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The British Columbia Retailer Sep 30, 1923

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Array ANNUAL FALL NUMBER
Th£ British Columbia
Vancouver, B. C.
20c per copy; $2.00 per year
SEPTEMBER, 1923
OJ
V)
CONTENTS
"Trading Witbin tbe Empire"
By J  B. Thomson
Proceedings of tbe  I8tb Annual
Dominion Convention  R.M.A.
Tbe Great Sugar Mystery
"Tbe Ethical Side of Business"
By W. H. Malkin
Prairie Butter to tbe United
Kingdom
Fall Styles in Millinery and
Footwear
First " Harding  Memorial Stamp
Readies Vancouver
Insurance-   Items of Interest
to the Retail Trade
Bread Eating Countries of the
World
All Regular Features
Vol. XVI. No. 1.
Sixteenth Year.
\ "Standard" Paper Bags—3 grades
We Manufacture and sell
the following 'Standard"
Paper Bags
Lachute  &  St.  Jerome,
Paper Mills*.
Que.
Manufacturers   since   1870
"MANILLA"
"LIGHT KRAFT"
"HEAVY KRAFT"
THEY ARE
Actually Stronger, Tougher
More Pliable, Mo»t Econt mical
Most Satisfactory
It Pays to Use the Best   They Cost No More
J. C. WILSON, LIMITED
Manufacturers of
PAPER BAGS.      WRAPPING, TISSUE AND TOILET PAPERS
for    Wholesalers and Retailers.
1068 HOMER STREET, VANCOUVER. B. C
Phone: Sevmour 731
THE BIGGEST SOAP VALUE ON THE MARKET
Include it
in your
next order
The White Laundry Soap
Manufactured by
THE ROYAL CROWN SOAPS, LTD.
VANCOUVER, B.C. 1923
IIIK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILEB
 I '   B. C. «A*Si™      '
We Help You Sell the Farmer
11 ml ever) farm home is today a prospect for Linoleum is due in a large measure to
consistent, year in and year out. Dominion Linoleum Advertising appearing in every
important Canadian farm publication. Four specimen, seasonable, summer-time advertisements sir.' shown in reduced form above.   They present
Dominion Linoleum Floor Coverings
to ihe fanner and his wife in a way that makes selling easy. Economy, comfort and
adaptability to everj room in the house points that have a strong appeal in the
thrift I farm home arc emphasised. Keen dealers handle Dominion Linoleum Rugs
and Linoleum by thc yard because of this result-getting copy.   It pays.
Cut this out and preserve it with the first and second of the scries. The fourth will
appear in next mouths issue "I "!'>. c. Retailer.
Dominion Oilcloth & Linoleum Company
Limited, Montreal
/Vn. 3 of a series of informative advertisements giving practical reasons for selling
Dominion Linoleum Floor Coverings THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which is incorporated the B  >    TRADE REVIEW
September,
ROGERS'
GOLDEN SYRUP
"The End of a Perfect Day"
■flMade from finest flavoured cane sugar, a special grade of which is imported for the
purpose.
flPut up in all sizes of packages to suit your customers* requirements,
|[Tn paekages designed to beautify your store.
2-lb. tins, 24 to a case. 10 lb. tins, 6 to a case.
5-lb. tins, 12 to a case. 20 lb. tins, 3 to a case.
Perfect Seal jars, 12 to a case.
The British Columbia Sugar Refining Go. Ltd.
VANCOUVER, B.C. 1923
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which Is Incorporated the B. C. TRADE REVIEW.
PROFITS
After all
are the
Essential
Point
in your
Business.
Without
Profit
you
cannot
succeed.
On them
depend
yjur
Success.
Sell
Goods
that are
quick
sellers
and lines
that show
Good
Profits.
Brunswick Brand Sardines
Are QUICK SELLERS with a NICE PROFIT
Make BRUNSWICK BRAND your Leader.
The Sales are enormous.   Order
from your wholesaler.
Connors Bros., Ltd.
BLACK'S HARBOR, N.B.
Say you saw it in "The Paper the 'Retailer "Reads" THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which is Incorporated the B   C, TRADE REVIEW
Srlil.ii,
Our Grandmother's
Loved Flavor
Quaker
Tbe loved flavor of Quaker .lams   the
pure lull rtehneft* of fresh, ripe fruil
fjet*** Ms lasting goodness from lhe bum
li If recipe of our grandmothers, l"i* c
i*. made in our grandtuotli r s *iu.* nl
> | nini I ie u ny    Vi ■• \un just fruit ai d
si'... t ax she did.
Dominion Canners, B. C
Limited
Head Office:      -   -     VANCOUVER.
MUTUAL FIRE INSURANCE
Stop   the   fires,   keep your  property  and   spend   less  for
insurance.
The sole pupose of mutual  insurance  is fire  prevent ion
efficient stewardship, and lower cost insurance.
Mutual fire insurance is not a commodity, it is a principle.
Mutual fire insurance means fire prevention through inspection and education.
Common  sense is a fundamental of mutual fire insurance
-apply it to your fire insurance problems.
For particulars get in touch with
801 VANCOUVER BLOCK
VANCOUER, B.C.
Retail Merchants' Underwriters Agency
of the
Northwestern Mutual Fire Association
_
Say you saw it in "The 'Paper the Retailer 'Reads" 1923
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which in Incorporated the B. C. TRADE REVIEW.
%fy
BRITISH COLUMBIA
RPAILER
Publiibed Monthly
FIFTHKNTH YKAK
GKJNKRAI.  MHIK'HANDISB.
GKOCKKIICS, DHYGQODS,
HARDWARE, FOOTWEAR,
OFFICIAL ORGAN OF B.C. BOARD
RETAIL MERCHANTS'
ASSOCIATION  OF CANADA.
A" MONTHLY JOURNAL published in the interest of Retail Merchandising and the Development of Commerce in Western Canada.
SUBSCRIPTION RATH: Two Dollars Per fear, payable in advance.
Advertising; Hates on Application.
Publishers:   PROGRESS PUBLISHING CO. LTD.
Suite   101-2  Merchants'  Exchange   Building
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Telephone Se)   3861 Cable Address—Shipping   All Codes
Editor, J  8  Mot i im)!, w   \  Code, Business Manager
F.is'rrn Canada Representative, .1   S   Robertson, 9 Richmond Street East, Toronto
Entered at Ottawa an Second-class matter
Secretaries,   Represent
Branches R. M. A.
Agassiz W,
Armstrong G.
Chilliwaek .A.
Cloverdale A.
Courtenay   F.
Cumberland J.
Cranbrook J,
Duncan L.
Esquimalt  H.
Grand Forks S.
Hammond & Haney.. .A.
Kamloops A.
Kelowna A.
Ladner A.
Ladysmith j,
Lytton  B.
Merritt  G.
Mission F.
Nanaimo J.
Nelson    E.
New Westminster D.
Prince George  C.
Princeton A.
Revelstoke J*
Trail T*
Vancouver W
Vernon D.
Victoria  ...J*
White Rock E.
ing  the  following
.  A.  Jones
H.  Smith *
Knox
J. Burrows, Pres.
Field
Sutherland
F.   Scott   (Pres.)
E.   Helen
E. Pickard
T. Hull
J.  Scott
H. Muirhead.
S. Wade
W.  Bull
McCormick.
Rebagliati.
B. Armstrong
(Pres).
C. Lightbody
L.  Ward
F. Gigot
Stuart
C. Reid (Act. Sec
Sorenson
P. Hume
A.  Robley
F.  Ing
Fernie
Wallis
H. Hardy.
Vol. Wl   W   1
September. YA22.
Vancouver, B.C.
THE BOGUS CHECK "ARTIST."
TOURIST TRAFFIC.
The rapidly increasing shipments of grain and
other commodities through tin* port of Vancouver
will be a direet benefil to those interested m trans-
portal Ion,
Thesi shipments cannot however bring anything
bul an indifferent prosperity to those engaged in the
retail trade.
The one thing thai will improve the bank roll ol
the retail merchant is an increased tourist traffic into
V.lli.-.HIV. I*.
\«'t s»-r\ niitiiv years ago Im** Angeles with a population o! Borne fort,> eighl thousand decided upon an
advertising campaign, inviting the world  to ins] I
ih. natural beauties of her surrourtdings
Today 'Ins Californian city, embracing Hollywood,
has a population of one million souls, and is known in
every quarter of the American continent
Advertising haa brought this about, and there is
no reason win Vancouver, situated amidst magnincenl
natural scenery should nol succeed to b nf*'' extent by
adopting a similar method for increasing her popularity with nor southern and eastern neighbours.
The opening of the Pacific Highway on Labor Day
demonstrated beyond h doubt how eagerl,\ motorists
will avail themselves of a run to British Columbia, and
the publicity which we understand is lo Im* given to this
connecting link is certainly a step in the right direction. Retail merchants should, and will join any move
ment thai tends to increase the flow of visitors into
\ ancouver.
The recent amendment to the penal law in the United Stair** which is directed toward the punishment
of "bad check artists" bids fair to offer a real boon
to the entire business community in that country.
Th'* new law eliminates the ten days' notice previously required to be given the had check passer before
in could be prosecuted. It allows the regular notice
of protest to be admitted as proof of insufficient funds.
or lack of funds in the hank on whieh the check has
been drawn.
Thr new law dispenses with the necessity which
formerly prevailed of producing officials of the bank
on whieh the bogus check was drawn to testify. Under
the old law il was impossible to convict withoul such
testimony, and many forgers and bogus cheek passers
consequently escaped prosecution because of the inability of man}  bank officials to testify against them.
!n that way the had check artists who invariably
used cheeks on out-of-town banks knowing how difficult n would be to bring witnesses front such hanks,
are now stopped.
Tills  new   law   has  the  support   of  the   Hotel   .Mens"
Association of New York City, the New York Credit
Mens' Association, the Bankers' Association of New
York State, and many other business organizations.
Steps are new being taken by the British Columbia
branch of the K. M. A. to discover just exactly how
stringent are the laws of this country in connection
with tin passing of bogus checks,
Note oar new address:
Suite 101-2 Merchants' &xchange Bailding THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Willi which Is Incorporated the B. C. TRADE REVIEW
Trading Within the Empire
A review of commercial conditions existing in the Mother Country.
r,\ .1   i;. THOMSON
Snecialh  written for the I'.. V   Retailer
Sept,-,
: inner
_
The Vanoouver Board of Trade have the distinct
honor of being the first Board of Trade h* Canada
who have sent a delegation to Great Britain, Fhe pur
pose for which this delegation visited thc homeland
was to try and convey to our kinsmen and fellov citizens of the British Empire a better knowledge of what
Canada, and especially British Columbia, could do to
make the empire self-supporting. .While at the same
time imparting information regarding the natural resources of our Dominion to the members of the various
Chambers of Commerce in Greal Britain, they in turn
showed a very great deal of what they have accomplished in the way of products in Great Britain in the
various spheres of industrial life and where we could
assist by using British products in preference to goods
of a foreign country, and in that way strengthen the
links of the chain of commerce which, has a good deal
to do with binding the British Empire together
and keeping it a unit.
The reception accorded to the delegates from Vancouver was remarkable. From a standpoint of faospit
ality no people eould have been kinder than were our
hosts in London and the provincial towns of England
and Scotland, which we visited. During our trip we
had the pleasure of meeting and speaking to some 21,
000 of the leading business men in Great Britain, We
received an immense volume of publicity in the British
press. Some 300 newspapers with over ~,H' articles
covering our efforts there certainly conveyed inform
ation regarding the opportunities which existed for investment in Canada, and particularly in the west, and
also for the assimilation of our fellow citizens of the
empire over there who would be suitable for doing
their part in the various spheres of labor in Canada.
We are all agreed that Canada must have a greater
popultion. and especially in the western section if we
are to derive the benefit of the natural inheritance we
have.
As regards trade conditions in Greal Britain, thc
period of reconstruction, and mure particularly thc
aftermath of war in Europe, has deprived the home
country of a greal many of her former markets, IV
sentially the British people live off their e-xporl trade,
largely taking raw materials from the various parts
of the world and manufacturing them for the various
requirements and styles reouired in the world's mar
jj-ls.   Tim shutting off of the immense buying power
so many millions in Europe has left many of these
duslrics with a shortage of work;. Their s.'.-ins to
be a difference of opinion as to whether the future
prosperity of Groa! Britain depends upon the development of her own overseas Dominions and those mar
kets which thev offord, or trying to effect a condition
in continental Europe which will again return to them
the markets they enjoyed in the past. Our objective
was to try and show them that at leas! as far as we
were concerned there was a greater opportunity with
their own flesh and blood in the overseas Dominions
to make for a permanenl commercial relationship
rather than thai relationship which has been so often
destroyed during past centuries in Europe by war. It
was necessary foi i  >■ protection <>! ti-. empire for  he
Mother Couutrj  and the overseas  Dominions to gel
together when war came, and we hold thai il is equal
l\  necessary for them to keep together no\i  in com
inereial relationship so as to be abb* to maintain the
principles ol freedom for whirl) we fought    One can
not   help  but   be   impressed  lhal   Ihis  condition  has
brought about a chant.''* to a great many of our leadin"
industries m Greal Britain, and thai uow the) are be
ginning to real   •   tho magnitude and importance ot
development of markets such as lhe Canadian market?*
and are prepared to consider its requirements in detail
and make goods wl    h are suitable for the country lo
a greater extent than <\er ' ■ fore,
h is to be h* ped thai some greai good will eome
out of the Imp- rial E oi om c Coi '■ * ■ wee and thai
when the Governmenl • i lers represent ng Il e \ \t i i
parts of the empiri •• * '■._"■),• Vm som« happ*** un
derstanding will be arr red .-a. whieh will facilitate
greater buying ai :  *el   ng among***.! our own people,
whether it   a  igl   th<  tirms of a preferential tarifl
or in some other course then again ll i re is oo •. i< h
tion but thai the Bril sh Empire IV.* bit toi wl ; is
to throw its doors open to thi pn '• of Greal Rriiain
and to visitors to that exhibit on next rear v*
lhe puhlie an opporl wit) thej have never had In fori
of knowing whal tl -• i m* in   -  apable of producii ::
As regards th< li xl l< * dustn an I ll • distr ;- it -'
of its produi *-. :" would n lhal thi average
me  haul   i   (Sreal  Hritaii    espei al ■   the larger dis
trihtttors, have been .2• V *.. .< ■> ,    *: * h. r m--,'-eka*.. :>•
without thc same ri *  i ol loss as the retailers in wesl
em Canada,    Ever *'-?a\ in eompai *oi  to home prieei
one will find on risiting lhe sl     i  n London t! al then
K nol even apparent the an    n I    I diffi n n •■ pi pn
sen ted by our tarifl   i  ll i rai ous commodities shown
j; the selling pric      In other woi It   to me it would
appear thai tbe retail mei hanl  was getting a ver)
much k>! '< r profit based on lodav's markel values in
Greal Britaii   lhan are lhe retailers in Western Cav.
ada.    rio- question of he    ol bus i ess amongst retai
merchants is nol  as apparent  as   m>   would imagine
when you read of ihe millions who .n-e unemployed
lhe dole system, which is st ill m rogui*-  seems to leave
a great deal ol mono  for the working class to spend.
rticatres,  all   places   of  amusement,   railroad   trams.
summer resorts, all scorn '" be crowded tost .is much,
it nol more so, then 'he\ were in pre war days  hcon
omieall)  the dob  system is unsound, and there is no
question but that it ean only go on until the difficult)
of unemployment can be deall with    The cosl i- too
greal for lhe British taxpayer to stand, and some other
solution than that of a government allowance musl be
forthcoming to di'-,\\ with thosi  who havi  not work,
The manufacturing textile centres were not hus,\
ami on all sides were complaints regarding the lack ol
orders, Of eourse, when the factor or raw materials
is eonsidi red tbe price of cotton and wool had made it
almost impossible for an- greal reduction to be made
in prices of textile requirements so as to stimulate bus
iliess. 1923
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which Ifl Incorporated the B. C. TRADE REVIEW.
Bul there is one tiling we were ph aged to hear. and.
that is in the majoritj of instances the efficiency ofl
the operator had eome hack very largely to a pre-war
standard, if not even exceeding it, so that the product
is a ureal deal better than it was during the peak period.
,\s regards the outlook for prices, ! do not think
the retail merchants can look to have ail) cheaper
tneivhandisi to offer the public than they have. There
are practically no distress goods, as ong might term
it, on ihe market there, ami when; goods have to be
made to order costs are always figured on the conditions at the tune of placing of order, both for raw
materials and  ol her cos* s.
In conclusion: 1 would just like to say that n greal
deal of good for Canada, ami especially for British
Columbia, ean eome from the visil of the Vancouver
delegation to Great Britain, provided that whal has
been done as you might say in pioneer or spade work
is followed up. Tins can he done and everyone can
pin*-* a part m il by giving atl lhe assistance they can
tifst to our Agenl General in London, who has m ably
s, • forth the claims of tins province and Canada as «
whole; seeing thai he is furnished with reliable information, much of which at times, no doubt, is overlooked: by seeing that every effort is put forth to keep
the opportunities in the development of our natural
resources before British capital with due regard that
statements are always conservative rather than overestimated, and that where investment is made by British investors and other investors in this provinee no
piatter who they are, that everything is done to assist
in making their husiness successful. Two or three thriving, prosperous industries in which I'.ritish eaptal s
livested which would daily appear before the British
public in featuring the progress and profits that were
being earned, would he the best inducement to others-
to come here and help to develop our province.
The Empire Exhibition is being held in London this.
coming year, and il is to be hoped that exhibts .from,
I'-rtish Columbia will he a sufficient quantity and embrace 'In* main industries of our province, as we will
hsve to compete in that Exhibition in showing our possibilities with the other overseas Dominions who are
verj mv'n alive to ihe opportunities which exist n
getting capital ami the proper elass of settlers from
Greal Britain.
Report of Proceedings at the Eighteenth Annual
Dominion Convention R. M. A.
1;-,. GEORGE H  HOUGHAM, Special Representative  Dominion Executive Board.
The thih Annual Convention ol th<' Dominion Board
,,•   •■.,■   I'm,.,.   *\],r |u,n!s'   Association  of Canada  look
piae. al Ihe Mount Itoyal Hotel, Montreal, opening on
Morula). Augusl 6th,
Km- the t'w'st lime iu lhe history of the A-*-" iation
ever) Province in Canada was represented by accredited delegate*, In adition to the offictrs and Secretaries of the various Provincial Board . tin * -Mowing
officers of the Dominion Executive Council were m
at tendance
.1 A p..into Id, Dominion President, Winnipeg ; J.
(I Watson, Vive-president, Nf ont real; W. G, DcWolfe,
vice president, St. Stephen. S B . W. J. Hopgood, Vice
president, Halifax. S S.. \Y A Stewart, vice president.
Charlottetown, P L I i Ifcnrj Watters, Dominion
Treasurer, Ottawa; IV M. Trowern, Dominion Seere
tary, Ottawa; \V E FaweetL vice-president, Saskatoon; V T. NL Dei-mid, vice-president, Calgary; J, I
Crowder, vice president, Vancouver; Geo. S Hougham,
late Se,Metai \   Provin if British Columbia, and now
special representative Dominion Board and Dominion
Kxecntive Council.
President •' A Banfleld, in bis annual address congratulated the association upon having passed out ol
i ■ I
the experimental .stage and achieving the dignity ana
prestige of an  organization  of twent) seven years
standing, mentioning that  this prestige and reeogni
tion was now rcadilj conceded by legislative assemblies
throughout Canada as well as h)  the public at large.
Mr, Banfleld dwelt at some length upon the associa
'Hill's   activities   dlU'ing   'he   Near,   since   the   Inst   Con
vention, in connection with the Sales Tax and referred
tn the unfortunate litigation in whieh the association
had necessarily been involved because of the ambiguous wording of amendments to the Special War Revenue Act brought down by the Government in 1922.
Owing to the uncertainty of the language used, Departmental Regulations had been made which in effect meant thai many retailers were called upon to pay
as much as $100 a month to keep track of a tax of $20
a month payable to the government. In support of his
contention that the Act had been poorly drafted, the
President drew attention to the fact that out of nearly
thirty cases brouc-lu before the courts no two judgments were rendered alike, each judge or magistrate
reading a different meaning into tin* Act. The President used these facts as an illustration of the necessity for greater interest among retailers as a class in
business legislation both Provincial and Federal, and
further took occasion to point oul that the colossal burden of taxation under which Canada is at present
struggling must'inevitably, in the final analysis, express itself in merchandising.
Mr. Banfield stated that the estimated revenue for
the coming year is approximately $400,000,000. The
authorized expenditure, including currc-at and capital
outlay is $520,000,000, showing a debit balance or $120,-
000,000; or, in other words, the fifth yefmr after the
Armistice witnesses the National Debt n.-re than a
billion dollars greater than upon that memorable day.
Mr. Banfleld pointed out thai the puhlie had a rightto
look to ihe Retail Merchants' Association for a policy
that would not merely protect the interests of that
trade itself bul the int.rests of the, puDlie upon whom
ivtail distribution depended for its existence and called
upon the association to recognize its responsibilities
ii 10
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILEE
With which is Incorporated tin* B, C TRADE lU'Vii;w
September,
and protect the consumera gainsl the spurious in goods
and the unethical in tradep ractice,
Secretary's Report.
The Secretary's report, presented by Mr. E, M.
Trowern. was largely a review of legislation in the
Federal House, in which the association had been interested during the preceding year. An outstanding
feature of this report, under this heading, dealt with
lhe Sales Tax Act in detail, and while recording the
long-daawn-Ollt controversy between the Department
of Inland Revenue and tin* association as to the definition of tbe term "" Manufacturer" for purposes of Sales
Tax Regulations, recorded the fact tha* tin* organization bad. after three years, won a major point in that,
its contention that the Sales Tax should !"• applied at
the point of manufacture or importation instead of at
the point of distribution, this principle having been
accepted by tin- government and emboded in tlie new
Sabs Tax Act effective January 1. 1924.
Referring to the Stamp Tax on receipts, which the
Secretary characterized as an annoying and cumbersome piece of legislation, Mr. Trowern regretted tbe
association's efforts to remove this tax had only been
partially successful, and stated that the association was
determined to continue its representations t<» the Government with a view to having this tax removed en
tirely. Meanwhile, however, be recorded the fact that
tbe association bad been successful in two items in
this subject, one of which was the removal of sales
slips from the category of receipts and the new regulation requiring Inland Revenue Stamps to be used
upon receipts, notes, cheques, ami drafts instead of
postage stamps, which would have the effect of eliminating the artificial inflation of post office revenue
derived   from   the   sab*  of   postage   stamps.
The variety and scope of tin* association's activities
in the legislative fiejd is illustrated by the following
list of legislative enactments with which tin- associaton
has been called upon to deal in some form or other
since the 1922 Convention:—
Workmen's Compensation Act.
Minimum Wage.
Egg Marketing Act.
Bank Act.
Certification of Invoices for Kates of Exchange.
Registered Parcel Post,
The Income Tax Act.
Chinese Exclusion Act.
Regulations of the Bureau of statistics.
An Act Respecting the Testing and Inspection and
Sale of Seeds.
The Narcotic Drug Act.
An Act to Regulate the Sale and Inspection nf Fruit
and Fruil Containers.
The Bankruptcy Act.
An  Act  lo Amend  the  Petroleum and  Naptha   In
spection Act.
An Act io Amend the Insurance Act id' 1917.
Acts to Amend the Inland Revenue Act.
An Act to Amend the Customs Tariff. 1907,
An Act to Amend the Business Profits War Tax Act
1916.
An Act to Amend the Income War Tax Act, 1917,
An Ad to Amend the Feeding Stuffs Act.
An Ad to Amend the Dairy Industry Set,
Regulations covering the Manufacture ami Sale of
Oleomargarine.
Etc., etc.. etc.
The Secretary presented a supplementar) report re
viewiug legislation durum' the past thirt) five years,
designed to control Bo-ealled ''combines, commencing
with Section ■^',**, of the i'rimmai Code and ending with
an appeal lodged with the Privy Council as tlie result
of an injunction brought against the late Board of
Commerce, at  tin   instant t  tlie Retail  Merchants'
Association   of  (anada   to   prevent   tins   Board   fixing
prices.   The report, which was ver) illuminating, wan
listened to attentively b) the convention, and a state
ment b) the Dominion Beeretar) 'hat a successful an
p.-ai to the Priv) Council bad resuh'-d m freeing re
J.  A.  Ba^fteid
Re elected PrttldiOl  '«3*l
tail distribution  from  irksome  restrainl   and  •jovuiir
the asoeation the power to work oul a fair and equil
abb- trading policy as between manufacturers, whole
sabu's. retailer*, ami consumers was received with en
t hiisiasiu by * he eon\ < ut ion.
In this connection, Mr Trowern pointed oul that
tin* association was nov* \j\ a position to handle com
plaints with ret".-relic- ?,, trading poliev of eertain man
ufacturmg ami wholesale establishments to an extent
that had never been possessed hitherto nwuu.' to the
confusing   character  of  the   legislation   to   which   this
report referred, ami called upon the various Trade Se
turns ami Provincial Boards of the association through
OUt I anada to prepare for lt vigOTOUH polic)  in Conner
tion with these matters during the ensuing year under
ill" direction of the Dominion Executive Council.
Another \ei\ interesting supplementary report was
aVo tahled hy the Dominion Secretan covering regu
blllOlls   between   tile   Women's   Keo||OlllM   Department   of
the National Council of Women and the atcociation
officers, having for its object the protection and edu
''ation oi ihe consumer in such matters as the quality,
price ami methods ,,f distribution, and advertising,
etc., in the retail trade. The members of the Economic
Department of the National Council of Women had
concluded that  it   was necesar)   and desirable to have
nelsons <d' praetieal experience to assist  tbem in pass 923
rn
HIE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Witt, which ih incorporated the B,
11
TRADE REVIEW.
oo
he
ing judgmenl upon the merits of complaints lodged
with the Women's Organization in nueh matters as the
difference between pure and adulterated f Istuffs,
various qualities of meals offered for sale, the differ-
, ne,- between pure wom|!cii goods and woollen mix-
tures, between properl) ami improperly prepared pharmaceutical prescriptions, between teal ami imitation
leather, 'In- quality of furniture, jewellery, and all
articles offered for domestic use and consumption,
Tlo* report was received with gratification as em-
lying "t recognition by this representative body that
Retail Merchants' Association of Canada desire to
advocate and maintain honest goods and honest methods of trading, and tho co-operation of the association
was pledged to the S'ational Council of Women in their
efforts to protect thc public irom the false \j\ advertising and the spurious in cjuality,
Following tbe presentation of the Secretary's general am! supplemental'} reports, the convention considered recolutions as follows;
Resolutons.
I Stamp Taxes on I hetjuvs and Receipts,
2, Dominion Governmenl Statistical forms too complicated.
:'.. Oleomargarine
\   Sale of Table S) rup Prohibited
5,    Amendment to the Kood and Drugs Act,
6  Qualit) and Analysis of Koodstuffs,
7. The  Same  ol  the  Piodu er to appear on the
\\ rapper of I lair) Butter
**>   Amendment lo the Root Vegetables Act .
u   Hoods to be properly marked as to the country
of origin.
lu Proper representation ol the quality of Woollen goods
II I lefinttion ol Trade flections,
12.    V   S    IV   Che,pi. s.
IT A proposed method to overcome the custom
adopted b) some Manufacturers of giving Mail Order
and other hoiis.-s sj>. mi! discounts.
ll. 1 nspeelnui ot Meal
15. Complaint   agahisl   Klevator Companies.
16. Postal Mone) Orders
IT   Refund of Duxur) Tax to Automobile Dealers,
is   Income Tax.
19, Special Committees tn Electoral Districts for
tin* purpose of keeping the members of the Dominion
Parliament m tlo.se districts posted "ii 'In* legislation
wep romote or oppose in connection with the Dominion
House
Sump  Taxes on  CHecmcs and  Receipts.
THAT notwnhst.uallm: lhal  some reduction was made b)
He- governmenl in the maximum lax on bank cheques, it is
Hi-- opinion oi ihii ConvenUon that in fie** ol lhe Increase in
He- amounl ol the sales tax, lhal taxation on both hank
cheques and receipts should t»' removed entirely; as the
present system discriminates unfavorablj agalnsi the averagi
cltlten ami merchant
THAT we again un;. upon tie- member** ol the Dominion
Executive Counctl lo 'lo everything within their power to have
theae annoying taxes nbollshed  Carried.
Dominion Government Statistical forms too complicated.
THAT WHBRKAS it li 'I"' opinion of this Convention lhat
while we consldei it necessar) that the Dominion Government
should if able to give statistical Information as tn the quantity and kind of gooda manufactured in Canada, that it
should not iu securing thia Information, place an unnecessarj
expense and annoyance on those retail merchants who do a
small portion ot manufacturing ami who have not the raciii-
lies tor keeping » detailed record ol Mn- information required
hy the government. Many instances have been brought to
the attention of our Association whereby our members have
been threatened with heavy fines for not filling in forms that,
while they may be suitable for large manufacturing plants,
are entirely unsuitable for the retail merchant class;
CONSEQUENTLY, we urge upon the members of the Dominion Executive Council to continue their conferences with
i lie Government In an endeavour to have the mrms submitted
to retail merchants amended.
Oleomargarine.
WHEREAS our Association has from time to time placed
itsell on record as being strongly opposed to any legislation
prohibiting  the manufacture and sale of oleomargarine in
Canada;
AM) WHEREAS we have ascertained through the Chief
Analyst tor the Dominion Government that oleomargarine
contains no substance which is injurious to health;
ANI) WHEREAS its sale has been increasing from year to
\ear, and our customers want it;
AND WHEREAS a Bill was introduced by the Minister of
Agriculture which attempted to regulate the sale of oleomargarine but which was voted down, and which places oleomargarine in the position whenv.v its manufacture will have to
be discontinued on August. 31st, 192:?, and the sale of it by
retail merchants will be prohibited on March 1st, 1924.
THEREFORE tlie members of this Convention again desire to place themselves on record as being strongly opposed
to any attempt to prevent the manufacture and sale of oleomargarine in Canada, and again urge upon the members of
ihe Dominion Executive Council to continue their efforts in
this matter. Referred to Grocers Section for expression of
opinion.
Sale of Table Syrup Prohibited.
WHEREAS our attention has been called to the fact that
some of our members have been prosecuted for offering for
sale table syrup which was described by such name, and
which was composed of pure and wholesome ingredients, and
which In no waj was misrepresented, owing to the fact that
legislation on the Statute Hooks, placed there by the maple
smear interests, makes it a criminal offence to sell an\ syrup
which is ol the same colour as, or which in any way resembles
maple syrup, and whereas we consider jlus to be class legislation.
THAT this matter be referred to the members of the Dominion Executive Council, with a request that they endeavour
to have this clause in the Maple Products Acl amended.
Carried,
Amendment to the Food and Drugs Act.
THAT it be a recommendation from this Convention that
the Food and Drugs Act be amended by the addition of the
following clause:
That no dealer shall be prosecuted under the provisions
ot this Act when he can establish a guaranty signed by the
wholesaler, jobber, or manufacturer, or other party residing in Canada, from whom he purchased such articles, to
ihe eitect that the same is not adulterated or misbranded
within the meaning of this Act, designating it. Said guaranty, to afford protection, shall contain the name and
address of the pari> or parties making the sale of such
articles to such dealer, and in such case said party or parlies shall be amenable to the prosecutions, fines, and other
penalties which would attach, in due course, to the dealer under the provisions of this Act.
And that this matter be referred to the Dominion Executive Council to have the same put into effect,
('allied.
Quality and Analysis of Foodstuffs
WHEREAS in view of the fact that the Kxecntive Officers
of the Poininion Committee of the Grocers' Section of our
Association recommend for our consideration lhat all food
stuffs now on the market, and those that will eventually be
placed on the markel, be purchased according to qualit \ ; ami
WHEREAS we have already recommended that the manu-
fucturer be made wholly responsible for the quality of the
articles manufacturer by him; and
WHEREAS the Kxecntive Officers oi the Dominion Committee of the Grocers' Section recommend thai an analysis
of all foodstuffs offered for sale by manufacturers be made by
the Government, and that it be ihe privilege of our members
to obtain through the Dominion Committee of lhe Grocers'
mm 12
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which is Incorporated the B   C   TRADE Ki:vu:u
September.
Section, if they so desire, an official analysis of any ol the
same;
THAT this Convention, therefore, endorses this recommendation.
Carried.
The Name of the Producer to Appear on the Wrapper of
Dairy  Butter.
THAT WHEREAS we have received requests for an t\cl
to be passed making it compulson thai the producer's name
be either printed or stamped on the wrapper of dairj butter.
as it is considered that the name ol the producer appearing on
this product would act as an incentive to produce a better
quality, and at the same time would create and hold a repu
tatlon for tin p roducer;
THEREFORE, we request that this matter be submitted to
the members of the Dominion Executive Council, .md that
they take whatever action is necessary to put tin- same into
effect.—Carried.
Amendment to the Root Vegetables Act.
THAT WHEREAS the members of our Grocers1 Section
have requested that the following commodities Cabbage,
String Beans, Spinach and Bananas, be Included us the Hoot
Vegetables Act, whieh Act specifies certain vegetables which
may be sold by Weighl;
THAT this Convention approves Ol the same and that the
matter be referred to the Dominion Executive Council.   ('...:
ried.
Goods to be Properly Marked as to the Country of Origin
THAT it is the opinion ot this Convention thai In tlie case
of all goods which are manufactured oi Imported Into Can
ada. and which bear the name ol tlie countrj ol origin, that
the name of tin* country indicated lie icon should !>• genuine,
and that any attempt to falsel) mark goods -,> anj manufac
turer should constitute a criminal offence, and tha* prosecu
tions for the same should take place under tlie False Adver
Using Act, and that should any such action be taken, i! be
under the direction of the Dominion Executive Council so tar
as the R. M. A. of ("anada i.s concerned.- Carried
Proper  Representation   of  the  Quality   of   Woollen   Goods
THAT it is the opinion of this Convention tha1 Dominion
legislation should be enacted wherebj it will ),*■ a criminal
offence to misrepresent the qualit) o; all woollen goods, and
that this matter be referred to the Dominion Executive Council, with the request that a Bill be prepared thai will meet
this requirement, and that an endeavor be mad'- to have the
same become law.—Carried.
Definition of Trade Sections.
WHEREAS in th" operation ot our Association work we
are being constantly called upon to define tie- meaning ot tie
various trade sections; tor instance, what we would consider
the term "Grocer" to mean, or "Fruiterer,'' or "Confectioner,"
or "Restaurant Keeper.' etc., etc., and. as Mere ta no legal
definition for any trade section on the Statute Books at the
present time, we recommend that this matter be referred to
the members ot the Dominion Executive Council, with 'he re
quest that they prepare proper definition ot Me- various
trade sections, so that uniformity can be secured throughoul
Canada as far as possible, with tin- objecl or having leglsia
tion prepared thai will define tie- meaning ot each ot tin- vai
ious trade sections ol our Association, and that the dim-rent
trade sections be consulted thereon,   Carried,
N. S. F. Cheques.
THAT WHEREAS the practice ol Issuing cheques when
there are not sufficient funds in the bank to hOnoui them is
detrimental to business, and calculated to injure the credit
of honest members of the community, and feeling that such
practice is frequently indulged in with deliberate intent to
defraud merchants;
THAT this Convention, therefore, requests the Dominion
Executive Council to confer with tie- proper authorities in
order that the law in this regard maj be made moi.- drastic,
-—Carried.
Mail Order and Other Houses Special  Discounts
THAT WHEREAS it is the opinion ot the members ol the
Saskatchewan Provincial Hoard that some manufacturers
give   extra   discounts   on   goods   purchased   to    Mail   Older
Houses, ami also to some other large i> 'ail m. i. hauls, where
\)\  the)  have a meat  advantage over the majorltj  m thr
retail  trad. ;
A\'l> WHEREAS  'he  Saskatchewan   Provincial   Board  I"
lieves that In view ot the above circumstance that tie- action
ol those retail merchants who undertake to num. and in..i: . .
their own wholesale house \% justifiable, when mch is run at
a regular wholesale house, and thai  manufacturers should
Bell lo such tit ins on the same basis as what  ll known as the
Jobbi ra' lisl
IT IS THEREFORE requested thai thi* subject  be    ,
considered b> this Convention.
Inspection of   Meat.
in \t ii is the opinion oi this Convention U\.o
the laci thai considerable agitation hai beei created i
out various partx ol Canada regarding llu neci
ing all meal Inspected, thai the Dominion Governmei
Quested lo perpane a report ihrough lhe Departmeni oi
with the co-operation ol the Departmeni ol \.m. . -
having meal inspected, and which wtii be applicable
cities, towns and districts wherevei such meal li •;■■<
lequi! • '1 .
AND THAT this Blatter be rcfi rred to ih<  I'm
utive Council to t*k< action thereon    Carried
Complaint   Against    Elevator   Companies.
\ ii",1,
n
Hi
Til \T \\ HFKFAS. eon;;
panies are ad** anclog moi •■ i
t he same are raalui ed, b i '. a
11 - art* agali I the rules ol
. i. vator compai Iv   op«»rati
WE THEREFORE reeon
Dominion Executivi   Councl
I tnmtnlnn   f las pram- hi     it
m.e*>   '■ n.t' <•!, v ,i'
v■   under w
•on
tn
ri.     ,t
Kn'cuilvi   '
<!m ontinued    Refei ri u lo l torn In I
Post.)'   Money  Orders.
THAT WHERE \> ft nurabei ol - on plali ■ i hav-   beei   ••
i > i \' d from oui  members lhal  11 •     in   rpqu* il   I
to i ash po - "''.' •■ tnoi ej   ordei    w\ rl   bav<   no  ;  ■ ■
on them for tht  nam* o paye*   snd tht  men   ml   ll
fori   has no waj ol Ascertaining II ihi   bear**i  '    ih«   [**■
' ■ i tt ho rn thi  mo n i    ortli i       ■ .   , »,i,.
TH v r ll I"  a ;■■• omn endatloi      >ra this Convci tloi
we ; ■ qui si the Po tma ler-Oeneral to put Into effeei
0 moi •-• ordei wl li h will requln     e name o      ■   ;    l
Refued  of   Luxury   T.i«   io   AutOmobHl   Dcrfv
TH v\ WHERE \s li gislatioi  was apt ><l b) 7...  Don
Co".ei nue nl  o   ..-   ■ '.< • |'loi tl  charactei    whirl   plan I  i
di ali i - In automoblli    ii  a different posit -    otner r*
tail merchant, and whereb) ihej wen  called upoi   to ; . ■    •
the '>o\ ia nmeni n supei luxu     tax)
AND \\ HERE \s « ~ • lax wa   i  movi A n.  ■-.. Go**,
ernmenl It caused a ver) heavj   oi    lo thi  Retail  Vuiomoti
1 lealers
AND WHEREAS after reviewing ill thi facta, ll was cot
sldered b>  [he members ol thi   Dominion  Executive   Council
lhal the amounl no overpaid bj the Retail  UUomobiti   l>
' i    ihould tn- refund) d to Ihi ra b)  the ',<•,.  ••..-•
THAT the no rabei • ol thi   Coi -. ■ • m.    having beard  ill
tie- facts in connection therewith   endoi •   ihi   act loi
members ol lhe Dominion Executive  Couurll, and unc up*1
them lo do all wuhm theli power lo secure .i refund ol thi*
amount  ovei paid     r.ui i. ,|
The   Income  Tax.
Til \T WHEREAS a resolution lis bi i n rei elved from lhe
members ol tin Quebei Provincial Hoard ttatlng lhal the5
have taken up the question ol the advlsabtltt) ol continuing
the Income tax as devised, and now n, operation, b) the I1"
minion Government, and thai the> has. unanimous!) decld
ed that the collection ol such tax from lhe retail merchants
and people oi the province ol Quebec, In vlvw ol thi Incren •
in the .-ah-., tax ami other systems ol taxation, should b<
abolished,
that this matter i„. niiu considered bj ihis Convention.
Committees to keep the members of the Dom.n'on Parliament
posted on Association's attitude towards legislation.
THAT WHEREAS II Is the opinion Ol thll Convention lhal
it would be great!) to the advantage ol oui Dominion leglsls 19211
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
W ith whli h is me.' porated the B, C
13
RADE REVIEW.
live work ii ;i committer wa.-, appointed in each electoral district throughoul Canada, whose dut) it would he to Interview
persconally the Member ol the Dominion House for thai
electoral district and acquaint him with the legislation we
are promoting or opposing, so thai when the Members 01 Par
I lam en I meet in session the) will properly understand our legislative requirements;
AND WHEREAS in order to make these committees effective, we suggesl thai the retail merehanta ui each electoral
district select a chairman, Irrespective ol part) politics, who
is a representativi retail merehanl in thai district, to be
Known as "Legislative chairman ol the electoral district," and
(five him autnorlt) to selecl his own committee, which shall
consist of nol more than "seven and nol iess than Ciree no-minis, in addition to tlie chairman;
\M> WHEREAS bj  hai ••• committees ol thia character
II will enable lhe members "t the Dominion Board ol our As-
sociation lo direct all communicatlo ■ regarding our legislative requirements lo th'- chaim u nl such committees, and
have them call thi members ol th * comn Ittees together and
have them preseni lhe facts personally to the Member ol
Parliament for the district, with tin objeci ol making our
requirements clear and iccurlng his bupport lo the same;
THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED thai wi go on record as
approving such a proposal, and thai lepn be taken to have
the game pul itii» operation    l !ai i l< d
Re   Egg   Grading  Regulations.
• I ■ :       '■ a     lallOll    i'.e-
1 HAT \\ HEREAS the
! dominion Go** 11 nnu i I and
ahi ad) proved Itaell lo bi
retail irade
And Inaamui h a    a  nui
ai e tmprai th able and ai -
and anno) am •   pai I li ulari)
meni ol i ggi lo thi   r< ail
w. believe thai suftti !< i
to sui ■  ai  Impoi tani ti atli
la li there fori reaolved
minion  Executivi   Councl
ihi   i'i--- iii adli .'  iemulation
d  b)   tlf
it ion   has
asmp
KI   111
s t u I'
nave
Boot .md  Siioc  Manufacturer! to Consider Certain  Lines of
Shoes.
II having I- ■ ■   foui I by |   tei
< hant Us om  provli        tnd   «•
minion, that 111 tall    Ines o
to b<- all right slmpl)   will uoi  0
ol   nhoe dealern  Is  beeoi     .■    h - ■
sui b it:.>     and that bi*c<
In the t oi dui I  n bui li •
ing extent   foi the lossi    w.   m ■
faull ol oui '>w •     w ■ an o  I In i
throughout   ( anada   should  ui I •
sponslbllil)   I*'-  plai ed  upoi    :: ■
place    This would   «•   b< llevi   i
erclsed In his *<!•-. iIon and   i  li ■
lo the trade
THEREFORE   I"    ll   n  olvei
handling shoes   local and provincial   bi   asked
this resolution and commttt Icali  their views to
< tlTli •   w lihoul di la)
Refei I'd io Bool ai J Sho«   .*** ciloi
i<   inei
oui   tl ■   1"'
tuple, appear
th*   capital
in tintion ol
handicap
10 an alarm
! through no
jIlOl    dealers
, its prop< i
u •• In Ing e\
tore offering
i'i   iradi    sections
bi   ,. keil m pass upon
1 lolllit- lo I
bo   lakei    b)   lhe
uid put Into active
RESOLVED i hai Imn • il •'• at tl
I dominion Bxecut i\ i Council to esl tiblli
operation .» Dominion-wldi Implement Prade Section so thai
Borne reilel foi the man) grlevanci i ol ihis trade section ma)
be Becured
That it is the opinion ol this Convention that when fit
lall Merchants or othei persons Invest iheli mone) In whole
sale business and conducl them on legitimate wholesale lines
lhal the Manufacturers should recognise and deal with them
on a w holesaie basi...    <\u i u a,
In view ol the facl lhal the Railwa) Commission approved
ol advance In express rates during Hip war period on the un
derstanding thai same would be reduced when the war was
over ami as no such reduction has ben made, the Dominion
Council are requested to take up this matter with a view  to
securing satisfactor) reduction In rales
Thai legislation bi   sought  whereb)  the employee of the
Canadian National Railways will be compel! <i to meet their
legal obligations while they remain in the employ of the said
railway.
That this ConvenUon express its satisfaction at the change
made by the Federal Government in the form of the one cent
Piece bul also expresses the opinion that the new five cent
piece should be withdrawn from circulation and replaced
b) the old silver nickle.
In view of the faci thai the policy being carried out by
the railways of Canada tn regard to rates as affecting the
Maritime Provinces is detrimental to Canada's progress. Re-
BOlved: That a committee of five be appointed to take up with
Un- Railway Commission, in co-operation with other interested
bodies, the policy of railway rates wherever these affect retail merchants.
WHEREAS many overcharges for freight are due to expense bills Bhowing a greater than the actual weight of shipments, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED: That the Manufacturers and wholesalers be requested to co-operate by marking the weight on individual packages and boxes when goods
are being weighed out for shipment; and that the Dominion
Executive Council be requested to take action thereon.
WHEREAS Height classifications are being changed from
time to time by Classification Committees and
WHEREAS these Classification Committees consist of representatives of the Canadian .Manufacturers Association and
Hoards ol Trade and
WHEREAS the Retail Trade is not represented on those
Committees
THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that tae Dominion Executive Council take whatever steps are necessary to secure
representation on these Classification Committees so that the
interests of the Retail Trade will be properly protected throug-
oul Canada.
Dominion Ereeutive Council sessions followed immediately at the dose of the general convention, at
which important •■natters of association administration
at:'! policy were considered. The growing complexity
oi modern merchandising and the increasing variety of
the activities of the association have created an over
:n reusing demand for service from all classes of retailers throughout Canada, which has necessitated
th* opening up of new departments, all of which were
analysed minutely by the representatives on the Dominion Executive Council from the various provinces.
One new departmeni which has been added this year
provides tor the appointment of a Special Representa-
ti e who will devote his time and attention to the
building up of the various trade sections throughout
Canada, a special Held work under the direction of the
president,
The services of Mr. George S. Hougham, late secretary for the Province of British Columbia, who has
been identified with the association programme for ten
years, has been secured and he will enter upon this
larger sphere of activity immediately.
During the closing sessions of the convention, President Banfield look occasion to congratulate the visiting delegates upon the seriousness of purpose which
had characterized their deliberations, and stated that
the convention had unquestionably been the most successful and had accomplished the greatest amoul of
work of a constructive character within his memory.
A very fine and varied programme of entertainment
was provided during the week of the convention by the
Quebec Provincial Board, and the Montreal city branch
of the fi. a\. A., and delegates were unanimous in their
expressions of appreciation of the generous hospitality
extended to them. Any reference to this programme
would be incomplete without particularly mentioning
ih,. names of Behevin J. Sansregret, president of the
Quebec Provincial Board, and M. Lapointe, Secretary,
the latter individual receiving a presentation from the
visiting delegates as a permanent reminder of their
visit to Montreal.
!   il 14
nil*; BBITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
RADE  KKVU'W
Beptei
'llllier.
\\ ith which is mo- porated Ine
■
GEORGE S. HOUGHAM DEPARTS FOR OTTAWA.
Appointed Special Representative, Dominion Executive Council and Dominion Board, R. M. A. of
Canada Inc.
Our congratulations are mingled with a keen sense
of rogrel when we rorord the departure of former
provincial secretary George S. Hougham, to take up
his duties at Ottawa, as special representative for the
Dominion Board of the Retail Merchants' Association
True it is that honest endeavour to servi the retail
community, and to create a better understanding
among the various branches of food distribution, has
resulted in well merited award, and we are proud of
the work which .Mr. Hougham has achieved in this regard, but the loss uf such a diligent officer causes deep
regret among tin ranks of the retail fraternity in 'ins
province.
Mr. Hougham carries an envious record tn Ottawa,
and llu* provincial Board will watch with interest his
further progress in this more importanl field,
Since Mr. Hougham first became affiliated with the
Association in 1914 until he relinquished ins position
as provincial secretary in AiilmisI last he has carried
out some organisation achievements whieh are inter
eating io record.
In ihe year 1914 In* was appointed secretary of the
Cranbrook Branch, when R, M. A. activity in this pr"
vince was in a somewhat   nebulous state.     In  the  toi
owing year, .Mr.  Hougham  organized  the  Nanaimo
• ranch and was appointed secretary to that body,
In 1918 .Mr, Hougham was made provincial organ-
/.er. and it is worthy of note that during Ins sojourn
in this province no less than thirty.three branches
were organized under his direct supervision. It was
in this year that he became affiliated with tin British
Columbia Board, and the following year saw him fill
ing the joini positions of secretary for the Vancouver
Branch and the B. 0. Board.
.Mr. Hougham enjoys the confidence of retailers
wherever personally known, and we predict that lie will
add further laurels lo his career m a position which
offers wider scope for hi*, capabilities.
DRUuGISTS ENTER WHOLESALE TRADE
Tin* wholesale drug business ot .1 A Tepoorten,
I.united, Water Street, Vancouver, established in the
\ear 1910, has been acquired by a British Columbia
-siiiliate rf retail pharmacists, known as tin- United
Retail Druggists,
Those who have become interested in tins venture
'■f sel!i!r_' direct to themselves are setting no precedent,
for druggists m Manitoba, Ontario, and ih.hi\ United
Stales cities are collectivel) distributing drugs to their
calling, and finding the procedure profitable.
The project appears to have been well received in
tins province,   'bit of some two hundred retail drui
•.fists  in  British  ('olumbia. one  hundred  and   s>\?\   are
said to hat •■ joined '■ V- gj ndieate
With a capitalization of >iV!**,h'!<>, members of the
United Retail Druggists pa) 20 per cut, «.f the cost by
subscribing from *$500 in ^V'"1*1 each, the remaindci
to be pan! from the profit** ol the buslines
The husin-ss will be carried on under the name J.
A Tepoorten as formerly, with I". J Tepoorten a**
manager.
The following comprise the board of directors
A   K  Merritt   chairman , George Cunningham and R
11   MeDuffee, Vancouver; Yi'-d Wjltis, Victoria; Wai
ter Hews, New Westminster; W.J  McCutcheon, I'riwt*
Rupert; J, Buckham, M LA, Golden; and Ar hie Gal
biwas, Kamloops,
CUSTOMERS WON T PAY YOUR STORAGE RENT
By  A   M   Burrotigl h
The money thai you pay out in store rent will bit)
so many cubic feel nl sidling space Kvcrv fool you
rent should return a profit
See that y ou an- getting it.
A lease holder was trying to sub lei a store building
to a South Bend merchant.   Ti;e dimensions of the h *•■
Wel*e   such   that   the   bll'hi'-r   sou;.-   <, .-,t |**j* ■! ■<• I 'o»*<-   had   Rel  1
ed a huge store ro ro to tlie rear **f the store building
itself.
The merchant was asked lo pay a rental above Ihi1
average,   IL- objected.
Tlo- t>to ner argued :
'Think of the edge vou Ml have on vour eoropeti
tors     three tunes as much storage space.
Bul the merchant, wise m the wavs of store keep
ing, replied :
'Nothing doing. I want lo run a clearing house,
nol a storage house Customer's wont pay storage
rent on idle merchandise."
The merchant finally rented a store that cost him
1«J ''en's per cubic  foot  a  Mar      And  it   was worth  It
Lverv   foot   of  space   had   a   definite   sales   \alin*      The
merchant knew pretty closely how much il would yield
him too.
He applied the same principle to his bookkeeping
department   small thoughl it was: His position was:
"I ve got a big inventory of figures lying around
in  batches ol  sales slips, credit   vouchers, purchase or
tiers and the like.    They are no good to nn* lying there
and doing nothing," 1023
TMK MUTISM COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which is Incorporated the B. C. TRADE REVIEW.
15
KENT S PHONOGRAPH
HOUSE OPENS NEW
HEADQUARTERS
IN VICTORIA
The new loc.ition "f 1 be Kent
Phonograph store jn tb,. huss
shopping cent re on \ al i?s
St reet, be! w een I touglas and
I (road, mai ks anoi her step m
the progress ol a pioneer Vie
toria   litm,  that   has  striven  to
oM\e     |i,,      best     pOSSible    service
to  tin*  eoinmuiih \.
hands' uie!\   fui nished     'tis' ru
meut     demonstration     room*'
with a record rack rum ng t! v
entire Um -Mb of thi  store, pro
\ i<| ing e xeep! ions I sen \w and
r;|s\    .K'-rss   |fl   ||||    '..M'.'.-   BKSOrt*
menl ul x*' 'ords kep! in stock.
Ho..in>  wind m. n ma ke pass
11' •■  an  artist ir  dtsplai   -'"  the
instrument*-*   **■* hieh    ' he   firm
bandies, nod the imposing entrance  is  .--.  its.-it   ,(u  invitation  10  inspect   a  music
• i iki' wl i h rai   s I   -h among stores of this nature on
lhe i'a ifie * 'oast,
Kent's Phonograph Store is the only establishment
in British Columbia retailing phonographs and records
exclusivelv.
'h  rapid turnover ol  merchandise will yield no*
a protit, wh) not,a turnover ol figures into live, use
able   t.t'ts '
IL ap] ed bis theory. Toda** he is prosperous. IL
drives nn expensive make ol car. lbs home is the
vnvy "! his neighbors,
The reason is nol dihM till to find lie buys and sella
on the suri  foundation of cold, hard tacts.
IL  mi   ■ * ins books nnd accounts a clearing bouse.
Kigures take the form of reliable facts
There js a dailv turnover of fiirures for everv de
partment o|  (
.111
i -s a Iurnover I Itat **• ictus
a stcad\  stream of profitable information.
L answers ouestions lhal determine policies, hoes
'his article turn fasl enough to vield the lughest per
cent of protit ' is tii.it elerk selling enough merchandise lo warrant his present salary , or a larger or smaller s.il.tn
Is this 'ustomer abusing his ereditl Is too much
mono) tied up in receivable accounts! Arc his discounts taken prompt!*** before the tenth of tin month*}
Turn over your merchandise often and your battle
for profits is half ***** on.
Tut ii over the figures of vour business dad) and
thc battle is completely won. In that way onlv will
you know when, where or wh*\ adequate profits come
I loin vour business operal 10118,
NEW ZEALAND WHEAT SHORTAGE  POSSIBLE.
\ possible shortage ol wheat In New Zealand is Indicated
thia comlti gseagon aa a result ol Hoods in the principal wheat-
growing sections ol the colon) During the month o! Maj
heavj  floods were experienced throughoul  the eastern por
Hon of Ui© south island, which is the largest agricultural section  and   practical!*,   tin-  onlv   wheat   growing  district   iu   the
colony,   Estimates for the coming season are nol yel available,
CREDIT  MENS' DICTIONARY.
Terms and their meanings, as submitted to  Daniel
Webster.   (Too   late  for   insertion).
Credit Man—Official crepe hanger.
Salesman—Pedlar: Order Stuffer; a lout or common
fellow.
Sheriff—Gink who brings debtor bad news.
Customer—Term used to designate account that pays
0. K.
My  House—Nickname applied to jobber by retailer
when shipments are coming forward 0. K. and
all is hunky dory.
Debtor—Synonymous with   "customer."    Used   only
when relations become strained, and legal bloke
invites you to attend a "con"-ference.
Creditor—Term used by legal bloke when shipments
stop and meetings begin.
Attachment—"The Tie That Binds."
Bankruptcy—Last  sad   rites for the dead.
First Dividend—"The Great Divide."
Final  Dividend—"The End of the Trail."
Unsigned Check—Polite Stall. Illegitimate Offspring.
Collection Draft—Paper that usually "blows" back;
Legalized blackmail.
N.S.F. Check—Dud (see A. E. F. records); Cold paper: a teaser; round trip script, abbreviated from
the Latin "Non sic Fakus" ""Never say fail."
Promissory Note—"Kathleen Mavourneen"—It may
be for years, and it may be for e.ver.
Trade Acceptance (See marriage ritual") "I promise
to take thee for better or worse.
Compromise—Optical delusion; making $1.00 look
like 25c.
Salesman Report on New Account—See reference
under "Carmen," "Toreador," and other works
pertaining to bull.
. 16
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
wuii which is incorporated the r.  C  TRADE i:i:vu;u
Septembi
u
GROCERIES id PROVISIONS
■
GENERAL BUSINESS.
Retail grocery husuu'ss has been very fair during
ihe past thirty days. School opening, ami tin* return
from summer vacations have focussed the housewife 8
attention to tin* family preserving moils. Retailers
have this year enjoyed a very creditable business in
fresh fruits, fruit jars ami other preserving requirements. Fruit has been cheap, and sugar prices, compared with 1921 and 1922 have heen more or less moderate, with the consequence thai more than the average
quantity of fruit will probably !>•• put up this season.
All lines of groceries have hecn moving out well, .and
brisk business is forecasted for the fall months.
Then* was a very uotieeable lack of interest on tin*
part of retail grocers in tin* lecture given at the Hoard
of Trade auditorium by Mr. Parley, of the Service Departmeni of ihe National Cash Register Company, of
Dayton, Ohio, on l-Yiday September 7th. Mr, Farley
had a real message for grocers, and it is unfortunate
lha: a larger attendance of grocers did nol materialise.
Sugar: Prom a price point of view, this has been
a very difficult commodity to deal in. When out las;
issue went to press, liie prevailing price on 1'.. c. granulated I'1*1 lb. bags was $9.75 per ewt. Since that time
it has declined to a basis of $9.10, and back up again to
$9.35 per ewt. We cannot quite see where the market
justified tin* last advai  although we have not suffered to the extent ihai dealers on the Atlantic I'l-asi
have suffered, during tin past few weeks, where the
price as we go to press is around •-**!1.**".
Rice: The terrible catastrophe in Japan has had
ihe effed of further stiffening local price quotations
on Japan rice". Local nulls were compelled to advance
prices a further $10.00 per ton. and at this figure will
only take business subjeel to continuation. With possible heavy shipments to Japan there may be a
shortage of this commodity. A good substitute how
ever is io be found in Imperial rice, a Lousianna rice
similar in style io Japan, and considerably lower in
price. Piest grade China rice is aVo up $10.00 per fortv
mats,
Canned Vegetables: There has been no change in
prices since our last issue, with the exception of •■ Refugee" beans which opened al $1.65 doz. for 192.'!
pack. Demand is fair however, and it is expected
thai opening prices on corn and tomatoes will be
named within the next week or two,
Canned Fruits: Opening prices on apricots and
peaches were named by the local canners during the
Week, Sn. 2 size will go to the trade at $2,40 pel* do/en.
and No, 2' ■■ size at  $3.30 pel* d0Z,  for both  peaches and
appricots. 1923 prices show a considerable reduction
over lasi season including opening prices on the gallon size.
Evaporated Fruits:    No change- of note since our
last   issue,   with   ille   possible   exception   of   tie's,   both
black and white, which are weak    Cli equality black
figs can  now   le- pur-hased  tor eleven edits a  pound
as compared  With twenty three cuts at  this tune lasi
year.   Apricots and peaches are also quite reasonably
priced in comparison.
Beans:    The Japanese disaster has had a tendency
to tirtu up the market  for  Kotenashl  while beans, .,!
though local quotations have nol advanced at we go
to press,
Crisco:   This commodit)   advanced on -nt  per
pound on September thc Ith, making Is ami lis 'Jo
cents per pound, and *>s ami Btn 26e Tin- aborti-nil
market is titm.
TEA TALK FROM LONDON
Discussing  conditions   immediately   following  lhe
tea auctions a London authority writes     "he interrup
tion of the sales having extended over a longer per ml
than usual, ehK'fU he atisi  ol the dock strike tn ibles
tin- absorbing capacity <>t the trade becanu  more  is
grensive.   The demand for • eylon leal grades,
are also wanted for export, has proven pretty liveli
Trade buvers have been to some extent ii fl h '  ed ii
their attitude on account ol il * hand   ap lo lhe di
erics, althougli these have nol i n quite so serious as
expected.   As a matter of fact, the duM payments  n
London have been fa rV  satisfactory, mai  i * ••.
anee for holiday   influen es     Im   nffei * -- ol da*,,!
tea tins week are conned to small quant ties      Sew
season s China tea will hi slots in making its appear
am*e, ami busines in thai dire 'oui is hampered uudei
these circumstances, although some inquin  has beei
reported  for thc lower grades up lo aboul   lid  per
pound.   Puturi arrivals of Kintueks have been selling
at about reeenl rates, ranging up to about Is 3d  per
pound.   Tlo- new treasons crop m Northern India has
proved satisfaetor)     The quantities advised as regis
tered for dispatch to this eouutn in the ic< ond hall ol
duly amounted to 16,000,000 pounds, thus showing an
excess ol over 5,00,000 pounds as compared with lhe
same period in 1922, and the aggregate since April 1
last   would   thus  represenl   over   14,000,000   pounds,
which   denotes  an   increase   of   well   over  9,000.000
pounds, againsl the corresponding figure**! for ho-1' year,
TEA AND COFFEE BUSINESS SOLD.
William Braid & Company's Plant Becomes the Pro
pcrty of A. W. Blott, New Westminster   Will Re
organize With Bcveridgc Interests,
The  old established   tea   and   coffee   business   ol   \\ d
liam Braid & Co., recently became the property ,i!
A. W, Blott, of New Westminster, by virtue of an or
dor given by Mr. dustier |>  ,\   McDonald, confirming
the sale  by   \V.   tl.   Hedges,  who,  as   trustee   in   bank
ruptey, has been in charge of ihe business for the past
few months, 1923
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Wilis which is Incorporated the B, C. TRADE REVIEW.
17
Mr. Blott, who is identified with several other large
industrial concerns Oil tho lower mainland, proposes to
earry on the business under the same name and has
incorporated a company for thai purpose, it is stated
thai d. M. Drainie and George Beveridge are likelv in
he associated with Mr. Blot! in the new enterprise,
The sab- involved the transfer of asaets valued ai
approximately $35,000,
PRAIRIE BUTTER TO THE UNITED KINGDOM via
VANCOUVER AND THE PANAMA CANAL
An interesting Made development i** being inaugurated in Vancouver, which tnny r* *u!t ui revolutionizing the present method of transporting Western Canadian da in products.
A trial shipmtnl ol seven
...i i
ii   i nous
ami boxes of Al
berta and Saskatchewan butter are being exported to
the United Kingdom \ni this port and tin   Panama
Canal.
Arrangements for adapt ini this route were re-
eentlj completed by P Pallesen, general manager of
\bv I'etitrai Creameries, and president of the Alberta
Dairyiticmt' ami Manufacturers' Associations, who was
instrumental in obtaining rates which will make possi-
h ■ a wry material saving in comparison with the long
i aid lo Montreal
Thi lit -V. M.iil Steam Packet Compan) is handling
tins shipment, and should it prove satisfactory, il is
in order to predict lhal Ihi transportation of dairy
products from lhe prairies through Vancouver will he
itecond onl) to the increasing movemeni ol prairie
grain to tb< markets of the Orienl and the British Isles.
TUDOR
TEA
" The Tea  Willi a Pedigree "
Is being sold by 309 stoics and grocers in
British Columbia.
The most profitable package tea for the retail
trade.
THE PRICE IS NEVER CUT
H
Blended and packed by
TUCK & LIGHTfOOT ltd.
VANCOUVER. B. C.
STOCKS OF NUTS ARE SMALL.
Prom The Hills Brothers Co.. 376 Washington Street, New
York.
A good business in nuts is lokked lor this fall, as stocks
"ii hand are small in most cases and distributors have been
buying on a hand-to-mouth basis, the Hills Brothers Co.
stales In a general review of the nut situation. Last year,
however proved so disastrous lor most imperters of nuts that
firma In this field are buying very cautiously this year.
A small crop of Tarragona almonds is reported from Spain,
bul it ia thoughl thai the California crop will be unusually
large to counter balance this,   spot stocks are light.
The firsi foreign walnut to reach this country in the fall
is the Naples, but these cannot arrive before the latter half
m October. It is reported that this crop has been damaged by
drought, but iti 8 too early to determine the exact extent of
this injurs. French walnuts, the Cornes and the Grenobles,
reach this country next. It i.s hoped these will arrive here a
week or two before Thanksgiving. Advices from Bordeaux-
are to the effect thai there will be a good crop of Cornes, but
it is said that there will be only a small stock of Grenobles.
There Is still a limited quantity of old crop walnuts available, but good quality nuts are commanding a premium and
will soon be sold.
Spot siocks of filberts art* extremely scarce and new crop
Sicilies will not reach here- before the first, half of November,
although Naples fllbers can arrive early in October. For the
Jewish holidays and the Halloween trade retailers will have
to depend on what spot stocks there are, and it is doubtful
whether these will be sufficient for the demand. New crop
filberts have been quoted under the price at which the old
crop are being sobl. but as they cannot get here until too
late, the irade is buying the old crop so as to have filberts
when there is an actual demand for them.
There was a large crop of Brazil nuts this year and the
markel is practically finished so far as Para and Manaos are
concerned. Stocks of large washed are not excessive and the
irade will probably be able to buy medium nuts throughout.
ilu- rest of the season to better advantage. The nuts are of
good qualit>  this year.
EDDYS
MATCHES
Back of every E D D Y
M A T C H is a carefully
planned square deal for retailer and wholesaler alike.
Since 1851
The E. B. Eddy Co. Limited
Hull. Canada is
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which la Incorporated the B  C, TUADE RRV1EW
The Great Sugar Mystery
Sept
emno
The rapid rise in the pric of raw sugar during the
firsl six months of thc presenl year is explained in the
following story, compiled from authentic information
received from the centre of activity, New   York.
11 may perhaps be described as a melodrama hnk
ing a climax, and reveals in satirical vein the vacillations of the American government, the sugar men
and the public,
Not many days ago the announcement was made in
New York that the country's estimated consumption
for tin* first six months of 1923 would rait below the
consumption for a like period of last year by aboul
2* •_.  pel* cent.
Surely by no means a  very dramatic announcement to make, and vol it brought to a close in a dis
astnuis anti-climax  om* of the  most  singular melodramas of recent history.   That item has writ ten tint**
to the sugar mystery.
Two ami om* hall' pei- cent is hut a small cracker
for so large a whip, luit it injected a might) **tuu:, mi
now that the tumult ami shouting have died down, a
resume of this curious drama is nol without its instructive points.
I.t was m the earl)' part of February that the puhlie began to awake to the fact that the prices on New
York surar market were beginning to go up. The
bottom had been so thoroughly removed From the sugar
market during the years 1921 and 1922 thai signs of
its approaching restoration were taken as decidedly
unkind.
The rise might have occurred with less e\ 'itement,
had il not heen for a dramatic incident, in which the
department of Commerce played a leading rule.
Tin* department's February report estimated a
world consumption for tin* current year slightly greater limn the estimated production, u condition thai
would so cut into the 1922 carry-over that there would
be an abnormally small surplus of only about half a
million ions at the end of 1923.
This estimate was enough i*> justify a rise, bui unfortunately news of it leaked oul ahead of time, a fact
which not only hastened thc upward movement Imi
also served to focus attention on the exchange, in
some wild tradui'j in Fi lunar) th.- price of Cuban
futures was boosted a hundred points foreina a i»e.s
sat ion for the day, on the suggestion oi «-• improprtct**,
concerning the leak, and the war wa** ou!
Mr, Hoover and hts depart men! v..'.- blamed for
alarmism.   Tho scere ar,\ seemed to evade rather thai
meet the charge by point.!.:.' no\ that although the ps
iimate showed n consumption outrunning production.
the carryover was so large thai then* would le* a c.ur
plus a* ihe end of the year, and thus then  was no
"shortage      I! amounted * : an unfortunate eonfusioi
between shortage antl deficit ivii   h can nol be s.ud hi
have hVpcd tl ■- sil ual ion
ike facl n-maiufi thai ti mi n us ol less lhan (tail  •
million would be the smallest  re oi led in years, a: 1
({notations continued to mount \o \bv underKtaudal
annoyance ft ji puhlie wl    *l   bad  jusl  been ana i■ ■ .|   i\
iis department ol ■ ommeri •   'hat tlu-i
age.
a< as uu short
The   public   n
n: fleeced     h
•       ll     t   le
to en*
nei
being   suddenly   add* I   to   I   til
termed sugar barons, a disl i   l ■
ed to receiv -  with., m* evi I tu
ed by *«anting, in a ■•; r i in
against hoarding
1 n th-- mean I ime potii ten] * ■ \
be heard and in Man h the !'• ;
vi e entered i bund ■     •   len
I   v depart ment  thel
invest (gating "in gt eat   *•
Mr. Hootrr had bei i   m.  itij   til a   ■ r three w• • ks the
Tariff Commission was a oui in   nv< tigatc   and llu
Federal Trade Commissioi   was cut rel>   wil   ng ti
vestigate whenever il might be called upon to d« so,
In the meantime a 'ual rnw sugar had climbed ""':
3.16 a* thc '-nd "t Januan  to o\>r '*'     refined I    '
gone iintii 6'    to over ''. sugar .7 retail was neariiit!
1" eents a pound, and the futures unabashed by tin-
ular iiobitit\
u inai  oi an tvt
at oi * began I
Legislativi   Sei
• ■. • ■•ligation
al   ■ had bei n
a whole montl
Voonia Garden
Ceylon Tea
Will satisfy your most discriminating customers.    It ,H tl,
finest  quality   Flowery   Orange Pekoe, and is packed
hermetically sealed lead packages.
Half Pound Packages, 66c. Ib.
Pound Packages    .       65c. tb.
Five Pound lead lined boxes 64c   lb.
e
in
B. C. Agents for
Ross's Famous
Belfast Ginger Al;
Rithet Consolidated
Limited
VICTORIA, B. C.
Vancouver  Island
Distributor*
Huntley & Palmer's
Biscuits ■
'222
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which Is Incorporated the B. C, TRADE REVIEW.
19
McCormick'
s
(S JERSEY
1 cioya*}
McCormick'• products well displayed, bring in
big profits and new trade.
GROCERS, recommend to
your customers the use of
WILD ROSE
Pastry Flour
Royal Standard
Bread Flour
They  h.ive  here   milled  111  Vancouver  for cner fifteen
yc.irs   and   are   worthy   of   your   support,
Vancouver Milling and Grain Co.
LIMITED
Head Office and Mills:
Vancouver, B. C:
Jersey Cream
Sodas
Tin- most extensively nd vert ise. 1 soda biscuits in Canada. People know them as thc
quality biscuits with the delightful flavor.
They also know tha* McCormick's products
arc made in a great snow-white, sunshine facility
Sell  McCormick's Products—the goods the
customers know,
McCormick Mfg. Co. Limited.
LONDON, CANADA
BRANCHES at: Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto,
Hamilton, Kingston, Port Arthur, Winnipeg,
Calgary, Edmonton, Vancouver, Halifax, St.
John, N.B.
Keystone School
Supplies
These good School Supplies are all British
Columbia products. They show the dealer a very good margin and give the student excellent value for the money expended.
Complete stocks of all lines are constantly in hand so supplies can be shipped im-
mcdiati ly.
If you do not carry Keystone
Brand, write for Samples and
Quotations.
Smith, Davidson & Wright, Ltd.
MANUFACTURERS   AND   WHOLESALE
PAPER DEALERS
VANCOUVER
VICTORIA
J LM)
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With winch is Incorporated the B  C  TRADE REVIEW
Septum
ler
blazing front page publicity to which they had hecn        carried refined sugar down, mid ret.nl prices with il
dragged from the security of the financial section, con-
The   melodrama   ha**   been   liiin *'d
tinned   upon   their   erraetic,   but  generally  upward
course.
It was at this time that the investigation began i<*
hear the fruits of discovery. The Tariff Commission
discovered lhat the tariff had nothing \o do m the matter. Thc department of Justice discove*ed that there
wt re no grounds for criminal action, hut thai iu lhe
absence nf a sounder programme it was willing t** attempt U\ close ihe exchange by injunction. Tin* department of Commerce appeared i" discover nothing;
while Senator Smoot, in a mood which is rare in that
astute gentleman, discovered a plot of horrid propor
lions, whereby the dealers in Cuban sugar had deviously planned ihe whole thing for the purpose ol
breaking down the tariff and annihilating the American cane and beei industries. The public immediately
hit upon the idea of a sugar strike. In 'his galaxy <•!
absurdities, the sugar strike was, it now appears, the
mosl absurd of all. for the leaders wi re attempting the
impossible.
The actual effect of ihe strike upon consumption is
now seen to have been negligible, and it is diffieull to
trace any psychological effect '»n llu- traders.
It is true that a break From tin* peak prices came
when lhe strike excitement was at its height, hut this
is not a clear relation to cause ami offect.
Refined went as high as $10.25 and sugar retailed
in some places at 12 cents. At the beginning of May
refined went hack In $9.50, bul it rose again after 'hat.
and until recently varied between $9.50 and $9.90, well
above the point at which the strike began '*' take hold.
The strike and the attendant uproar have ignomin-
iously and completely petered out.   The sugar dealers
have ceased to he hai'oiis, and more favorable crop re
ports, coupled with the uncertainties of nnd year havi
sent down the quotations "ii the exchange, while quite
recently something in the nature of a pri *e war has
allien   in  (•
\er_\ unsatisfying manner,   The absence ot anvonc re
motel) resembling a hero is bad enough, l»m tlmre is
apparently no villiatl, and with the puhlie apparently
at ease, it i** diffieull to even discover the corpse.
TIMELY TIPS TO GROCERS
At Tins tune of the year, 'he public appetite de
mauds a more van* I assortment of food than is \\n
case during the summer month***
I nbounded oportunit)  is afforded the ret.nl gro
er ti) serve In** customers with the newest pack of can
lied fruits and vegetables.
There is a growing desire on the part <>i the publ
to have two or three vegetables  with  the  priucioal
meal, in conjunction with potatoes, in preference to
only one vegetable, as was the ease in thi  years gone
by.
Numerous items must  be  therefore added  !■> his
stock that, perhaps he lias not    irried before wieh an
canned   sweet   potatoes,    spinach,     raut    sue, ,*..,
mixed vegetables for soup, lima beans  etc
ihese commodities are coming ti »n and mori  into
demand each y&nr, simph because the publ    in • ■<■■•..■
ous oi a different menu from tin old 'standby*** " corn
peas and tomatoes
I tie next six months will -.•., tness ai  iuerean im \ •'
nine nf business, and the groeer w II * it n il i rean \\'w
share, because the community must hi  fed  ai I tin n
tail grocer is justly recognized as the   ntermed m *
s'-r\ c t bv communil j.
1 In re is a growing lendenet on thc nart of tin
housewife to relinquish to a large extent her annual
I""1"* preserving, This ond tion is ,t eentnated foi
lowing the inflal ion of n igar pi
tlie   W ide  ,ito .( \i ,-   grocer   tO   s. .     * j.,,'
supply ol preser*» e«i on hand
(1   ll   Will   nn'
iin an aucouatt
GROCERY PRICES CURRENT
The following are prices quoted for principal lines of leading wholesale firm*.    Prices quoted are necessarily
subject  to   market  fluctuations.
RAMSAY BROS. & CO.. LTD.
10c Assorted Sweet Biscuits, packages,
per  dozen ..... 1 00
15c Assorted Sweet Biscuits, fancy carton, per dozen 1 BO
Chocolate Bars, assorted kind*,  2  doz
to a box, per box '•'>•' and 91c
Cream  sodas,  2s.  tins,  each 12
10c Cream  Sodas, packages, doz 1 00
]')'■ Cream Sodas, packages, doz I 33
Family sodas, packages, per dozen ! : r
Queen Royal Cream Sodas, i"-i lb ? 16
Queen  Royal, tins, each . 7.*Z
E.   W.   GILLETT   CO.,   LTD.
Royal Yeast— Per caBfl.
'3   lo7,.   pi-frs.   In   case       2.10
Pure  Flaked   Lye— Per case
4 doz,  in  case   | 5 75
5 cases  .    '.) X",
10 cases, 4 doz. In case     6.60
Magic Baking Powder—
per case
4   17. .  4  doz  ...       ? 5 7 I
fi  oz.   4   doz    7 55
8 oz.,  4 doz    B 06
12  07..,  4   doz  12 26
12   OZ.,   2   d  z  .6 36
1  lt>. 4 dnz     . . IS 55
1   11..   2   doz  .   8 00
21'..   His    !   doz 9 86
r,  It)    1*  floz  .8.80
Caustic St*.-*. (Granulated)—
2.' in  wooden pa iii
(,(> lb   wooden palls
6 lb  canisters (100 lbs. in <rmo)
in lb  canister (100 lb*   in rase)—
I'.O lbs   iron drums
400 lbs    barrels
Cream of Tartar, o, ,
a  tb   pap< •  pi f«   ■ 1 dos         I
'•Ah   paper pkga   11  doi   In • ■ •■ ■
Pi 1
•I dos   '« It*,   papei  pkgs, 1 dos *■■ tt.
i"i 1 ■   pkgs,  assoi ted
Pei
'..■ tb   cans with screw covers 7 dos
In case)
1 lb,  laiii. screw covers m Ao*.   In
case )
•". lb.  square canisters    *•.  dos   in
case 1
Oi in   wooden < asea
v*. ib   wooden poit
100 tn   lined kegi
Wl A,   lined  Darrein
Magic   Sod-*—Cane   No    1 —
1 cnae (M 1 tn   packages)
1 a 1 ■■■ 0   :i ore
Bl-Cerbonate   of   Soda—
''.'"'   1 ■■■■'   per ke*
400 tb   barrels, per barrel
KELLY,   DOUGLAS   A   CO.,   LTD.
Nabob   Products
I,"    |V
tO ISH
. »IVi
.  ,11
14 H
U
10 H
Special  discount  of 5   tier cent    allowed  on
Five   Cases   or   more   of   Magic    Making      Alum.   ■{*,   d'>x.
Powder. Allspice,  No   8,  tins,  doz
81
-. (|.
.11 .
i i '■ 1
17
7.80
7 10
7 <"'<
7H
88
I to king   ;
Raking I
!'    '     I  ;-
i ^     '. I,
Biking 8 7a. so
I iking  ■***•! 1. 84
!' -rax.   I41     1   1
lil.ick    I -,••.. ,r     ll
n «**
.!■■«
gl •■ 1    dos
1 '■■ « oailo   i* id ' ■ ••    dos
Chill  Powder,  wtmil   doi
1 '**•''' n.   :*   <■/    tins,   dos
Cayenne Pepper, 3 tins, dos
Cloveaemall   doi
Cui 1 y Pow dor, 4 oi   gin m   a ,
1 •!■ '.-i-r.    sin 1II,    Aof.
1 Ktmi is (nil fin ■■■•••  1  j ni
hlxtrnets  1 .1!   n ..        ■    ;  oi
i>|. ,, *.,  (nij  fl 1 voui »)    8 01
Mace, small, dos
Nutmeg, small, do*
1 -ipi Iks   in ail  1 Ins,  A07.
■ '■'■ •'■■  Bpli --, 8 tin*   dos
I'o ilti -.-   1 iresslng,   Sage,   - n
1 h"m.c. Tumeric, 1 m«   , 1 >,7.
Plrkllng  Spire,   doi    No   3
Marjoram,   Mini    Pbj *l< y
Tartaric  Arid,  Us, d<>*
w hits  Pepper,  tins,  dos
.1 "7
s 3'»
14
H
1 OS
1 is
I ir>
4 2 i
v n
1 ii
1 10
1 16
1 no
80
I    In
8,60
1 10
(Continued on page 2?,i \'*2d
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which is Incorporated the B. C. TRADE REVIEW.
21
Paper Bags—Grocers, Attention!
THE "RAVEN" MANILLA
THE " GARRY " LIGHT KRAFT
THE "RUPERT" HEAVY KRAFT
The above brands of paper bags have again and again
demonstrated their quality to grocers and confectioners
throughout the Province. From testimonials and recommendations received by us we are thoroughly convinced
that in offering you paper bags we do so knowing that the
customers whom you serve can be assured that all packages packed in these bags will arrive at their destination
secure and neatly packed.
Merchants who appreciate the value of good delivery
of their merchandise may rest assured that the use of
these bags will give them a superiority of product and
service in this line.
If your wholesaler does not offer you these bags please
phone or write us and your requirements will be promptly
attended to.
WOODS MANUFACTURING CO., LTD.
Winnipeg, Manitoba.
NORFOLK PAPER COMPANY, LTD.
163 Water St.     Sey. 7868     VANCOUVER, B.C.
Continental Paper Bags
arc recognized by all discriminating merchants
as supreme in their sphere
BECAUSE
quality is always maintained
Prices arc no higher than are asked for Bags
of less merit.
Manufacturers
The Continental Paper
Products Ltd.
OTTAWA. ONT.
AGENTS
Smith, Davidson & Wright Ltd.
VANCOUVER. VICTORIA.
Are You Handling
RAMSAY'S
"Queen Royal"
LINE OF
CREAM SODAS
Packed in large ami small litis. A delicious appetizing biscuit, li will appeal to your customers. Ask
our representative to show you this line or write or
phone us order.
This bisruit will give every satisfaction, Let us prove
this by sending you a trial tin ai once.
Ramsay Bros. & Co.,  Ltd.
VANCOUVER, B.C. VICTORIA, B.C. 90
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which is Incorporated the B   C  TRADE REVIEW
Septenihi
Advertised
Bread
THE demand for Shelly's
4-X Bread is greatly increased by our extensive advertising. This means
a greater turnover—bigger profits for YOU!
SHELLY  BROTHERS
VANCOUVER VICTORIA
NEW WESTMINSTER NANAIMO
You can always
rely on—
■St*
COFFEE
As importers we specialize
in Coffee Roasting, Tea
Blending, the manufacture ol
Flavoring Extracts, Feather-
liKht Baking Powder, and associate lines—Spices, Cocoa,
Lemonade Crystals and Persian Sherbert,
All these Jameson  products
are easily identified  by  their
trademark.
THE
W. A. JAMESON COFFEE CO.
Victoria and Vancouver, B. C.
Vancouver Phone Sey. 2723
GILLEffS LYE
^ EATS DIRT        ^
Chloride of Lime
16 oz. Package
Supplied by .ill wholettts grocers
in  British  Columbia
Manufai hired by
CANADA COLORS AND CHEMICALS LIMITED
Succeeding
TML  JOHN  B. PAINE  CO.,  LTD.
Toronto Winnipeg Vancouver
Agents:
STARK & STERLING
VANCOUVER,  B.  C. 1923
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which is Incorporated the B. C. TRADE REVIEW,
i 'alitor I 'il. 2 ot  dos
,   »tor Oil,   * os   '!"/•
I .-..ni Baits, '<•*. dos
|.r!;'t  Colora,  I os .  dos
icings (Chocolats, Knn«« i *tti*k, Lemon
vanilla,  Whltti  Almond,  Orange)
dos    ■
Jelly Powder, An*
i , n . nnde  Powder,  dos        	
Mustard.  Is   doi
Mustard,   -is,  doa	
MsiM.tid.    !t   doi
s.iit I'.-ii.-.  "4a •!"/.
Sulphui   '«". dot . .
r,.,   on en Label   la Iti
,, |   Qreen IjsM,  'm   pet  th
m.  tl>   I-..- k i>;. *'
.. It*   pack <>■•■<
Tea, de  Lux*    **"■  - '  "'■
Ti i   ,t.<  i.i>\.-.   Vfiprnixm   '.i   pei   lb
vini iror,   doa
THE  W.   H,   MALKIN   CO.,  LTD.
"MalMn'i   Brit"   Product!.
1 15
fin
1.78
1.46
■in
2 2b
i r,H
4 71
2 40
9r>
$5
S8
M
r.o
Kxtmrt? (all fl
122   di..   .
IS/4   ../..
g   OS
avora)
16
OS.
».'
OZ.
v..
gallon
Hull
aiy<
12
13
orl hp
2 ..7. bta
4  OS btK
Honey
24 % at jgra
24   13 OS Jars
2« 2«  tins
12, ifl   tins
per doz.
per doz.
per doz.
.per doz.
per doz.
.each
each.
per doz.
per doz.
per doz.
per d-'Z.
per doz.
..per doz.
per ooz.
...per doz.
...per doz.
'..' Ft OS
Baklni Powdai  [Vim
<**   12     >*.
is sm
Baking s- ii
12   *     H    < ' I -
IS/I r»i   tin*
Cl **?«*<■    ( Vtt- UHW    Mi. -. I
1)1    I w
I "*"r,t :*■    •'   'j' v ' *. |'.    I v.
i   itard I
t oi    ei
I dos
1 ei d<>!
;.. r dOS
pei dos
pei do*
J-:   cJot
I  40
.per doz.
per doz.
...p.-r doz
..per lb
. 11
I 16
6 ':
IS
I It'
M    B   S
t'i-r .I it
pei dos
pt     >loji
pel rjol
SO
Jelly  Powders   (ail   flavors)
12  4  OS
Lemonade   I'owder:
12 4 uz ctns                      . ..
12  S oz  ctns	
Muelard
12 3h tins 	
12 S3 or  tins	
24  is   tins	
12  6a  tins  . ...
SpiccK* and S.-.iM'nings
Allspice  12 ft tins  perdoz.
Cinnamon 11 3 tins     per doz.
Cloves  11/3 tine per d<-z.
Curry Powder il 1 tins perdoz.
Chill  Pow der per doz.
Olngerll S Una perdoz.
Mm**  12 3   Una      per doz.
Marjoram 11 S Una .        perdoz.
Mint   12 1   tins  perdoz.
Nutmeg,   1! 3  Una  perdoz.
1 tp-iki  :c 3 Una  per doz.
I nraiey 1! 3 tins         perdoz.
Pstlry, Mixed I!  3 tins  perdoz.
Pepper, black I! 3 Una     per doz.
Pepper   caywine it S tins ., per doa
Pepper,  white \i  3 tins perdoz.
Poultry Dressing 12 3 Una     perdoz.
JagO, ground  '.2 3 tins ...      perdoz.
Saga rubbed 11 1 Una  per-doa
B ivory  ts 3 Una   ..   per do*.
Ttiyme 22 3 Una  •  per doz.
(Continued on page 27)
2.25
4.25
8.00
15.00
22.00
6.00
11.50
1.75
8.2*5
-2.40
3.50
6.00
11.60
.95
1,25
1.G5
4.60
8.50
.60
.96
1.05
1 35
1 35
3.35
1.06
1.35
1.10
1.10
1.10
1.15
1.10
1.10
.95
1.15
1.10
1 00
1.00
1.00
3.00
1.00
1 umeric   12/tins    per doz.
Whole Cinnamon 12 ctns  per doz.
Whole Nutmegs, 12 ctns  per doz.
Whole  Pickling  12  ctns  per doz.
Celery Salt, taper bots ....perdoz.
Curry Powder, taper bots  per doa
Tea
100/ls   perib.
60/">s8  per lt>.
30/18   and  20/%   assorted   ....per Ib.
12/68   per  lb.
Vinegar
24   qts    per doz
P. BURNS * CO.. LTD.
Shamrock Products
Ayrshire   rolled   shouliers,   pei   lb...
Bacon, 5-8, per lb	
Baked ham, with dressing, per lb	
Cooking oil, 5-gal. tins, 40-tb per lb
Creamery Butter,  Shamrock,  cartons
Creamery Sutter, without cartons ....
Cheese, Canadian, large, per lb	
Cheese, Canadian,  twin,  per lb	
Compound, Carnation, No. 5, 12 case
Compound, Carnation, No. 3, 20 case,
Cooked hams,  Shamrock,  per lb	
Dominion hams, 12-16 lbs	
Dominion Bacon, 6-10 lbs. per lb	
Dominion Bacon, 10-14 lbs. per tt)	
Dominion Shoulders, boned and rolled
Dripping,  beef,  4-lb  bricks 	
Hams,   per  It)	
Hams,  boned and rolled per lb	
Head Cheese, 511). tins, each 	
Jellied   tongue,   per   tin   	
Lard, No. 5, 12 to case 	
Lard,   No.   3,   20   to   case   	
Lard,  carton,  15 tbs	
Lard.   No.   1.   cartons.   30  lbs	
Mincemeat, kits, 25-lb, net, per lb.
Meat Loaf, per lb	
l'ork   Pies,   per   doz	
Pork, roast lejrs with dressing Ib	
Smoked fish, kippers, 20s, per lb	
Smoked   fish,   kippered  salmon.   10a
and 20s. per tb	
Smoked Cod. 30s per lb	
Selected fowl, per tb —	
Selected Chicken, per tb	
23
1.00
.60
.60
.90
2.10
2.25
.63
.65
.64
.66
2.50
.18
.42
.41
.17%
.38
.37
.22%
.22%
9.55
9.60
.42
.28
.31
.30
.18
.15
.30
.34
.50
1.75
10.15
10.20
.U%
.18
.14
.17
.35
.40
.10%
.15
.19%
.23
.38
Display
4
v
fl-fl-flOI-M ***tf»
An appetizing summer dish and so
economical.
Thc delicious tested recipes on every
carton will help to sell other groceries.
From your jobber or
Kelly Confection Co. Ltd.
VANCOUVER. B. C.
90 per cent of
STEVENSON'S
QUALITY BREAD
IS SOLD BY
RETAIL GROCERS
THE  WISE  GROCER  WILL
UNDERSTAND WHAT THAT
FACT MEANS TO HIM.
Phone Fairmont
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Do*I With O
ur Advertia-art:    They Make Thia Official Publication Potalble at $2.00 a Year. PIP
24
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Wiih which is Incorporated the B  C   TRADE REVIEW
September
i ;
I
To
Ever since CARNATION made
the grocer "the modern milkman," it has been a consistent
policy of this company to back
the men who sell Carnation Milk
with strong, systematic advertising.
The new campaign to appear
this Fall in the newspapers of
British Columbia is alive with
attention-arresting illustrations
and filled with practical suggestions which will help your customers in their cooking and
show them how they can have
better meals by using more Carnation Milk.
Made in Canada 1-923
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With whirl, i. Incorporated the B, C. TRADE REVIEW.
Brisk Campaign
Boost Your Sales
25
■
Every possible way in which
you can identify YOUR store
with this advertising will help
you to reap more benefit from
it. Window displays, counter
displays, and any special
" stunts " which will show those
who pass your store or enter it
that vou carry Carnation will
tie you more closely to this campaign.
Remember —your customers
want the best. By taking advantage of the interest in this advertising and Mrs. Mary Blake's
Favorite Recipes which will be
featured, you can increase your
Carnation turnover largely and
also speed up the sale of many
other items in your stock for
which these recipes call.
; f.
"from Contented Cows." 26
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which is Incorporated the i*  C. TRADE REVIEW
Septenibi1
I
1
Baking Powde
Cont-iins no Alum
Absolutely Pure
THE W.IL MALKIN Co. Ltd.
VICTORIA. VANCOUVER. NANAIMO
WILSON BROTHERS
Established 1890
Our Motto i» "SERVICE"
We cannot offer to sell you goods cheaper than any other firm is in a position to do, but we CAN
give actual facts to prove that it is
ECONOMY
to deal with us
Sfcrt-TS WILSON BROTHERS. VICTORIA. B.C.
Wholesale Grocers
SHAMROCK RRAND
HAM, BACON, BUTTER, LARD, SAUSAGE, etc.
l-'irst Quality packing house product** pul up by  l\ Burn a & <■*.,
Limited, which means they ;ir«* thc highest grade, always reliable
iiinl without equal on this market.
YOU CAN RECOMMEND SHAMROCK BRAND.
P. Burns & Company, Limited
VANCOUVER
CALGARY
EDMONTON
Say you saw it In ueChe "Paper the Retailer Reach" 1023
THE
With
BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
THE   ROYAL   CROWN   SOAPS,   LTD.
w.ncouvtr    Price    Llet—F.O.B.    Vancouver,
or  New  Writmlniter.
Terme Nett 30 Days.
"Adcx" Soap Flake* W l*Ib i-kt*-   box   |,7fi
"Apex" Soup PTake»,  !-  '"•'■ i';*iN   1"'*   - '"
\ i,;i pranoatae CaatUe, box oi 16 i'"•
liti i> Motile li  !,<lX '''  *•''     s *•*'
i' i.c .M>.tth'<i. box *>t SO . .
Crown OtitHK-nl,  24 6«,  tx>X ot 144	
frown < *Uv«, per grow
Climax or Montr*-***! (wrappM), i.*>* oi
6 55
4 KO
I ..'■
6 10
I 20
3 |Q
4 IS
6 ft j
260
6 2fl
|'.nff!i"!'   tt!i:c  M*>ttto<Ji   bo**  oi  td
GoWea Want S* Ih»x   .f 1S"h
Ooldsn Waat Powdar, l-lo   box o( i'i
coi.ien Bar. boa <>f 30
KI "riyko (wrapped), box <-f r*.-
Klnndykc  (unwrappadJi  box of BE **** i
Kien> Otyoartna, box ol H4       *» 0*3
Linen  (unwrappad)  boa ol   100 3 M
i iquld Ammonia! i dot, <ii*   box "f 2i i 95
Linutd Blua, I doa qui . boa oi M     . 4 os
Mechanlc'a Ptoa Tar, fc>i of 100—     . 6 so
MecbanlO'l I'lne Tnr, box Oi 60   2 10
Otlvo CaaUla, otJcaa. boa oi IM . 4 60
PrlmroM   (wrappad)i   i***   oi   K *'_
£xtrn hard unwrapped, boa oi W
Perfect  (unwrapped), boa oi 100 >.S0
Wrlto (Or TlOiat »»<l  HOltJ S<»«pi.    SptCtAj
piicaa on <>. 10. 3*6 a"'1 l0,J oo*o*
[•endrny'a ' rt  boa of 41 6 3"
leiulrn) ■  POWdlNtd   Ammonia.   DOI  Ol
•Ji '   *'
Special prieei on 6. 16, 2** and 100 boxaa
Pendray's   Water   GUh,    Egg    Preserver
i',,«* :i Una  t- * - aa* j ,.
Iir.|    < *T.*W I   .     bW     Ot     Ii J
which is Incorporated the B, C, TRADE REVIE
Royal Crown [.ye, i>"x of 48   5.30
Itoyal  Crown  Naptha,  box of  100  4.75
U'A.il Crown Powdered Ammonia  i-ti> 3.kg
White Wonder, box oi 100   5.30
w hlte Bwan Soap, 5« box of 120  6.45
White Swan Naptha, boa of 100  4 75
w hlte  Swan Washing lowder, 8 tb.,
b..x  of 24      G.55
THE   JAMESON   LINE
W.   A.   Jameson   Coffee   Company   of   B.   C.
'The name i.s the brand"
Coffees:
"Jameaon'a Brand" 60—la to a 'ase  f   .47
"Jameaon'a Brand"  ',:*<  48
Tea:
w.
Pepper,  ca>er,ne,  per  dozen  	
Pickling  spice,   per  dozen  	
Tumeric, per dozen 	
Marjoram,   per  dozen  	
Mint,   (IX'   ozs.)   per  dozen	
Poultry dressing,  (IV2 ozs.), per dozen
Sage, (lMi ozs.), per dozen 	
Savory,   It1'   ozs.),  per  dozen  	
Thyme,   (lVa  ozs.),   per  dozen  	
Celery salt, (2 oz. btls.). per dozen	
Discount on application.
RITHET CONSOLIDATED.
"St. James" Products.
Voonla Ceylon Tea, Vfe-lb "66c; l-tb 65c;
Kn.siK'i Ten,  Is 	
27
1.15
.90
1.00
1.00
1.15
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.25
"Jameson's  Brand'
SO-   Is   to   case ..     .62
}'■" - ';;s   to   case      .63
"Jamason's Uram
Baking Powder: Jameson's "Featherlight"
:, it. tlna, per do* 18.80
:'-;ib Una, per doz    7 20
l£oa   nn**. per doa     2.30
Extracts: All flavors, bottlea
l$-l o;itir(.              2 25
li-* ounce                    4.20
11 B ounce           s.4d
[J. 16 ounce                      . . .       is.80
B n ten r dr nks:
Poraian Bberbert 8-0*. Una, per doz 2.25
Lemonade Crystals, 10-oa tins, per dos 2 25
st.
St.
St.
St.
St.
St.
St.
St.
,1 a m es
James
James
James
James
James
James
James
Coffee   Is   	
Coffee, 5s 	
Coffee 25s and
Kxtracts, 2-oz.
Ex tracts,
Extracts,
Extracts,
Allspice,
50s
1-0'/,.
8-oz.
16-oz.
2-oz.
doz.
Koy ii Cwwn Boap, 6a. boa 01 iw
!'.<•*. .*! I M-u r,   POW •'■' *     box  Of * 14*
lUivsl Cnsstn  i'owder,   I It    '-•*
li, «, ii f'i '•.<, n  ' 'i-.!«•.*«'«'.   bos  ■ ;   li
1
t ,
I 0 •/.'•!)
1 er dosen
01 I, per dozen
der, per dozen
dozen
y.  1.  •» r dozen
,-, per dozen
ire, pei doa
er doxen 	
1 ;, i'<" dozen
1 t-. per dozen
... 1 00
  1.00
  1.15
  1.15
  1.00
  1.16
  1.00
.. 1.20
.   .   . 1.00
. . .. 1.1".
  1.00
  1.10
Cinamon, 2-oz
Black Pepper
Curry  Powder
Cayenne   	
Cloves   	
Ginger   	
Marjoram
Mint     	
Mace ~
Nutmeg
Pastry
White   I
Poultry
Parsley
Paprika
Sage
Savory
Thyme
Trjmerlc
Spice
Pepper
Dressing
5, 64c
.52
.50
.'4 8
2.10
4.00
7.00
13.75
1.00
1.10
1.00
1.30
1.20
1,40
1.10
1.15
1.15
1.40
1.15
1.30
1,15
1.05
1.15
1JJ0
1.05
1.05
1.05
1.05
Why not make
your cash register
ring up speedier
profits by hand;
line a foil line of
DelMonte
CANNED FRUITS
VEGETABLES £r
FOOD SPECIALTIES
Prize Winners!
Tin*   Fleischmann   Yeast-for-Health   Contest   offered
15000 in i»rizt's. ranging from $1000 to $10.
Vour customers can't win them all, but every one of
your cU8tomtrs will want to know about them and
read our announcement of the prize-winning stories.
Gel behind the Health contest and help put it over
big.
The Fleischmann Company
YEAST
SERVICE
The incrming populnnty of NABOB Vacuum packed Coffee i.
Convincing proof of its superiority.
And you can Recommend and 'Depend on NABOB lo Solisfy
Rich, Fragnvnt, Dclicious-And Always Fresh.
VACUUM PACKED 2S
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which is Incorporated the B   C. TRADE REVIEW
The Ethical Side of  Business
\V. 11. .Malkin, President, The NY. II. Malkin Company  Limited.
Septembei
[Editor's note: In the following able address, delivered to tin* Vancouver Kiwanis Club recently,
Mr. .Malkin not only emphasises the philosophy relating to human character and conduct, but strong
ly advocates tbe creation of a "Faculty of Com*
inerce" in British Columbia's University.]
"Having been asked to speak upon business
standards and methods, choosing my own title, I
have decided to speak about the "Ethical Sid.' ot' Business." This title may perhaps presage -t somewhat
"dry'- discussion, but I shall endeavour to encompass
my remarks with a brevity, which will not unduly try
your patience.
Premeditating what 1 am about to say. I looked up
the word "ethics" in the dictionary, and found which
no doubt most of you know, that "ethiea is that branch
of philosophy which is concerned with human character and conduct." and therefore il is that portion of
husiness which is represented by human character and
conduct about which !. particularly wish to say n law
words. And in bringing this subject before you, I do
want to avoid any appearance of preaching. I am the
last man in the world to enjoy telling people what
they should or should not do.
This is a subject which it is difficult to deal with in
anything but an abstract way in for.- a mixed audience
of ihis kind. Ai the same time, there are eertain fundamentals which apply with equal force to all branches
of businesses and professions, and these fundamentals
receive the least attention at the hands of all of us,
specially the younger element, who in their haste and
anxiety to realize their ambitions overlook fundamen*
tals, forgetting that they are functioning twenty-four
hours in every day, and o'i.~> days m every year, and
all the time. And it is often the neglect of fundamentals which causes defeat and brings about disaster.
I should like to preface my remarks by quoting Mr.
Calvin Coolidge, President of the United States,
addressing "Amherst Alumni."
**lf material rewards are to be the only measure
of success there is no hope of a peaceful solution of our
The
Old Reliable
MinarcTs Liniment
Co. Limited
J Yarmouth, N. b.
social questi* ns, tor thej "dl never In* large cuougl
to satisfy, But such is nol thc cast\ Men struggle for
materia! success because that is the path, Ihe process,
to tii«> development ol character NN e mus forevei
realize that material rewards are limited and in a sens*
the) are onl) incidental, but the development of char
acter ts unlimited and il in the on!) essential, Tin
measure of success is nol tin qualit) of merchandise
bul the qualit) of manhood which is produced
NVe should always remember lhal our businesses nu
lie no other than our character makes them, and per
sonal character is the fountain source of trui socia
progress,
I think one of tin* mosl important thing!* for a l>u*
ness or professional man. is to have n fixed aim, and
definite idea as to hois thai aim is going ?,, o,- a**.,.:., a
Por a lawyer, or a doctor, or a dentist, to rush tl rougi
his examinations and gel hts degree, gel into .1 bus
1 es*., ix j.ir more simple than the future jnii ding ol tl
business or profession,   Tins applies to th.* voting bus
ness man starting iu business, n-> matter whether ;* >**
in the retail, manufacturing, wholesale, ot nn a hr«*
whatever class of husmess j| is, the factors which wi
decide  the StlCCCSS  or  oth-UU
Hide! Jul   :•  If*
the venture are the hidden factors t«> which 1 rel rn
it moment ago, and these hidden factors must be givci
close attenl ion,
A husmess or profession to be reall) successful musl
primarily, of course, make n profit, because if il il
not make a profit   !>> profit I mean 1 perccntagi ovei
the ordiuar) curreni rate of interest, vo  7 or **'■
it could nol live and therefore tin* business would • ' m>
to exist, so that primarily the most essential thing
a busim ss is a reasonable profit
One would imagine that to make a profit it woi
only be necessary to exercise tlo- ordiuan judgmenl ol
a man of business to bu) and sell al a profit, hut this
dors not natuarlly follow, If *.*,*• were entirely depend
enl upon the labors of our nun hands and our oun
brains for our returns, it would be another matter, hut
we arc mosl ol us depending upon the labor of the
hands and brains ol others and therefore il is verj
necessary thai the relationship between ourselves and
J. A. TEPOORTEN
LIMITED
WHOLESALE DRUGS
PATENT MEDICINES DRUGISTS' SUNDRIES
PHARMACEUTICAL PRI PARA I IONS
308 Water St.
Vancouver, B. C. 1923
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Witti which i.t Incorporated the B. C. trade review.
29
those associated  with  us  m our work is of the right
I \ pe.
During the last twenty-five years it seems to me a
new element in business has hecn gradually making
itself apparent, and thai is tin* "human element."
Large employers oi labor toda) who are m any way
thoughtful) have come to the conclusion thai the most
importanl part of building and organizing a husiness
is, to huihl men, and this, ol course, applies to the
Kinall business in the same ratio as the large husiness.
The lawyer or business men who has only one clerk
should select that man with the greatest eare. Do nol
get a num into the office because he is apparently smart
find oul a little bit aboul him   find oul aboul Ins
father and mother   whether he lives at home and so
on    And in the large employment of men, where the
engaging ol labor is a dail) occurrence, the employ-
w. h. Malkin.
non! of nun should UOl be haphazard, but should be
gone into \*x\ carefully Even the employing ol an
office ho\ is a mosl important matter, because in that
boy 'heir is possibly thc germ of some high official, or
even general manager, and every lime yon take a boy
into your office and train him and hi is a failure, il
means a loss, Vcn often the boys with real character
are the boys who at-e J,,w in developing, '"it they will
go much farther and much higher than the quick superficial lad who has not the same foundation ol character,
Thi association between employer and employee
is a subject which could easily be dis usscd by itsell
for a whol,. n,»,,11 hour, h is of tremendous importance
in the building up and conducting of a successful busi
ness. There should be perfect understanding ami
hearty cooperation and svmpath)  between employer
* i 1
and employees. Well trained employees arc nol ai
ways eas\ to obtain, but a well trained man who com
bines knowledge with tact, and who puts everything
that is hes! ui him into his work, should nol onlv he
well paid, but if at all possible he should share in the
profits of tin* husmess I am a great believer in profit-
sharing, which after all is based on the principle ol
payment by result.   To create a spirit of cooperation
in a husiness, no mailer how small, titer mus! be very
liberal treatment -riven In the employer and some in
centive to increased energy in the way of bonuses or
profits.
There is another point which I should like to touch
upon before closing, and that is, the relationship between education and business efficiency. While admitting that many successful business men have only
had a very indifferent education, and that many highly
educated men have turned out dismal failures in the
husiness world, I would still say you are more likely
to yet first rank husiness men from a highly trained
and educated community than you are from a community that is only indifferently educated. Several
efforts have hecn made in British Columbia to have a
Faculty of Commerce in our University, and I hope
before long we shall have enough public spirited men
to subscribe sufficient to make this most desirable end
attainable.
You Kiwanians have heen so successful in all that
you have undertaken, that 1 almost feel like suggesting
to you that one of the best efforts you could make
would be to make it possible for a Faculty of Commerce to be created at the University and so enable
your young men to take a course covering banking,
international finance, insurance, transportation, business management, and the relationship of labor and
capital, I believe that it would be possible for your
club with your energy and influence, to put this matter before the people and raise the necessary amount.
I understand it would only take about $6000 or $7000
a year to create this Faculty, and it' fifteen citizens
would subscribe $500 per yer, the Faculty could be
made possible, Let me throw this suggestion out to
you. Business today demands the best brains and the
best trained men if it is going to be elevated to that
high position which 1 think it should occupy.
IMPORTANT
Postage Stamps Are Not to be Used on
Cheques or Receipts After October 1, 1923
Sub-section 2 of Section 10, Special War
Revenue Act. dealing with stamp tax in receipts and cheques, comes into effect on October Ut next. After that date EXCISE TAX
STAMPS are to be used in place of ordinary
postage stamps, which in the past have commonly heen used on both cheques and receipts.
Particular attention is drawn to this matter in order to avoid the possibility of cheques
being dishonored.
It is understood from the Hanks that the
use of postage stamps on cheques after that
date will to all intents and purposes, be con-
gamed us unstamped paper. do
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which la Incorporated tin* B  C. TRADE REVIEW.
Se,
Member
separately
Home preserving means a big demand for
Davidson Enaraaledware Utensils. Feature
this sanitary ware in your windows give it
extra prominence in your store for quick
sales and welcome profits.
The Davidson Home Preserving Outfit gives
you a compact, complete proposition to put before your customers. Everything they need
for the job—a big 18-quart Enameled preserving kettle with Enameled cover, wire rack for
for cold   pack   method,   basting  spoon,   ladle,
dipper,  skimmer and  me.tnurmvr  i*up   • •  *.•
piect- with a bundled   and   one   year   round
kitchen   Uses
**ell Davidson Bnameledware, the clean
ware, that retains the full flavor and color ol
fruits and vegetables and is easiest of all to
ke p klean. Every piece bears the Davidsoi
Seal of Durability,   Sell j| jn sits or separate
ly.      It's   gOOd   husmess   cither   \\ a \.
Write todaj for quant it)' prices and at trap
live  two color  Window    poster.
ie
^/kcE^ap^rijlA/^c: f/m,/u
Established I860,
Head  Office and Factory:  MONTREAL.
137 Powell Street, Vancouver.
Toronto. Winnipeg. Calgary.
DAVIDSON
Say yjou saw it in "The Taper the lietailer cReads" 1923
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With win,), lo Incorporated the B. C. TRADE REVIEW
31
Distributors report a good volume of husmess, with
j* much earlier demand than usual for ranges, heaters,
s| ove pipe**, etc.
Retailers are in the position where the) are protected to R great extent against projected increases,
jobbers stocks being adequate fo take care of their requirements,
h is however advisable thai merchants keep tbem
selves posted on changing conditions in the stock situ-
ation, and make their purchases judiciously, for heavy
demands are possible from provincial and federal con
struetion projects, and stocks mav be cleaned up more
rapidly than they ean be ieplaeod.
Wholesale houses report good volume of sales m
guns, shells and other hunters accessories,
Okanagan business shows nigus of improvement,
nnd with the brisk demand for British Columbia fruit
from the Prairies, the fail outlook foi liardwaretnen i**
pr< mising.
Vancouver Island reports much better husmess m
all merchandising lines Mining activities are brisk,
with ever) prospect of continuaton during the greater
part of the *>*> inter,
Collections are better, hut there i** still much room
for improvement in this regard.
MARKETS AT A GLANCE
Paints. Sales fair, prices remain firm al  former
quota! ions.
Sheet Steel.        Sales  active,  prices  unchang* I.
Local  stocks complete
Rope Manila and Sisal.- Sales are quieter,  Prices are slightl)  lower,
Game Traps. Rural  orders   fair,  prices  firm,
st oi ks good.
Clocks. ■ Jobbers' stocks in much better condi
lion, shipments to retailers probabl) will soon gel
under  full  swing,
Furnace Scoops. —   Interest  is   routined to small
lots for future deliveries,   storks ample, prices firm.
Sash    Cord. ---   Interest   continues small; stocks
lighl and prices are said to be somewhat softer.
Snow Shovels. Jobbers report good advance sales
and stocks are ample to meet reasonable future requirements,   Prices are firm.
Bolts and Nuts. Prices holding firm; jobbers stocks
m good condition, demand brisk.
Good Volumes of Nails Being Sold.—Nails arc reported to be selling in good quantities. The prices are
nrm and unchanged.
Fair Sales of Linseed Oil.—The sales of linseed oil
during the last few weeks have been fair. Prices have
nol changed.
Rnsswin Food Choppers Higher.—New quotations
show higher prices on Russwin food choppers.
Stove Pipe Sales are Increasing.—With the approach of fall and cooler weather sales are becoming
heavier on stove pipe, elbows, toes. etc.
Sheet Brass and Copper Lower. — A lowering in
price has been recorded on both sheet brass and copper.
The new quotations aro approximately ten per cent.
lower.
Brass and Copper Wire Decline.—A decline is noted on brass and copper wire The new figures show a
decline of ten per cent.
Hobbs Washers Drop. By revising the list a drop
in price is noted on Hobbs pattern split washers.
Steady Sales Maintained on Turpentine.—A steady
and fairly active sale continues in turpentine.    Prices
remain unchanged.
Eaves Trough and Conductor Pipe. — Demand
steady; manufacturing and jobbers making prompt
shipments, prices unchanged.
Axes.—Present prices expected to hold during fall;
sales satisfactory, manufacturers still slow in shipments.
Files,—Sales reported heavy; stocks fair, price?
firm.
"Chains—Lighl weldless chains in steady demand;
prices firm and unchanged.
Screws. Situation unchanged, excellent orders being placed, fair stocks reported on hand.
AUTO ACCESSORIES.
Good Sales Made in Auto Windshield Cleaners. —
Auto windshield cleaners are enjoying good sales. The
"Presto" sells at $1.60 each. Mayo Skinner $6.50 each
Fair Sales Reported in Running Board Step Plates.
Pair sales are reported by jobbers in running hoard
step plates.    Klassy at $1.85 each; No. 90 at 50c each.
Lubricating* Oils Remain Steady—Sales of lubricating oils are reported as being very good by dealers
locally.   Greases are also showing good sales at this
season of the year.    Prices on oils remain steady.
Automobile Accessories.—Sales fair, prices firm.
Stocks light. A good fall and winter demand is expected.
1
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THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
wuii which la Incorporated the 0  C   TRADE REVIEW
Septembe
Fall Paint Business Should Be
Abundant
All around you on every street in your town, there is new  paint business to
be had this fall.
Perhaps you hav* sometime fished a stream or lake where the hii* speckled
beauties lay deep below ;he surface waiting to he templed l>\ just one partie
ular fly.   .lust so is this business waiting to be approached, to bane its fane)
tickled by seme especially tempting painting idea, to be made to rise In a
sound economic suggestion.
Occupied as you are with the detail of your store management vet could m-o
not snatch a few minutes here, a half hour there, to persona I h  -lraw  mmv. ni
ihis potential business to your paint department!
The average customer enters your store vvith intent to buy some specific
article or articles. Why nol increase your sales by a special appeal to hsm to
consider painting or varnishing tins fall' U it not true that ibis average
• ustomer is susceptible to a logical paint appeal, and appeal which mean-- real
economy to him in tin* bum run :'
Put the famous slogan to tin* test this fall, by personally telling a few of the
many citizens in your community whose properties need painl    "Slave the Sur
face and Vou Save All,'" 1923
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Wnli which is Incorporated the R   C. TRADE REVIEW.
33
GOOD ENOUGH
There has m ver been a time in the history of the
,;ide when We bad as many Strictl) modern, up to-date
stores for the distribution of hardwar
n;ili|Waie   niuii-n   mo    iio    uimui'miuii   oi    naniw arc   as
Ul. have in Canada to-day. Sever in previous his-
\t,y\ have we had the splendid facilities for displaying and atlvertising hardware, Taken as a whole, the
hardware window displays ol this country are nol
(•xcceded in attractiveness n\ Hoi's,- of any other conn
ti\ ui iio* world Koim ol the finest advertising in
our daily newspapers is thai done by the retail hardware trade of this country.    'Hardware and Metal."
DOMINION   CARTRIDGE   COMPAN*    PREDICTS
BUSY SEASON.
The Dominion Cartridge Compan) anticipate heavy
fail husmess ami have made up large stocks so that
ih ilers can got ammunition on short notice. There
has b< en a greal deal of inconvenience in the pas; years
\\ iih the large rush
.• \
■ USUI
uriiij* th
Itll r III"!!! IK
of the year, whieh touml factor) stocks depict wl. This
vt 11 now be eliminated,    It is forecasted that r'V- will
. an ex i ptionall) jood year for ammunition through-
ii ii t anada
Kx«
eilen!
ame conditions prevail this year
,;.,
season )c,r small ijhhii opens two weeks earlier m l>
lhan [>re\ lousl**.   Tl is
ero ?" get a bet ler i I ai
go - itttl     Dm : «, phea
ri ease, and relailers si
\ ear's sab
(tenerall)  big game
are exceptional!)  good
demand for tai
Ifl  I" high
metallic eartl
>wer, am!
[i,w s t he sportsmen and shoot
al th< lo al birds before they
.nis i■ j ia I, etc. are on the in*
ibi look forward to a record
ni iitions throughoui ( anada
fhere is a greal I y  i nerease I
si o\\ u by sales
Conner
e ■  i     111 M
1
■j***1" There are man**, retiuests from consumers for
large metallic cartridges, advising that thej cannot
procure same rrom their loea dealer, Dealers should
give their attention to this bus ness ami at least earn
an assort ment .>t the mo ■
i"u
11 III   sizes
A  WORTHY   CAUSE.
Refund  of   Luxury   Tax  to   Automotive  Dsaier-a  Universally
Support td<
bj J   K   Dixon
,   ol   Un    Vu:o
\ short Well reasoned address was gh
ol Ottawa, member ol tie Advisor) Comn
motive Section ol thfl Retail Merchants' Association ol Can
ndn ai a reeenl luncheon held al the Mount Royal Hotel.
Montreal, which was attended bj members ol thi Domlnloi
Board ol Thi Retail Mercl ml Usoelatton oi Canada from
ever) provlno In th* Domlnloi o well as lhe leading Vulo
moth e 11, ah i •• In ihi cltj ol Montreal,
The speakei produced figures io provi Ihe Impossible bui
den ol laxatlon lhal the automotive Dealers had been forced
to contrtbuti lo the Dominion irenaur) over night, as ll were,
and which was brought aboul ihrough lhe repeal of the
luxury lax bj an Order-lnCouncll Issued b) tin Dominion
Government, dated December I8ih, 1920, and which became
effecth ,• Iiutiiiili.it <-l \
Mi Dixon quoted case after case ol Dealers throughoul
Canada who locked up their places ol business on Saturda)
night,  Decembei   18th,   1920,  believing  themselves to be In
i I financial standing and enjoying good credit, nnd on their
wa) back to ihetr stores on Mondn> morning, December -Qui,
pucked up die morning papers onl) to find themselves raced
with bankruptc) unless lhe Government should refund nem
ih.- ia-.es the) had paid In advanei ol 15*7 and 20*2! on arge
stocks ol  automobtlea thej  had on hand and Intended roi
Bprlng delivery, and on which the luxury tax had been repealed, i hereby making it not only impossible but illegal for
the dealers to collect said taxes from the ultimate consumer
whom the War Revenue Act clearly intended should pay it.
li was pointed out thai the Automotive Dealers represented considerably less than one-third of one per cent, of the
total taxpayers of the Dominion and that they had contribut-
"I al one stroke luxury taxes upwards of $1,500,000.0(1. The
speaker produced statistical figures showing that if each taxpayer in Canada had been compelled to contribute in the same
proportion as the Automotive Dealers had contributed that, it
would have produced $7,276,500,000.00 or three and one-quart-
ei times the national debl as it stood at that date. The speaker stated it was the intention to ask the Dominion Govern-
menl to introduce a measure at the next session of Parliament to reimburse the Dealers for their losses in this luxury
tax, and he had no doubt whatever that the efforts in this
direct ion will be .successful, because, he stated, "I have never
mei a man in any walk ol life that does not heartily support
us once the discriminatory features of the case are clearly
explained to him."
Mr Dixon had just returned from a special trip through
the Maritime Provinces, where he attended the Annual Convention of the Nova Scotia Provincial Board of the Retail
Merchants' Association of Canada, held at New Glasgow,
N S. and also the Prince Edward Island Provinical Board
Convention, held at Charlottetown, P, E .1, At both these
conventions, as well as at the Annual Convention of the
Dominion Board of the Retail Merchants Association of Canada, which includes all sections of trade, held in the city of
Montreal, resolutions were passed and carried unanimously,
supporting the Automotive Dealers in their efforts to get back
this mone) irom the Government, which was taken from them
through a cruel discriminating combination of circumstances
ovi r w hieh they had no control.
The speaker also pointed out thai the Dealers throughout
Canada advanced this money to the Government for these
luxur) ia\es. feeling that it really constituted a sort of trust
fund, and advanced the money to the Government in implicit
confidence and fell iV same sense of esecurity as they would
it the) deposited it in the Government Post Office Savings
Department, believing, of course, that they should be permitted to pass ii on to the ultimate consumer, whom it was
clearl) intended by the Act should pay it, or, in the event of
Ihe removal or repeal of the tax by the Government that the
same would be refunded to the Dealers in the same manner
as the Government subsequently refunded all similar taxes
paid b) the manufacturers for all cars they had shipped to
their various retail branches throughout Canada prior to the
repeal of the luxury  lax.
The dealers feel that in this respect they have been most
unfairly discriminated against, and thai their confidence has
been sorely abused, and many of them openly state that there
was nev.r a confidence game filled off on this continent that
was more cruet and disastrous in its results than the manner
In which ihis hiMiry tax case has been handled throughout.
In order io bring home more clearly to their minds the
seriousness of this matter to the Automotive Dealers, the
sneaker reminded his audience that five of the Automotive
Dealers of Montreal who were present at the luncheon, repn sented firms whose aggregate losses were $102,822.79, an
unreasonable burden for these firms to assume.
Surelv. in the face of these facts, said the speaker, the
rtipj of even self-respecting Canadian citizen is only too ap-
,,,,,.„,. nnd he entreated his audience, representing as they
,i rl Retail Merchants from all provinces of the Dominion, to
|(*.,-vp no s»o»e unturned until this injustice was wiped out
ni the ta-at'on records of the fair Dominion of Canada.
New Kind of Friction.
The insurance adjuster who had hecn investigating
thu lire turned to go.
"] raieo down here tn find Olll the cause of litis
ii,v nnd I have done so." he remarked.
"That's \vh«i1 I want to know.    What caused ir.''
demanded thi  house owner,
•* It V a plain ease of friction."
•• What va-mean    friction .'"
"The fire was undoubtedly caused hy rubbing a
,).n,e *lioiisand-doll:u* insurance policy on a two-thousand dollar house."
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THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which is Incorporated the I*   C. TRADE RKV1RW.
September
A GOOD SALES POLICY.
Selling Policy of the Townley Metal and Hardware
Company That Should te Endorsed by all Manufacturers and Wholesalers in the Dominion
ll   is   ollf   policy   tO   sell   to   wholesale   only.     The
question as to who is entitled to be considered as a
retailer is determined by the class of goods he carries
on hand for resale.
A general hardware stock is entitled to buy anything in our complete line, ex ;ept agency goods u a
town where an active agency exists in any agency line,
Special lines, such as tin simps, grocers, druggists,
jewelers.   garages,  sporting  goods Stores,   etc,   are  in
tilled lo buy al  wholesale prices any class or Hue of
goods that they have their money invested in or u**e in
tlie conduct of their husiness.
Factories are entitled to buy at wholesale prices
such goods as ihey use for manufacturing their products or such tools as they use m the process,
Examples: jeweler or druggist buying docks and
watches, chafing dishes, vacuum bottles, etc.. which
arc regular stock items with him, would not he entitled io buy ai wholesale prices for his own personal
use or for use of his friends such items as washing
machines, lawn-mowers, held fence, refrigerators, etc.
It is our policy thai the merchant in the town who
has invested in this class of goods is entitled to tlie
husiness.
A manufacturer, as for example a packing house,
would not he entitled io buy at who!.-sale prices for
the personal  use of its  hundreds of employees  such
items as a cook or heating stove,  or a  spade,  hue or
rake    su h sales an* retail husiness, and as we have i
retail department, or retail prices, we are put m ti
position of retailing at wholesale prices, if we a!V,
such sales lo he made, a position which is not only  \\\
fan* to the established retail  trade*, hut  detrimeuin
to the hest interests of all, and at tin- same tune eailsi
a direct   loss to our house.
This   pohe\   applies  DOtll   to   e|!y   ainf   eolintl'S    tt'.M
Tie special attention of eit) salesmen and employei
is called 'o this policy because it carried to an ex
treine by  the interchange of purchases at  wholesale
prices betwee-n jobbers and manufacturers id varioti
lines lhe tune would soon eome when {he thousand i I
[Tm]
Demand Meakins' Rubberset
BRUSHES
Oit*r*t brueti  menttfeeturert  In  €*"*$*.
Et!at»H|»**d   1181,
The  Dealer  wo htntflee <"<r  b*MiJ***i Qfi*
the     lirnr'l     (if    O'.ir     «•*{>* >U«ttC«.
AtV    for   nc*   C atJio^»«
Meakins & Sons Ltd.
82*?   POWELL   IT.          VANCOUVER,    0    C
Faetery,    Hamilton,  ont.
    .—
Protection and Preservation
with B-H Products
T
EiE "Save the Surface'' educational campaigns have been a tremendous success
for they have awakened the public to tin necessity of propert) preservation by
the use of Paints and Varnishes.
These campaigns have meant much to th-' dealer in Whit.' Leads, Paints, and Vai
nishes. B-H dealers have benefitted wonderfully for th<-v have built their business on
B-H quality products.
B-H Agents recognize that they have a superior  line  of  Paints and   Varnishes
no matter what the requirement, they have a bigh qualit) producl for t ver) purpose for
which a brush is used.
B-H  deahrs appreciate all  the  forceful   advertising    that    has   heen   conducted   in
their behalf, and the li || dealer llispla)  material   for all   products  is unexcelled,
The result has been greater sales and greater profits for them.
We will gladly furnish, without any obligation, full
particulars of the |; || Agency proposition.
RRANDRAM-II EN DERSON
^^■■■■■■■■{■■'   '■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ LIMITED
MONTREAL HALIFAX ST.   JOHN. TORONTO WINNIPEG
MEDICINE  HAT CALGARY EDMONTON VANCOUVER. rv
Tl 1K BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Wild which in Incorjjo atcd the B  C. TRADE REVIEW.
35
,,;ployees of such establishments would be getting
then* supplies at less than retailer's cosl and the sue-
,•(•ggful continuation m business of retail merchants
w ould be greatly handicapped,
Believing that all fair-minded dealers and manufacturers will see this policy in the game lighl thai we
j,,  and commend our position, we instruct each cm
njovee I" conduct  himself in such a way   a*, will make
,\,r\ s.de of our company conform to 'his policy.
SURFACE SAVING
Fall   volume   of   paint   and   varnish sales   will   be
phenominal.
Prom tin* firsl ol September onwards this season
iffers a splendid opportunit) for thc retail hardware-
man to realize n very handsome profli from the sale of
painl and varnish
Man) factors, some ,,t uiueh ma) s;u,| \n bv uu-
- ..2. will result in the fall of }'i2\. being oni of thc
best seasons for the disposal oi lars**1 stocks of paint
-  ai has ever occurred in the Dominion ol Canada,
In consequence of the late spring which curtailed
to very large extent the ear!)  painting season, much
;n
work was room nonet!, rikI is still waiting
in
done
I iifavorablc weather conditions were responsible
' •■   the  suspension  ol  much  residents!  construction,
and home buildm-.' ali,I other structural work ha** heen
read over the summer months   These must he completed before ihe cold weather sit-, in, ami painted
read) for occupancy.   Right hen is a rea  opportunity
>l   paint   and   \ Smisll   sales.
Then think of thc profitable fields for business during the fall months when paint specialties are ever in
demand for such purposes as linoleums, stove pipes.
Boors, autos, porch floor paint, interior furniture enamels, and wall finishes
Almost even customer who enters vour store during September or October is a prospect foi some painl
spe ialty,
In deciding upon a line of specialties, tin  retailer
should »toek lines that will appeal at this particular
season, but he should never lose Ihe opportunity ol un
pressing his customers that even mouth ol Ihe year
can he mad'   a "Sa\e the Surface" month.
The pleasure resulting from a liewl) applied coat
ol   paint   or  varnish  does  much  !*■'  create  a  spin*   ol
goodwill between the merehanl and Ins customer.
Never be too bus) to ^r>\• all the information at your
disposal regarding the application of surface saving
painl or varnish to your customers   Tune spenl in 'hi**
Wa)   meats dollars m your hank sceounl
The opportunit) is here for brisk sales in paints and
varnish and will continue just as long as the hardware
*nen take advantage of  tin    Dominion   wide  appeal
which is fostering a knowledge of the necessity for sur
ta e protection in thc minds of tbe people ol Canada.
Save the Surface and yo.ll  Save  All,"
BRAZIL   EXPORTS   OF   COFFEE.
More than 4,000,000 bags ot coffee were shipped from
Brssll in the si\ months en dins June 30,
NEW GOODS.
BAKSAVHER DUAL PAN.
Proven mosl popular among that class of trade
who demand something differenl from the old style
and wi hout the hack-aches necessitated by the shore
BAKSAVHER
DUST PAN
wb
NEW WAY
handle; nicoly balanced on handle and swivel, so that
dirt drops to the bottom when pan is lifted from the
floor. Width of pan 12 ins., with 26Vo in. coppered
wire handle, finished in black enamel.
"More Light"
Lighting Systems
FOR   HOMES.  BARNS,  ETC.
Sell your customers "more light" it will please them
and pay you.
-MORE     LIGHT"     LAMPS
AND   LANTERNS
are of an unsurpassed standard and have given complete
satisfaction wherever used.
Our uptodate plant stands
behind you for prompt service  in   repairs.
"Junior" Bag Mantles
Are  absolutely  guaranteed  or  money  refunded.
MORE LIGHT LIMITED
VANCOUVER.  B. C.
U. S. PICKLE CROP DOUBLED.
As man) as 5,603,000 bushels of cucumbers for pickles will
be the f. S. crop of this year, according to a forcast by the
f s Departmeni of Agriculture, If this production is realized
ii will be more than twice thai of last year, owing both to
larger acreage and to greatly increased yields per acre. By
far the chief producer is Michigan, which has a forecast ot
2,579,000 bushels. THE BRITISH COLUMBIA  RETAILER
A W V „
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17 . :■/.
totted axe
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Automotive I'rict* List
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<A0 O"o: ;■. ■-    -   .. A.i     '  -   :,    .       \ i    ,
« ..- r,     I'    ..-:••:     m,    •     12.2*1 W9 I'i   '• ■
'M    2    |2 14   eai h     "•    • •-        N r 5
each: Home, No   55, $2.16 each; Horon, No
CHfTKNit,   BARJtBLI,    S'o 11   :    i
m,   :   |]' ' i ea< I    So  2   111.10 ta   i   .'•<    "
:    : 7S    <  ■' h
CLJ5VI8    HALKABLE   Por   !t>    f*
CLOTHE8 MNi;, V.'ii'.F,   P«r each   50 f .
jcr    IM fc . V>
tit'At.t,"   •(-;»   *u>'V.   iti  ','■■;    , ff   ui-v;
\,.;,'V<"i \lh   l--irt     50  off   i.i'f,    I  11
F5AVTROTWH    !'<-•   100   feel    l-In.   |5.50
l'. -    M tl     12   r-    $7 60
Y'.\A7. Or eai Wtmtern, 55*75 '-ff Hat; Black
H ■" - *-.'!   ':'", off lint
of* f.r;'- ;vr dm r,;» if k Hf-iivv atrap <
ifi   $2.00    '. • '■    $2.66   6-ln   |2.90;  8-In   ?l 16
CiOKROOATiWl TBE -Per doxoti pair* -
toi,  12       n ||   r: 80; Mn  16 25; 12 In. $12 60
Hi'.-II * ••7 i;u *>4x3- pi) 9%c a fool, *•»•*
•J-nly Ifl • •   .fo ,t
Hon**"****" gHOBrS- Iron, Noa 0 to I, $10.00
pr-r Jft0*l*a.; iron, Not 2 and larger, $9.76
per 100 Ttio
Mtn\H %s\T) COMMON fir 100 tt,« .
6 Iti and error, I20.7O; '■'.. '. and 6 inn $27 00.
KNOBS, RIM DOOR   Japanned, $3.26 per
do?
LAMP  (7HIMNEY8   A.   par  caao  8   do*..
$i ?S per Ao/,    \. dot a»r/  $1 tb\ i:. per caa<a
6 do*,   $1.66   POI   A',i.     U,   |/<-r  dOZ.   fl $$.
IKE
PAINTS   AND   OILS
Q r ,i n d r ,im   H (fl rl | r to n
Or
i: II     'f:11j.-*. Oi
H    II       '   |    •   .•   ;,
li H  E) tei II
(u-ln' iry i r>li ■
Oreona   md <m
nil  \r,.h'.r Shin
i if Unary  rolnra
Grrena and Ore
.*-'■■ v • •   s •. 11 n   -
In  i r a   i -m*
•     In A gal   cam
k'le   S'.i.t.
In   i  i''I cana
>■*>. in 'i k a   cana
PAINTS
i iidlna i y  csolora  In   !■ (wl    ca n
*>•'.! 11 oi Rpnour r>f>i ch painl
Martin Senour Neutono white
11 •
( 5 •
2 >!
1 -".
1 r,<
Oalton
I    !   I
t 10
3.16
I »■
11   b
i    I
HWI    '
M   « '  *        " U I   «I  '-
. ni off Hal [923
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Willi    util, 1.    lo    I     ... ' ,(-*JXll
»< '* u incorporated the B. C, TRADE RE
VIEW.
OUR LATEST!!
We illustrate herewith our latest
range in ••White Bock" porcelain enamel finish, with nickel trimmings. Our
new "Economizer" is finished in dark
blue enamel.
Tins range meets a great demand
and you owe it to yourself to investigate it thoroughly. Also produced in
three other finishes.
Send  for   our   new   catalogue   and
price sheets
No.  '801   Laurcntic '*D" Fmsh Square.
MMJorlomn)
566 Beatty St. Vancouver, B. C.
Phone: Seymour 7596-7.
37
V
! 't
i i.
The Secret of a Profitable
Paint and Varnish Department
The real secret lies In having your Paint and Varnish stock complete under
one particular brand. No matter what line you sell, have everything possible
under the one label.
The wisdom of this is that every sale of any Paint or Varnish you make will
surely advertise other lines you have for sale. If you stock MARTIN-SENOUR
100 .   Pure  Paint, why  not  also stock  Martin-Senour Stove  Pipe  Enamel,
Martin-Senour Varnishes and all such specialties.
If the cm of 100     Pure Pamt sold to a customer satisfies, and of this there
is no doubt, surely when that satisfied customer returns for. say Stove Pipe
Enamel, and  you show one bearing the  Martin-Senour label, it makes the
tale far easier than if you show a stove pipe enamel of another make.   This
same argument applies all along the line.
Look  over  the  shelves of  the  most  successful   paint  merchants of today,
.ind you will find them carrying and pushing one BRAND all the way through.
STOCK,   ADVERTISE   AND   PUSH   THE   FULL   MARTIN-SENOUR   LINE.
THIS   WILL   MEAN   REAL   BUSINESS  TO   YOU.
The Martm Senour line is very complete. It comprises a paint or varnish
product for every purpose and every surface. There is no need for any of
our dealers to go elsewhere to purchase any  paint or varnish specialties.
The Martin-Senour Co. Limited
■ I
;
:
1505 POWELL STREET
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Say you $aw it in the " Paper the 'Retailer Reads'' 38
Till*: BRITISH COLUMBIA  RETAILER
With which is Incorporated tin* B   C   TRADE REVIEW
Sept
e|||
You can Sell more Dominion
Linoleum and Oilcloth Rugs
This Fall than ever before
p
DON'T
OVERLOOK
PIECE GOODS
•2Many) women prefer
linoleum hy the yard
and it always is popular. The new patterns
are selling freely and
mill be in active demand
from now on.
Yes for we hove heen milking the tines! ran,*- of rug*** >n oui
history   rug** that nny w< man \s pleased !<* look .it antl proud
111      III ISSI'SS,
The illustrations above in black antl white give but r faint idea
ol [bene beautiful nit'** We shal • glad to send vou some «>i
these folders, so that you nun nee **■■*.imt a strong appeal tin **
rugn u ill iia\ •• to ) our I rade.
There will be a big demand for sanitary floor coverings tho.
fall, and tbe sale of
Dominion Linoleum Rugs
with vim will I"* what you deride • •* make it. Al! that ia
necessary is thai you put in 8 reasonabl*i good R.ssortiucnt of
tin* new patterns, with the hard, bright finish n new feature
thai makes these rugs the finest on the market Thi** applies,
too, to DOMINION Oilcloth Rugs.
Send NOW for the folder illustrated above and pick out vour
new patterns for fall selling.
Have You Our Linoleum Selling Helps ?—
They're Free.
Dominion Oilcloth & Linoleum Co., Limited
MONTREAL
Say you sail* it in "The Paper the rRetailer 'Reads" ft
1923
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Willi which la
incorporated the B, C. TRADE REVIEW
39
DRYGOODS and FOOTWEAR
FALL STYLLS
MILLINERY SHOWIN08 IN GREAT VARIETY.
,\s September is a month of tryouta in the new
fall fashions, all is still tentative as regards millinery.
Tin advance fashions show many types of small hats.
tain**, little pagoda or coolie shapes, mandarin turbans,
narmw brimmed high silk hats and the like. However,
the «*all remains for the cloche and pokes of the sort
women have heen wearing. Many highly-colored felts
appear, simple shapes with elaborate decorations, applied flatly. Blaek hatter's plush composes the new
and extremely chic, if not so popular, new walking
bat s'yh*,
One of iln-se types of millinery, or something quite
new, may forge to the front and become the winter's
most fashionable feminine headgear. At present
there ** safet) ■*• the numbers of deeorative aud decor-
itti 'I little cloche shapes.
STYLES IN WINTER FURS.
Long coats are to be worn almost exclusively 'Ins
winter. Reaching down i-* the ankle, these coats '1"
not permit of ihe dress hi low to show at all, a result
more satinfaetorih becoming than previous modes,
whieh left two or three inches of ihe dress showinjr,
ruining the whole effect of tho costume.
Tins year ihe long coat carefully preserves the
straight esl of silhouettes w belt or girdle of any
kind is worn i** break 'in  straight slender line from
shouhle]' to ankle     Tin* back ami front are as straight
ami flat as thev   possibly ean he made ; if there is any
fullness at al! in these coats it is introduced by means
<>f a Hare ai each side   The} ate worn eloseh wrapped
about tlo* hips and yet with a sort ol carefree grace.
The (lowing bishop sleeve, the mosl graceful *d all
sleeves for a  I u r COSt,  is worn almost  without  excep
lion.   Hip to he really  warm ami comfortable, there
must he a little inner sleeve of silk attached.
A \ei\  interesting note observed iu man*}  ot the
Ur\\   eoals  |s the  iiiiiisnal  w a\ s  ill  which  ill'* skills al*e
used.   Some coats are made to look as though they had
bias bauds by Betting tin* skins, jn the opposite way.
Thc New Fur Capes.
HIM s   are   also   gri
■a! favorites m the winter fur
mode, However, tin* silhouette of the cape makes not
the slightest attempt to follow that of the long coat.
Tl apes are ent  to tit  veiv   SlUlgl,\  about  'In' shoiihl-
i i's    Then there is a decided circular Hare, sometimes
from  the  elhow   to  the  hottoin  of  the eape.  while al
other tunes thc cape is straight to the knees with a
circular ruffle at tin* bottom,
The eape .hies not have a chin chin collar luit it
does follow ihe fashion for tin* high collar in a rolling
'•"liar whieh comes high in the back o! 'lm nock, over
'In' ears ami crosses almost al tin* point of tin* chin.
For tin* long coat and capes almost any fur is good.
But among the most popular are kolinsky, Alaska seal,
Hudson seal, natural squirrel, Viatka squirrel, dyed
squirrel, mink and tan, gun metal, black and grey
caracul.
PATTERNS OF FUR.
Fur collars on the new coats run to upstanding
or round types, and in the later models seem to get
narrower. The fur border is greatly employed, often
in hemlike effects, produced by handling strips of fur
to make a pattern. The same patterning appears
wherever else the fur is used on the garment.
Distinctive Coat with Alaska Sable Collar.
Made from all-wool Fashlona cloth, this coat is trimmed wltn
heavy black silk braiding, ami has panels at each side of coat
\o hem The modish sleeves, with the new flare cuffs are also
braid trimmed. The collar is of Alaska sable. Fastens with
two handsome buttons at side.
V: 40
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which It incorporated the B   C. TH IDE RK\ I8W
Septembi
I
A Siroivo' Line
to Carru
Strong in the qualities
that every merchant
can strongly recommend.
Stronger than ever, because those qualities
have heen strictly
maintained while many
lines have deteriorated.
"St.  Gcotoe
UNSHRINKABLE
UNDERWEAR
FOR MENS WEAR
If your customers rely
oh your judgment of
values you will welcome
St. Ccoi\k" as a guar-
antee of satisfaction.
All popular weights and
styles, in Scotch Knit.
I leavy Wool Rib or I ine
Elastic Combinations.
Get   them   from   these
Agents:
COM I  tk RODG) R
2.10 McGIU St, - Montreal
K. COPPING  iV SON
il Met in da St.       -       Toronto
V.uuouver
FIELD WOOLLIN Co.,Limited
Oshawa,Canada
Say you saw it in "'Che 'Paper thc Retailer Reach" '22
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA  RETAILER
Wild which la Incorporated the B   C. TRADE REVIEW,
41
Tht-*    **•!
gat>l«  Frtmmtd Duv«ty«« Coat
STRAP SLIPPERS POULAR FOR FALL WEAR.
Tbe strap slipper .** quite the most popular of all.
snaps ,.i rsrito Km.I a.i.i description are seen -some
extending wav* up to tbe nnkle in such narrow bam h
thai  tbev i mblo narrow  ribbons.    Frequent.}   at*
ti , work is  ii in the Rides of the slipper "r ,n ""
from coming up thi instep I" fact, tbe more unusual
lli-r strap, the smarter lhe slipper Sometimes these
Klraps are fastened with tin} bueklea. In Hie satin
slippers thc> are ven apl to have a button which ma
I Mi-,,1 if desired, with .i slide buckle ol pearls o
rhincstonea These buckles add grentl} to the sinari
elaborati »m of tbe dressier slipper.
I-,,.,,i leather is so attrartivel} trim and smart tha
il ,s admirably suited I'm' streel wear with the sman
laillenr However, sun!.* or suede trimmed with pai-
i,,t or dull leather is to be seen in tbe foremosl riinKs
"i' footwear fashions. In these suede shoes fcreat *
i -i .i      Pnvi-ui'iim*jj ways in
irenuih is shown in the countless ta8tnwi»««     .
whieh "the contrasting leather is introduced,   some-
times slashes in the miede show the contrasting leatnu,
or it mm be put on in lattice work or as r more ^
vcntional edging.   Certainly never before did ine .  ■ •
designers have such an opportunity to exercise a fertile imagination as that which ihey must use at present
if their shoes are to attain any degree of popularity
and smartness in the eyes of the well dressed woman.
With the contrast of leather a contrast of color is
apt to be introduced. Sometimes this contrast is given
a darker self tone or if .Milady prefers something more
unusual, vi\ id slashes of red, grei n or blue leather may
he found giving life and color to a shoe of otherwise
sombre tone. The great popularity of browns and
'an*- extends to our footwear so countless shades of
brown, tan and earnmel are seen in the newer footwear
modes* However, with the afternoon frock, if it is
black, black satin strap slippers are just the thing.
MEN'S STYLES ARE CONSERVATIVE.
There will be no decided style departures in men's
clothes this fall and winter. Simplicity and conservatism still rule supreme. While some of the lines may
be a bit austere, there is a tendency to break away
from them.
Novelties, outside of those usually found in sport
clothes, will be seen very little during the coming
months, particularly in apparel for the well-dressed
man. The jazz and rah-rah models of the past two
years are gradually becoming extinct, and once more
ihe pendulum swings back to the plain and more dignified styles.
NEW SEASON S SHIRTS FOR MEN.
Patterns that arc considered smart are those of
narrow neat stripes and small checked patterns and
the color scheme confined to one or two shades—never
more,
Tin* entire shir* color scheme of the season is to be
one of fairly subdued color effect. The higher colors
and the holder stripes are not as well placed in the
fashion calendar as in the past recent seasons. These
appl} less in the silk shirts than in the other fabrics
bul even in silks the milder effects are preferred.
v • '  •■■ ,1, I In "Mo-match shirts the big note is
s   in   madras,   poplins,  oxfords
the   plain,   solid   eoloi
hroade
doth
These come e
lam.   sui ui   « ■■.>■.....
cloths and mercerized materials.    Also in broad-
silks and either dull finish or sheen finish effects.
* >    i ....ii......
 itner wim or without, matched collars
White is v«.v popular and next in order are the plan
shades of mediui
>revs   lieiio. co
n alld  light   blue,  smoke and light
■ „ color and pongee tans.
CO OPERATIVE FALL OPENING BY NEW WESTMINSTER MERCHANTS.
Announcing the arrival of fashion's latest modes
»r fall, a  large number of New Westerminster retail
lerehants held a simultaneous fall opening on Septem-
r 6th, 7th and 8th.    An exploitation of ihis descrip-
ui marks an event of importance to the residents of
iy city, and new Westminster must be congratulated
i offering her shoppers an opportunity \o view their
1   ••'■•"■-• in nil  lines of merchandise in such a
n
Der 6th, 7th and 8tl
tioi
an;
Si^i^KepSreaehinMhisofl , «•
the effect  thai retail <
istablishments were very well
„„ ,od i  KM, City dr.*. *<■ '"• <* "•»•
th
I?
II
II m
h
ola.v,
^^SSiiMil 42
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Wiih which is Incorporated th« B  «'  TRADE kkvh:\v
Septe
*..'.
MONARCH    KNITTING
.' Hens $ Womens MniemMkiffcd Outer
-Knit
COMPANY    LIMITED
.itiil   fCttui  'Aniltinu   'Aifit-,
v  J-***:
\ ;\;:
Announcing the
new Seasons {Ine-
This seasbn*s Monarch-Knit stockings will be especially pleasing to
you. In style, and smartness, and
variety they surpass all our previous records.
At extremely moderate prices we
have been enabled to produce
distinctive clockings, stitches, embroideries and new weaves.
Modern knitting machines shape
Monarch-Knit stockings to fit as
they are knit, and permit us to
give them greater variety, beauty
and wearing quality without increasing the price.
Made in Silk, Silk-atid-Wtwl, Artitirial
Silk, and Mercerized Lisle.
Retail at 75c. to $3.
,7m
h
'Mj
AJ I {723
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER **
With which i** Incorporated the I".  C. TRADE REVIEW.
"Universal"—Canada's Finest in Knitwear
Vancouver Firm Demonstrates Successful Growth Producing Knitted Garments Which are Universally
Recognized.
i In* .,-•*.. iypiu. ni and rapi-l expansion oi the 1 tu-
vernal Knitting Company's business in Canada can to
•.-ine extent be gauged by figures prepared 1*0 the firm,
and which are positioned in the office entrance of the
Vaneou**** er I actor).
ll s> recorded thai in th,- year 1U15 the Universal
Knitting Compan) were operating with ten employees,
and th.* annua! payroll al that time was $6,000, To-da.v
one hundred workers are employed and $123,000 repre-
Rents the annual payroll. Such progress in so short a
lime cannot bul reflect thc excellence of qualit)' and
workmanship in "Universal" goods.
A slogan appearing in the Company's trad.* circulars to the effcel lhat "If a better garment could be
made, we would make it," ma) be trul) taken as evidence lhal no oxpense has been spared in turning out
a first class product which to-day is popular with merchants of two hundred and fifty-six cities in Canada.
In addition to the company's trade in the Dominion,
export business is increasing with China, Japan, Australia. New Zealand. South Africa. India. South America, and of course, the United States.
Photographs reproduced herewith give some idea
of thi* workrooms, and an exterior view of the plant
itself, but since the majority of our readers interested
in the drygoods trade are well acquainted with
uUniversal" products, a detailed description of the
many lines manufactured h superfluous.
Mr. A. C. Cohen, the popular bead of the Universal
Knitting Company has demonstrated beyond a doubt
what excellent results are to be obtained by a manufacturing enterprise in this provinee. where shipping
facilities tn all  destinations are available. It
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Wiih which la Incorporated the B, C. TRADE R.EVIKW,
Septembei
OVER-CAPACITY  AND  UNDERCONSUMPTION
While there hav< been tremendous stri«li*s made in
perfecting the system of shoe manufacturing through
the marvellous development of shoe machinery and
methods, and time and money has heen absorbed in improving raw materials and implements of shoe manufacture, which has resulted in speeding up production,
the matter of shoe consumption has nut advanced to
an) noticeable degree.
"Over-styling" is ihe natural result of tin* effort
to keep up capacity.
There are ton many shoe styles, ur rather too frequent changes in style, math unscientifically, without
adequate notice and preparation.
Over capacity undoubtedly causes the style evil.
Every shoe manufacturer must charge against each
pair of shoes he produces its unit share of the number
which is pretty soundly fixed, regardless of the number
of pail's produced. It is obvious that the more shoes he
makes the less per pair overhead. So he seeks always
to th> as near a capacity husiness as possible. Competition is keen, and that affocts his ability t*> get business
anyhow. lie needs the benefit of the considerably
lowt r per pair overhead on the capacity production in
order to meet competition. So he tries to get added
business with the hue of new styles. Every other manufacturer is doing the same thing. Result: Styb chaos
—retailers in an upset all tlo* while unstable equilibrium of retail stocks inevitable clearing-out of 'old'
styles i a few weeks old for the new which m turn i>
'old' almost before the dealer opens the eases   90 per
cent of brains and time put inio keeping up with the
never-ending style question    10 per cent, left for win*
foresighted, aggresivc store  management,   So,  \lt,s7
Loss' Loss'   Anxiety! Dissatisfaction! Uncertainty!
And mole's the pity, no real  increase  m aetun
shoe consumption.     What  Manufacturer A gets \o
Docs the Consumer Benefit?
Mo tin- consumers pclll)   benefit  by ail  this! S'oi
in  thi   least.     A  parade o|    s   'ond-stor)   workers' uh
Korh these premature!) dr,o\ stoekx a* a dollar or so
pair,   and   passes   the ill   <»n   tC   ihe   public      The  VV.
the\ nave al 'sales' i\w\ lose lour times over in increas
ed cosi in their 'regular   purha*.*-**    An ever-widei
ing produetion  ol Ktrictl)   cheap  shoes U)  meel tl
'dumpiii.'  of good siio.s Ih encouraged,
This means something «!s,«- again tlit- definite les
selling of the gradt ol shoe whieh ib*- people arc {.,
da) on the average, purehasing Sol because the pen
pie are demanding a eheaper-qnalit) hue bui beeaus<
the industr) is forcing it down theii throats in tlte
struggb to reaeh eapaeit) I ■■ trade is.is ifjtelj m-
ated and fostered a public appetite for alioci .-.*
price,   regard lesa ol th<* true eMinom*. ol s*'"1*! shoes
.I statist ies were available for the past iwo '/ears
they would undoubtedly re-veal the facl thai the wo
pie ot tliis eouuirv arc not UHiug a* main shoes per
head of the 1'opubitioi   as the*) were {went\  *■ • .■■ * a >•■,
(um■in.■in  cuti   appearing   in  tliln Mcctlon ui-e  reproduced   through cmirtoM*, til the Kim
Modelii are manufactured  In  Hi.ii   nun  i,.. toi j i
• 'in,iii .ina Sua i 'nice in) 1923
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which is Incorporated the B. C. TRADE REVIEW
45
and   as  tO  production,  there  never  was  a   time  when
there- was so little protit in the making and distribution
()f shoes.
What can be done abotll  il I    Taiiiids, maiiiifacl ur-
ei's, wholesalers and retailers should get together on
this proposition to sell more leather shoe-, to tin Canadian people.
NEW SPORT HATS,
'"'L.V/UM'/r
i.,'        1     it'ttte^rtsrw*
F"  '        "   ■■■ 'lllljlltfa.
_"". -tlhiiliv
\     1   -"
, '■•'. Itlautk
-   ' U'l'ttTBi,
\       »••.•*>   tykutiiv
m Wltutfk
/'/fii-W't-u i,/'
"..;•■ '-7t\''
M;
'■•»'   tiLinii,
j, ■" tn-4 i-.i,
\( l,D it'll-
M
Sporl hats are made of blocked fell and they are
jus* as apt to be .it the cloche shape as they are to    ,    ... ....
turn awa) from the face in a round brim rolling away      ";\ '"%   41  4^.'!>fe
from the load ali tlo* wa) round,   The) arc trimmed
nol al all unless it is some motif of embroidery or a
band of ribbon with an ending coeade, taking its place
m harmoBN with Ihe rest oj th- design
mtii
*WVl'
, \r  * 's,'.t,/-
M>
PRIDE OF THE WEST    ISSUES CATALOGUE
Drygoods dealers will be interested iu the 1923-4      '  •■>*
catalogue re entl) issued b) the "Pride of the West"
Kni'iut**.' Company, listing 'he various lines oj knitted
wear manufaetured b)  this firm.
Actual photographs of sweaters, bathing suits, etc..
give a comprehensive idea of the appearance of these
kiutt<*d garments, and merchants will have no diffi
cully in chosing tin* lines par ieularly adapted to their        ***j
trade
A kJ^2^M,n,tH-
rnSifrJ?   //»iA»-*».ur
^V-AV:-*)
xJ& otl Yi'%"y-~, ■ .-■
531 *M* *•■-'
^^sihmfie
• ■      ■•   Um/'im."
-••£   AiJilnCic
■ 4^.Ml- tlink-rvH."
7"'m. lllrnttic
-t        i " Hi>it,iiirt,»wi;
rm
tlkillll*
tlmft M*f<
->*?:, A/Lintf
,'M*    tH.wtir
- --'     ,
AtlriUttC
ll/'fll
FIRST     HARDING MEMORIAL STAMP    TO
REACH VANCOUVER
Vancouver Board  R.  M.  A.  Receves Message From
Marion. Ohio.
Retail .Merchants' Unreau,
Marion. Ohio.
September 1st. 192:)
Mr, W  IV In'.*, s.eretar).
li.C Board, Retail Merchants' Association
"I  l 'anada,   \'aiieoin er,   Ik I'.
I 'ear Mr   Jjig,
In the death of our beloved President, Warren ti.
Harding, our nation has suffered a serious loss.
It se-utis Rtting therefore, thai tin-, his home town.
whieh iiaturail) will miss bini most, should he honoured b) having bestowed upon it the privilege [d using
Ihe firsl "Harding Memorial stamp," winch is conveying this 1. iter to \ .ui.
If, from his life, sacrificed a** it was in the pursuit
"I duty, we gain a closer and more kindly spirit ot cooperation, a grcati r tolerance for the opinion of others,
and a more lasting respect for the beautiful things his
life exemplified, then he will not have died iii vain.
"When becoming weary for tin* moment. In lay down,
and taking his burden for a pillow, fell into that dreamless sleep, whieh kisses down his eyelids still may
we adopt as our motto, the wonls which In* murmured
with Ins latest breath! "Tha* is good    go on."
Sincerel) yours,
<;. ii. iiri.si*:.
Lay in a plentiful supply of
Atlantic—you'll need it.
Atlantic quality, fit and wear
have built for these garments
a reputation that clears off
your shelves in short order.
Tlie best time to order is now.
py 1
ATLANTIC UNDERWEAR
1 > **f tM
Limited
'rttfSsjLU
MONCTON.N.B.
' , m*M
E. H. WALSH &. COMPANY
.^^1
Montreal and Toronto
Selling Agents for Quebec, Ontario
and \\ estera Provinces
53
The UNDERWEAR
that OVERWEARS 4b
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA  RETAILER
With which is Incorporated the B  C. TRADE REVIEW
Sente:
Illie
BUSINESS CHANGES—BRITISH  COLUMBIA  AND
ALBERTA
Brookmere—
Madden. John.—Reported sold out to H. Snell (grocer,
hotel, &c.)
Cobble Hill—
Macklin ^ Napper Ltd. (ti.S.)—Ilailift in possession for
mortgages.
Jubilee—
Carver. L. H.—-Reported sold out to Francis and Fhuiuigan
Kelowna—
Sturgeon James (confy. &c,)—Reported sold out
Kettle Valley-
Whiting.   A.   (G.S.)— Reported   succeeded   by   t;.   \V,   M.
Gane.
Nanaimo—
Bradfleld A.—Reported sold out.
Port Hammond—
Gordon. E. R.—Sold out to H. C. Belts .drugs).
Prince George-
Prince George Fur Company—Reported dissolved partner
ship.
Tofino—
Sloman, James reported sold oui to Tofino Trading Co.
Victoria—
Paint Supply, incorporated,
Ringshaw, John—Sold out delicatessen business to Tii
lesin & Burt.
Laurence, E. J., confec. lob., &C.)Sold OUl to T. B   K.-n'
Pither &  Leiser, Importers.-Building destroyed  bj   Bre.
Stead Brothers .—Reported selling out lo K. Tlmberlake
(grocers).
Blake.  H. B.  (mfr. ladies" and children's dresses)    in.-*
continued, and reported "left."
Chapman. Claude  (grocer)—Sold out  to Joseph tvey.
Vancouver—
Clark & Stephens (florists), assigned to F. J. Carter.
Britannia   Wire   Rope   Co..   Ltd.    Robert   Gibson   withdrawn.
McCullum. A.P.—Stiffened fire loss.
McNeill.  Welch  <fv   Wilson   (Assigned)     Assignee calling
for tenders for purchase of balance of stock
Vancouver Printing and Publishing Co.   Reported chang
Ing ownership.
California Salt Co.—Gazetted as ceased to carrj oa bus
iness in B. C.
Campbells Limited  (mfg clothing, etc)    Assigned
Cook. W. R. & Co., Ltd.—Succeeded bj Balfour Nixon
More, (jeo (Royal Meat Market).—Assigned to C. C. ML
T. A.
New York Outfitting Co.   Dresawell on Easj Terms, I.
aking application to restore name lo register,
Canadian Rcppltal Suppl) Co., Ltd    Applying for chanj
Ol   nam.    to  Canadian   Surgical   Supplies   Ltd,
National Advertising Co ol li C Dissolved partnersl
Paris Hai Manufacturing Co Bailiff's sale adverilsi
Parsons \  Parsons Canadian Co    Qaseued ri ceased
carrj on business in B C
Western Cloak  A   Suil  Co    Reported effected come
Ulise
Wilson Brad) Ltd    To t"  wound up voluntarily,
ALBERTA
Beaumont-~
(loyr, Q  li    Assets sold h> c c  y   r   \  h;>i
Barons-
Mank
Montreal   Closed branch.
Benalto-—
Kinna ,v  Buchanan   Reported dissolved (G.H »
Bowdcn —
Reynolds, •'   s    Rf ported   told oul
Blairmore
Istricl I    V   \  C
i f * i a um
and stores sold io Cards ton Trading Co  (gen store)
Calgary —
C
lobit w    Opened branch ut Edmonton (leal •
Vlberta Jobw i I»ls< oi
Net |er, J U* poi ti d io
Sheedj  Bros    Dtseoi
Coaldale and Chin —
Lui d   I'* *•■:  a  Co
Edmonton —
Excelsloi   Pn   ■     Purcl
I|m:/.,.   Qt d   pUbll   tlPl
Alberta mhIII i- i tampan      I
II trvey, .1   T    Ri porti»d   o
Medicine Hat—
Moore, J  .1  I Roti    j  J   Mi
takei  "■••■: b\   on
d l> 0
i * - rti»«<
id bi   llcaumoi
1   old oul
tpneral
id bui
Nanton—
Nanion l>
<  o
dd
Ponoka—
Steel   W   I    IHscontinued  (iumbtM   ind smpl* n •
Pleasant Vlsw—
Redkap  tl   ll    Sold out to r  li   Small
Rosevear—
Tremblaj   I*  .1     \   ■ •    idvertl n d   oi    ih   bj  C  '    M
T   \   (0.8.)
Wetaskiwin —
Tugendhaft, M   i»    Discontinued (hardware)
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH
(Food and Drugs Division)
RE SALE OF DRUOS NOT TRUE TO LABEL
The Pood and Drugs Acl (1920) and the Regulations (1022)
are intended not only to protect  the consumer against  in
jury,  deception  or  fraud,   but   also  as  a  guide   to  officials.
'rom the dealer's .standpoint they should tend io prevent un
iii- competition, and thUp promote better business methods
nd  belter business ethics.    First  and  foremost, all  articles
of food and Drugs should be TRUE TO LABEL.
Tbe following is an extract  of the  Food and  Drugs Act,
920:
(1) Every drug shall be deemed lo be adulterated
within the meaning of tbis Act if its strength, quality
or purity falls below the professed standard under
which it is sold; or if, When offered for sale under or
by a name—
(a) Recognized   In   the   latest   edition   of   the   British
Pharmacopoeia; or
(c) recognised   in   the   latest   edition   of  an\   foreign
Pharmacopoeia; or—
(i i which Is *>o! j...,,-! i/. ,j in m j pharmacopoeia, bu
Is  found  in  some  general I)   recognised  standard
woi k on in.,!, rls m«*dl< n oi drug
it dlffen 'nun ihi  itandard ol strength qualit) or pur
ii\ laid .lown then In
cji i nless -mil a <iiuj- i old In such ■» manm
a** plain!) to tndicati lhat Its qualit) i» to bv judged
bj an authoritj othei than the iiritisti Pharmacopoeia
and such authoritj i named, it shall !>>■ doomed to b*
adulterated unless in conforms to the Blandard ol
strength, qualit) and purl!) foi such drug Is the?*. %p
defined bj the latesi edition ot the liiiii»*h Pharms
co pools
Kver) Pharmacist aftei familiarising Itlmsell with the Food
and Drugs Act, and the regulation passed bj Ordei In Coun
eil, should carefullj Inspect hi** stock snd Instruct his stall
This Is based upon two principles firsl thai Ignorsnc-
ol the law excuses no one, and second, lhal having knowledg*
of whai the legal requirements are, one Is obliged to oo
serve them "i bv prepared lo bear the consequences.
(Signed) .1   \   am vol',
Deputj Minister ol Health THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RBTAILEE   .
47
INSURANCE
ITEMS OF INTEREST TO RETAIL MERCHANTS
I  cannot be I iften pointed oul thai it is mote m
lhe intereal of tlie insuring public than of thi fire in-
suranee coinj';iiue> thai a serious effort should be
made to reduce the appalling fire waste of the country,
winch lasi year amounted to no less than $7.00 per
head for every iti.nt, unman ami child in Canada.
Tim** thc bead of a family of live, the family unil here.
hav to meet a pa*} men!
in real money i n provuu
foi insurance and fire loss. When this is compared
with a per capita laaa ol 15c in the European compan-
t, s, some idea is obtained ot the burden carried by the
p.i.j.je of ihi** country h\ this annual fire loss, Eighty-
five per cent, of this fire waste in preventable and it
is ! a\p nol been taken
The Retail Merehanta' I nderwi tors Agency, the
policies of which are guaranteed by the Northwestern
Mutual !•' i e Aaaociatioii is doing its pari in taking
stem* to    remed>   the sit tatioti        Kor twenty-two
■: - ing fire w aste. I*
ed lo the cause of
tal       plMf'lpie        ill'"!!
seems passing sti ange I hat
long ago to ft \net\y the sit
\ eatn the Sort \\w esl i n
is deftnitelv ci
prevention
he   luuuam
whieh llu organisation is low led ■* lire prevention
\\ iiua insurance and fire prevei lion are synonymous.
No high degree of nti gen i h required to understand thai an miiii' diate saving of fire waste would be
effected il definite physical and moral standards were
demanded of all properh owners v* all ''"'' insurance
Imt tj-,   pen     (ins praeiice ol stock com*
.. i nn nal t l\ regardless
I . enoi moils 'It'1' w aste,
ntable    I ombatinu this
panics m gj\ ii g ii sui tyiee
"I standard is responsible Ft
s'l per cent    nl u hieh   is vr<
i-ta *ti v niul ual msuriui
hclie\ es that SClt elioti nnu
the inspection of rinks and education of property owner*, in the elements of fire prevention will largely curtail Canada's enormous fire waste, The proposition is
simple, for ii those properties thai arc up to standard
in construction onl\ are ehosen, aud th""*'* property
owners win. show .1 ilisposition to he care tut are piii*
ed out; if regular inspections arc made lo maintain
good conditions, and if a consistent educational earn
paign is carried on. there are bound lo be less tires m
our mutually insured properties. It naturally Follows
thai given less tit'1 s, there w dl be less losses to pa\, and
a** mutual insurance has no profit to pay to individual
capital, there musl be n large amounl of mone\ saved,
and the policyholders gel the savings. When all nre
insurance companies do business on the same basis
th< ti will fire waste be reduced to n minimum.
FRIENDLY SUGGESTIONS TO EVERYDAY FOLKS
If your home is electrically wired with N'o, 11 wire,
ii** mosl homes ar.*, that wire will tranamil just so
much electric it,*-, in a given length of time. \ly on eon-
net up too many electric iron** or washing machines
or electric cleaners., or toasters, or grills, when too
main lights arc burning, an j one of several unplcas
am things mnj happen. An electric w ire is like a
water pip,., yon c-in crowd just **" UlUCh eurreill over
the wire or .just so much water through the pipe.   Go
beyond the limit and your water pipe will hurst.
Go beyond the limit with an electric curctiit and a
fuse in the fuse box down cellar will blow out. That is
whal the fuse is there I'm*—to protect your property.
tf you put a penny in the fuse box to take the place ot*
a Mown fuse, or if you put too "big" a fuse in place of
one thai has heen blown, then your wiring will over-
iM.n. It is likely to overheat at some confined point,
inside the walls somewhere.
Your furnace was nol designed as an incinerator
for paper and rubbish. Wood kindling, topped by
coal, will not send many sparks up the chimney, but it
. ( <* pile a barrel full of trash on top of a coal lire and
give it a draft, you are going to get mighty rapid combustion, A filmy glowing mass is going to sweep up
the chimney and rain pyrotechnics down on your roof
with a scattering or trace for your neighbor, as good
measure. Maybe the neighbor has fire-proof shingles,
maybe vou haven't.
FIRE PREVENTION WILL SUCCEED WHEN
PEOPLE REALIZE—WHAT?
The Km. revolt ion propaganda much on people's
lips throughout the country is splendid. But it ean
never be the success that ir ought to be until people
realize thai fire prevention should mean a reduction in
insurance cost. Today il doesn't mean that—not completely.
If a propety owner will elevate the character of his
property, re-moving many fire risks and providing
certain safeguards, he can raise bis classification and
will get a lower insurance rate from all insurance companies.
The owner who shoulders a personal responsibility
and so conducts bis affairs as to prevent tires;—be gets
no benefit in reduced insurance rales from non-mutual
companies,
Non nun ual companies consider the properly only.
Mutual fire insurance cost is governed by the
human element as well as by the property itself.
And, between the two. the human element is the
most important,
Show people that tire prevention means all the savings that it accomplishes in the way of reduced insurance cost and tire prevention will then arouse the general public as it should.
Of course, the reason the tire prevention movement
does not stress personal responsibility as a means to
lower cost insurance is this: It is not deemed proper
that any general activity should step on the toes of
private interests.
If you are a careful man if you believe in lire prevention, you must also interest yourself in mutual fire
insurance, duly through mutual insurance can you
collect the whole benefit.
* ;i
'  f   !
II
i
Vi 48
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA  RETAILER
Septet,
p
How Good Is Your Pound Cake?
Try This Recipe
Silver Pound Cake
FORMULA
Flour, 24 lbs.
Cornstarch, 1 lb.
Powdered milk, I lb.
Sugar, 2 ] lbs.
Cottolene, 7 lbs.
Butter. 4*:> lbs.
■> i
liirt*; whites, ^____^___^_
Milk,   12r4   lbs.
Lemon flavor, i oz.
Orange flavor, !<j oz.
Salt,  1 ■ •  ozs.
METHOD
Put the sugar, butter, Cottolene, salt,
flavoring, and powdered milk into tha mixing bowl and begin mixing at slow speed.
Alter the ingredients have been incorporated, change the speed of the machine
to second speed and allow the mass to be
whipped briskly until it becomes light.
Now gradually add the t%% whites while
the mixture is being whipped until they
have all been incorporated. Add the milk,
and stir. Now add the flour and cornstarch, and mix until the mixture is
smooth. Care should be taken to keep the
mixture cold while it is being made, he-
posit the mixture into forms, preferably
forms having a wooden lining on the side
and an asbestos lining on the bottom.
These forms should be lined with a thin
paper before the mixture is deposited. It
is advisable to have a double jacketed
kettle into which a brine solution can be
injected so that the mass can be kept cool
nnd prevented from overheating by agitation.
Open Up
Grocery Connections
With Pound Cakes
elicious   Pound   Cakes   neatl)
rapped will open up connects
i
..i    i.t;
i
, •     .1 M   ,   I.   I
Ait I   ■
'I
10W   I I' tl C '■ IC  ; ■ C >'<   '
if pound and pack;
l IKC *».
IM!IEFAIRBANK3fflHffiQ
Limited
260   St.   Jjimci   Si..   Montreal
Alt  Until in, iisuri m,-i)li ,\r{
Am ';. .in ,"   i oi,- ,i; ■ r.tir,'
Say you iaW il in thc " Paper thc 'Retailer  Reads" I!)2fl
THE BEITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
49
Bread Eating Countries of the World
Most Countries Show Strong Increase-Canada Leads the World-Bulgaria Doubles Consumption in Ten Years- Capacity of Largest Bakery  in  Austria  Exceeds Half  Million
Pounds per Day.
The best way to compar-   various countries aa to than the mere increase in wheat consumption as. for
(heir bread e< ngumplion in to take as hanis their wheal instance, in the United Suites, where bread consump-
onsumption, although the latter is more or less pro- lion increased 11  per eent per annum from 1!)1T to
portionate to bread consumption for two main reasons; 1922,-therefore, more than the average yearly increase
l    The proportion of wheal ■■■ len in various eoun- in ulna! consumption for Bulgaria, although the latter
tries is neve* the (tame, reaching al its highest !)2 per leads the world in increased wheat consumption.
ct'iil to Portugal againat onl) 65 per cent in Canada.
„\    A more or les« importanl quality of flour other Rye Consumption,
lhan wheal fiour ia utilised for bread making in some h is also interesting to note, as complemental iu-
■ (tries; sn Austria, for example, one tenth only of the formation, the 1922 rye consumption of some of the
bread ealHi is made oul ol pur.' wheat Hour, above countries:
Wheat Consumption Best Basis ,                      K*vr consumption in bushels (1922)
1  Denmark      6.6
Veti wheal consumption is altogether the mosl eon- ■> |j|ini!aliv                                                c
venienl way ol comparison and the following Y>\ ol ;; \,;nv.iv                                                 og
".   (went) two largest wheal eating countries of the | Qolland                                                  33
world i" therefore interesting to study! 5 Sweden                                                 3
Average ,; \\,,}i:\mu         2.7
increase      yearly 7 Austria        2.2
1022       11)12       in 10 years increase s tlungan     1.2
(per cent     per cenl y Bulgaria  9
1 Canada 9.3 6.6 \< ■ :; 10 France    6
2 Belgium •*■ I 6.7 - * '-•• Here we see Denmark sixteenth as wheat consumer,
I Prance 7 '* 6:'• 25 -■■> leading the world as rye eater, whilst France, third
I Portugal          6 '*■          •*>               VI             • >■'. 0I] , j]i( ^\u,.(l\ ]'st, js tenth on the rye list.
'* >!',un               i> I           1 a             :;.*-             • !..» *\|(lst 0|* ,j,t, iarge rye consuming countries of Eur-
•> Bulgaria          6 1          '•'<             l'1"           1" opi are north of the European wheat belt.
JBwfcnd          6            \A            25            2.5 Canada
8 tiling irj c 1 50 .)
P Switzerland     6             1.2             t';             •:; Canada is at present the largest wheat consuming
In Aiisirlia            "io           1                 o~               IV country of the world, although not the largest bread
11  Argentina        "1 1           I a              20              2 eater for the proportion of wheat eaten, as bread in
1*  |||||y                   *, |             j,,                17                1,7 Canada  amounts to only 65 per eent  against  85 per
I'. United States  * '>          I                ;;            :;*:1 eenl |V"' P"»*ce-
11 ll.illat.d           U           VJ             12             1.2 Belgium.
IH Austria '• * •'-- .; d
](| 1 *,,,,,,,, 1           ;            •> 7             in             1 Belgium, second wheat consumer, has the largesl
17 (Jermanv         26          2.6             none          none wheat and rye consumption, with a total of 11 bushels
Is !• ,,,',',        0-          ,)'r             ,,,„,,.          none per annum, namely, 8.3 bushels of wheat, and 2.7 bush-
II) Russia         unknown     1.9      unknown   unknown Vs of rye.
• »,, l$„   ,               ,, ,           1 ■*,             in             1 of course, a large proportion oi the rye consumed
2*1 \,,.  .              10          11             20            2 in Belgium is eaten as bread, but a considerable amou.ni
.",., j   »   ' ■               V            V             "nonr          nonp 0f ,.Vl. flour is also utilized for the making of the fam-
Of coiim 1922 figures were not available for Uu** ous Belgian gingerbread which  is as famous in its
sia, bul of all Ihe remaining hvcnl; om mitries, all line in Europe as French champagne.
bul thi'i • show rd an increase varying from :1 per cenl France.
in ten jmta for Miatria to 100 por emit for llulgnria; as ,„.„„,,
'"H acrm.nnj    ' RmTn"!    e  HI,    .1'     ,•     . "ttag country on a per capita basis, ana although her
snowing nn increase   we shall see turtnei tin iibmhis •                   ■                           ,
,   . .                . population onlv amounts to sligntlj  more tnan one-
,l,s lflek nt >n«Je;w;    .             . .    ,. n  , .    ,,..,„.,, t|in,| of the American population, the total bread con-
As ;l !»attf oi ,il1"' lhc f!uftl   ""'     ,,   .*   a sumption of France almost equals the United States
consumption in various countries was oiien giuuui i
I 50
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which is Incorpo Med the H   C   TRADE REVIEW
Senten
m
'.
That Old Home-Made Flavor
Flavor, the quality in Bread that determines how much
of it will he eaten.
One of the greatest aids to flavor in your Bread is the
Fleischmann No-Dough-Time Process,
Consensus of opinion shows that Bread made by this
process most nearly resembles the old home-made
flavor" that your customers have signified time and
again they desire.
j4$k your Fleischmann representative
THE FLEISCHMANN COMPANY
3 166 Burrard Street
Fleischmanns Yeast
Vancouver,    Victoria,
VANCOUVER, B. C
Fleischmann s Service
Nanaimo,    Calgary,     Edmonton.
consumption, reaching al present nine tenths of it. In
other words, a Frenchman eats twice and a half times
as much bread as an American.
IM course, there are several reasons explaining this
important eating of bread: race, habit, kind of bread,
etc.; but experts generally agree that the qualit)' >-i
French bread, not as rich as Ami rican bread, a** well a*.
the very crisp crust, both contribute largely to tin**
high consumption.
On the other hand, bread consumption in France is
rapidly nearing its poinl of saturation, and is very
likely not going to increase much more from m.u on.
As a matter of fact, in view of avoiding the buying
of foreign wheal  and  therefore sparing  French ex
change, the French Governmenl i** endeavoring to de
crease as much as possible the consumption of bread
in France by a strong "Ma* hss bread' campaign.
Portugal.
of all bread-eating countries, Portugal reaches the
lii*_'lit'st proportion in bread to wheat: 92 per cent, bul
its small population of six million does nol make of
Portugal a bread markel of great importance.
Although there are so far in Portugal only small
individual bakeries, a large modern bakery, financed
by French capital, is presently being pul up in Lisbon and will start running in 1924.
The* capacity of this bakery will reach 300 one
pound loaves per day, in one factory, all the baking
heing done in continuous ovens.
An agreement has already been reached between
the new company and the greater pari of the small
Lisbon bakers in view of having them gradually stop
their own bread making and operate as Belling stores
for the company.
Spam.
Spam is ,t corn| nraliveli       -■  In   ut
though i •■!' '""     ,m    - '■'■■,' i ■
V an   '.i:i    ,•.!,,:,■',.•    ..'    ■ . <•   .       ■■
II i   t !.'>;■■ i . ..|     : •      | (| | (i \HM M •'     i,     < ]
lhe Fi •!. I ni del      la*is
The main diffi  ...     n th* facl
France evci   ind   cat        nty of tu
to '1". in Bpain, peopli
their food   • al   !< *s   lire id   thai
I* reneh coiisumi rn
So far, there are onh two cities in Si
lar-- baker	
:
pohi ical capital     bi en at
lilbna, the ore -il). and Madrid   il
■ it, ihe larg- st hnki •
Madrid; ti.- "Campania  Madnb n.i   V Wo :i .:•   -
has only a dail\ rapaeiti of f>0,(XX) pound**
Barcelona, lhe  indusl r al capital  of  I lie * oui"
with her populal ion ol om ai d b uuai ler in I  o
onl) small bakeries si, •.,.     \\\\\ British capitalist* •*
couraged by the success of Ihe large bakeries ,,!
Bilboa and Madrid, are presentli  studying the i1"-'"
bilities of a large industrial bakeri in Barcelona.
S'panish bread is famous in Kurope for its vvl
ness, and it i> onl) European loaf-bread, with Briii
broad,  can be compared   in  whiteness  to  Amen*
bread,
Although flour ia never bleached in Spam, S'pium
mdV run ;it ;, \a-\-\ low rate of extraction.
Bulgaria,
Bulgaria has doubled her wheal consumption in lei
years, and now tanks sixth as bread eating i utri **
the world, being thc leading bread oater of easlei
Europe, i9ai
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Wiih which is Incorporated the B  C. TRADE REVIEW
51
Of all the Balkan Stairs, Bulgaria was the first to
start a large modern bakery, which was put up gome
twent) years ago in Varna, the Bulgarian pun on tin*
|;la k Sen, l>\   Austrian millers.
England.
England is tin* onl) eountr) in Europe where the
traveling Canadian fan cai bread that "feels like home
again,'   either in shape, whitencjts ur taste,
England is also lhe onl) country of iViri.pi' where
bread loaves ari  machine-wrapped,
Hungaiy.
01 all European countries, Hungary has always
been famous tor its tiin- wheal and flour,
As a matter of fact, liuugar) has always been tie'
granar) of Central Kurope, Elungarian Hour being
considered as the best buropcan Hour, and Hungarian
millers as tnaslcih *a, *,he .nt
Since llu* war, consumption ■>! wheat flour has de
creased in Hungary, on account of the extraordinary
rise oi prices, ulnUi consumption of cheaper rye flour
I a* steadil)  iuercaa* d.
Switzerland.
Thi Swiss Confederation, although much smaller in
population than greater Sen Vork, is extremely varied
in races and tastes
As « wheal consuming country, Switzerland ranks
with England and Hungary, but the three characteristic parts of Switzerland German, Italian and French
Switzerland, do nol all cai either as much bread or the
same kind ol bread,
Switzerland is a country where the co-operative
system lias rca lied a ven high point of extension and
ol course all tl c large co operative companies run their
on n indusl rial bakeries,
Most of the wheal imported hi thc Helvetic Re
public comes from either the States or Canada.
Argentina.
Th** Argentine Republic, e«jual in surface to the
I nited States, has a total population that docs nol ex-
eeecj the joinl population of Xc\\  Vork and I hicago
The majoriti of this population is oi Italian origin,
and therefore shows a strong liking for pastes of all
kinds as wi-il as corn-meal, m preference to wheat
bread.
The Argentine "gauche" the cowboy of South Am
erica, hardly ever eats any bread al all, and ins wife
often bakes a weird sorl of dough with neither yeasl
nor leaven, which she calls bread. Useless to say thai
this s.. called Argentine bread is flal both in shape and
taste
Wheal consumption in Argentina is the sain.' as in
Italy, owing to the similarit) of race existing in both
countries,
Italy.
I»i course, hah is by excellence a "paste ' conn
try, and  Italian pastes arc famous the world over.
On the other hand. Italian bread is generally verj
poor in qualit) and dull in color, especially since th*
war.
still, Italian bakcra make very good rolls, bul an
fond of giving them most extraordinary looking shape-.
The Italian peasant eats ver) little wheat bread,
but pleilt) of "polenta," which is plain corn meal
boiled  in water with a dash of  mil  and served either
hoi or cold, generally with cheese or onions.
The onlv large bakeries existing tn Italy are lo-
Lake of the Woods
Milling Company
LIMITED
Makers of
FIVE ROSES
• FLOUR •
The World's Best
Daily Capacity 14,200 Bbls.
B.C. Offices and Warehouses:
1300 Richards Street 1614 Store Street
VANCOUVER VICTORIA
TICKETS AND   I.ABELS
MADE  BY  SPECIALISTS.
A specialist, In any calling, Is one equipped to produce results promptly, satisfactorily and economically.
This Is where our plant differs from the average printing office. We cany in stock many tons of colored card
boards for Immediate use. At one operation, with our
nvodi rn specialty machinery, we print tickets in two to four
colors on front of ticket and on the back; number each
ticket the same or consecutively and perforate sheet
both ways; or we can print your tickets and re-wind
Into rolls to suit, each ticket numbered consecutively
and correctly. We make bread labels in two colors for
the price of printing one color, in quantities, and put
up Into rolls of 5.000. We make the tickets for ths
IVOR Ry. by the millions; for the North Vancouver
Ferries; for the Government, and all kinds of theatre
tickets.    May we not be of service to vou.
NICHOLSON, LTD.
Phone:   Bayvlew 376
2092 2nd  AVENUE WEST VANCOUVER.  B. C.
" 'Tis the heart's voict alone can reach
the heart."—De Mussett.
The invention of the telephone
resulted, not from an effort to find
a means of communication, but
from the deep pity in tin* heart of
the Inventor for those without the ability to heat* the
human \oicf.
The range of the unaided voice is only a few
feet; bul the same voice speaking into the telephone
may be heard a mile or three thousand miles away.
The Inflections, the accents, the Individuality ana all
transmitted faithfully.
The telephone stands ready day or night to trans-
mil your voice to relative, friend, or anyone with
whom you have need of speech, The telephone is
the universal Instrument,
BRITISH COLUMBIA TELEPHONE COMPANY, LTD.
1 THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Wiih which is inc.: p.. ..!-•■! the B   C. TRADE REVIEW
Septcrol
W
BeechNuf
Chewing Gum
Mint flavored        Always refreshing
The attractive display box and package
first draw attention
—after that the pro
duct sells itself.
Order from your jobber
Beech-Nut   Company
of Canada, Limited
HAMILTON
ONTARIO
eateil 111 Genoa, the mail] Italian por! on the MediP
tvati. ami  iii   Milan,   the   fascial   Clt)
The groatesl drawback to tiny extenson nt model
bakeries in Ual) lien in the facl thai the Italian hou
wife is thoroughly  accustomed to buying her i'i*'
on credit, a rootle of sale that always proven itself d
astrous for large industrial bakeries.
United States
So far, sugar ha** been the eharaeteristic Amci
food, as the average consumption now  exceeds h
pounds iiff year per capita, ou! iln* t'tBctenl publji
recently undertaken b) (lour, yeasl and bread protj
ers in the United States* in IkmhuI to keen Amei
bread consumption constantly  increasing,
Austria.
Although Austria has been reduced since the wai
from a !■"• million empire to a sis million republic, l»r
consumption per capita has remained practically
changed,
\\os- of the Austrian bread is made ol a ft
flour containing about one fourth w heat flour and * i
fourths rye flour; this bread is coarse and darl
does ii"! r*>em!i|r m ih«* least Viennese bread sn I
kiiuu n in America.
Chi the other band, Viennese bakers have rendei
Vienna rolls, the so called '*semmel, famous Ihe w»i
o\ er,
In fact, Viennese baking methods are as * m
Rurope as Hungarian milling methods and even 1
bakers ad mi l thai thc best rolls are made by \ ieni
lakers, wiih Hungarian flour
There exists ni Vienna the largest baker)   in tl
world, the "Ankerboit" eompany, unit i dait)
acity of 550,000 pounds, out  of which one lei I
wheat flour bread and nine-tenths rye bread.
Although not as important in total capa< *• as tl
large American bread companies, the    Ankerhroi
by for the largest one factor) baker) m the woi
Th.- total surface >>f the factor)  amount** to V'
acres, the company running its own wheat ai I i
Hour nulls
The eompany operates in Vienna 105 depots
plies bread to nearly 5,000 wholesale customers, ai
the daily turnover, in gold value, exceeds 1*20,000 •
day,
Denmark.
Rye bread ,h largo!) consumed in Denmark, bi
the total wheal snd rye consumed nearly reache** tei
bushels per .mtiiiui
AlthiMi^ii very small in sixe, Denmark is one ol '!
leading agricultural countries for what concerns mod
.rn farming methods and the average wheal yield pei
acre of Denmark is the highest of an) eountr) in the
world.
Russia.
It is ni course unite impossible i<> obtain anv rccui
ate iiifnruiatn.ii nn either wheat production or bread
consumption in Russia since the advenl of thc Sovieti«'
11olden A ge,
One fact is nevertheh is eertain: thanks to the im
provements brought on by communisl methods, fam
ines have nOM  I uiie vearlv  events in parts of a einin
try that used to be one of the granaries of the world
Before the Bolshevik administration all southern
Russia was famous for its line hard wheat and heau"
ful while bread, bul white bread is now n thing of the
past  in Russia. 1923
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
with which is Incorporated the B. C. TRADE REVIEW,
Buy in British Columbia
53
Mrs. Haines Marmalade
orange
GRAPE
FRUIT
PINE
APPLE
X WHISTLE
Wrapped   111   Botties
CROSS  A.  CO. Vancouver.
B.  C.   Boies   (or   B.   C.   Goods.
B.  C.  Good*  for   B.  C.  People.
National   Paper   Bo*   4   Carton  Co.
Limited.
260  Lome  Street  W.       Vancouver.
TEA
The Finest
CORNISH & COOPER
Sash,   Doort.   Joinery.
245   Duffenn   St.   W.,       Vancouver.
Telephone:   Fair.  963.
Milne
y Middelton
Limited.
Wholesale
Millinery,   Notions   and
Small wares.
347   Water
Street            Vancouver.
HOISERY
UNDERWEAR
ROSS, DURNO, LTD.
Wholesale Di*) Qoods
500 Beatty Street. Vancouver, B.C.
Sey. 3566
Specialising In Ladles' and Child
fen's Hoslerj  and Underwear.
Use our stock for Bortlng up.
Prompt shipments.
PAINTS
Brandram-Henderson
of  B. C. Ltd.
GRANVILLE    ISLAND
Vancouver.
PACIFIC AGENCIES LIMITED
Importers
TOYS,    BASKETS,
and
GENERAL    FANCY
RUGS
GOODS
319-321 Homer Si.
Vancouver
|
Voonia
r*"v    'Pi      Ml
■■ * ml  ■ cwl~;
* -«t i    .» !-■  -ut-: .-
vjciracn
1     Tea
E. Chrystal & Co. Ltd.
Sash,   Doors.   Store   Fixtures   and
Alterations
108 Georgia  Street  E.    Vancouver.
tr "^
us
NABOB]
XEA **■ •'
EMPRESS HOTEL
235 Hastings Street E. Vancouver.
t mm* oi the best finished and furnished hotels in Vancouver.
Every   Modern  Convenience.
J. S. Maxwell & Co.
500  MERCANTILE  BLDG.
VANCOUVER.
Representing
T. I. BIRKIN4 CO. LTD.. Notiii|h»m
Lace.   Curtains,   Nets.
HINES STROUD & CO. LTD.. London
"Airlette" Down Comforters,
Tapestries.
T. E. L1NNETT STARTIN LTD.. Birminfbam
Pins,   Hairpins,   Notions, etc.
BUSINESS SALES SERVICE
We   have   buyers   for
Drygoods
Mens Wear. Hardware iiitot General
Stores   anywhere   In   B.   C.
For   quick   sale   list   with
Pemberton & Son
418 Howe St,    Vancouver, B. C.
J.G. MacKinnon 6? Co.
Independent Silks
Ladies' and  Gents'  Dresses and
Clothing
508 Mercantile Bldg.      Vancouver.
V. H. WETMORE
Manufacturers'   Agent   Specializing
WOELLER     BOLDUC     &    CO.'S
CHESTERFIELDS
The Best in Canada
324-330 Water Street     Vancouver.
Phone:   High.  3889
IDEAL CONE COMPANY
Manufacturers of
ICE   CREAM   CONES
Purest  Made      Cost Less
335  PRINCESS  AVE.
Vancouver.
E. J. WAKEFIELD
36 Dufferin St. E. Phone: Fair. 4959
Artistic Wicker Furniture
Strongly built. Concealed supports.
WRITING     TABLES,     SETTEES
FLOWER   AND  HALL  STANDS
CHAIRS
This   Made   in   B.   C.   Line  merits
your   earliest   attention.
Mail orders or inquiries will secure
prompt   response.
WIRE FENCING
B. C. ANCHOR FENCE CO. LTD.
1031 Pender Street West.
WIRE    SCREENS
V
1 1
' i
i; 54
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
With which la Incorporated the B  C   TRADE REVIEW
Buy in British Columbia
Se|,M
PAPER BAGS
J. C. WILSON    LTD.
1068  Homer  Strjet,        Vancouver.
ROVAL CROWN
SOAPS
Manufactured In British Columbia
and guaranteed.
ROYAL  CROWN   SOAPS   LTD.
PAINTS
MARTIN-SENOUR
CO.    LTD.
1505  Powell   Street,
Vancouver
m mm - bar
KNITTING CO. LTD.
J. J. MACKAY,
Agent.
804  Bower  Bldg.
Vancouver,
HOSIERY
YEAST
THE  FLEISCHMANN  CO.
1166   Burrard   Street      Vancouver.
J. A. TEPOORTEN
LIMITED
WHOLESALE    DRUGS
308   WATER     STREET
VANCOUVER, B. C.
McCORMICKS
JERSEY CREAM
SODAS
McCormick   Mfg.  Co.   Ltd.
1150   Hamilton   Street,   Vancouver.
C.  H.  KENNEY, Manager.
SERVICE    TO    OUT   OF    TOWN
SUBSCRIBERS.
The British Columbia Retailer will
be pleased to furnish subscribers
the names and addresses of representatives or agents of eastern
manufacturers in Vancouver. We
will also advise where their com-
modities can be purchased.
N.  K.  FAIRBANK     CO.  LIMITED.
Yorkshire Bldg. Vancouver.
Hams & Bacon
Swift's "Premium"
SWIFT CANADIAN CO. LTD.
Vancouver,
Fire Insurance
Ret.ii!     Merchants     Underwriter*
Agency.
420   Pacific   Bd'g. Vancouver.
PAPER
BAGS     AND     WRAPPING
Norfolk Piper Co. Ltd.;
136 WATER STREET
Vancouver.
"Prue" Cottons
DOMINION  TEXTILE  CO.  LTD.
510 Hastings St.  W.        Vancouver,
GALVANIZED IRONWEAR
THE THOS. DAVIDSON MFG. CO.
LTD.
1T3  Powell  Street Vancouver.
41 a it J 2Iff
'<   Vi iii   T//   /
REGISTERED.
CHIPMANHOLTON        KNITTING
CO.  LTD.
E. H. Walsh & Co. Ltd., Agents.
318   Homer   Street, Vancouver.
ALBION AGENCIES
Manufacturers'     Agenti.
Wmch   Bldg.    VANCOUVER,  B. C.
Martin  Hail  &  Co.  Ltd.
Sh'-M'i'i>!  DlrminftMJin w d Loi don
Eaguu *i
High c'4»s   Silver,   Electro   Piatc
Spoon*    aed    Forki
BtjinltM   Steel   Cutlery
ENQUIRIES   SOLICITED
UNDERWEAR
ATLANTIC     UNDERWEAR     LTD
E.  h.  Waltfc A Co.  Ltd., Agtoti
31fl  Homer  Street Var.touvf"
I     ;      :.' ; -.   ' ■...:::
n
I   C. H. Jones & Son
Limited.
PIONEER     BRAND
TENTS.   AWNINGS.   FLAGS   AND
§    CANVAS GOODS OF   ALL   KINDS
S Jobber**   of:
Go'd   Medal   Camp   Furniture
i:    CottO" duck, all widths an<j MrtSghti
;«   WATER      STREET,
Vancouver.   B.  C.
-„ K ;:';:,;•; K :. :   I      i: it '; ;i     :   :   X t; *' ;■ '.'. '■ ::.*;"•'
NEW   BRIGHT   COLORS
Alto Rffgulnr Shad** in Stork
in
JAPANESE
CREPE
.Srn.) for  iniiiplr* t.xlnv   ".ml  lai.r
•dvsntagfl o( prtMnl low pru e
AURORA SILK CO.
700 Mercantile Building
VANCOUVER. OUR COMPLETE STOCK FOR FALL AND
CHRISTMAS TRADE NOW READY
Diamonds
l^i.isi.* and
Mounted
Canadian   Agents
" Sni nup
Silvei Polish
%    . ,«■    ..^.ja1mmW***>.—
SSES
FULL LINE OF MANTLE. WALL. CHIME.
AND ALARM CLOCKS
Waltham and
Swiss,
Pocket and
Wrist Watches
Community
Plate
Western Wholesale Jewelers
Cor. CAMBIE and CORDOVA STS.
VANCOUVER, B, C.
SWIFT'S  PREMIUM
Hams and Ba
Our "Premium" brand smoked meats are always of superior quality, uniform in cure and
trim, which assures your customer of absolute
satisfaction. Results will be repeat business
and increased volume and profit.
Swift Canadian Company, Limited They Wear Li
—that's one big feature of Rock Rib and
Hercules Stockings. Tell that to your
customers.   Then tell them this:
Rock Rib and Hercules Stockings are
knit especially for boys for cold weather
wear. Only the strongest yarn is uscd-
twO'ply up the leg and three-ply at heel
and toe. On account of all this they stay
away from the mending basket longer
than ordinary stockings.
They are made in sizes 5 to IO1. and
put up attractively in boxes of a dozen.
If vour stock is low, vour wholesaler
ar T       •
has a supply waiting for you.
Chipman-Holton Knitting Company, Limited,  Hamilton, Ontario
Mill* at Hamilton anj Wetland
ROCK RIB HERCULES
Boys and Girle
,y
jtts|g
i  e\tt\  loot*   nett
AtketbctBMfwciil*
*\ JetittlAe. Si/r»
*V< tu I'). It.nrJ
. t t r * c 11 vel > io
dOAciM,
Lv
Vl
-^

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