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The British Columbia Retailer Nov 30, 1920

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Array I
I
HIRTEENTH   YEAR
2  • I'
NOVEMBER, 1920
Dry Goods - Groceries - Hardware - General Merchandise
p ■ v   •
V   '     V
VANCOUVER, B.C.
> - r ■
• ■:
*\
)M RAL
it
^a
if   "   .v  V    ■
• v ^
The  Best  in Ouling Shoes
i  \ i
V, ITH
F. &  F. HENDERSON, LIMITED
Phi        Bo)
Sey mi   i
416422 Cordova St W.
VANCOUVER   B.C. I
1
J
Mr. Retailer:—
How're your Figures to-day?
Trelly slow, eh — business much more of a pknk
without 'em —We'll aav so,
BUT this little fellow will
keep all your figures iu
the pink of con-
dition   every
time and all the
time.
Price only $185
Terms If dttlrtc*
And You'll Never Get the
"FIGURATION BLUES."
Let Us Show You—Well Be Pleased to Do So.
BURROUGHS
Adding - Bookkeeping - Calculating Machine*
E. C. COLEMAN, Mana*er for B C.
119 Pender W. VANCOUVER, B.C.
Look Over Your
Christmas Stock
l«y IhM timi | n %M find *.<**»«-
rw Cttriftwai good* ut ifaori,
nilnn-  from  »-,ifh   ml?  Of  through
rrlookeii
I
.,. ,.,
\v? hftvt t*>>*. jptntii *'hmt*n**
rjn^mttofii in Un$a I md **ai>« i ttorv
boo&f,  ami  Buuoyp   otfef?  Itiooi of
< hrMma* iiovrUi**-*!
1 ?..-«,,-- ^,„i4.»i Bffi rfidj
a mttiitl*>'i noli e
;• at
Smith, Davidson & Wright, Ltd
Manufacturer* and Wholesale Paj*r DeaJen
VANCOUVER and VICTORIA, B C
The Martin - Senour Co., Limited
MAM'FACn IUHIS   OF
High-Grade Paints and Varnishes
B*h C°'Umbia FaCto^ >™ Powell S„ee, Vancouver
Phone High 422 |«)20.
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
103
This machine does what no other receipt-
printing cash register can do.
1. It prints the merchant's name.
2. It prints the price of each article.-
3. It adds the items.
4. It prints the total of all items.
5. It retains added and printed records.
J. SMITH
COMPANY
10 MAIN ST.
0.17
0.32
0.48
0.09
TOTAL
$01.06
Copy of receipt
printe'l for each
customer
It also does other important things for merchants, clerks,
and customers.
We make cash re$stets for every line of business
NATIONAL
CASH  REGISTER CO.
OF   CANADA  LIMITED
jj
J 104
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
;i
/Si>\ . j.
ROGERS
f
GOLDEN SYRUP
■I
Tb« Bnd of a Perfect DtyH
'"■""'•'•'I cane sugar, . special grad 'whid
IPut up in all sizes of i,-i,-l-	
° Packages deLldf-Mt°-S,Ul •'"'"' cuateffi*»
IfMade from finest f|;
purpose.
o beautify y<
•in- store.
■ ia imported for Uin
requimnoutft
2-lb. tins, 24 to a case
5-lb. tins, 12 to a case.
10 -b. tins, 6 to a case
Perfect fcal j.„, „ to , J"lb ■* » t. . M
The British Columbia Sugar Refining Co. Ltd.
VANCOUVER, BC. 1020.
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
105
A SPECIALTY
THAT BECAME
A STAPLE
.OME year** sjro man)   people considered
Evaporated Slfll* u merely ,i substitute
for fresh nulk.   U*i g different story today.
Polk"*    WS»>
"ST. CHARLES"
EVAPORATED MILK
because ll actually improves their tea, coffee,
cocoa, favourite cooking recipe*, etc.  Borden's
ST. CHARLES Evaporated Milk is always i
!»«< f»mn«i on the paotfj shelf of today's house-
wife    the -V'ttnan who known,
Xxy s«'!hnj4 it to your customers, by the doacn
tins, especial)**' with the week-end order bul
uuik«v Hur»' first thai you are well sjoi-kc*! with
the three popular iln s,
Attractive selling helps senl dealers ou
request.
THE BORDEN COMPANY
LIMITED
MONTREAL
VANCOUVER
4$
ST CHARlfj
Qotdtd
SI. CHAR1CI
■kJ-tJCfHifrfTifrkUti     4
OUR TRADE MARK
la Your Guarantee
RESTMORE
Manufacturing Company
LIMITED
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Wholesale Manufacturers
of
The Famous Restmore
Mattress
AUo
Woven Wire and Coil Springs
Steel Beds
Sanitary Couches
All kinds of
Furniture for theHome
J
I I:
/7MADI   INN
ft B.C.
^IP^
Show Your Customers
the Restmore Line
n I'.ll)
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
November
MR. RETAILER	
You will find it easy to speed
up your sales if you will cooperate with our advertising
department
Royal Standard
FLOUR
Our newspaper advertising campaigns for the coming
year addressed to the housewife are unusually strong
in "appeal, particularly tho.se for ROYAL STANDARD
Flour and and WILD ROSE delirious Pastry Flour
The difference between these two products-- th«* 081
from the hard kernelled wheat and the other from soft
wheat, is pointed out in forcible manner, (he advantages being shown from the standpoints of both satH-
factory baking results and economy. Hooks ihowfng
these campaigns are in preparation and we shall bS
pleased to forward you copies when they are MfflptStad
These will show you what we are doing to help you
sell these products and how you ran help us lo belp
you.
MAKES LIGHTER. WHITER BREAD
Tali ileejaa win i*1 bacatdl up b) stfotssj ,r*,»**«R--*h?'"
sdTtrtisiaSi skowtas Ufcs bovsmvtlt h«»* ?h»* salesMUd
flour li bumss from tin bsal of Um "^•s afreet." The
Modern utUUnr* procnnts ?,» *h.»h iJsta **tspatrta*i*fs
quality Is attained "lit bi ibowa bj itravtoas oi Um
inachUMfT, lbs taleffof ol '"^ various Baits and «»* "h<>
s^'-<»rvs.!)>r'*      The   food  (}oalttf*M   »Ht   bi
wilt  ?h«- rleanUr****-.  <»f  *hf   *»*■<'•«•»«<•«
<r-mph*«lj««--'  a*
Wild Rose Pastry Flour
Ml   *Nc   9f"*fpttft*t'l*K]    j.*g   jjjjj
< -Am
The Sppatti*)  appi;',
psitKn   Th*, rteaaeet ..- *f>.« now sad Um o-«-wm* o(
it* as« Easts**! ol ordinary *!»«* *r»r -*-sstrj
8he Will Ask for Thew Flour*   WUl You
G.ve Them to Her*
2£22?r Mi"!"? * Grain ec. Limited
OFFICES AND MILLS
VANCOUVEB, B.C.
Branches: Victoria. Nanaimo. New Westminster. Mission Ciiv
Agencies: Duncan, Courtenay, UnKte*f Prairte. CWdale, Ladnfr
GOOD
DAYS AKK (iKTTINO 8H0BTKH    lil-rri-,. ,	
na i «,.,... ■"""'•I'   BETTKB WOK IT v,,i k gTOCK
OF UHP8 AND LAMP GOODS.   OUR STOCK 18 VERY
COMPLETE.   V7WTB 08 TO* PBICB8 ON,
Gasoline Lamps, Coal Oil Lamps,
Lanterns, Chimneys, Burners,
Wick Shades, Etc.
♦•♦
41 Alexander Street
Martin, Rnlayson & Mather, Ltd
WHOLESALE HAEDWAEE
VANCOUVER, B.C.
■ 1920.
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
107
BRITISH COLUMBIA
RtTAILLR
Published Monthly
THIRTEENTH YEAR
QROCKHIK8, DHYOOODS,
HARDWARE,
GENERAL  MERCHANDISE
OFFICIAL ORGAN OK B.C. BOARD
RETAIL MERCHANTS'
ASSOCIATION UP CANADA.
A MONTHLY JOURNAL published in the interest of Retail Merehan-
disii'f and the Development of Commerce in Western Canada.
SUBSCRIPTION RATI Two i>oiiar* Par Year, payable in advance.
Adv««rtn»lnK Hate* on Application
Editor: \V  J   HDOO,
Pubinhtrti: PROQRESG PUBLISHING CO- LTD.
did opportunity for Britons to visit
home and also for Canadians to see
the Old Land and its manufacturing
and retail businesses.
So much ean be accomplished in a business way by travelling
with such a party, whieb will be
feted and catered to in every conceivable way by the hospitable Old
Country folk. The particulars given
in the announcement are certainly
alluring and the visitors will learn
more during that trip than they will
in an ape by remaining in their own
locality, and will discovery many
things they never knew before which
they will be able to turn to much
profit intellectually and financially.
The trip will cost real money and
take real time, but it will be worth
it many times over. It will be an
investment in the sound and gilt-
edge Bank of Health, Relaxation,
Education, Unlimited!
EDITORIAL AND BUSINESS OFFICES
LONDON BUILDING,
VANCOUVER,  B.C.
Tel'-phon**. So>mour INI
V,.|  XII.. No. 3,
NOVEMBER, 1920.
Vancouver. B.C.
WHY IS IT?
scanning i'\rr the •eores ol eont*
inttnieatiotui   which   have   reached
ut   in   connection   with   the   Lux
ury     Tax.     and     with     particular
reference to tin* method of collection
by stamp and cancelling machine,
one It ftrtiek with the almost unaui
mora querv which runs through pro*
test and criticism alike. The query
taken somewhat tins form:   "Why
in it that retailers, and retailers only
and always, are made the victims OX
administrative     inefficiency    and
ignoranceT
* • ■
The   answer   is   very
simple.   It was given by l>r. Bindley
in his address before the Vancouver
Branch, whieh was reported in our
last issue, and is obvious to anyone
who has given any close study to the
position of the retailer as a political
unit.
Despite the fact that his interests
are definite, that he of all people in
the Community should den,and busi
ness administration by busiu ss peo*
rde, he has been so accustomed lo let
11;.' public who are his customers
do his thinking for him  th.r );<• has
largely lost th'- facultv of eonstruc-
Uve thinking. It may be that these
Words Will be resented by some readers, as an overstatement of the ease,
but if reasons need to be stated for
this conclusion, they are tioi far to
seek. As was eloquently stated by
Dr. Hindley, agriculture, the professions, labor, are political entities.
With definite objectives, clopely knit
c-ganisations, and an esprit de corps
v hieh so far has been painfully lacking in the business of retail distribution.
Organisation is a matter of educa-
Ii••!'.  and not until ill - sank an I fi! •
of retailers have learned to bury
smit'l animosities, e:s h unit conduct
ing his business according to fixed
principles, making the best of what
he has in the way of capital, location
and knowledge, and cultivaitng the
habit of thinking in fundamentals,
rather than superfieials, will the retail trade ever constitute a factor
worthy the serious consideration of
politicians or statesman.
A WISE INVESTMENT
The coming visit to the British
Isles of American and Canadian
Drygoods Associations announced
elsewhere under the caption of "Will
B.C, Participate," will be a splen-
PADDLE YOUR OWN CANOE
Once again our friend, the editor
of the Agricultural Journal takes a
tilt at the R.M.A. In a front page
position in black-faced type in the
October issue he makes the statement that the R.M.A. (amongst other
organizations) have -"practically"
asked the Government to suppress
his journal.
It seems most unfortunate that the
editor in his zeal for co-operation
among farmers cannot find any better method to serve the cause he has
at heart, than to indulge in these unwarranted attacks. It is simply not
true that the R.M.A. has ever asked
the Government to suppress the
Agricultural Journal, officially, unofficially, directly, indirectly or in
any way whatsoever. There may bo
some doubt as to the propriety of a
government department publishing
a journal in the interests of one section of the community at the expense
of the whole. It would be reasonable to suggest that if the organized
farmers need a journal to express
their viewpoint or to carry on propaganda, that they should finance
it themselves, as the retailers and
other trades and professions do, but
whatever may be the opinion on this
point, the R.M.A. has no quarrel
with the Agricultural Journal as
such and has never nt any time suggested that it should be suppressed.
The naive appeal of the editor of
the Journal to his readers for their
opinion as to the continuance of the
journal or otherwise, is hardly one
of any weight, since it is understood
that the journal whilst professing a
Deal With Our Adv«rtli«rt:    Th«y Make This Official  Publication Pottible at $2.00 a Year. L08
THE BEETISB COLUMBIA KKTA1LKK
Ni
>v rni
►ompliment*
dollar subscription, is a complunei
arv publication and what is free
usually more or less welcome!
is
d
DOES THE AMOUNT OF YOUR
FREIGHT BILL INTEREST YOU?
Elsewhere in this issue appears
an article from the pen of Mr. K. IL
Fairley. who is assistant  secretary
at the Vancouver office and  incidentally,  freight   adjustment   manager,   Mr. Fairley possesses excep-
tional qualification in the very complicated matter of freight rates, an
has repeatedly urged that retailers,
individually and through their associations, should take much more interest in the question of transportation companies3 freight tariffs than
they do at present.   Apart from the
particular matter, which is the subject of Mr.  Fairley's remarks, hia
expert knowledge of this department
makes him an authority to whom retailers   would   be   well   advised   to
write on any matter affecting their
relationship as consignees with the
transportation companies.   Mr. Fair-
ley   will   be   glad   to   audit   your
freight   bills  for a   period  of  four
years and if. as is quite likely, yon
have been overcharged at some time
or other, will  make application to
the transportation  company  for a
refund.   He has already got results
for some members and only awaits
a chance to do the same for you.
and there is no denying thai the -1
fori is a splendid missionary Idi i
and is calculated, if the mer- bants
visited do their part, to instil into
the different districts a better appreciation of the association *s work and
consequently snd nceeaearily to in-
crease its membership.
CREDIT RETAILING OF
VICTUALS
from
ispn
The article on thui iuhje<
the thoughtful pen of Mr A
of  New   Westminster,   is   most   WCl
come. And not mere!) of what he
says, hut because he has iaid it'
We mean that B<\ retail merchants
to write US wjth  SO)  *•■' '■
i e ra
are slon
ideas they have sn their mind, in
whether you agree with Mr   >pr;
»>r not. be can be given credit for
enterprise, thought and the ability tn
set, md mi put nil argument Into
the admirable form he ban In tim
latUI     >    many   people talk  but it
etuis right there, and what you mj
in your itore in Nanaimo, Kemioopd
Bnderby, Nelson, r*eruie or *'hilh
wack attarn* no tangible form and
dOM   no   tangible   good   unless  j it*
display   Mr    Spriee»   iptr I   u I
''pr,,,'■.,'    il      So   whi 1st   we   " • ■ "
hcar'd. n*k for >-»;h«-r views OH W
Mr  v, t ■ I  I IS tt.i I   we wan! !« Uk**
this oni ortunitj of shaking btal
for taking hia time lo pla i h
before bis brother retailers U
good
!.'• W *
Winter Phonograph Display
Suggestions from Canada
By Ernest A. Dench.    Special to the   B C Retailer      Copyright
KEEP THE POT BOILING
Interest in Dr. Ilindley*s address
in our last issue has been so widespread that there is an'inquiry from
the interior asking whether it would
not be possible to have Dr. Hindley
visit that territory. The Provincial
secretary is endeavouring to arrange
an itinerary with a view to having
Dr. Ilindley speak at two or three
important centres, the expenses to
be shared by the branches in that
district.
GOOD MISSIONARY WORK
During the mouth I recently spent
in covering Canada, over the Dana*
dian Pacific Railway, the fierce
Belling phonographs and records
were planning a winter sggretsti
campaign. Their window displays
and newspaper announcements reflected this tendency.
These  displays   demonstrated,   of
course, that the long winter nights
are most susceptible to phonograph
sales Some of the display methods
may prove of assistance to you in
selling more phonographs and re
cords while the wint'T months are
with us.
An Artistic Example
The Hudson*1 Bay Co., Vancouver.
B.C., adorned the background oi a
recent phonograph trim with drop
yellow  curtain  materials     The  tup
of the curtains was covered with
strips of green, blue and terra cotta.
the   strips  being   hung   to   form   a
frieze-like effect. Draping the sides
were strips of grey cloth, with I
fringe at the bottom marked with
a
a is a
•.t--db..flrd
The  idea   of  having   periodical
gatherings of retail merchants in the
nntlvioff ,i;o<„; *,     e i- , .....*.   <m   iii>-  oouom  rnaraeu  w
outlying districts of Vancouver for two lines of black square*    On  ,
hose tradesmen who cannot get to stand draped with an      nnta     uu
&S metP ;; t?a4th: tz^t^r *?,a,io f ,(1
eood one -,n,i n,,.,.,... -   , '" ""'K"''' "r ll"' st,""l for a gnm
wbS   1»'"'    1'1'l.l"r","t a" 0ri"",al'''"-'w" '""I " 'I"- n"r
wS8: itbTobjfr/ & en! rl;;1 •';;; tf -'- •*,■?
nith iboa1   I fema oa t»»p   K stti
cd on tl    floot sl ea< h m«I* - * Its*
; ferns wer* pteeea of I;*
lure pertaining I ■ tne phonograph*
dutpia) • !
Capitalising Opera Start Vis l
Fletcher Bros,, Vancouver, B.C
lied up iheir principal window dt*
play with the local vidlt of i fan ■ ■
open Ringer K\ thi }
portico constructed of
Running from the »o|t of the port*1 ■
were twisted streamers «*f whit** i
per, the itreamen being fastened (o
the ceiling To one -tub', resting on
an easel, was a lark*" photograph Oi
the distinguished *unger. draped with
an Italian flag to Indicate ber na
tlOnalit) Direotlv      opposite      the
photograph wai i large cabinet type
phonograph.  The background al ''
rear centre held ■ large abowcard
The card was captioned "Superla
live."     Below   the   caption,   in   tin
middle, appeared the name of lhe
artist, balanced »t each aide by such
headlines as '*( ire a test Soprano aud
"Greatest Phonograph " The mis<i
itig link appearing at the  lower
centre stated "(Jreatesf  Records   '
Neatly arranged on the floor of
the window were ihowcardi giving
the names and numbers of the r''
cords Comprising this famous sing
er i repertoire,
All Instruments in One
The Mason & Risoh {'<>., Vancou
ver,   featured   a   certain   tuake   of 1020.
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
109
phonograph in their show window.
The ilngle model placed at the rear
centre was balanced on either side
by Ittch cards as:
"A is all  phonographs iu
One,    It playt all makes of records."
" \ '--——■' is all instruments in
one.    You can  bear your favourite
instrument at its beat
A brown ribbon was chained t >
the reproducer of the instrument,
the ribbon forking out into four ribbon streamers, each being attached
at the other end to one of four popular makes of records
Ensuring the Genuine Model
Qrinne) Bros.. Windsor, <>nt., dis
played a single phonograph with the
lid wnle open The phonograph represented a well-known brand, white
tapes trailing from the trade mark
inscribed on the middle of the phonograph ltd to ?!.. window glass. Here
idvertiaements inserted byOrinners
in flo* local newspaper-* were posted
Bach advertisement idviaed one to
' Look ins di the lid to ensure
the genuine
The Archwpv Effect
R s \\ ill ami ^ Sous, Ottawa,
i mi . !- atured pi onographa aith s
large     cent;./ located     window
showeard. The card was in '■-', form
of an en b, with i i •■■ in< ' model en
i loaed in I' in 'i Booklets in th*
f«»rm of arches were srranged on
the windou floor There wan s card
sttachi d to thi ph me rra|1 bearing
lhe following measagc
"Just purchase six records and
\w will d- liver the outifl to you
immediately. The balance in eas)
monthly payments.
The Phonograph and Its Parts
Ormea, Ltd., Ottawa, On!. arranged a large cabinel phonograph on a
green plush covered mould at the
rear centre, Then was n rose ribbon
leading from the phonograph to the
phonograph motor, room for which
was found on a pedestal ai tin  iron!
centre,   Here a card   pointed   oul
that :
"The ' • ' motor plays ten records without  rewinding."
Another rose ribbon running from
the rear centre phonograph found its
terminal at the front right, where au
ingenious record filing cabinet was
placed.    The card here announced:
"H ird filing system, with con
venient arrangement of drawers and
records in all the larger cabinet instruments. "
At the left front was an oval shaped, all-wood  tone amplifier, backi d
up   by   the   following  rose   ribbon
bedecked card:
'The aid to perfect tone  reproduction."
The Merry-Go-Rouud Stunt
J, M. Carriere, Hull, Que., introduced animation with excellent effect, On the floor at the middle was
a portable phonograph. The thing
that attracted attention was a small
dog on the record part of the instrument, for as the record revolved, it
carried the dog with it. The merry-
go round was certainly an unusual
one.
The phonograph without a record
is like a wagon without a horse to
pull it, so now for a few displays of
these articles,
The Juvenile Record
Demonstration
The Toronto Music Co., Toronto,
Out bad a drive on the kiddies via
the indirect, but effective, parental
route. The show window represented the interior of a children's nursery, fully equipped with small white
enamelled furniture, toys, portable
phonographs and juvenile records.
While the display itself was sufficiently out of the ordinary to attract
considerable attention, two small total children were engaged with the
object of using the window as a
play house during certain intervals
of fin- ,|ay. The youngsters entered
into the spirit of the thing, playing
numerous re/ords that  would espe*
< ially appeal to children.
Making Use of Wall Panels
The  Berliner Oram*o-phone  Co,
Ltd., Montreal, divided their whit"
painted window walls into panels.
Records were placed inside each
panel, the white paint oi which was
an excellent color contrast to the
black of the record, The panels were
Square a! the top portion of the
window, with an oblong panel in
between each square panel. Three
records occupied each oblong pain 1
while each square panel contained
one record. On the floor in slightly
titled positions, weft" framed cards.
One record was attached to the
middle of the card. Each Card contained a different dance bit, but
bore the same caption as the rest:
"The latest dance hits. Conic in
and hear them "
Records on Instalment Plan
Another Berliner display contained a large show-card. The card was
perched between a cabinet model at
the rear centre and a portable instrument resting on a rose plush cover
ed mould down in front near the
middle.   The card stated:
"Why wait when $2.00 puts thirty
selections in your home?"
"Balance in weekly payments."
"Phonographs on easy terms. No
change in price."
Largest Stock in the City
George S. Pequeguat, Montreal,
had a card in his phonograph window that announced:
"We carry the largest stock of
records in the city. Best quality
phonographs from $58 to $650.
"MADE IX CANADA"
A Drive on Needles
Heintzman & Co., Ltd., Saskatoon, Sask.. arranged a special display in order to push the sale of
phonograph needles. On the hardwood floor at the rear centre were
several cabinet phonograph models.
Billows of white cloth were formed
on the floor around the front and
sides, with packets and tins of
phonograph needles neatly arranged
over the same.
Seeing More Records
Heintzman *s. Toronto, ran the
following timely advertisement on
the subject in the local dailies:
"Records
"Keep your assortment fresh by
constantly adding something new—
especially with the long evenings on
us when the ' ' becomes a real
source of pleasure in the home.
"Ask us for new lists."
The Record Booth Display
The top part of the record demonstration booths is space that is often
allowed to go unusued. D. 1). (Jor-
don, Ltd., Ottawa, Out., have a show-
window that is opt'ii at the back.
The last of the row of white painted
record sound proof booths is very
near the rear side of the show window. The space on top of the last
booth was recently occupied by a
neat stack of bottles of furniture
polish. A card hung down the side
of the booth that could be seen by
every passer-by, enquired:
"Have you tried ' V Twenty-
five eents. It is a splendid furniture
polish and will not injure the finest
phonograph surface."
Every business man should be receptive to new ideas, because if he
relies upon his own thinking apparatus all of the time it is apt to become a little rusty. Suggestions
front such sources as the foregoing
act in the nature of a lubricant.
You  Ha/e  Not Read This Journal, Until  Vou  Have Studied the Advertisement*. no
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
November
Who Pays the Increased Freight
Rates ?
By R. Hill Fairley, Manager Freight Adjustment Department,  British
Columbia Board, R.M.A. of Canada,
Grand Trunk. Grand Trunk Pacific,
International and Transcontinental,
land for the purposes of tins judgment I am considering them aa part
of this system    will face an opera?
Columb
Retail merchants as a whole have
taken   very   little,   if  any,   interest
in  the  various  applications of  the
Canadian railways to the Hoard of
Railway Commissioners, for increased  freight   rates,  as  evidenced   by
their apathy toward the recent judgment of the Railway  Board which
grants to  the  transportation  companies  of  Canada  an   increase   in
rates of from thirty-five to forty pet-
cent. Not so with the manufacturers
and wholesalers who have always
taken a very  keen  interest  in  the
question of freight  rates, although
it really makes very little difference
to them  whether or not  rates are
increased as they pass on the additional charge to the retailer, who in
almost  every  ease absorbs  the  increase.
The total increased revenue that
will accrue to the transportation
companies by virtue of increased
rates as granted will, according to
the chief commissioner amount to
$270,450,000.00, the greater portion
of which will be paid oul of the profits of retail merchants of Canada.
who meekly submit and murmur not!
Figure it out for yourself. Mr. Retailer. Take for example a case of
shoes. The additional freight is sufficiently large to enable the whob-.
saler to pass it  on to you.  but   it
amounts to very little on ;i  sior-l..    '.     '» ■  '  V *   """   l,,r  W«K'
pair, NMeqimflj   t VL!      hi               ',""'7""'' ""'l ""ll"'""; *
to the retS price.   Th-     ,„    -,      '"'."V.""1"'1'''   «-'"l  Tma mm,
«■•>»< (teSisS t:::i:::i!::trr
•os 111 nave ocen a desire
on the part of the Hoard to grant
Burfictent increase in rates to assure
ffe cMya>n Pacific Railway paying
«ta usual dividends.  It is apparently
"°J n?htl5i;1 theae larg rpora
twna should be left to the exigeneiei
of trade conditions to work out their
°*n salvation by means of the strict,
w economy ... every department of
iw varous operations.   Who war*
anfce« the Profits of the reader  or
wholesaler or the manafacturerl
7''V'«M.ast four or five years
" »"■}«-» comparatively easy, on
Hldyadvancn, markc. „,makl.
'-'J.rofitron, your year's trad
n«; ™e peak of the hill haa been
"<   !-l arid you are now to mak,
ing deficit of al least 160,000,000.00
per year. fUBumbg that the wagi
the increase on each tin is very little,
and 80 on with every commodity
handled by the retailer. All these
little increases you are paying OUl
of your profits, and from the figures
quoted above, they amount to a very
tidy sum which the retail trade of
Canada is paying in addition to the
many other forms of taxation which
are saddled upon you.
Let us now take a look at the
judgment as contained in general
order Xo. 308 of the Railway Board
and examine some of the reasons put
forward in support of the enormous
increase in rates therein granted,
The Chief Commissioner, who wrote
the judgment says: "If we give a
rate whieh will barely allow the
Canadian Pacific Railway Company
to pay its fixed charges and dividends, or a lesser rate, then it is
absolutely certain that the Canadian
National    system,    including    the
other words you arc left to the «*xig-
enciea of trade eondiUona,   But not
m with  the Canadian  Pacific  Rail
way.    Their  dividends  are   practb
eaJly guaranteed, and their immense
reserves   left   unimpaired      It   area
argued b) Mr Gear) representing
the City of Toronto, Mr. D'Arcj
Scott, representing the Government
of Saskatchewan, and Mr  Coyne, re
presenting the amalgamated Beards
of Trade of thi three prairie prOY<
IfiCea, that the Canadian Pacific Rad.
K*ay  Company  should  draw   00  its
reserves  to |OtU<* l*|t**ftt, if tlCer-mary
f<>r the payment *»f dividends   Thi
Chief Commissioner •*■»* ttttahlf la
agree with thil view point,    He SaVS:
"If the Canadian Pacific Railway
Company ha*. f«>r many VeUrl past,
kept an outstanding position among
transportation eompanit* of thr
w.>rid. it ss beeauae, through wise
buainesi management thej have been
aide to plate themaelvea m aueb i
financial position that the fmannat
world ha* faith in th<» Institution,
etc."    Perhaps yon,  Mr   Retailer
might be able to maintain your pfli
mt finaneia] position dnrmg the
coming months by having your pro
fits assured
With reference to the Canadian
National lyetenti there la e&pr eased
an caracal sol   itation for Its a il
fare   which   i*   verj    commendable-.
But why should the Railway Com
miaaionera expect a railwaj that »*»
utill a colonisation road to pay ita
waj The lion Arthur Meighen,
Premier of I inada, at « luncheon
given   in  hil  honor  in  Calgaf)   ti;
other day. slate,{ thai the I anadtan
National systems for their greater
part were eotottixatiofl roads and
could nol  be expected to pay  for
many years to come Why thll anility on the part of the Railway
Board to hurry them into the dividend paying class' As far aa thi
retail mer bants are concerned, it
would be far preferable !o pay your
share of a fifty million dollar deficit
than to pay thin amount and more,
wholly out of your own profile, Into
the eofferi of the Canadian  Pacific
Hadway to enable the shareholders
to draw their usual dividend** We
leave this phase of the judgment
with you lo think over.
We wish now  to eonsider another
part of the dechrion of the Hoard
which   reads  as   follows!   "At   the
hearing, reprcaentativei of the dif
8 more or less or, I, ",,ftmi
,,1,'f,,,'',^i'i^andwiehar»','!',/.'n f;r""f     »Nl    Rled    statements
Jailer who has Du   b   s,,!t     ,'        V,ML'- at *r",li l«*'^"- A«ir **
«fw to take hiraito tha EJ!? ,pectiva   f,»»""i«l   eonditioiti   for
™f<^ '»r to take rare of..  ' "r Wae *Vn ^ ; «" »*•<>**»* ** to-
"r°fi,»  ^e  a   falling  N1,,rke       h %™$AU l'^ "^ " F" »""
Biantial increase m operating ratio,
....
""I With Our Adv.rt|M„.    ru
'■   "* M"k« Th" •"■" MM. M „ .
Y««r. 1920,
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
ill
which in other words, means the
number  of  cents  which   8  railway
must expend m operating its road U*
order to earn one dollar, which was
alleged, by counsel for the Railway
Association, as the surest teal of the
financial condition of any railroad,
and unfortunately, with the exception of the Canadian Pacific Railway,
winch was nnsatisfa lory, practically all the other roads showed that
it was costing as much, or more, to
operate them than they were r< iv-
ing, and the term "operating ratio"
does not take into account anything
in the way of fixed charges or di-
eidcndi      Kote the words In bold
type uCOUnael for the railway asso
eiation" staled thfs was the surest
test, and the statement was apparently accepted by the Board without
further inquiry in    what    expenses
were charged against operation,
Look at this from the standpoint of
your own business     Y>-u have h
called  upon  from  time  to time  to
pnpare Income lax returns for Fed
eral and Provincial Governments.
Do you find either Government will
accept any and all charges, or dldUC-
tiona, againat your groat revenue or
do   they   make   |   close   I rutiny   i)f
three expense item*' why did the
Board accept the statements of the
railways without close scrutiny f We
do not wish, for a moment, to insinuate that the railway compauiea
falsify their statements. We do
claim,  however,  that   the   Hoard  I I
Railway Cotnmiseioneri should bav*
engaged the service! of a chartered
accountant familiar with railway accounting systems, to look into the
nature of those items which are deducted from operating revenue Such
items a.s depreciation of road, equip
ment. buildinga, am! right-of-way,
and also appreciation on these items.
if any, also if amounts paid for loss
and damage claims have been charged againat operation, and the scrapping of buildings and  equipment,
The way these matters are bandied
has an important beating OH the net
result,   and   in   our  opinion   should
have been inquired into by the Rail*
way Hoard before its decision on so
far reaching a question was rendered
Before Closing these observations.
one other feature of the judgment
should be brought to your attention.
For a number of yean there has
existed a discrimination in freight
rates against the West and which
has been the subiect of Vigorous
appeal before the Hoard on variou I
occasions,  but    without    relief.    In
sneaking to this question the Chie
Commissioner   says,   "l.u    order to
satisfy myself of the facts, 1 have
investigated the tariffs, both East
and West, applicable to the more important tratiie movements
Allowing for the undoubted fact that
a v.-ry large proportion of the traffic
both east and west is on the commodity basis I am still forced to the conclusion that the rates in Western
Canada average considerably greater
than in the Kast. possibly around
fifteen or eighteen per cent." Notwithstanding the Hoard's conviction
as to the actual extent of the discrimination against the West, a difference Of only five per cent is allowed in favour of the West. Then-
seems to be no satisfactory explanation for this attitude.   One is almost
forced to the conclusion that all the
railways have to do is to ask. and
they will get what they want. There
is no doubt that the railways, being
iu possession <»f the facts, and with
traffic expert! and eminent counsel,
are able to present a very strong
ease, while those Opposing do not
always show unanimity of action nor
have we evidence of careful and expert preparation by available traffic
experts.
The commercial organizations of
the West, including the Retail Merchants' Association of Canada,
should unite in asking for a hearing
on the whole rate question, not only
as to the discrimination against the
West, but for a discontinuance of
Eastern and Western lines, mountain
and prairie divisions for rate mak-
in? purposes. We should insist on
the various systems being taken as
a whole, and now that one of the
systems boasts of a prairie grade
through the mountains, special mountain rates should be done away with
and brought to the level of the most
favourable grade the same as in
other parts of the country, and the
railway with the longest haul between tWO points must meet the rates
for the line having the shortest haul
between  the same two points
Mr. Retailer, why not instruct
your association to get behind the
various organisations that arc fighting for fair treatment front the railways of the country. In the last
analysis you arc the one that pays
any increase in the freight rates We
have shown you that it is paid out
of your profits. If you are going
to continue paying increased taxes,
for freight rates arc taxes, why not
have something to say. The Parliament of Canada created the Hoard of
Railway Commissioners for the purpose of regulating freight rates and
all matters pertaining to railway
operation.     The   machinery   is   at
hand, and there is no doubt that if
intelligent and expert care is given
to the preparation of our appeals for
better treatment at the hands of the
railways, the Board is bound to give
you the relief, the burden of proof
being with the railway companies.
•   •   •
Since the above was written, the
following news item has appeared:
'The Canadian Manufacturers'
Association has made application to
the Hoard of Railway Commissioners
asking for the earliest consideration
of the question of equalizing freight
rates between Western and Eastern
Canada. This application is based
on the recent order-in-eouncil issued
by the committee of the Privy Council recommending the Board of Railway Commissioners to reconsider
their judgment in connection with
the recent increase of the freight
rates.
"Particular attention iu directed
in the application to the question of
rates in British Columbia ant) the
maritime provinces, and claims that
conditions have materially change 3.
since the board's order in the Western rates case was issued in 1914.''
FIVE DOLLARS FOR YOU
Have you read the advertisements
in this issue? If not. do so and tell
us which, iu your estimation, strikes
you as being most original and doing
the work intended. Five dollars
will eome the way of the person
whose criticism is thought the most
apt. Result will be published in our
January issue, Time limit for com
petition. January 1st.
DON'T READ THIS
If You Have Not the Interests of
the R.M.A. at Heart.
If you value tie Retail Merchants'
Association you must necessarily
take interest in its official organ,
this journal, which is its printed
mouthpiece. It is only by the cooperation of the retail merchants
throughout B.C. that we can give
you a paper approximating an ideal
—we want news and notes from
every corner of the province—one
part is just as important as another.
Communications must reach us by
the 8th of the month at the latest
for the current month's issue.
Of our subscribers we ask that
they see that other retail merchants,
not subscribers, are put on our mailing list, as this may be the means
of their becoming members of the
Association.
So please remember that the success of the "B.C. Retailer" is in the
keeping of each subscriber. 112
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
N»
vemln i
The Stamp, the Cancelling Machine, the
Association and the Government
Prompt and Strong Representation Made to Premier Meighcn by Deputation of Prominent B.C. Merchants
With the rapid approach of Monday, November 1st. retailers Belling
articles subject to the Luxury Tax.
throughout the Province, began to
take a more active interest in tlu-
regulations laid down by the Depart
ment of Inland Revenue for the collection of the Luxury Tax by same.
Up to within a few days of going to
press most retailers were only vaguely aware of what was involved in
these regulations. As information
began to be accumulated by the Provincial office, it became apparent
that the stamp and the cancelling
machine meant to the retail business
an irritating piece of red tape, which
was entirely unjustifiable.
The visit of the Honourable, the
Premier, and the Honourable A. J,
Calder to the Pacific Coast, created
a favourable opportunity for the
presentation of the views of
British Columbia retailers to these
responsible Ministers with regard to the use of the stamps an 1
machine, and the Provincial office
took the initiative with regard to arranging an interview with the Ministers which took place on Friday,
October 29th.
Prior to the date upon which the
deputation waited upon the Premier,
a representative committee assisted
the executive officers of the British
Columbia board in preparing the
following memorandum:
The Honourable Arthur Meighen,
Premier of Canada.
Sir:—The deputation present
before you is composed of the
following gentlemen;
Mr. M. J, Phillips, ready-to-wear
clothier, and president of \H\
Board. Retail Merchants' Association of Canada.
Mr. II. T. Lockyear, general manager of the Hudson's Bay Co.
Mr. Chris, Spencer, proprietor of
the David Spencer Department
Store, Ltd.
Mr. Geo. A. Hawker, secretary-
treasurer of Cordon Drysdale
Ltd.
Mr. J. W. Foster, ready-to-wear
clothier.
Mr. R. M. Millar, china and glass-
ware merchant.
Mr. .1. T. Crow»ler, the Cunning
ham Drug Co.
Mr   Fred   < luff,   boot   and   shoe
merchant.
Mr Win. Woodward, Woodward I
Ltd.
Mr. I). H. Kent, Kent Piano Ho MM
Mr .;. ii. MeBobbie, Walk Over
boot  shop.
Mr. H. C. Wilson, boot and shoe
merchant
These gentlemen in addition to
the  spheres   of   influence   repit
sented by their respective buai
nesaea are a commit!.e acting in
conjunction   with    the   executive
officers of the British Columbia
board of the Retail Merchants
Association of Canada, and they
therefore speak for the retail trad
of this Province.
Th- subject  with  whieb  this
deputation is charged is the mat
tcr of the LiUXUry Tax now being
collected in Canada by the retail
era, with particular n ference I ■
certain defects in the tax itself,
and with specific reference to the
method of collection,   In present
ing our views on thia subject we
would wish to emphasise that re
presentations made do not urtae
from a momentary or petty irri
tatmn, nor do the retailers wish
to escape from the burden of Can
a,Jl''»" eitixenehip laid upon them
by the war and  its aftermalfa
I here are certain  features,  ho*fl
ever, in the application of this tax
tC Which retailers us a class feel
justified m entering a protest
baaed upon their actual experi
'''""•   To begin with the word
luxury" is an elastic term.    In
the   present   condition   of   world
mJrke£ '" raw material* a eon
waerable number of artidea which
nayebeen classed aa luxuriea can.
,,,,, be io designated. True econ*
°my hea it. the direction of the
Purchase of good material that
Will stand up to wear.    [\ js not
P**We to place such goodi on
the •helves of the retail atorea today at prices within the exemption
;'7.'V.«l.-dbvtl,eL,,x,,rvTax    1,
\M<f*    The coniequence mux!
"Stably   be,  and   is.  i.lat
public, and particularly the work
ing elan public, are driven to
purchase cheap, inferior mater.,
in wearing apparel, which m nol
economy, but waste   On the other
hand, people in affluent etrcum
stances are not retarded from the
purchase of superfluous luxuriea,
which  the}   ean WW afford,    A-
this  memorandum  ta eon-'-1 - *
with a statement of principl i
r«th«*r than an elaboration of dl
tails, we must aal jroa to ace* i
this statement of fact, w itl
iu*ttrati*m although itioatratiofi
could b<* plentifully luppited if
neeeaaarj
The  method   of  Colli tlOO  now
hi force, as well aa the method of
■-. lion   contemplated   by   **
new regulations ctfwtite Sovcm
ber  first,  throw-   up"ti  the  reU
trade  the  burden  of collecting
taxes from the public, which »?!
rolves i considerable number "■
irritating detail* and add t«» the
general  overhead  of Um retail
business bi slowing up the Hues
foree.    In mani stores the new
method of i ollei   - n which pro
*< ides I i thi use oi ll imps and .»
cancelling machine, means the ad
dttiou "f people to the clerici
itaff for tl i ■ Koreas purpoai ot
looking after the  Government**
Sates, this is no; fiction, but fact,
The business of distributing eom
ii s m  retail calls for  the
HO
lymcnl of a la rue numb*
r 0:
i pie, manj of whom do not re
mam permanently in the bttaineaM
and who have but a traiurienl in
''"rH' >•» it The eompli sti I
regulations provided by the Lux
ttry Tax, call for con entration,
and concentration is impossible In
» retail itore upon busy days
Cases must inevitably ariae in
which saJei people, [gnoranl of
the regulation! will make sales
u"u" Which the luxury Tax is
Chargeable and omit tO make the
charge    An Inspector of the In
a'"I Revenue  Department  would
have power to prosecute a retailer
for s„ei, an infringement which
would gain for the store an on
J,,,:'*aut ttotorietV, apart alto
Jjtner from the injustice of iii
Hi-Mag a fine for an infringement 11)20,
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
113
of regulations which it is impossible to carry out.
The history of the stamp tax on
patent and proprietary medicines
collected  by retail druggists in
Canada, during the last four
yean, affords plentiful illustrations of tills sort of thing.
As   a   class   retailers   are   law
abiding     Tioy   invariably  adopt
an attitude toward Government
regulations which ih meticulous!)
correct, but the regulations go\
erning ih«* collection of the Lux
ury Tax place strong temptations
in the \\t%\ of individuals WhOSC
moral fibre uuiv  not be as Strong
aa some of their fellows, !i does
not require a considerable amount
of ingenuity to evade the tax : .•
common consent between the retailer and his customers. The effect of evasion on the part of one
retail dealer is to weaken confi*
deuce in the public mind m the
retail trade as i wind.- Incidents
are ennatantl) being reported in
which proape live customers have
refuse.! to complete the purchase
of in article when the matter of
the   J.uxnrx    Tax    «;is   broached,
and have stated that thej have
no difficulty in securing Mich
article! fax free elaewhere,
it is our opinion thai no meth«
0d Of Collection which human in
geuuity can devise can succeed <u
getting around this condition,
while the attempt to meet it by
the affixing of stamps to the ulca
slips, simply adds an additional
irritation   to   the   accumulation
which the retail trade and the
public are restive under While
W| can never be satisfied with the
system which makes of the retailer
a tax collector, We are prepared
to endeavour to carry on the
Government's regulations which
call for periodical returns to the
Inland Revenue Department,
pending the repeal of the tax al
together, which is the objective
We   desire   to  accomplish.
In offering these general criti
cietni this deputation wish 10 take
the opportunity of emphasizing
that such criticisms arc not based
upon   theoretical   ob ections,   but
upon actual experience.   The re
tailer and his sales staff come into
contact with thousands of people
and they are in a Unique poll
tion tO interpret public sentiment
and their interpretation of it is
that the public themselves are in
tensely antagonistic tO this system
of tax Collection, This deputation
speaking  for the  retail  trade of
this Province, jN fully aware that.
Canada's war debt must be paid.
Jt il equally impressed with the
necessity for diverting the financial resources of the country from
non-essentials  to  essentials,   and
does not wish its criticism to be
merely destructive.
A   policy  has  been  enunciated
by the Retail Merchants' Association of Canada, assembled in convention in this city, of duly of
this year, and behind that policy
the retail trade of British Columbia stands.    That  policy is that
if the Luxury Tax is to be retained ni principle, it shall be
collected at the source of importation or manufacture, which
would have the effect of placing
the fundi in the hands of the Government by a direct method of collection, involving none of the expense, possibilities of evasion and
continued irritation which arc
characteristic of the present method of collection.
In conclusion we are convinced
that the Luxury Tax itself is
impracticable and that the method
of collection by stamp has intensified existing hostility to the tax
and the Government itself. We
have evidence that a targe number of representative retail establishments throughout the Province
will refuse to use the stamps and
cancelling machine, as provided
in the regulations effective November first.
We ask therefore iu  the name
of the retail merchants of this
province   that   the  Government
will, take into immediate and serious' consideration the situation
which we have outlined and re-
Hive the retail trade from an obligation tO enforce a system which
in their judgement is impracticable,
Respectfully submitted.
M. J.  Phillips, president, B. C
Hoard,
George  SL  Hougham,  secretary.
i'. C.  Hoard.
The reception accorded the depu
tation was courteous and attentive,
it being quite obvious that so far
as the two Ministers were concerned, they were entirely unfamiliar
with the nature of the regulations
Inid  down  by  the   Inland   Revenue
Department, except in the most general and vague manner.
Following the presentation of the
memorandum by the Provincial secretary, an interesting sales demon
stration was conducted by Mr. H.
T. Lockyear, general manager of the
Hudson's Bay Co., of Vancouver,
who produced the stamps in ail their
\arious denominations, together with
the sales slips, upon which imaginary transactions had been recorded,
showing that in many eases it would
become necessary to affix seven or
eight, or even more, stamps, to the
sales slip, which would be handed to
the customer.
In presenting the ease in this
striking manner, which was backed
up by many sound arguments from
other members of the deputation
present, an impression was undoubtedly registered on the Minister's
minds, whieh no subsequent arguments will be able to entirely efface.
At the conclusion of the interviews
the Honourable Arthur Meighen
promised to take the matter up immediately with the Minister of Finance, Sir Henry Drayton, and from
aubsequent reports which have been
received at the Provincial office,
there is every reason to hope that
the representations made by the
British Columbia board of the Retail Merchants1 Association of Canada will have the effect at least of
modifying the regulations considerably, while there is a strong probability that the use of the cancelling
machines and stamps will not be insisted upon at all. Every possible
effort was made by the Provincial
office of the Retail Merchants' Association to supplement their direct
representations to the Premier by
getting into touch with all other
branches of the Association throughout Canada, and with the Dominion
office, seeking similar action in their
respective spheres, and if the hope
that was engendered in the deputation is justified by results, considerable credit will be due to the British
Columbia board in having taken the
initiative.
EVERYBODY DOING IT!
The Canadian Manufacturers "Association say that the Luxury Tax is
causing unemployment through reduction in business, injuring business, discouraging the investment of
capital and on the other hand that
it is securing comparatively little
revenue for the (ioverninent. They
are asking for its abolition.
Further Luxury Tax matters are dealt
with on Page 124.
You  Have Not Read This Journal, Until You   Have Studied the Advertisements. 114
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Moveinhc
B.C. Merchants Who Have Made Good
3.-WM. H. BONE, Victoria
Mr. Bone Has Pinned His Faith From His $15.00 a Month Start in Life,
to  Business  Integrity   Begotten  of His  Religious  Principles and to
Hard Work, Total Abstineice and Physical Fitness,
Wm. II.  Hone was  home  in  the
town  of Bowmanville,   Ontario,   m
the year 1855.   His father was from
Cornwall, and his mother from Yorkshire.   They came to Canada in very
early days and   were   married   in
Montreal, later settling in Bowmanville.   In the year 1859, his father
came to Victoria, remaining there.
however, for a very short time. The
motive that influenced him to come
was discovery of gold on the Fraser
River.   On his arrival in B.C., many
were   returning   from   the   Fraser
River, giving discouraging accounts
of their experiences, and he decide 1
to  return  while   he  had  sufficient
money to take him back.
Later, gold was discovered in the
Cariboo and in 1862, he again decided to come to B.C. In 1863 he
sent for his family and this was
when W. II. Bone made his first
appearance in Victoria; he was eight
years of age and is now entering his
sixty-sixth year. So he has been a
resident of Victoria for fifty-seven
years. His education was confined
to attendance at several private and
semi-public schools.
The   opportunities   afforded   in
not eery urgently required ris
• ''!■•• Horn, i remember tl it I •
some considerable period of this tirm
we only had communication from
..— •*•   anwiueu   in U(, on|v }K,,j communication from
those early days were very different San   r>an,;s(.n  ooee  U1  ?.<„  wePk«
to those provided today;  however, yitT ,nanv yetr| {h), e0B,*j,g Mf ,„,.
he managed to obtain    a   common San j-Vaneis,, steamer was regarded
school education that has seen him M a t,r,.at ,|av for UH     jt  WftH tp,.
safely through so far.   In the year (.ust„m ,„ ,..,,;,, a Rag ((Vi.r .ht, „M
1871, Mr. T. X. Hibben was looking I)riani   ,-,,,,.,   mnmannk,   ,|m,   fh„
for a boy to fill a vacancy caused by SaI1 Francieco itearaer was in sight
the resignation of a boy friend of aI|(|  immediately  the  people  began
lo eon " > —   *
young Bone's, who recommended
Mr. Hibben to secure his service,.
W. H. B. was pleased ami so were
his parents to secure what at that
time was considered a very desirable position, the salary paid being
$15.00 per month. His duties comprised what is usually given to boys
entering, sweeping out the store, do*
livering papers and parcels and making himself generally usefu
tofngregate around the po», ofr.ee
;""!1I- N Hibben Coa, w, „.„.
!" ,f,,,s" very early days a treat
Jf^ of attraction, Ournewsp^*
wwrtjwnt was very active. I have
"J ' « patrons standing m line
*A,tln& anxiously to obtain the var-
;;---Papet,,,,ev,ub,enb,|f()r
'V   ',   ''"l as',|"'"l"l trade in thi.
''»"'"»'<»• department,    I w
SW^e»^nK  53
....    i
member  often   having   to   work   all
'When I recall the experiences of night.     Victoria   at   that   tune   was
those  very  early  days   I   see   how the distributing point for the whole
vast the changes are," said Mr. Hone of B.C.   Vancouver was not dreamed
to our interviewer.   "When it is re- of    Wharf Street In those days was
membered that there were no rail- the wholesale distributing centre of
way communications either through the country."
Canada or the U.S.A., our means of The firm of T. .V Hibben Co,, the
obtaining mail and merchandise was well-known booksellers and station-
via Panama, and in case of articles ers of Victoria,  was established  in
Deal With Our Advertisers:    They Make This
1 *.*■** and probablj comes next to the
Hudson i  !ui,   i'«,   for «$*«♦  m  \'h-
toria, Thry 'now oeeup) Um Bight
former!) known a*   Fort property
and   was   so   Occupied   by   the   Hud
•W I   Baj   Co .   from   I*** i  u,   l$60
The Historical Soctet** has placed i
brass plate on the corner with the
following inscription
Phe   Fori   of   th-*   Honoural
Hudson*  Ba)   Company,  occupied
this lite from t*-4 r t„ |$*jo    \ ■ ,
tablet t* placed on the \>: comer
to preaervi aa ancient landmark
the Historical Sodef} of Victoria "
In the year l***! a partnership was
forme I between Mr T N Rjbbe*
G w Katumrrer and Mr Hone n,
the rear 189G Mr Hibben died and
•uhatonentl) Mr « w Kammem
paaaed away Mr Kammerer'a in
Icreat was purchaaed bj  Un  ll
ben and  Mr   Hone ami "has *o eon
tinned Up till about I yrar ago when
Mr* Hibben died    It is noi anli
pated that a joint stoek eompanji
will be formed between the *h,% of
Mrs  Hibhen and Mr. Bone    Row
ever thia has not  been definite
decided upon
Por mam ;., «rs Mr  Hone has been
entirely entrusted with lhe managi
maul of the business and today the
firm is more favourably circttfflJtan«
ed than ever before Tiwir praatnt
buaincsa location it one of the best
m the city, being situated on Goi
eminent street and It la generally
admitted that there hi D0t any other
better location
lhe  Hibben Bone  building  ia ■
fOUr      storey       reinforced      eouerete
banning-    The  Ren,  occpig,  ,|„.
main  floor, approximate *dia  being
i :iil ™* '""'"■"'i'1'' rate on the
Wilding is only 40 cents |0 it ean be
judged by the rate that the building
i« considered a safe Nsk I
Outside of business Mr. Hone has
"Iwavs enjoyed outdoor sports and
whilst  he Ii ,mw i,,  his s.xtv sixth
year he enjoy! a game of both tennis
»"d golf and occasionally playi Bad-
mjnto» ««** baa for some years taken
^lwt?«« "f foe Y.M.c.v buaineas
gymnaaium classes, To ba medically
examined at 60 for insurance and
Official  Publication  Possible at 12.00 a Year, 1920.
IHE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
115
to be given an excellent  report on
his physical condition la surely something to be envied I
Mr, Bona married when ha was
twenty.three IL- has all his life
been a total abstainer, both from
SpiritUOUS liquors and smoking.    Be
is a member of the Methodist church
and a prohibitionist. "The latter
just at present is not very popular,"
he said. "I am confident, however,
that it will be when the general
public realize what (Jovernment
control will develope into."
AMOMQ THE UTAiLBK
Bdgewood  Co-operative   association ban been voluntarily wound up.
K   Bailey, of Kholt. is reported
closed out.
A. W. Bleaadall, <«f Pernio, hi dead.
IL- was in the drug and stationery
buaineaa them.
Clover &  Meekijohn, grocers of
be-no.    we    bear,    were    recently
burned out
Mrs Ida Bowcott has sold her
gr«n cry buaineaa at Sidney to .1. F.
dennej, of Victoria
Sinee our L»st iasue, Bogardus,
Wiekens. Ltd. of Vancouver, baa
suffered a loss In fire to their paint
and glass stock.
0, W Bennett, of Vancouver, i>
reported sold out.
The I1, c Gramophone & Talking
Slachine Co.,  Ltd, creditors have
met and all claims were to be m by
October Slat,
Thos Host haa sold out hia cigar
store toCharlea Allan, at Vancouver.
11 Tomkiuson, of Grindrod, has
sold Jus gent ral store to afcCaabland
&  Spencc
A meeting of the creditors of the
Pioneer toffee | Spice afilla, Ltd..
of Vancouver, will be held December 8tb,
T H. Wyatt, drygooda, baa removed  from   Vancouver  to  South
Vancouver.
The City Bargain shops of Vic
toria have dissolved.
J, S.  Batch has retired from the
McKeiurie Street  Grocery  al   Vie*
toria.
W. M. Ritchie, of Victoria, bas
sold    his   interest    in    Primley    vv.
Ritchie,   Ltd.,    bicycles,   sporting
goods, etc,
II W. Coinui, of Victoria, is sidling his stock of suit eases, jewellery,
etc, by auction ami discontinuing
buaineaa,
F. .1. Carter bas been appointed
liquidator of the Harvey Coffee &
Spice Mills, Ltd., of Victoria.
Spencer   Meads,   butcher   of   Vic
toria, bas sold out to Gilbert Bryant.
dames Adam has purchased the
stock of the Western Grocery Co.
Kstate at  Victoria.
Mary  JanOBtack   has  bought   the
grocery buaineaa at Pernio lately
< arried on by Joa Bublick.
Glover & Bleiklejohn, grocers of
Fernie,  were recently burned out.
.1. F. Jenner, of Victoria, has sold
his grocery buaineaa to W. I. Randall.
O'Connell'a, Ltd.. Victoria, recently had their stock damaged by fire.
It is understood the loss was covered
by insurance.
The title of the Granite Trading
Association, Ltd., has been changed
to the Co-operative Granite Trading
Association.
F.. M. M. Johnstone; of Jubilee,
did not sell out to F. M. Begg,
grocer, as anticipated.
C. 11 Tomliaon, grocer of .Jubilee.
Bold out  to \V   I'. Nursey.
The hardware business of A. D.
Dennick, of Vancouver, has been
sold to A. W. Wallace.
Mrs. Martha Whitely. of Vancouver, is contemplating selling out.
Fred K. Me.Mnnn, of Merritt. is
reported as having sobl his lot and
building and discontinued his confectionery and grocery store.
Charles Ta-sie, grocer, has sold
out to A. S. I'lrieh. at New Westminster
A. Hayden, of North Vancouver, is
reported negotiating sale of his business of a baker to J. W. White
A Theodore, of Vancouver, has
sold out his confectionery store to
a Chinese firm.
A. C. Thompson, grocer of Vancouver, bas assigned.
The Linden Grocery, of Victoria,
have admitted Haul L. Green, as
partner.
II Criguon is now at 975 Rohson
Street. Vancouver.   IIis grocery was
formerly at 894 Granville,
W. IV Nursey's grocery is now at
Jubilee.    Be  wns formerly at  2624
Albert street, Vancouver,
F. D, Brtton has succeeded II.
Don "an  in  his grneerv  business at
42nd and Victoria, South Vancouver,
Warner & Moore have taken Warner's Market at 25th and Fraser
Street, Vancouver.
A. A. Arnold, of Arnold & Quigley,
has been elected to the executive of
the Vancouver Branch, R.M.A., vice
William Uickson, resigned.
G. Hansen has sold out his grocery
at Langlev Prairie, to 0. Anderson
& Co.
W. H. Singer has bought the grocery business of S. Butler, at
Milner.
The grocery business of K. Harris
at Dunderave is now owned by F.
C. Harris.
A. I. Bind, the popular secretary
of the Port Aiberni branch R.M.A.
is in the General Hospital, Vancouver, having come successfully
through an operation. He is on the
way to complete recovery. He is
being well looked after by the Vancouver office.
Mr. Sharpe, of the Vpres store,
Vancouver, has sold out to F. B.
Blythe.
F. A. Young, of 65 Lonsdale Avenue, North Vancouver, has bought
out Putnam & Suit, grocers.
W. Brown has bought out W.
Laurence, the Veterans Delicatessen
on Rohson Street. Vancouver.
The Elite Store (Mr. McCaskill)
las sold out her business on Granville Street South, Vancouver, to W.
Peters.
The Economy Meat Co. has bought
Stewart's Market (I). II. Stewart)
of Vancouver.
The following companies of interest to retail merchants have recently been incorporated in British
Columbia:
Overwaitea, Ltd. s New Westminster) 615 Dunsmuir Street. Vancouver. $10,000. Acquiring the business
carried on by R. C. Kidd under the
same name at New Westminster.
Healers in tea. coffee, etc.
Van ouver Trading Co.. Ltd., 136
Water Street. Vancouver. $'20.1)00.
General    agents    and    commission
merchants in produce,
Vancouver Supply Co., Ltd.. 186
Water Street. Vancouver. $15,000.
Dealers iu Produce.
The following partnerships of interest to the retail trade of the
Province have been recently registered :
Knglish & Scotch Woollen Co.—
Louis Alfred Gareau, at Victoria.
The Pacific Bakery—G, A. Far-
raut. at Marpole.
Fairview Shoe Co.—Jas. Haddad.
at Vancouver. 116
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Kovembct
TI1K CAREFUL BUYEB feels that be is running a grave rsk m purchasing
any brand of underclothing with which he is not familiar.   The scarcit)
of material has forced so many inferior garments on the market thai
the wise purchaser has learned to let a trade-mark be his guide a trademark
that has a house with a sound reputation behind it
The name "Penmans" has been synonymous uith quality underwear for
so many years that you may, with a feeling of assurance, stock up with these
well-known lines, knowing that they will meet with a readv response from
your trade.
r&nmans
UNDER WEAR
'"CHE STANDARD OF EXCELLENCE"
Penmans Limited, Paris.
Also Makers of Hosiery and Sweater Coats. im ™B BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
CREDIT RETAILING OF
VICTUALS
By A. 8pncc, Retail Merchant of
New Westminster, B.C.
Every retailers' publication eon
tains one  or more  articles dealing
with complaints against   tin- abuses
the present retail credit syatcm II
suffering under, and  various pana
eeaa are offered.
The writer of this is of the opinion
that a radical change in the credit
retailing  is not  only justified,  but
timely and Imperative and advocates
the total abolishing of ere.lit retail
ing in vietuala I groceries, meats,
firth, milk, bread, etc., against which,
no lieu can be held and gives the
following reasons for BUCh drastic
measures
117
STORE WINDOW OF W. R. KING d CO., OF PENTICTON
This in oto« of the pictures that Secretory Hougham brought back from his Okanagan
trie It ti certainly worthy of a first-la** city. Mr. King unserves the sine jna non
Of triado*! Creating as •Hub-: not as much," as possible. It he had loaded up
his display with a eongiomeratlor f tics, hnts, overcoats, umbrellas, etc, the
picture would bave given an Impression of a junk shop window rather than that
of mer,* fttrtttshtags. The effective floor covering, the tasty arrangement of the
benches ami pedestals, the introductions of baskets of foliage, the attractive background, ami the general ■balance,'' all combine to make this window a decidedly
creditable one
The selling of food on credit seems    ,.Vl.r fortft|-e hlm for t|1(, ,.asll ston,s    in beinp proteetetl  by law for his
to me to be a survival of the custom
of grubstaking, a* practiaed m the
pioneer day*,  and  under pioneer
conditions.
The trader outfitted the proapec
tor*, muors, loggers, trappers, fish
erinen, farmers, timber cruiser-, etc.
His share m the venture or the mar
gin  of  hia  profits  then   took   well
care of the risk assumed, which riak
was mor<- of an accidental ami lata
of a moral nature,
His  customers   were   personally
well known to him and the eaaca of
dead beating a  rare exception
.Since then conditions have totally
changed and is credit retailing for
victuals in view of today's changed
conditions anachromiatic I
1. (»nly a  relatively small mini
ber of his customer* and their trust
worthiness   are   sufficiently   .veil
known to the credit giver, the majority of these customers arc con
tinually shifting about.
2, The income of the purchaaing
public, in toto, is today on a more
stable basis.    Wages, salaries,  rent
als,    etc.,    having    superseded    tin
chance incomes of the pioneer,
S, A deadly competition of grow,
ing intensity has arisen. An ever
increasing number of cash stores, ot
co-operative and departmental stores
whittle the margin of profit down
to danger point, yet  the credit  M
when they are flush again; in many just claim.   Just watch the bullying
caaea  not   only   not   having  settled cunning, sneering and evasive con-
thetr accounts with the Samaritan, duct   of   the   majority   of  debtors
but even turned mto open or poten- against   judge  as   well   as  against
ttal enemies against their creditors plaintiff.   And they get away with
when asked to pay.    They have to it  too.    All  the  merchant receives
suffer serious handicaps under pro- is again a promise (?) to pay.
-fressive   credit   restrictions,   under       of    the    capias    law    and    the
discrimination by manufacturers and garnishee   laws,   the   less  said   the
wh"bsaicrs   m   favour  of  the  cash
stores, and under the fact that their
tied up capital prevents them from
favourable purchases.
.*». Firms selling automobiles,
pianos, sewing machines, gramophones, farm implements, and all
other kinds of machinery; real estate sellers, hotel keepers, lawyers.
.t''., in short all other sellers protect
themselves by strong associations, by
provisoes, clauses, rental contracts,
mortgages, notes, rights of seizures,
liens, etc,
It may be true that the single
amounts for BUCh debts are usually
larger than a single individual grocery bill, yet 1 venture to assert that
the total of all outstanding victual
lulls iu Canada, at anv time, is many
What  were the results of
efforts by deputations and
better,
all  the
memorials to parliament to get anything like the protection afforded to
other lines of business—none!
6. The ease with which many
credit stores open an account, without asking for references and without making enquiries, leads to extravagance, is the cause of many getting into unnecessary debts, and is
the initial cause of the downfall of
many an individual who otherwise
would have hustled and kept
straight.
The responsibility for such moral
accidents rest far more with the
credit giver than with the credit re-
eeiver.
The losses sustained in credit bus-
times larger than the total sum ot    iness through non-paying customers
debts for those Other mentioned objects, yet we arc not benefitted by
any legal protection of practical
value.
are distributed among and charged
to the honestly paying customers.
Where is there any ethical justification for tins'?
All these enumerated facts must
Theoretically  a  retailer  in  foodstuff may have a small protection by    bring home to you that credit retail-
taileri try to meet' the cash trailers'    process of law. ing in victuals is obsolete, suicidal
price cuts by cutting to the same       m ,os,   of ^forcing collection    and.mmoral and may convince you
level and give credit and service be-    j)V |aw   jn -jm0 nnij money, is out
sides. 0f aj| proportion lo each single case
4. The city as well as the rural of debt; and then whoever tried to
eredit Storekeeper in expected to tide collect by small debt court proceed-
over slack times, finance enterprise* ings (or have only just been present
of pleasures of an cver-incrcasing as an onlooker at BUCh a eourO must
number of his customers, who, how- have lost the last bit ot naive beliet
of the necessity of transforming this
system of merchandizing from a
credit basis to cash basis.
Suppose bank managers would
confess to their directors and shareholders, that they have loaned out
the resources of their institutes with-
1
You Have Not Read This Journal, Until You   Have Studied the Advertisement*. 118
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
November
out legal protection, without enquiries, without interest, without guarantees, and that by havinc so acted,
done harm to many clients, turned
others into potential enemies and
lowered the prestige of their trade
in the eyes of the public. What
would n(> tne verdict?
Some injustices, abuses or absurdities are SO inveterate or of s1 ch
magnitude that they dull reason and
paralyze action.
FRUIT, VEGETABLES AND MILS
SUBJECT   TO   NEW
REGULATIONS
British Columbia importers have
been advised that besides the parcel
and package amendment to the food
laws of Canada further regulations
had been passed calling for close
inspection of fruits, vegetables and
milk.
The orders reads as follows:
"Xo person shall import, nor
shall there be imported, any fruit
or vegetables, or fruit or vegetable
products, canned, bottled, dried,
evaporated or otherwise preserved
for food, or any milk, condensed,
evaporated, dried or otherwise pre
served for food, unless the requirements of this section are strictly adhered to.
"Collectors oi customs shall not
clear any importation of fntit or
vegetables, or fruit or vegetable products, canned, bottled, dried, evaporated, or otherwise preserved for
food, or any milk, condensed, evaporated, dried or otherwise preserved for food, unless such shipment ss
accompanied by an affidavit in duplicate taken before a justice of thy
peace, or other peraon duly author
iaed (in the country of origin) to
attest such declaration.
"The form of declaration, which
must be addressed tO the collector of
customs,  must  state  that   the  ship
ment   described   is   manufactured
from sound raw materials, and that
its manufacture was carried on tinder the sanitary conditions provided
for in the regulations, that the pro
duets are jit the time of shipment
sound, wholesome and fit for human
food, that the containers and packages show thereon the true name
and address of the manufacturer, Of
of the first dealer, and that the fjejv
eription of the contents is correct
Place and date must I.,. ihoWU and
also the name and address i»f the
actual manufacturer, name and address of shipper, name and address
of comsignce,  number of packages,
number o! container* in each pack
age. name of product, Identification
marks, signature of shipper, the stg
nature of the person before whom
the declaration is sworn.
"All fruit or vegetablee, or fruit
or vegetable products^ canned, hot
tied, dmd. evaporated or otherwiae
preserved tor food, or anv nulk, eon-
denaed, cvaporatedf dried or other
wise   preserved   for   f«od,   shall   be
tnbjeet to inch inepeetion in the Do
minion of Canada as may be deemed
ne canary or advisable, and any fruit
of vegetables, or fruit or vegetable
producta, canned, bottled, dried, ova
poratad or otherwiae preserved Fof
food, or any milk, e-ondettee I, eva|
ated, dried or otherwise preaerved
for food, that doea not •■■ nf* no to
(hi  reouircment* of  the*.*  regula
lions  and  the  eppendieea  thereto
shall, upon condemnation bj an inspector, be forfeited,   Such samples
of importa aa may be deemed oe**e*i
sary by the m*pe-te»r to ha used for
testing   for   grading,    for   -piattty,
quantity or purity shall ba furnished
bv the importer frr*- of anv chart*''
but the veterinary, dtreetor-ejenoral
shall furnish inch importer with a
report of the examination of sai I
sample or sample* within a reaaon
able time
B.C. CREAM CHEESE
This is the best selling Cream Cheese on the Market. Buy it Direct Iron the Manufacturers
READ OUR TEMPTING OFFER
^ZZT* lTm ^ da!e of this •»•» of the B.C. Retailer, we will pay all express
ft gJTZ1 w °aSe °r m0re <6aCn CaM Containin«two d0Mn Pac^ea of B.C
Cream Cheese) to any grocery store or dairy in the Province of British Columbia
N0TE:_0n One Case Order We Will Pay One.half of th, Expr«, Charge.
T1"S ''"'*that the rmsit e08t<" >■"' »'" be $1.90 per dozen. The priec paid by retail
P ere nght here in the city of Vancouver
ThlS ^ ;""1 ""•, ' of deli™7 *» azures y f r,,,,, .s|„„k 11Ml| >:M
customers,
A> Xms time approach* and you, fml ahh h ,„   , ,
your shelves hut dont forge, they'll want ft C. CREAM CHEESE
Manufactured by
The McQueen Produce Cn   I u\
25 Pender Street West ,M'    lj°*»   *'"*•
VANCOUVER,  B.C.
rtk, ro>.
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
119
WILL B.C. PARTICIPATE?
When the American and Canadian
delegates of the Retail Drygoods
Aaaociationa arrive on their aehedul-
ed trip through Ureal Britain, the)
will find that England, under the
dire tion   of   Lord  Cur/on,   has  ar
ranged I eomplete itinerary through
the principal retmi eitiee of the
United Kingdom, U is a return
visit for the trip the British merchants made  through  the  United
States  and   Canada,   and   in   every
community where the visitors are
expected, local delegations have already been appointed to make full
arrangements for their entertain
men? The leading merchants and
the Chambers of Commerce are coi
la bo rat m j*
Tiie first ten days, according to
present [dans, will be spent m Lor.
don, where the delegates will be
feted by the Foreign Office and the
Lord Mayor     Automobile trips will
be made to points of hiatoricaJ interest and to the great trading centres
near by, and  then  the hosiery dis
trvtji of 8eotland and Lancaahire
will be visited. A week will beapeot
m Inapecting the Yorkahire textile
nulls  and   a   week   in   the   Midlan 1
counties, Birmingham had Stratford-
on Avon, and the Shakespearean dik
tn t«  will  also  be  me]tided  in  the
itinerary
"If   possible,"   say*   Mr.   .1     R
(^tulter, Jr.. secretary of the London
Drapere1 chamber of Tjrade, "we
hope to give the delegatea an oppor*
tunity, during their visit, to tour
Ireland   for  a   week,    British   mer
ohanta feel indebted to the merchants
of America and Canada for the great
kindness shown them during their
trip   through   these   eountries,   and
they  would like to show their viss
tors a really good time on their trip
through Oreat Britain to reeiprocate
thin kindness."
HIGH PRICES
A woman, we are told, was buying
a pair of sciaaora at a departmental
store ami the price aaked was a dollar.    She   suggested   that   B   dollar
was I big priee.   The clerk explain
ed  that  steel   was higher.    Steel  is
generally quoted by the ton, and the
ebanees are there would not be ten
eents worth of steel in the sciaaors,
Clothing ooncerua in the states and
Canada that have recently diseovcr-
ed a falling off In buying, declare
that people have reached the point
where they  won't  buy at  the high
prices,  and   that   prices  must   eome
down.   An American manufacturer
claims thai high wages have been high coat of merchandise and labor,
the mam cause of high prices. He eoupled with small profits forever
stated that pocket makers got $100
a week. Whatever the cause, they
eertainiy hae been getting at the
people's    pockets   The    Uxbridge
.Journal.
VANCOUVER   READY-TO-WEAR
MERCHANT MAKES IMPORTANT
MOVE
The removal of Mr. D. K. Book's
ready-to-wear  clothing  store  from
117 BaStingS Street  West to No, LiT
marks another era in the progress
made by this old established firm.
For the peel 15 years the store has
been well known to the citizens of
Vancouver.
Speaking of the reasons which
have prompted the chance of address
Mr. Book s.ud: "Despite the bigh
eost of living and the apparent ban!    should make the most of their op-
r»h may be in front of us    portunity to save on their insurance
keeps an executive at its wits' ends
to show that profit at the end of the
fiscal year. Present indications
would lead us to believe that prices
now have a downward tendency although labour will in all probability
still continue at the present high
wages. Therefore, the only means
apparently to enjoy the profits is
by lower overhead expense.
The seemingly unimportant items
in many instances are the difference
between succesB and failure. This
is particularly true in fire insurance,
so often relegated to an agent without attention being given to its cost.
Efficient administration is the keynote of the successful merchant of
today and the survival remains to
the fittest or to the most efficient.
As a means toward this efficiency
and     greater    profits,    merchants
I have io much faith in the country
gem. rally and the city of Vancouver
in particular, that I have selected
this time in whieh to enlarge my
premises, Tin* new premises at 137
Hastings Street West will provide
three tunes as much accommodation,
and will, in addition, be 8 daylight
store    By that 1 mean." continued
Mr Book, "that it will not be ne-
cessary to use artificial light,   This
is i ureal advantage, as it enables
our Customers better to judge their
their selections."
by using the service of the Retail
Merchants' Association.
SURVIVAL OF THE FITTEST
Tlnsc are days that test the ability  of  the   man   in   business.    The
CANADA WITHOUT ARMOUR
Armour & Co. announce that it
has closed out its business in Canada, including a packing house at
Hamilton. Ont, and selling agencies
at St. John, X B.. Sydney, Hamilton,
Montreal and Toronto.
The supply of hogs in Canada is
insufficient to keep the packing
plant running, it was explained, and
the tariff on importation of dressed
meats makes shipments to the selling agencies from Chicago prohibitive.
OH, MY YOUNG FRIENDS DO BE CAREFUL"
'Pairplay," Vtnoouvw,
A FUTURE BREACH OF PROMISE ACTION
Her Lawyer: "Besides these love letters, we have this interesting film
of the actual proposal, taken through the key-hole."
Deal With Our Advertiser.:    They Make This Official Publication Po.tible at $2.00 a Year. !'
120
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Nov*? tithe
i
[•j
OUR LEGAL COLUMN
Conducted by L. Dashwood Jones,
Solicitor to the B.C. Board R.M.A.
of Canada.
We have made arrangements with the
legal adviser of the B.C. Board of the
R.M.A.. Mr. L. Dashwood Jones, barrister
of Vancouver, to conduct a legal column
in this journal, thus placing at the disposal of our subscribers another free
service. The 25th of the month is the
latest for enquiries to be received to be
answered in the following month's issue.
Full particulars affecting the case must
be submitted. Address all enquiries to
our office, 203 London Building. Vancouver.
"Jos. C. asks: The yearly lease of
my store ran out recently and 1 am
now a monthly tenant. The landlord
has made several advances in rent
and recently advised nie in the middle if the month tlmt the fen? for
the following month would advance
$10.00. I have refused to accept this
l.oiiee.   What is my legal position'*
A. Anv provision in vour former
lease not repuganl  to a mon)hIy
tenancy whieh you are now holding
under by inferem e, would by implication be incorporated in such
monthlv tenancy and subject to the
contrary being shown owing to the
above, you are entitled to one
month'8 ootice of advance of rent
)r to quit. The rule being: In eaae
of tenancies other than from year
to year and in the absence of special
stipulations, "reasonable" notice
must be given, and in the case of
weekly and monthly tenancies a notice equal in length to the period of
the tenancy is sufficient notice. A
notice to quit to be effective must
be given so as to expire on and with
the last day of the period of the
tenancy.    "Reasonable'"  notice  be
ing a matter of "fact," t}"' »»*>•'■
rule is subject to be rebutted in anj
particular case.
Grace W. aaka; If I pa) my rent
iu advance have I to give 3U day*
notice  before  leaving  the  premiss
Mv tenancy is a monthly one *
A.    You   would   have   to   give   B
month's notice, expiring on and with
the last day of the period of the ten*
ancy, unless your base hi for one
mouth   certain   when   no   notice   is
necessary,  Payment in advance does
not enter into the matter of notice
unless particularly agreed upon and
payment of rent in advance m no
discharge to the tenant unices when
the day arrives, the lessor is stilt
entitled to receive and give i die-
charge for the rent
a. C. P. asks Does the pubii nation
of a notice in the prcefl that a man
is no longer legally responsible for
the   debt-,   of   his   vufe   protect   him
againat legal suit for recover)  ol
debts  contracted   by   ber  after  the
publication of such notice I
A. Vour question does not giva
enough particulars in order to as
Bwer shortly. The above depei ds on
the relationship of the husband and
wife: A husband is h,-; '■• on a
contract  made by his wife fa pur
suance of her authority aa an agent
of necessity. That is, a wife i* entitled io pledge her husband h credit
for necessaries as Ins agent, though
he may have given express notice to
the contrary, unless it can be shown
that she is adequately provided for
and this even where the husband and
wife are living apart with the bus
band's consent, or she was forced to
live apart from the husband through
his cruelty, adultery <>r desertion.
I low ever,  where a  Wife elopes  from
bar buaband or liven apart from hil
without   hi*   coneent   or   without
cause, abe baa J!" implied authorit)
!<» pledge bis credit, nor baa ihi
even for absolute necessaries after
having committed an act of adulter)
even if she were turned out of doors
by ber husband, without any means
of support, unices he either connive I
nt. or has condoned fh«* offence   an I
the publication of a notice In the
latter ease u*'s protect the husban i
OFFICERS OF THE B C   BOARD
RMA  AND BRANCH
SECRETARIES
BC   Board
Preset. ..•   \|   .1   Phillips, Ken i
I'smishing's   v a  Westminster
Firs" Vice President, Uarvej ltur<
phy, Hen's r^urnishtngs, Nai
Second V*ie« !'*•• a      ' J  ll  As
irell   f >■ pal Ii ■ i ' Store, I "Inlliv, ,
Ho.u   '}>• us    |>tr i 1 II   Kent   K     I
Piano * •>. Ltd . Vat     ner
S- *••'.I-;,   i.  ■  s  Hougham,
Branch SectrttartM
Armstrong   A   I>  I'-nauh
Craobrook   v*   \i   Barrii
Duncan   ll  A  Thorpe
Kamloop*   .1   |{   Colli
Kclowna    \  8 Wed**
Ladner    C    V   CbemberUyne
Uerritl   0 E  Howes
Nanaimo* J  I.  Ward
Hon Bee   W  i: Griffith
S't-lson   K  P Gig ■•
Nen Westminster   Walter V Ing
Hon  s«»i, CI  H Jackson,
Penticton   Sydney Clark,
Port Albtrni   A  I  Bind
8 Van ou\er   i,  k  Powler
Vancouver   dec 8  Hougham
Hon Bee . J !•  M**rrile* i
Vernon    .1   MeOaaktll
Baking Powder
CONTAINS NOAI.IM
Our Bi(r Advertising Campaign Now On
Newspapers    -    Bill Boards    -    Trade Papers
The demand will be greater—Order Now
The W. II. Malkhi Co., Limited
VANCOUVER    NANAIMO    VICTORIA
■«.
iiimif,|iiii-*Miii»ii
*~i***i-1 -mrmtjin r bmhuii. jim 1920.
TIIK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
121
ONUS ON RETAILER
Sale of Drugs and Patent Medicines
Subject to New and Important
Regulations.
Consumption of drugs m Canada
in  being  cut   down   by   the  amend
menti to the Drug Aet brought into
force   til)**  year,   according  to   Dr.
Henry Baaoo Voung, chairman of
the Provincial Hoard of Health, who
ha* just returned from the Dominion health conference tit Ottawa.
A summary of the new regulations
brought   lore  by   Dr.   Young show
these new requirements:
1   Opittm and derivatives are for
bidden in medicines for internal use.
2, Cocaine and ita salts or prepar*
ationa  must   not   be  present   hi an;,
proprietary or patent medicine
3, The content of alcohol is Sim
Ited.
4.   The      presence      of     Scheduled
drugs must be declared on the label.
5. Drugs must be designated by
tlnir commonly used name    For ex
ample, ecetaniiide must not be call
ed phonylacetamidej nor strychnine
be spoken of «»* nui vomica.
6. No patent   medicine shall b
labelled as a cure for anv disease.
7. No false, misleading or exaggerate*} claims shall be made on the
label or wrapper
8   Certain derivatives of coal tar
are forbidden in infant remedies.
Every article covered by this Act,
must now be designated by a special
number,   known   a*  Its   registration
number, dearly printed on the wrap
per and label tO identify the article,
No one may aell anv patent luedi
cine iu bulk, but  only  m packages
or bottles
The   storekeeper   is   llllble   to   the
penalties for a violation of the law,
according to the regulations.
"The inspector who purchase-.
any patent or proprietary article re*
presents the public, ami hia dealings
like those of any ordinary consumer,
are   with   the   immediate   vendor."
Professor ,1, A. Amyot, Deputy Mm
inter of Health, explains     "Hence,
if fraudulently dealt with, he has
recourse against the vendor, and
only against the vendor. The vendor must, therefore, protect himsclt
by assuring himself that the article
sold by bun is a legally saleable
article, under this Act. No vendor
at retail can escape this responsbil-
ity, which he carries in virtue of his
business,
'The pos.ses.sion of a registration
number docs not of itself authorize
the sale of any article covered by
this Act. All vendors of articles
covered by this Act should protect
themselves by making sure that the
manufacturer has not only secured
registration under the Act and has
properly labelled his product, but
has also paid his license fee for the
current year. In addition to the
penalties fixed, the stock held by
any vendor under conditions not in
conformity with the requirements of
the Act. may be seized and de-
st roved."
PROTECTION COMPANIES
AMALGAMATE
The news comes to hand that the
B.C, District Telegraph Co.. Ltd.,
has amalgamated with Fire Patrols.
Ltd., both of Vancouver,
The amalgamation of two protection companies must result in organization and equipment that enables
the rendering oi services more efficient ami up to date than iu any
other city on this continent. For
instance, the men on patrol are uniformed and armed, every man being
experienced at the work and having
seen active service in France.
The company enjoys the strong
and hearty support of the fire and
police departments and fire underwriters, and the board of directors
is composed of well-known men of
Vancouver, with all local shareholders.
Subscribers for various services
include practically every prominent
business house iu the city, as well as
the    railway   companies,    Dominion
Government, etc., and in one month
the company were instrumental in
frustrating three burglaries with no
loaa to subscribers concerned,
The services consist of: Central
station system of night watch signals, electric supervision of automatic sprinkler systems, electric protection against burglary, automatic and
manual fire alarms, fire protection
advisory department, watchmen's
patrol, merchants' police, light control, special salvage.
It is the new company's intention
to establish and maintain a patrol
system of merchants' police and a
combined niuhl watch and fire patrol" which will afford the merchants
of this city tin- very best protection
possible. Its headquarters are at
516 Hastings Street West, and it
cordially invites inspection at any
hour.
The fact that subscribers' interests
are looked after and their business
premises guarded at all hours during
their absence, also that watchmen
for any emergency are supplied for
any length of time from a night upward, shows that the company is out
to please and to do the thing thoroughly.
All fire calls are received simultaneously with fire department,
which is directly connected to city
fire alarm systems and answered at
brigade speed.
The managing director is Mr. C.
11. Daniels, of the Ureal North Western Telegraph Co. and B.C. District
Telegraph & Delivery Co.. and the
general superintendent is Mr. 0. L.
Lister, of Fire Patrols. Ltd.
NEGLIGENCE NO EXCUSE
The Vancouver Short Weight Bylaw is given below in tabloid form.
The inspector has been busv and
several eases arc pending. The bylaw provides for a fine of one hundred dollars and costs for each offence :
"2. It shall be unlawful for any
person to sell or deliver any commodity to any other person in the
City of Vancouver of a lesser quantity or lighter weight than that
which is contracted for by the party
purchasing the same or than that
which is represented or held out to
be the quantity sold or delivered by
the vendor to the purchaser.
"3. Mr. Charles Jones. License
Inspector, is hereby appointed inspector for the purpose of carrying
out the provisions of this by-law.
"4. It shall be the duty of the
inspector appointed pursuant to the
next  preceding section:
"(a) To investigate and check up
the quantities and short or light
weights and other measures of gooda
or commodities sold or delivered in
the city from time to time, and to
entertain and hear complaints respecting short weights of measures
which any person in the city may
present to him;
"(b). Where reasonable grounds
for suspecting any short or light
weights, or short measures have been
sold or delivered in the city, to any
purchaser purchasing any commodity to weigh the same, and to check
the weight or measure the same.
"5. Any person obstructing or preventing the inspector appointed here-
under shall be deemed to be guilty
of an infraction of this by-law, and
liable to the penalties of the same."
Vou Have Not Read Thia Journal, Until You  Have Studied the Advertisement* 122
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
November
!
11
THAT ARE ALWAYS FRESH
YOUR CUSTOMERS APPRECIATE
BLANCHARD
EVAPORATED
FRESH   EGGS
(In Packets
A PURE FOOD, PREPARED FOR
IMMEDIATE USE
GROCERS : A woman
prides hrf sell upon the <|ual-
ity ol Krr home made bread,
ami any attempt on the \w\
oi a GNthl to tuhfttltutr a
cheap imitation uhen Roval
Yeast Calm are caled for,
may mean thr loaa m>t only
of that woman's tratie, hut
thr tra<le oi with o< fin
frirml* a» may he influenced
by her.
Order Now From
PARSONS, HADDOCK
COMPANY LIMITED
Wholesale Produce.
1057 Hamilton St. VANCOUVER, B.C
Royal Yeast Cakes
MOST PERFECT MADE
E. W. GILLETT COMPANY LIMITED
TORONTO, ONT.
Winnipeg Montreal
mi form it)  »»t
•«th iii retail
Uniformity Counts in Flour Sales
rhe unique position fchnf l>m.;t«- n
q^ty S a LCtha \L "SU^Z^ '" S "" '"' ! ■
' ,:,,;.';'' "-■••-»!.. s wonderful gn
PURIT9 FCOUR
"MORE BREAD AND BETTER BREAD"
Prom coast to coast, evervd«v ti
" ifc" ■* ^^SS^ir-asws
WESTIRN CANADA FLOUR MILLS CO. LTD
Head Office: TORONTO ONT
«"upeg, Brandon, Cab,,,,  ,,, ,UflL
Prince Rupert fiffi ,vl","",'»»- Vancouver  Now W   , 1920.
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
12:1
Mr.   Pcrcivol  Wollajton
joined Wilaon Broa. then Cowan
a, Wilaon the well-known whole-
mi** grace**** ..f Victoria, in Febru*
'i\ 18 I at manager, in which capacity he acted until Augual 1919,
whan he sliced from active nan*
egcmont,   the   tnanagerahip   being
That the red letter selling plan ia
still much in evidence.
That a Vancouver firm <>f furniture (I'-aii-rs has a bedstead marked
down from $150 to $75!
That it iiijiv he true hut it will
require an affidavit
Thai  the Asaociated Advertising
Club  of  the   World   is  doing  good
work for boneat trading.
That "why not call a spade a
spade
That   Otte day  the  policy  of  the
Nasarene >vn! come oul on top.
That the camouflage of trade will
then he a tiuii}: of the past.
That an employee ia more than
justified in refusing to carry out
a de 'eption.
That your uncle was glad to see
that the Nanaimo Herald reproduced
our Harvey Murphy page.
That Nanaimo should he proud of
lum
That  our advertisers Wataom &
tak«*n by Mr .1   Vaughan Roberta,   Campbell offered samples of their
v. h«» had been sn the emploj of the   chocolates.
iirni in the accounting dnartmcnl
for Motie yenn
In the early days of hia snparvi*
«ion of the company'a affairs, Mr
Wollaaton  was one of the prime
movant in the formation Of I credit
men's aaaociation, to have member-
shin 111 the cities of Vancouver and
That the moming after the advertisement appeared Water Street
resembled a bargain morning at the
"Bay."
That some wanted f> pound hoxes
as samples I
That   Mr.   De   Wolf said  he  was
Victoria,    Thia  aaaociation,  which   aaving that size tor your uncie.
did excellent work, later merged into
the Canadian Credit Mens Aaaoeia*
tion.
He waa alao active in the formation of the IU'. Wholesale Grocers'
Bzchangi   and   held   the   office   of
treaaurer from the inauguration of
the exchange until a year ago.
Whilst not having severed his
Connection With Wilson Bros, Mr.
WollaatOn, who in the past interested
himself in the management of insolvent   estates,  has recently  received
from the Dominion Government the
appointment of authorised trustee
That  the ladies fell in love with
the picture of the new president.
That WO refer to President Crow-
der, not to one Harding 1
That they wanted to know all
ahoiit  that  famous anecdote of his.
Thai further enquirers are referred direct to the said .1. T. C.
That he can be found at ye signe
of ye pestle and mortar, also ye ice
ereame   soda,   corner   Hastings  and
Granville,
That C. II. Kerr, of the Kerr Man-
*I|)|MII 111 ll|t»II*.      Ol       illll M'M  l. I'M       11  " >  ■■••  .
under the new Bankruptcy Act, the ufaeturing Co., of Vancouver, nau
appointment   being   for   Vancouver „„ exceptionally interesting buyer s
Island, with jurisdiction throughout trip.
That his carload of purchases will
he along in good time.
Who said B.C. was "wet"? A
friend of mine, a commercial traveller, left Vancouver on his last trip
in .June. 1 saw him off at the station in a downpour of rain. I met
him on the train a couple of weeks
a.'o on the way hack to Vancouver.
Winn we arrived in the early morn-
ni1-'. I took a look at the weather,
and reported to him that it was
raining. "What still." Then he remembered. "Yes. they told me B.
C. had gone 'wet'.''
1 heard a good one on a certain
respected retail merchant in a prosperous little up-country town. He
had ordered a case from Calgary,
ami gave strict instructions that it
should be plainly marked "books,"
as he didn't want the local people
to know what he was getting. Much
to his chagrin, he got a note from
the local station agent, as follows:
"Bear sir. a case of hooks arrived
here for you and is leaking badly.
Please call for same promptly."
Which  reminds  me* of the time
when 1 had a store in .   I used
to give some odd jobs to a poor old
man who had a hard time getting
work on account of his being a well
known hard drinker. I was sorry
for the poor chap, and often got him
to do chores for me. He came to
me one day and asked for a quarter
to buy some gin "to clean the windows with. "Gin to clean windows?
how do you use it?" I asked. "I
drinks the gin and breathes on the
window," was the unexpected response.
Sandy M'Nab took a sixpenny ticket in a raffle for a pony and trap.
He won it. Was he pleased at his
good fortune?   Not a bit.
When the pony and trap were
brought to him, he surveyed them
gloomily, and said:—
"I tclt ye the whole thing was a
swindle."
"What's the matter?" asked his
friends.
"Where's the whip?" demanded
Sandy.
the whole  of  B.C.    This  doubtless
followed from his frequent appointment as assignee for insolvent firms
during his manv years' service with
his firm, and from the manner in
which he filled these positions.
That he visited Patterson. N.J.,
New York. Montreal, Toronto and
Other villages.
That he reports very favourable
buying conditions.
Deal With Our MverWeerai    They Make Thi. Official Publication
Possible at $2.00 a Year. 124
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA BETAILEB
So VI
Mil!
';
!..
Luxury Tax News
A BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
WANTED!
The retail section of the Victoria
Board of Trade had a letter placed
before it at its meeting 00 October
28th from Mr. W. W. Ballard, of
Gordon's. Ltd., on the matter of the
Luxury Tax. Lack of space alone
prevents the reproduction of thi*
trenchant criticism in full, but we
will quote what we consider of most
importance to our readers:
"Many articles of merchandise
are being renamed and are being
sold by merchants who are endeavoring to gain sales by this method
of 'beating the devil round the
bush.' Scarves are being called
'mufflers.' and mufflers arc not taxable.
"Confusion still exists as to
whether a dressmaker must pay the
Luxury Tax or Sales Tax or neither.
For many weeks we collected the
Luxury Tax from dressmakers, who
complained bitterly at our action
and cited firms who were collecting
only one per cent sales tax on the
same merchandise that we collected
the ten per cent Luxury Tax. We
took this matter up with the Inland
Revenue office in Victoria, and we
•rot the verbal ruling that the dreaa-
maker was classed by toe Ad a.-> a
'manufacturer' and the retailer WHO
sold ber goods was tor the moment
considered .1 wholesaler, and the
dressmaker thereby should only paj
one per cent Sales Tax
"Since  that   ruling  WU   made,  a
further interpretation by the Inland
Revenue oil ice was given to us Thi*
new ruling said 'the Bales Tax Stopped when it reached toe retailer,'
and the retailer could not collect
either Sal'- Tax or Luxury Tax from
the dres.snu.ker.'
"This latter ruling u.is cancelled
within twenty four boura, We ira
now informed that the retailer moat
collect the luxury Tax from the
dressmaker, notwithstanding the
fact that the dressmaker can buy
the same merchandise From the
wholesaler or jobber and pay one
per cent Sales Tax."
This is just an instance of the
general confusion with regard to the
interpretation of the Luxury Taa
A merchant who sells goods to ho*
fellow retailers much charge him the
Sales Tax    The purchasing merchant
selling goods to the public charge,
the Luxury Tax phi* the Sales Tu
10 that ha 1* 'Ihi* penalized in faVOttf
of the person fr*un whom he has
bought UM gOOda, who il abb  to IfII
them direct to the public without
requiring payment «»f ib** Sales Taj
from  the pubh
a r*tf*MH rMMMM
N S  AT ONE WITH B C
A* evidence thai Be   t* !». do
mean* alone In it* opposition to th«*
roltei ti in of luxury tas hi stamp**
the following  wire  from  the  Nova
Scotia branch at -he H.M A   '<• -,: I
quent witneai
"On Nor ember 1 the retail m*>
bantu of Canada will be aaked to
face one of the moat detrimental
laws in regard In the retail trod*
vi/.,   collection   Of   luxury   tax   by
stampa, Wc are qoiti wall aarar*
that the government moat h».«-
money to carry *»» and th«* retail
met hanta »r«' willing lo help sn all
possible waya, hut moat eertainl)
ohjeet to the nae of *»*.si*np* u» eolle
tion of luxury ?ax
We had a triaif from Mr T«>lor
of the Inland revenue d«'j*«rtm»'iii.
who gave aa very little Information
aa to how the retail merchants ar*- to
meet th** difficulty m ths* moat ran
GOING ?
TF VOL SELL EVERY NECKTIE IN YOUR 8TORE DURING THESE NOVB^BB SALES 80
1 MUCH THE BETTER
HAVING TAKEN ADVANTAGE OP THE PRESENT CONDITION OF THE SILK   MARKET WF
ARE NOW PREPARED TO PILL YOUR XMAS NEEDS WITH VBCKWKAR OF 81 "I If «  PERI \
TIVE QUALITY AND DESIGN THAT IT WILL BE A PLEASURE FOR YOI   TO DISPLAY TIIFM
TO YOUR CUSTOMERS
PRICES
From $6 to $24
Per Dozen.
IMMEDIATE
DELIVERY
KERR'S NECKWEAR
At <"' < ran ii  * • •   foot patron*
Be Uiej  demolaell-M --r matron*.
Make a bee-line !<•<  your rurvkwi»*t   tu^rr i
PreaenU f>r their "boy*'   oi  broil....
Their dear huaband*  r,„  nnoihtfi
Hjcheal *llk« ana dainty pattern*
'Mi.-y know i >•'.'. lo < boo** n !<,•
Bee '.<m have a choice eeleeUon
hi thi* all-Important m lion
wnhv::;:;r,;,;;!:,!:::;':j:;^:f:; »«««•« *«• te m
We'll Joel e/ag-er K..(.    ,   M«bel
win appreciate thli well known brand ol KERR
Km
YOU KNOW OUR LABEL   ™<s is a J^^| product   n ls
THE KERR MANUFACTURING
500 Beatty Street Seymour 9058
EXPRESS
CHARGES PAID ON
ALL ORDERS <>F 6
DOZEN OR MORE
8AMPLE8
FORWARDED ON
REQUE8T
OUR GUARANTEE
COMPANY
T%7
VANCOUVER,  BC. 1920.
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
125
workable schema, We stated that
it was to protect the honaat mer«
chant    Then if the retail nun haul
hai to ba penaliaed by the government to protect him against the dis
honaat trader, it ih a very poor law,
one sided,  unfair and  unjust     All
merehanta are entitled to fairpia*?
and for the preeent are willing to
collect the tax as heretofore, not.
withaianding the fael that it ha*
proved moat detrimental and means
a great loss to our huMtH-ss
"Protests have been made find
letter* written to the government
and ill have met a similar fat»\ the
waatepaper banket   The only plan
left la to bring our case before tie
jipt.* and  public and ask  their CO
operation with na in this vital matter. We therefore aolicit the co-operation of everybody, cititen, mer*
chant  and  pr»*i-»  from  Sydney  to
Victoria, to help in our fight for fair
play at the hands of the govern*
ment."
LET THE R.MA DO IT FOR YOU!
The Provincial secretary baa re
reived the following telegram from
Mr. B M Trowern. the Dominion
aaeretary
Have been adviaed today that
through «>ur efforta Got ernment have
decided not to lek retail merchants
to take out manufacturera' license
or pay manufacturers1 sales tax. oi
two per cent Order in council to
he panned confirming same Notify
members and  press of your pro*
vines
This recalls the paragraph in last
month's laaue, page "'"». regarding
the merchant tailors, and will show
what th«' KM A of Canada has ae«
compliahed for them
ONE EFFECT OF THE LUXURY
TAX ON LABOUR
A deputation oi three men rcpre
seating the union labour men em
ployed in the manufacture ol pianoe,
organs and phonographs, and who
are affiliated With the American
Federation of l.ahour. Waited On Sir
Henry Drayton, Minister of Finance,
and lion. Gideon Rohertaon, Minis
ter of Labour, recently, urging removal of the luxury tax on certain
kinds of production, declaring thai
its imposition has led to b great deal
of unemployment, over 650 men in
Toronto, it was staled, were out of
work as a result of shortness of pro
duCtion, The employers stated that
the luxury tax had removed the demand for these classes of instruments.
It was suggested to the Government that the luxury tax be included
m the sale price of pianos, organs
and phonographa instead of over and
above the aalea price, as at present.
The delegation was given a sympathetic bearing, and consideration
of its request was promised.
INTERESTING DOCUMENTS
Anent the Latest "Tax" Developments.
The following telegram was sent
on November 4th by George Taylor.
Department ol Inland Revenue and
Customs to Richard Jones, Collector
of Inland Revenue at Victoria, which
la self explanatory ;
"Uee of stamps in payment of
sabs i»r articles subject to Luxury
Tax effective from first instant.   No
authority granted by Department to
dispense with this requirement which
is being observed by merehanta in
remaining part of Dominion. Retail
Merchants' Association, Vancouver,
have no authority so far as Department is aware1 to issue advice referred to Please instruct merchants
to comply with requirements."
collection in its entirety with view
to obviating delays and* store difficulties.' I presumed you had been
advised.
"Arthur Mcighen."
"Vancouver.  B.C.,
"November 6th, 1920,
"The  Right  Hon,  Arthur Meighen.
Premier,
" Kamloops, B.C., or en route.
"Further tO our representation**
with reference to Luxury Tax regulations calling for use of stamps and
cancelling machine, and in the ah-
pence oi official advices, we would
appreciate statement  as to whether
anv relief may be looked for from
these regulationa   We gathered that
representations made to you would
he  forwarded  tO   Finance  Minister.
and have suspended action with regard tO stamps and machine, pending further advice.
"Retail  Merehanta' Association of
Canada.
"George S. Hougham, Secretary of
ll.C. Hoard."
"Kamloops. B.C .
"November 6th, 1920,
"George S. Roughem?
"Vancouver. B.C,
"Referring  to your wire.    I   immediately after meeting delegation
forwarded their representations to
Minister of Finance, and received
following reply: 'Basis has been arrived at which will enable departmental Stores collect Luxury Tax
without  adopting stamp method of
"Vancouver, B.C.
"Sir:—If a bona-fide departmental store haa separate and distinct
departments for laces, ribbons,
gloves and hosiery respectively, with
separate accounting system for same
and uses computing cash registers
to record sales, and cash register
receipt showing amount of sale and
tax in separate items being given to
the customer, stamping of sales slips
or cash register receipt is not required, provided merchant furnished department with guarantee bond for
sum represented by maximum
amount of tax plus twenty-five per
cent during any one month previous
year's business, and provided further that each taxable sale shall be
indicated by designating mark on
the computing sales slip, thus, by
adding total of taxable sales and
taking one-eleventh of amount, the
tax collected is determined. Under
these circumstances cash register
computing slip showing each day's
transactions and tax thereon, must
he deposited with you at the end of
month after having excise tax stamps
representative of aggregate amount
of tax affixed thereto and cancelled.
"0. W. TAYLOR,
"Assistant Deputy Minister, Inland
Revenue."
SASKATCHEWAN FOLLOWS
B.C.'S LEAD
The Insurance Commissioner of
Saskatchewan and the executive of
the Retail Merchants' Mutual Fire
Insurance Co. of Saskatchewan, have
just approved plans by whieh the
North Western Mutual Fire Association reinsure the Retail Merchants' Mutual and retire it from active
business after December 1st. This
information is peculiarly gratifying
to the B.C. board, who have the satisfaction of seeing the work pioneered by them in connection with their
fire insurance department, receive
the stamp of approval of the Saskatchewan merchants who now complete the chain of associations which
extends from Winnipeg to the
Coast, which are offering fire insurance under a very attractive plan
to members of the RM.A. s
You  Have Not  Read ThtS Journal, Until You   Have Sidled the Advertisement!. 126
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Novereb
i
!■ •
ii
»
BUY "EDENBANK
The Butter of Superior
=========== Quality =======
Only the very best quality of pure, pasteurized cream is selected for making Edenbank
Butter. This is ripened by the beat processes
known to dairy science, and handled with the
most scrupulous care, enauring that delicate
flavour so greatly appreciated,
Edenbank Butter will give the utmost satis
faction—every pound caff be depended upon
for finest texture and colour and delicious
flavour.
Supply your customers with Edenbank
Butter—it. will ensure you their Bteady
patronage.
Phone a trial order to Fairmont 4244
THE
Edenbank Cre-amery
17th Avenue and Ontario Street.
"ALWAYS GOOD'
CORONA CAMHKS
A consignment of the above high-grade confectionery lias .'list been I'ceeived,
FINE CHOCOLATES
in five pound boxes, and half, one and two
pound packages.
Staple confectionery—pails and boxes.
Singularly  refined  in   flavour
k
A trial will <•
OllVinee
Watson & Campbell Ltd.
DISTRIBUTORS
110 Water Street. VANCOUVER, B.C.
Samples Mailed on  Request.
MORI and raors peogls are saklai tor SMKLLt B
ix BRiSAD It u advtrtiaerd aeaiywhafa, am
door sad in Um public press lass aaw, ws »***
showing toasewtvas be* "*» u** *»«*r* iir-***} At*4
the> II a»k ?«>r SliKf.M fl HaVS is In ***0et StatS
SHKU.VS *\  BR£UD .:* M^*ifl**»tt*" halMNl at mm
*sodal coedliJoas    WtU rtoasK artth gatdea tirowa
crtfp erast, Uaht  Ems tastared tends? crmnh    ti
nuke.*   return   *■<*!*•*»   "», taw   tts   BtSSMlaf-l   tu***'-*
varies
// Stakes "Come Again" Customer i
ft rot
Shelly Bros. Ltd.
VANCOUVER
NEW WESTMINSTER
VICTORIA
NANAIMO
■:■   '  ; '.* u tF a
I Keep in a generous stock <-f
UNKi TEA to meet the de-
|»MJj   ^th   the   W»U«U1C«   tl.nl
l-ANRA brings back every trial
customer for a repeat order,
JUKKA TEA is positively the
nnesl grades of tl.,. Ceylon
Gardens.
1 R is sold at a popular priee to
*w both pocket books and taste
JJ  ™ vast  majority of Tea
* "Msiuiicrs.
WM. BRAID & CO.
Vancouver, B.C. 1920,
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
127
Tlure has been no Improvement
in the general conditiona (governing
retail merchandiaing, whieb in com*
moii with all classes of commercial
busineas feeling the effects ot crcdii
stringency and nncertaint)  In lm*
mediate   outlook
The better understanding of • ion
tmnc conditions forced upon the
**0B*tB}ereJaJ communit) b) the war
has lad to I change of the term
" financial stringency" to "credit
stringency," since it has hern borne
in on our minds that st is credit and
not actual money, which control*
the eaac or difficult*! of cotnmcrt ial
tranasctiona. it has been apparent
(ur loms time past that the constant
increase m prices ol nearly ever)
commodit) must sooner or 1st* r bave
the rctiuIt of outrunning the avail
aide credit of the world, and thai I
reaction was Inevitable,
The present position of the mar
kets i* frequently spoken of as s
"buyer's market, ' meaning that the
buyer has all the advantage, and
that the seller has tO take what he
ean get, uo-re or less. However, so
violent have been some of the fluctuation* of late, mainly iu a down
ward direction, that it is more or
lass of ■ joke to term the position as
favourable to the buyer, for be ,s
faced with the conatanl uncertainty
inseparable from unstable prices,
and he does not know when to buy
or m what quantities,
Ah a natural result of this general
position,   the   retail   merchant   has
been  forced to a very conservative
policy in buying, not only locally.
«>ut throughout the entire world, and
irom every centre come reports that
"buyers are covering requirements
only for current needs," or "hand
to mouth buying is the present policy
dust how long this policy will he
maintained will be determined by
the time it takes for the markets to
become stabilized, .Just a.s it was
impossible for prices to go upward
for ever, so ;t is impossible for prices
to fall indefinitely.   As soon as the
pri < of commodity falls below the
price at which it pays to produce
it. the production ceases or is curtailed, and sooner or later a short -
SgC is evident, and the price again
rises m consequence. This is the
law of supply and demand, and the
war and the conditions following it
cannot alter it. The readjustments
which arc now taking place will find
their  level   as  soon  as  output   and
consumption balance. Consumers
ar<* "on strike" against high prices,
and their strongest ally is inflated
credits, These two factors in the
situation are the cause of the present more or less violent downward
trend in prices. The very violence
of the readjustment will, however,
he the cause of its short duration,
for already it is seen that factories
have ceased or cut down their output, and retail and wholesale merchants arc Selling from their existing stocks.   Very soon, iu most lines.
the shortage will begin to be felt,
and orders will again flow to the
manufacturers, in most cases at
higher prices than the same goods
arc today selling retail.
So will the pendulum swing back
and forth, until a stable position is
reached, and then we shall be once
more on a "normal" basis. Until
that time, caution will undoubtedly
be the watchword for retailers,
wholesalers and manufacturer alike.
Local merchandising conditions
in British Columbia are of course
affected entirely by the general
conditions, and business in this province is in an unsettled state, with
retailers exercising great caution in
placing orders, and wholesalers reducing their stocks without any
strenuous effort to maintain them
up to a normal level.
Nevertheless, basic conditions in
B.C. are quite sound, and a condition of prosperity is evident throughout, with a feeling' that a great improvement will be manifest in trading early in the New Year. While
credits are restricted, collections are
quite good, and there have not been
an undue number of failures. Underlying the present uncertainties, there
is a quiet confidence which is based
upon a knowledge of the stability of
the resources of the Province and
the belief that conditions will stabilize quicker here than in the older
centres, where speculation in large
stocks of merchandise has been more
general than in B.C.
ft
It is reported that many classes of
manufacturers, noticeably silk nulls.
are cutting wages 20 per cent and
demanding an additional hour labour
daily, or. in the alternative, closing
down.     Materials   in   all   lines   are
moving slowly with many plants unloading at considerable loaa.   Public
show a rather sceptical attitude
and   retailers   are   somewhat   "pan
ieky."   Drastic reduction sales arc
being held from Coast to Coast.
Returning  travellers  report   very
little doing and  cannot  gel  orders
even when goods offered at less than
cost of production, M is clearly a
buyers' market, but buyers apparently overstocked with high-priced
merchandise. The public, who are
the ruling factor in the present situation, will presumably take advantage of price reductions. Volume of
business will diminish stocks and
rush   orders   for   merchandise   will
eventuate.
lake other branches of trade, the
drygoods trade is suffering from unsettled   conditions,   due   tO   violent
price fluctuations and holding off
buying on the part of the public.
Newspapers everywhere have been
running "scare" articles regarding
slumps in the price of this and that
line, and as »- result the public have
taken fright and will only buy things
actually urgently needed at the moment, even refusing to purchase
their ordinary requirements, making
use of old clothes and half worn
textiles, which they would have
scorned in normal times. The general expectation on the part of the
■Hi
"■■
mm V28
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA  RETAILER
Novwtiht
■ I
.1
J. C. WILSON, LIMITED
Makers of
The "Standard" Paper Bag
UNEQUALLED FOR STRENGTH AND DURABILITY
Phone Sey. 781
And of tin' following Hues:—
Greaseproof Paper Pie Plates
Stationery
Ice Cream Plates
Oyster Pails
Twines
Wrapping Paper
Toilet Paper
1068 HOMER STREET
Phone Sey. 781
VANCOUVER,  BC
Empress Cofeee
THE COFFEE THAT  LIVES  IT To  ITS
REPUTATION FOR PURITY, WHOLE80ME-
NESS AND SUPERIOR FLAVOUR
VOL AS A  DEALER CAN  RECOMMEND
IT STRONGLY TO YOUR CUST04EER8
THE REASON EMPRESS COFFEE IS PRE*
PERRED IX THOUSANDS OF HOMES TODAY IS BECAUSE IT is lun PER CENT
EFFICIENT AS A BEVERAGE.
90 per cent of
STEVENSON'S
QUALITY BREAD
PUT UP BY
Empress
Manufacturing Co. Limited
VANCOUVER, B.C.
is SOLD BY
RETAIL GROCERS
Tm*:   -VISE  QR0C8H   WILL
UNDERSTAND what THAT
PACT  MEANS  To   n,M.
wmmmm.
Phone Fairmont
VANCOUVER, B.C. i.
120
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
129
public for moeh iowef prieei in the
imnedhlte   future   JH  to  home  extent
being contributed t« hy mme of the
retail merchants, who, throwing ull
caution to the itfindt, are miking
statement* in their advertising men
U "prices broken to pre war levcla''
"slashing reduetlong iin»l Ml forth.
leading the public to think that the
bottom ih going out of the markets.
Curtailment of production in man
nfaeturing m the textile Industries,
both cottons and ivoollena, »* great,
and a serious situation will develop
if, n* s* expected, ■ itrong demand
springs up early m the new year,
when eurrent stocks in retail hands
ar«' naed up and orders begin ooee
more to filter through to lhe mills.
It ix feared that prices will again
swing upward violently, and inch a
condition is had for trade in general
for what is wanted ia a condition of
liability.
At   the annual convention of the
National United Clothieraat Chicago
on November nth, gooda offered for
prompt delivery were at price reduc-
turns of I * * to 25 par cent under current  wholesale values,
"The puhlie is not buying, manufacturer! and dealers are overstocked," said W. L. Mohr, treasurer and general-manager of the aeso-
eiation,   today       "The   price   must
eome down. We have passed the
peak in high prices of wearing apparel. Men's clothing will be eon-
sulerahly cheaper from now on. The
retailer can afford to sell at less for
his costs are becoming lower.
"Here are some men's shirts,'' he
said indicating an exhibition,
"which wholesaled at $45 a dozen a
few months ago. Now they are offered at $16.50 a dozen. Here are
two thousand suits offered at $16.50,
suits that ordinarily wholesaled at
$45.50. The age of extravagance
has passed and rather than let the
goods rot on the shelves, the manufacturers are getting what they ean
out of them."
"1M
Prices m the hardware trad- are
continuing firm, with the exception
«»f Itn** based on cotton, jute and
hemp, such a.H cotton rope isah ord,
lamp trick, manila rope and bo forth,
?h<* primar)   market! in cotton tuni
hemp have undergone i conaiderahle
drop  jn   values.    It   is  not   known
whether these marketa have aa ye!
stabilised themeelves, and Un future
course nf prieea is uncertain.
Linated and turpentine have also
de lined and fiah oils, vegetable oils
nml other paint basea have alao lak<
a downward course, so that revision
»n prieei in paints is likely again to
he the order of the da v.
On the other hand, the prices of
most lines in iron and steel goodl
have slightly advanced, the increased freight rates hatting produced
this viiccl. In the iron trade output has barely eaught up yet with
demand and therefore prices are remaining firm, and seem likely to
remain s<> for the present.
It is. however, notable that production costs in Europe are falling
rapidly, and some Quotations are being received from England for steel
which are on a lower baail than those
quoted by mills in Canada and I nit -
ed States.
The outlook as a whole for the
hardware trade is therefore uncertain, and a cautious attitude is being adopted by wholesalers and retailers alike, there being no tendency to increase' stocks, or to buy
more than is currently needed.
Demand for hardware lines is very
fair, wholesale houses in Vancouver
reporting a good volume of buying
from country districts. In some
points, where business had been very
slow, a slight revival has been noted.
Credit conditions remain about as
last reported, with collections a bit
slow, but on the whole satisfactory.
The present trade depreaaion ia
not materially affecting retail gro-
eers who are ordering for their immediate   needs  and   the   volume  ol
buaineaa is reported by the wholesaler as very satisfactory. It must
he pointed out that the retail gro •
ers are strongly advised to continue
purchasing    present    requirements
only.    A  recent  demonstration  has
proved that th.' public are showing
a decided preference for B.C. sugar.
whieh is retailing around  18c, das«
pile the fact that Chinese and Other
foreign eonaignmenta ate offered at
a reduction,
The market for Fall dried fruits,
viz.. raisins, prunes, apricots, poach
es, etc. is firm, and demand good.
with prieei stationary. It is noted.
however, that there arc one or two
exceptions.
The recent decline oi 80c a barrel
in Hour has eased the cereal market
Considerably. No advance iu corn
meal, peas nor heans is looked for
until Spring.
Canned fruits are moving quite
freely, despite the ruling prices of
these commodities,
There is absolutely no reason why
the retail grocer should take a pessimistic view of existing conditions.
Wholesale aiol retail grocers have
received sufficient warning of a de
cline in the price of foodstuffs, and
if the retail grocer is forced to sell
at a closer margin than heretofore,
he is presumed to have surplus cash
on hand to offset this difference.
This also applies to the wholesaler
who is taking a sane view of the
situation.
High grade teas are very firm
with cheaper lines assuming a
stronger tendency. It is reported
that futures have strengthened considerably, presumably on account of
depletion of U.S. stocks, no quotations appearing for Central American or Santos teas. Spices steady,
hut cost of putting these up (labels
and containers) materially increased.
aaaa 130
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Noveml
uim
i
.; i
I
(
ft
rown orooni
Works
LIMITED
Manufacturers of the
DUCHESS, KING. JANITOR SPECIAL
PEERLESS. PRINCESS. PROVJNCE.
LAMES' CARPET. PERFECTION,
FAVORITE. CEILING BROOM,
WAREHOUSE   BROOMS
WHISKS OF ALL KINDS
GLASS WASHBOARDS
Crown Broom Works Limited
332 FRONT STREET EAST
Phone Fairmont 1148
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Lake of the Woods
Milling Company
LIMITED
Makers of
FIVE ROSES
FLOUR
The World's Best
Daily Capacity 14,200 Bbls.
«
B.C. Offices and Warehouses:
1300 Richards Street 1614 Store Street
VANCOUVER VICTORIA
B.C. District Ttltgraph Co., Ltd.
An.lf-.-ttd with FIRE PATROLS LTD.
FIRE
PATROL'S
jHJ
REPORTS AND STATISTICS
Covering a Period of One Month Oaly
Fire Calls answered *rt
Doer* found unlocked and  attended to M
Accessible mrtndews fa*se**H<l »****• o*- *>foh»«   &
Iwlttitaa le*t on *ne light* bufn'n-- by accident »!
S»'c and Vault Hf>M* »t*t ©ff by accident I?
S*e*e« left open by accident '
Report   of   unusual   o-Uurvnces   on   iybi<"t«fi
premise! H
Dortai tali psffo*l om asui »** ***inidM \» »*-*
a< t of robbing a • ?«»*•■«■<  afni  i»f-*%-*l«*-J  by  OM Qfj f**Bf
UMfiohiiaa   The tarahu ***x*el***i*d * Mfatmce al ?-*<*
**Sai*l  ImpilSOBIBBBl
Aaothtf Ptirotmaa ^mpioywi by  u* #*'**•*** of!
burglar* on a *«*•*»-ri'»rr*' i»r-*«'.i»<"« iftlo tehtott *ft
eQtr4A«'f* ha.-f *w»«*n far****:. b#'of-* eh«? b*«J Utttf 10
r«-f. |Tjrgy »:th ftaythiflf
.\n aitnajH ia bvsal opera * fasdl *♦** ***«> f*v-*
trated bj «>*"-*, **| ow pit**oU**wa   The wihacfftsu n»
'hi* CfAftJ Mlfff******] BO (OSS OWtBf IS Ihll .rriV*
Th-« li * raatamaai *-o***rtas ONS MONTM OHUf,
In frsM itrtttlBMf
Can You Afford to Be Without Thu ProKrtlon
Phone Seymour 651
We   Work   in   Cooperation   W th  th*   CNy   r*i'e   and
Poistf Department*
5*6  MAST'f-iGS  STREET   W VANCOUVER
r
EDDY'S
lhe Best-liked Matches
liked heeauae «>f the Eddy Quality thai ntftr
changes
E\'rv match a real match —perfeeted throufh
the "know bow*3 of Horn.- rdxty ymn match-
making experience,
Thirty to forty drffer*ni hrmul** a match for
every purpose.
Stock Eddy'u. They are eaally sold and always
Hatisfv.
TKe E. B.  Eddy Co.
LIMITED
HULL, CANADA.
■ 920.
THE BMTISH COLUMBIA BETAILEB
131
FOR SALE and WANTED
FREE TO SUBSCRIBERS   ::   LIST YOUR BUSINESS WITH US
aUatNiaaia FOR *ALi AND WANTED We will m»ert announcemente under
thi* h**dl*»0 FRift OF CHAROC to eut>»*Mt>->ri To non-eubaerlbere the
<f*'$t •• |fl a wofd. minimum |1, eaeh with order. Wt an receiving many
en*uiri»* #r^m the Praswea tor buefnetaee in B.C. The only favor we aak la
that tfcerM WiaecHSiri -*»**« make ue« of the above offer let ua know when
they  are  ew)t*d. M that  we  may  withdraw  the  advertiaement.
tTOREi FOR RENT; ARTICLE* FOR SALE OR WANTED, ETC : Our charge
under thie heatfing it* ey|>etrt'jere and non-eubacnbera alike) la 5c per word,
minimum  |t.  caah  with  order.
aaaftM 'altera to "'CSaea-.*;f<* Dejtt." DC.  Retailer, 201 London  Qidg., Vancouver.
POR  SALE
General 8torc and Pool Room m
connection,  Vancouver  {eland, ex
'■'•llrui    developments    g<»mg    on.
sSor«- doing  good  turnover; owner
th«*r«' tox yi «r*    Stock at valuation,
ahoul 13,000 Building and fsxtur**
11,500. Pool Room, - tables and
building 11,000, Fui' opportunity
for energetic man and wtfe B 20,
• o " M Ci Retailer.
General Store In rising town on
Vancouver tahwd for sale; also
beuao and barn Proprietor retiring
from business; stock at invoice Full
particulars on application, B-25,
euro of "I' C Retailer "
WANTED
General Retail Merchant is detir
ous oi locatiitg in good progressive
TO A CORRESPONDENT
An answer has been received lo
the advertisement of"H 17". which
reply cit-'j.Vi is printed In this
issue under "For Sale,' a*> ' HI7
has not called fnr his replies, "HIT*
has tlo> first refusal of this of for,
i»ut other applications are in order
m case he doea not communicate
with us.
THE SECRET OF SUCCESS
M0ne oul of every 100 people
earns hi* living by retailing, said
a speaker «tn recent advertising con*
ventlon, Continuing be said In pari i
In other words, there are more
people in retail selling alone than In
any other line of endeavour, except
agriculture.   Yet, after twenty years
mil around, out of every I"'1 who
have embarked In retail storekeep*
Ing, less than 5 still have their nanus
over the door.
oommunltji, preferably Okanajgan,
Kooteuay, or Vancouver laland,
Some capital; well known to Vancouver wholesalers. B 21, c*o "I'».
C, Retailer.*'
8ilent Salesman, 6 or 8 foot, square
type, by Victoria retail merchant,
li 22, eo "B.C. Retailer."
Poaition Wanted by a man with s
general business experience of nine-
Iccn years, and three years' experience hi guts' furnishings and clothing, fan furnish best of references
from two of the largest houses in
(ana.la.   B 23, C-0 "M.C Retailer."
Experienced Accountant offers
merehanta advice and practical aa-
siatance with hooks and correapond*
ence, Enquiries invited, B 24, "B.
( . Retailer.M
The financial agencies show that
15,000 retailers fail each year, and
85 per cent of them   12,-~>o did not
advertise!
Yet. the outstanding reason for
the failure of more than 50 per cent
of these was over -buying.
Over-buying   means   too   much
"stick stocks."
Now, if profits lie in quick turnovers, and failures are avoided by
having money iu the hank    and ad-
vertiatng will not only dispose of
surplus slocks hut also bring in the
money to put iu the hank you can
see not only the advisability but also
the absolute necessity of advertising,
Sonic oi you reineiuher when there
were   practically   no   mail   order
houses.
Some of you rememher the time
when all the mail order houses put
together (and it  was less than ton
L. W.Taylor
& Company
PUBLIC  ACCOUNTaiNTS
Auditors, Cost Analysts
Board of Trade Building
Seymour 365.      Vancouver, B.C.
years ago) did not do 4 per cent of
*he retail husiness in America.
How do they stand today'/
Of the $15,000,000,000 worth of
retail buaineaa done annually, the
mail order houses do $1,500,000,000
—10 per cent.
And how do they do it?
The mail order houses and the department stores who advertise do
more than 25 per cent of all the retail husiness in America and their
proportion is growing all the time.
Yet. altogether they only represent
30.000 ot the retail stores iu the
country—or about 3 per cent.
There is something in your store
—bigger than the building—bigger
that the merchandise. You will find
it mentioned at the very beginning
of the 22nd Proverb:
"A good name is more to be chosen
than great riches."
What is your good name worth?
How do you stand in your community?
The point 1 wish to make is this:
Instead of shrieking ''sales—sales
—- sales" — instead of eternally
pounding your merchandise and
lauding your values—devote a little
space to calling attention to your
store; to your policies—you will he
building infinitely more permanence
to your establishment and its standing in the community,
Wbea Um Mistaae is Ysars, Ndp Correct It
Sometimes as soon as you give the
operator a telephone number from
memory, you realize you have called
the wrong number. The first impulse
is to hang up the receiver, but, you
should wait and say to the other party,
"Beg pardon for calling the wrong
number.*4 Then everybody feels all
rtpht about It.
If you hang up the receiver without
acknowledging your error, the operator Rets the blame when she tells the
other part; that "there's no one on
the line."
B. C. Telephone Company 132
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
,N oven
1
i
I §
V)'
[;l
Patronize Home Industry
BUY
COLUMBIA BRAND
Writing Tablets
— and —
School Supplies
Made in B.C.
Wrapping Paper, Twine, St. Lawrence
Paper Bags, Toilet Paper, Picnic
Sundries and Stationery
Columbia Paper Co., Ltd.
VANCOUVER and VICTORIA, B.C.
St. Francis Hotel
Directly opposite C.P.B. Depol and ,   k
fr°m  Po8t U"""  -"I  ,1,,  ,,„si„„s ,.„„„.„
MODERN IN EVERY BESPECT
European Plan, $1.60 Up.  Cafe in Connection
J. NATION 4 SON, Manager..
Golightly Bros, Ltd.
%t\r, j*,
>**   o*
tmi o«i*t Mitr washim **»o
Laundry Machinery
Um   mm*   mm*"   UttMHM   mm*'-'   r-rttl   •■
J2»'"***»*«>"   *— e if Ma      . ... . r.      ...        ..,,,.,.
M™t,',J"r*,c* * !i*: '  *'■ h*«     v*<"'*   •>  •-*•
**J * *"* T 7 w r, c    r
*SJ  Po<nt«i>   '.»•„.
P *> -. •• •    »i
-. *««-.. "■ ■ ■» r*».  ti
a'"   is
Time
to
Unload
Now
3crnJfM£R
2)3 VSSa  MOTO JAff ^;»
a" i
Going
(Jo * n
Head Office   310 PENDER ST   W
Room* 101 104 Ri-c-fi-Sclmsn  Building,
VANCOUVER,   BC
Anybody Can Cut Prices
Mu'  »■ takes expert special sales ncrvi t to
conduet aaueceasful sale and ahoa s profll to
Z^e   {vviM"rrUiii *Hm »« »*-'
HM-II   Mo,:,;   xkw   MJCOIUM   IN   VAN.o, VKK
IS MONTH    JTRITB rOR IM»*ca NOW
•^KWQ   DDCEMBER   4ND  MM un   BAL8S
Wr.te,  wire 0r  Phon«  R.F   8',8
Merchant! Supply Department,
Dominion Sales Co 'f»(l
THE HKITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
138
ADDRESSES WANTED
Thia service it tree to our subscribers
for the purpose ot locating old customer**
and others. Send fullest information
poaa'ble. We afS '©cat ng some every
month. It is only by friendly co-opera
ton that this column can be run at all
lUOOSSSftllty Help those who may be
able to help you, by writing the off'ce
of the "B.C. Retailer.' 203 London Build
ing, Vancouver, if you know anything in
the nature of a due to the addresses of
the   undermentioned;
Dumlun, M aa K. K<,rm<-fb ol SSTM
Sophia Bi , Vancouver Beltev-Mi to
i.»n m (dthei Vancouftw ot Victoria.
Rebc'in,   VV.   H.    FWQVkHj  »t  fctilftaiOOfl
Myrray, joe,   Pormorij  at 111  Keattty
Me,   VaniouVfr      B©U****Nl   tO   have
novo*] to boom othet awl ol the
t ritjr
McOougai. T. M,    5.!vc4 at StanW'y OfMft,
corner Bidwotl m4 BaittJay Btioete,
Vaecoovof    li#lie*w*4 to  be  in  or
»r»nm<l  Vaf!,v<*uv**r
D*agl#, J.    Wai  with t'   P   H .  now -wk'e!
!.. fet vita P <;  B Raihft*r
Dwytt**, Jaa.    TvafltttOf     Kandl>   |h«*« at
Kittihuto    PwytHf worka ui* eoaal
w«< »s»h to |*aira whets
McGinn, p   tats ol PeoUrtoo
Putney, j   I   I-'" ol iliac* Raptrl
\.<i:   il iOI '*<.  toonthl a**', and  Ii
said to bif *n the Otauaas    J" **
theatrical man
Mjirtm, j, r L«ati ot Pitaes Report
Patntor; aow «as<s to u> m v^a&oott*
rti
Marthing,    Mr»..    Wm.     KnrnH-rl)     Pontk
ton. intr* t.f 4ayoi, I' C
Whittmgton, Alfred    S.ut' to bS with (AS
of th«' Vaacoovor or North Vaacoo*
trei shipyarea
Miner,     Clarence    nrusebt       Formerly
ko; '<!i vv«» Kis.it, Vancouver
Carlin. Terrance and Cliiabeth    Lots of
?01 Brouthtoo Street, Victoria, form
erly Ol QoldOO     Said  tO  hnvp  (**MM
to Montreal    Ho Is a boihtar sad
contractor
HerebecW.  M.   \Va»  MCtion foreman  '•
T r al Haaelton    Now iaid to t**
wlth I n i;
Peace. E—Formerly of Trine-* Rapsrt
Bolleved to ho In or around Van
OOBVOf
Rudell. Joseph—Formerly of Swift current, Souk   iio i« a barber.
6/1 "• *THi oa<>OUUL MflNTU*?
••ok Mi  si vi: Lb of  t iomt s
IOi    TOM    SrtMPLLi  -^ iJUO TO T |ON^
R71 floor<• l/C-.L'" ^o^'^
K/lCin<'. CaiSTM/lNTLf F/*K'TOKY.
Btearfham, Frank—Wan at 380 6th Ave.
K.   Bettered to be ailll in Vancouver.
Adams, Miss A.—Formerly of Seattln.
Believed to l>e in or around Vancouver.
Cooper, Alfred—Wti at Williams Skiing.
SWjSgSj In loKifin**.
Barrett Timber Co.—Was at Salmon
Arm
R MA. AT ORANDVIEW
The first «»f a series of meetings
of retail merchants in the outlying
districts <>f Vancouver was held on
the *ih at Qrandview, President J.
T. Crowder finding time amid his
busy day to take the place of honour
at the gathering.
Professor Angus, of the University
of  B.C.,  teas  the  principal  speaker
and he delivered as address on
'Who Pays the Taxes," After examining numerous assessments prevalent in this and Other countries.
the  professor  suggested  that  the
Ideal   and  just   system  of  taxation
was graduated income tax. Unfortunately, be added, they were not
y«vt   ready   for   tins   system,   for   it
seemed that people would pay large
sums in taxation by the indirect
method, while they would Sght and
sttempi to evade every system of
direct taxation although the indirect
form might mulct them considerably
more,
Mr. <J   Hoy Long, barrister, who
acted for the grocers' section in the
Early flosint; Bylaw, gave B resume of the Association's experience
at the city hall, and pointed out that
the alien competition iti the retail
business had assumed such serious
proportions as to render the efforts
of British horn retailers to better
their conditions almost fruitless. At
every turn, whether in legislative or
commercial matters, the retailer who
was endeavouring to live up to s
high statolard of commercial and
civic ethics found himself penalized
by the presence of people from foreign lands who had no respect whatever for such principles.   Mr. Long
presented some very striking figures
in   this   connection   and   suggested
Triumph
Tea, Coffee
and  Cocoa
PACKETS ONLY
Packed by the
Bon-Accord Tea Co.
(Sacceneri te Ike Late R. BaUeri
PHONE.  FAIRMONT 669
VANCOUVER.   B.C.
PURE AND
WHOLESOME
NABOB
BAKING
POWDER
Contains
No Alum
It is a pure phosphate baking powder, giving good results in every baking.
Order By the Case.
Tell your customers to save
the  certificates  for Wear-
Ever Aluminum.
Kelly, Douglas
& Co., Ltd.
VANCOUVER 134
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Novemb
■
i ■ ■?
"ii
hi
I'll
'j.
that the matter was not one for grocers only to combat, but in the last
analysis was an issue which even
intelligent retailer must fare. He
suggested that the only possible way
was through organization, a plea
which was later emphasised by President Crowder, who made a frank
appeal for membership in the Asso-
tion from all classes of retail merchants.
BAKING POWDER UNDER
SCRUTINY OF HEALTH BOARD
An attempt is being made by the
Canadian Department of Health to
determine just how long a baking
powder   will   keep   without   undue
deterioration.   The worth of a baking powder to the consumer is directly dependent upon its gas producing power under the conditions
of baking.   Deterioration in this respect is inevitable if the article is
kept too long on the grocers' shelves.
Manufacturers do not feel that they
should be held responsible for baking powder which has remained on
the retailers'   shelves   for   several
years.  Following a recent inspection
of baking powders it was suggested
by the chemists of the Health Department   that    manufacturers   be
compelled to mark the date of manufacture on each package.
According to A. MctJill. chief analyst of the Department of Health,
the investigation of baking powders
on sale in the Dominion revealed
that the labels on some baking pow-
Vancouver
Creamery Co., Ltd.
WHOLESALE DEALERS
BUTTER & EGGS
15-23 Alexander Street
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Phones: Seymour 5056-7
ders were so glaringly absurd thai
no intelligent  buyer should  be d<
ceived by them.
Of the 353 sample- of baking
powder collected throughout the
Dominion,   forty-six   failed  to  meet
the requirements of the food laws
and were classed as adulterated   As
the standard for baiting powders
had already been in force fifteen
mouths when the sample* were col
leeted the department felt that ample
time had been allowed to the trade
to adjust   Us goods to the require
ments ol the law-.   Seven sample**
made claims upon the labels which
were not borne out by the analysis
Nine samples had names that were
more or lens misleading and gave th *
purchaser to understand that he teas
buying a superior article.    The in<
vest i gat ore believe that lASSS CXBg'
gerated claims were due to ignorance rather than fraudulent intent
on the part of the manufacturer's
The following was recommended
for consideration by the Department
of Health ss a result of the inveafi
gat ions-
1. Work l»e undertaken as soon
as possible to determine the keeping
qualities   of   the   various   types   of
baking powders
2. Work be undertaken to evolve
a simple and reliable method of d*-
lectins* the presence of tartrates fa
baking powders
3. Standards be amended to:
(a) Compel the marking of the
composition of the powder on each
tin or package of baking powder;
(b) Compel   the   marking  of  the
date of manufacture on each tin or
package;
(c) Compel     marking    the    net
weight of the contents on each tm
or package;
(d) Prohibit the printing of nnv
advertising' or descriptive matter,
other than directions for use and
such other information as is required by law, on the labels of tins or
packages.
DOES THE DAYS WORK
EXHAUST YOU ?
YEAST the food tonic ■
will help yoy Baling Vea*i
creates vigour and energy,
" fatal for Healtl S ot
,i (rakes ■ daj
At • out grocer 'a   Fteiael
manna, ot pours*'  Send for
the    booklet      ^ eael    fo'
Health
lhe fltisdinuiiri Company
I tea Bar**s****I &»••#*
VANCOUVER.     BC
Toledo Computing Suits
Sp*****! • bam for Groetri
Bttidlfffi an! . r»r«*?tloB*r*s
Mobaji £}«f*rtt i »tu« Mill*
Mtel l bopfatni ant Moot oriod"
**r», B*rfc»l Unpieved tu q
Bliesi BoM on TVmi or Wi
nmm for < tafe
Bates Agent for n<
C. S. CHAMBERS
424 Ca*ai..a Sl   W        Vaa*a*-,„. |.f
€U2E«n>
ronl,
^ntalnr, «nou-*h for tour adult*    vm .   ,     ,
KcllyConfecHorr"""'''
».i)iiliiW>HaHih.»w,n.i,i 1920.
TIIK BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
135
Great West TEA
eacetTa ONtv
No Premium*    No Deal*
No Price Cutting
QUALITY  ONLY
Westera Grocers Limited
ukiwi mm. tummm 11
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
,eeeeaeaeejuAA»*>eeeeeee
/eeeeaetae^^ir^efeaeeee
'♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦MM
FASILV SODAS
Best by Test
Cnip, Appetiaing. Delicious,
TRY A PACKAGE TODAY
Por 8ale at All Leading
Orocen.
Ramsay Bros, ft Co.
UMirto
VANCOUVER, B.C., and
VICTORIA, B C
APPLEFORO COUNTER
CHECK BOOK
CO. LTD.
COUNTER CHECK BOOKS
AND WAXED PAPERS
Radcliffe A Lewis, Agents
Phone Seymour 2885
315 Seymour 8treet,
VANCOUVER, B.C.
NAPOLEON EXTRA VIRGIN
OLIVE OIL
Guaranteed Absolutely Purs.
Best   by   Test.
Wt will refund the money to any
customer who   is   not  satisfied
after using NAPOLEON OLIVE
OIL.
A. Maqnano Co. Ltd., Nut*
IS PswtU Street   VANCOUVER. B.C
Canada Foml Hoard l,lc«nM ft-1T1
Canada Permanent Mortgage Corporation
..$6,000,000.00
46,900,000.00
$33,000,000.00
INVITES  YOUR  DKI'nSIT
Capita] I Paid-up)
Reserve and Surplus, Earned (Over)
Investments Exceed
Established 1855
4',  Paid on Deposits Subject to Withdrawal by Cheque.
432 Richards St. O. L Smellie
Vancouver, B.C. Manager.
VANCOUVER RETAIL
MERCHANT MAKES BIO DEAL
One of the largest local realty
deals that has been made for some
mouths  wan  made  when  Mr.   Wm.
Dick, the well known Beatings St.
east, clothing merchant, at Vancou
\er, became the owner of the pro-
party at the northeast corner ol
Hastings and Carrel! Streets The
price   involved   in   the   transaction
teas $125,000.
The vendors are the Bank of Tor
onto, who have held the property for
some year**.
On the property is s two-storey
brick building which ranks among
the  pioneer structures of the  city.
The property has a Frontage of SI
fert on Carrell Street with a depth
of M feet along Hastings street.
tlo' corner being at present occupied
by a fruit store.   Exiating leases for
the premises to occupants on both
the   ground   floor   and   the   second
story offices have about ninety days
to  run.  after which   Mr.  Dick  will
j*et possession.   As soon as he gets
possession, he intends to have exten
live alterations and probably an additional storey added to the building
In order tO transform it into one of
the most attractive and up-to-date
Clothing stores iu the West. Mr.
Dick already operates three other
large stores with more than KM) feet
frontage i» the same block.
GANONG'S
CHOCOLATES
KEEP IT UP
One step won't take you very far,
You've got to keep on walking;
One word wont tell folks what you
are,
You've got to keep on talking;
One inch won't make you very tall,
You've got to keep on growing;
One little "ad." won't do it all,
You've got to keep 'em going.
SOME RAISIN
You've heard about the raisin
With the kick of ten per cent
Hut the raisin with the wallop
Is the ,,raisin'' of the rent.
Retail   Grocera'   Advocate,   San
Francisco.
Scale & Cash
Register Co.
LIMITED
54 Water Street
BRANTFORD
Computing   Scales,   Meat
Slicers and Cheese Cutters.
BOND
Automatic Weighers.
IMPERIAL
Standard Scales.
COLES
Coffee Mills, Peanut Butter
Machines,   Meat   Choppers
and Bone Grinders.
Old Machines taken in as
part payment, and a liberal
trading allowance made.
Write for Catalogue and
Prices.
Telephone Seymour 2747
Deal With Our Advertisers:    They  Make This Official Publication Possible at $2.00 a Year. ■I
5
M
(.-■ '■ I
-     ;
i !
'■I
136
THE HKITISII COLUMBIA RETAILER
Novembi
e   •
e   •
PRICES CURRENT
The following are prices quoted tor pr.napai Illttf of leading, wholesale firm,    Other i.sts *.»i be added    Price a
quoted arc necessarily subject to market fluctuation!.
DDRDEN  CO.,  LTD.
Eagle Brand, condensed
Reindeer  Brand,  condensed
Gold Seal Brand, condensed
St Charles EJvaporateO—tail
8t Charles ISvaporated— family
St. Charles Bvaporated—small
Maple Leaf, stwiltseaV- tail
Reindeer  Coffee—small
Coffee -large
Cocoa— large
Cocoa-
Muited
Malted
Malted
Malted
DO
Reindeer
Reindeer
Reindeer
Borden's
Bor den's
Borden's
Borden's
Borden's
-small
Milk.
Milk.
Milk.
Milk.
Malted Milk.
small,  pel
large pe
hospital,
in Ih. tin.
S3 lb. tin. r.
oos
dos
loa
it.
>«-r 11'
WM. BRAID £ CO.. LTD.
Tea, Braid's Best. Is, bags ....
Tea, Ideal. Is, bags    .
Tea, Big Four, La, hags .
Coffee.   Braid's  Best,   Is
Coffee,   Braid's  Beet.  SS-M
Coffee.   Big Four,   Is.   bags
Coffee,  Big Four, M-M
Coffee,   Ideal.  Is,  bags
Coffee.   Ideal,  13-60     	
Ideal.   Is,   tins-
Coffee.   Plantation,   Is,   bags
Coffee, Plantation, 25-5"
Coffee,   Combination.   25-50
Coffee.   Sterling   25-50	
Coffee,   Royal,   25-50	
Lanka Tea. Is    	
Lanka Tea,   '.is	
(I'rices  subject  to  engage  without   not
«;.
4*.
I I
.SI
.SI
i<
45
<y
M
.49
<•;
.41
.33
IS
SI
14
lee >
Home,  i
P.  BURNS & CO., LTD.
Shamrock Products.
Hams,  10-12. per lb 53
Hams,  boned and  rolled,  per  lb  57
Bacon, 6-8, per lb 64
(B)  Hams, 8-12,  SMS, per lb 51
(B)  Bacon. 6-1".  10-14.  per lb 52
(B) Shoulders, toned & rolled, per lb       36
Cooked Ham, Shamrock, per lb  67'j
Ayrshire,  rolled shoulders,  per lb. .31
Lard, No. 5. 12 to case     ... IS 55
Lard, No. 3, 20 to case.  LS.M
Lard, No.  1, cartons,  15 lbs.  . 34
Lard,  No.   !  cartons, 30  lb.  ...       **S*S
Compound, Carnation, No. 5, 12 case 11 :.",
Compound, Carnation, No. 3, 2o case II 2<i
Drippings,  beef, 4 lb.  bricks .':«
Mincemeat, kits, 25 lb. net, per lb. 204
Cooked eorn beef, per lb  ,29
Meat Lpaf, per lb  27
Pork  Pies,   per doz  45
Pork, Roast Legs with Dressing, lb. ,f*J
Baked Ham. with Dressing, per lb. .70
Cooking Oil. 5 gal. tins. 40 lbs., lb. . 2!
Creamery Butter, Shamrock, carton .62
Creamery    Butter,   Shamrock,   Without
Carton   6!
Cheese, Canadian, large new. per lb. 32
Cheese, Canadian, twin new, lb g|U
Smoked Fish, Kippers, 90s, per Ih. 10$
Smoked   Fish,   Kippered   Salmon.   10s
and 20s.  per lb  ,1J
Smoked Cod, 30s. per lb  i;
Head Cheese, 6 lb.  tins, each    . SJ
Jellied Tongue,  per  tin  . 2 75
Selected Fowl, per lb  ;,j
Turkeys,  fancy selected,  per lb. 62
Selected Chicken, per lb  21
CANADIAN   POSTUM   CEREAL  CO.
I'OBtum Cereal,  12 pekgs.,  per doz. 2.60
Instant, 24-4 oz. pkgs., No. 8. per ca«<- 5 85
Instant, 12-8 oz  pkgs.. No. uo, p(.r rase & 00
Instant, 6 large, 12 small pkgs., No. 9,
per case   545
E.  B.  EDDY a CO.
Matches
Including War Excise Tax.
Parlor, 200's, per box  8 30
Silent, 200's, per box    •, 30
Silent.   600'*,   per   Itox is 00
Capital Safety, per box        jjjafl
Pony Silent, 75'b, per box   15 go
Sesqul, 50's, 10 gross, per box   26 60
Golden  Tip,  SOO's,  per box    '" 17 HO
Comet Silent, per box   [4 00
t«>t
U,.
per
b '\
I*n
II
: i 1 1
1   1
EMPRESS   MANUFACTURING  CO
Cllma*   Brand
'amt—
Sirawbe**r*r, Raspberry, Red Cwtigt,
(looeeberr**,    Greengage     Aprl
I'bitis. t'e I* h   \<«f-"'?. !. 40, ..•■  d <t
Ite, « od,   IM *   lb
Jelly-
st • ,t« ben'
Apple,   I
109,   n I
S5 lb. rood.
la. 1.
•«•■
<j.-i
Emprsas n-aid
Jama—
8trawhe***7,  Raspberrjr.   Lo^nberry,
Blackcurrant  Apricot. Blackberry,
Gooseberry, Red CttrrBJM, Psumoa,
Prune, Peach, Assorted, ' lb f
pet   dee
1,r«>c!.K,>»*<•, rs-tm. ; .'   g;A*»   ;•-■•:   *"f     *
- lb (in. pee dee * •
lie*} .Currant  Jtl       I   lb   flaira   du*
Crabspple JeB*   t lb glass, pe* See    I
Apple Jelly, ' th  e '«*. pet dos I il
2 <!<>*.   I  lb   r*l*ww>« t < 1 .>.**•
4   d>*X     1   lb    tins   10   <**r
E.  W.  GILLETT  CO.,   LTD
Royal Yeait—
I •'  ra iw
I H
3 do-,    pkgs    In   CSSI
Pe-fumed  Lye—
4 d(M   in  1 UM
5 cases
IS esses ot m*'f"
Magic  Baking Powder—
4 n*. .   4   d"t
6 OS , 4 do*
8 11-. . 4 dot.
12 OS., 4 dOS
12 OS., 2 SOS
2 lb. 4 dot
1 lb. 2 dOS
2S    lb.    5    dOS
5 lb.  m  dos
Special discount <>f I per ceitl s(lowed en
Five Cases <>r mors "f Magic Baking
Powder
per c*j-*
1 :1
I (|
pat  I *
1 tl
■ j.
I : I
I k|
J M
«
II M
Cauatlc Soda   (Granulated) —
2r. lb  wooden pat la
fi'i 'ti   wooden pn.Ua
50 lb   srooden cases
5 lb  canisters (100 Um  In i»**i
W lb  < sniatera 1 IO0 11*1   in raw)
'"•'■  lbs   iron   drums
400 n.'H, barrels
•• ,
«3H
IIH
II
IIH
Utt
10',
Cream   Tartar—
p'T dOS
'« ll>   pa|«-r pkgs 14 dog   In 'a«,-» |.M
ft lb  paper pkgH n -Jos   In <a»«i      3,10
4 <ioz   '4 ii,   paper vkg*, 2 ,\,,t   u
lb  pepei pkgs, asaorted tl II
p««r d'»*
ft Hi. case witi» screw covers (4 dos
lib. square canisters (ft dot in case)   1 01
10 ib. wooden cases
25 ib. wooden paids
100 ib   lined kegs
,SI*(
Magic  Soda—Caae  No.  t—
1 case (id 1 n> pseksfts)
0   OfiSeS  or   more
BI-Carbonate  of   Soda—
112  Ib.   keg*,   per  keg
400 Ib   barrels,  per barrel
LTD
HtLLV,   DOUGLAS  4   CO
NsOoB  FfS)s*sjs*si
Mom,   %9. Oos
l'.,.;\, i-     ,\- hi    ^i*.    dog
Tart^ri'    ACte\    '*«.   #**•
Itares.   '•♦»   ■' *
• j  i .,»■»>.!■.- r,   ti   II  ■•■«,   :  1
ng INjwder, t* N oi    Sol
llektfsj  r--« ''• -    •-'   • ■!■■    '  I
H«king   )'-■* !<-.   f If    " A
■ ■« 1 ■     '     .1* ■ ai    \«    ! *
Pii j--*- H d 1   I    la    sSs
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Salad   I»r«-»«inff   irmm,   '   ,*
Nit in,i l>r*>aailni, cream, 7 «•«
Attaplca    Ib
(!'.,«• v  Pepper, lb
Cayenne,  Ib
Cinnamon, Oaylon   it»
Clwrea,  it.
','inter.  Cochin   lb
CbllllPH     Ib
Maes   ib
NutintajSi lb
Pepper      -rhllfl     lb
Mil,-.J   p>< klln«-    ||>
Saitpetrs    crystal   snd   it
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Sods, ao ia, csss
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I II 1X'0
THE BKITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
137
W. M. MALKIN 4 CO.. LTD
"MalMn's   Btal"   Products
|'.a*.i*:g   I'owdrr.   «•■,*  ot    !.«•«    d«t
uu/T) Powder, n No, * t-mum*. u<*a.
t uatMfd   li»»*K   12   tOc.   t-o*   OOg
i IMhSfd   I OWOSVi   "*«<«•»  k>ti».   Bag   StM
■ ..!!,«'      .Vltiifcit, *    ««c<n.     »#„    »•    a I>>1    SS«
una.   "SfH   lb
f*YStill  "I    hlitgf,   llg   Ol    tUUk   doa
i'.»tr*a«~f*•.  I*   I ol   lapat  bottiea  dan
|>atr«< U.    IJ    I    <>*     tajM-l    l».(t|««,    Sol
i ay, »♦  ,"<>*.   {sue,  j«pr u*«t
jUemonsde ("wwosi   u lei Um  4"*
jalu*utro, i* No  I '»'•». pet Sot
Mustard,   11 * 00   U*M  i>*f  Stt
■ • r*fy   -wot.   Si  i  >•*   ;-■•'.'..««   ij't
*rjt»'   IHwtJsvs   pat   Set    U   SM   I <''•,
raitlt  s*i*ose)
fat, Malkina Best, lee feat, bsg*a
Its*.    *d.*lk.n #    |i«-*t      immfi* ,.    iu   tj»,
and JO  '*,•    »«*•*
"*>.*.  . N toria *
. in*fg*r, ii <jt
A ;-.- e * ■ ■ -1    sot
i '*»}. .',:.r      SOS
(.linger,   d *
Ctoiaamoa    <*"a
llfati ■   l vpiMtr, i*
i mM*1   >|i t«-»J    |«
I      art*    ;*     in
It*****   pet  d -
,\5i #py,,-« in  sn
Ope r *. Pa {Mil a
> pi < *   's ...'■ sn*e
111   I i
til      r«     '   .    . r»      u
,iw     Ht   |g
f. ■ i «•>*, pee dot
d *
1 9M
2 10
I II
l|
ld>
I fc?
4. , |
I M
l is
I  **
. si
i .
I M
U
II
I ll
l'AHW.5   A   MAODOC*   CO      LTD
\ sd let V'attc)  I - it I I   >■     sty I   Uss
i  Hi   in I   .i •
•.. ■   al*   •:   .    ,  -   < . . « ■ , •
it*   hrt-yji»
Aftaaffta   ttrwi  I i rwai  n     INttii
'•     . * s
l.*Vo-,»*d*!w   | If i . ., ■! , ■      i°|)wm
J'* IT*-    p**
|t|a>*v bard
j SS   :: {if. «
l*-rapi«ret«*d    M I
:'-   IS      ' .. i   '      |   '
i la
H0VAI    CROWN   SOACS
!. i.Ypws    kmi    ia
1 I      Vl « M 5     P*  K, i       S a
Kkt-i4j I •■
r.. rai f*rowo t. .-«■
M    . ,:i   i".-,, a •:    \\ ., s"   rt|    ■    iwtb
lt..)»5 t*fown  VVe-diittg   iv*   ,
>     ' ■ ••   W >■■>>.  v,   - - •..
it rs!   • Vt»ta     Nept
I;  rati Vr»m     ■   . . -
Croew   i i i ■   < ■
i *»!.;<•   , ■
I  (t*Utin   • ''ai r.*     JO ■»
ftuyal  <>*»w*-,   |s*wt   Ammonia
,   ..-.'!      t.t'll™
Standard »>•.><■    •   ■,-■ • .-. .,
■ ■ aaii   ;- itlea
Wj.ft h«*«i gbevint  • . i.-   ii
VV !(■'■.    I«ae.      N
< SO
,;,««
13
i
i -jnr.,9,  *..  dos   lo bos. i*« dos * I
Sel Bode.  5 tnt) lots «!»*«•» so Ibt   •■ ■  "
VANCOUVtR   MILLING   A   GRAIN   CO
H " 'I   H(ftr>da*d    iU-
•I'atbio.J v
Laos   tH«n   , j,   1 ., 1    \, jt   ,n„f   }   jj,,,
*I«ast than IS t<M»
lO-ita,  *tin**ia gunnies
5   giinnir*   Iota   «nd   »»*>rf
Wild  tt.«»*  Fkuir.   4>»
"ir-tfio bote
1" bbts   and  oral
• " Ifta,  Single  funn aa
*» eii(i»»»«w lot* and oetf
WbOla WllStl  a*tt| rtmhnrn.  I'll*
Slngts bbls
10-lOs, Single lunn'ee
VV »i,vit
• 'ni*.   wbnle   <•! >
''i*t». ir   BDrt -pround {SB)
• •oiw   pulverlsiHl
Barley,  wh.>!»>
Berle)   ground
Corn,   wnoln
Corn,   ft
Cornmeal, fw.i
I'm n
Bhorta
Bcratoh
Poultry mash  i*hi
in ■   Hoppi 1
Pork   Chop
I'tU tv
All prii «•„ delivered Vancouver except
marked •
THIS MBRCHaiNT KN0W8 THE
NEW NEIGHBOR 8 NAME
"I will pay $1 (a fee first person
arho infornu arte of a aaw family in
thf iu'iK'hl>inirJu><nl," i.s thd mensage
earned by a promineat sigo m the
StOTfl of I Huinirlian mtTihaut. Naturally, be knows the nanus of the
Dewcomen within 1 few hours after
their arrival Uu- neigbboortood
children see to that. The merchant
sends one of bis clerks to eaU 00
the newcomer,  t»-lls of the various
chorchea, schools and stores in the
mrroufidings and toeidentaily informs then that h<- vvoulii appreciate
theif trade. Uy this courteous means
h** has buill up a remarkable trad'.-,
win h is onstantiy increasing as old
residents who have honghi elsewhere
iOt replacea by the new Deighbours
v. ho   patroniae   Ins   h|ore.    Business
K- •. i< v   Si  John. N'.li.
THE CREED OF HAPPINESS
Del up right m the morning, Go
to bad Bright it night   Start with
joy in your heart, hope IH the future, kindness in your purpose.
If it ih 1 dark day, never mind,
you will brighten it up. If it is ;i
bright day, you will add to th-*
brightness Give s word <>f cheer, n
kindly greeting and s warm band-
shake to your friends If you have
enemies, look up, pass them by, forget and try to forgive,
!f all of us would only think how
much of human happiness is made
bv ourselves, there would be less of
human misery.
If nil of us would hear in mind
that happiness is from within and
not from without, there would be a
well sprint* of joy m every heart
and the sun would shine for ever.
Trv it'
UN
1: o»
II H
t 10
1110
u to
: 10
1.00
11 rs)
* is
ft) OS
*4 00
:,; r»>
cj ...»
- . .'■
u m
w 00
;.; , 0
4!» fffl
14 I) I
JO 00
TCI 00
To 00
|| Ml
lli,'»,i
"Thmk naught a trifle though il
small appear;
"Small sands the mountain, moments make the year,
"Am! trifles, life.'*
IT IS NOT ALWAYS EAST
I o
'It
Jo
Jo
To
To
To
To
To
To
To
To
To
I'd
apologize,
l>oj*iii over,
admit error,
be unselfish.
take advice,
be charitable,
be considerate,
keep on trying,
think and then act,
profit by mistakes,
forgive and forget,
shoulder a deserved blame,
T IT ALWAYS PAYS.
—Dohertv News.
DO UNTO OTHERS"
Have you read over the "Addresses Wanted" column 1 We get
00 pay for this you get no pay,
either, hut we both benefit some
trade members, You may want the
same service yourself and will expect our other subscribers to look
down the list for your henefit. Have
s glance at the long list in this issue
and help the other man!
WHY THE SALE WAS NOT MADE
h is not humanly possible to sell
to everyone who comes into the
store, but a record of the reason why
a sale is not made will furnish important data for future buying and
as a basis for developing better salesmanship. One dealer requires his
salesmen to fill out a blank stating
the reason for each failure to make
a sale. One result has heen that it
was found to be easier to put more
effort into closing a sale than to
think   up  S   reason   to  put  on   the
blank. Such a plan, if diplomatically explained, will he accepted as
giving the salesman a voice in the
management. Otherwise it may
cause dissatisfaction among the
salespeople -Business Review, St.
John's, X.B.
By taking revenge a man is but
even with his enemy; but in passing
over it, he is superior.--Baeon.
FOR NON-SUBSCRIBERS
, „, this out ami mall to the officii of the UC, Retailer/' 803 London
ButkUng, Vancouver, B.C
PI-mm Mod the "n. Retailer" for a year to the .undersignevl at the
kddr*si given, for whiea 1 en. lose tl.   (Please write plainly.)
N \ M !•
I'D   ADDKKSS :N
THE BRITISH COLFMHI \  RKTA
WILSON BROTHERS
Established
h-wl   ISA I
Our Motto  is " SER\ ICfc
We cannot offer to sell you goods cheaper I
iw fir
•     ft'f    CA  1
give a-i i
pr
ECONOMY
i » ti
So^ WILSON BROTHERS, VICTORIA. B.C
a»fc -'-.    -.  esi •» -*'■ ■    *        •«.
iv**-. >y!TvOTr-i '-*f
\ -,  •   ■ *  '   A v i  > 4 '    • « j •
inc tMRRft?aja*rSTANDARD '>:';'V .
CREAMERY i.W BUTTER   >*
SHAMROCK BRAND
Stands (or the Highest Grade Butter
It is our endeavour to m;    "      tin   11
MKND '; > I)
Rclialiilil \ Lr<>es ■
t Si
;i < < >M
v
VMRi
K
; i; \ \ ' i
P. Burns & Company, Limited
VANCOUVER
CALGARY
EDMONTON
i
I
EFFICIENCY Brand Heavy Rubber Footwear
HIP, STORM KING
and KNEE BOOTS
Brown and Whit*
N
K.  r I
THREE, FOUR and SIX
EYELET LUMBERMEN'S
WE ALSO CARRY A LARGE STOCK OK    MALTESE CROSS     BRAND  HOOTS    LUMBERMEN'S
-AND LIGHT RUBBERS. S.-...I V..„r K„:,h 0, I,,    to U
Gutta  Percha &  Rubber,  Ltd.
526 BEATTY STREET, VANCOUVER
664 YATES STREET, VICTORIA
i, Vancouver's Most Up-to-date Flour and Feed Mill
with ii
*
liailLH
FLOUR, FEED & P
T
JLi
FOODS
QUALITY AND SERVICE GUARANTEED
I.I   UU   v
tc
Victory Flour Mills, Limited
806  BEACH  AVENUE
VANCOUVER,   B.C.
PI   oei    S"
... i^      o.., to      .i^'ii
L
THE CONSTANTLY INCREASING DEMAND
for that wholesome cereal beverage
\v  (J
cereal
makes it good business judgment tor
the grocer to keep well stocked.
Postum comes in two (onus Postum
Cereal -theoriginal form mustbewell-
boiled to bring out its full, rich flavor.
Instant Postum, the soluble form, requires
no boiling, but is made in the cup instantly,
- ^^
NSTANT
POSTUM
A  BrVERAGE
The profit is good and the sale is guaranteed
Canadian Postum Cereal Company, Ltd., Windsor, Ont, Canada '
I
I !
i
Swift's Premium Oleomargarine
Qie     &
j r
IV TIMES I IF IIKJU !'!;!< Ks Till |    U)   W
Is A COXSIDF UAIJLE ITEM |\      (H s \     <    i >]
PREMIUM OL] OM UxMiALMXE CAN I!        sM)
lo\
i»
W
I is USED. \\|i w
THE Ilftil] ci 1ST OF U\ IX(j.
FOR  SALE  BY ALL DEALERS
\ i
M   I
Swift Canadian Company, Limited
Vancouver      New Westminster       Vict i tf*i   ,n        r i	
Edm
nf nn
■

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