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The British Columbia Retailer Mar 1, 1924

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Array TM British Columbia
Vancouver, B. C.      FEBRUARY, 1924
Sixteenth Year.
20c per copy; $2.00 per year.
Have you an unseen partner
who gives your goods
Tht' Ortatnr Dayton   with tfoetric features
constantly advertising your busnitss.
away !
Small overweights, due to inaccurate weighing, are free gifts
to >our customers. A faulty scale is like a foolish partner,
giving your profits away.
Government inspection protects your customer against underweight; ii does not penalize you for overweight. Don't let
>our scale rob you under your nose. Make sure your scale
equipment Is strictly efficient and up-to-date.
The New Improved
DAYTON
»
Computing Scale
is the last word in accuracy and efficiency. Based on scientific principles approved by all governments, the DAYTON
was the pioneer computing scale. It has kept pace steadily
with modern discovery and invention, and today is the finest
and mosl complete scale on the market.
Examine the New DAYTON, and see for yourself how accurate and efficient it is. If you already own a DAYTON that
has given long and steady service, turn it in and get a New
DAYTON, with its added improved features. Let us show
you how at small cost you may keep your DAYTON equipment up-to-date.  Drop us a card today.
DAYTON cylinder and fan Scales are sold on attractive monthly payments. Discount for cash. Generous allowances on your old scale.
International Business Machines Co., Limited
Head Office and Factory\ 300 Campbell Avenue. Toronto. Ont
A. R. DeLong. District Agent, 230 Cambie St., Vancouver, B. C.
Service and Sales Offices tn Calgary,   Edmonton,   Saskatoon.   Kegina,   Winnipeg. WalkervMe- London. Hamilton,
Toronto.  Ottawa,   Montreal.  Quebec,   Halifax. St. John. N.  B., St. John's.  Nfld.
THE   DAYTON   IS   MADE   IN   CANADA PAPER BAGS
Standard—Light Kraft—Heavy Kraft
Paper Mills:
Lachute and St. Jerome, Qne.
Manufacturers since 1870
These are our leading lines ami have been For years
the best bag value*- before the retail trade of Canada.
The paper used in their manufacture is specially
made in our own paper mills and is actually tougher and
stronger,
If a better bag wow possible -I. C Wilson, Limited
would make it.   52 vears in the husmess.
J. C. WILSON, LIMITED
Manufacturers of
PAPER BAGS.     WRAPPING, TISSUE AND TOILET PAPERS
for   Wholesalers and Retailers.
1068 HOMER STREET, VANCOUVER, B. 0
Phone: 8eymottr 781
r
MAKE BIG SALES BY FEATURING
CROWN
Manufactured
in British
Columbia and
Guaranteed  by
"The
Perfect
Toilet
Snap
if
THE ROYAL CROWN SOAPS, LTD.
VANCOUVER, B. C. 1924
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which I. Incorporated the B. C. TRADE REVIEW.
3
"Good Delivery Service
Does Increase Patronage**
Mr. M. T. Ellis of Ellis Brothers Limited, Toronto who
use Ford delivery service says:
"Our present outfits have stood up under two years ol heavy
service in the crowded streets of Toronto, making two deliveries a day and are still giving satisfaction. We consider that
good delivery service does increase patronage and that a
good-looking outfit has a considerable advertising value.*
Ellis Brothers use a panel body mounted on the standard
chassis and find it very economical in operation.
Thousands of Ford delivery users in many lines of business
corroborate Mr. Ellis* statement, and count their Ford
deliveries among their greatest assets.
There is a special Ford body type for every delivery job.
See your local Ford dealer and let him show you how Ford
delivery can earn money for you.
<Sfonct>
CARS * TRUCKS * TRACTORS
FORD    MOTOR    COMPANY    OF    CANADA.    LIMITED.    FORD.    ONTARIO THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which is Incorporated the B. C. TltADK REVIEW,
frVbruurv
lhe ST. LAWRENCE LINE
PAPER BAGS
Made in Canada—from Canadian Papers
lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllMlllllllllfllllllllllllllllllllllllltlHIIIIIIIIIHIflllllll^^
"SIMPLEX"    -   Light Manilla
" MAPLE LEAF "  Light Kraft
"LION"      -    -     Heavy Kraft
lllllllltlllllllllltllllllllllllllllllllllllltlllllllllllllltltlMlllttltlllltlllllllllttttllltlltlllttltlltlfll
A Bag suitable for every kind of Merchandise—
Made by St. Lawrence Paper Bag Co.
SELLING AGENTS FOR B. C
COLUMBIA PAPER CO. LIMITED
CARRY LARGE STOCKS IN VANCOUVER AND VICTORIA
British Columbia Grows the Best
Quaker Brand Fruit
and Vegetables
11
Art   .k       y°U T b.Uy' md thw ■ why P«0P*«
lie them *, well.    For wme mam Brifi.h SoE
■p-w gr0W8- be"er.fr"'» «"J vegetable, and the
theT^l T°* 'A S""*? Brand k'tehe"» «ve. all
Je natural flavor.   Q^„ Bra„d ;. the be., ,ha, can be
Dominion Canners B. C
Limited
Head Office:
VANCOUVER. 1924
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which Is Incorporated the B. c. TRADE REVIEW.
ROGERS
f
v-v*
M,
!
GOLDEN SYRUP
i*
! j
;i
'! .2
"The End of a Perfect Day"
flMadc from finest flavoured eane sugar, a special grade of which is imported for the
purpose.
HPut up in all sizes of packages to suit your customers' requirements,
flln packages designed to beautify your store.
2 lb. tins, 24 to a case.
51b. tins, 12 to a case.
104b. tins, 6 to a case.
20-lb. tins, 3 to a case.
Perfect Seal jars, 12 to a case.
The British GolumbiaSugar Refining Go. Ltd.
VANCOUVER, B.C. THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which is Incorporated the R. C. TRADE REVIEW.
Pel
»ru«rv
GAMBLING
The desire to gamble is without a doubt almost as old as the human race
and the efforts of reformers to stamp it out are as hopeless as shovelling sawdust against a strong wind.   However in these modern days there are so many
outlets for the gambling instinct that to gamble with one's insurance is foolhardy, to say the least.
Write your insurance therefore in strong and old established Stock Companies.   Don't gamble on your chance of recovery, in event of loss.
Our Companies do not contest bona fide claims on obscure technical points.
o*'
0t*Jk
Established 1899.
Incorporated 1917.
FELS-NAPTHA
THE GOLDEN BAR WITH THE CLEAN NAPTHA ODOR
J \M
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With whlrh In Incorporated the R. C. TRADE REVIEW
BRITISH COLUMBIA
RETAILER
Published Monthly.
SIXTEENTH YEAR
OHNBRAL MERCHANDISE
GROCERIES, DRYGOODS,
HARDWARE. FOOTWEAR.
OFFICIAL ORGAN OF B.C. BOARD
RETAIL MERCHANTS'
ASSOCIATION OF CANADA.
A MONTHLY JOURNAL published in the interest of Retail Merehan-
diiiitg and the Development of Commerce in Western Canada.
SUBSCRIPTION RATE. Two Dollars Per Year, parable to ad-rance.
Advertialng Rates on Application.
Publishers: PROGRESS PUBLISHING CO. LTD.
Suit* 101-2 Merchants' Exchange Building
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Telephone Bey, 3S61 Cable Address—Shipping—All Codes
Kdltor, J. B. MorTln-on W. N. Code. Business Manager
Entered at Ottawa as Second class matter
Secretaries,  Representing the following
Branches R. M. A.
Agassis...- W. A. Jones
Armstrong „G. H. Smith
Chilliwaek .A. Knox
Cloverdale A. J. Burrows, Pres.
Courtenay F.  Field
Cumberland J. Sutherland
Cranbrook J. F. 8cott  (Pres.)
Duncan L.  E.   Helen
Eequimalt H. E. Pickard
Grand Forks 8. T. Hull
Hammond A Haney A. J. 8cott
Kamloops A. H. Muirhead.
Kelowna A. 8. Wade
Ladner A. W. Bull
Ladysmith j. McCormick.
Lytton B. Rebagliati.
Merritt G. B. Armstrong
(Pres).
Mission F. C.  Lightbody
Nanaimo W. F. Norria
Nelson E. F. Gigot
New Westminster D. Stuart
Prince George  C. C. Reid (Act. Sec
Princeton  *• Sorenson
Revelstoke J. P. Hume
Trail T. A. Robley
Vancouver W. F. Ing
Vernon „ D. Fernie
Victoria J. Wallis
White Rock E. H. Hardy.
Vol Wl No. li.
February, 1924.
Vancouver, B.C.
Sales Tax versus Turnover Tax
The government i* apparently considering the abolishment of the Sales Tax. which has proved BO unpopular, ami whieh presents complications whieh government Officii!* themeslvis Hiui difficult to interpret, and
mention has been made at Ottawa of the introduction
of the Turnover Tax,
The Retail Merchants' Association hss in the past
condemned the general principle of the turnover tax.
claiming that some sections of the retail trade and especially tlie smaller retail grocers would be placed in
an unfair position if such a tax were introduced, since
the margin of profit possible in the majority of grocers
commodities is exceedingly small, ami it is reasonable
to suppose this attitude of the Association will continue until an equitable basis be arrived at. which will
work no hardship upon any section of the retail trade.
In connection with any discriminatory effect this
projected lax may have upon the trade, it is interesting
tO note that "provision is made to prevent anything
escaping except goods handled by thc very small dealer, whose tax would not be considered worth while to
collect*'   Such provision would appear to encourage
an increase in the number of small dealers, who in
many cases are able to make handsome profits with a
small overhead expense, and who won\d contribute
nothing to luxation revenue.
Apart from this portion of the retail trade which
may be immune from taxation, there are features in
thc turnover tax which bear a distinct relation to the
present Sales Tax. While the Sales Tax is limited to
the manufacturer, producer, importer, wholesaler or
jobber or to whichever of the foregoing class is first to
sell commodities in the finished state, the Turnover
Tax is to be imposed upon the gross sales of commodities and services of all businesses above mentioned and
also to mercantile, financial, and professional classes.
It is to be applied at all stages in the process of commodities between the raw material and the consumer.
Every turnover of goods will call for the payment
of one per cent to the government, and the manufacturer or merchant can at the end of the month or at
any other period estimate the amount liable for taxation purposes from his gross sales.
Simplicity is the chief merit claimed for this new
tax. There will be no necessity for intricate bookkeeping, inspection is simpler, and there are no rebates,
but thc otic feature which stands out pre-eminently is
that a larger proportion of business will be reached
by this method than is possible through the* medium of
the Sales Tax.
"While there is no very denitc information as yet to
hand regarding the government's decision to abolish
thc present tax, the R. M. A. will offer every resistance
to a tax which discriminates in any way against any of
its members in the retail trade. ft
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which Is Incorporated the It. C. TRADK REVIEW.
Feb
ruary
GROCERIES y PROVISIONS
PB
GENERAL BUSINESS
February 18.
Retail grocery business to date this year has been
only normal. .January and February are considered
to be about the two poorest business months of the
year, and while this year has been no exception, the
retail grocery business seems to be on a much sounder
footing and tho retail grocers themselves are more optimistic for the future. There is little doubt that Vancouver and surrounding districts will benefit very materially by the influx of new arrivals during the next
few months. Vancouver is spoken nf as the most
prosperous port on the coast, and the constructional
work laid out for the summer will naturally go a long
way towards attracting population to this city.
T.t should not be necessary to remind retailers that
Lenten Season commences in February and continues
until early April. Special features of fish, canned,
salt, smoked and in brine, will appeal to their customers who are adherents to the Lenten period.
Sugar.—The frequent advance in local quotations
on sugar since our last issue came as a surprise to
wholesalers and retailers alike. While the advance is
universal in North America it is hard for the layman
to account for it at this time of the year, when eon-
sumption is light. Furthermore, raws now being used
by the refiners were booked ahead months ago at Hrm
prices *-vhich would not justify any increase in priee.
A possible reason may be that tin- European beet crop
has not turned out as well as expected, which has no
doubt brought England and France into the Cuban
market. Some authorities are inclined to the belief
that tho market will show strength for several weeks,
and we must not lose sight of the fact that early in
March last year local quotations commenced to advance until, April the 12th, it reached a peak price of
$11.25 per hundred pounds. Today's quotation is
$10.20 per hundred pounds, as compared with $9.00,
tho price ruling when our last issue went to press.
Canned Vegetables.—AID lines of canned vege-
Ibles are exceptionally strong, particularly torn*
roes, peas and corn. In the case of tomatoes, the
B. C. canners are now shipping some sizes to Eastern
Canada, indicating a shortage there. Stocks here
are considerod ample to carry through until the L924
pack, but there is no possibility of lowerp rices. Corn,
pack, but there is no possibility of lower prices. Corn,
Quaker, the most popular brand, is entirely cleaned up
so far as the canners are concerned.   Stocks in local
jobbers' hands will noi last more than two mo-.it!.-.
after which American brands will bave to be brought
into the market. Peas an** also very scarce, Early
•I lines are almost sold out even now by both canners
and wholesalers, and it in predicted that American
lilies of peas will also have to be brought in to relieve
the shortage.
Opening prices on California asparagus for 1924
pack were named February 1st.    Price* on the popular
sizes show an advance of approximately lo pot cent
over last year's figures,     Lack of uioisiun* ill C«i f«>rn
ia wiii! a consequent short pack *s the reason.
Advertised   braids   are  supposed   to  be   pretty
well    in    the    hands    of    the    ' "Snnmaid"    people.
If   this   is   the   ease,   no   lower   price   may   be
expected. The growers are getting about as little
for their raisins as they ean possible take and live. A
recent report from California is to the effect that the
Associationf Owing to poor quality and a heavy surplus
over and above anticipated demand, have actual!) destroyed 35,000 tons of 1983 crop raisin-
Figs are easier with concessions being offered to
relieve paekers of surplus sloek
Prunes are tirtn on all sizes.    1982 I*«rry ov. r ss en
tirety cleaned up and a big export demand from Oer*
many has relieved the market on small sixes. So lower
prices arc expected, and there may be advances s little
later on when the demand is heavier
Peaches and Apricots an* Hrm and market advancing.
Dates.—The tirst shipment of new crop dates reached this market the latter part of .January. These went
to the trade at from 8'Vfc to !l cents for llallowis. These
are now cleaned up and the n»-xt shipment is due about
April 1st. The prices on the second shipment will be
about the same as the first.
Currants ere easier, although present prices sre
only temporary,   Stocks now in transit will be shoul
1' j cents higher.
Evaporated Apples are ncarce and prices sdvancing.
Beans.—Prieei are now as low  as thev will be.
BeaOS are -good buying at present quotations.
Coffee.— Recent cables report a very firm coffee
market ami if it continues, advances will bi necessary.
At any rate, there is no possibility of lower prices.
Canned Salmon.—Stocks of pinks ami Uohoes are
are rapidly depleting. Cchoes especially will be higher in the tt! ar future.
Corn Flakes.—Further advances have taken place
On all brands of corn Hakes, mnking today's list «>n
Kellogg.s in single ease lot $4.00, ami other lines iu pro-
portion, 1924
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which is Incorporated the B. C. TRADE REVIEW.
"Fly Tox"—This is a new line being offered to retailers. It bas been on the market however in
the east and in l\ S. A. for the past two years and has
,11,1 with wonderful success. It is made in Canada
,*t Bridgeburg, Ontario, by the Hex Chemical Company, «'ho also have six factories in I*. S, A. It is
a chemical preparation used with a spray which is supplied free with each bottle and is sure death to Hies
and    other   insects.    It    comes in two popular sizes.
namely 24 8 oz. bottles at $9,00 case, and 24 1*3 ox, at
$13,50 esse, SS well as larger bulk containers for big
users. Retailers are well advised to order a case or
two for spring delivery. It will be one of the best selling Hy exterminators this year.
THE COFFEE OUTLOOK.
New York. Feb. 10.
The visible supply of Braxii coffee for the United
States has decreased ami is 988,277 bags, of which 426,-
600 bags are afloat; the visible a year ago was 1.224,000
bags. Slocks in the Bra/.i! sea ports show a slight increase ami are a total of 1,021,000 bags; the total
stocks a year ago were 3»599,000 bags, The deliveries
of coffee in the I"nited States are good, being for twenty-four days of .lanuary 502,656 bags of Braxii and for
the twenty one days of January 226.004 bags of milds.
a total of 818,660 bags. The 'Centre de Commercio
de Cafe of Kio" estimates the coming Kio crop of
2,."jtH».(KSi bags The report states that the current
crop has been damaged and that the yield will be
smaller than expected The present Kin crop was estimated between 3,000,000 to 3,500,000 bags, with pre-
ponderence of opinions being of the lower figure, Under date of December 26 the "Hra/ilian Review " reports "that the lack of rain and the excessive heat during the previous few weeks has done great harm to
the eottOD and cereal crops,'" No mention is made of
damage to coffee but no doubt the trees have suffered
from drouth. There have been no further developments with regard to the permanent defense of coffee
and the opinion is expressed that no steps will be taken
by the government until the recently appointed tinan-
cial mission has hi*-en consulted in the matter. The financial mission is now on its way to Mra/.il and is expected to investigate conditions ami make suggestions
towards improving ami developing Braxii,
Then* is little chance for a material decline
When the prospects of the growing Brazil crops
are considered, together with the fact that the consuming countries are without sufficient supplies to enable them to refrain from steady buying. The spot
demand for milds is quiet, with the- market very
steady. Stocks show a slight increase. Europe continues to be a large buyer of mild coffee at prices
mueli better than the United States trade will pay.
UNFAIR COMPETITION.
a decision rendered recently bj the United states sup
nine court has definitely determined tlo* right of a whole*
sale Krocer. acting Independently, to withhold his patronage
from a manufacturer who Hells to chain stores or retailers
direct ami refuses to pay him the regular wholesale discount
without beltiK guilty or unfair competition. The decision was
l» the case of Raymond Br0S.-Clarke Company, wholesale
grocers or Lincoln. Neb., which has attracted considerable attention In the trade since lis Inception several years ago.
IT-s.**9**-
He can introduce
• You to the Largest
Number (/Dimes in
flie Stvrtesi I» sslNeTime!
That's Turnover/
DON'T be deceived by the profit you
make on a single sale.
If you make small-profit sales many
times a year, you make far more money
than on a few larger-profit sales made but
a few times a year.
That's the principle of "turnover." So
don't load up on slow-moving merchandise.
Toilet soap, for instance. The average
retailer carries 50% of his toilet soap investment in brands that turn over only
once a year!
To speed up turnover—to increase the
year's profits—weed out dead stocks. Put
your whole investment of time and effort
and money behind brands that move
quickly. These, you will always find, are
the popular, nationally advertised brands
—in any line of merchandise.
Palmolive Soap, for instance, will turnover 17 times a year! It can introduce you
to the greatest number of sales in the
shortest possible time and thereby increase
profits for you.
2)16 10
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which is Incorporated the H   Q TRASH REVIEW.
Feb
ruarv
Baking Powder
ConiniiiN no Alum
Absolutely Pure
THE W.H. MALKIN Co. Ltd.
VICTORIA. VANCOUVER. NANAIMO.
p^——■     '     li ii
WILSON BROTHERS
Established 1890
Our Motto is " SERVICE "
We cannot offer to sell yon goods cheaper than any other firm is in a position to do, but we CAN
give actual facts to prove that it is
ECONOMY
to deal with ns
itMUZ WILSON BROTHERS, VICTORIA, B. C.
Whole-sale Grocers
SHAMROCK RRAND
HAM, BACON, BUTTER, LARD, SAUSAGE, etc.
First Quality packing house products put up by P. Burns & Co.,
Limited, which means they are the highest grade, always reliable,
and without equal on this market.
YOU CAN RECOMMEND SHAMROCK BRAND.
P. Burns & Company, Limited
VANOOUVER
CALGARY
EDMONTON
SB-Mi 1924
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Wtth which la Incorporated the B. C. TRADE REVIEW.
11
U S. OOVRNMENT L008E8 8UOAR EXCHANGE
SUIT.
Supreme Court Holds that There Was No Evidence in
Case to Substantiate Conspiracy Charges.
The r. s. Government lost its suit againsl the New
Vork Coffee and Sugar Exchange, as was predicted
before the cast* was taken before the United States
Supreme Court, following the decision of the Court of
Appesla at New York, where the suit had its first hearing. The High Court ridiculed the proceeding and
Chief Justice Tift, who read the opinion, said there
u;m not the slightest evidence presented by the government to substantiate its complaint.
The original petition condemned the rules and
regulations of the Exchange and the clearing I louse
Association, alleging th »•*■>* were operating in violation
of the Sherman Anti-Trust Act, and that both created
artificial ami OUWaranted prices. Whieh were not based
upon the law of supply ami demand. A very small
percentage of the transactions on the exchange, it was
claimed, was bona fide, and that it was purely a gambling proposition.
The government proceeded to acl last year, when
sugar began to raise precipitately, following a report
by the Department of Commerce that there was a
world shortage in store for 1923.   Raws immediately
began to rise, forcing up the price of the refined product.
Injunction is Refused.
Agents of the Department of Justice made a hurried investigation with the result that an assistant to
the Attorney-General filed suit in the Court of Appeals
in New York, the object being to get immediate action so that an appeal could be taken direct; to the
United States Supreme Court. When the hearing was
held the Court of Appeals donied the plea of the government holding that there was no violation of the
law. An appeal was taken to the United States Supreme Court. The litigation attracted wide attention
throughout the grocery trade and was practically forced as a result of public sentiment. The people were
aroused over thc rapid jump, in the price of sugar. The
Mayor of Xew York advocated a boycott. Some of
the womens' clubs took up the fight and appealed to
the housewives throughout the country to discontinue
the use of sugar. Thc refining, trade cautioned the
public against a stampede, say lug that it would only
aggravate the situation.
On Monday. January 28th, Chief Justice Taft in his
ruling said that there has been "absolute failure by
the government to connect thc defendants or any of its
officers with any conspiracy" as was charged. The
injunction sought to restrain the Xew York Coffee
and Sugar Exchange from further dealing upon its
board in sugar futures, whieh was refused by the District Court was upheld by the Supreme Court of the
United States.
Why  fates-lake  Sales
Increase so Steadily
All over Canada sales of Interlake brands of Toilet
tissues continue to increase at a steady pace. What is
the answer? Consumer approval of the whole line.
Dealer co-operation returns a satisfactory profit.
As a retail distributor you co-operate with us by
stocking INTERLAKE BRANDS. Your profit is assured.
IntcHakcLTis$uc Mills <b.
Head Office: 54 University Avenue, TORONTO, CANADA.
Sales Branch: McGill Building, MONTREAL, CANADA.
Mills at MERRITTON, CANADA.
,s^*aSaatb^ 12
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which It Incorporated the R i\ THAPK REVIEW,
February
TUDOR
TEA
" The Tea With a Pedigree "
Is being sold by 369 stores and grocers in
British Columbia.
The most profitable package tea for the retail
trade.
THE PRICE IS NEVER CUT.
B
Blended ai\d Packed by
TUCK&UGHTFOOT "°
Marvcouver.DC
EDDY'S
MATCHE
Canadian
clean
through
a quality that
never varies
The E. B. Eddy Co. Limited
Hull. Canada
'
"Let the Clark Kitchens Help You."
YES
People   who like
Tomato Sauce
with Boiled Din-
net will also buy
Ctatl('$ Tomato
Ketchup.
Your Customers
would enjoy
CLARK'S
CANADIAN
BOILED
DINNER
Needs merely to be Heated,
and served—and tt provides
a complete well balanced
meat and vegetable course.
Primer beef, potatoes, car
rots, onions, beef stock gravy
—We assure you that it is a
mtghty nice dish, and one it
pays to  push.
W. CLARK, LIMITED, Montreal
EatAbUit-imenta  at  Montreal,  Qua.;  St    Rem!,  Que    and
Murrowr, Ont.
WAFFLE BRAND FANCY TABLE SYRUP
IS EXCEPTIONALLY GOOD.
Note: We could not improve the syrup so we have
improved the container.
KeHy Confection Co. ltd.
1100 Mainland Street
VANCOUVER, B. C. 1924
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which In Incorporated the B. C. TRADE REVIEW.
13
BLOW TO DEALERS FROM U. 8. OFFICIALS
Distribution of meat products by chain stores owned
by packers is advocated by Charles J. Brand, marketing expert of agriculture.
Advocating a i>ollcy which would, if carried lo completion,
mean the elimination of the Independent retailer. Charles J.
Brand. consulting specialist In marketing Of lhe United BtatSS
Densftment Ot Agriculture, has exploded a bombshell In the
tanks ot the trade by advocating the* distribution of meat
products through chain stores. These stores, presumably,
would be operated by (he meat packing companies.
Endorsed by Department
High officials of the Department of Agriculture apparently
endorse this plan, aa a detailed siory ot Brand's scheme has
been sent out by the press service of the deportment for general publication. It Is a part of an address made before a
livestock convention In Omaha, In which this official declared
that retailing meat through large organisations operating
chain stores would tend to cut down food costs at the greatest
single point of expense, and would benefit both producers
and consumers. Entrance of the meat packers into thia enterprise would affect this savlnK, he said. The report continues;
"Mr Brand remarked that the five largest packing companies In this COttntr? are prohibited from engaging in the
retail business by the well known packers' "constant decree"
entered by the Supreme Court of the District of Columbia. In
the case of the Tolled States of America against Swift &
Company and others, Other companies, however, may sell
meat at retail A few are doing so. One packing company
Operate* forty retail shops. Others operate from one or two
to twenty five or thirty Many grorers chains handle meats
and find the business profitable. If independent operators
can carry on meat chain stores profitably, why can not the
packing companies do so. Mr Brand asked. Statistics indi-
caf«-. the speaker said, that no less than 10 per cent of the
total volume of retail trade in this country Is made up of
m«*at and livestock products.
Blames Dealer for Cost.
The total me.at and lard bill of the American public tn
11*22 was about |3,26t 363.H!.e All commodities sold at retail
in 1*5122 had a value of $36.4OO.O00.(MM.», Cnder the present
s>stem of retailing. Mr, Brand said, the idea of too many operators Is large margins ami small volume. Slow turnover
sod high unit operating costs are the result Records ob-
talned by the l>i*pat intent of Agriculture on the relation of
expense to total sales In retail meat markets show that expense is always high where volume of business is small, while
the expense decreases steadily as lhe volume of business increases. H in thus obvious that measures which reduce the
number of retail meat concerns and increase the size of the
remaining ones, can help to reduce meat prices. Mr. Brand
asserted.
"High costs of meat dlstrlbuiion pile up at the retail store
said Mr Brand, "OWing tO lhe need of handling meal in small
quantities, stilling ihe convenience of consumers, and carrying
proportionately heavy overhead."    It  is worth while, he de-
"Good Morning!"
Have you had your
Fleischmann's  Yeast*"
The best way to lake Fleischmann's Veast lor correction of constipation is dissolved in hot water, (not
scalding) night and morning, on arising and retiring,
This is Importanl tO Bll your customers. Pass on
Hie message lo them.
The Fleischmann Company
YEAST
SERVICE
flared, to Inquire whether increased efficiency and economy
can be obtained from farther integration in the livestock industry that will call for the conduct by the packers, under
wise supervision, of great chains of retail meat shops.
Cites British Example.
"The fact that many packing companies operate retail
shops," Mr. Brand said, "proves there is no objection to the
principle. He thought it would be possible to effect a saving
of 10 per cent or $300,000,000 a year upon the retail selling
price of meat by the development of large retail organizations. Such concerns, he said, would have advantages in obtaining supplies, In spreading expense over a large volume of
business, in possessing expert guidance, in rapid turnover,
and in expert buying and efficient merchandising.
"As an example of what is possible in this field, Mr. Brand
cited the achievements of Lord William Vestey and his associates in Great Britain and elsewhere. The Vestey group
owns ranches, packing plants, ocean steamships, cold storage
warehouses, wholesale meat establishments, and more than
2500 retail meat shops in the United Kingdom. Last year the
organization bought 1000 retail shops in South America. Mr.
Brand said he was told by Lord Vestey that there had been
times when only the retail end of the Vestey business showed
a profit.
"Mr. Brand contended that retail business as a whole ia
sufficiently concentrated in this country. There are, he said,
about 1.30*0,900 retail communities of all classes, or one to
every 100 persons in the population. These retail stores have
3.350.000 employees. The average annual volume of trade
per store is about $30,000. but this figure is swelled by the
operations of the great department stores and mail order
houses. Mr. Brand figured that for the largest single class
of stores the annual business may be less than $10,000 each.
The great number of stores in relation to the population explains the high percentage of failures in retail trade, and
points to the need for larger operating units, Mr. Brand declared "—Commercial Bulletin.
BISCUIT CASE  DECIDED AGAINST CHAIN  STORES BY
TRADE COMMISSION
Board  Issues Order to   Biscuit Companies to  Stop  Giving
Chain Stores 15 per cent, on Unit Store Purchases and
Refusing Independent Grocers Right to Pool Their
Buying to Obtain Same Discounts
The retail procers of the United States have won first blood
in the case against the buscuit companies in which they complained of discrimination in discounts in favor of the chain
stores. The latter have been allowed the maximum discount
of 15 per cent, on unit store purchases which fell below the
$200 a month purchase requirements though the National and
Loose Wiles Biscuit Companies refused to permit independent
retail grocers to club their purchases in order to get the same
maximum discount. The latter offered to buy in the same
way and pay for the goods in the same manner but the companies declined to permit combination buying and in this way
prevented the one-store grocer from obtaining prices that
would enable him to compete with the chain store systems.
The Federal Trade Commission, in a decision announced
ARE YOU HANDLING
RAMSAY'S
"QUEEN ROYAL"
LINE OF
CREAM SODAS
Backed in large and small tins. A delicious appetizing biscuit, it will appeal to your customers. Ask
our representative to show you this line or write or
phone us order.
This biscuit will give every satisfaction. Let us prove
this by sending you a trial tin at once.
Ramsay Bros. & Co.,  Ltd.
VANCOUVER, B.C. VICTORIA, B.C. 14
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which Is Incorporated the B. C. TBAD8 KKVIKW.
Pel
iruary
Del Monte
CANNED FRUITS
VEGETABLES fr
FOOD SPECIALTIES
- quick-movinp
products that ^
gather no du^l
- but the profits )
they make are *
steady and sure ;
i**^*-"-*^^
NABOB
Saves you time when customers ask for "Fresh Roasted
Coffee."   That's exactly what Nabob is.   The vacuum tin
keeps the flavor in—you sell it "fresh from the roaster.
Kelly Douglas & Co. Ltd.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
\i<
BRAND
M
vANCOUW p *' '
ANNOUNCEMENT
We are going out of the Grocery business.
Write for prices on any lines you require.
Vancouver Island
Distributors
Huntley & Palmer's
Biscuits
Rithet Consolidated
Limited
VICTORIA, B. C.
B. C. Agents for
Rosa's Famous
Belfast Ginger Ala 1924
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
with which is Incorporate-* the b. c. trade review.
15
pcently issued an order In which the two companies are for-
hidden in the future to sell the chain stores at one price and
chai«e independent retail grocers a higher price when the
Quantity and quality and ■selling cost Is the same.   The order
,i the t'omrolHHlon also says th* buucult companies must stop
"iviiiK the «'h»-,n *'»r*"» S discount on the total purchases or
the separate Stores unless a similar discount on gross pur-
chaaes i-**" -Riven to assoelitlton* or combinations of independ-
,ii't retail grocers.
The full lex! of the order Issued by the Federal Trade
iommisslon requires the National Biscuit Co. and the Loose-
Wiiea Biscuit Co. to discontinue:
•(.—Discriminating in price between purchasers operating
separate units or retail grocery stores of chain systems and
purchasers operating independent retail grocery stores of
similar kind and character purchasing similar quantities of respondent's products, where such discrimination is not made
on account of difference in the grade or quality of the com-
modity sold, nor for a due allowance for the difference in the
cost of selling or transporting, nor in good faith to meet com-
petition in the same or different cummunities.
2,—Giving to purchasers operating two or more separate
units of retail grocery stores of chain systems a discount on
the gross purchases of all the seperate units or retail stores
of »uch chain system, whtre the same or a similar discount of
gross purchases is not allowed or given to associations or
combinations of independent grocers operating retail grocery
stores similar to the separate units or stores of such chain
system.
GROCERS CONVENTION R M A.
British Columbia Grocers' Section holds mid-winter
Conference—Representative gathering winds up
with banquet and social evening—Representatives
of wholesale houses attend—Officers elected for
1921
Ranking as one of the most
r* preventative gatherings of re-
tail grovers evef l»«*l*l in this
province, delegates from man)
pointa outside thi* city attended the mid-winter convention
.if the Grocers" Section of the
British Columbia Branch ol the
Retail Merchants' -Association,
which was held »»» the board
room, Pacific Building, Hastings si reel West, on Wednesday February 18th last
A i the dose of the convention delegates were joined by
their wives ami attended the
hanquel later in tin* evening at
lin* Manufacturers' Building t*>
whieh representatives of van*
■Oliver's leading wholesale,
grocers  ami   produce   houses
Snd tht ir ladies received  invi
tut inns us honoured  guests at
the function.    Goodfellowship
m ar ke d    the    procecdinp
throughout,  and   this get-together  feast   should go
far towards creating a bettor understanding among
these two importanl distributing bodies.
Conference Addresses
During the afternoon conferences, brief hut interesting addresses were giveu by Dominion viee-presid-
ent Jos, T. Crowder, ami Provincial president. Daryl
II. Kent.
Mr. Crowder. whose subject embraced Benents
nf Organisation,*' after enumerating the many ami
varied concessions and enactments granted by the gov
ernment at Ottawa in favor of the retail trade through
the efforts of the R.M.A., told his audience that they
could also obtain relief from oppression and discrimination, provided their requests were reasonable. Mr.
Crowder presented a new line of thought to the grocers whereby they could render a more complete service
to the community hy studying the composition of the
floods they sell in order to suggest to their customers
the nutrstive, muscle-building and frame forming
properties contained in the various commodities they
handle. In a cheerfully sarcastic manner Mr. Crowder,
while admitting that the grocers' section of the Association was hy far the most important body in the organization, ventured to suggest that the service given
to the public by the drug store was pre-eminently superior, because the druggist knew, and had to know the
contents and value of the goods he sells.
President Kent before enlarging upon his subject,
"The Functioning of the Provincial Organization,"
discussed the membership fees and the ratio upon
which each merchant be assessed, and stated that,
after considerable discussion the Provincial Board had
decided to hold this question over until the Provincial
Convention that a more comprehensive viewpoint may
hi* obtained from the membership. Mr. Kent after
touching upon the Trade Section idea emphasised the
fact that it was the obvious duty of the secretaries of
the various sections of the Association to present resolutions and propositions in a clear and definite form
to the provincial secretary in order that he may deal
with them in an intelligent manner. The provincial
secretary's time is fully taken up, the speaker said, in
"-*" * (CKJ(«»TWS -(-XKtDATWS - K TUe <OW0 WE gg / \
fcjfa*.Jwiwtoi tt- yv cahTco a coc one-CD mm !j&
*r~~~~ "* tF', -,-:..--■■- ■.: ...--„,, -.-.:-n . :~22Z22x 222~^i*^t^zz a
ELKney
LAtmce-
ToMVfHin?!	
i^M«D WAITER
S'
HICHAM    _
1 avm+at>*ma
»-j*n«r-1* •
At the Banquet.
The above sketches were made at the Grocer's convention banquet by E. R. McTaggart
past president. Greater Vancouver branch, R.M.A..
adjusting and tabulating recommendations from every
trade section in the province, and placing these before
the provincial executive for deliberation, before passing same on to Ottawa. The speaker intimated that,
bulletins are to be forwarded from provincial office to
the membership twice monthly.
Among the many subjects discussed at the afternoon conference were the various phases of the Salc-s
Tax, "Free Deals," Wholesalers Selling to Employees,
Misleading and Unfair Advertising, and many other
features of interest peculiar to the retail grocer.   In 16
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
with Which is incorporated the R «-*. TKAD1 ukview.
cbruary
the evening short addresses were delivered by K.
Fraser who represented the produce man. and J. P. D.
Malkin who spoke on behalf of the wholesale grocer.
Mr. Harkness, the chairman of the It. C. Grocers' section also spoke, the general theme of these addresses
being "co-operation."
Officers Elected.
Tlie following officers were elected to the executive
of the B. C. Grocers' Section of R. M. A.. James
Harkness, Vancouver, chairman; (J. ll. .lacobson. New
Westminster, first vice-president; T. H. White, Vancouver, second vice-president; treasurer. K. h, Betty,
Lamed; and S. J. Wilson. Kamloops. lion. Secy.
FORM NEW COMPANY.
DONT'S FOR USE IN AVOIDING FORGERIES
Losses last year were the largest in history—Precautions for guidance would tend to check crooks.
The National Surety Company of New York has
announced that 1923 showed tlie heaviest losses of
any previous year due to forgery of checks of business
men by crooks. These forgeries have run to unusual
amounts. There were more $100,0(10 instances, than
ever before and the biggest scheme ever attempted
was when a gang sought to defraud stock brokers out
of what it is estimated would have been $4,000,000 if
the scheme had not been detected.
It is so much easier to "work" the grocer or other
merchant if he is not always alert as to these possibilities. In order to put dealers on their guard. The
National Surety Company has issued some '•don'ts"
as a guide to avoid forgery.   Here they are:
Never cash a cheek for a stranger. If this simple-
rule were scrupulously observed it would end at once
a great portion of our annual forgery loss.
Never let anyone else check up your bark book
with cancelled vouchers returned from the hank. This
is the one job that every business man should do personally.
Never sign a check in blank or make it out payable
to "cash" or "bearer."
Never leave your check book or cancelled vouchers where anyone else can get hold of them.
Never accept a check because it looks businesslike.
Crooks are now counterfeiting efliecks of well-known
concerns.
Never assume that a bank certification stamp makes
a check safe. These certifications arc being counterfeited by crooks.
Never do what a stranger suggests in order to identify him. He probably has an accomplice at the other
end of the line to give you the information you desire.
Be sure to provide a safe place for delivery of your
mail. Do not depend on the type of box that can easily
opened by a crook.
Always write your checks carefully with ink, typewriter or eheckwriter. Begin each line at the left-
hand si3e and leave no space-between your words.
Finally after you have taken every precaution you
can think of, make your bank account absolutely safe
by faking out a forgery bond.
Palmolive  Manufacturing   Oo.   (Ontario),   Limited,
Formed as Manufacturing Part of Soap Business.
The Palmolive .Manufacturing Co. (Ontario). Limited, have been formed with a paid-up capital nf $1,.
000.000 to take over the plant and fixed assets of the
Palmolive Co. of Canada. Limited, Toronto, Tin*
Palmolive Co. of Canada will henceforth handle the
sale and advertising of thc Palmolive soaps and toilef
products while the new company will be purely a man
ufaeturing eoneern.
COCHRANE'S  COMMENTS
ON  PRICE CUTTING.
Say. Mr  EDITOR:
If I make a thing ami SKt.L IT
It belongs* to the man that BUT8 IT
And he ran let) It CHEAP
Or Rive it A WAV
Or lei ii SPOIL
And I should WORRY
As long as I get the MONKY
Hut SAY
Suppose the goods hear my NAMK
Ur trade mark, or (IRANI)
Hate I sold my NAMK
Along with the GOODS?
Nix. nay. not at all. NO,
Ha« the buyer any RIO (IT
To cheapen my NAME
Bj selling below a fair PRICE!
Or to injure my REPUTATION
By selling spoiled GOODS?
Verily. 1 trow NOT.
If he want* io (TT PRICKS
Let him take off my NAMK
And then he ran (TT
Afl much a* be UK KM
You'd think even a LAWYER
Could understand THAT
Hut lotfl of JUDORfl
Can't ice It at AIX
They get lost In a FOG
Of "public policy" and "r«*«!ralnt ot TRADE"
About honesty and JUSTICE
If I were a manuKAOTCRKR
I'd label my good* like THIS
"ThlS can of pickled ben's TKKTH
(Or cat's whisker* in GLUE
Or whatever st WAS)
Ih worth SIX HITS.
If anyone Hells it CHKAPKR
You'd better WATCH HIM
HeoatiHc he's fixing to STING YoC
On the next thing you HCY."
And there'd be no price CUTTING
On my GOODS. 1!)24
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With Which is incorporated the B. C TRADE REVIEW.
17
GROCERY PRICES CURRENT
Tht following art prices quoted for principal lines of leading wholesale firms.   Prices quoted are necessarily
subject to market fluctuations.
RAMSAY BROS. A CO.. LTO.
10c Assorted Sweet Biscuits, package*.
!^r  down   . J 00
.5c Assorted Sweet Biscuits, fancy -arson, per JOftS I H
ihocotate B»r«. a-worted kinds, 1 dot
I., rt  t«ot,   |"«r   t»»*
.icani sodas, la, tins, each '-
..   iVeatn  Sodas,  packag* *.  dOS 1 *"*»
Ih    t'rwun   Sodaa,   pttklUgta,   d«»l 12-'
mmlljr *od««. packages, per doten I I f
Quean Roysl Craain Botes, ptf B> ISH
ijueen Itoyal. Mn* ^fl**'1 .31
E.  W.   OILLtTT  CO.   LTD.
Royal   Vesit—
i a***  »»"*«■*  u* mm
Pure Flaht Ly*—
* *"<»*   tn fa***
{   -,**•**«»
io case***.  < <l<»*   in ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Magic  Bshfng Powde-r--
4 .i*   « d,.-t 5*88
I os   i dot I "*'
* 0«    ♦  dot -*2&
12 o*   ♦ <k.t                                              13 W
j*» I cast tots
10 Jb   wuo-tlen »■*-»»<* 4'*
i", tb   aroodtn pails ,-H
IM tb un-Mi kags o
.>>••   t1<    lin<*«t   tvtrrtts tJH
Magic   Sods,  Case   No,   «-*-
1   (-.--hi*   (SS   !   !t»    ptckagtS) I w
i i*M#,*n „t  tnotf) 1.88
BtCA'monatt  of   Soda—*
ns n» ksga pat1 k-"* * *-'
100 tt»   twuttdt**.  |H*»r  Iwm««l tt 55
CautttC   Sod*  •Granulated}-- Per  Kb.
1<*  tt>    ciiiitntrr   iti-«   It-*   in   >««sm-> 11*4
*»« tt.*   inon grams ISH
CfMm  o*  Tartar— l'«i   d«»t
■» tt> paper jiks-* 11 dot In oast)    I M
•*;  tt>   puipct   |»kK*    It it"*   tn 00011      i M
'■» lb rtiii* witii straw oovart t< dot
in  <*»jm*i I 10
i tt<   i-rtii» Bcraw eovtrw (I doi   la
(MUM 8.88
'• tt>   «>i'.ij«:<*. oaniattra, s d >*  la
I a n I ■*'*' -
K1LLV,  DOUOLAS  a  CO..   LTD
Nabob   Products
do*
. dos
dun
Muffl,   ',-,**.  dux
Mtaplet, Mo  8, tins dos
linking Powdtr, II ll os
Baklni Powdtr, i* II os
Hating Powder, )2 i!_
itiikinsr Powtiar, *• to, dot
Puking  Soda,   M   tn,   QtM
Flaking Soda, M |r|a, dot.
Borax, Kt*. dot
Him k   PtpptT,   tin**.   dOS
Celery  <;)u   f)ass, dos
Nabob OoflEtti munii tins taob
-'ofr«»«-., im n»
1 "offee,  lm ttt
Custard Powdtr, dot.
*'ni k Tapioca, dos
Cbooottts Pudding, dos
Chill F*owdtr, small, dos.
Cinnamon, 2 oa tin-*-, dot
I 81
I;;.
s .10
18.10
5 3«'
JO
n i
* .*
1 ,00
t.i'O
2ii
1 00
l 00
1,00
l 60
i n»
Cayenne Pepper, :t tin!*, dos,
ClOVtS,    MIMlll,    dOt
Curry Powdtr, I *>r. glass, dot.
Ginger,   small,   dot.
Kxi-iiitx  lull  tlaVotMt  2 «>z.. dot
Extracts <ait Savors) 4 os., doi
Ksti-M-t* i.tit Savors) I os., dot.
Rx tracts,  snorted,  10 ot
.\iin«-. small, dot.
Nutmeg     miiaH.   dot
i spt-tka,  sm»ill tlnn. duz
t ii«tiy  S{»u-i*. 3 tin.*, dot.
t «utti> i»rf!win*«. Hiiiir, Savory,
Thyme,  Tomtrlc,  Una,  <ti>t.
li'klinK  SplOt,  A**t   N<>   3.
M«f)«nuii,   Mint.   1 *.sssi.->
Tartaric   Arid.   "•**,   dut
w tilt,- Pepper, tins, dos,
i*rtftt«n  • dl, I OS, d«t.
t'sslor «»li.   t  OS,  dOI
t-lirtwitn Halts*.  j|a d"*.
Ftuit Dolors.  I os. dot
iriiflf*  M'hixolaH*,   !<•».**'•    t'mk.   Lotntn,
ViintiUi, White, Ahnond, Orange) dos
JtUjT E*OWdW, dot.
LenM>nade Powdtr,
Mufttsird.   I*.   dOS,
dot,
Mustard,
A«t
Mustard, **-** <l'»t.
Sulphur, \*. dos.
T«*«. Qrteti Lab«J, b**  i*4*1  •''
Avu. *',<*,«n Labtt, la per lb.
Is, Ib, paekagts
%  tt».   pi kax«'»
T,*«. -dt Luxe, Afternoon, i lb.
{•<•.-, dt Luxe, Afternoon '-j*-* per tt>.
Tni. dt Luxe 14a par Ib.
Vtntfar,   doa     	
THE W. H. MALKIN CO., LTD.
"Malkln't Best" Products.
Arrowrool (8t VlnctnU
t: * os etna pwdos,
Ll |   OS   ..     per do*.
Hftkinc  i'owder  (Purt  PbOtplUltt)
1,20
1.-40
L78
1.10
'• U
iM
9.60
17.00
lit
1.10
1.85
L10
1.0",
.»j
1.16
2.00
L15
1.35
8,80
,fio
1.T5
l.l*.
1.00
8.50
4 50
2.40
.«5
.()'
.86
,88
.61
.78
.80
.80
2 30
1.40
IS/U ot.
IS/lfta
il, Is
Btking Soda
12 4  nt.   ctns
1! 8  ns   tin*  	
Cocoa
24 ft '»»
Coffto (Varaww Pack)
I tb  tins
Cream of Tsrtar 188-51 i,lir**)
II t or.   etna
12 I os  etna
il  Im   tins 	
Custard Powdtr
t os. etna
g os, etna
nuts Bundrtaa
Borax. 12 4 ot
Bpsom Satta ll/l os ctns
Sulphor, 12 4 oi. ctns
Bxtraets fall flavors)
12  t OS.
12  4 o*
S  o*.
16 os
25 »t.
per dos
par dot.
per dos.
per dot.
per dot.
per dos.
per tb
per dot
per dOS.
per dot.
per dot.
per dot.
per dOS.
per dOS
per dot
per dot.
per dot.
per dot.
per dot.
3.00
9.85
17.85
.45
.60
1.50
2 80
6 OO
1.00
1.00
.75
.60
M
8.50
4.75
9.00
l7.oo
24.00
Glycerine
12 '2 r,z bts per dos.
12/4 ot bts. per dos.
Money
24/8 ot Jars per dos.
24/13 ot. Jars  per dos.
24/2s   tins per dos.
12/46   tins per dos.
Jelly Powders  (all flavors)
12/4 ot.   per  dos.
Lemonade Powder:
12/4 os ctns  per dos.
12/S ot ctns per dos.
Mustard
12/38 tins per doz.
12/8s os tins per dos.
24/ls tins   per dos
12/5s tins  per th
Spices and Seasonings
Allspht- 12/3 tins ..per doz.
Cinnamon   12/3 tins per doz.
Cloves 12/3 tins  per doz.
Curry Powder 12/3 tins  per doz.
Chili  Powder  per doz.
(Jinger 12/3 tins  per doz.
Mace 12/3 tins  per doz.
Marjoram 12/3 tins per doz.
Mint  12/3 tins  per doz.
Nutmeg.  12/3 tins  per doz.
Paprika 12/3 tins ..per doz.
Parsley 12/3 tins  per doz.
Pastry,   mixed,  12/3  tins per  doz.
Pepper, black.  12/3 tins  per doz.
Pepper,  cayenne  12/3  tins....per  doz.
Pepper,  white,   12/3  tins per  doz.
Poultry Dressing 12/3 tins ...per doz.
Sage, ground 12/3 tins  per dos.
Sage, rubbed 12/3 tins  per-doz.
Savory  12/3 tins  per dos.
Thyme  12/3  tins  ....per doz.
Tumeric   18/tins    ~ per dos.
Whole Cinnamon 12 ctns  per doz.
Whole Nutmegs, 12 ctns  per dos.
Whole  Pickling  12 ctns  per dos.
Celery Salt, taper bots -...perdoz.
Curry i'owder, taper bots  per dos.
Tea
100/ls    perlb .
60/t.vs   t)cr !l>-
80/18 and  20/^8 assorted   per tb
18/88    perlb.
Vinegar
24   qts perdoz
Marmalade.
24/1   glass     per .Int.
12/4   litho   tins pel* dot.
.lams,
Assorted 12, 4  tins per dot.
Apricot  12/t tins per doz.
Black Currant 12/4 tins       per dos,
Datnaon   12/4   tins    per dot.
Gooseberry 12/4 tins per dot.
Loganberry 12/t tins per dot.
Peach 12/4 tins   p!r doS.
Plum 12/4 tins per dot.
Prune, 12/ tins per dot.
Strawberry  12/4 tins per dot.    9.76
P.  BURNS A CO.. LTD.
Shamrock Product!
Ayrshire  rolled shoulders,   per lb
Ba<OOn,  Shamrock,  li-s,   per  lb
Baked ham, Aitii dressing, per lb
Creamery Butter, Sluunro k, cartons
1.75
326
2.40
3.00
6.00
11.60
.95
1,25
2.25
1.50
4.60
8.60
.60
1.00
1.10
1.40
1.75
1.40
1.10
1.4*0
1.15
1.15
1.13
1.40
1.16
1.15
1.01)
1.20
1.16
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
.60
.60
.'JO
2.10
2.25
.65
.67
.66
.68
2.50
8.10
8 10
9.00
9.00
9.75
8.00
9.25
9.00
8.50
7.50
r.   f. •
1. ro
9.75
17
.86
.38
.47 18
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which ts Incorporated the B  C. TRADE RRVIEW.
Pel
»ni a ry
Advertised
Bread
OUR extensive advertising
creates a willingness to purchase Shelly's 4X Bread—because
they know it's unifomly good.
Every customer that our advertising ** pvills'** into your store to
purchase a loaf of bread, is a prospective customer for other lines.
SHELLY  BROTHERS
VANCOUVER
NEW WESTMINSTER
VICTORIA
NANAIMO
Magi<
BAKIN<
! f'OWDIB
The confidence created in
the mind of your customer*
of your entire line of goods
is appreciably increased
by your recommendation
of articles that have been
proven to be of the highest
quality.
MAGIC BAKING POWDER!
CONTAINS NO ALUM
E   W   GILLETT COMPANY  LIMITED j
I I O     <  A N A t > A
creamery Butter,  Shamrock, cartona   M the royal CROWN »OAPt. lto. E*t» h** oawntppa-d, h,*» of 88
Cheese,  Canadian,  lanje.  pei   lb M „ m     _ , .    , tmt   - n -     UiMMMI      'Vrf^l   tSSWIS-PPSd)   but   Of   IM 8.80
Cheese.   Canadian,   twin,   per  tb U%      V*"C0UVtP    Pr'"    "fT^f*    """^        WrtU  for  fttftel and  Hotd fmmWm
Compound.  Carnation,   No.   5.   J2-eas, MB V i    Jv. « n. I' t*"*11 ,,Hr** W **   *  * *ml  ''"
y-. j   .-, «.• „,, Terme well aw ueye. h..*,.*
Compound,  Carnation.   No.   ,»,   m-i-*** *•» »5 i«»*i>»
Cooked hams. Shamrock, per lb      89 ...      .. „        mmham   -t t tt,   t.kc   h»« IH Pendra) * l,yi».  l«»s of 4* 8.48
Dominion hams, 12-16 lbs     88 ./"**„ *»P "«•* Jj     "'   J "■ *»      ? ivn.tr,> ,   lN,«.Ur-l   Ammonia.   »*»«   2« 3 >**
Dominion  Bacon,  6-10 tbs.  per lb 25 "Apex" Soap  Klak»*s. 12 1 tb   pitta,  DO* 2 W / ,
Dominion Bacon. H'-lt lbs. per lb    21 A Le Krunraliw OaaUla, box Of 2j » 18        H|wr"*' {*r,< ** on *  ,0* 2& "h€|  ,0°
Dominion Shoulders, boned and roiled     .18 ...       „     .  ,   . f „, -«        boss*
Dripping-,  beef.  4-Ib bricks  15 7ue  »*»«.  "■  of " ••»• pgnert^i   Walt**   GMm    lee   Preetrvtr-
Hams.    Shamrock,   per   tb ft Crown Oatmeal. 24 da.  box of  144 1.80 ("*        ,"/„      . " , M
Ham«.  boned and  rolled,   per tb .30 CtWB Olive.   p«r  |TOM 8.78       /^V*  ,ln"  '       ?£
Head Cheese. &lb. tins, each  „     .60 CUmax or MOntraot  (wrapped)   b.x  2S 6 40 „       V        '    *° "«-    •    •"--
Jellied   tongue,   per   tin        1.73 Bnglleh Blue Mottled box of 10 180 ■"»! Uss*F IWMSi •*. »-terwll
Lard, No. 5. 12 to case   9.55 Golden West  5s.  box of 12<>« 4 US ,w*r n*
Lard, No. 3. 20 io case   9.60 Golden   West   Powder,   3   lb.   box   *,t   24 <*. 6.i Uo>H'  ,Wn  Ho<,•,•   >•   ,"*   ,2"*   '   '   ' *"   "
Lard,  carton.  15-tbs l?% Golden  Mar.  DOS of SO 2 SO *****   *V"wn   '*»*«''"*•   '*,s   J«*   onl>     6bi
™rdl iL°; 1L»ar«n"^ 30'.* «. *I Kkmdyke (wrapped) bos of 18 s 40 "**■» rr"wn  ,*°»d««  >  n>   '*** "' M J*J
5SS ^ib5**' net> PCr *        M Klondyke  *unwf*in»d,   to*  of  N        Ml «^ <*™ Ck.  be* of 4, Un. 8.88
Pork  Pies' per doz.'   35 Klero Oly eriru*. box of 144 8.00 u">»1  ,,r"*"   '•>*"•   •*'x   of  4S J*"
Pork, roaM lejf« with dreeetng, tb 38 Linen   (unwrapp««d(   Imix   of   100 8.88 Royal  OOWO   Naptha.   twn  «i«f   190 ' '
Smoked   fish.   kipj>ers,   20s   p«r   lb lOty Liquid   Ammonia.   2   do*   q!s    ln,%   24      4 IT. Uoytil  frown   PoUfdarad   Ammonlii   lib     8.10
Smoked  fl»h.  kippered  salmon,   10s Liquid  Blue,  2 doz. qts.  bos  of 24        4.18 White  Woodar,   »<•'« of  !<«• JJJ
and  20s.  per  tb „    .17 ICeOhanto'e   Pine   Tar.   Ikix   Of   100 6 S.1 White  Kwan   BOtOi   '"■•   1h,%  "f   ,2"
Smoked Cod, 30s per tb 18 Mechanic's  Pine Tur,  box of .*>'• 2 80 White   Hwan   Naptha,   l«>x   of   108 I •*••'
Selected fowl, per Hj 25 Olive  Castile,   cakes,  lx>x  of  800 4 fin White   Swan   Wanhlne   l'owdi*r.   3   tb .
Selected  Chicken,  per lb 3r» Primrose   (wrapped)   box   of  2."i 4 flfi tmx   of   21   6 •'*'
$1,000,000 A DAY NEW INSURANCE TAKEN IN       1022, reported to the bureau thai their Mlea in 1928
CANADA. ^''H lH w increase of 17 par eent abore tin1 s«i',s 'n
                                             1!»22. which wen- $310,372,000.   ll in alio nn everage
Is at rate of $40 per capita compared with $50 in "f °tf m,of ,m'w i"N"r'",«"': l»'r. «'»l»itn.   This is eom«
u 'ten Stat parable with the figure nf $60 ot new ordinary U»ur-
ance per capita which w»h nold in the Irnii<-<1 States
Over $1,000,000 worth of life insurance each day during V.Wd,
was the average amount sold in ('anada. according to During the month of December tin* nales of the i»>-
figures just published by the Life I nsuranee Sales He- porting companies were $37,377,O0O as compared to
search Bureau of New York. $80,16*7,000 in Deeember, 1922, an increase of almost
Companies which had in force over 85 per cent, of one-quarter in the volume of sales for lhe whole conn-
the legal reserve ordinary insurance on January 7, try. [924
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which Is Incorporated the B. C. TRADE REVIEW.
19
B.C.
Products
mwmhmytt*)
ESEwm  IT rl.
Sell
B. C.
Products
IVHtf rtose
Pastry Flour
MADE IN VANCOUVER
Vancouver Milling and Grain Co.
UMITED
H.iJ Oilier •■*! Milb: Viicoiw, B. C:
What Happens
when ymir customer starts home from your
Btore wilh ii bag of -well, anything
and the hag bursts!
Most times, you never hear aboul it,   You
simply see friend customer less from thai time
on.
Using a
Continental Bag
it Bag Insurance
Manufacturer!
The Continental Paper
Products Ltd.
OTTAWA, ONT.
AGENTS
Smith, Davidson & Wright Ltd.
VANCOUVER. VICTORIA.
90 per cent of
STEVENSON'S
QUALITY BREAD
IS SOLD BY
RETAIL GROCERS
THE  WISE GROCER WILL
UNDERSTAND WHAT THAT
FACT MEANS TO HIM.
Phone Fairmont 227
VANCOUVER, B.C.
RU. DOG BRJ
w 4M* w -
■"JWHHATEO
M        Keep u | dry p|*t
%   ^ JOHN 1 PAffll *•
.... *-»0»TO   :   sntSIITtt
Chloride of Lime
16 oz. Package
Supplied by all wholesale grocers
In British Columbia
Manufactured by
CANADA COLORS AND CHEMICALS LIMITED
Succeeding
THE JOHN B. PAINE CO., LTD.
Toronto Winnipeg Vancouver
Agents:
STARK & STERLING
VANCOUVER, B. C. 20
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which Is Incorporated the n. c. tkapi-: kkvikw.
February
KNIT WEAR PRICES DUE FOR AN ADVANCE.
^^m**.
1024 Opening prices very firm—In some cases increase
over last year's prices recorded—Adjustments are
necessary.
It is .somewhat difficult to understand price advances in wool. Some mill operators claim lhai the supply
of this commodity, has not. since ihe war caught up
with the normal demand. There undoubtedly has been
some shortage in the finer grades, when, price advances are more or less in order, but the main reason for
the general advance may possibly be ascribed to ihe
very unsatisfactory wool crop, in Australia. The density or otherwise of sheep's wool is regulated by climatic conditions, and at the time when cold weather was
expected on the Australian sheep rar.ehes.a mild spell
was experienced, resulting in a thinner fle-ece growth
for a period of about one month. When the weather
became cold fleeces thickened up, but when this wool
was clipped, it was found to contain fibres of normal
strength at either end, having a weak section in the
centre, prohibiting the spinning of it into finer yarns,
with the result that higher prices had to be paid for
wool that could be used for these yarns. During the
latter end of 1923, however price advances extended
to cross-bred wool also and practically all tin* materials
used in the woollen mills have shown- substantial price
advances.
The situation then with regard to the products of
domestic mills is that production costs dictated higher
prices, but that every effort is being made to keep
them down to the level of Vd2d. Prices are not now
entirely dictated by production costs. The necessity
of the mills to do business, and the competition of imported goods were the determining factors during
1923, aid they will probably exercise a big influence
during the present year. Throughout 1923 retailers
pursued more or less of a hand to mouth policy with
the result that mills frequently found themselves with
big stocks on hand. Anticipating such conditions they
made their prices at the start of the year as low as
they possibly could, and even then further price concessions were frequently necessary to move the goods.
The result was that while a great many mills showed
a good-sized volume of business during \U2d they claim
that it was done at little or no profit.
There is a great deal of uncertainty at the present
time regarding the condition of retailers' stocks.
Some mills say that the retailers purchased SO can*
tiously throughout last year that tiny cannot have any
large stocks at hand. On the other hand one mill roll ports that it had a considerable stock of seconds to
dispose of, and when it applied to its usual outlets for
these goods, it was "fold that they could r:ot take a
single garment no matter what the price was. This is
something that it never experienced before and leads
it to believe that stocks must be quite heavy,
The biggest problem that confronts the Canadian
manufacturing knit goods trade at the present time is
the competition of imported goods.   This is especially
severe in high grade underwear and in all Jim* of
hosiery, and it has been stated that unless some change
i.s made in the tariff at the next si ssnm of Parliament,
the knit goods industry, and the woollen cloth industry
as well, will be unable tu carry on.
UNDERWEAR.
Then* is very little change OVSf last year's prices
in most lines of underwear. Thi* fa occasioned not by
any reduction in manufacturing costs, nor declines m
material prices, bul because the whole effort of manufacturers has been to maintain prices at the lowest
level, if this were not done, there j** little doubt that
the buying public would show a marked hesiteney in
making even nominal piuvhases,
A close survey of the Western irade luis shown thai
any higher prices for underwear wonld Inevitably
result ju merchants cutting down their purchases foi
lowing the first showings and.reducing their volume
when they did buy.
Add to this the decided Objection of the public |0
paying   higher   prices, and although manufacturers
would be entitled under existing conditions to show 'A
mark up. they take the stand that SS business condi*
tions shov*, every evidence of improving considerably
this year, and rather than do anything which might
tend to retard free buying, have absorbed the Increasing COStS in the hope of making good upon a largei
volume of Sales they look for this Reason,
While the general priee level is slightly higher,
this IS almost wholly due to the new sales tax, whieh.
however it may he disguised,    18    inevitably    passed
along. It can be taken for granted that manufacturers, in spite of higher costs, have kept opening prices
for the 19JJ4 hues at a consistent level, although this
invariably has been done at a sacrifice of profit margins.
NECKWEAR.
Silk and wool fabrics are taking a big place in the
windows of some of the leading stores.    This fabric
has registered a great success, and manufacturers have
been kept busy on repeat orders from all over the
country, whieh shows that men are not far behind in
taking Up a novelty if it appeals to tbem. This suggests that clothiers might do Well tO Spring something
new on their trade at frequent intervals, and it applies
particularly to the neckwear Held, which too often
appears to be regarded as unworthy of any great attention, in the belief that when men are in the market
for a new tie they will come in and buy.
Silk and wool appears to have passed out of the uncertain novelty elass and to have become accepted as
a staple.   It is also promised increasing favor this year. 1924
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With Which Is Incorporated tho P.. ('. TRADE REVIEW.
21
Mills at Kincardine and Owen Sound, Ontario
" We believe in the Retail Merchant."
CIRCLE-BAR HOSIERY
FOR
MEN, WOMEN, CHILDREN
Silk, Cashmere, Artificial Silk, Fine Cotton
and Combinations or same.
Circle-(Bar Hosiery gives your Customers satisfaction
and you--Mr. Merchant--a good profit. Feature
Circle-Bar jor 1924, and your Hosiery Department
will make a record.
AGENT
J. J. Mackay, 804 Bower Building, Vancouver, B. C.
Tke Circle-Bar Knitting Co. Limited
Kincardine, Ontario
oun'ian
HOSIERY 22
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which Is Incorporated tho R C. TRADE REVIEW.
Februi
in
MANY COLORED COATS.
Deep pile fabrics and heavy wool brocades are the
favorite materials for dressy coats: still maintaining
their strong position in feminine favor. Smart plaids
and stripes, plain camel-hair cloths, and fleecy fabrics
hold the sports field. They are also very prominent for
travel and motoring. Checked back coatings in lovat.
fawn, and two-tone ribbed brown with lemon, orange,
royal bule or rust plaids are very popular, too. Caracul cloth is selling largely for the short sports coats
and jacquettes in grey, two browns, royal blue, fawn,
beige, scarlet, and pepper and salt mixtures.
SILKS.
Novelties still take the lead in the silk market, and
abundant evidence of an expanding use for this elass
of silk i.s apparent to every close observer. Even the
most conservative of manufacturers now devotes no
little time and expense to the designing department
from which new ideas in novelties issue, and.no expense is spared when the outcome appears to warrant
thc expense. One leading printer of silks has no less
than 250 patterns ready for spring.
The raw silk market has been somewhat quiel of
late, the feeling being abroad that prices should fall,
but against this must be placed the fact that bales in
storage in New York on November 1st were less by
1,300 than they were a year ago. a decrease of more
than 20%.
In some quarters the present stock is considered
atiple in view of the fact that conditions are more or
less quiet in the industry—a condition likely to continue while buyers refrain from placing advance orders..
Knitted silks in the quieter range of Colors are in
great demand for jacquettes, coatees, and sweaters
generally, the new floral designs finding great favor
with the buying public. Krepe-de-lecn. one of the
more recent of knitted silks, is increasing in popularity daily, but crepe de chine and Canton crepes arc
undoubtedly in the forefront, with satin finish a 'lose
second. Velvets are good for both day and evening
wear, the chiffon variety being mostly favored for
evening wear; in fact, in these days no wardrobe is
Complete without at least one evening gown of velvet;
cut velvets seem to grow in variety and glory overnight. Brocades in oyster white, or in combination
with silver or gold, arc striking and aumptous. A"
shades of mauve, chiefly of the pink tint, are used for
evening wear; trimmings of gold lace, rhinestonefi or
drapes of self forming the principal decoration. Novelty silks for southern wear are moving, but nol in
large volume.
COTTONS.
Cotton continues to hold the attention of the textile
market; prices are maintaining their high altitude with
but little change. A slight weaeningk in futures was
noticeable recently, but this was more due to a feeling of uneasiness occasioned by the presence of speculative buyers and the consequent withdrawal of trade
iHiyersjJhe* latter eagerly reentered lhe market when
liquidation of speculator's holdings forced prices
down to the 35c level. Spot cotton continued strong
throughout the month, hut slight priee recessions from
thc high record of November made themselves felt.
Tin- significant point iu tl Uton goods market,
however, is lhat the waiting attitude of buyers has
been transferred to tin* selling side. Whereas a short
time ago it was the buyer who decided to wait for better prices, now it is the distributor who is exercising
caution, ami the buyer has now no doubts as to uloili
pr the market is due to rise or drop.
LINENS.
Willi prices of cotton stdl away up it is not -.tn
.prising that the attention of lhe consumer turns to
linen, and as this were not enough, all kinds of novelties, esjfW'ially iu table linen, are being offered. Broad
bands of colored linen form inscrte at a depth of about
six inches from lhe vd^v in afternoon cloths; qj block*
take their places, or it may be severed stripes <>f varying size complete the border. .Mauve, purple, blue,
pink, and an occasional red are among lhe most popular shades. Heavy colored linens with matching nap
kins are being shown largely, and ress linens an* es
peeled to be good again for spring business,
FASHION NOTES
Outstanding among dress design*- for early spring
is  the tubular  model  having  8  three quarter  length
body over a scant foundation skirt of matching <«r eon
trastiug material.   Circular ruffles or pbatings so one
or two tiers trim Ihe bottom of the overdress which i*
beltless and as slender as pOSSthle,    Long sleeve*, wi!
flaring ends turning backwards or downward over
lhe hands accompany thi**** model.
• •     •
Little capes appear with a pretty effe t on da) and
evening frocks. On georgettes and crepes one **.>•*
them bordered with fur. French designers are using
ostrich feather trimming in this way on delicate feb
rics for evening.
t     #     •
Striped flannel skirt I worn with plain color jacket*.
and vice versa, are a distinctive type of sports apparel
for spring and summer.
• •     •
As to colors, tile, brick dUSt, red, eedar, glu} Mot)>\
artichoke green, canard blue, peach and copper ahsde.s
arc among the favorites now,
• •      •
Bouffant skirts are on the increase and fabrics that
call for fuller treatment are being featured iti thc elev
crest outputs of the new season's looms
• •      •
Flannel is an outstanding success iu sports modes
This new flannel has a very fine finish more like
broadcloth.    And there's an altogether new  one ih-V
call Kasha-flannel.
• •      •
For tailored suits this spring a grey or tan I will
cord, with a short box coat, flat collar and string tic
will be popular. Fashion, however, talks of another
from a Paris designer made of men's wear serge in
navy or blaek, pencil striped; with a cosl that nips in
slightly at the waist and suggests the lines of a man H
Tuxedo, or a riding habit.
• •     •
Fashions for the warmer weather occupy the attention of the more exclusive stores just now, and Some
striking outfits are shown doubtless they will be seen
later on in Canadian resorts.   The shawl effect is used 1924
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which ti Incorporated the B. C, TRADE review.
23
OUR ORD1
Wholesaler shews
the BIG LINE
i
for FALL 1924
IN justice to yourself and your trade you
should use extra care in your buying for
next Fall. Your customers are becoming more
critical every day and it will mean more to you
than ever before to be able to offer them garments of recognized quality.
The consumer expects the utmost value for his
money. You require a reasonable profit.
Penmans are showing a range
which will enable you to
please your customer at a
comfortable margin. Insist
on seeing the whole range and
choose the qualities that suit
your trade. Your Wholesaler
has our samples. On these
pages we list a few of the
Fall lines.
ii-flC" stands at the head of our
*'*'     natural merino type of garment.    Its popularity may be measured by the number of its satisfied
•♦wearers.   You have to make no excuses or explanations to sell "95".
The public know it has no equal.   It
has stood the  test  of many years
of actual service in all parts of Canada.
There is no garment in the trade the
same as "95" and every "95" garment bears the Penman trade mark
shown below.   This brand is
your one sure guide:—
Line ISO is of "95" quality but of heavier weight and is made for the man
who desires the maximum of warmth. It is a line you should stock.
Fur those who prefer a garment cf thc natural merino type but lower in
price, we have an excellent range. These garments will be found to be
superior to the various imitations of "95" and will afford a good margin of
profit.    They range in quality and price as listed:
Line 100,        Preferred,       Line 71,       Line 8059
All of these lines will sell at prices which will mean satisfied customers.
Keep these Pa$es lor Reference
"95" is made in Men's,
Ladies', Boys' and
Girls', two piece and
union suits, also in
Men's Night Robes. 24
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which is Incorporated the is. C, TRADE REVIEW,
February
Your Trade Demands cfitwianj Qualiti) and Value
PEN
f
Fleece
THE pre-eminence of Penman's fleece lines
is conceded by all.
They have become
the standard of
*^|4 quality by which all
others are judged.
We have proven in fleece
that the policy of "making them better" pays,
and    the    tremendous
volume   sold   in   these
popular lines shows that
the dealers also realize
that it pays.
Of course you recognize
your old friends 37 and
80 in  the illustrations.
Put more of them on your shelves.   Thc
public know them and ask for them.   Be sure
you are in a position to fill this demand.
Don't forget we make fleece in a number of
other qualities and in all styles. wLwjuiiiujijmiuMmmMimmvihihiiiwihiiihihh n.
BW Value in these fast selling lines
Line 37 is made in
one color only.
Line 80 i« offered in three
different color pattern*.
Mibermaits
5ox
THBRB it a
big business
being done in
Penmans Lumberman'* Soi.
Don't overlook
the tales opportunities in these
splendid values
now to much in
demand for
sports as well as
for outdoor
work.
TOP SHIRTS. For many years our lines of
top shirts have enjoyed increasing sales. Thc
extra weight and high quality of the materials
coupled with the comfortable fleece lining make
them quick sellers. Better look over thc samples.
You will discover surprising values.
Your Wholesaler sells fienn.
PfN
mil 192*1
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
with which is Incorporated the B. C. trade review.
25
(resimaaj Lines arc the backbone of the Trade
PEN /<?
ANGLE
Al! Wool Kb.
MPpStd in twt> psree »fvl
UnM>o *u<u""
Wool Ribs (,
and       \
Scotch Knifx
Superior Quality
Finer Finish
Greater Money
Value
These points stand
out prominently in
Penmans heavy all
wool line Ribs and
Scotch Knit, when
compared with other
offerings.
These splendid garments ^
ore the result of careful
selection and grading of
thc wools and painstaking
supervision in all manufacturing departments. They
add prestige to the Penman
trade mark and will add
prestige to your store.
In a number of weights and in all styles of two piece
and union suitr.
'All-wool Scotch Knit
in two-piece and
Union suits."
Mitts in Wide Qan4c of Colow and 5tijles
Have
Your Wholesaler show
You these
KH
ANul!
Don't overlook thc business in
Mitts. A little time spent in
Roing carefully over the samples
of Penmans mitts when the Wholesaler's traveller next calls will
&mpty repay you. You will find
a wide price range and an unusual assortment of designs and
colorings.
These illustrations show
only a few
of the many
qualities,
patterns and
color combinations obtainable in Penmans com-
Slete range of
ten's and
Boys' Mitts.
The assortment is the result of many
years eiperi-
ence and will
be found to
embrace lines
suitable to
the trade in
every part of
Canada.
--Dent buti until ijoi
the wle line 26
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which is Incorporated the B. C, TRADK REVIEW.
Pebr
tl.'U'V
Proven Qualify cfbifiicutf fori* Goods
*■*•*•*■■
Sweatees
Here are a few
numbers select
ed   at   random
frcm     a    wide
range of styles
and      colorings
which thc whole
salt* trade is in a
position to show
for Fall. 1924.
Be sure to sec
our     all - wool
worsted    -qualities in Jersey*.
Coats and Pullovers.   Made in
several styles of
neck and collar
design.
Our ALL WOOL Sox atethe standard of the Ttade
For years Pe.imans have specialized in the production of high
grade heavy sox. As a result
they show a range that cannot
be equalled elsewhere. These
illustrations are intended merely
to give you some idea of the
extent of the range for next Fall.
Sox
in the quality and
weights your trade demands
QUI large Output m th'w MM
makr* it jH>»til)l*r to product
ihrm in a quality which tannot
Ix* ■ppratctWd      Thry will giv
your nutomen esrriirni satisfaction and can be prurd to
•how a  lihrral   margin nf  profit
PEN
ANGLE
Ask ijour Wholesaler for
cPtnma/ui
sec the whole line
Pl. n 1
11124
THE BSEHSH COLUMBIA RETAILER
WlUh which is incorporated the B. C. TRADE REVIEW.
27
most efTeetivley in a while nilk, embroidered in vivid
silks and fringed with silk braid to a depth of eight
to t«n inches Itsdrapes falling over shoulder and
knees. Another model stressed the use of eyelet embroidery, -n^inK il for long blouse, sleeve trimming, and
K. finish the hem.   In sport fabrics, flannel takes first
place; next oomea jersey, kasha, silk alpaca, knob
knitted suits (after liie style of bouclfi) and wool or
silk knitted laee dresses,
Black  lingerie  is establishing a  firm  foolm;
es-
|iicia!iy when it is fashioned of either georgette or
(haul illy laee. A bit of colored ribbon garniture is
the onlv ornament.
FOUR SELLING 8EAS0NS 4 YEAR.
Big U. 8. shoe manufacturer comes out with definite
policy.
A well known IV S. firm of shoe manufacturers has
announced « new sales' policy based on four selling
season's per year. During theae periods they undertake to make no changes in styles. They are initiating
this policy, they stale, iti the interests; of their retail
customers with the object of stabilising fashion movements and helping the retailer to avoid unduly rapid
style depreciation and the accumulation of odds and
ends upon his shelves.   They set forth their ease to the
retail trade in a statement, whieh is reprinted below.
Thil plan was brought up It the last convention of the
shoe Manufacturers' Association of Canada an.d some
of our Canadian manufacturers have been striving to
follow along these lines as closely as possible. The
statement re-ferred to wil. therefore, we believe, be of
interest.    It follows:
"Announcing a New Sales Policy."
"A careful investigation of the chaotic conditions
in the shoe trade resulting from the too frequent style
changes whieh have taken place during the past few
months, convinces us that the mat tor in whieh business has been done recently is all wrong and that in
lhe interests of relaib-rs an immediate change must be
made.
"When a new style is presented every month, (or
•*v» n more frequently) it is impossible for a dealer to
dispose of One lot of shoes before another arrives, with
tin* resul! that his sales people turn to the newer pattern and leave a goodly portion of previous lots on the
shelve* l<» become dead stoek. the loss from which will
more than wipe out profits made on the earlier sales.
It is manifestly impossible for the average dealer to
turn his sloek twelve times a year ami consequently
equally impossible for him to profitably receive.
twelve limes a year, tow styles which arc frequently
io better and in many eases le*-.**. desirable than patterns already in stock. The result is R mixture of odds
and ends that tie up capital and often make it impos-
sihie to meet maturing bills promptly
"The best retailers are agreed that it is not always
the newest pattern that is most desirable, but the pattern that, being in harmony with lhe style trend, looks
best and consequently pleases the customer. Too frequently these monthly styles turn out unauthentic ami
Miekers, They are gotten out hurriedly ami the fact
that they are new is no proof that they will sell, and
when they (lo sell up to expectations, it is usually at
'lie   expense  of  other   good   styles  already   in   stoek.
which they "kill" before their time, Frequently buying was adopted for safety and to aid stoek turnover, 28
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which is incorporated the B. 0. TRADE REVIEW.
February
but too frequently buying produces just the opposite
effect, because it so often results in over-buying and
over-variety. Every merchant knows that a constant
procession of styles confuses the situation and makes
it just that much harder for him to know what to buy.
On the other hand, iti s manifest that the old six
months season is too long to meet existing conditions
and keep a dealer's stock up-to-date.
"We belive that we have found the remedy ami
are prepared to take the iniative in this matter. We
know that the sound business judgment of the best
merchants will approve our course. We will hereafter handle our business on the basis of four-selling
seasons per year. Our salesmen, will, in the near future, start on their trips for the Spring Season of 11124,
showing shoes to be delivered from .January 15th to
April 15th. About February 15th they will start on
their selling season for summer shoes to be delivered
from April 15th to July loth and quarterly thereafter.
"Here is the important feature of this plan. We
pledge ourselves to make no changes in styles during
any selling period. Thus our salesmen will present
for your consideration for Spring precisely the same
shoes on February 1st that they will have when they
start on the selling trip soon after Deeember 1st and
for the Summer selling season when they will present
the same shoes on May 1st that they present on February 15th, so that you can buy this line of shoes whenever the salesman calls, with the absolute certainty
tfisf we will, during that period, present no later styles
to interfere with and upset your stoek antl make less
valuable the styles which you have selected."
STYLE TREND.
Sales of sandals will be large for the coming year,
it is generally agreed. Indeed, some manufacturers
fear an over production of sandals, and are alarmed
by the very low prices quoted on cheap lines.
It seems evident that there will be a vogue of colors
for 1924 shown by the way orders for Faster and
spring shoes have been booked. Gray seems to lead
for Easter, in tlie best shoes for dress wear, but browns
in several shades may prove the best sellers. Blue will
be used slightly. Red and green will be used chiefly
for sanHals. Good sales of white kid and ealf shoes
are looked for. Patents and black satins are considered staples.
Grains, such as li/ard and alligator, are numerous
in the sample lines, and undoubtedly there will be a
considerable production of thorn.
Soles wil be light and flexible. Makers of welt
shoes have followed the lead of makers of McKays in
getting out shoes with flexible foreparts, thin, elose-
trimmed edges and slim shanks. Wood heels will be
more largely used than ever on both wells and McKays. Sandal types, of course have wider edges,
broader shanks and lower heels, but they have flexible foreparts. The old type of thick, firm-soled shoetf
has disappeared.
The Ames-Holden Tire and Rubber Company is now
harketing its own footwear, general lines of rubber
varieties under the name of "Rhino" selling direct to
the retailer through its agents. All connection with
the parent organization has been severed. W. H. Wcig-
and is general manager. P. Smiley, factory manager
and R. W. Ashcroft, advertising manager.
CANADA'S   INDUSTRIAL   PLANTS   FINDING
MORE WIDELY EXTENDED WORLD MARKETS
One Year's Production.
Classen  of   Products.
Hosiery—
Woollen and worsted
Merino or mixed    .
Cotton  	
Silk or silk mixed
Underwear, combination-
Merino or mixed
All wool
All cotton
Silk or silk mixed
Underwear, separate—
Merino or mixed
All wool
All cotton
Wool or Worsted ?an>H
Cotton or mixed yarn*
Sweaters, fain*.  vestf, vie.
Hoods, scarfs nil toqaet
Qlotrei and mitten*
Legging-* and sailer*
Fancy   knit good*
flannels and HhceUnjt*
Bool & thou lining** ft  felt*
•fortC*?  cloth &  stockinette
Miscellaneous  product*
Amount received from CUftOfQ
and contract work
Total value of products
t'nit
of Quantity
Measure.
dos.
doi.
dot,
lb H,
dos,
si yda,
690.55?
n»T.6S3
I..Tit}.!'is
380,701
63,180
Is.sso
180^884
IJOO
8*9,54»
77,0*8
i.lss.Tin
t ,885,858
.171,339
2ao 585
92.115
16l.7li»
11.852
28 AS 1
(5,000
847,848
888 Mi
Betting
Value
at Fai tors
54,566,883
■8,786,749
1.711.71!!
4.660,880
1,786,808
860,918
n ?**• toi
183,000
1,135,081
1.881.702
7,847.218
8383,096
858,881
9,850,343
1,087,198
1448,800
808,969
847,481
117,000
858,881
882,848
L385.1S2
68.538.706
THE LEATHER INDUSTRY.
A reporl ou the Canadian leather industry recently
issued hy the Dominion Buresu of Ststistics for the
year 1922 shows a total value of production of $24,«
291,884, as compared with (82,906,628 in 1921 snd
$89,967,831 in 1!»2<>. These totals are exclusive of the
values of hides ami  skins tnmieil  f**r customers bul
include ihe amounts received by lhe tanneries f<,r
custom work. The principal statistics fnr the Industry
in 1921 ami 1922 sre tabulated as follows:
1!»L'I
Number of establishment!
Capital   invested
Number of employees
Salaries and  wages
Cost of fuel
Miscellaneous expenses	
Cost of materials 	
Total expenditure
Value of products
1922
116 ll"
32,818,775 132,187,488
3,854 4,208
| 4,302,918 * l.osl.ini'J
$ 467,549 I 600,989
$ 1,728,260 $ 2,074,255
$15,754,951 $16,157,858
$22,253,868 $21,813,664
124 291,884 $22,91 f5,528 1924
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which is Incorporated the B. C. TRADE REVIEW.
faster Selling
nana hmitina
yams -
because
ihey are
advertise
Jm
:r
fcQok.g'..*»OfMrrJ»   k«-?*'\
'-y
Iv*
Rr
««
/^►ipa,
'M**f.»*»«•.'*
52S- -
•»
!ivn
!°narchT
■>-**■
<*>
...
KwJS^^^lB the
»*tv mc* -r*qui.;.„ VMf' , <*m of
'"*<*»<, ft» J7 k   ,,<K?   "The
A««n«aaSo£^ ^IBxtd
ie***
tonwghout Ca„;Ja aUe *»kr«
•*?S3fo***»«
*«^&£****£
29
*-. -*v>ir-S
M» !
f«
Mona
Has*
'vftBSW
MOE
MllNAUC
,;ii(A.
^^ *8*i   ^^^■■•■■i*-*--^^^
COMPANY
LlM|TED
' mmmtmmss^.^7^
V^i,,;fJ
5 >is«X';?r5..
SVBSSl' i-i
MT
:om pa
Jtrteyt, Hosiery ami
ILiiui knitting Varn*
Head Office:
Dunmille, Ont.
Monarch Knitting Company,  Limited,   Dunnville, Ont. 30
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which is incorporated the Ii C. TRADE REVIEW.
Kel
truarv
Vancouver Branch R.M.A. Holds Fourth
Annual Meeting
Reports of Efficient Work Mark Conclusion of Successful Year—Retiring President
McTaggart Advocates Better Business Ethics—Addresses by Ex-Mayor Gale
and G. H. Hougham—Officers Elected for 1924
Some sixty-five retail merchants ani their friends
assembled at the Hotel Grosvenor on the night of .laiiuarv 21 when reports of the past year's work were presented at the fourth annual meeting of the Vancouver
branch of the Retail Merchants Association of Canada.
One of the principal speakers of the evening was
ex-mayor R. H. Gale, who with his usual snappy method of driving home his point, interested his listeners
with an account of recent port development, dealing
with the grain movement through the port of Vancouver, and the revived interest that British capital is
taking in the city, which is rapidly becoming a profitable centre for invest ment.
"Within our time Vancouver will be the biggest
city on the Pacific coast with a population double,
even treble, that of today,'' asserted Mr. Gale. He
dealt particularly with the expansion of tin grain trade
and attributed it largely to the consequent increase iu
shipping and general interest aroused abroad in Vancouver and his faith in the city's near future.
"1 think that Vancouver is over the hump and is
going to prosper and grow as she has never grown be-
for," he declared. "All that we need to do is to
show some of the faith that outsiders show when they
come to Vancouver."
Mr. Gale reviewed the phenomenal growth lhal has
featured the port's grain trade, and referred to his
recent successful mission to England, where he interested the largest milling eompany in the British Empire in Vancouver. That firm had decided, when four
of its officers had visited Vancouver and had seen for
themselves the strategic position of the port, that it
should erect, not a 1,000,000 bushel elevator, but a 2.-
000,000 busht 1 elevator, at a cost of about $2,500,000.
Altogether, Mr. Gale pointed out, between $20,-
000,000 and $25,000,000 will probably be spent iu and
around Vancouver on projects under way this year.
It must of necessity establish a large payroll in Vancouver for the next 12 months to come, he said, guaranteeing merchants a certain degree5 of success in 11124.
Tourist traffic, too, i.s on the increase, he Stated,
the publicity bureau having informed him that litis
year it is expected that the number of tourists will be
almost double that of 1928.
Sales Tax Discussed.
George S. Hougham, special representative of the
Dominion Board, R.M.A., followed with an address on
that much discussed subject the Sales Tax, and intimated in the course of his remarks, that, on account of
the complexity of the tax, and the hostility displayed
against it, there was a possibility of this form of taxation being superccedod by a species of turnover tax.
In the meantime, however, Mr. Hougham suggested
that all possible assistance be rendered the government
in helping to solve the countless difficulties which are
daily cropping up, for by this means only would a
smoother Operation of the measure be possibles
Tear's Work Reviewed.
A brief review of the year's activities, more fully
expressed in the report of tbe secretary which follows,
was rendered by the retiring president. K. K. McTaggart, who seasoned his remarks with an appeal for
more consistency in the practices of retailers them
selves, antl a greater elTorl to show the fraternity
that they practice mere marly what they preach |}e
commented very favorably upon the work of secret an
W. F, Ing, and the efficient manner m which he at nil
times tarries on his duties.
E.  R. McTaggart. retiring president.
Secretary's Report.
The secretary's report  indicated clearly that  thr
affairs *>f this branch of th'*- Association are m a satis
factory condition, financially Stronger lhan at thc
close of the previous year. He pointed "tit lhat this
branch still functioned in conjunct ion with the B. V.
board ofli.es of the Association,   Th is was done nol
only because every effort was being made to cut down
expenses but it has been found to act Satisfactorily be
cause the work of thc two offices are so closely related
The activities of the Vancouver and Provincial Om•'•s
have been carried on by Mr.  Ing and two stcnogra
pliers, until quite recently, when an assistant had been
appointed as organizer. Mr. Ing intimated however
that although office help had been reduced to a mill
iiuum, the ever increasing amount of work warranted
a much larger staff.
"We are glad to report," the secretary stated, thai
the finances of the Association are in a much better
'•ondition than at any time in the history of this or
gani/.ation, a stattneiil  fully justified  in the treasurer's report which was rendered during thc meeting. 1924
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which In Incorporated the B. C. TRADE UKV1EW.
31
Membership Assessment.
Mr. Ing reported that the membership of this
branch now stands at two hundred and eighty-one,
which although somewhat below that oi the previous
period will be considerably augmented as a result of
more intensive organization methods.
"While on the subject of membership, continued
Mr. Ing. "it might be in order to state lhat at the
lasi provincial Convention it was ordained thai anew
system of assessing membership dues should be put
into effect in B. C. A wale based upon the number of
employees of each member was consequently adopted,
This necessitated a complete survey of the membership
in the province, which is at this time being carried on.
Herman B. Net I ton.
Elected president for 1924.
Owing however, to the non receipt of necessary details
from members of the Association complete data has
not been secured It is hoped that by this method, the
smaller merchants will pay the smaller fees and the
larger merchants pay the larger fees, in accordance
with the number of employees necessary for them to
carry on their business, This would automatically do
away with tbe criticism that larger merchants were not
paying their portion towards the upkeep of the Association as compared with the smaller merchant. We
have at present a prospective membership list in Vancouver of nearly one hundred new members which we
hope to enroll ns soon as the membership rate of dues
has been definitely decided Upon.
Credit Service,
"Arrangements made  with  the  B, C,  Credit   Bx«
change Ltd*, have not proved financially possible owing to the limited calls made upon UUell service by nielli
hers. The entire work of the Credit and Collection Service has been taken over by the Credit Rat*
iog department, independent of the Association, but
responsible to this Organisation for the elass of service rendered, and a special service rate is now being
Offered to members, based on the average number of
'■alls which any one member would make in the course
of a year.
"We believe that those members who arc taking
advantage of this Credit Haling Department, which is
one of the most efficient OH the Coast, are more than
Satisfied    with    the service rendered, and we would
strongly advise that every member doing a credit business, should take full advantage of this service.
Trade Section Activities
A large number of Trade Section meetings have
been held for those sections which have been active
during the past year, and while we have not as yet
many Trade Sections which are active, those that
have been functioning have been doing splendid work,
particularly do we refer to the Automotive, Druggists
ami Grocers' sections.
"For your information we may state that very comprehensive plans are now being made by the Dominion office for enlarging our Trade section work
throughout Canada on National lines, and in the near
future we epxect to have not less than eighteen active
Trade Sections functionir.g in B. C. A National Trade
Section secretary is to be appointed, whose special
duty it will be to devote his entire time to the building up of Trade Sections in order that every province
ui Canada will be linked up through their Trade Sections, each one operating as a National unit on any
particular question which affects their interests."
Personal Property Tax.
After alluding briefly to many phases of office activities. Mr. Ing referred to the Personal Property Tax
campaign which has been carried on for several years
by this branch of the Association. ''This culminated
iti a special campaign during the last session of the
Provincial House with the result, (of which you are
aware) that through the efforts of your Association,
we have been successful in having this tax reduced
oil',, with an intimation from the government that
they will abolish the tax entirely at the next session,
and we have letters on file from ministers of the government to the effect that it ;s the intention of the
government to do so without fail.
Sales Tax.
"We must next refer to the Sales Tax, which is still
a bone of contention among all classes of business,
and although your Association has been succes'.ful in
obtaining a majority of their requests for the elimination of the numerous clauses detrimental to the retail trade, the Advisory Committee at Ottawa are meet-
ing the Government continually requesting further relief for the various lines of retail trade. This office has
been receiving an average of two or three amendments
a month, whieh the Government is passing in an endeavour to meet r.eeessary requirements of retail business.
Plans are now being laid to bave the present act
amended so that it will be illegal for any manufacturer or wholesaler lo show this tax as a separate item.
us is now the case.
"Vour Association made representations to the Governmenl ami they complied with our request that the
tax should not be shown as a separate item, but other
representations were made by manufacturers and
wholesalers, and the Government again changed it,
making it optional for the manufacturer to include
the tax. or show it as a separate item, on the invoice.
"This is only one of the many complications which
vour Association has been tak it g up week after week
duriiur the past year with tho Government, and not
even the Government officials, who arc supposed to enforce the Sales Tax are capable of interpreting it.
We- have however succeeded in gaining exemption for 32
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
with which is Incorporated the n. G TRADE keview.
b\*h
ruarv
many lines of the retail trade which would hcve been
classed as manufacturers had it not been for the efforts
of your Association at Ottawa. Whatever relief you
may have received from the operation of this act,
thanks are due to the fact that you have an Association which is ever functioning, and daily watching the
Walter F. Ing, Provincial Secretary.
interests of the retail merchants. It will be obvious
that the amount of time necessary to cope with such
pieces of legislation, prevents to a large degree your
Association giving sufficient attention to more practical service, by which we mean Trade Section service
to our membership.
We bave endeavoured to keep our members fully
advised on every important move in connection with
this tax, and considerable work is yet involved until
the same is either entirely eliminated or placed on a
basis which will be equitable antl fair to all parties
concerned.
Oriental Immigration.
The Oriental Exclusion Campaign which this Association has been carrying on has terminated successfully, and there- is now on the Statute books of Canada a Chinese Immigration Bill, which, as the Chinese
Commissioner, Mr. Feathers!one stated at a recent
meeting of the Association in Vancouver, practically
means an Exclusion Bill, under which it will be-almost'
impossible for any Chinese to enter Canada other than
a very few exclusive classes. It was largely owing to
the efforts of the B. C. members at Ottawa that we
were successful in having the word "merchant" confined to those Chinese who had been in business for
not less than three- years in China. The Bill also
stipulates that they must have a capital of not less
than $2,500 over and above all other expenses, and that,
there must be a bonafide and genuine opening in Canada for tbe particular business which the applicant
proposes to enter upon arrival in Canada. All applications for passoprts in China will be thoroughly investigated by the Commiss'oncr before the emigrant
is alolwed to embark, and if when upon his arrival in
Canada it is found that any misstatements have been
made, he will not be allowed lo remain iu Canada, The
vexed question regarding the student elass, is now eon.
fined to bona fide students attending some University
or college in Canada for educational purposes, at the
end of which period they must return to China. Under
this act also every Chinese in Canada must now be
registered ami protographed. ami we agree with the
Commissioner when he states that unless some loophole is found in this act the influx of Chinese into Canada has to al! inti nts and purposes been effectually
stopped. It is now our aim i»» see to it that those
Chinese already in Canada make no further inroads
into the legitimate trade »>f the white retailer, and
in this connection we wish to emphasise the importance of the amendment which we were successful iu
having passed at the last session of tbe Provincial Leg*
islature, whereby power is now given to any municipal
ity to control the activities of peddlars ami or hawk
ers, ami to prohibit this class of trader from continuing his business after regular established retail stores
are compelled by law to close.
Grocers Section Re-Established.
lu our last ant ual  report  it  was Stated that lhe
Grocers' Section of our Association bad decided to
branch out by themselves as s means of inducing tbe
larger number of gTOCers to take care of their own
problems,   We are glad lo report at this time that
tins section has seen fit to again become affiliated with
the Association, and there is every reason to believe
that    it    will    become    one    of lhe strotigesl  num
erically and one of the most active of the Vancouver
branch.   We have now a membership of some forty*
eight in that section, and believe that this membership
lieve that this membership will be more than trebled
throngli the ensuing year,
Geo. H. jsntsn, eecond Vice-Pretident.
Civic Licences.
'As you arc aware, tbe question of -civic licences is
still before the City Council, ami we hope that through
the representations we are about tO make that we shall
see a decided reduction in the amount of licence now
being paid by the retailers in Greater Vancouver.
Branch Activities.
Vour executive have met regularly on an average
of once a week during the year, ami have held sonic i:ejt
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which Ih Incorporated the B. C. TRADE REVIEW,
33
John Oevine, Treasurer.
fifty or more executive meetings during their term of
office. A great many questions of local interest have
been taken up by your executive in tbe interests of
this brunch, ami to enumerate them in full would be a
difficult mailer al this time. Sueh questions as lotteries, N. S. F. cheques, Half Holiday Act. Shops Regulation Act, Hollar Days, Daylight Saving. Picnics,
Spring openings. Smuggling, Horse Ha -ing, Vancouver
Exhibition^ Publicity, Entertaining visiting delegates,
Opening of Pacific Highway. Trade Licences, &■•. are
only a few of the many questions which your executive
and advisory board have dealt with during the past
year. We wish Mr. President, that it were in our power to give each individual member of the Association a
brief idea of the importance of the WOrk which is being
tarried on every day in the interests of the retail merchant, for it is only by the enthusiasm which is conveyed by our membership to their fellow retailers lhat
we can ever hope to materially increase our roll ot
members, ami thereby render a greater service to the
retail merchants of Vancouver. We believe that it is
no exaggeration tn state that the past year has been
Ihe mosl successful in thc history of the Association.
but in our opinion it is nothing to what we hope to accomplish, providing our membership will stand behind
and loyally support the work which this body is endeavouring lo do.
This brings me to a close of a report which I feel
does not do justice to the Association and its activities, but before closing I must refer briefly to the
good work of your past executive officers, who. by
their unfailing interest and time devoted to their work
without hope of reward i* a measure of satisfaction
and gratification to your secretary, ami we would
make an appeal right here to those members who arc
not elected t<» an executive office of the Association.
to actively support the incoming officers especially the
Trade Section chairman, to whom we must look for
guidance during the coming year.
We have endeavored to give thc very best service
ami attention to every member when called upon, but
we would ask you to remember that we are but human,
and liable at all times to make mi-dak*, s. and for lite
office we merely ask for your sympathetic eo-opera-
tion, and you will find us ever ready and willing to
help ami serve you to the best of our ability.
Officers Elected.
Herman B. Neilson was elected president of this
branch ot the A&ooi onion tor ine ensuing year in succession to E. H. McTaggart. Other onieers elected
were as follows: Vice-presidents, Messrs. John M. Watson and George 11. Jarman; treasurer, John Devtne,
and honorary secretary, W. (J. Bell.
During the evenir.g, vocal solos were rendered by
Mr. A. H. Dingman, who was ably accompanied by Mrs.
Dingman, ami the meeting, declared by those attending to be one of the best in years, was brought to a
happy conclusion.
BUSINESS CHANGES—BRITISH COLUMBIA AND
ALBERTA
Cumberland—
frraser, J.—Reported sold out. (Confec. &e.)
Gordon, Watt.—Reported sold out to ti. H. Vvycherley. (Gro).
Cranbrook—
laylor, Harry—-Reported sold out. (Groc.)
Marpole—•
Brown, Win.—Reported sold oul. (Groc.)
Pouce Coupe-
Hart, George—Applying for extension.
Port Moody—
Port Moody Trading Co. Ltd.—Assigned to J. F. Mather;
meeting ot creditors held.
Parkesville—
Smith, C. S. & Co.—Reported sold out to D. IB. McNeil &
Co. (G. S.)
Prince Rupert-
Crosby, F. M.—Reported sold out  to W. H. Montgomery.
(Furn.)
South Vancouver—
Peoples Drug Co.—(Curtis & Gilley) Reported sold out.
Vancouver—
Egg O Raking I'owder Co. Ltd.—Gazetted as ceased to carry
on business in U. C.
('.rote  Rankin Company—Gazetted as ceased  to carry on
business in B. C.
Hughes Owens Co. Ltd.—Gazetted as ceased to carry on
business in B. C.
Foster, N. G. Ltd—(Paint & Wail paper)—To be wound up
voluntarily; W. A. Freeze appointed liquidator.
Hastings. C. E.~ Reported sold out.
Kitsilano Hardware Co.—G. H. Watts reported sold out.
Morris. Jos.—(Sample Shoe Co.)—Assigned to F. J. Mather.
Okanagan Vegetable & Fruit Co.—Dissolved partnership.
Braidwood, Wm.—Reported sold out to Frank Braidwood.
(Groc.. Meat, &C.)
Calder. Andrew Ltd.—Reported assigned. (B. & S.)
Gibsons Suitateria Co.—Reported assigned. (Tailors & Clo.)
Victoria—
IVich, Robi. A— (Fairfield Grocery)—Sold out to H. Cross.
Rithet     Consolidated     Ltd.—Discontinuing   grocery   dept.
(Shipping, Insurers. Importers, etc.)
Royal Confectionery—(Simon Antipas, prop.)-—Suffered fire
loss; insured, (Confec. mfrs.)
Rutler. James H—Sold out to R. H. Flint. (Confec. &c.)
James  Bay   Pharmacy-—Ownership acquired  by  Victor E.
Emery. (Drug & Sundries.)
Mavnard. Albert H — Admitting G. Stewart into partnership
as Mavnard & Stewart. (Photo Supply).
Gaitskell, Geo. H.—Sold out to Mrs. F. W. Bell (Groc. &
Confec.)
Leiser. Simon & Co. Ltd.—Sold out to Maciionalds Consolidated Ltd. (Whol. Gro. & Pro.)
Alberta.
Blairmore— - _ n
Parley Wholesale—Assigned to official receivers; c.C.M.
TA. appointed custodians. Meeting of creditors held.
Blairmore—
Plnkney. F. M.—Pecoased (gen, store).
% 36
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which is incorporated the B. C. TRADE REVIEW,
Pel
iruary
HARDWARE, OIL and PAINTS
3Sr
GENERAL CONDITIONS
With stocktaking and the countless revisions made
necessary by the new 6 per cent, sale tax completed,
Vancouver hardwaremon arc preparing forayear*sbus
iness which is destined to be the most satisfactory in
the history of this province. Despite unfavorable
weather conditions a fair volume id* trade is reported,
and seasonable lines are moving quite freely.
At a recent meeting of hardware-man in Vancouver
eertain complaints were registered against practices
which are hurting the legitimate retail merchant. It
is claimed that jobbers are selling to large consumers
who cannot be classed as boua-iide dealers. Such a
practice is in direct contravention of business ethics
and steps are being taken to put a stop to such dealing.
It is also reported that many stores, nol actually
in The hardware busines are being sold goods by representatives of eertaio hardware bouses. As these store,
keepers would naturally buy from the retail trade Such
methods are likely to strain business relations between, the retailer and the wholesale houses, and'
should, in all fairness to the legitimate retail hardware-
men, be discontinued.
The building outlook for the present year is good,
and many large contracts are let for constructional
work; lumber camps, and mills are going to be busy:
interest continues in the mining fields of the province,
all of which tends to justify the exceptionally good
prospects outlined for the hardware trade generally
during 1!I24.
MARKETS AT A GLANCE.
Rubber Belting Prices Advance.
The discounts on rubber belting have been reduced,
thus increasing the prices on this commodity.
Builder's Hardware.
Immediate demand is only fair, but the outlook
for a good volume of spring business , as soon as the
building season opens up . is good.
Nails.
Demand fair, prices linn.
Steel Traps.
Fairly good demand in territory where trapping is
done.   Stocks good; prices stiff.
Stove Goods.
Demand more or less inactive, being mostly in the
nature of replacements, Stocks good; prices stationery.
Pyrex Commodities Have Tax Absorbed.
New lists are now available on all Pyrex products,
The tax it is understood, is absorbed in tbe quotations
given, the discount being 'd'd 1/3 per cent.
Window Screens Include the Sales Tax.
Quotations are now available on window screens,
and the prices arc stated to be net, tax included.
Putty Prices Firm.
Putty prices remain tirm at old level?, which were
iu existence at the start of the year.
Shellac Prices Finn.
Firm prices are maintained in the shellac market,
It is reported that prices are likely to continue as thev
arc for sometime.
Wrought Iron Pipe at High Prices.
Revised quotations are in effect OU black and galvanized wrought iron pipe.   The advance allows for in-
cludim-* the new sales tax.
Canadian Made Chisels Advance Ten Per Cent.
Priees on Canadian made socket firmer, chisels have
been advanced approximately ten per cent.
Stove Bolt Discount Now Effective.
The old discount of 50 and \0 per e»nt whieh Used
to apply <>n the stove bolt list has been cancelled and
a new discount of Wo Hnd lo per cent which include!
the sales tax.
Paint and Sundries Move Out.
Booked orders for spring dating for paint snd iuu-
drieS are now being shipped out.
Rope.
Sales fair; stock ample; price* firm
Silver Plated Flatware Prices Include Tax
New and slightly higher net prices ar«- now in effect
00 1*47 Rogers silver platt flatware. Thc advance was
mad'* effective to Offset   the sales tax.  which  ss now
included In the selling priee to dealers,
Building Paper Advances.
Building paper advances, new quotations now re
corded show advance of approximately ten per cent
Wrought Boat Nail Prce List Revised.
Wrought boat nail priee list revised to higher levels,
The new prices show increase of about five per cent.
Tree Primers and 8hears Move Out.
Jobbers are now shipping booked orders with Spring
dating for tree pruners and shears.   Prices have ad
vanced five per cent.
Carpet Sweepers Quoted at New Prices.
New prices have been quoted on Bissell Carpet
Sweepers.   The new prices Include the sales tax.
Base Prices on Cut Nails Are Revised
The base price on cut nails has been revised. These
nails arc now tpioted at $7..'ill base.
Prices on American Ammunition Advance Slightly
Prices  on   American   ammunition   have  advanced
slightly.    This advance is made in order that the tax-
might be included in the sale price to dealers. 1!I24
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
W ith which ih Incorporated the B. C. TRADE REVIEW.
37
No. 1891 Laurentic "0" Finish Square.
OUR LATEST!!
We illustrate herewith our latest
range in "White Rock" porcelain enamel finish, with nickel trimmings. Our
new '*Economizer" is finished in dark
blue enamel.
This range meets a great demand
ami you owe it to yourself to investigate it thoroughly. Also produced in
three other finishes.
Send for our new catalogue and
price sheets
566 Beatty St. Vancouver, B. C.
Phone: Seymour 7596-7.
The Secret of a Profitable
Paint and Varnish Department
The real secret Met in having your Paint and Varnish stock complete under
one particular brand. No matter what line you sell, have everything possible
under the one label.
The wisdom of this is that every sale of any Paint or Varnish you make will
surely advertise other lines you have for sale. If you stock MARTIN-SENOUR
100' r  Pure Paint, why not also stock Martin-Senour Stove Pipe Enamel,
Martin-Senour Varnishes and all such specialties.
If the can of 100'% Pure Paint sold to a customer satisfies, and of this there
is no doubt, surely when that satisfied customer returns for, say Stove Pipe
Enamel, and you show one bearing the Martin-Senour label, it makes the
sale far easier than if you show a stove pipe enamel of another make.   This
same argument applies all along the line.
Look over the shelves of the most successful  paint merchants of today,
and you will find them carrying and pushing one BRAND all the way through.
STOCK,  ADVERTISE  AND PUSH THE  FULL  MARTIN-SENOUR  LINE.
THIS WILL  MEAN  REAL  BUSINESS TO  YOU.
The Martin-Senour line is very complete. It comprises a paint or varnish
product for every purpose and every surface. There is no need for any of
our dealers to go elsewhere to purchase any paint or varnish specialties.
The Martin-Senour Co. Limited
1505 POWELL STREET
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Say \}OU saw it in "The (Papet the 'Retailet 'Reads" 38
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which is Incorporated tho It. C. TRADE REVIEW,
Ji
antiarv
New Prices Issued on Leather Soles and Heels.
New prices have been issued on leather soles and
heels, which are in most eases lower than those formerly quoted.
Some Clothes Wringers Advance in Price.
Dowswell Lees and Co, of Hamilton, have announced the advanced prices on clothes wringers as a result
of the sales tax being included in the Belling pri*
ice
NEW GOODS ON THE MARKET.
CANT SPLASH MOP WRINGER.
FAMILY SIZE
No. 114
"Cant Splash
Two piece
all-Steel. 14 gaofS
Black Enameled.
Por 8 to 2)
. ounce Mops.
Packed Vi doxen
to the crate
Weight 6?-*i lbs.
No.   14   S a me
in all galvanized.
GRAVITY GATE CATCHES.
Wrought iron, japanned, length <>f bar"»ins., weight
per dozen bv* lbs., one dozen in a box.   The wrought
iron bar fastens to gate, when gate is closed the bar
engages into the catch which automatically locks
itself; it is released by turning the lateh upward.
P
Demand Meakins' Rubberset
BRUSHES
Oldest brush  manufacturers  In  Canada.
Established 1852.
The  Dealer who handles our brushes gets
the  benefit of our  experience.
Ask for new catalogue.
Meakins & Sons Ltd.
829 POWELL  ST.        VANCOUVER,   B.  C.
Factory,     HAMILTON,   ONT.
HARDWAREMEN ATTEND ANNUAL CONVENTION
A large gathering of numbers of the B. C. Hard
ware Club attended the annual convention held at the
Hotel Vancouver, Wednesday, February 6th.
Conditions were reported to have greatly improved
during the past year, and the outlook for the hard
ware business generally in 1924 said to be particular
ly encouraging.   The secretary reported an increase
in membership, ami the club finances were pronounced
sound by treasurer W. C. Stcarman. Tbe following
are the offi *ers elected for tbe coming year: President,
Mr. William Kitbl; firsl vice president, (». (1111111;
secon<f vice-president. Gordon Kearns; treasurer \V.
C. Stcarman; secretary, H, A. Ogilvie, with 1). A. liar
hour as auditor.
At the close 0! business proceedings, the delegates
with their wives and lii-tly friends, together with a
number of city guests, joined in a banquet and cabaret
ii: tbe ballroom of the hotel.
EMPIRE STEEL WILL 8HOW MILLION GAIN
Will meet first preferred div dend and add a million
to depreciation reserve.
While thc financial statement of tbe British Empire
Steel corporation  for the year ended,  December 31,
1923, i* still in the course of preparation, ami will not
be available for some time, tt is understood lhat earn*
IttgS have been moro than #l,«KMl,(MM» in execs* of those
in 1922,   Sufficient has been earned, it is understood,
to meet the dividend on the tirst preferred stoek, and
to add more than $1,000,000 to depreciation reserve account, bringing the latter up i<» $28,000,000,
The statement »s expected to show that «*urreti»
assets are five times current liabilities, while accounts
receivable alone arc sufficient to meet all current obligations,
TORONTO MANAGER, MARTIN SENOUR CO.
K. .1 Cookson, who has represented the Martin-Sen
our Co, in various Ontario territories tor the past fifteen years, has been promoted by Iim company to the
position of Toronto branch manager Mr Cookson,
through his years of lerviee as a salesman for this
company is well acquainted with the retail trade of
Ontario* His many old friends ami customers will. DO
doubt, be pleased to learn of his promotion to this
more responsible position.
BRANDRAM,   HENDER80N   CO.   LTD.,   TAKES
OVER VARNISH C0MPANIE8
Brandram, Henderson <'«». Ltd., Montreal, have
taken over the Ohio Varnish Co. Ltd., "ml the Indus
trial Varnish Co. Ltd.. both of Hamilton. Ont.   Scroti
atious Involve the taking over of the  business, trade
marks, etc., of the Ohio Varnish Company Limited,
manufacturers of Chi ■tunnel ami other products and Of
the business of the Industrial Varnish Company Ltd.
ALL AUSTRALIAN CAR HAS MOTOR NEAR THE
MIDDLE.
Australia is again attempting to place ou the mar
kct an all-Australia automobile. Its unusual features
include an engine located midway between the frCW
and rear wheels, chain drive to th-" rear end. an entire
absence of frame and a body constructed of ply-wood
glued aud sewn together,
■m (34
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
39
HARDWARE PRICES CURRENT
The following art prices quoted for principal lines of leading wholesale firms.   Prices quoted are necessarily
subject to market fluctuations.
AMMUNITION.
Loaded Shot Shell*.
Dominion:
Canuck. M
|| .. n M *  I'* <"h $44 «5
U «* k W * iS oh. 14.11
imperial,
ll i;  i 26 *   V%  oh M *-*>*
::  i 2* *  !«»  «-»» bl 'A*
American.
I* M •"  Nitro Club 12 O «l«i D» ch   6J.SS
Peters Htfb «.5ui» SI 13
l* M C   Arrow 1*2 «* x 24 x \%% *h &S.S6
jvtei**   Premirr S9 K
Metallic Ammunition.
Dominion
U .Mii»irt Bknokotaaa ♦.tB
22   t*'tMt   Srmikflt-*** 1.41
22 i.   tufle StnokeltMM LIS
M t. loflp Laantok 6Ifl
American.
23 Short  MiwHnli'W .5 M
22 i»na -Stnokoleaa t.4-9
22 1.   Kitln  Hnwh•>!<•«• I 7'
**: t.  Rifle LeMnok 1 W
ANVILS P*t*r Wright, tulb» to IM n>* .
:*,,-. over n» n>» 22*-.
v.XKH IV,* ASM, I'll Oi* t'S2«<"' to *'5 2«
do* double bit ft*C*M unit.it.4i«ul. tSl.tfO '■
I2i 20 dot.; hunter* ase**, III M oOfct Single
bitted a»e*, unl a«dt«4. $14.10 to SIT 40 d«*i
BARlf-Crow, fti.oo p*r too tbe
HKl.TlNVt -4Mm, rawtod* Side*, U 4».
CUt i !C sit 12 Ifi ptr IM fef«t. Si* «t ISM
ptf MM feet; 4* at M 5>« {ner too f«*«*t.
BOLTS, CARULViE tin full packages).
S, and miialipr up t« **-m !<«!»« kMM >*« IO
off iiat. ovsv SH B> 18 10 ot? U»»t. ** *'• and
bwgOT, all lewthi***. {»-«« Iv off hwt N«»t<* new*
km prloos i» «*ff*«>'t
BOLTS, MACHINE **4 and <nmal!»r up to
4-ln long, \*a* S3 3 10 off tint QKttr 4-in MM
$0/10 «»*ff lUt. \ i'lo and *4 les* :H '•" ,,fy
tie-rt     Note &•*• MM |»ri«««» in SSToOl
I** »1.T**. STOVE*   L«M 17', M.o off tut
BOLTS, TIKI'; -hem 2« ofcl J"•; ,m all
bolts for broken  package!*
fiOARI). Ilcvft l'« 1,000 to 6.000 feet.
m 00 per 1 e<Ml feet
BOILERS.  l-UNOBa—M-tal*.  Ill Ifl «**»«-h
BUtLDINQ  paper   Tarred,  lie  lo It M
S««»r   r»»tt    Accortllttg   to  14 unlit-*    I'kin   Mc   10
I!   » per roll
bcitsPlated, J«t   antique oop-par ■"**
dull brttaa flniah   l4-|g$M4.  ptf pair tic;  "Di-x
SU,    rn«-   -fmlr   JTr.   (Us4H<   P*-**  enir-   Hkl
nt'TTS   Wpoutht  at#*t   No   tk,  Iki-SU.
It M  P*r  do*.   |)| sx$%,  12 54   p<T   do*    *4'»\
<i-    IS22 par dot
CARPET TOT    !« OS., BOIh    13 M r-'tl
CATC1IFS. (TPPrMim <Hd tnwpvr ami
dnit brass Anlatt. It. M p«r hundred
«*tt\iN ciftil it. 4»i«'tru- weld, t-tfl, B$.S0
l»r IflQ »•«. «*. 111 «» p«*r S0«> tt>-«  US, PUI.M
\><"     ?I1M1    If*
I'ti'iN  u*ii«, 5-16 * it, flit aaehi %
114    Ml*, r-a-h
CHOPPBRS i*tw»iv-CnlvorssJ No fl. 12! Ifl
ti» t'nivrr»«t No |, |M e*1 do* Cnltfersal
No 2. ixi oo ,1,,-i: tlntverssl No t, 14-t 20 d.»*
Homo,   No    SJ».   |2 *J«   «».i'-*h;   Homo.   No    •».*>
12 "S <*nrh ,
CH1TRN8   BARRRLL —No  <*•   %t<> ~<> saeh;
No   1. Ill JO wch: No   2. lit SO rnrti; NO, 3.
I"? Tl -A-vt-1
ft.KVtS    MAI.EAM.K   IVr   th    20<**
CLOTHE8 l.tNt:. WIKB- t>r each, &o ft.
tflo: too fa.. JOc
[HULLS Kit Mook l" '< **tt "<•« lint:
btaaksmtth ""--in  4*s ofl now n*t
KAV*rHof«;ii ivr too *<*.«.! S - in tt.50
Ifl-ln   H ||: iJ.tn   $2 60
file.i Qrtat Waataro, H** off lint. m«<*k
Dlamood. M I 1 off tint
HtvrjFS IVr dot t<alr» l»-»nvv xtr^p 4
In   12 2**;  ,*.(n   12 «*»:  R-ln   |3.00;   Si"   M-M
COT-tRTTQATBD   TW?   Pa*   dot»n   ptOtn
t-ln   12 ||   6.In   tf..40; I In   %\ to. 12-ln   HIM
itosiv WAT BR- --jvi-piv iflc a f.K.t. 'jx
l-Ply I'D*- a fiNd
HORsn SHOES—Tron, Nos n to I. l1**"^
por toon,*,; |run> Xo, J nnd la'*"**'*. I'1 fl
per tftO n*t
IRONS,  BAD.   common   iw  too tha.—
I Oi*    nod ov-i   2*.V    ,t    »    Hint   .".   tt>M    Wc
KNOBS, MM \HMin   Jaraoned. f3-r' 'H'r
dor
LAMP   nttMNK.YP    A.   ne-   mat*   «   do*
II II p'*r do* : A, por do*   |1 75: K   P«P eatfl
fi dos, ft U por dot :  B. per do*   It 8R.
I.ANTKKNS—Short   or   long   globe,   plain,
$13 *:» do*.; Japanned, fisk&j <ioz.
MATT0CK8 I'U-k. 90c each; Cutter, 90c.
so oh,
MOWERS, J.AWN-Woodyatt: 4-bladexl2
Inch, |1A.M; 4-t>ladexI4 inch, $11.00; 4-hlade
Xlfl irnh, $11.15. Empress: 4-biade x 12 inch,
HIM; 4-»»lade x 14 Inch, $13.10; 4-blade x
16 io<h, $13 SO. (Jreat American: 16 inch,
IM.M; IT inch, $25.7-5; 19 Inch. $28.30. Penn-
HUtvtnle Junior: 14 Inch. $21.50; 16 Inch,
VM 2'y. 1% Inch. 127.25.
KAILS, WXRI6—Baaa $*i.40 fob. Vancouver: t'ut. baas $7.M f.o.b. V-aiwouvet*.
NSriTINO. POULTRT—Per roll—2x12.
11 M; 2x24, MM! 3x3C. $4.20; 2x60, $6.80;
IJCIJ,   t2.7,fv; 1x24. $5,00;  1x88, $7."«>.
M'TS—Per 100 1T)» aavance over list—
BQoara. snuttl lots. 18.75; square, case lots,
SITS; hrxaKun. >«mjtll lotK, $1.96; ht-xoRan.
esse lot*-. I4.2G.
PICKS—("lay. 6-7 lbs.  $70c each.
PINK TAH- i ff;ii. KC each; ^ icsrl , Mo
saob; M »ra!  IM <-at-h.
PLASTfStl OP PARIS-11.6ft per IM tbs.
RIVETS AND BURRS—Black carnage. »tt>
-fours »7t*. N«.. | aasorted cowered rivets
No   | Mo tb ; -assorted copper rivets and
bum **.7.\ No | assorted coppered burrs
Slid tntrrs 3!c per lt» No. S coppeied burrs
■*. por ft : t'oppered rivets 26c per tb.
Coppored burrs 37c per lb.
ROPK BASE Uritish manila, base, I6**sc;
pure manila, urn- r.»>*.
SAWS. BUCK Happy Medium, $1 3."> each:
Happy Idea $1 II each;  DlSBtOJU No. 6. $135
pack. _ -.
BCREWS Bright    flat   head   fl-7%/10 otr
i si    briRht   round heaul.  *S:>/1»> off list;  bmSB
Itat   head Vf%/li "tt  list;   brass  round  bea<l
51/10 off list.
SCREWS, CAP- i'-i, i>tY list
st*in;ws, *«kt  -:." off list
SHOVELS AND 8PAODB—Olds or rox.
(T1LM t«*r not \ Jtmm or Bxriktog fUkM par
tRON, BAND -Per IM tbs.-m-ln. $4 50;
l**-ta   $4 M;  1 - Hi.  $« Ifl
IKON. BLACK BBBET-per lOflfts.— tl
nags l« 10;    * soata **M- 3S-20 -«uage*
$1.10: % tcimttt* $7 20 .«.—.
IKON. «ALVAN!/.IU> SHEET -Per 100 lt*£
—M guage American or English  $• *5;  -.4
guage $7 7:.: lS-2'- guage $7.55.
Spoopg— Moose N<»  <- $"•« dot ; no. *,
VMM do*. No   s. $!».» dox; No. 10. |M.M.
All above in black finish.
s*)i,in*:n-i*, x 14, case lots. IM per ro.,
i«ss etc par ft .. ,   w
BP1KKS   PHESSKH   Per 100 tbs.-M inch.
»,M; 1-11. IT.Mj ^ in- It.M
S'fM'fdvS Galvanised fence. $s K per 100
It's in ful) kegs; galvanlred poultry netting.
I**- $0 per 1"" tbs. In full kegs
TACKS -Parpet. 70c off new list.
WIRE. BARBED—POT roll—4 point, rnttle,
«•*. nvt   $:. on*  4-polnt  hog. N ro.ts $5 50.
WTRH PLAIN GALVANIZED- Ter 100
lb  \*., |, »•; .t". No. 12. W.M,
W'U'J* c A A P'*1- ISA ",!4 No* ,0' iiM''
\„   11. \t, 1".  No   12. *-•"•>
WRINOBRfl Baa, W.0I *»: ***#&
$*.,; oo dos . hi.-v.i... $n 10 doa.; Ajax, Hw.oo
WASHING MACHINES Vsloa water pow-
,» na 76 each Seafoam Htectric. I7I.M eaoh;
Sno^alt.  &T.M each;  Patriot, $18A10 ea^.
VtSK.-t    WARREN   S'M.IP   BOX—M   H>a
$10 00 saeh! *>0 tbs   $.2 00 each,
PAINTS AND OILS.
Brandram-Henderson
Per -Gallon
imi "-EngHah" ordinary colors $*•■••'
v 11  "Engllah" white   r.~r. *w
B-H Evtcrior on Shingle Stain—
Ordinary colors, in 4 nl cans  $1 «r
Oreens nn.l rbevs.  In 4 Ral. cans  2 Of
M 11  Anchor Bhlnglfl Stain—
firdlnary eolnrt, In * sal cans  j jjj
Orreni and Oroya, In 4 gat. cons  i.v
PAINTS
Oatlo"
Ordinary colors. In I ial cans $Ug
Martin Senour porch paint *■£
Martin Senour  Neutone  white a-'-'
Martin   Senour  Neutone color ...   3.73
Martin  Sencvur  flow paint    4.15
Sherwln  Williams,   white    4.65
Sherwin Williams, c^lor   4.30
Sherwin  Williams,   porch    4.30
Sherwin Williams,  floor   4.16
1'L'TTV— her  100  tbs.
Bulk, barrels 800tbs $6.60
Bulk.  Irons 100 lbs    7.76
Hulk, Irons 2>5 lbs    8 30
Tins, 5 lbs; per lb    S»V»
Tins,   lib 12\
UNSEED OII^- Gallon
Raw, i to 2 barrels   i.2,s
Boiled.   1   to 2  barrels     1.28
LEAD, WHITE IN OIL— Per 100 lbs.
l.ooo tbs. to 1 ton  $15.10
I*-.**!*     IfvGO
Brandram's  Onuine        16.03
TERPENTINE—                                    Gallon
1 barrel lots $ 1.70
VARNISHES— Gallon
Elastic,   No.   1 $ 8.06
Elastic,  No.  2   7.40
IV  Linoleum  6.55
IV Marine  Spar   6.95
IV Furniture    3.65
IV Pale Hard Oil   4.60
Less 33 1-3 per cent.
Lacqueret  $6.00 less 40
MORE   LIGHT   LIMITED.
Prices to dealers.
Lamps   for    $8.00
Lanterns   for    *.    $6.75
Junior mantles  pe** do      .75
Automotive Price List
ABSORBERS  SHOCK—Float  A Ford No.
1 at  $21.50.
AtVELERATORS   FOOT—Wireless   Ford
at $1.75 each.
ASSORTMENTS—Cotter pin 13c each; Cap
screws 38c each: Set screws 30c each; Machine screw 75c each; Machine nut 75c each.
BATTERIES—Hot Shot $2.»6 each; Dry 6x
2'4 55c each.
BOOTS—Tire 4-in. $1.25 each.
BUMPERS—Twin bar $13.60 each.
CAPS—Radiator $100 each.
CARBORUNCLPM—Valve grinding 6-oz.  $4
doz.
CARRIES—Luggage, collapsible $4.30 each.
CEM ENT—Radiator, % lb Wronder Woik-
er $5.40 dos.
CHAINS—Weed 30x3«*, $6.35 each; 32x3•%
$7 00 ea*h: .11x4 $7.70 each; 33x4 $8.20 each;
31x4 $9.00 each.    Less 30'i.
RID O SK!D~30x3t4 $3.75 pair; 32x3%
tt.M pair; 34x3V, $4.10 nair; 30x4 $3.95 pair;
.*«x4 $4.50 pair. Less 30''r.
CLEANERS WINDSHIELD—Presto $1.60
each; Mayo Skinner $7.50 each.
COILS—Soark single $5.66 each; Spark
double $11 00 each.
DEFLECTORS—Wind adjustable $15.20
pair
ENAMEL—\i pt. Jet Lac $6 00 do*.; .j-o«.
Wonder Worker $4.80 doz : Martin Senour
Quick Drying:. 1/64 13c each: 1/32 19c each;
1 16 31c each: •% 34* each; Vi 96c each; %
$1 70 each.
HORVS—Electric  J5.73  each.
JACKS—No, 200 $2 00 each; No. 4 $2 26
each: No. 41 $6 00 each
LOCKS. MOTOMETER— No, 390 $2 65
each: No. 391 *3.00 each; No. 392 $7.50 each.
MIRRORS—Rfi<r v'ew $3 00 each.
Ol Ir—Monamobile, lipht $1.55 gal.; medium
$1 |0 wl.: heavy $170 gal.
patches BLOW OUT—Locktlte No, 2
«».* each: No. 3 30c each; No. 5 75c each;
No   6 17c each.
PLATES—Sten  $2.00 each.
PLUGS—Soark Champion 53c each; A, c.
Titan "V e**ch* Hel-FI. 5Rc each
i'oi isn MTtjT\AJL—Ktondyke. Vi i>t. $1.16
dOS :  ,» r>t. *2 40 dox: 1-pt. $4 SO db*.
PPMPS—Tire Ace $2 60 each; Crown $150
each.
Tf a it S—-Robe No 127 9flC each
Fabr'c tires, universal non-skid tread: 30x
3U   $1X00.
Oi*ev tubes: SOvIU'. $2 50; 32x3U, $2 73; 31x
4 $3.50: 3?x4 $3 75: 33x4 $3 85: 34x4 $4.10.
Tubas: less 30 per cent off list. 40
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which is incorporated the I!   C. TRADE REVIEW.
February
A STATEMENT YOU CAN UNDERSTAND
As at December 31st, 1923
ASSETS
Cash in Office ami Hanks	
Securities 	
These securities consist of Canadian and I*. S. tlovernmetit. state nnd municipal bonds and other securities of the highest grade,
Premiums in Course of Collection	
All accounts over 90 days old are excluded.   This represent! I normal amount
of live current accounts equalling only about 8*8 days' gross premiums
Miscellaneous Assets 	
Consisting of interest accrued on bonds; amounts due from Other Insuranc**
companies, etc.
Total Admitted Assets Belonging to Policyholders
From these assets we have excluded all furniture and fixture,*, automobiles,
printing plant, supplies, premium accounts ov»-r 90 day* old. and «ll other
• assets not quickly convertible into cash.
LIABILITIES
Reserve for Losses in Process of Adjustment
Reserve for unearned Premiums
This reserve is the full unearned portion of the premium held for the p»»)
ment of any future losses on policies in force.
Reserves for Funds held under Reinsurance Agreements
Reserve to Cover All Other Liabilities
This is a reserve to cover taxes accrued, dividends accrued on expired poll
cies and all other current liabilities, other than lOSSei
Net Cash Surplus	
♦ 326,440,88
11,689,860.68
♦  437,247.48
*    38,284.77
This being the net amount left after providing for all reserves SI tflbOti
♦2,491 J42.81
Total Liabilities
119,007.94
♦1,750,092 12
♦    44 ,887,50
110,853 57
$  448,401.68
♦2,491,842.81
DECEMBER 31, 1023
Surplus for Payment of Future Losses.   This All Belongs to Policyholders and is Merely
Held for Their Protection 2,208,003.80
Consists of the net cash surplus, together with unearned premium reserve,
1023
Net losses Paid to Policyholders
Dividends and Savings to Policyholders
SINCE ORGANIZATION
Losses Paid to Policyholders    	
Dividends ard Savings to Policyholders
$1,286,247.48
$1,000,200.61
$8,366,478.57
$7,138,410.32
Northwestern Mutual Fire Association
801 VANCOUVER BLOCK
VANCOUVER, B.C. 1)24
rn
niK m-JlTISII COLUMBIA UKTAILKR
With which is Incorporated tha i:
41
TRADE REVIEW.
it \s sometimes remarked by insurers that the
.Wrtl'western .Mutual Kire Association is too particular m its underwriting methods. The accompanying
cul forcefully tellfl a story of careless underwriting
thai is being duplicated in scores of cities in the North
American continent, with disastrous results to lives
and property. The story unfolded is. to the Northwest-
.in, added incentive to further develop the husiness
of tire underwriting, with a view t<> eliminating all
possible Hre hasards. Over insurance, carelessness,
(■ad housekeeping and ignorance create *& very low
moral hazard, tad nowadays, with she physical risk
being protected hy highly specialized lire fighting apparatus and the buildings being lire proof and semi
tire proof, the moral hazard constitutes the larger risk.
The Northwestern inspects every risk, satisfies itself
that the values are real and then covers for noi more
than Ml', of the real value, exccpl under CO insurance.
Inspections are made -periodically afterwards, Further,
the Northwestern believes in and practises selection of
rixkv
The foregoing metheods nre th© secret of thc company's low loss ratio and its ability to pay targe div-
idemls-m other    words,    "tire  prevention"    is the
motto.
WHAT   THE   BUYER   OF   FIRE   INSURANCE
SHOULD CONSIDER.
When a man buys tire insurance, he is interested in
several qualifications in respect to the company issuing
that insurance,
I nsuranee is merely a promise to pay in case of loss,
It is natural to inquire;    Is the company sound and
is its plan stalde? is then* reasonable assurance that
when theloss does occur (if it does), the company will
then \w doing business?
The mutual company that you may be considering,
will delight iu answering the above questions, Their
past record will be an index for you,   Maybe they will
ihots you that in one hundred years no nre mutual has
faded that has protected ||s position by a definitely
arranged '"surplus,*' along Hues that are today follow
cd by practically all mutuals.
Another import ant consideration is the "attitude
of the company toward caitus. a loi of people never
consider that feature at all, not until they've had a
tire and are seeking settlement, Then it is thej discover its true significance.
Any company or any man may discount the worlh
Of a contract that has been given, when it comes to
settlement People who arc "hard losers'* can tight
Ihrough the courts aud trot out a hundred different
technicalities. Just claims can be collected from such
people but at what cost in time and bother?   And 80
We say, study Ihe r )rd of the company you arc in-
SUring with. We know "mutuals" who have operated
for over twenty years continuously without a single
court suit.
TT.15   MORI
Marshall Grenfell Says Underwriters Careless.
IE
FIRMS ARE GIVEN TESTS
Special Operatives Secure Insurance,'on Had Property Without InvcfitigatlMr
Aa 4h« opening sun In a crusade
»f.iU*i»t (he emderlylng cauM of
Portland's Ore bug troebles. special
• operatives ot tho Uta marshsd's of-
I In tltt ye&urday cl'.no*<J insursace of
|*>:.c<>0 oa three old houses! two of
which were recently destroyed by
firebugs and the third of which was
partially destroyed. None of the
houses ha* any value.
The operatives turned over to Fire
Marshal Grenfell and City Commissioner Bigelow policies already written snd delivered aggregating 111.-
ooo. and ths melt today ta expected
4o Urlng la tbs rest of ths policies,
the agents having agreed to mail the
policies yesterday. Ot IJ agents visited by tbe operatives, only five re-
fused to write Insurance until ths
property was vlmed and appraised.
Several of the others urged the special operatives to Increase the
amount of insurance.
ammttstfjta Kasy te Get.
The purpeee in pulling the operatives in the fie*J wu to demonstrate
hew easy It Is for a person to buy an
pld shack and insure il heavily and
then destroy it by fire, defrauding
the_ Insttrano* companies, causing
j trouble lor the flte department and
endangering surrounding property
ajij-livvs.
/Th? three propcrtlis selected for
.the tryout of tlie 1st methods nf ".he
S-isur.tii-i- aRents were 20*11 Cant
Hr>*a- v.iv, whieh was destroyed recent!)- and found to have* 11 I'M*
w»tth of insurance coverln-g Turnl-
lure that actually cosl less than IIS;
ill ritioh avenue Nortit. which was
burned by a tire hug for ths insurance and i-MI Sixty-second avenue-
Southeast, which was set afire and
partially destroyed for the same
purpose. The operative wese Instructed not tu ask for any spcctiled
amount of Insurarce. bul lw ask the
agents <c/fix the amount.
Se Investigation Made.
lu tin majority of caacs the
naents advised the operatives that
ej,ey were fapiHiar with the property through their office maps and
the amount Ot n«urance was iwtreed
opon ami the policy written at that
tune. In some cases the policies
v ere ■ffllvtred t« tne operant** at
onee and is othi r cases they wete
mailed to a pustoffice boa where
they were received, yesterday after-
r.fcon. , ,
The purpose of making this test,"
raid Fue Marshal OrenfslJ yester-
• *>y.>"«-i:* 10 ttWW to the public anil
to the insurance agents the cause of
so many small flies in Portland ami
the possibilities of bum Ing'places
(or Insurance, which practice has
tuen tamed nil hy tire bugs.   .    ••
"1 h»ve vuiied a large number of
fins that were most ccrttttlly Incendiary an I I found ovei '-Insurance In
every case.
'The best basis'to start op a, cm-
sado against over-Insurance is lo
have tho proof that over-Insurance
conditions exist. w> gave tie in-
stiraiKA agents every chance In ths
world to keep from falling into uur
iirarififi by giving them, every
chance to Inspect ths property wo
off. rel and for .that reason no
charge of taking advantage of them
can bo made. Tho operatives who
visited tltem were strangers to them
and *Wg»»POorl>' dressed ' 42
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which ta incorporated tho B. 0. TUADR REVIEW.
Pel
•nruarv
The Sense of Values
Absence of This Valuable Trait Causes Half Our Business Worries and Troubl
By JOHN M   HARTLEY
IT is hard to get through life without a sense of values as without a sense of humor. A narrow vision discounts the sense of values. We* are horn
into a world of environment just as we are horn into n
physical world. We are fortunnate if we ean break
through the habits of thought with whieh we are nut-
turned in the disciplinary years. We are more fortunate if we man ave various experiences, even poverty
to contrast with prosperity—it will help us to sense
values.
Half the jalousies of the world exist because many
lack a sense of values—proportion. We compare others with ourselves, and we may he short of stature.
"Because he could swear hy none higher, he swore
by Himself." We accept our own value, and until
proved, or checked, by experience, we must dub along.
The doctrine of all men being born free and equal
sanctions the starting point as within ourselves, lint
we find through life that there are degrees of quality,
both in spiritual, moral, and in economic life. Commencement days at school from grammar right
through till college ends—finds the highest personal
sense of values. The* premium is soon bid down when
life begins trading in abilities. Good stuff well trained will show, and the stock will rise as it proves value.
Economic value is very naturally the first value
that we consider, as it has to do with our daily bread
and the comforts and luxuries that lie above bread and
water. The barometer of wealth is perhaps nol ihe
best theory of provin-g life-value, but is accepted aa
the popular measure of success. Class jealously is
built on the variables that lay in economic values.
Equality—there is none in this important field. If there
was, taxation and many other things would be simplified. The economic field has a definite effect on
every other phase of life. It takes the leisure that
cornes with economic independence to explore for further comforts and enjoyments and to develop the arts
that bring pleasure to all of us. Independence offers
the means and opportunity for human experiences;
some of them are foolish, some of them wise, those of
real value become accepted and very soon the common
property of the whole human family. And yet we
liave constant jealousy of our economic superiors, hut
mostly class jealously. Politicians see to it that this
class jealously is kept alive, as they and we need it in
the- business of life.
We Weaken Ourselves.
We wrong ourselves when we do not seek the oilier
man's point of view. We handicap ourselves if we
build for ourselves a false standard of values.    We
an- nut of ourselves perfect, nor can we truthfully accept ourselves at our own worth. We should seek
comparison with other*. Wt* -should extend our environment, and find the views ami experiences of others,
and thus add t<» our own knowledge and ability (o
judge opportunity. The baker that limits his opportunity for irade experience to his own shop, and fails
tO mingle with others ol Ins kind, ran win little future
in the baking business, We Can keep our nose bo close
to the grindstone that we lose perspective and tee onl)
the knife and 'he grindstone.   Both are useful, but
only when the grindstone sharpens tin* knife, anil otil>
when the sharp knife ia put |t> further duty in the at*
ttvity of life     We can ROt *« I ourselves as a standard
even to ourselves until we have proved our ability in
competition with others,  Self satisfaction m the surest
mental path I" B rut. Our dense of values ean onl\ be
kept keen by association with others     We can keep
alive and progressive only as we step out of ourselves
and our shop, and sise ourselves up in comparison with
others. Then We learn something- have the mental
desire to learn when we admit WS don't know it all.
He Explains it all.
The peculiar thing about the man in a rut is Ins
willingness to admit how smart he is,   If business Ist
bad, buck is against him. His sense of values is warp
ed.    The rest of the regime D| «re out of step with lllffl,
and  In* resents it.    He is an autoerat  al  heart, and
wants the world, as ii applies to his individual business, made over to suit his ideas ami convenience.   I"
our trade we can't do this, neither ean we have the
world set back a few years to those good old days when
our theories did fit. There is something wrong with
the world, the trouble lies with us. We have let our
sense of value becomes dull, and have failed to revise
our point of view i>r our program lo lit the changing
world. Values are never stable. Stocks go up and
down. We have but one fixed standard of value the
gold dollar aud its value- is but lhat of a denominator as it takes more or less of them to buy a given
thing on different days. Values lay in the average that
supply and demand sets. Your value and my value
to society lays in how our services are judged by the
public that we serve, and our returns are comim-nsur
ate. They set the tempo by which the regiuiet.t march
es. and if we are out of step with the regiment, ami the
regiment is doing well and we are not, ii Is wisdom
for us to take stock of ourselves ami get in step.
The retail bakers have always set their high vain*'
on production lhe craft The wholesale bakers have
stressed the selling end of baking, We retailers arc
very apt  lo get  vexed  al  the  wholesalers when  we M
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which is Incorporated the B. C. TRADfc RETVIEW.
43
Lake of the Woods
Milling Company
LIMITED
Makers of
FIVE ROSES
• FLOUR •
The World's Best
Daily Capacity 14,200 Bbls.
B.C. Offices and Warehouses:
1800 Rio-hards Street 1614 Store 8treet
VANCOUVER VICTORIA
3
realise thai thev have found that their judgmenl and
their seleetion tits these days better than ours. It's no
use getting peeved, we can do likewise.   The craft is a
great thing, but this is a -selling age must boa selling
age because our methods and machinery of production
iias gamed faster than the ordinary needs of consumption. This is ho in most every line of endeavor, and
the general fact builds the trend of the age that reaches every line of production. The merchant is the winner   lie who produces to till the progressive aeeds of
good merchandising will prosper. He who produces
even lhe best goods and puts no effort comparable to
the general merchandising efforts of other trades into
tlie .sal- of them, will languish. All the bitter lamentations of Jeremiah will not avail to alter things as they
are     We can't turn the clock back even to that day
when Emerson pointed thc moral of the better mous^
trap as an  incentive  to road building,    ll  may have
1 n     true     then        Kuyrson     may     h*»ive    sensed
tlie values of his day but this is a selling
age, ami the* very best mouse trap needs skillful introduction to this sceptical world as it is, aid considerable selling even after it has been prove! a swell
mouse catcher. It is results that count, and craft production well sold will secure re-sults. No consumer
has any fault to find with the craft, the fault with the
retailer who may be doing less business than he ought,
io do will most always be found in poor merchandising.
We should see that our judgment of valuer is in tune
with the age—and this is a selling age and growing
more ho.
Xo one can afford to bo stubborn or too much set in
their ways while journevimr through this world that is
adding speed each year. The ruling factor ra our business is the counter- md tin* bench,    It IS nt the conn-
Her Study—
NUTRITION
The modern woman may progress far, but she'll
never progress beyond Interest in her big study
—the nutrition of her family.
She has learned that the presence of yeast in Bread
la one of the chief reasons for its nutrition, due to
the presence in yeast of the precious Vitamin B,
now recognized as an essential food factor.
Fleischmann's Yeast Is one of the richest known
sources of Vitamin B.
Remind your customers, so that they won't have to
remind you—■
Fleischmann's Yeast
Adds Nutrition
The Fleischmann Company
Yeast
Fleischmann's
Service
Diamalt
tcr where business is done, and over whieh the value of
our goods is returned-   We have to step some to keep
with things as they are.   To study merchandising is
at least interesting.  It is also profitable.  A new show*
case or window background may easily pay largeu
cash returns than a new machine.   It is hard for us
who work at production to adjust our notion of values
to accept such a theory.   Mingle with some of our
successful ones in the trade and find out how they
figure things out.    You might  be riglit—but if the
other baker is more successful and does more business,
and makes more money, you must agree that his program better tits things as they are.   The chanees arei
you will find that you and he differ considerably onl
what a store girl is worth per week, what rentals and'
locations are preferable, and if it pays to doll up a|
store    You will very likely agree as to shop equipment ami shop practice.   Your whole difference will;
lie in his higher estimate of the merchandising end off
our business.   His sonvse of values has been revised as
things as they are* demanded. He has followed through;
from the bench outward to where the customer has aj
say.   lie has taken his nose from the grindstone and
looked at his business from a longer range, and taken
a full prospective.
It is a good thing to follow Solomon's advice "And
know thyself." .We ean find our value by comparison.
We can only get a real idea of our ability by reading!
of, tin1 mingling with, others in our business. We may
be entitled to medals, but it isn't good form to pin
them on ourselves. We may not like the way things
arc going in this busy world, we may desire the old
days bacli most earnestly, but this world as it is, is*
where we have to do business, ami we must compete according to thc rules that exist and as they are amended* 44
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which ll incorporated the II C. TRADB REVIEW.
February
from time to time. We want to keep our sense* of
values up to the minute. If we do we need nevt if
worry about next week or next year, we will be able
to meet it Under any exigencies, and meet it with intelligence and assurance of success.
SMALL BUSINESS AND GREATER PROFITS
NON-COMMERCIAL   PHOTOGRAPHERS    EXEMPT    FROM
SALES TAX.
The Minister of Customs and Excise has been pleased to
establish the following regulations, under authority of Section 19C of The Special War Revenue Act. with Amendments
thereto, in effect from January 1st. 1921:
Photographers selling exclusively to the consumer or user
are classified as retailers, and are not required to take out
a sales tax license.
The term "photographers'* in these regulations means ordinary photographers only, not including photographers who
make and sell photographs to be used in connection with the
manufacture of other goods.
(Signed) R. It. Farrow.
Commissioner of Customs and Excise.
Small business and careful management not infr	
quentiy result in a greater percentage of profits than
a large volume conducted under careless supervision,
lu otlor words, it is a toss-up nowadays which is the
more important, to know how to manufacture quality
goods, or the supervision of such production,   But it
does seem that no matter how successful a man tun\
be iu turning OUt high class products it will avail him
but little if the cost of turning them out is proportionately greater than his trade will pay for
TICKETS AND   LABELS
MADE BY SPECIALISTS.
A specialist, In any calling. Is one equipped to produce results promptly, satisfactorily and economically.
This is where our plant differs from the average printing* office. We carry In stock many tons of colored card
boards for Immediate use. At one operation with our
modern specialty machinery, we print tickets in two to teltr
colors on front of ticket and on the back: number each
ticket the same or consecutively and perforate sheet
both ways; or we can print your tickets and re-wind
Into rolls to suit, each ticket numbered consecutively
and correctly. We make bread labels In two colors for
the price of printing one color, in quantities, and put
up Into rolls of 5.000 We make the tickets for the
B.C.E. Ry. by the millions: for the North Vancouver
Ferries; for the Government, and all kinds of theatre
tickets.    May we not be of service to you.
NICHOLSON, LTD.
Phone:  Bay view 370
MM 2nd AVENUE WEST VANCOUVER. B. C.
QUICK ACTION and ACCURACY
are what one depend* upon when placing i i«ong Distance call   These are
factor! which our Long Distance ita8
ever" themselves* to provide vou with
Are vou ma-kluK vour Telephone deliver Ie»e,
useful service tn >o«r business or home liii'7 \i
your disposal are i<»ng Distance ttaii n> all principal towns nnd village* within hundred* of mJi-81 Qt
your own Telephone, Including many United States
points,
Call our    Hate Clerk'* for charge*     Vou will find
them reasonable.
BRITISH COLUMBIA TELEPHONE 00. V.r\
• e
e e
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which is incorporated the B. C. TRADE REVIEW.
Buy in British Columbia
45
s •
Mis. Maine's Marmalade
ORANGE
GRAPE
FRUIT
PINE
APPLE
X WHISTLE
Wrapped in  Bottles
CROSS A CO. Vancouver.
B
C.
Boies
for  B.
C. Good*.
B.
C.
Goods
for  B.
C. People.
Nati
ona
1  Paper
Box 4 Carton Co.
L
noted.
260
Lome Street W.
Vancouver.
CORNISH & COOPER
Saeh.   Ooora,   Joinery.
245  Duffenn   St.  W.,      Vancouver.
Telephone*.   Fair. 963.
Milne & Middelton
Limited.
Wholesale   Millinery,   Notions  and
Smallwares.
347  Water   Street Vancouver.
PAINTS
Brandram-Henderson
of B. C. Ltd.
GRANVILLE    ISLAND
Vancouver.
«V'A*liS
Voonia
Garden
Tea
E. Chrystal & Co. Ltd.
Sash,   Doors,   Store   Fixtures   and
Alterations
108 Georgia Street E.    Vancouver.
PAPER BAGS
Paper begs, wrapping paper,
tor atl requirements.
COLUMBIA PAPER CO. LTD.
1038 Hamilton St. Vancouver, B.C.
J. S. Maxwell & Co.
WO Mercantile Bldg., Vancouver, B. C.
Phone:  Sey.   1533
Repre»entlng:
T. E. LINNETT STARTIN LTD., Biraiifksa
Plni,   Hairpins.   Notions.
T. I. BIRKIN 4 CO. LTD., Nettiiikaa
Lace   Curtains,   Nets.
NINES STROUD 4 CO. LTD., L.nJ.i
••Alrletle"   Down   Comforters.   Tapestries. Etc.
CLATWOITHY S SONS LTO. tataala
Store display 4. decorative equipment.
QUAKER JAM8
Made of fresh fruit and itigsr; tin*
purest Of Ingredients,    Will
satisfy
Ihe most exacting.
DOMINION  CANNERS,
B. C.
Limited
VANCOUVER, B. C.
IS YOUR BUSINESS FOR SALE
our department dealing exclusively in the sale of mercantile
mil other businesses is organised
in give prompt ellleieilt service
at cost usually less than the (tiff
erence in price we can procure
for you.    It  pays to list  with
Pemberton & Son
418 Howe St.   Vancouver, B. C.
PACIfIC AGENCIES LIMITED
Importers
TOYS,    BASKETS,    RUGS
and
GENERAL    FANCY   GOODS
.119.321 Homer St. V.neo.
J.G. MacKinnon & Co.
Independent Silks
Ladies' and Gents' Dresses and
Clothing
508 Mercantile Bldg.      Vancouver.
MONARCH   KNITTING   CO.
Limited.
Mens and womens hosiery knitted
outerwear and hand knitting yarns.
Represented in British Columbia
STEWART A WALLACE LTD
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Phone:   High. 3889
IDEAL CONE COMPANY
Manufacturers of
ICE   CREAM   CONES
Purest Made     Cost Less
335 PRINCESS AVE.
Vancouver.
E. J. WAKEFIELD
36 Dufferin St. E. Phone: Fair. 4959
Artistic Wicker Furniture
Strongly built. Concealed supports.
WRITING     TABLES,     SETTEES
FLOWER  AND HALL STANDS
CHAIRS
This  Made  in  B.  C.  Line  merits
your   earliest   attention.
Mail orders or inquiries will secure
prompt response.
JEWELERY
Complete     stock     of     diamonds,
Watches,   Silverware,   etc.
WESTERN    WHOLESALE
JEWELERS    LTD.
Cor Cambie and Cordova Streets.
VANCOUVER, B. C. 46
e e
e e
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which is Incorporated the B. C. TRADE REVIEW
Buy in British Columbia
Pel
iruarv
e e
e e
PAPER  BAGS
J. C. WILSON* LTD.
1088 Homer Street,       Vancouver.
ROYAL CROWN
SOAPS
Manufactured in British Columbia
and guaranteed.
ROYAL CROWN  SOAPS  LTD.
PAINTS
MARTIN-SENOUR
CO.   LTD.
1505 Powell  Street,
Vancouver
TK CIRCLE - BAR
KNiniNG CO. LTD.
J. J. MACKAY,
Agent.
804 Bower Bldg.
Vancouver.
Mimn
HOSIERY
YEAST
THE FLEISCHMANN CO.
W. S. DUNN, Manager.
1168  Burrard  Street     Vancouver.
J. A. TEPOORTEN
LIMITED
WHOLESALE DRUGS
308 WATER STREET
VANCOUVER, B. C.
MeCORMICKS
JERSEY CREAM
SODAS
McCormick  Mfg. Co. Ltd.
1150  Hamilton   Street, Vancouver.
C. H. KENNEY, Manager.
8ERVICE   TO   OUT   OF   TOWN
SUBSCRIBERS.
The British Columbia Retailer will
be pleased to furnish subscribers
the names and addresses of representatives or agents of eastern
manufacturers in Vancouver. We
will also advise where their commodities can be purchased.
N. K. FAIRBANK    CO. LIMITED.
Yorkshire Bldg. Vancouver.
Hams & Bacon
Swift's "Premium"
SWIFT CANADIAN CO. LTD.
Vancouver.
Fire Insurance
Retail    Merchants    Underwriters
Agency.
420 Pacific  Bdlg. Vancouver.
PAPER
BAGS     AND     WRAPPING
Norfolk Paper Co. Ltd.
136 WATER STREET
Vancouver.
Water Repellent Clothing
R. A. 8IME;
B. C Distributor
CampkU it-Mk m ht-J
SIS VtttaauU IcU-Jtat
V»M«tm.'a c.
fatattmai $aath a taattakt
GALVANIZED IRONWEAR
THE THOS. DAVIDSON MFG. CO.
LTD,
123 Powell Street Vancouver,
mm
J
REGISTERED.1
CHIPMAN-HOLTON       KNITTING
CO, LTD.
E. H. Walsh A Co. Ltd., Agents.
318  Homer Street,        Vancouver.
FURNITURE
Fir Furniture of Quality.
DOWLINO   MANUFACTUR-
ING COMPANY.
266—2nd Ave JE.   Vancouver.
UNDERWEAR
ATLANTIC    UNDERWEAR    LTD.
E.   H    Walsh  4  Co.   Ltd.,  Agents
318 Homer Street Vancouver.
I C. HL Jones & Son   i
J Limited.
x Manufacturers
* PIONEER    BRANO
| TENTS.  AWNINGS.  FLAGS  AND
" CANVAS GOODS OF ALL KINOS.
Jobbers of:
Gold  Medal Camp  Furniture
Cotton duck, all widths and weights
28   WATER     STREET.
^ Vancouver. B. C.
'lK*<!XIK*<iXlK»!XiM^«iXlXJKlKJCiX!*K5K!X^!X^
T. D. STARK Telephone
F. W. STERLING Sey. 6195
STARK <* STERLING
MANUFACTURERS'   AGENTS
1401   Dominion  Building
VANCOUVER, B. C.
FRAUD INSURANCE
ALFRED W. McLEOD, LTD.
Vancouver and
New Westminster 1
Bags to satisfy—that's all
"RAVEN"  Manilla
"GARRY" Light Kraft
"RUPERT" H^y Kraft
These bags are made by the Woods Manufacturing Company at
Winnipeg, only Western Canadian bag makers, on some of the
most up-to-date paper bag making machinery in Canada.
Our business is to turn out bags of quality at proper prices.
That our growth has been so steady is due to our friends, the
retail trade, recogniiing the superior quality, service and satisfaction found in using these bags.
We would be glad to send you samples.
NORFOLK PAPER CO. LTD.
136 Water St.       Sey. 7868.      VANCOUVER, B. C.
Agents for B. C.
Woods Manufacturing Co. Ltd.
Winnipeg, Manitoba.
Swift's Premium Frankfurters
Brookf^ld Brand
Pork Sausage       I
J~tl! iVW.»« C7     __J     ,"
\
The desire of the average merchant is to increase his volume
of business, thereby getting more profit. You will find Swift's
"Premium" Frankfurters will fulfil your desire—Superior to
any Frankfurter on the market-make sure you insist on "Premium" Look for the tag bearing the brand-A trial order will
satisfy you they are what you should stock.
Swift Canadian Company, Limited ■HHBHBBSHHHBeBBHW*!**.
Comfort, Long Wear,
Neat Appearance
—these are the factors for which thoughtful
mothers seek out Little Darling and Little Daisy
Stockings for their children.
They have a splendid year-round demand all over
Canada. A complete stock in your store means
a steady profit. Get in touch with your wholesaler immediately.
Little Darling Stockings —for babies. Little
Daisy—(or children of all ages. You can get them
in a wide range of dainty colors—and black—all
have silken toes and heels.
Chipman-Hoiton knitting Company, Limited, Hamilton, Ontario
Mills at Hamilton nnd Wetland
90
LITTLE DARLING"
"LITTLEDAISY''
Buster Brown, Three
Little Daisy, R
\\ 1    '

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