches a day.
Most of the 4.ri<HUHRUMH).000 matches manufactured for lhe world markets are lhe products of a half
do/ni countries having special facilities for the production of this article of world requirement, The
three requisites for successful manufacture of matches
'ire. first, a plentiful supply of the kinds of wood suit-
pd for their manufacture! second, plentiful capital for
Ine purchase of the ingenious and expensive machinery by whieh thev are turned oui; and. third, plenti-
90 per cent ef
STEVENSON'S
QUALITY BREAD
IS SOLD BY
RETAIL GROCERS
THE  WISE GROCER WILL
UNDERSTAND WHAT THAT
FACT MEANS TO HIM.
Phone Fairmont 227
VANCOUVER, B.C.
ful supplies of labor.   Aspen and white pine are thc
timber chief Iv used.
'MOTOTERIA" THE LATEST
Detroit haa a grocery on wheels that is run by a Chain Store
Organization.
Taking the store to the home is not novel. Peddlers with
horse and wagon still ply about as they have for years,
through eountry districts and cities. Some ot them now use
automobiles.
Now there has been developed the "mototeria" by the
Motoieria Co. of Detroit, which is a specialized body placed
upon a two and one-half motor truck. The "mototeria" is
large enough io carry on display a complete line of groceries,
fully comparable with the stock carried by the average small
chain grocery store.
The first "mototeria" was put into service by the Wright
X* Parker Co.. a Detroit chain store system. Seven more
have been ordered and a combined garage and warehouse is
being built to accomodate 20 trucks and adequate supplies
of merchandise.
The 'mototeria" store is 22 feet long by seven and one-
hall feet wide with attractive Interior and a glass show case
lor fresh vegetables in the tear. As a customer goes in the
front door she is given a large market basket, suspended
from an overhead rail, in which she places her purchases. Incidentally, she must follow the overhead rail past every bit
of merchandise in the store.
The first day's business with the "mototeria" in Detroit,
yielded cash sales of $416. It Is said to be averaging $1000
per week now.
FULL ONES HANG DOWN.
"Sand-y," said « pompous Scotch laird to an old tanner,
•vou are getting very bent. Why don't you stand up straight
like me?"
"VVeel." answered Sandy, "d'ye see yon field o' corn?"
"I do." said the laird. LM
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which is Incorporated the B. C. TRADB REVIEW,
M
marc
GROCERY PRICES CURRENT
The following are prices quoted for principal lines of leading wholesale firms.   Prices quoted art necessarily
subject to market fluctuations.
RAMSAY BROS. * CO.. LTO.
10c Aasorted Sweet Biscuits, packages.
pe:   dozen   ._      100
15c Assorted Sweet Biscuits, fancy carton, per dozen      1 50
Chocolate  Bars, assorted kinds, 2 dos.
to a box, per box   95
Cream  sodas,  2s,  tins,  each   42
10c Cream Sodas, package \ doz     LM
15c Cream  Sodas,  packages,  doz    IM
r amity  -■■■rt*---, pa<kagf>.  pn  dozen $ 2.4-
Queen Royal Cream Sodas, per tb 15**
Queen Royal, tins, each  31
E.  W. GILLETT CO.  LTD.
Royal Yeast— I'er case
3 doz.   pkgs.   in  case          - 2-20
Pure Flake Lye—
4 doz. in case ... Mi
5 cases      Ml
10 cases, 4 doz. in case .... 5 80
Magic Baking Powder—
4 os. 4 doz  5.85
6 os.  4 doz  7.75
8 os.  4 doz 925
12 os. 4 doz  12.50
5'/*- 5 case lots. *
10 tb. wooden cases          .    46
26 tb.  wooden pails    46
100 tb. lined kegs    .43
360  tb.   lined   barrels    ,      .41*4
Magic Soda, Case No.  1—
1 cahe (60 1 tb.  packages) .7 40
5 cases or more  .. 7.30
Bl-Carmonate  of  Soda—
112 lb. kegs, per k«g  7.75
400 tb. barrels, per barrel 2516
Caustic Soda (Granulated)— I'er lb.
10 tb. canister (100 tbs in case)          ,l$\k
100   tbs.   Iron   drums    12->-%
Cream of Tartar— Per doz.
% tb. paper pkgs. (4 doz. in case)... 1.50
M tb. paper pkgs. (4 doz. in case) . 2.90
% lb. cans with screw covers (4 doz.
in  case)     .1 8>i
1  ft),   cans  screw  coven*   (t  doz.   in
case 6 95
5 tb. square canisters.   '*, dos. in
case)  .56 4
KELLY,  DOUGLAS A CO.. LTO.
Nabob Products
-.him,  i,4k, doz 7,1
lUspire.  No.   3.   tins  doz.  l.OO
Baking I'owder,   18 12 oz , dos, . 2.65
Bakinf I'owder, 48 16 oz ,  doz.         3.75
Baking  Powder,   12  2*£g,   doz  8.30
Baking Powder, 6 5s, doz 15.10
Baking Soda, 60 Is,  case  5.30
Baking Soda, 24  »£«, doz 60
Borax,   -4s, doz. 75
Black   Pepper,   tins,  doz  1,00
Celery  Salt, glass, doz  1.00
Nabob Coffee, small tins each  29
Coffee,   Is  lb 55
Coffee, •**•*« tb    .53
Custard  Powder, doz  1.00
Qui:.k Tapioca, doz  1.00
Chocolate   Pudding,  doz 1.00
Chili  Powder, small, doz  160
Cinnamon, 2 oz. tins, doz  1 10
Cayenne Popper, 3 tlna, doz.
Cloves, small,  doz.
Curry Powder. 4 o*   glass, dos.
(•inger,   small,   doz.
Extracts (all flavors) 2 os.. dos	
Extract* (all flavors)  4 os. dos.
Extracts (all flavors)  8 os. dot
Extracts,   aswrled,   16   oi.
Mace,  small,   dos.
Nutmeg,   small,   dos
Paprika,  small tins,  doz
Pastry Spice. 3 tins. dos.
Poultry Dressing, Sage. Savory,
Thyme.   Tumeric,   tins,   dot
Pickling Spice, dot   No. 3.
Marjoram,   Mint,   hirsley
Tartaric Acid.   *»«. do*.
White Pepper, tins, doz
Castor oil. 2 ot. dot
Castor Oil. 4 os. do*
Epsom Salt Si, •*>»», do*.
Fruit  Colors.   2  oz.   do*. .
icings (Cbocotate, Rose, Pink. tanas*
Vanilla. White. Almond. orange)  do*
Jelly I'owder. dos.
Lemonade powder. d<>*
Mustard,   Is.   dos.
Mustard,   Vis,   do*.
Mustard.  %»   dos.
Sulphur.   %9,  dos.  -
Tea.  (Jreen   Label,  %#,  per tb.
Tea. (Jreen Ijshttl, Is. per tb.
3s,   tb,   packages
5  tb.   porkages
Ten. de Luxe, Afternoon,  I tb
Tea de Luxe. Afterinxm  V»» P*'r tb
Tea. de Luxe %n per lb
Vinegar,    dos.
THE W. H. MALKIN CO., LTO,
"MslMn'e Best" Products.
Arrowroot  (St. Vincent)
12'4 os ctns     por do*.
12/3 os per dos.
Bilking I'owder (Pure  Phosphate)
1.20
1 40
I 75
Lit
LM
475
| IM,
17.00
M0
1.10
135
no
\M
II
I 15
2.00
US
1 35
MO
.(50
1  9S
I (5
) OO
J ****
I |o
4 $0
2 40
iM
.67
M
.13
M
7s
M
.u
2 10
1 40
3 75
3 00
17,85
45
«0
48/12 i>* per d«»*
12,/2%» per  do*
!2/5s per d«*
Baking Soda
12/4   oz.   ctns  per dot
12/8  o*.   tins     ...   per dot
Cocoa.
24/8 oz . prr dot    I 25
Ccffco  (Wuum  Pack)
1 tb tins per It.
Cream of Tartar tW,'t pure)
12/4 o*.  ctns
per do*
1 50
13/8 oz.  ctns
per dot.
2 90
12/ls  tins               	
. per dot.
«00
Custard Powder
4 oz. etna
per dOS.
1 00
8 oz. ctns	
per do»
1.90
l>rug Sundries
Borax.   12/4  oz.            	
per doz.
.75
Epsom Salts 12/4 o*. ctns.
.5')
Sulphur, 12/4 os ctns   	
per doz
.60
Extract? (all flavors)
12/2 oz	
per do*.
250
12/4 oz	
per do*.
4.75
8 oz.
par do*.
0.00
ie tn	
per  do*.
17.00
25 oz.
pet dot.
24.00
per dot
per do*
p«w dot
per d«»
per <t<>*
per d>»*
per   do*
Glycerin*
12 *| oa bts   	
13 4 os bts
Honey
Ml os Jsrs   .......
34/lS o* Jar*
14/ts   tins   	
12/4-a  tins  ..... .
Jelly Powders (all flavor*,
13/4 os.  ....
Lemonade  Powder:
11/4 oa ctns ~~.~~,—.~~,
It/I os ctns
Mustard
IJ/3* tins
II la os tins
24 la tins „„, u...^...,.^,,,
12/la tins ». ...—..
Spices and Seasonings
A5li»i*t .*  13/3 tin*
Cinnamon   12 3  tins
Ck-ves l*L3 tins
t'onry  pnwder  !2,*3 tins
ri-.tli j *.»•*•-..t*r
<;stiK«-r   s: 1 tins
liaea is/i tins
Mittjvram  12/3 turn
Mint  Sf/3 Um
Nutmeg.   12,/3  tins
Paprika \&f% tins
Parsley 12 3 tin**
Pastry,   mixed,   Mtt   Um
Pep|»er,   black.   12/3  !w.» j
Pupprr,   cayenne   13 3   tint    per   do*
Pepper,   whit-***.   13. ,1   tin*
Poultry IH-Assing  If 3 tins
ISfftt ground U,l tin*
Sag«. rubbed 13 3 tlna
Savory 13 3 tins 	
Thyme   13 1  tins 	
1 umertc   ll, tins
Whole Cinnamon 12 ctns
Whole Nutmegs, 13 ctns
Whole  Pickling  13 etna
Celery Salt, uper bots  .
Curry Poader, taper bol*
Tea
100/Is
M/fti ..
30/ls ami  M/J&l  assorted
I J/5*
Vln-gr.r
24   qts
Marmalade.
24/1   glass
12/4   litho   tins
Jams
Aaaorted 12/4 tins
Apricot  12/4 tins
Black Currant  12 4 tin*
hammo?   13/4  tins
(Jooseberry 12/4 tins
l.«»g»nberry 13/4 tin«
Peach  13/4 tins
Plum 12'4 tins
Prune. 12/ tins
Itnspberry   12/4 tins
Strawberry  12 4 tin**       m
P. BURNS A CO.. LTO.
Shamrock Producta
Ayrshire  roiled shoulders,  per  tt>
Bacon.  Shamrock, 6-8,  per tb
Baked hum,  .villi dressing* l»e:* lb
Creamery Butter.  BhamrooS, eartoni
1 v,
i N
2 40
3 |0
I
1,10
per do*
I.U
per dos
j:j
V-i   ,(,,*
1 H
per dot
4 10
p*r ,lo*
tu<
per tb
,40
per mttn
1
per   SOS
I 10
per <t»»i
! (0
per AOS.
i Ti
t*wr «)***
\ X
(x*r  SOS
J Ui
par dos
J d
per  d«*
1 11
)»«*r  60S
I li
per  do*
s ll
Jwr tb'***
1 to
p««t Soa
1 16
per  do*
I tl
p*r  dot
I -W
\;-r    «)•>(
1 H
por d»»*
J li
p«f do*
1 00
per dos
1 <w
patMtos
1 00
per doi
1 ■•■•'
per do*
l 00
per ton
: 1'
per do*
("0
per d»*
so
per dot.
')•:■
per dot
2 10
per d»s
i.n
perlt, .
a
t»er lb
*7
par tb
U
per It)
1,1*
|>er di>*     2 oO
t»«*l
Aot
1    J ■ ■
t>ei
■ lot
8 1"
par
Ant
**, Oil
per
Attn
per
it* n
1 ".
per
doi
v 00
pel
doi
!» U
per
Aot
!» c"
per
do*
I:.'
pei
pet
do*
doi
7 10
1.7 a
*> Tl
per
do!
!i V,)
Ah
.IS
M VM
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which Is Incorporated the B. C. TRADE REVIEW.
25
.,,.„,.   Canadian, terse,  per lb
,,,.„,.'   Canadian,   twin,   per  fl.
compound,  Carnation.   No.   5.   12-cas,*
, ■ .,„p.,uiid.  Carnation.  No.   1.  .*■*■*•»•*•'
„,kVd  hams.  -Shamrock.  |mt R»
Dominion hams, 12-»« 0>* -j
,timioii Bacon, 6*1" lbs. per tl.
!      nion Ba«on, io-l* »»  t'«r n\    •
Snlon Shoulders boned and rolled
uripplnf.  b«ef* .*•«*'   l»r|iMl
,!limV   jbamrook,   t»*r  n>
(,„,„-, taped snd reUei, par tb
Head Cheese. Mb   tins, each
j filled   tongue,   per   tin
jjujd, No. 5. 12 to «»jm'
I ,,,*,, So. 3. 20 W SSM
U.td.  carton.   lS-fle*
Lard.   No    U  cartons,   3(»-tb«
Mincemeat, kits. 35-tb. net. per lb.
Maol  U»*f.  !«"*  tb
ports P<«**- P*** d*3* *, '"-'-,* M
«'.«k. r*»ast W» with dressing, tt*
Bmoked rt*h. kipi***. *» per n»
Smoked  Ash,  kippered  salmon.   10s
Md   3»s.   per   tb.
Smiked Cm!, 30* per th
Elected fowl, par *t>
Sitected Chicken.   |nstf  lb
,14
24»i,
9.15
»55
.38
.25
24
.23
.18
,11
.26
.VI
M
US
9.55
0.60
.17
,;4
15
35
l*>
.On*
J 5
16
.25
.IS
THI ROYAL CROWN  SOAPS, LTD.
Vancouver   Price   Llet—F.O.B.   Vancouver,
er New Westminster.
Terms Nett 30 Days.
"Apex" Soap Flakes, 24 1 lb. pkts. box 4.85
"Apex" Soap Flakes, 12 1 lb. pkts. box 2.45
A Ut Pranc-alae Castile, box nf 23  4.10
Blue  Mottled,  box of 20   6.30
Crown Oatmeal. 24 6s. box of 144  4 90
Crown Olive, per gross    9.60
Climax  or  Montreal  (wrapped)   box  25 6.40
Knglish  Blue Mottled box of 20   6.30
QoMen Went 5s. box of 120s . 4.95
«i«lden   West   Powder,   3  lb.   box  of  24 6.65
QotdftB  Bar.  Ikjx of 30 2.60
Kiondyke (wrapped) ix»x of 25...      6.40
Kbndyke   (unwrapped)   box   of  25  6.25
Klero Gly erine, box of 144   6.00
Linen   (unwrapped)   box   of  100 3.90
Liquid   Ammonia.  2  doz.   qts.   box   24.... 4.15
Liquid  Blue.  2 doz   qts..  box of 24  4.15
Mechanic's  Pine Tar.  box  of  100     5 65
Mechanic's  line Tar,  1m>x of 50 2.90
«>Uve Castile,  cakes,  box  of 200 460
Primrose (wrapped) box of 25 4.66
Extra hard unwrapped, box of 30  2.60
Perfect   (unwrapped)   box  of   100  3.90
Write for Toilet and Hotel Soaps.
Special prices on 5, 10, 25 and 100
boxes.
Pendray'8 Lye, box of 48   5.40
Pendray's  Powdered Ammonia,  box  24 3.90
Special prices on 5, 10, 25 and 100
boxes.
Pendray's  Water Glass,  Ego  Preserver-
Cases 24 tins per case  4.60
Red Crown, box of 25  4.65
Royal Laundry Flakes, 88%, In barrels
per tb 13
Royal Crown Soap, 5s, box 120, 1 c/s 5.55
Powder, box 24s only... 6.65
Powder, 1 Ib. box of 50 4.90
Cleanser,  box  of  48  tins 3.80
Royal
Itoyal
Royal
Royal
Royal
Royal
White
White
White
White
box
Crown
Crown
Crown
Crown
Lye.  box of 48	
Crown Naptha, box of 100	
down Powdered Ammonia lib.
Wonder, box of 100 	
Swan Soap, 5s, box of t20	
Swan  Naptha,  box  of 100	
Swan Washing Powder, 3 tb.,
of  24	
5.40
4.85
3.90
5.30
5.55
4.85
6.65
ROLLING STORES DENIED
Toronto Police Refuse Them Right to Operate In that City.
Tho Police* Commissioner* of Toronto have refused to
grant a license to an organitation operating under the name
of the Home Service Stores, which aimed to operate rolling
■•.'.ores In that city.
At a hearing the Canadian Wholesale Grocers' Association wa* represented by Its secretary. A. (\ Pyke. together
with wholesale grocer* themselves, while the retailers through
the Retal Merchants' Association had a committee present.
Both of Ihese interests opposed the license.
This is the second unsuccessful attempt to operate rolling
RtorSS in Toronto Two years ago the Roly Redy Stores,
Inc. irled the venture but soon gave it up
E.   B.   EDOY   CO.   MANUFACTURING   SESQUISULFIDE.
e K II. Kddy Company of Hull. P, Q. are now operating
ir
and
prepaid at  parcel  post rates, posted in  Canada addressed
for delivery in the United States.
They further require that commercial invoices or statements of value be enclosed with books prepaid at printed
matter rate, also in sealed parcels of general merchandise
prepaid at letter rate, posted in Canada addressed for delivery in the United States.
ine r.. it r.u«y v»uip«»»j "» ■»«»>• ■ *■*« * — * -~ •
th.tr new equipment for manufacturing sesqulsul-nde of phot-
phorus. of which they are relatively large 01*1*1 in thelt
match factory This equipment was designed, erected am
put In Operation by K A. U Sueur, consulting chemical en
gtneer, of Ottawa
THE SUGAR CROP.
Present  sugar market  conditions ate keeping buyers of
..lined sugar from purchasing beyond their immediate need*,
according to n recent review of the Industry.   Buyers pmer
(0 have refiners carry lhe load and run the risk alterjaax
vear's experience.    It  is generally  believed  that  the hlghtr
prices quoted  bv  some  refiners  are  more  or  less JMWnw.
Sugar slocks in Cuba Increased 57&.MO tons In the first n
weeks of the .ear    Stocks now total over 800,000 tOOS.   Buff"
production up lo February   1  aggregated over MS.000 \   <• *
Total receipts of sugar at Cuban shipping ports are neaiiy
U  large ns  thev  were  last   year  despite  delays  HMNV
rains.   Receipts in the first month were over twice as niu
as two years ago.   The crop Is progressing favorably am
weathfr has been generally fine.   The recent irequen   n    -
have been of great benefit to the spring idannp*    l    an
which are to go Into the present crop.   The gngWl Wg
market seems to have supplied its wants lor shlpment^earner
than April and Is Inclined to look on for ^^•■J?1, J, h
French beei sugar crop win amount to «0,0M tons.  Witn
Prieei extremely advantageous for producers laigtconU22,%
For beet roots will be closed and a big increase foi  u.4-
must be relied upon.
PARCEL POST TO THE UNITED STATES
New United States Cuitoms Requirement!
The United Slates au.horitles ™"*^^^*55
the  Is. of April next. Customs Declaratlobh-J »      *  "J
attached to all parcels of general merchandise (piuccl po.u
RETAIL GROCERS MAY CARRY IMPORTANT RECOMMENDATION TO NATIONAL CONVENTION.
Retail grocers of British Columbia may be given an opportunity to declare whether or not they favor the practice ot"
manufacturers selling direct to retailers and cutting out
wholesale merchants and if their answer is in the negative,
favoring the wholesalers, the question may be carried by B.
C. grocers to a coming grocers' conference in Ottawa and a
nation-wide expression of opinion on the subject would there
be obtained.
The subject has been discussed by members of the grocers' section of the Retail Merchants' Association of Greater
Vancouver and a majority of the grocers declared that they
were not in sympathy with the practice of certain manufacturers, particularly those of the east, in engaging in direct
dealings with retailers.
The grocers were of the opinion that wholesale merchants
could not be dispensed with and should be given assistance
by the retail trad? to continue in business with the maximum
power of serving retailers.
Vancouver grocers will place the matter before other
grocers of the province and if a majority are of the same
opinion the trade in the west will carry its recommendation
to Ottawa where a national conference of grocers will be held
shortly.
TEA TALK.
New York. March ".—Although trade in teas reflects ordinary current requirements of consumption for the most
pari, there is a large and broadening interest in Ceylons and
Indians of good quality. The activities of buyers, however,
are restricted by the paucity of offerings of such teas on the
spot or from abroad, and for such lots as are obtainable top
prices are being paid readily. The same situation exists in
London where fine grades have been advancing as a conse-
(itience of a good demand and limited supplies. According
10 mail advices from London, exports from Colombo to the
United Kingdom, in the last half of January amounted to
fi 570.000 pounds against 4,742.272 pounds during the same
time last year, while the total January shipments of 10,250,000
pounds exceeded those for January 1923 by 1,713,340 pounds.
Shipments from India to the United Kingdom from April 1,
1923 to January 31. 1924. amounted to 248.349,000 pounds as
compared with 211.190,000 pounds in the corresponding 1922-
23 period. 26
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which is Incorporated the B. C, TRADE REVIEW.
Ma
n it
Mon
Knit
ajscment
JostetCseUing
Hosiery
over shown tn
Canad
OSIEPY
>.*ȣ.
*f   .,7"    ■■
l*.-* v    *
fli
M !-"'Jm
li***:-*
P
*«*&SZ3':Q.
JftS
JBXSmQ *-***- 1921
Tilt; BRITISH COLUMBIA KKTAILElt
With which iii incorporated the B. C. TRADE REVIEW.
27
SUITS IN VOGUE POR SPRING.
Tin* big demand tiii.s ipiing will doubtless lie for
suits, many charming models having made their appearance in the spring opening displays.
The spoils eut and pattern predominates in these
models by Canadian manufacturers, although two and
three piece styles are included in the season's offerings.
As regards material*, twills, jerseys, flannels and
iweeds »re all featured quite strikingly, although
tweed and flannel* predominate, with the leading patterns in stripes and cheeks, Heavy twill is also
noticed.
Jackets generally are cut in shorl design, many
douUle-breetcd coats in SBMri lengths heing shewn in
costumier* windows, with the stn^ie-breaated model
enjoying » eertain popularity.
Bulla of the IpOftS variety show Ihe short jacket in
it Mititewhaf plainly tailored effect, featuring mannish
collars and rovers, with one, nvu, and three buttons.
Other models have jackets of a semi-fitting effect, some
n ith bolts, aud others showing DO indieation of a
waist line.
In the more formal type of suit lucre is a much
wnier style range, ranging from short i«> slightly below the hip ami some knee-length types,   Straight
Inns, however, are a common feature Willi the season's models. The question ofdrimming or no trim-
mint' scents lo ba i ease fur the individual designer,
••'"Tlainlv both the severelv plain as well as the trim-
ined suits in the more formal types are to be seen, and
ihe trimmings range from just buttons to buttons and
embroidery or grald more or less lavishly used. Colors are shades of blue, greys and tan. with the old
Validity, navy, losing none of its popularity to the
lighter shades
MENS' WEAR.
Reports from that centre of fashion New fork, indicate that this season's fashions in mens wear are
modelled upon a very conservative basis with nothing
of the startling element about the styles.
The New Yorker of the present time who dresses iii
lhe latest fashion is not to be seen taking his constitutional up and down Fifth Avenue, but is more likely to
■'•• found in the more exclusive hotels niul restaurants
of lhe Metropolis. These men have llu time and leisure to keep up to the dictates of fashion, and the most
xmartty groomed have an appearance of rich tailoring
with little touches of sartorial artistry to indicate
the r assoi'uilion in exclusive circles.
Quite a few derbies are to be seen with spats ol
pearl or llght brown and many of the stylish dark blue
Hoards overcoats clothe llu- well-dressed male. Dark
I'luc Chesterfields with velvet collars are also noticed,
together with box coats in the same color; in facl daw
blue overcoats are tlu* coats of the hour. bong cash*
mere mufflers in stripe or check design are prevalent.
The stiff while collar is to be seen upon the old
men, often a whig, but  is evident  that  the younger
men are indulging in the soft collar attached, matching the shirt, and pinned with a gold soft collar pin.
One typical costume reported from New York pictures an extremely tastefully dressed man in dark
blue doubie-brested suit, cut with the broad shoulder
and slim hip lines that is one of the seasons' vogues.
His shirt was of narrow Madras of narrow blue and
white stripes, the collar soft, with horizontal stripes
in contrast with the stripes in the body of the shirt.
The tie was black poplin with narrow French blue
stripes, and be wore pearl grey spats and patent leather shoes.
NECKWEAR.
Spring colors in neckwear are decidedly brighter
than has been the case for some time, and it is apparent
that the present will be the most colorful season in
years. Light blues, light browns, and light greens are
seen with stripes and dots as usual, but the whole effect
of these fabrics seems to be very much brighter than
formerly.
The popularity of silk and wool neckwear shows no
signs of abating, and the new color effects being shown
promise to give it a new lease of life. This material
will by no means be crowded out by the bright color
effects in other silk fabrics, for the bright color effects
in silk and wool are quite as effective and distinctive
as those in other fabrics, and the range of patterns
has been much enlarged.
Tlu' fair sex is becoming more prone to adopt masculine neckwear and four-in-hand mens' ties in narrow shapes have been quite popular with some of the
mannish outfits, in fact a special four-in-hand in the
narrower shape has been designed for women's wear.
Here is a selling hint that may be useful in connection with the sale of womens' ties. Generally
speaking women are the principal buyers of neckwear
for nun. and the display of a rack of neckwear for
women, with a neat card attached announcing that
they are womens" ties might result in a number of
sabs.
Prominent neek wear men have predicted that the
bow lie will be quite popular this season. A great
many of the new fabrics are adaptable to the bow
shape, a vogue which is said to be increasing, especially among Ihe younger members of thc community.
SHIRTS AND COLLARS.
Two new collars have been introduced to the tvade
this spring, novelties somewhat unusual in their Conception, Tite first is tho single striping in black,
mauve, or blue, which is appearing on both the starched and webbing collar about a quarter of an inch from
the outer edge. Another maker uses two rows of
stitching in the same colors and of the same general
form.   Some local dealers ir* stocking these upon pre-
There appears to be no groat demand for thc wing
collar, nnd although some new numbers have made an 28
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which t« Incorporated tho B. C. TKADE RSJVUBW.
Mji;c|i
appearance, it is not considered likely that there will
be much call for them this summer.
Webbing collars have undergone an importan: development since their first appearance, in the early
days the public merely called for a webbing collar, but
now a particular style is demanded, and the smartest
styles are the ones that sell best.
There is confidence among retail merchants in the
shirt of better quality, with collar attached, appropriate as they are for general street wear. Thc shirt
with collar attached is very comfortable in the summer
months, but it means a clean shirt every day. and it is
uncertain whether this style will be as popular this
season as last.
Fine mercerized cotton cloths have made an inroad into the market somewhat to the detriment of the
silk shirt, while the demand for fine wool taffeta ami
shirts of that nature has become practically negligible.
Millinery.
A brief inspection of Vancouver s millinery establishments leaves in the memory one outstanding impression—variety. Dame Fashion usually so whim
sical whore milady's headwear is concerned, seems this
soring to have outdistanced her range of former years.
Colorings too are brighter, and a more varied assortment of trims are to be seen in the spring d splays.
The small hat is of course iu vogue at the present
time, turbans, cloche, toque, and here and there a tri-
eorne vie with each other for milady's favor, brilliantly
trimmed in colors of sand. jade, purple, orchid, erab-
180
• Ml.
apple, sandalwood, ching blue, almond green and
in black and white.
Materials ami trimming delightfully blended -
prise Georgettes, Failles, Shot Silk, Champion Cl
Visro, and  Mankok,  trimmed  with  braids of m
tagei, polo, hemp, coburg and yedds ami many creations are finished in flower, ribbon, wing, lace and
Malines decorations.
in straws the Milan and I'i^it are very much in
prominence.   The color trend so far as ean be observe.)
favors   brown,   and   a striking model tn snndnlw |
rail an, pressing closely to the crown and trimmed with
opalescent currants has attracted much attention
In contrast, another model in turban style trimmed
with wide black lecipicred ribbon ranged in airplane
bows ban been favorably commented upon.
For those who favor the tailored or sports mode
melon-crowned bangkok models are to be seen, with
their logcabtn bands jaunty mejeury wings and fluted
ribbon cockades
YARNS
There has been a distinct ehnnge in the trend of
the yarn business during the last few seasons. It h
lo 'Omtng no re and more apparent that yarns are no
longer merely a Fall and Winter proposition, bui thai
the new style tendency has created an all year-round
demand which is being profitably capitalised by man)
sit*eissfii! storekeepers who have adjusted their nor
chafolissn* plana accordingly, It is wfl worth featur
in\* yarns at all times, because sales run info such fin?
volume.
BIG VALUE
FEATURES
of the
"Hosiery That Wears "
1. Tapering toe—Rives longer
wear.
2. Deeper 4-ply bee)—-gives perfect Instep fit.
3. Narrowed ankle-—gives ankle
trimness free from wrinkles.
4. Deep elastic knit top—fits
knee snugly, yields with
every movement
5. Double soles—for extra mileage.
6. Special numbers—for those
who require an unusual combination of sizes.
Your Customers Are Out For the Biggest
Values They Can Get
GIVE IT TO THEM
With
Hosiery
Today more thai! ever before, your CglSteffliH ar«* determined to get the
most hosiery value for their dollar
Wide awake dealers are giving it lo them with Ctrcle-Bst Hosier* III
♦> Hig Value Features impress r customer al B glance with the extra
value offered. Comparison serves «o strengthen this impression Longer
wear and greater comfort prov,* h   Retail - -Satisfied customer* Incress
ed sales.
Check over ihe ♦; nig Valae Pastures <>f Clrole-Bsi Hosiers  -sod ie! as
send you prices.   You will he quick to realise Ho unperatled value*.
Circle Mar Hosiery includes all style* for men. women and children. In
botany   wool,  silk,  silk   and   wool   combinations,   mercerised   lisle   B»d
cashmere.
Circle-Bar Knitting Co. Ltd.
Kincardine, Ont
Mills at Kincardine and Owen Sound
HMtlltt
HOSIERY 192*1
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With Which in incorporated the 0. C. TRADE REVIEW.
29
MUSICAL SALESPOLK.
David Spencer Musical Society wini high praise in its
Opening presentation.
\ d«'idedly praiseworthy venture into the realms
,,l musical comedy hy members of Ihe snlesforce of
David Spencer Limited, whieh resulted in unanimous
commendation from two capacity houses, was staged
Bi the Orpin um Theatre on the evenings of March "d4.
,\s an amatuer performance ihe producl ion of
The Geisha11 hy tha David Spencer Musical Society
will leave in the memories of Vancouver playgoers an
impression not easily to be forgotten.
The close attention to detail and the very excellent
judgment o! those responsible for the production is
deserving of the highest praise
Curiosity the mental attitude of the first night audience was gradually superceded as the comedy progressed by an attitude of real inter*st and appreciation, dispelling any sign* of a anpercillious patronage
thai is usually displayed towards the efforts of an untried amateur company.
The Weil-finished portrayal of the principal characters, ami the really admirable smoothness which
characterised tho presentation of this famous musical
comedy was deserving of nothing less than the spontaneous appreciation which was given to tt.
It may perhaps he considered somewhat outside {he
scope of retail business to indulge in public theatrical
entertainments* but when such is entered upon with
the sole intention of encouraging musical talent among
Vancouver's citizens, this noteworthy debut of the
lis.M.S. will receive the eneourageintnl which it tie-
serves
M»ssrs, David Spencer Limited arc lo be congratulated upon tho initiation of a pleasurable and worthy
phase into the daily round of labour.
TEXTILE   MANUFACTURERS'  SAFETY   ASSOCIATION
Tin* annual general meeting of the Textile Manufacturers'
Safely Association, reprejeentlng employers* in Class 17 under
Hie Ontario Workmen's Compensation Act. was held at the
King Edward Hotel Toronto, on February 13, with R. R
Hoodie, Hamilton, vice-chairman el lhe Ontario Division of
lbs Canadian Manufacturers' Association. IB the chair.
There wai « representative attendance at this meeting,
including delegates from Hamilton, Waterloo. C.uelph. Toronto, Halt. Kitchener and Wellattd. Employers present pr*
*i itled their figures showing their accident experience lor the
past year and In many oases the accident cost W8S very con-
Milerably  lea*  than   the  assessment   paid.    Some  of  those
present, expressed the opinio nthsl the Isrger firms were
cwrylaf more lhan their fait* share ol Ihe compensation
' ohIs.
Tlie following were elected directors for ihe ensuing year:
v E, Adam. Canadian Coltons. Limited, Hamilton; A. N
Hurus, smith Manufacturing Co. l.lmlied. Toronto; C. 0.
Cockahatt, SUngsby Itanufaeturtna Company, Brantford;
William Hartley. Colonial Weaving Company, Limited, Peter-
borough} M. 11. Holloti, Chipman Holton Knitting Company,
■•■million; s. a. Reed*, Plymouth Cordage Company, Weiiand;
■• A. Steer, Toronto Carpet Company. Toronto, These with
l{ R- Mootlle. the retiring president, will constitute the Ex
• cutive. Committee of ihe Association,
At a subsequent meeting or directors. A. E. Adam was elected president and S. A. Reed vice president.
FINAL ARRANGEMENTS DISCUSSED
Amalgamation with the R.M.A. favorably commented
upon at recent three-hour convention of National
Shoe Retailers Association.
i
Ai a recent meeting of the N.R.S.A., many subjects if vital import to the trade as a whole were
brought to the attention of the gathering. Among the
more important matters were: Increased insurance on
shoe stores; Protest against the increase in freight
rates; Thc Receipt Tax; Combating injurious statements regarding the shoe industry; Another matter—
a detail of convenience—which the N.S.R.A. had taken
up was tho matter of having laces threaded in tennis
goods, and a request for this has been handed to rubber
footwear manufacturers.
Question of Amalgamation
The important item on the agenda was the report
of the committee on the proposed amalgamation of
the N.S.R.A. and the Retail Merchants Association of
Canada. Progress has been made in this regard, and
hopes were expressed that negotiations will have reach
ed a satisfactory conclusion before the next annual
meeting. President Blatehford requested Mr. Stephens
of Ottawa, who, he said had played a large part in
these negotiations, to report upon the situation.
Mr. Stephens referrod to meetings that had been
held in Montreal and Ottawa between the representatives of the Retail Merchants' Association and tho
N.S.R.A. lie pointed out that the former body was
a national organization with offices in the leading cities from coast to coast and canvasers on the road all
the time In that way. he said, tho clerical work of
the N.S.R.A. could be carried on without extra expense.
One difficulty in the way of amalgamation, he stated, was fees—the amount to be collected and the
amount that would be apportioned to each of the two
bodies but this matter was being adjusted and it was
only a matter of time before a satisfactory arrange
no nt would he reached.
Mr. Stephens was convinced of the desirability of
the amalgamation on account of the much stronger
hacking with which the association could take up
matters affecting its interests. He felt that before the
next annual meeting the matter would finally have
been settled.
A letter form Mr. Trowern, secretary of the Retail
Merchants' Association, was read by Mr. lilachford.
Sentiment Universally Favorable.
The letter stated that no expression unfavorable to
the amalgamation had been received by that association up to dale. Wherever their organizers had been
throughout Canada they had found that the proposition should be gone ahead with. The only difference
now was in arriving at some method of dealing with
the general merchants whose stocks included considerate stocks of shoes as well as dry goods, etc. The*
assistance of these merchants was desirable, but at the
same time they wanted to avoid making the membership fees for the various trade sections they were concerned with so large as to prevent them from coming
in.
Mr. Blatehford pointed out that numerous details,
small but difficult to deal with, had come up in con- ■^
30
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which in IncoimnOe.l the H   C TRADK REVIEW,
*-«*«-
arch
r
li
nee tion with the amslgamation. else it would already
have heen completed,
Mr. Vaughnn, of Francis & Vaujrhnii. St. John, N.lt.
expressed himself as favorable to the linking up of the
associations and said he believed that the shoe merchants of the Maritime Provinces, in general, felt the
same way about it.
Geo. St. Leger, Toronto, was -heartily in accord
with the idea, and believed that with the added weight
of tbe Retail Merchant's Assn. the N.S.R.A. eould ae-
eompl sh a great deal for the shoe trade, lie pointed
out that there were many abuses that called for action, particularly referring to fake sales, illegal "failures," and earpet-bagging practices generally.
OFFICERS FOR 1*24
Shoe Manufacturers' Association of Canada
President: L. P. Deslongchamps.
1st Vice-president: J. A. Walker.
2nd Vice-president: J. E. Samson.
Executive Committee:
Western: F. J. Leckie.
Ontario: F. H. Ahrens. W. H. Duffleld. 0. H. Ansley. F. S.
Scott. L. C. van Geel, Geo. A. Blacbford, 8. G. Inderhill
Quebec: J. M. Stobo, J. Perkins. G. Carpentler. J. B. Goulet
Montreal: 0. Dufresne, R. M. Davy, A. Tetrault. N.  Mac
farlane. R. Lanthier. A. A. Bradley.
Maritime: J. D. Palmer.
Past Presidents: J. E. Warrington and Joseph DeottSi
Representatives of Rubber Companies: John .Myles.
Manager and Treasurer: Roy Weave..
Secretary: Lionel Theoret.
Shoe Wholesalers' Association of Canada.
President:   Alfred  Lambert   (Alfred   Lambert.  Inc.  Montreal).
1st Vice-president: Arthur Congdon (t'onitdon Marsh Lid..
Winnipeg).
2nd   Vice-president:   Georges   Brown   (Brown   Rochette
Llmitee, Quebec).
Executive Committee
Maritime Provinces: R. T. Hayes. St. John. N. II.; ('. S.
Sutherland, Amherst.
Quebec: J. I. Beaubleti. Quebec; E. Darveau. Quebec.
Montreal:  W. Girourard;  H. V. Shaw;  R. H   Locke;  R.
Montague Davy.
Ontario: Hugh White. Toronto; W. A. Hamilton. Toronto;
J. Pocock, London; R. R. Griffith. Hamilton.
Manitoba: J. J. Kilgour, Winnipeg; W. A. Law, Winnipeg.
Saskatchewan: W. Sutherland. Regina; J. Kennedv. Moose
Jaw.
Alberta: J. I). McFarlane, Edmonton; J. Dower. Edmon
ton.
British Columbia: John Darner, Vancouver; J. Henderson,
Vancouver.
Past President: J. A. McLaren, Toronto. Ont.
National Shoe Retailers' Association
President: C. R. Lasalle. Montreal.
1st Vice-president: C. S. Rannard, Winnipeg.
2nd Vice-president. L. C. Lockett. Kingston. Out.
3rd Vice-president: H. W. Rising. St. John, N. II.
Secretary: J. L. Chisholm. Toronto, Ont.
Treasurer: Jas. W. Jupp, Toronto.
Provincial Chairmen: Chas. B. Stanford, Vancouver. B. ('.;
Fred Irvine (Hood & Irvine), Calgary. Alia.; Wm. Marshall.
Moose Jaw, Sask.; John Affleck, Winnipeg, Man.; Geo. SI.
Ledger. Toronto. Ont.; Alme DeMontlgny, Montreal, P. Q.;
John Vaughan, St. John. N. B.; Geo. A. Mahoney, North 8yd
ney. N. S.; J. A. Robertson, (Goff Broa.), Charlotletown. P.
E. I.
Past presidents: Howard C. Blachford, Edward A. Stephens, George G. Gales. Warren T. Fegan. THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
with which Is Incorporated the n c. TRAGI* review.
Spring Window Display Suggestions
31
Hy Ernest A. Dench.
Tight)
(Copy;
Capitalising Weather Predictions.
The Two Mae*, Ltd., Ottawa, Onl.. lake advantage
,1 weather predictions ill preparing their newspaper
advertising. Advance news of rain was recently her-
altled in the following piece of copy:
"Haiti Tomorrow'*
No need to study weather reports if you are ready
for real wet weather. "Let eom< what may" is
the slogan of the man who has on,* of thev* dressy,
waterproof coats.
Look as good on a clear day as ihey do in the rain.
Thc idea! coat for changeable weather.
Serviceable Tweed* and Paramattas in Trench <*r
Slip-on Style*.
These coats regularly sell at 125.00 and 126.50, so
step in today and pick yours at $18,00. *'
A sketch of a man in a raincoat going through a
a -.bower wa* run at tin side of the text matter.
Making Juvenile Sales.
Sam Scott, Ltd.. Vancouver, ll. (\. stimulated business during a recent spelt of rainy weather hy pre
(tenting a free repeating cup gun with every juvenile
raincoat The window display in which this offering
v\as featured contained Ihe raincoats on wax figures,
with one ol lhe gun* heing placed here and there.
Newspaper *pncc was also employed, the copy heing as
below:
"Rainy Weather Coals for Hoys and Uirls
For keeping tin children dry tn this pelting rain, there
hi nothing to equal these English Transparent Oil
CoatS, with raglail sleeves, velvet collars and wide bottoms. We have them in black and yellow, olive and
blue, to lit boy* and girl* from 2 to 6 years.
While they last $5.25
Hats to match fl-5,
A repenting cap gun free with every coal.
The Season fo; Straws.
Once a year, a* regularly as clockwork, the halter
has to deal with the s» ison for straws. The longer you
have beet, in business, ihe greater your difficulty in
digging up new ideas for window displays.   Hemmed
in. perhaps, by his own town, during the greater period
Of tin* year, the halter ha* little opportunity to see in
person the kind* of straw hat window displays thai
halters in other cities arc putting in. The next best
thing to a personal visil i* a trip by proxy, so now I
will «e| to some of the best ideas picked up in recent
travi 1*.
Always to the Front
posite side was the latest straw hat model.   A show
eard backing Up each exhibit announced:
"First Always—First to show you Straws-
First to sell them out."
"First always—While other hatters are striving to
dispose of their Spring Hats, we show yon first the
straws for the new season ahead."
The middle of the trim was occupied by a largo
eard. illustrated with the face of a clock, and worded
as follows:
"Time to Switch from that Old Soft Hat or Derby.'"
Two Kinds of Straws.
David's Ltd., Montreal, chose a somewhat different
mat ner of heralding the season for straws. The window itself contained a new display of straws, but in order to attract attention to the display, space on the
window glass was utilized in an unconventional way.
Know the kinds of straws through which Alice and
her girl chums like to slip their chocolate soda and indulge in small talk with the handsome dispenser. Well,
a hunch of these straws were broken up into lengths
desired, then fastened with muciliage to the window
glass to form the one word. "Straws." Above the
word in question was the representation of a straw
hat, the band of which was formed with a strip of red
paper. Hot!) the crown and the rim of the hat were
formed with different lengths of whole straws, fastened
to the jrlass with mucilage.
The Native Panama Hat Worker
The L. J. Applegath Hat Co., Toronto, Canada, featured Panamas in their window display. The central
exhibit was the figure of a native maker of Panamas.
He was garbed in his native* costume and was seated on
a chair working over a partially made Panama. The
window floor was covered with materials of which Panamas are made.
Rainy Day Stunts.
Uainy Days need not be had business spells if full
advantage is taken of the opportunities which they
present in the disposal of appropriate merchandise. As
a matter of fact, rainy days can always be turned to
profitable account if weather reports are carefully followed so that when the rain falls you have already
anticipated it with appropriate window displays and
newspaper advertisements, All over the country there-
are live merchants doing theae things and you would
do well to follow the excellent example set.
During periods of rainy weather, the Premier Hat
Stores, Ottawa. Ont., arise to the occasion with a headless male figure in a belted raincoat. This figure is
placed in the lobby outside the store, just behind the
umbrella rack, so that it acts aa a reminder for those
folks who are waiting in the lobby for the shower or
storm to clear up. This stunt results in many impulsive sales.
(All Rights Reserved.)
> i 32
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETA1LKK
With which Is incoriKKiited the It. C. TltADE REVIEW.
M
arc
BUSINESS CHANGES—BRITISH COLUMBIA AND
ALBERTA
Cobble Hill-
Perry, J. Business being closed out. (groc. etc.)
Cowichan Bay—
Cowichan Bay Stores Ltd,—Ownership assumed by A. L.
Dunley. (gro. etc.)
Stewart. J. A.—Reported sold out to C. J. Whipple, (gro.)
Cumberland-
Burns & Brown—Dissolved; Brown continues   (gro.)
Duncan—
Henslowe, J. C. E.—Sold out to M. Geoghegan. (cigars, tob.)
Grand Forks—
Jeff   Davis   &   Co.—Reported   sold   out   to   McKinnon   &
Haverty. (G. S.)
Ladysmith—
Gould.  Mrs.   Mary—Creditors  meeting   held.   Compromise
offer accepted, (gro.. d.g.. etc.)
New Westminster—
Westminster Supply  Co.--lncorporated.   (gro   etc.)
North Vancouver-
Cave.   E.   E.—Reported   sold   out   confectionery   busines**.
(confey. and transfer.)
Renshaw, R.—Reported sold out to G. H. Legros (pbg. and
hardware).
Port Alberni—
Higginbottom, F.-—Reported sold out to J. Street, (bakery
and restaurant).
Port Moody—
Whipple, C. G — Reported selling to Cressweli & Co. (g s.)
Vancouver—
Jones, C. H. &. Son—Reported asking extension of time.
(sail and tent makers.)
Quigley Knitting  Mills Ltd.—Assigned   to   A.   P.   Fostet
(Meeting of creditors called).
Stevenson & Hoyland.—Applying for change of name  to
Stevensons Ltd. (wholesale boots and shoes.)
Strand Boot Shop Limited.—Applying for change of nam*-*
to Shoe-Craft Ltd.
Bunting, Chas.—Reported sold out to Chas. Allen (grocery
and confectionery).
Davidson, Wright & Alcock Ltd.—Applying for change of
name to Davidson Wright Ltd.
Bowen Bros. Limited. — Sold out lo Richardson    Welch
(men's furnishings).
Ridgeley    Protective   Association.—Gazetted as ceased to
carry on business in B. C.
Wrigley   Director.es   Ltd.—Amalgamated   with   Henderson
Directory Co.
Laidlaw Cunningham Ltd.—Applying for change of name io
Manhattan Pharmacy Ltd.
Stanford. F— Taken   into   partnership   one   S.   Sorenson
(B. and S.)
Stewart & Wallace Lt<". — Applying for change of name to
S. D. Stewart Co. Ltd.
Calgary—
Strack. Wm—Sold  stock of boots and  shoes  (corn,  and
B. S.)
Webb, Arthur.—Purchased slock of boots and shoes from
Wm. Strack (drygoods, men's funis., &c.)
Hutt-Smith, Co. Ltd.—Stock sold to L. W. -Caldwell Co. Ltd
Victoria Grocery.—Reported change in ownership.
Edmonton-
Bargain Store Limited—Assigned to It.  P.  Wallace   (do,
and B. S.)
Cheetham, H. A.—Assigned to R. P. Wallace (G. 8.)
Regent Shoe Company Ltd.—Stock sold by C. C. M. T. A.
Weeks & Co.—Asigned to R. P. Wallace (whol. fruit).
Winnipeg Clothing Store.—Assets sold by C. C. M. T. A.
Karp, B. & Co.—Assigned C. C. M, T. A. custodian  (Clo.
men's furn.)
Edgerton.—
Murdoch, W. D.—Closing out lo engage in auto business in
Edmonton.
Ferintosh.—
Tanner, K. W.~-Assigned to R. P. Wallace, (;, c, m  T  A.
custodian (G.S.)
Irvine.—
Koesllng,  N.—Reported  negotiating  for  sale of business
(drugs).
^ST!!P^^!X£SBB^!^^^!mmJm7^^^^^^^^.
One House
for Paper
Hundreds of merchants throughout the West
ern provinces find it more profitable to confine
their purchases in paper to this house.   Their
stationery, school supplies ami merchandise <»f
similar nature  are standardized  in  Keystone
Brand.
The paper used for wrapping, the .string,
folding boxes, paper bag**, et * . are also S. 1>
& W. supplied.
Smith, Davidson ft Wright, Ui
MANUFACTURERS  AND WHOLESALE
PAPER DEALERS
VANCOUVER
VICTORIA
-• ■- f ii
J. A. TEPOORTEN
LIMITED
WHOLESALE DRUGS
PATENT MEDICINES DRUCISTS' SUNDRIES
PHARMACEUTICAL PREPARATIONS
308 Water St.
Vancouver, B. C.
The
Old Reliable
liMiyi'-**
*»movTHMt
'•JtlTBttr.-,
Minard's Liniment
Co. Limited
Yarmouth, N. S. 1! V
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which Is incorporated the B, C. TRADE REVIEW,
33
^Hotthan, o. -Hi-Hneh at Brant, Alia., closed (G.S.J
Lestraihaa- J  It.-Sustained nre loss (l>. (J.   Furn.)
L TwenUeth* Century  Book  Store.—Tenderi  for etock  and
aMH» asked for by trustees
MM0lTnvSl« Mercantile Co. Ltd-Assigned lo H   P. Wallace.
PCp,C"(e River Cooperative  Association of I*. F   A.  Ltd.—
A signed  to &  P-  Wallace  «J. 8.)
<r>ME THINGS WE SHOULD READ IN OUR INSURANCE
bU POLICY.
I.—All policies should recite specific amounts each on stork
building, furniture and fixture*
2    The condition)* tturroumling the proptrty insured Should
not violate any of the warrant lea recited la lhe policy.
aii policies should concur as to amounts, conditions, per
mils and warranties,
I.- if more than one policy If lamed OB a property, earh pol*
s«v must permit eOaettrrenl insurance.
S   u the physical haaard of a risk is Increased by any means
within the control or knowledge ol the insured, without
notice to company, the pott***** i* voided,
»; Where insurance u on tmildiajts or content*, if sh<* loss Is
(Stated for the want of a Rood substantial brick, stone or
Cement chimney, the poller is void if it can be shown thai
lbs assured knew that the rhitntun whs in an unsafe con
dltioa or Improperly setmrad,
7 Fifteen days are allowed earh year for alterations or re
pairs, without permission from the company, otherwise,
written permlsjiion roust be obtained.
8.—If assured carries insurance on his property in one company, without notifying the other, even though it is not
fraudulent, he is only entitled to recover 60 per cent, ot
his loss.
9—Insurance companies must be notified at once in event ot
change or interest, title, or possession of the subject of
insurance, or the policy will be void.
10—The use of gasoline, benzine, benzole, dynamite, ether,
fire works, gun powder exceeding 25 pounds in quantity, ,
naptha, nitroglycerine or other explosives, phorphorus,
or petroleum or any of its products of great inflammability than kerosene oil, without permission, will render the
insurance void.
11.—Policies do not allow kerosene oil in quantities exceeding
five barrels and do not permit this to be drawn nor kerosene lamps to be lighted except by daylight or at a distance not less than ten feet from artificial light.
12.—A building Insured shall not become vacant or unoccupied
for a period exceeding thirty days without permission attached to said policy.
13 —The insured in event of loss must use ali reasonable
means to save and preserve the property at and after a
fire or when the property is endangered by fire, in neighboring premises.
11.—Losses of accounts, bills, currency, deeds, evidence of
debt, money, notes or securities are not covered by ordinary lire insurance.
15—No insurance policy will pay beyond the actual cash
value of the property destroyed.
16—The entire policy is void if the insured has concealed
or misrepresented, in writing or otherwise, any material
fact or circumstance concerning the subject of insurance.
NEVER SAY DIE.
He—Why the deuce do I struggle with this silly job?
Fair Typist—Don't be discouraged.   Think of the mighty
oak—it was once a nut like you.
MUTUAL FIRE INSURANCE
Stop the fires, keep your property and spend less for
insurance.
The sole purpose of mutual insurance is fire prevention,
efficient stewardship, and lower cost of insurance.
Mutual fire insurance is not a commodity, it ia a principle.
Mutual fire insurance means fire prevention through
inspection and education.
Common sense is a fundamental of mutual fire insurance
apply it to your fire insurance problems.
For particulars get in touch with
Retail Merchants' Underwriters Agency
of the
"JSSSXSIF* Northwestern Mutual Fire Association 34
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which is Incorporated tho B. C. TRADE REVIEW.
tare!
HARDWARE, OL «/ PAINTS
*w£w
• I—
MARKETS AT A GLANCE
Nicholson and Black Diamond Files Advance
By lowering the dicsount, Nicholson ami Black
Diamond Files are now higher in price.
Copper Wire is Quoted at Advanced Figures
Copper wire is tpioted at an advanced figure. The
new prices are only slightly higher than the old, the
increase amounting to two ami half per cent.
Brass Snare Wire Higher in Price.
An advance has taken place in the prices of brass
snare wire.   The advance amounts to two and a half
per cent.
Sad Irons Quoted Higher to Include Sales Tax
Mrs. Potts sad irons are being tpioted higher in the
local market. The revised quotation includes the new
sales tax.
Screen Wire Cloth Booked Orders Being Delivered
Booked orders for screen wire cloth are now being
shipped by local distributors.   Prices are unchanged
Seasonable Sale of Nails.
Local distributors report a good seasonable sale of
nails, both wire and cut, at levels established some
time ago.
Linseed Oil Market Fair.
The linseed oil market continues to show a fair
amount of activity with sales in fair volume being recorded.   The price remains unchanged
New Prices on Yankee Screw Drivers.
The new prices which arc being tpioted by jobbers
at present on Yankee tools arc slightly higher and include the salts tax in the selling price.
Miller Padlocks Now Higher
Miller padlocks now higher in price.     The new
prices amount to about five per cent, higher.
Wrought Iron Washers are Quoted Higher in Local
Market.
Xew higher prices are reported locally on wrought
iron washers, the change being made necessary to take
care of the new sales tax.
New Prices on Disston Saws.
Xew revised prices, which include the sales tax arc
now in effect on Disston saws.
Spring Bookings for Poultry Netting Going Forward
Spring bookings for poultry netting are now going
forward.   There are no changes in prices locally.
Harvest Tool Bookings Being Executed in Good
Volume.
Harvest tool bookings for spring delivery are now
going forward to the dealers from local distributors,
the volume of this business beuig fairly heavy. VVel-
land Vale makes are unchanged, being tpioted at net
list.
Higher Prices on Plastering Trowels.
Xew and higher prices Ure in effect <m plastering
trowels of the Cincinnati pattern.
Stillson Pattern Wrenches Higher in Price.
Xew prices are in effect on Stillson pattern wrench*
es as t\ result of the sales tax being added to the selling pries to dealers.
Plumbs and Levels Show a Revision in Price
Prices of plumbs and levels have been revised, New
prices issued include the sales tax. the advance being
sufficient tO take care of same.
Cant Hooks and Pea vies Revised.
Xew lists issu ! of Cant Hooks and Pea vie* -,i,**m ,»
revision of prices, and some eases amounting to an Sll
fanes and in others to a decline in price,
Butcher's Beams Show Advance in Price
Butcher's beams show an advance in priee as % re
suit of revisions made in latest it*? issued.
Some Solder Prices Are Advanced
Some prices of solder lines have advanced
Brass Prices Advance Slightly.
An advance has heen made effective on brass rods
and sheets amounting to one eent per pound
Candle Wick Drops.
Candle wick shows a drop of approximately sis per
eent from former prices, *
Awning Cord Declines,
following tn line with the cotton market in the «!<
elines, awning COrd is tpioted at lower levels
Black Sheet Market Firm.
Black sheets .show considerable movement. Prices
remain firm at former quotations,
8hellac Market Advances Prices
Shellac prices are advanced fifty cents s Dillon.
Cotton Waste Prices Firm
Cotton waste show a firm market undertone, with
prices remaining at former levels.
Firm Undertone to Roofings.
While the various lines of roofings are reported Utl
changed in price the undertone of the market is nrm.
Sand Paper Declines.
A decline of aboul ten per cent lots taken plan* in
the price of sand paper in the local markets.    B BOO
A and Star brands are affected by the reductions en
nounced.
MAY HOLD CONVENTION AND SHOW IN
WINNIPEG.
Winipeg.—There is a possibility of a la rye-sen !>•
hardware show and convention for Western Canada
being held in Winnipeg at some future dale, accord
ing to J. II. Curie, seen tary of the Hetn*l Merchants'
Association, Should the event materialize, it will be
the first of its kind locally, as it will be devoid en
tirely to the one class of goods,
A meeting of the hardware section of thc retail 124
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which \a Incorporated the R C. TRADE REVIEW'.
35
trade has already been held to consider the prospects
of such a show, when a report upon the holding of sim-
ar shows and conventions in other parts was made
,v Mr. Curie and C. C. Faulkner, both of whom went
into ihe matter in detail
I.t was suggested at the meeting that tin- wholesalers and retailers assemble and discuss the advisability of instituting a show and convention along the same
lines that have made them so successful and popular
elsewhere.
SPRING WINDOW DISPLAY SUGGESTIONS.
A Drive on Paint Sales.
The season when the painter's brush is worked
overtime will won be with us,   The earlier ybu begin
vour Spring drive OU paints and varnish ihe more sales
you will make. Winter is seldom one long stretch of
cold weather, ami il is during the mild periods that a
great deal of outdoor panning is done. Then, again,
indoor painting i* never hampered by climatic conditions, so you can play safe both ways if you are to be
fore with your window displays- for these are what
give housewives the cue that there is painting work to
Im* d<Ule
A Simple but Effective Canadian Example
George i lignum and Bona, Ltd., Ottawa, Ont, were
responsible for a neat bul distinctive display of paint*
ing supplies. Cans of differenl colored paints woe
stacked across the rear At tlie front center was a
utar-sbsped design, formed with large paint brushes
laid fiat on the floor At each side was a smaller slar-
shaped design, for which small brushes were used.   A
semi •circle at the «xact centre was composed of three
wallpaper knives,
Singling out Barn Paints for Display Attention.
Batons, Toronto, (int., exhibited a huge barrel of
ham painl 111 the middle <>f one of 'heir broad show
windows. The barrel was hedged in on both sides by
stinks of three pound cans of varnish.
The "Before and After' Appeal.
Iv Harris and Co.. Toronto, Ont, featured a grain-
nig paint in I heir window display, Three strips of
very rough boards formed tin* central feature. One of
the boards had been treated with lhe paint iu question,
while the second board had not. To further emphasize
the contrast, the third piece was merely half painted,
showing the difference very distinstly. The foreground
was occupied by s sample of the paint in addition to
the article employed for the graining work.   A show
Card drove the point home without any wasted words;
"This did it."
A Pleasing Color Scheme
Ashdown's, Winnipeg. Man., made effective use OJ
their window trim facilities. The right Side of the
'rim was occupied by a step ladder, on each step ol
which rested a seven-pound can of paint At the opposite rear side was o work bench, painted a mottled
green and bron/.c, also slacked with seven pound cans
Of assorted paints. Elsewhere room was found for a
series   of   stands, each painted in apple green with
patches of golden yellow, glass shelves were placed
over the stands, with one pound cans resting on the
}*lass shelves, tin-on and gold cardboard blocks formed a ohockboard effect on the floor,
Making a Specialty of Paint.
The Paint Store, Edmonton, Alta., exhibited the following sign at the rear of their paint display:
"The Paint Store—
New Stoek—New Ideas.
Everything for the House Beautiful."
Featuring Alabastine in a Display.
The Hunter-Henderson Paint Co., Vancouver, B. C,
devoted a convincing display to Alabastine. The
space at the centre front was taken up by a large,
round galvanized pan, filled to capacity with powered
Alabastine. There were small trays containing pink
and blue powders at each side. Across the rear came
neat stacks of different tins of Alabastine in cartons,
with a paint brush on top of each stack. The floor
covering consisted of printed cards advertising the products.
PAINT-A YEAR-ROUND PRODUCT.
Arc you, Mr. Dealer, one of those "Winter Leaguers" who draws the curtains over the Paint Department when the chilly weather comes and say, "Nothing doing now till Spring?" Probably you are not,
but the fact remains that tliere are some dealers who
actually sit back and toast their shins against the stove,
saying that paint only can be sold in the Spring and
in the Fall. If such is the ease, how is it that so many
successful paint dealers figure that they can make
eight turnovers a year from their paint departments,
and yet some of these dealers live in a colder country
than B. C. For instance, does the manager of the T.
Baton Stores in Winnipeg issue orders to close the
paint department when the cold weather comes? This
is not that store's kind of merchandising. It didn't
make- its huge success by closing any of its departments at any time during the year. What is the answer.' Simply this—The dealer who thinks he can't
sell paint or varnish in the winter can't. The dealer
who knows he can, does, and his sales go right along.
Right now there are dealers who are saying, we won't
order until after the Spring opens up, because we can-
uoi sell paints in this weather, well, they are right,
if that is what they think, "they can't."
Hut how about you, Mr. Dealer, are you going to
let one of your most profitable departments lie dormant
during this early Spring month? Do you realize that
there are more inside surfaces than outside, and that
these surfaces are paintable? Do you realize that
tliere are floors to be varnished, floors that have had
hard usage last Summer and through the Winter and
now want to be put into shape for the following Summer.' It is perfectly true that in weather such as we
have had during thc last few weeks, there are not many
people who think of paint. That is your ;ob, Mr. Dealer. It is your job to make them think of paint, and it
isn't hard to do either. Here's how: Carry a good,
well assorted stock of pure paint. Carry it up in front
of your store- where people will see it. Use your win-1
dows to suggest interior painting advantages. Advertise in your local paper. Suggest painting and you will
sell paint. Get out a good Husiness Promotion letter
on interior paints and varnishes. Follow these letters with calls on the prospectors. Bun a slide in your
local movie houses, (let the Women's Clubs talking
and thinking of paint. In short, get some push back
of your paint department right now. 36
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which is incorporated the B, C. TRADE REVIEW,
Ma.
OUR LATEST!!
We illustrate herewith our latest
range in "White Hock" porcelain enamel finish, with nickel trimmings. Our
new " Economizer" is finished in dark
blue enamel.
This range meets a great demand
ami you owe it to yourself to investigate it thoroughly. Also produced in
three other finishes.
Semi for our new catalogue and
price sheets
No. 1891 Laurentic "D" Finish Square.
566 Beatty St. Vancouver, B. 0.
Phone: Seymour 7506 7.
Dowling Kitchen Tables Sell
Kitchen tables made of clear well seasoned fir, properly manufactured is a
line which has taken well for years with the buying public.
Serviceable and
Economical
Tops are of special select three-ply fir veneer, made with or without drawers.
The square or round turned legs are reinforced with false tops and screw
bolt fastened.
Finishes are natural or any required.
Sizes are 26-in. x 46 in.—24 in. x 36 in. and special sizes to order.
Dowling Manufacturing Company
266 Second Avenue.
VANCOUVER, B. C. 1924
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which in Incorporated the B, C. TRADE REVIEW.
37
POINTERS TO BE GAINED AT MEETING OF
GREATER WINNIPEG "SAVE THE
SERVICE CLUB."
Jlardwnremen attending the bonsplel from a num-
l)cr of points in Manitoba and Saskatchewan were
guests of the Ureater Winnipeg Save the Surface Club
it iisclast meeting held in the Marlborough hotel recently.
Between fifty and -sixty dealers heard several ad-
dresses and watched with great interest a number of
demonstrations both upon soiling point ami its various
uses.
A demonstration of cloning a sale was staged by
John Drewe antl .Mr. Mills, with Mr. Drews taking the
par! of the salesman. The object wa-*, to show how a
customer who had intended buying a cheap grade* of
painl was converted to using a better grade. Mr.
Drews brought out many arguments to show that the
bell grade of painl was the cheapest in the long run.
Is cost exactly as much to apply a good paint as a
heap variety, and while one would lose its body the
better grade WOUld stand for years and act as a constant preservative of ths surface it covered.
(', V. Rnnnard, president of the Winnipeg Retail
.Merchants' Association then gave a short address and
spoke of the value ot a salesman knowing the merits of
his goods, He instanced several case, m his own business of selling footwear where a salesman, by not know
ing the selling points «f merchandise had lost sales
which could easily have been made
Geo, Taylor of Kau!k« rs Hardnwre Ltd., and W. H.
Kill put on the nexl demonstration winch showed how
a dissatisfied customer should he handled, tn this ease
the customer complained of poor quality paint ami demanded his money ba«*k and announced that he would
never spend another cent at the particular store where
he had bought the   poor' paint
in questioning the customer on the methods he had
used in applying the paint. Mr. Taylor cleverly
brought out that the fault lay entirely with the customer, lirst because he had not followed tin directions
"ii the can in respect to thoroughly stirring the paint
SO that the oil and pigment were of an even consistency, and then in not seeing that the surface to be covered was properly cleaned. The customer admitted
lha| he bad only stirred the paint for about five minutes and had not bothered to wash the woodwork, because he thought that it was not tic*-essary. His belief was that 'paint covered a multitude of miis.
Demand Meakins' Rubberset
BRUSHES
Oldest brush  manufacturer! In  Canada.
Established 1852.
The  Dealer who handles our brushes gets
the  benefit of our experience.
Ask for new catalogue.
Meakins & Sons Ltd.
129  POWELL  ST. VANCOUVER,   B.  C
Faetory,     HAMILTON,   ONT.
At the end of the demonstration the customer was
not only completely satisfied that the fault was his, but
had left an order for another supply of paint, and had
been given many good ideas upon surface preparation
which included filling nail holes, coating all knots with
shellac, and above all having the surface perfectly
cleaned.
Care of brushes.
Sid. Littlewood next spoke upon the proper care
and uses of brushes, and also showed how varnish and
varnish stain should be applied to both new and old
work. Mr. Littlewood had gone to a great deal of
trouble in preparing panels to illustrate various points
he wished to bring out. For instance he had an old
table leg which was in bad shape. He showed first how
such class of work should be sandpapered smooth and.
then a varnish stain applied. The next was a panel
of wood supposed to represent a new floor. The demonstration was intended to show the proper finish for
both stain and varnish.
In demonstrating the care of brushes, Mr. Littlewood told the dealers present that they would be doing
a real service to customers by advocating the use of
the best brush obtainable. He, for instance had brushes in constant use which he had had for fifteen years.
By means of panels he showed the audience the
bristles from different grades of brushes, and other
panels were used to show the difference the brush made
on fine work. One large panel was divided into two
parts. One side whieh was streaky and rough had been
painted with a poor stiff brush, while on the same day
and with the same paint the second half had been done
with a good brush. The difference was apparent both
to sight and touch. Mr. Littlewood received an ovation when he concluded his address.
Advocating a spring clean up campaign in every
town and village in the west, A. J. Webb outlined the
stages in featuring such a campaign step by step. He
instanced the excellent results that the town of Selkirk. Man., had obtained last year at a cost of less than
$100, but which it was estimated had resulted in business amounting to more than $5,000 for the local merchants.
lie also pointed out that in addition to such a campaign being of the utmost value in improving the appearance of any place, it meant a great deal of increased business for practically every class of merchant. The main thing was to get it started, for example was contagious, and one citizen would start
cleaning up because the contrast between an untidy
place ami another which was spick and span would
make the first appear so much the worse by contrast.
Mr. Webb wished to impress upon the merchants
present that clean up meant paint up also. One went
with thc other as a matter of course. Paint he said
was the best preservative yet invented. It not only
preserved, bul it added to the appearance of property,
and thus made it more valuable. He instanced the
case of dealers in used automobiles. The first thing
they did with an old ear was to apply a coat of varnish to make the ear look like something, and this
frequently meant closing a sale.
Thc same principle applied to property. A spring
clean up not only was good for merchants in a business sense, but it improved the morale of a town. People could not help but feel more optimistic when their
surroundings were bright and clean. 38
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which Is incorporated the B. C TRADE review.
Morel,
C\we kelp you build
if  nist9es.Kt\ +m nmeii
BIGGER V BETTER SALES
Advertising that creates sales is the kind you want. That's the kind we
use. This year our campaign will be bigger and broader than ever before.
Copy is running in leading farm papers now; so, too, are magazine pages
in full color. Dominion wide newspaper advertising will soon appear
and the keynote of the whole appeal is
Dominion Linoleum Floor Coverings
for every room in the house. There are no half measures. We are
working to make this season's business a record breaker for every Dominion dealer.   Your share will be proportionate to your effort.
Start now. Check over your stock and order a good representative assortment of the new spring patterns. Prepare for a weekly Linoleum Window. We'll gladly help with materials and suggestions. Get your floor
display in shape.   Plan early—and reap the profits later.
Write to-day for window display material   sent free
Dominion OikJotfa and linoleum Co, limited
MONTREAL, Canada wM
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which In incorporated the R. C. TRADE RE\rlEW.
39
NEW GOODS.
No. 1 Kanner'i Double-edge Stropper
Nickel plated for (iillette blades, both sides of the
.,., can be sharpened without removing the blade
AUTO BRIEFS
jr. iii machine; Stropping roil* are wound gpir
,M.„uine horschidc leather.   One in a box.
allv with
Car Licences issued during January.
More than 11.500 licences were issued in Vaneouver
during the month of January, representing the payment of practically one quarter million dollars.
The actual figures are $224,150.40, whieh while falling short of the total for a similar period in 1922, are
nevertheless considerably higher when it is considered
that auto licences are this year 25 per cent cheaper
than was the case last year. It is estimated that if the
same regulations prevailed, the returns would have
been more than $-'100,000 for January.
CAR WITHOUT FENDERS.
A wagon without fenders to protect
passengers from dust and mud is bad enough, luit a fenderless automobile would
be unbearable. The Massachusetts state
legislature was primarily responsible for
the adoption of fenders on automobile*,
passing a law in 1900 that required motor
vehicles to be so equipped.
Ccuput" Flexible  Steel  Belt  Lacing tor Leather. Baiata, Rubber or Text.le
Belts; Complete with Gauge and Hinge Pm«.
.... ..» .t- ir.
Si?"*,    No* 18
i hfctUHMM «*<
ix*!!, in** ."> |
I < Oftlm, box
«■»!.  in*. 8
I *!!<• li-OX sufflci*
ent tor width
ol b« ustiK, toi M
Weight per
boa. Bbi i
j« 25 S? 35 -15 65
JiloJ is 8 iti!o*4 KtoS 32 9 Mtofi i« 5 ISto-ft %U>7
0>
12
fill
<■»
:■'-.
12
96
IS
IH
1%
12
•Ji
ts
5«*i
TWO PROPHECIES FULFILLED.
Twenty-five years ago, in the New
York World, Thomas A. Edison is quoted
as prophesying that the automobile would
revolutionize transportation. The far-
seeing inventor's prophesy has been fulfilled. Few believed him when W, C. Dur-
rant. in 1908 predicted that by 1917 over
1,000.000 motor ears would be required
to fill the demand.
The Thoe. Davideon Mfg. Co. Limited Opent New Branch.
nwiisK to their ♦steady increased, activities In the West.
Th«. Tho>* Datfdsoo Manufacturing Ca Limited, Montreal,
haa found it necessary to opaa ■ "•■**' br«nfh ln Sllska,oon*
BMk . in order to cope with the business Irom this tetrl or>.
The new branch which In situated at vl" ^'sl 23n* sJf®r
Will be under lhe direction of capable members of the ( om*
pany's staff
This latest addition bring! lhe WBObcrof Davidson branch;
Ml ui» to five, the others bdiu* at Toronto. Winnipeg. (alM>
and Vancouver.   This Is quite In line with the Bervlce  IW
Tbos. Davidson Mfg. Co, have been nix Hut lO the trade for the
past 61  years
The optnlai of this new branch ihould prove itowg
a»d of great latareai to the hardware community J»»m
toon and the West in general, aa -showing the conflden . mn
company has In the future prosperity Of the gieat ww
BUSINESS FOR SALE,
General store and Post Oliice. stuiated on «W^j
16 acres, mostly  suitable for cultivation. WJ«™g!^
miles from Vancouver,   Oood ^^m'\cT     ZaiIZ    kio*
Stock consists of drygoods. boots and shoes, ha d*are, S
certea, etc..   Husiness on sound, paying basis. Showing g<
profit    "lloats    for    Hire"    busim ^Include;    inkng *OOU
money.   An exceptionally good proposition wWeh can b. put
chased on reasonable terms, with fair cash payment,   aph.
Bos 'Mi. "it, c Retailer."
When its a problem to know where to stop to discharge or take on passengers, remember that there will
always be a vacant space at the curb near a fire* hydrant. In many cities it is against the law to stop to
discharge passengers in the centre of the street, but
nowhere can mere stopping before a fire hydrant be
construed as parking.
HARDWARE  DEALERS  FIND GROCERS CUTTING  INTO
BUSINESS-SOME COMBAT BY RETALIATION
In a discussion concerning practices of a certain soap
eompany distributing their goods in this country, it was re-
cently brought out that ihis company were enabling grocers
to rive an enameled pail free to every purchaser buying he
Mil full of soap. This form of premium method ot selling
Soda 18 said to have made deep inroads into the hardware-
s chances of selling similar enameled pails in the to-
Sties where the scheme has been introduced, and the hard*
ware dealers have given much thought to the subject of de-
i  ,V vavs and means of combating this state ot affairs
Retaliation in one form or another has been suggested and
While th 8 is not always the best plan, it brings to mind the
wse recently where a grocer, to boost the sale of coffee was
luaklng a feature of selling a peculator at a very low price
With each purchase of coffee. Jd
, L^^a^lXimmS^a& m% **£
I!,,,, %%m . *■* tmv W^fiea*xtmm <rS 40
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which is incorporated the B. C TRADE KKVIKW.
afarci
•       \%-t *
-*&$
Gardening—and Garden Supplies
I'm a bit of a gardener myself when I get the chance, so I
know what good garden supplies mean.
Anything I hate to get hold of is one of those watering
pots that come loose at the handle before the summer is half
through. Lots of them are like that.
The boss and I were out in the sample room the other
day looking over our garden supplies for this spring, and if
I'm any judge, our line for this year is better than ever--if
that's possible.
Take our watering pots. They stand the racket and they look good. The new
line is hot galvanized and japanned, which means they are rustless. They're mighty
pretty
And here's something else about them that'll catch you. You know the trouble
you sometimes have finding a can to fill your auto radiator. The Davidson watering pot has a removable sprinkler head. Take it off and you can'tbeat it for filling
radiators.
Order the Davidson line of garden supplies early.   The first demand is
always the heaviest.
If you can't wait for our salesman just send in your order.
The Senior Salesman
&U0i
Established I860,
Head Office and Factory: MONTREAL.
Branches:
Toronto
Winnipeg
Calgary
Vancouver
DAVIDSON <M
n*
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Willi which Is incorporated the B. C. TRADE REVIEW.
41
HARDWARE PRICES CURRENT
Tht following art prlcee quoted for principal line* of leading wholesale firms.   Price* quoted are necessarily
subject to market fluctuations.
.11
144 08
»:.-;*•
t:< <.*•
51 "oi
BS.S8
69.19
68.16
t H
; If
fi 10
MB
"i"
I fii'i
?..t»t)
AMMUNITION.
Loaded Shot Sheila.
Dominion:
C.iruich.
|f ii v 26 X  I1*  oh
If 0 X S3 X ill  eh.
Imperial.
*,.* <; **. y> x is on.
*,  i  n "**-  IN  ch,
r M C  HIOO Club 12 <» X 2* x IN Cb, 62.S&
ivters Htffh tiun
I   M t*   Arrow  12 G X U m IN «h
Peters  Premier
Metallic Ammunition.
Dominion
.„• itioil Snionelees
.*:  Long  Sniolteleei
ss t,   ittfle Smokeless
.. i. nine LoibioS
American.
H Short ntnokileas
tl i^>nit Btn-akelsMi
,*.•  1.   Ride SmokeleM
83 I,   I title Irf»«o«.»k
ANVILS Peter Wright. |9fba Ut US Qw .
.**,.■ nver IM n>* tin.
vxi:s- I «-»>•' A*ra. IN !•»»« US**.« i«> MJ.SB
doi . double Wl MS* nch-andled. 118.19 1"
s.;..» Aot hunters «*«**». |13 ft9 Sot.; **i»*i«*
blued .,*•*,,**   unhandled, iw.jo lo I1S.99 doe
BARS  Crow, 111 oo pec 100 Ibi
BELTING   Ia***\   rawhide   ride*,    ti Mi
,'     i   K*   11   I.* >   per   IM   lt*.*t.    N"   i*t   I*1 ,m
,,,-- im fool; u* At *» >> per loo feet
BOLTS.   CARRIAGE(in   full   p*»cli»it«**i
*., anil mailer »p to **»*sn   long. lata M 19
.1 Hst;  oVST  BU   in    S!>   P> i«**T tint.  I/M ind
largvr   all Ifi-iath*, lies IS "ff W   Note new
»! price* In «'ffwt
BOLTS. MACHINE     \ and »t-nsiU*r up to
« tn tone lees ji I to "ff list; ever ♦•In !***»
w/io «>ff ti*t. n j to and K lees Iii 19 ©fl
;•:»!     \'i>!<- iitw lt«t prices In ttttmVA
IM.T-s. STOVE •Lee* «TN 10 "ff Kgt
BOLTS    TIRE   l.«**"»   19   a<ltl   If,   00   «B
boHi f«r broken parkafe*
BOARD, EHMtver- Pei  1*019 to s.ooo feet.
|B1 <vi t-«,r t (tftrt fP«.|
HOILf**R8,  RANOEd -36-gals,  Ill **rt each
iU'lLDINC]   PAPER   T«!"<l    *V   i>* 9LM
,.    !..J!    v<.vinittiK t<< qnaSt)    PI*ifl 90c i"
BUTTS -Plated,   ML   antique   copper  «nd
brass Itnlsb «N*»i*N par t**»' 99c; ll$>
"■ !»••  nil  Mc    *in*«-iv'{ ix'i  v«.'»if  *"«'
BUTT8->Wrou«ht *t«wi   Ko   N4   lUxtU,
II v.*, !>.-•  ,ji»». BiisSVl 99.M per «i"*    'S**-
*!-. ISM p«t «1<»t
''utrnr kei.t  h ot. soih. faj5 r<-n
CATCHES.   rrrtV>VUI>   *»l,t   ronvr   -and
dull brass flnlsb. fli 99 t««*r hand-rod
CHAIN <V»il H. eliHtrS. weld, "J!"" B*W
im tOO lbs; V lis *o jw<r 199 lbs 1*19, WS.M
per IM n>t»
•'HMV tA'ttttim. 5*1* s 51. fljf ftvAi; \
til   fit tl en  h
-s'HntM'KKJ* ^Mit»   Inlterasl No   8, ttt.-M
''"x. I'niverMil No   1. lfT.99 <!•>*.  UnlvwsiJ
Vo t, MIM dos   Universal No 3. SM.M do*
Home,   N"<»   H    f2 3*1   Midi    ll>>ii*«>.   Ko   M
L1 *f, n»rh
CWURNS BARRBLL—No 9, |19,T9 each;
Ko i. tu io each; No I. m M saeh; No 3.
til 71   «xvh
'"l.KV'IH    MALE.MM.lv   TYr  tl.    31c
<i.otmkh live WIKM—Par sack, H 'I ■
1819 ii"* . (09 ft   !•> M doa
i>itu,i,s mt *!,*u 19/1 "ff nee ll»t;
bknitMnttb *«*-in  «7n "ff new ii"i
BAVTROI tJH   iv-   loo  f,-,*t.   |«ln   M.Mi
I"M)   »<*. 1,0;   !«.(,-,    $7 %
ITLSSS—Oreel Western, Blfl of? Sat; Black
IM "i*,.o.« ->;,',   „ff iiMt
HTNfi*R8   Per <tn»  netr**—Heavy rtrep   '
III V'.io;  r.-in   $2 7o;  «;-in,   f3 00;   S*in,  $-1 7"
OORRttOATTO   TRR-l>r   iloi»«n   pnl'T
l-ln M70; 9-ln M.TI; R-tn 99.991 !-*ln *!** *'v
HOBS, W.vrEK Ns*''-!'''* 19fl S foot, 'm
i*i.h  n^ n Uttil.
HonsE SHOBS8- iron. No* 9 to 1. |M.9$
Der loop.** j iron> xog | a-ml lorr-^r, 19 7..
Mr ttin n-,*
'honk. had. COMMON—Par 190 Ttm»-
9 P*»  -.n.l c»v*r 2t'**   3  4, mtel f U>w, Mr
•<N'«>I(S. UIM DOOB■-Jnp«nni*il. M*M P*1'*
■"Ion
TAMP  CHIMNEYS—A.   »*••""   0»«S   *   '•«*«
♦' i'.ii |*,»p (inn :   v. Der <l«»t. tl 7u;  H. v*-*'i  t*aH«*
i; 'i"K |LM per ii«>« ; n !>»*•* ii<>*  $! S'--
..!'^NT,'*KN*H""Short or lon« K'obe, plain,
111.a0 do-* ,  Ji*i*!inri*»Ml.  fir,.05  <lox.
MATTOC5CS- pirk.   |io.M   each; cutter.
$10*0  rii,h
MtnVEHS. LAWN-Woodyatt: 4-bladexl2
inrh, f SO 2&; 4-l)hid»xl*l inch. $11.00; 4-blade
xK in f|].::,. I'^nprcKK. 4-in blade x 12-ln,
MIJO; (>btade x H-in. IBS.00; 4-hlade x
H*in fn 7j Oreal Amertoan: lo-in.
$33 OO; 17 inch. f2f».7&; 19 inch. $28 50. I'enn-
enlvanie Junior: 14 Inch. $21.50; 16 Inch,
f»tU:  IS Inch. $27.25.
NAILH, W||U;-Ha».e $5.40 f.o.b. Vancou-
ver; <"ut. base ftM fob. Vanoouver.
NETTING, POELTRY—Per roll~2xl2.
11 M; 2x24, $3.00; 2x36. |4.20; 2x60, $6.80;
IMS.  $2.75;  1x24. $5.00; 1x36. $7.00,
NOTS—Per lOO n>B ea%*anc« over list—
Square, *maii Kit-*. M.M; square, ca»<> iot»,
u 75. heaacon, ratal) iota, $6.26; hexogan,
caae tote, $4 25.
I'H'KS-   <*k>. 6-7 ft>». PU0 doz.
PINE TAlt-1 RKil. 8k* e«ch; N ml. 29c
mvh;  N ith!   Um* »<ach.
I'LAHTKR OP PARIS   tLM per 100 !».».
BIVETrS AND BURRS—Black carriage. Bib
bom 57c; n*<i, | assorted -coppered rivets
No. S Sic "fti : tt»norted copppr rivets and
1.,-irr* 57c, No 8 aitttortcd coppered burrs
end bttlTS "Ee V?r Th. No. 8 coppered burrs
17c jmr Iti ; Coppered rivets 26c per tb.
Coppered hurre 37c per lb.
ROPB EASE--British manlk, base. 16Hc;
pure innnita, Iwse 1!H*.
saws. BUCK   Happy Ifedlnm, $i 33 each.
Hanpy Idea $1 35 each; DiWtOtUI No. 6, $1.35
tat h
SCREWS   Brtghl    flat   head   67N/10 off
Hat; hrljtht round head. 95/10 off list; brass
Aat hoed J^/IO off list; brass round head
7) '10 off list
SCREWS, EAE—42N off list.
SCREWS    -HIT    50 off liM.
SHOVELS AND SPADES—Olds or Fox.
tllM jm*( dos % Jones or Bulktog $i4.5o per
dos
IRON.   HAND   Per LOO ll«s   -14-ln.  $4.50;
iN-uv   $4 90; Un. li M.
mON,   BLACK SHBET—per lootbs.— i«
|tmg«   $6 10;    4   yuage  $6 00;   18-20  guage.
19 M; M ruage 1" ;f>
(RON, EAl.VANIZED SHEET -Per 1*0 lbs
;S   ginxf   American  or  English   $7.75;   24
Kimire 17 75; !t-M -SUrtKe $7,55
BCOOPB—Mooae No  i, I17.M dos.; No. 6.
tllM '»"« ; No  tX |MM dos.; No. 10, $20.00.
All sbove In Wach finish.
S<»I.l>r.H '- v N. case lots. 3'A* jm>i- lb.:
Irss  43c  p,*r th
SPIKES. PRESSED—POT 100 n**-~\a Inch.
IT 60;  S-H   »7 25:  N in   ttM.
8TAPLK8 -Oalvantied fence. $S.2*5 per 100
flNs in full keits: galvanised poultry netting.
110 90 p«*r 190 Ihs, in full kegs.
TACKS—Carpet. T9c off new list.
WIRE. HARPED—Per roll—4 point, rattle.
SO ro<1.  $5 M; 4-point hop. SO rods $5 50.
wipe.   PLAIN   GALVANISED-Per   100
it.   No. l».  $6 10; No   It, $6 60.
wipe <> A A—Per 100 n>s. No, io, $9.00;
Sfo  It, $« 19: No  i- MM.
VVRINOBRS X'.iv. tSl.M 4>Si Safety..
$07.00 do*     Pii.mIi-. Mt.90 »loz.;  AJax. $171.00
doa
WA8HTN0 MACHINES-Velox water pow-
..* Its 75 each; Eto^foarn Eloctrlc, $76.oo each;
Snowball   9I7.M each;  Patriot,  $19.00 each.
VP*JE>    WABREN   SCPID   HON   35   U>8
im 00 each; 50 lbs W1M each
PAINTS AND OILS.
Brandram-Hendereon
Per GnM',,,
ii-ii "English" ordinary colore |4 ?'
t*.n  "B^allub" whRe *-^
p.H Rxterlor Oil Bhlngle Stain—
nr.lin.irv colora.  In 4 pnl   can«    f1 »J
O-eens  "'id  Orevs.  In  4  sal   cans   2 0:
p.H Anchor Shingle Stain—
or.linnrv  colora    in   4  sral  cnn«       ]^
Orreni end Oreys, in 4 gal. cans l &**
PAINTS
Qnllrtn
Ordinary colors, In 1 ri<i  cane      1*1.80
Martin Benour poroh paint *. j
M.utin Senour Neutone white         8.9*3
Martin 3enour Neutone color   3.75
Martin  Senour floor paint   4.16
Sherwin Williams,  white    4.65
Sherwin Williams, oator   4.30
Sherwln  Williams,   porch     4.30
Sherwin Williams, floor   4.15
PUTTY— Per  100 Ibe.
Bulk, barrels 800Ibe  $6.60
Bulk, Irons 100 lbs    7.76
Hulk. Irons 25 B»s    8.80
Tins, 5 tbs; per lb „    9H
Tins.   lib.     12%
UNSEED OIL- Gallon.
Raw,  1 to 2 barrels $ 1.30
Boiled,  1 to 2 barrels      1.33
LEAD, WHITE IN OIL- Per 100 lbs.
1,000 lbs. to 1 ton  .917.50
Less  19.86
Brandram's Genuine  - - -   18.03
TURPENTINE—                                  Gallon.
1 barrel lots  $ 1.70
VARNISHES— Gallon
Elastic.   No.   1   $ 8.06
Elastic.  No. 2     7.40
IV  Linoleum      6.66
IV Marine Spar     6.M
IV Furniture    3.85
IV Pale Hard Oil     480
Less 33 1-3 per cent.
Lacqueret $6.00 less 40
MORE  LIGHT  LIMITED.
Prices to dealers.
Lamps   for      $8.00
Lanterns   for    $6.75
Junior mantles  per do      .75
Automotive Price List
ABSORBERS SHOCK—Float A Ford No.
1 at $21.50.
ACCELERATORS FOOT—Wireless Ford
at $1.75 each.
ASSORTMENTS—Cotter pin 13c each; Cap
screws 38c each; Set screws 30c each; Machine screw 75c each: Machine nut 76c each.
BATTERIES—Hot Shot $2.96 each; Dry 6x
2V> 55c each.
BOOTS—Tire -4-in. $1.25 each.
BUMPERS—Twin bar $13.60 each.
CAPS—Radiator $100 each.
CARBORUNCLUM—Valve grinding 6-os. $4
dOK.
CARRIES—Luggage, collapsible $4.50 each.
CEMENT—Radiator. Vi R> Wonder Work-
er $5.40 dot.
CHAINS—Weed 30x3ft $6.35 each; 32x3H
$7 00 each; 31x4 $7.70 each; 33x4 $8.20 each;
*Jlx4 $9.00 each.    Less 30'i.
RID O SKID—30X3V4 M-75 pair; 32x3^
$3.9& pair: 34x3% $4.10 pair; 30x4 $3.95 pair;
33x4 $4.50 pair. Less 30c*-.
CLEANERS. WINDSHIELD—Presto $160
ench: Mayo Skinner $7.50 each.
COILS—Spark single $5.66 each; Spark
double $11.00 each.
DEFLECTORS—Wind adjustable $15.20
pair.
ENAMEI/— Vi pt. Jet Lac $6.00 doz.: 5-ots.
Wonder Worker $4.80 dot.; Martin Senour
Quick Dryina. 1/64 13c each; 1/32 19c each:
1/16 31c each; x& 5-k* each; U 96c each; %
$1 70 each.
HORNS—Electric $5.75 each.
.TACKS—No. 200 $2 00 each; No. 4 $225
ench; No, 41 $6 00 each,
LOCKS. MOTOMETER—No. 390 $265
ench: No. 391 13.00 each; No. 392 $7.50 each.
MIRRORS—Rear view $3 00 each.
OIL—Monamobile, light $1.55 gal.: medium
$1 60 gal.! heavy $1.70 gal.
PATCHES BLOW OUT—Locktite. No. 2
*3<* each*. No 3 30c each; No. 5 75c each:
No   6 17c each.
PLATES—Steo  12.00 each.
PLUGS—Spark Chempion S3c each; A. C.
Titan 6Sc each: Hel-FI. 5F>c each.
POPISH. METAL—Klondyke. Vi pt. $1.3o
.lor..:  U Ot. 82.40 doz I  1-pt $4 SO do8.
PUMPS—Tire Ace $2 60 each; Crown $150
each.
•rah.S—Rohe No 127 90c each.
Fahrto tires, universal non-skid tread: 80x
3V.'.   $13.00. 	
Gray tubes: 30\3V.'. $2.50; 32x3% $27o; Six
4 -M.R'O: 3?x4 $3 75: 33x4 $3 85: 34x4 $4.10.
Tubes: less 30 per cent off list. 42
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which is Incorporated the B. C. TRADE REVIEW.
Mn n*!:
The Technology of Baking
Condiment.
The blending of spices and volatile oils for flavoring
purposes.
Although the baker has not taken advantage of
the combination of \hv numerous spices aud volatile
oils, thev ean be used for making most eyeellent cake
and other flavors. It is possible to «1«*v**l*»i* this pari
of the baking business to a very high degree, putting it almost on a plane with the perfume industry.
!,t is the- flavor and odor that largely determines
whether a eake is good or bad. One can make 8
eake having a most wonderful appearance wiih an
excellent grain and texture and if it possesses an undesirable tatse and odor it will not sell very well.
As the take business becomes more competitive
the baker must become more efficient in giving the
cakes the proper taste and ador. Bj this ire do not
mean that be should neglect the other good qualities
and put more stress on the introduction of desirable
spices an dessential oils, for thc appearance of a cake
also has considerable to do with it*** sale, .Many bakers use either too little or too much flavoring matter.
This is especially true in the making of spice and
dark fruit take Some use only one and in some
eases two or three spices in making a combination
and the combination is very often not properly balanced, Which injures rather than aids the sale of
eake.
There are some who are also too much interested
in the purchase of cheap spice and flavoring matter.
Only the best spices and aromatic oils and other flavorings should be used. If it is desired to cheapen the
mix. the baker can do this by making a combination
of spice and sugar which will tone down his spice to
any desired degree. The writer has found it a very
good practice to make up combinations of different
spices together with some sugar. This not only makes
a milder spiee flavor hut also makes it possible to bring
out the flavor better, and wlo-rc large quantities of
sniees are handled so niiieh damage i*** not done when
the baker adds too much spiee tn (he mixture.
In making the differenl combinations it is necessary
to take into consideration the quantity of* volatile flavoring matter present in the different spices, ihv relative
strength of the different volatile oils and the purpose
for whieh the flavoring is intended. In the heavier
yellow mixtures, such as the package cake*-, commercial
pound eake and so-called wine cake, mace should be
the predominating spice, in some of tbe darker mixtures Such as dark fruit cake, cinnamon or cassia
should predominate, while in other dark spice cakes.
(finger should be the predominating flavoring matter.
By making the combinations, the intensity of liie predominating flavoring is mellowed or toned down, whieh
together with the flavor produced by the combination,
usually makes a very attractive flavor.
The success of perfumery manufacture is largely d»-
pendent upon the fragram-y of the different bouquets
which are made up «»f a combination of different silastic substances. The baker, too, in lhe sale of cakes,
can put lus business on the same basis nnd by putting
in the proper combination of fragrant flavoring mai
ter he will enhance Ins eake busines**..    We have maV
up a number of combinations that may be med tot •
guide   tO   those   who   have   had   little   experience   HUn
the making of flavoring combinations,
Plain Cake Flavor.
Formula No. 1
Finely ground mace, - lb*..
Powdered sugar, I U».
i >d of lemon, • * ot,
Oil of coriander. l * oz
Method.
I'm about one-fourth of the sugar into a mortar snd
then drop by droj> add the oil of lemon and Oil of COr*
lander while th<* sugar is being rubbed. Then add the
balance of sugar snd blend After ths sugar and *••
atib* oil have become thoroughly blended, add the macs
and mix. This mixture should be put into a tight container and stored for about III days, after which it may
be used.
Formula No J
Finely ground mace, 2 lb*.
Powdered seugar, 1 lb
Angelica root oil, i |*» ot,
<b! of sweet orange, j „ os.
.Method
Thoroughly blend the oils with tin* sugar is men*
tioned under formula No. t.  After % thoroughly blend
has been made, add the mine ami mix.    Put  it.to fl
tight container ami store
Formula No. •"!.
Oil of mace. %\ !-j ths.
Powdered sugar, I Ih,
Oil of rosemary. J   Hi *u,
Angelica rootofl, 1 10 oi
oil of bitter almonds, I 16 07.
Method.
I si  the method mentioned under formula N"  1
Dark Cake Spice flavor.
Formula So, 1.
dinger, 1 lb.
Cinnamon, I ozs.
(  lovef,   I o  ti/„
Fennel oil, J   IH oz,
Coriander oil, I 10 os,
Sutra r, 1  Ib.
Method.
Make a thorough blend of the fennel and conn"
der oil with the sugar as mentioned under formula NT°-
I. plain cake flavor.   Then thorough mix the ginger. m
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which !» incorporated the H. C, TRADE REVIEW.
43
Gat oven  recently  installed in  Shelly  Bros.,  Bakery with capacity of 50,000
loavet a day. or 4.500 ioavs per hour.   It it the largest of its kind in
Western Canada.
II
Lake of the Woods
Milling Company
LIMITED
KUkwiof
FIVE ROSES
• FLOUR •
The World's Best
Daily Capacity 1<200 Bbls.
B.C. Offioss and Warehouses:
1300 Richards Street 1614 Store Street
VANOOUVER VICTORIA
"/ Want a
Loaf of Bread.
>t
Few women go into stores and say: "I want a cake
of soap, a can or soup, some pork and beans, a bottle
of catsup, a package of breakfast food," wtthoui
having definitely in mind the brand they want.
Yet thousands of women daily go into stores and say
"I want a loaf of bread," and accept any brand that
Is offered. This is your fault, if you are failing to
show the grocer why your loaf is the one he should
give her.
First sell ihe grocer. Then educate the housewife
to come asking for your loaf of Bread*
Fleischmann's Sales Promotion Service
will show yo how to do both these things.
Ask your local Fleischmann representative. »
The Fleischmann Company
Yeast
Fleischmann's
Service
Diamalt 44
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which Is Incorporate the It   C. TRADE REVIEW.
Marc
rcn
cinnamon and cloves, add it to the sugar mixture ami
blend. It is advisable to use finely ground spices for
the mixture.
Formula No. 2.
Cinnamon, I lb.
Cloves. 1 lb.
Oil of coriander, i' oz.
Oil of orange, Vi oz*
Oil of bitter almonds, 1/16 oz.
Powdered sugar, I lb.
Method.
Make a thorough blend of the oil antl sugar ami
then add the cinnamon and cloves aud mix thoroughly.
Liquid flavor for White Silver Cake.
Formula
Oil of mace, V. oz*
Oil of bitter almonds, 1 Hi oz.
Oil of sweet orange, | Eg os.
Oil of rosemary, • - oz.
Rosewater, ! t pt,
Alcohol, 2 »|K
formula
TICKETS AND   LABELS
MADE BY SPECIALISTS.
A specialist. In any calling. Is one equipped to produce results promptly, satisfactorily and economically.
This Is where our plant differs from the average printing office. We carry In stock many tons of colored card
boards for Immediate use. At one operation, with our
modern specialty machinery, we print tl -kets In two to four
colors on front of ticket and on the back; number each
ticket the same or consecutively and perforate sheet
both ways; or we can print your tlcketa and rc-wlnd
Into rolls to suit, each ticket numbered conaecutlrely
and correctly. We make bread labels In two colora for
the price of printing one color. In quantities, and put
up Into rolls of 5.000. We make the ticket* for the
B.C.E. Ry. by the millions; for the North Vancouver
Ferries; for the Government, -and all kind* of theatre
tlokets.   May we not be of service to you.
NICHOLSON, LTD.
Phone: Bay view 376
!0tf Ind AVENUE WEST VANCOUVER. B. C.
I    •■!   Ill Ml 11
Add ih«' differenl oils to the alcohol ami shake thoroughly, After theoils lum been dissolved, add lhe row
water ami again "hake. Put the oil into g ,'(,,-}< t.uj
Ored bottle and store for about one Week After tins
it may hv used for flavoring purposes.
There are a large number of other combination*
that can be made for Afferent kinds of cake* rolls,
buns ami coffee enkes, In making these combinations,
always take care *v> a* ion to overbahiu *e tin* Bavor
ami in no case use too much Savoring matter, as too
much flavoring ii worse than none at ail
CHEAP NIGHT RATES
Wv Hint know you adore it "bargain"'
*mo«t everybody   do«*».  atuS even  |n»b*
He utility companies offer *Uiem!
Hold >ou<! ix>tsg Distance »orj»t eoaattvatloai be
twees UM hour* Of » |>m and | a.m. when we Kh*-
you a conversation lasting UtrC-0 Om** that of tin*
day period allowed at tht* regular <J»> rat*.* to 15 C
Telephone Company stations. Now wha? OOttld le*
more alluring*
Call the  "Hate Ckrk" tor charge* or ofh»r psHICQ-
lars.
IRITISH COIUMIIA TELEPHONE COMPANY, LTO.
Beedh-Nut
Chewing Gum
The full-flavored goodness of
Beech-Nut Chewing Gum
remains unequalled. It contain* an abundance of delicious peppermint — leaving
the mouth cool, clean and
refreshed—the breath pleasantly sweet.
Thousands who never before cared for
gum now chew Beech-Nut Chewing Gum
regularly. So ask all your customers to
try it; they will find a real delight in its
delicious and refreshing mint flavor, and
the springy liveliness attained by the use
of pure chicle.
Pleased customers, ever-increasing sales,
come from recommending Beech - Nut
Chewing Gum.
BEECH-NUT COMPANY OF CANADA. LIMITED,   HAMILTON, ONT. .ii
e e
e e
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With whieh ia Incorporated the B. C. TRADE REVIEW.
Buy in British Columbia
45
e e
e e
Mn. Name's Marmalade
ORANGE
CRAPE
FRUIT
PINE
APPLE
X WHISTLE
Wrapped  in   Bottlfi
CROSS 4 CO. Vancouver.
B.
C.
Boxes for B.
C Gooda.
B.
C
Gooda for B.
C. People.
Nat*
ona
Paper Box 4 Carton Co.
Limited.
260
Lome Street W.
Vancouver.
CORNISH & CIOPER
Sash.  Doors, Joinery.
245 Dufferin St. W..      Vancouver.
Telephone:  Fair. 963.
Milne & MiJJelton
Limited.
Wholesale   Millinery,  Notions  and
Smallwarea.
347  Water  Street Vancouver.
QUAKER JAMS
Made of fresh fruit nnd sugar; the
purest of Ingredients, win satisfy
the most exacting.
DOMINION CANNERS, B. 0.
Limited
VANCOUVER, B. C.
PAINTS
Brandram-Honderson
of B. C. Ltd.
GRANVILLE    ISLAND
Vancouver.
L Chrystal & Co. Ltd.
Sash,   Doors,   Store   Fixtures  and
Alterations
10S Georgia Street E.   Vancouver.
nvaboq
M
ItKJK
PAPER BAGS
Paper bags, wrapping paper,
for all requirements.
COLUMBIA PAPER CO. LTD.
1038 Hamilton St. Vancouver, B.C.
J. S. Maxwell & Co.
500 Mercantile Bldg., Vancouver. B. C.
Phone:  Sey.  1533
Repre tenting:
i«Mui» ww mis (i. in, niasimmu
Wire Hardware aae* Statiaeery Seppliet
wii (owm arm i muss ci. ui.. toaanio
Art Bran sad Capper
MM1I ftUMM I SMS. (OMttt Ml
Cecea Mali, Nithat, tmss Raft
Clatwertay Display Fhtarei
IS YOUR BUSINESS FOR SALE
Our departmeni dealing exclusively ill I lie sale ol mercantile
»n»l oilier businesses Is organized
to give prompt eltlclent service
nl cost USU&H) less than the difference in price we can procure
for you.   It pays lo list with
Pemberton & Son
418 Hows St   Vancouver, B. C.
JEWELERT
Complete     stock    of    diamonds,
Watches,   Silverware,   etc.
WESTERN    WHOLESALE
JEWELERS    LTD.
Cor Cambie and Cordova Streets.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
CANADIAN
TOLEDO SCALES
E. S. CHAMBERS, Agency Manager
Vancouver.
MONARCH   KNITTING   CO.
Limited.
Mens and womens hosiery knitted
outerwear and hand knitting yarns.
Represented in British Columbia
STEWART 4 WALLACE LTD
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Phone:   High. 3889
IDEAL CONE COMPANY
Manufacturers of
ICE   CREAM   CONES
Purest Made     Cost Less
335 PRINCESS AVE.
Vancouver.
Associated Agencies
LTD.
IMPORTERS
Artificial Flowers, Trimmings, Novelty Jewelry, Veilings, Dress Ornaments,  Butterfly   Wing  Jewelry.
615 Pender St. W. Vancouver.
BORDEN'S
EVAPORATED
MILK
Vancouver Office
332 Water Street
BEECH NUT
CHEWING GUM 46
• e
e e
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which Is incorporated the B   C, TRADE RJ"BV11W
Buy in British Columbia
.MmvIi
e e
e e
PAPER BAGS
J. C WILSON   LTD.
106S Homer Street,       Vancouver.
ROYAL CROWN
SOAPS
Manufactured in British Columbia
and guaranteed.
ROYAL CROWN  SOAPS  LTD.
PAINTS
MARTIN-SENOUR
CO.   LTD.
1505 Powell  Street,
Vancouver
TttOKlf-N
KNITTING CO. LTD.
J. J. MACKAY,
Agent.
804 Bower Bldg.
Vancouver.
HOSIERY
YEAST
THE FLEISCHMANN CO.
W. S. DUNN, Manager.
1166  Burrard  Street      Vancouver.
J. A. TEPOORTEN
LIMITED
WHOLESALE    DRUGS
308 WATER    8TREET
VANCOUVER, B. C.
McCORMICKS
JERSEY CREAM
SODAS
McCormick Mfg. Co. Ltd.
1150 Hamilton  Street,  Vancouver.
C. H. KENNEY, Manager.
1
8ERVICE   TO   OUT   OF   TOWN
8UB8CRIBER8.
The British Columbia Retailer will
be pleased to furnish subscribers
the names and addresses of representatives or agents of eastern
manufacturers in Vancouver. We
will also advise where their commodities ean be purchased.
Carnation Milk
B. C. Representative:
OPPENHEIMER    BROS.
134 Abbott St. Vancouver.
Hams & Bacon
Swift's "Premium"
SWIFT CANAOIAN CO. LTD.
Vancouver.
Insurance
Retail    Merchants    Underwriters
Agency.
420 Pacific   Bdlg. Vancouver.
PAPER
BAGS     AND     WRAPPING
Norfolk Paper Co. Ud.
136 WATER STREET
Vancouver.
Water Repellent Clothing
R. a. si me
M. C Distributor
Camaiaaa Hack «• aaa4
m tUftaaim, amimma
i BEAR
VucMttr. S C.
ParaffaM-4 im* • aamiaMi
GALVANIZED IRONWCAR
THE THOS. DAVIDSON MFG. CO.
LTD.
123 Powell Street Vancouver.
*S-<3ISTprRgr)
CHIPMAN-HOLTON       KNITTING
CO. LTD.
E. H. Walsh A Co. Ltd., Agents.
318 Homer  8treet,        Vancouver.
FURNITURE
Fir Furniture of Quality
DOWUNO   MANUFACTUR
INO COMPANY
266   2nd Ave .1.   Vancouver.
UNDERWEAR
ATLANTIC UNDERWEAR LTD.
E. H. Walsh A Co. Ltd., Agent*
31S Homer Street Vancouver.
I
it
. r
C. H. Jones & Son
Limited.
Manufacturers
PIONEER    BRAND
TENTS.  AWNINGS.  FLAGS  AND
CANVAS GOODS OF ALL KINDS. \
Jobbers of:
Gold Medal Camp Furniture
Cotton duck, all widths and weights &
28   WATER     STREET.
Vancouver, B. C.
8
*^KNNiXiicMx xtxxixifiXKx xxxxxxxx x# Xi*
T.  D.  STARK Telephone
F. W. STERLING Sey. 6195
8TARK & STERLING
MANUFACTURERS'   AGENTS
1401   Dominion  Building
VANCOUVER, B. C.
FRAUD INSURANCE
ALFRED W. McLEOD, LTD
Vancouver and
New Westminster "RAVEN"   Manilla
" GARRY" Light K,aji
"RUPERT" Heavy Kraft
Breeds ni Paper Bags, only Paper Begs
aide ie Western Cioads will insure your
PROFIT. MR. GROCER,
By yonr customers satisfaction in receding
tkeirn srcha-Jise in good condition
NORFOLK PAPER CO. LTD.
136 Water St.
Sey. 7868
Agents for B. C.
Woods Manufacturing Co. Ltd.
Winnipeg, Manitoba.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
n
rt
P
Swift's Premium Frankfurters
Pis
**•<»■%*■;
The desire of the average merchant is to increase his volume
of business, thereby getting more profit. You will find Swift's
"Premium" Frankfurters will fulfil your desire—Superior to
any Frankfurter on the market-make sure you insist on "Premium" Look for the tag bearing the brand—A trial order will
satisfy you they are what you should stock.
Swift Canadian Company, Limited Famous for Years
AND rightly should they be, Buster Brown Stockings
have given wonderful wear—have proven comfortable
and neat to the hoys of Canada for over twenty years! They
have two-ply legs and three-ply toe and heel.
Mothers know this! They demand Buster Brown Stockings.
Their sale is tremendous — all over the Dominion. Reap
your full share of the profits. Carry a complete range of
sizes. Put them on your counters. Feature them in displays.
It will handsomely repay you.
Order from vour wholesaler.
Buster Brown's Sister's Storking* are knit from a
two-thread merceris ed lisle and are especially
suited for girls' wear. Black, tan. heather shade,
pink, blue and white.   Moderate in price.
Cliipman llolton Knitting Company, Limited Hamilton, Ontario
Mill* at Hamilton <iuJ \WlhnJ

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