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The British Columbia Retailer May 31, 1921

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 THIRTEENTH  YEAR
MAY,   1921
Tm British Columbia
i
Dry Goods - Groceries - Hardware - General Merchandise
20c Per Copy; $2.00 Per Year.
Vol. XII, No. 9
VANCOUVER, B.C.
I
You Cannot Have
Good Bread
Unless You Use
Good Flour
OGILVIE'S
Royal Household Flour
Is the Realization of All That is Best in Flour
THE
Ogilvie Flo-ur
Vancouver, B. C.
Co.,
314 Dominion Bldg.
Phone Sey. 6891 » n	
Mr. Retailer:—
How're your Figures to-day?
'Pretty slow, eh     business much more of a picnic
wilhout 'em—We'll say so
BUT this little fellow will
keep all your figures in
the pink of condition   every
time and all the
time.
Price only $185
Term* if d.tir.d
And You'll Never Get the
FIGURATION BLUES."
Let Us Show You—We'll Be Pleased to Do So.
BURROUGHS
Adding • Bookkeeping • Calculating Machines
E.  C. COLEMAN,  Manager for  B.C.
119 Pender W. VANCOUVER, B.C.
Try These
Papers
< lefflii  Kails  Krafl   niul   Manila  papers ar ■
now h'tljjrd ; i he i ijual lo ' he I iiiest made
;.ii\\\ip,i.      T'Hijfli   and   stroi /   I'odii'M,  clt'au
colon d   11■• ■■  will i-HjH't'iiilh  r<   n   im-ud ' l*"*ni
st']vi'S nl tin   I ' •' Irui
an i   \ 0\\   V ill   tin,
tilt-til lo use ■
i'P thi  \\ lie»!
if.', madi   - ill '   '   U.I
fn •  ni! added induei
<   .\    • • '   ■   !i     \\ ••    U ,t!
-,' '  \      ■
Smith, Davidson & Wright, Ltd.
Manufacturers  and  Wholesale   Paper  Dealers
VANCOUVER and VICTORIA. B.C.
B.C. District Telegraph & Delivery Co., Limited
Operating in Connection with Great North Western Telegraph Co.       616 HASTINGS STREET WEST
With which is amalgamated FIRE PATOLS LIMITED
Seymour G51
ELECTRIC PROTECTION AGAINST BURGLARY       MANUAL FIRE ALARMS
CENTRAL STATION SYSTEM OF NIGHT WATCH SIGNALS
ELECTRIC SUPERVISION OF AUTOMATIC SPRINKLER SYSTEMS
During the Past Year Our Patrols Reported
and Attended to:
403 DOORS LEFT OPEN.
190 WINDOWS LEFT OPEN or BROKEN.
454 LIGHTS Left ON by Accident.
87 LIGHTS Left OFF by Accident.
17 SAFES Left OPEN by Accident.
FIRE PROTECTION ADVISORY DEPT.
WATCHMAN'S PATROL.
MERCHANTS' POLICE.
SPECIAL SALVAGE.
LIGHT CONTROL
UNIFORMED MESSENGER SERVICE.
We Work in Co-operation with the City Fire and  Police  Departments,
We Answered 207 FIRE CALLS Threatening Our Clients
Phone or Write for Further Information, 1921
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
307
Clerk D is making change from his cash drawer. The amount of the sale is
shown at the top ol the register. The other clerk is handing change and parcel
to the customer.   He made change from his own cash drawer.
A separate cash drawer (or each clerk
This makes clerks more efficient because:
1. Each clerk is responsible for  the  business  he  handles.
2. In case of error it shows who made the mistake.
3. It gives each clerk credit for the work he does.
An up-to-date National Cash Register with separate cash
drawers measures the ability of each clerk.
Up-to-date National Cash Registers are made with any
number of cash drawers, from one to nine
We make cash re#stds for every line of business
NATIONAL
CASH  REGISTER CO.
OF   CANADA  LIMITED
ii; 308
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Mi
;i\
ROGERS'
GOLDEN SYRUP
"The End of a Perfect Day"
flMade from finest flavoured cane sugar, a special grade of which is imported for the
purpose.
fPut up in all sizes of packages to suit your customers' requirements,
fin packages designed to beautify your store,
2-lb. tins, 24 to a case. 10-lb. tins, G to a case.
5-lb. tins, 12 to a case. 20-lb. tins, 8 to a case.
Perfect Seal jars, 12 to a case.
The British Columbia Sugar Refining Go. Ltd.
VANCOUVER, B.C. 1921
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
309
St. Francis Hotel
Directly opposite C.P.R, Dcpol and one block
from   Poal   Office  and   the  business  centre,
MODERN IN BVERY RESPECT
European Plan, $1.50 Up.   Cafe in Connection.
J. NATION & SON, Managers.
Patronize Home Industry
BUY
COLUMBIA BRAND
Writing Tablets
— and —
School Supplies
Made in B.C.
Wrapping Paper, Twine, St. Lawrence
Paper Bags, Toilet Paper, Picnic
Sundries and Stationery
Columbia Paper Co., Ltd.
VANCOUVER and VICTORIA, B.C.
Lake of the Woods
Milling: Company
LIMITED
Makers of
FIVE ROSES
•FLOUR'
The World's Best
Daily Capacity 14,200 Bbls.
B.C. Offices and Warehouses:
1300 Richards Street 1614 Store Street
VANCOUVER VICTORIA
Match
Satisfaction
Eddy's Matches, perfected
through some 70 years of match
making experience! are all that
tlu> most critical match user can
wish tor.
Thirty to forty different brands
—a. match for every purpose--
Ions matches, short matches,
smokers* matches, household
matches, etc.
The name Eddy on the box assures a satisfied customer.
Made in Canada, by Canadians,
for Canadians,
THE E. B. EDDY CO, LIMITED
HULL, CANADA. 310
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA  RETAILER
Ma-
MR. RETAILER	
You will find it easy to speed
up your sale6 if you will cooperate with our advertising
department
Our newspaper advertising campaigns for the coming
year addressed to the housewife are unusually strong
in appeal, particularly those for ROYAL STANDARD
Flour and and WILD ROSE delicious Pastry Flour.
The difference between these two products the one
from the hard kernelled wheat and the Other from soft
wheat, is pointed out in forcible maimer, the advantages being shewn from the standpoints of doth satisfactory baking results and economy. Books showing
these campaigns are in preparation an! we shall be
pleased to forward you copies when they are completed,
These will show you what we are doing to htdp you
sell these products and how you can help us t<> help
you.
Royal Standard
FLOUR
MAKES LIGHTER, WHITER BREAD''
This slogan will be backed up by strong "rtiison why"
advertising, shOWt&J the housewife BOW thll iplendid
flour is made from "the beat of the best wheat" Tho
m<*!ern milling process** by vrbJcb thin superlative
quality is attained will be ibOWB by drawings of tin?
machinery, the interior of the rarJoni units, and ot the
laboratory. The food qualities will be emphasised a»
will the cleanliness of the processes
Wild Rose Pastry Flour
The appetite appeal will be emphasised Is this campaign. The richness of the flow and the economy of
its use instead of ordinary n<>nr tox pastry
She Will Ask for These Flours Will You
Give Them to Her0
Vancouver Milling & Grain Co., Limited
OFFICES AND MILLS
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Branches: Victoria. Nanaimo, New Westminster, Mission City.
Agencies: Duncan, Courtcnay, Lansjley Prairie, Cbvcrdalc, Ladner.
J. C. WILSON, LIMITED
-Makers of
The " Standard " Paper Bag
UNEQUALLED FOR STRENGTH AND DURABILITY
Phone Sey. 781
And of the following lines:—
Greaseproof Paper Pie Plates
Stationery
Ice Cream Plates
Oyster Pails
Twines
Wrapping Paper
Toilet Paper
Phone Sey. 781
1068 HOMER STREET
VANCOUVER,  B.C. 1921
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
311
§6* J^IT'S" COLUMBIA
Rltaillr
Published Monthly.
THIRTEENTH YEAR
GROCERIES, DRYGOODS,
HARDWARE,
QBNBRAL MERCHANDISE
OFFICIAL ORGAN OF B.C. BOARD
RETAIL MERCHANTS'
ASSOCIATION OF CANADA.
A MONTHLY JOURNAL published in the interesl of Retail Merchandising find tlie Development of Commerce in Western Canada.
BUBS! R1PTION RATE: Two Dollari Per Year, payable in advance.
Advertising Kates on Application.
Editor: J. 8. MORRISON        Publishers: Progress Publishing Co., Ltd.
EDITORIAL AND BUSINESS OFFICES:
LONDON BUILDING, VANCOUVER,  B.C.
Cable Address: "SHIPPING." All Codes Used,
Telephone, Seymour 3861.
Vol. XII. So. 9
MAY. 1921
Vancouver, B.C.
EDETORIa
j g-1
"A distinct win for tli" retail merchant." Such was the verdict contained In the Dominion Secretary'-*
wire received at the provincial office
of the KM A. in connection with the
reccnl budget address.
Mr. Trowern alluded to Iho sales
tax being confined to lhe manufac
turer and the importer. This h \h
been persistently advocated by lhe
Retail Merchants Association during
the whole of last ) ear. Quite recently an influential delegation of retail
merchants called upon the Finance
M inster, pointing oul that, shoul 1
the Government extend lhe Bali s tax
lo all retailers, a-* had been ad\ocat■
de by certain commercial bodies
considerable confusion would necessarily follow, as was the case 111 tllC
attempt made to collect the luxury
lax through the retailer last } car,
A resolution of tht ' Jonfectionery
Section of the R.M.A, was forwarded BOme  time siliee  lo (Mtaw fl  ftdVO
eating th-o removal of luxury tax
with which they were still burdened.
This tax has now been abolished,
"What Is a Manufacturer?"
One question, however, whieh vel
remains unsolved, Is the definition
of n manufacturer, 11 is at present
difficult to determine lhe respective
spheres of action of the legitimate
manufacturer who manufactures for
distribution to the wholesale and retail trade only, and the many thousands of retailers who do a small
manufacturing husiness for immediate sale to consumers. Tins extensive class of retail merchants has been
advised by the Association's Dominion President to refrain from taking
oul a manufacturers' license, at the
same time promising protection to
such as are members of the Association, should action be taken against
them.
The Anti-Dumping Clause
The anti-dumping' clause contained in the new budget will be welcomed by the automobile trade dealing' in tires and accessories, who are
constantly faced with the competition of unknown and substandard
grades of goods frequently in evidence upon the ('auadiau market.
The DOW budget certainly demonstrates the value of co-operative effort in bringing forcibly to the attention of the (lovernmenl the aut-
molies and injustice of various forms
of taxation. It would be impossible
individually for retail merchants to
produce the effect attained by an
association such as the R.M A.
it is specifically set forth that merchant tailors, milliners and others
coming' under that heading in regard
to the provisions of the sales tax, will
in future be listed as retailers in the
full meaning' of the word.
Referring to the excise or sales
tax the new regulation says:
'That the excise taxes specified
in this section shall not be payable
on g'oods exported aud on sales of
goods made to the order of each individual customer by a. business
which sells exclusively by retail."
This takes care of future business,
but there is no provision for the
past.
The confectioners' case is still being' fought at Ottawa. Efforts are
heing' made to have any rulings of
the court made retroactive to May
19 of last year.
The Association is also pressing
for a ruling' on the general position
of the retailer and his status within
the meaning' of the Special War Revenue Act. The Association takes the
view that since the largest part of
any retailers' husiness is retailing,
he should be classed as a retailer,
purely and simply.
LATEST FROM OTTAWA
The following wire was received
on the 20th iiist. from Dominion
headquarters:
"The decision of the Exchange
Court in the test case taken by the
Government against members of our
Merchant Tailors Section to compel
them to take out a manufacturer's
license, and pay a salt's tax, was
rendered to-day in our favor, and it
also covers the list of other reta-1
sections.
CONVENTION.
The Dominion Convention will be
held this vear at the Fort Garry
Hotel in Winnipeg on August 22no
and the three following' days. Tlie
first day of the session will take the
form of a secretaries' conference,
which is now a permanent feature of
the Dominion Convention programme. Delegates will probably be sent
from the coast, including' Mr. George
II. McRobbie, who is the Coast representative on the Dominion Board.
APOLOGY
since the foregoing, advice has
been received at the offices of the
Retail Merchants' Association, bringing the gratifying information to the
members of thai organization, thai
under a ruling obtained at Ottawa
Owing' to the printers strike we
are somewhat late in publishing this
issue, also we have heen unable to
include some of Our regular features
as fully as usual, for which we ask
the indulgence of our readers. 312
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Mhv
Wholesaler, Retailer and Consumer
Important Conference held in Vancouver on the Privileges and Rights of Each.
■
f.
i
An atmosphere of continuous friction, and consequent loss of energy,
has been produced in the methods of
distributing groceries, by various
forms of unfair competition.
Concerns whose immense buying'
power, unless accompanied by a true
sense oi responsibility, arc a menace
to sound merchandising■ the spread
of Oriental competition; the absence
of any standard by which the legitimate retailer can he measured, and
last hut not least, the policy (or lack
of policy) l>y which some wholesale
houses have increased their turnover
by  selling'  direct   to  the  consumer,
are factors constituting a challenge
to the honest and enterprising groc
er. which he cannot afford to ignore
Having realized that a remedy
must he found before the situation
becomes desperate, the conference
called through the initiative of tie
Grocers' Section of the Vancouver
branch of the K.M.A.. and held in
Vancouver on April 13 and 14. was
the most hopeful event that has occurred in the grocery business for
some time past.
Although a general invitation wl!
extended to grocers and Btorekeepi tr
throughout the province to participate at the convention, unforseen
circumstances did not permit a thorough preparation, whieh such a con.
vention called for, and consequently
the attendance was not all that could
have been deisred.
Notwithstanding this fact, the Pro.
vincial Secretary produced a numl
er of questionnaires, which he stated
had hen filled iu by individuals a-
far apart as Prince George in Northern and Cranbrook in Southern Brit-
ish Columbia, and returned to him.
The conference lost no time get
ting down to husiness. ami chairman
llarkncss appointed  a  Resolutions
Committee, comprising Messrs. A. P.
0. MacDonald, New Westminster,
T. V. McDowell of Vancouver, an I
Geo. S. McKenzie of Kelowna. The
following' resolutions were introduced and adopted:
"WHEREAS, it is now the custom
for retail grocers to he assessed a fee
by the Government for the inspection
of their weights and measures, and
WHEREAS this meeting' considers
this custom to he an imposition on
the retailer inasmuch its ihe inspection of weights and measures is expressly for the protection of the public, litt LT THEREFORE RESOLV-
ED that a strong' protest be forward-
i-    i i
ed  to the Governnfen!   protesting'
against this custom with a view to
having same eliminated and having
all weights am! measures inspected
free  of charge  to the  retailer,  and
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that
we recommend to tins convention
that  action  he taken  immediately
with  it view   to having  the Govern
ment   enact  a  law  whereby  the  n I
weight of all commodities should he
stamped on the packages of such
commodity originating at the factory
or packing ';•■ is. or plant before the
same is plac u "ji ihe market for dis
t ribution and sale."
Both the foregoing resolutions em
attated from the Grocers  Section ol
the MeW Westminster Branch of the
K.M.A.
The theme in which the largi si
number of grocers were interested
was the matter of v*", . . >a!. •, selling
to consumers and the Provincial
Secretary announced that every
questionnaire returned lo thi ■•■''
conveying suggestions for the e*oti
sideration of the convention placed
this subject fir-" .... i I oi cm oat Tl ■■
!' olutions Committee in dealing
with tins issue, brovight in the following resolul ion i
■ WHEREAS the retail gro ers of
this Province of British Columbia ia
convention assembled protest against
ihe encroachment of the wholesa ■
grocers upon their legitimate trade
by selling t" hotels, restaurants,
hospitals, logging camps saw mills.
ig boats .tarmers, contractors, sec
tion  men,  bridge  orewa,  hoarding
houses, or any one of them, thus t.i'.
ing away the legitimate trade of the
retail grocers, which We consider i*.
detrimental   to  our  interest,   and   if
continued must jeopardise our finan
• •iiiI investment and seriously impair
Our   ability   to   remain   in   husiness,
and WHEREAS is is the custom of
wholesale grocers to sell their em-
loyCCS ill cost, and as said employees
are abusing the privilege by supplying their friends at cost prices, and
WHEREAS retailers iu almost all
other  Jims   of   trade,   particularly
tobacconists and confectioners, are
able to get groceries fit cost, and
WHEREAS the retail grocery trade
is the acknowledged system nf distribution to the consuming puhlie,
THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED
THAT this convention of retail groc
ers demand  the discontinuance of
this practice immediately, and forth
er demand that tin- wholesale grocers
confiue their sales to the legitimati
retail grocer,"
This  resolution  formed   the  basis
of a joint st ssioii of wholesalers and
retailers, whieh convened on the
morning of Thursday, April lith,
ami without doubt was the most
si i essful of i he entire convi n
lion,     Among   those    present  n
presenting    the    wholesale    grOCl r*t
trade  wen      Messrs,  a   Badenocli
f thi W< sti tn Grocers Ltd., •'. P l».
\\ Ikin "f VV, II  Malkin a Co . T G
S?
K   01
lhe  A    M.ieOonald  *
u
;; w Mcintosh, and P M KcU) of
KcIIt • Douglas & I '©., J, Phillip* ot
John Phillips -\ Co.
Iu the discission uhieh centred
ai otind this i csolul ion, ■ some plain
au\amislu i ti ithi were itat< I, m I
iheri could bi no mam ■ r ol d • i
left in the minds of both w holcsah < s
and rets • rs tl si the grocers of this
pro\ inci are determined to ass* * I
their legitimate rights, and to protect
then  ' ■ ■": ■ B   '     pott er of organic
• d rffori     11 was o  i io is j   impoi
•   ' aeh a final understands '
on this i th stion, to raeel ■ \ ■ ■ y con
tingene)  win. h mny  arise ,; row "
out  tin   ;•■ ot im -•   but  the d< sii
iltii   •••;    ' ■ ached  I     joinl  sgn
• • ol both wholesalers and retail'
ei s now pis cm (h< control ol the ru
tail  busineus  where  it   belongs   in
< ' da of th   retai   I! adc   and n
di pend cntin <;• upon the alei t
id ti isilom, displayed by I
grocei s   nnd   general   stor< keeper*
throughout  thi   pro**woe. and  \ ar
ticularl*)  1>\  (hi  organi** I   inits ol
• '•   R M   \ ,  as tO h0*S   effective will
be the cheek  pla 'ed  upon tit*) •
eroachmeut of the wholesaler into
I he retailer's field of act ion in I >
lure.
The i■ solution vthieh ilms gives to
the retailers the pott er to deal w ith
this question reads as follow s \
"WHEREAS this meeting of
wholesalers and retailers engage!
in the distribution of groceries in
this prot inCO  is unanimously of the
opinion that cverv effort should i"1
made to conserve the legitimate m*
ti i cats of both wholesale*"* and re
tailera, and as far as possible defin
t he limits of t he respect ivc torritor
ies in  which  wholesalers and retail
ei s may *-«• I i• • 11 business,
IT IS HEREBY RESOLVED fclial
;i committee representing the grocers
of B.C. he appointed at  the enuven
tion of the retail  grocers today and
tluil  the functions of this coininitte ■ 1D2J
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
31'}
shall be to prepare a list as nearly a*
possible Province-wide in its application, such list to contain the names ot
parties who may lie considered to be
entitled to wholesalers' prices,
IT   IS   FURTHER   RESOLVED
that the committee mentioned in the
foregoing shall meet the representatives of the wholesale houses in tin.'
immediate future for the purpose of
considering the list prepared by them
and that the final agreement reached
between the said committee and tlie
wholesale bouses shall be filed with
all branches of the Retail Merchants'
Association of Canada iu this Province, nnd with the wholesale houses
concerned.
IT   IS   FURTHER   RESOLVED
that in CS8CS in which wholesale
houses are invited to supply persons,
firms or corporations whose names
do not appear upon the list which
may he agreed upon, shall file particulars with the Provincial Secretary of the Retail Merchants' Association of Canada, who shall cooperate With the wholesale houses
in   securing   immediate   information
from the locality from which the application  conies  for  tlie  purpose ol
ascertaining whether such  parties
lire entitled to have their names
added to the list agreed upon."
The Groceteria Menace.
This matter of  Province wide importance   having   thus   I n   dealt
with, tin nvention gave consider-
able attention to the practice of certain large retail grocery establishments in Van 'Oliver, who are using
tlour purchasing power and business-
getting machinery to retail to the
consumer at prices below those which
their competitors can buy at, or even
below   the   cost   to   tllClllSelves.     Th'1
Provincial   Secretary   very   clearly
stated that K.M.A.. or any section of
it, was not organised for the purpose of stifling competition by arbitrary price agreements, either positive or implied, and with the representatives id' the three largest department stores of Vancouver present, lie pointed out that the grocers
of the city and province were not
evincing any personal animosities
against   the   heads   of   the depart-
ment stores concerned. They were,
however, of the opinion that they
bad a legitimate ground for complaint against a policy, which, if relentlessly pursued, must ultimately
have the effect  of destroying their
business, which to many of them represented their lifes' achievement
ami tlie investment of all that they
possessed.
G. A. H. PORTE
For the past ten years assistant
manager of the Hudson's Bay Co.
at Vancouver, has been appointed
to the position of General manager
of the Company's magnificent new
store  at Victoria.
Unfair Competition Immoral.
The situation was admirably summarised by delegate Geo. S. MeKen-
zie of Kelowna, who stated that the
man who sells goods for less than Ii"
can purchase them is guilty of an immoral act, because by this practice lie
undermines public confidence in his
competitors, who are doing business
upon ;i sound and reasonable basis.
The challenge thus thrown out was
taken up by Mr. W. 0, Woodward of
the department store, Mr. Victor
Spencer of David Spencer Ltd., and
Mr. .1. II. Kichdale of the Hudsons*
Bay Co. The luncheon hour prevented a conclusion of the subject at that
time, but the way was paved for a
further conference of all parties, and
to the credit of the convention it
may be stated that while individuals
retained their independence of outlook and freedom of expression, no
unpleasant impressions were left behind, aud it is not too much to say
that the situation thus courageously
faced is already on the way to satisfactory adjustment.
The Oriental Question.
At the afternoon session on Thursday, April 14th, the outsanding feature was jin address on the Oriental
question by Mr. Paul Findlay of the
California Fruit Growers Exchange.
Mr. Findlay swept aside all the surface talk on the Oriental question,
and plunged into fundimentals immediately.     His   most   outstanding
utterance was unquestionably, that
since the Oriental is here bv invita-
tion,  any  attempt   to   regulate  his
conduct  or  thwart   his commercial
ambitions while here, must inevitably be fraught with tremendous difficulties,  because the theory  of our
citizenship is equal rights to all and
special privileges to none.   We did,
he stated, have a right to approach
the question  from an entirely different angle which would be that because East is East and West is West,
and because the Occidental and the
Oriental   were   never   intended   to
blend, it  was impossible to permit
any further immigration of Asiatic
races into Canada.   Were we to take
this stand, said Mr. Findlay, we stood
upon our rights as a sovereign people
and we did not have to explain or
apologise to anyone for our action.
The  moment    we    step    off    that
firm ground and become involved in
questions of competitive merchandising, the difference in standards of
living between Oriental and the white
population, we must become involved   in  t'oniproinise.   argumenjb  and
finally bitterness, without achieving
the object we had in mind.   We cannot assimilate the Oriental into our
national life, and because of this fact
we   should   refuse   him   admittance
under any consideration whatsoever.
The speaker's line of reasoning was
closely followed, and an intelligent
discussion   followed.    Later  in  the
afternoon   the   following   resolution
was adopted with reference to this
matter:
"WHEREAS the continued immigration of the Oriental into this Province constitutes the most serious
social menace facing the citizens of
B.C.. this convention of retail grocers
here assembled protests against this
immigration and requests the executive officers of the B.C. Board to
bring influence to bear upon the proper authorities to absolutely shut
out the immigration referred to.''
Legislation  to  Make   Combination
Sales Illegal.
ruder the heading of "New Business" a resolution was introduced
by Mr. T. F. McDowell of Vancouver, and received the endorsement of
the convention, The resolution,
which reads as follows, deals with
the matter of what are popularly
known as Combination Sales, and is
particularly opportune at this time: 314
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
M.:-
WHEREAS it is the practice of
certain retailers to feature certain
lines of merchandise at less than cost
nuiking it obligatory upon the purchaser to purchase other articles in
order to obtain the article so advertised, which practise is detrimental
to good clean honest merchandising,
IT IS HEREBY RESOLVED that
the influence of the B.C. Board be
requested to secure Provincial Legislation making such practises illegal."
Provincial Grocers' Section of the
R.M.A. Formed.
The concluding item upon tin4 convention agenda was a resolution
which created a Provincial Grocers
Section of the Board of the K.M.A.
of Canada, the officers <>f which are;
Mr. T. II. White, chairman, Vancou-
ver:Mr. A. P. G. McDonald, 1st vice-
president, New Westminster; Mr.G.
S. McKenzie, 2nd vice-president, Kelowna* Mr. S. .1. Wilson, treasurer,
Kamloops; Provincial Secretary
G, S. Hougham as section secretary.
This brought the official business
of the convention to a close.
The report of the convention would
be very incomplete if no mention
were  made  of  tlie  address   by   Mr.
Paul Findlay, Retail Merchandising
Manager for the California Fruit
(•rowers Exchange, which was delivered in the Navy League Headquarters on Thursday evening. April 14th.
Mr. Findlay s address deserves an
article to itself, but as space cannot
be afforded in this issue for this purpose.  We  are  compelled   to  condense
our comment upon it to remarking
thai it was undoubtedly the most
practical talk ever delivered by a
grocer to grocers in this province,
Mr. Findlay's remarks were punctuated by it sparkling humour and illustrated by lighning calculations
upon the blackboard, which kept his
audience in a continual ripple of
amusement and expectation, and the
evening wiis voted an entire success
by every individual present.
It only remains for the officers
appointed by the convention to follow up the resolutions passed, with
vigour and insistence, to make of the
convention itself a definite starting
point for the improvement of condi*
tions for grocers and general store
keepers throughout the province.
The Difficult Art of Talking
Just Enough
(By George W. Hopkins.)
The trouble with the country is
that it has too many people in it who
would rather be a +1 an hour man
oul of ;i job than a 50 cent man on a
j my roll.
"Did you every try the doctrine
of scientific simplicity m selling
goods?" asked George W. Hopkins,
sales and advertising manager of
the Columbia Grapliopiioue Co, in
the course of an address to the members of the Poor Richard Club in
Philadelphia some time ago.
"Did you ever, for example, watch
what happens when a customer approaches one of those Greek or Italian banana vendors on the corner!
" 'How much are your bananas i
half dozen*' inquires the customer.
The street merchant doesn't say a
thing. He just reaches out. selects
six bananas, slips them into an ever-
ready bag. hands them to the customer    and    remarks,    laconically,
'Twenty cent.'
«
Scientifically Simple
"That's salesmanship, That's
scientific simplicity carried to the
ultimate and made doubly forceful
by the very lack of argument and
comment, lie takes it lor granted
that the customer is interested, else
he would not have asked the pri^e.
He doesn't run tlie risk of getting
into a discussion, and be doesn't hesitate in delivery. Three motions of
the hand, two words and the sale is
made.
"That is one of the reasons that I
am always hammering home to my
salesmen the doctrine of being scientifically simple of saying as  little
as possible and making every word
and every movement produce results.
When you get right down to it, the
less you say. the more you will ac
complish, anyhow.
Working Prospects on the Ply
"I remember, a few years ago
when the Remington Typewriter Co.
put a premium upon the calls made
by their salesmen, there was one
man who thought he saw an easy
way to make money. He would wander rapidly down the stret. going
into every store and every office ho
came to. opening the door and calling in 'Want to buy a Kemington
typewriter today?' Of course, the
answer was always in the negative.
So he would go on to the next place
and by nightfall would have a list of
'calls made' as long as your arm.
It got him the money from the home
office and it did more In a couple
of months he found that a considerable number of people had became
interested   mi   the   Remington   jvu-it
through bis very persistence and the
fact that ho used unusually simple
methods.
"Christ Himself was one 0f the
greatest of salesmen.    He knew the
language of the people. He never
used a two-syllable won! when one
half as long would serve tlie purpose. IB* ipoke (>r preached -or
sold in the most concise and definite form imaginable and, when it
was necessary to draw comparisons,
He made them with familiar objects
and couched them in language which
i ould not be misunderstood.
Tries Out Sales Plans on Child
"It is because of this doctrine of
scientific   simplicity   that   I   alway*
try out my Mies plana upon my 13
year-old daughter.    If she can grasp
the idea at 00 <\ then I'm sure that
it is ail right, but if the says "Daddy,
what docs this meant* I get to work
and revise the whob- thing, making
certain that there jan'l an obscure
link in the chain of argument
"Of course one of the principal
points in any selling talk is the ap
pearance of the obj* t,   When we
remember that thai which is seen
appeals to no leas than twenty three
nerve-centres, while that  which Is
heard appeals to hut one, the advantage in a phasing appearance either
of the individual or the product \$
at OSCS apparent.    But here   too, th-
argument should be simple,   There
should not be any clashing of colors,
end conflict of interest.
The Red and Yellow Customers
"It has been proved by actual experience that red ami yellow arc the
two colour', which invariably attract
the attention of persons ol a lower
order of intelligeni e.   A negro  for
example, w ill nick < ut a package
whieh bears either or both of tins"
eolours as far as he C8H see it -
while he will pay little attention to
the mauve or bah) 'due labels de*
signed to meet with the approval of
more fastidious tastes.   Hence, when
manufacturers or merchants wish to
make   a   'mass   appeal'   with   their
goods, red ami yellow should predominate, When they want to make
a 'class appeal/ the emphasis should
be laid on the more delicate tints—
a principle which appliei to window
display and counter arrangement m
surely as it does to the preparation
of the label itself 1921
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
3.1.5
VANCOUVER MILLING & GRAIN COMPANY'S WINDOW DISPLAY OF MADE-IN-B.C. PRODUCTS.
ROYAL STANDARD. '
As an instance of boosting made-
in B.C. products, a glance al the
Vancouver Milling & Grain Co.'s dis
play in the Hudson's Bay window
must surely have- arrested immediate
attention.
The background of this display
depicted recently cut fields of wheat,
with farm houses dotted over the
plain to the horizon. Two grain
elevators were shown in sharp outline
against the evening sky, and the
floor in the forefront of the window
was covered with a fine grade ol
Canadian winter wheal.    To the left
was a scene of an old time mill show
ing ancient  milling methods,  whilst
a   heavy   canvas   sack,   filled   'with
whole wheat flour stood iu the immediate foreground. A view of the
Vancouver Milling & Grain Co. s
mill on the right formed a background for it Back of .Made in B.C.
"Royal Standard" flour, and samples of bread iu I'ynx glass dishes
Seated between the two views. Fa
ther Time, with scythe and hour
glass, watched the evolution of the
milling industry from crude begin
nings to the finest product of human
ingenuity.
The Vancouver Milling & Grain
Co "s mill where "Royal Standard"
flour is made has a daily capacity of
500 barrels, and  the plant  occupies
practically a whole block in the heart
of the city, comprising flour mill,
flour warehouse, iood manufacturing plant, two elevators and office
buildings.
Only the finest grades ofCanad-
ian hard spring wheal are.used in
making "Royal Standard" flour.
which hi' become a household word
among the discriminating housewives
of this western country. Soft white
wheat is used in manufacturing
"Wild Rose" pastry flour, which requires but little shortening to produce those flaky biscuits, pies and
cakes which are so appetising and
desirable.
The mill itself is equipped throughout with the most modern machinery,
installed by Xordyke & Marmion,
who are possibly the most successful
manufacturers of flour mill machinery iu the world.
The better known brands of flour
are by no means the sole products of
this enterprising concern, for some
ninety lines of flour, cereals, grain,
feed, poultry supplies, seeds and
stock foods are handled here.
The company is financed almost
exclusively by B.C. capital, employs
some 130 hands, and has been operating successfully for fifteen years.
The Benefit of Organization
By Henry Watters.
Treasurer Dominion Board, Retail Merchants' Association of Canada
It might possibly have been better
to style the purpose of my theme
"The need of organization," but as
the benefit is intimately linked up
with the need, the more attractive
appellation may be allowed to stand.
In any event, we shall have to face
the problem of organization in its
fundamental relationship as a utilitarian need of human soicety, and
this in turn will be found to involve
the benefit, general and particular,
of human society in the mass and in
its units. So in whatever aspect we
figure the terms of our problem, we
shall have to erect our structure of
association organization on the basis
of need and benefit.
The implication should never be
lost sight of, that no organization
of human effort can ever be disassociated from the common weal, and,
further, that no association of human beings ean claim justification
for its existence except insofar as
it subserves a socially-useful fune- 316
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Mir
Favorite Dairy
Product
Your trade—your profits—can be iwrens-
ed o.. Kale of the leading milk product
of the day.
assso
ap the Milk Supreme is rapidly becoming
more popular. Delicatessen stores, Grocery stores and Bakeries can create s
steady trade by bringing this splendid
product to the attention of their patron-*
Fraser Valley Dairies, Ltd.
8th Ave. and Yukon St.      Sixth Ave. and Sixth St.
Phone Fairmont 1000 Telephone 1445
VANCOUVER, B.C.       NEW WESTMINSTER, B.C.
OUNTER
Ch*-**:
Bopks:
t»kOtiH
• THE WEST
■ PROMPT KUYfRY
:EVERaLLS LIMITED :
■ IETHBRIDGE, ALBERTA ■
MAIL US YOUR SAMPLE
FOR  PRICK
MORE and DOTS people are aaklni for SHKUA'S
4.V   HKKAI'       l!   i<*   a !v < 1T, ,.<|   r.ef> w here,   (Hit
door  and  in  the   public  press     Just   bow,  w<» nr«»
showing housewives how to um more Bread.   And
they'll ask for SIIKI.LYS     Have It  In your Itors
SHKI.l.Y'S 4X BREAD || icientiflcall)   faked under
model conditions    Well risen, with golden-brown,
crisp crust, light, fins textured, tender crumb,   it
DUUtet    return   pairs    }><>, |*JM   itl    itSAdSfd   rn-vcr
varies.
// Makes "Come A Rain" Customers
for YOl
Shelly Bros. Ltd.
VANCOUVER
NEW WESTMIN8TER
VICTORIA
NANAIMO
-*-»
r
f^\
There ii h ready sale for tl «> betl Scotch Jam They
are   finer   an I   fulhr   flavoured   than   other   JSIBI
Baxter*! Scotch Preserves ape without equal   your
customs**** will be delighted with them
Strawberry Raspberry
Black Currant    Wild Bramble Jelly
In i. 7. n and 28 lb tine   write to the agent* for
British Columbia
Manufactured by
Wl   DIVITD   NORTHERN JAM WORKS
. ft. DHAlUl, FOCHABERS, SCOTLAND
Telegraphic and (able Address, "lam Fo< habtrs, Morayshlrt,"
Codt used   ABC (5th Edition).
Agents: S. /*'. Mackenzie  '< Co., I'ancoir.ir, ll.C. 1921
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
317
TslsphOASSI Office,  Seymour 8951
Residence,   Seymour   1955R
I. OaBliuituuV^nnra
BARRISTER   AND   SOLICITOR
Solicitor   for
The   Retail   Merchantg'  AnocLUIon
of   Canada.   Incorporated
Orltlih Columbia  Board
309 Rogers Building
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Great West TEA
PACKETS   ONLY
No Premiums    No Deals
No Price Cutting
QUALITY   ONLY
Western Grocers Limited
Mewl mm itMitwii, i (.
NAPOLEON EXTRA VIRGIN
OLIVE OIL
Sni.i aiol 11uaranteed by
URQUHART & COMPANY LTD.
un ossors to
A. MAGNANO & CO. LTD.
98 Powell  St.      Vancouver, B.C.
"Tetley's
Teas"
Toledo Computing Stales
(No Springs)
Special charts for Grocers,
Butchers and Confectioners,
Hobart   Electric   Coffee   Mills,
Meat Choppers aud Hone (irind-
et'H,   Berkel   Improved   Bacon
Slleer.    Sold on  Terms or  I)is-
count for Cash,
Sales  Agent for lit'.
E. S. CHAMBERS
424 UrdoY. Si. W.
rincouver
. B.C.
tion in the interest of society at
large, Now. it must be quite intelligible that the first step in civilization was recorded when two or more
individuals became sufficiently en-
lightened to realize the utility, need
and benefit of organized association
for purposes of defence against unfriendly conditions and existence,
ever in evidence at a period in human history when the struggle for
existence meant much more than an
academic, philosophic statement. By
concerted effort to overcome obstacles to the realization of the ambition ami will of each in the pursuit of the satisfactions which the
human mind craves, and ever-ad-
vancing, ascending type of social relationship was favoured, shaping
the highly involved, political, social
structure recognized as nations.
Now, just as human history reveals the need of intelligent organization in the interests of human society, so does the record of business
activities exhibit a similar need for
organization in defence from unfriendly attack of influences unfavourable to the orderly, efficient and
Successful exercise id' those functions
which your modern merchant is fitted to fulfil in the interest of highly-
civilized human society. How much
and how great has been the contribution of the retail merchants towards the influences that tend to
advance civilization, would be beyond the scope of our present undertaking to determine. It may satisfy
the immediate needs of the discussion to project the assertion that no
state of human society deserving the
name "advanced*' is conceivable in
the absence of the function of the
retail merchant in providing, storing
and distributing the material requirement of human life. That this function is a highly-important and responsible one is evinced by the increasing appreciation accorded
trained specialists, This tendency
should Have the enthusiastic approbation and support of all intel
ligent merchants as being in the direct line of superior service, and in.
harmony with the fundamental, biologic law of differentiation of function, and support of merchants can
he achieved only through systematic
organization. Through organization
alone can also be attained that recognition of the value of society of the
function of the merchant as a civilizing agency.
Divisions of labour, and differentiation of function, especially as applied to specialization of service for
human needs, these have been conspicuous factors in high developed
civilization, and these factors necessarily demand intimate human organization for their fullest and more
useful expression. As the purely
commercial problems of merchandising depend on the same laws and
conditions for their successful functioning, it is evident that only
through the consolidated effort of
all classes and lines of business can
the fullest benefit and advantage of
organization be realized. While sectional associations for purely sectional requirements are to be commended and encouraged, the greatest benefit of systematic organization can only be attained by the cooperation of all special lines of business in one solid body, stout-armed
against all the multitudinous obstacles to orderly business practice
launched by administrative officialdom. Any merchant who fails to
realize that his fate is being determined daily and hourly, not by the
orderly operation of the natural laws
of mercantile functions, but by the
abnormal interference of bureaucratic regulation, will probably also fail
to realize the urgent need of intelligent organization in his own interest.
Let us hope, however, that this
type of merchant is being brought to
his senses by the accumulating burden of taxation in an aggravating
form, which he is forced to face at
everv turn in his business career.-
RAMSAY'S CHOCOLATE BARS
BEST
BY
TEST
"• ^MHKCHOfOUlf
.^71     a>.     r>     .
M'   !   °
I
MILK
CREAM
and
NUT
Try Some Today   For Sale By All Leading Confectioners and Grocers.
RAMSAY   BROS. & CO., LTD,
VANCOUVER and VICTORIA, B.C.
Deal With Our Advertisers:    They Make This Official Publication Possible at $2.00 a Year. 318
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Ma*
('has. A. Dodimead, jeweller of
Trail. B.C., is reported moving to
Pentieton.
The Richwell Candy Co. of Vancouver has dissolved.
The Knight-IIigman Motor Co. Ltd,
of Vanvouver reported change of
ownership.
Phillips Chocolate simp of Victoria have sold their Government St.
store to .lames R. llowcy.
R. P. Kithet & Co. Ltd, of Victoria
have amalgamated with Victoria
Wharf and Warehouse Co. Ltd., and
Kithet Proprietary Co, Ltd., snd are
incorporated as Kithet Consolidated
Ltd., with an authorized capital of
$1,500,000.
Mr. T. .1. Hirst has recently bought
out the business of Mr. YY. J, Pollard
at Nanaimo.
Notch Hill Trading Association
Ltd. are applying for change of
name to Notch Hill Co-operative Association.
A. II. Bennett, baker. Prince (iio-
rge, is reported to have sold oul to
A. 11. Allen.
Archibald  Shrimpton  of  Vancou
er, formerly in the butcher business
ill Calgary, has purchased the com
Killed general store and butcher busi
ness of.I. A. Kyan at South Wellington. B.C.
The llullatt Mercantile Co, of
Hul I at | has dissolved. H Whiteher
retires.
The Model Auto Liver*i of Vancouver has dissolved,
The Vancouver <"i_r.sr Store \t re
ported asisgned to the * '.I M.T.A
•'. G, MacParlane has purchased a
controlling interest in the Victoria
Owl Drug Co. Ltd.
Mr. J, Down, postmaster of Wood
pecker siding, has purchased lhe
buildings vacated by the Lumber
Camp at that  point, and  will erecl
a large general store there.
Mr. Melivn of Calgary has recent
ly bought the dry goods store form
erly operated by Mr. Hill nf .v
troug, B.t'.
The grocery business of Mrs Man
l'l.  Pearson    Estate .  Victoria, has
been sold and premises leased to ll
s, ll. Jones.
YY. I. Randal!, grocer of Victoria,
has sold oui to .1. \v. Songhurst
Mrs. \, P. White, grocer ■>! VI
toria, has sold out to Mrs, I.. Can-
i ron.
Merritt   Mercantile  Co.,   general
store, reported extension grsnted.
M. A. Thornton, general Btore, Pitt
Meadows,   reported   sold   out    to    \\
Struthcrs.
Keele 4   V| Kena i,-. hardware inei
chants "t" Vancouver, reported sold
out to Owen & McCallum,
Root. Sapp Ltd., candymaker, Van
eouver, has applied  for rhangt! of
name  to   Welch's   Ltd
K. .!. Smardon, clothier, Vancou
\ er, is reported to have sold mil.
W 11  I > Arias, gt r ol Vi toi
has sold his business io \|>s \|
Wood.
C. d. Patton   -•'   \s    mul y. u 81
Vancouver, has been iiteeecded by
s. s, Burgess.
The Smith Mei ml ■ I !o arc now
operating the store of J, M. Dale st
Hammond, B.I'
.'. McPherson is successor to Edgar
£ McPherson, 2179 Hantiii rs Si K .
Vancouver.
The Bungalow < • I inner lati
!> lituatcd on i,• .      le St.. is now
IROYAiVEMiaKES
,/.,■
Protect ^yourself
against variation in
quality. Stick to the
products whose quality is uniformly high
grade, with never a
bad lot to injure
your store's
reputation,
i*[\\JJM   an(* *ose V°ur
customers.
90 per cent of
STEVENSON'S
QUALITY BREAD
is SOLD BY
KKTA'i. GROCERS
E. W. GILLETT COMPANY LIMITED
TORONTO, CANADA
WiNNIPCG
MONTRIAL
THE  WI8E  GROCER   WILL
UNDERSTAND WHAT THAT
I'ACT   MKANS  TO   HIM.
Phone  Fairmont 227
VANCOUVER,  B.C. 1021
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
319
located at 599 s.-\ mour Street, Vancouver,
I1'. .1. K'. \N hitchelo has been incorporated us \\ hitcheio Ltd., Vancouver.
II. i >. Kirkham ('o. Ltd., Victoria
and Vancouver, is now know as
nii khan* s • Iroceteriaii Ltd.
it
ii
Health-Cakes
So your customers are call-
in.' the little foil-wrapped
cakes of Pleisehiuann's Yeast
that phssiciana are prescrib*
ing for all ailments of lowered vitality.
Cct your customers to place
a standin,' order.
lhe fleischmann Company
1166   Burrard   Street
VANCOUVER,    B.C.
J. A. Tepoorten
LIMITED
WHOLESALE
DRUGS
PATENT MEDICINES
DRUGGISTS   SUNDRIES
PHARMACEUTICAL
PREPARATIONS
308 Water St, Vancouver, B.C.
Triumph
Tea, Coffee
and   Cocoa
PACKETS ONLY
Packed  by the
Bon-Accord Tea Co.
iSucrtisori lo th* I »tc R. B»lmrr>
PHONE,   FAIRMONT 669
VANCOUVER.   B.C.
Thos Marr has succeeded Marr &
McAllister at 232 Broadway East.
Vancouver.
Price & Johnson have succeeded
M. Elford iii (ihilliwack,
*I. W. Uiviii is i\\,< new occupier of
the store lately run by W. J. LaBelle
at Lynn Valley.
I un IC «.V I '.. 47 Fraser Ave.. Van-
coiivcr. are now known as Currie's
Grocery,
i 'rau io-d '; (ir.)!"" v ,j; the new
name of the store of M. Crawford at
Ladner, B.C. This store was formerly operated by Smith & Scott.
The firm of Sheldon, Trites & El*
liotl of Jervis Inlet is now known as
Sheldon & Elliott,
The firm of Hurley & I'rosser, Lil-
loet, has been changed to Dan Hurley.
\\.  V.  YoilUg  is successor to J.  \V.
Atkey of Ladner.
P. Phillips, general store, Canford,
i nortiil s ild on* to S. ('. Elenning.
Kerrisdale   Grocery   reported   to
have sold out.
Jas. Munro Ltd., general store.
Prince George, sold out. T. J. Carter of Vancouver appointed trustee.
Percival Spencer of Port Washington is reported to have sold out his
general store to Bridge >fc Robertson.
The White Miy. Co. of Vancouver
is dissolved.
E. K. XicolU, grocer, Victoria, has
sold his husiness to C   F. Kmson.
.John Newsome, Willow River, is
reported to have opened ;i branch
store at New lands. B.C., nude!' the
s!>!- of \e-\la'iiis Mercantile Co,
We are always glad to make corrections. We do our level hest to
give nothing hut the most accurate
information, but handling thousands
of  facts   each   month,   we   are   only
human and liable io err, Mr. Henderson of the Canadian Produce Co.
of 1168 llailton Street, Vancouver,
courteously tells us that his company
is by UO means dissolved, as we stated last month, hul on the contrary is
verv much alive.
The Ever-Ready Garage & Service
Co.—Walter C. Reeve, Ira I). Worth
and Harold Smith.
Automotive Equipment House—»
Ceo. W. Lillie at Victoria.
Morson & Stevens—F. J. Morson
and Lester Douglas Stevens at Burnaby.
The South Vancouver Creamery
Co.—Stanley .Jones and Fred J. Gur-
nev at Vancouver.
NEW PARTNERSHIPS
Kclowna Hat Shop Lena Parry
"v Winnie Webster at  Victoria.
Acme Auto Repair Shop II. C.
Coolte and W, J. Mason at Victoria.
Five Points Electrical Co. Francis W. .1. Radgrave and Olaf Geo.
Nelson at Victoria.
Hanev Garage -Soloman Mussal-
leni at Port llaney.
Classic Shoe Co.—Albert Edward
<!rastore\ at Vancouver.
Uichw'ell Candy Co. Alexander
Panton at Vancouver.
JlrnfaBBtflttal
L. W. Taylor
& Company
PUBLIC   ACCOUNTANTS
Auditors, Cost Analysts
Board  of Trade  Building
Seymour 365.      Vancouver, B.C.
CrownBroom
Works Ltd.
Manufacturers of the
Duchess, King, Janitor Special,
Peerless, Princess, Province,
Ladies' Carpet, Perfection, Favorite, Ceiling Broom, Warehouse Brooms, Whisks of Alt
Kinds, Glass Washboards
332 FRONT STREET EAST
Phone Fairmont 1148
VANCOUVER, B.C.
PUBLIC SERVICE
The spirit of re-
sponatbttltj' to the
whole telephone democracy, to t h e
millions who form
the telephone-using public, Is the
foundation of service, it is the
appreciation of this responsibility
by the many employees of the
company whieh has as Its result a
comprehensive and adequate telephone system and an alert and
prompt handling of telephone calls.
B.C. Telephone Company 320
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILEB
NEW INCORPORATIONS.
P. J. R. Whitchelo Ltd., Abbots-
ford. $20,000, General department
store.
Reliable Electric Co, Ltd., 157
Alexander Street. Vancouver. $10,-
000. Electrical and mechanical engineers and contractors.
Crown Millinery Parlors | Vancor-
ver) Ltd.. 315 Central Building,
Victoria.   $10,000.
Campbell Raver Drug Co. Ltd.,
Campbell River. $10,000. General
wholesale and retail drug merchants.
Rogers Produce Co, Ltd., Ill4*
Langley Street. Victoria. $20,000,
Importers, exporters and dealers in
poultry, produce, meat, cattle, etc.
The' Taylor Meal Packers Ltd.,
2331 Main Street. Vancouver. $25,-
000. Acquiring meat ami butcher
businesses.
British United Traders Ltd., Vancouver. $25,000, Manufacturers"
agents, importers and exporters.
Pacific Mercantile Co. Ltd., 805
Vancouver Block, Vancouver. $10,.
000. Taking over the business of
"B. A. Heeney & Co.." at Dollarton;
merchants, storekeepers.
Smith Mercantile Co, Ltd.. Port
Hammond. $25,000. Qerenal merchants.
The Sun Drug Co. Ltd.. ~2o Standard Hank Building, Vancouver. $10,-
000.   Chemists, druggists,
The R. J, Gurney Co. Ltd., 1419
Douglas Street. Victoria. $10,000.
Wholesale and retail boot and shoe
merchants.
ADDRESSES WANTED
This service is free to our subscribers
for the purpose of locating old customers
and others. Send fullest information
possible. We are locating some every
month. It is only by friendly co-operation that this column can be run at all
successfully. Help those who may be
able to help you, by writing the office
of the "B.C. Retailer,' 203 London Building, Vancouver, if you know anything in
the nature of a clue to the addresses of
the undermentioned:
Adams, Chas.—i^ant address, Vancouver.
Previous address, Kelowna, 11.1'.
Depratto, J.—I*'iKt address, Vancouver.
Formerly of Kindersley, Bask,
Schmidt, Adam—Last address, Vancouver.   Formerly of Kelowna.
Harding, G.—Last address, Vancouver.
Previous address, Kelowna, B.C.
Conroy, Frank—Last address, lit* Duf*
ferin Street West. Vancouver. Ii"
lieve connected with wood business,
Saynor, Frederick—Late Bridge Inspector, Provincial Government, Regina.
Kinnear. a. E. —Travelling salesman;
once witth Hudson's Bay Co., and
then witth North-Went Biscuit Co,
at Vancouver.
Things That Will Help You Succeed
1. Think sanely.
2. I.earn  from  mental superiors.
.'{. Learn to listen attentively.
4. Read     best     newspaper!    and
books.
Improve vour memory.
Concentrate.
Don't worry.
Be systematic.
Weigh both sides.
Avoid Inferior minds.
o.
ti.
n
f,
s.
9!
10.
The    colored    Baptist    evangelist
was exhorting his congregation to
come up to the rostrum and have
their sins washed away, and slowly
all but one of them rose to their
feet and moved toward him.
"Why, Brudder Jones," said the
evangelist to the defaulter, "don'
yo' want yo' sins washed awnyt"
"I   done   had   my   sins   washed
away." replied Brudder Joust.
"Where vo' done dsl f"
"Ober at   de  Methodist   Church
"Ah. Brudder Jones," replied the
evangelist,   sadly.   "\o'   ain't   been
washed.     Vo*  Jos'   been   dry-clean
ed!"    Tit Pits.
Mr. 0   L   Lister, who has been Su
perintendent   of   the   B.C. District
Telegraph & Delivery Co. Ltd. sinci
that   company   purchased   the   Fire
Patrols Limited, of which Mr Listen
was formerly manager, has severed
ins connection with that compau>
Mr. c II. Daniels, managing direetoi
of the district eompany, %*,ill her,
after fill both positions.
Gf\<> &o<iOiV>OUr4l M/1NTLLS
FOR  Ml   STYLE 5 O»   l iomts
/ism  row   s/iMPLLJ   -'guctn'i.'
R-Zi/Hocr*-  -/Cu.L,p   (a"ccu!!;'c
r'At\f\C COAST MAUJK fAt TORI.
"He Died Intestate"
and the estate be bad blllll up «;if SjtilRiltlstered e***cH*ftlittg tO thi law, tttd
10: in a>conkune eritii Us oft-expressed Intentions
Will  fhis  bKpp*Ml IO V|>ur Mtats gftef dk**C«SMSI?     Make  >«ntr  Will  a:v!
appoint this Company as your 1 !x*^«*ii*<r   Sfoor t&ttmtioiui will bs ts^scuardod
and thr Interests of four dependent* faithful)*1 served
We invite consultation or cofretpoodonce
THE CANADA PERMANENT TRU8T COMPANY
PAID-UP   CAPITA L-~4l.0O0.OOO.
BRITISH COLUMBIA BRANl H
OBORGE I LEG vtk. Manager,
Canada Permanent  Bldg. 43? Richard* St.
VANCOUVER.  B.C.
For Sale and Wanted
BUSINESSES FOR SALE AND WANTED: Wl Will IftSSff announcement! twice
under thll heading FREE OF CHARGE io mbicriberi. To non itib!crlbere Iht
chart)*  It 5c  a  word,  minimum |1, cash  with  order.
STORES FOR RENT; ARTICLES FOR SALE OR WANTED, ETC : Our charge
under this heading  (to eubecrlberi and  noniubicribert  alike)   It 5c  per word.
Addren letters to "Claiiifled Dept.," B.C. Retailer, JO)  London  Oldg , Vancouver.
»-••■ • -•-•-•-•-•.»-»
FOR SALE
WANTED
Olcl-establinlhecl      Grocery      Buninen. Successful    Hardware    Manager   from
Good,  clean  stock,  first-class  fixtures,    Prairie would locate iii B.C. Iramedlatol)
delivery,   choice location in Vancouver
City.—T. a- s„ cars of 11 c. Retailer,
• K a R /• care of B.C, Retailer,
Exchange Trad of l<and tor stock ol
..Old-established Retail Boot and Shoe merchandise, |8,OO0 to $26,000 Land
business In Fraser Valley, Might con- level, partially Improved; irest future;
Kider trade for general store.   Hox "X,"    near Vanvouxer, B.C.; close In;  value,
ii''1'! an acre,   Small acreage t« selling
B.C. Retailer.
..$2,000   Available   for Inveitment   as     for double SbOVS |>rlee     Describe itocfc
I»art Interest In country itore    N W W,     and amount.    ,1.  |)   WeMtenhaver,  Ah«T
care of "B.C, Retailer." deen, Washington, 1921
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
321
The Bankruptcy Act as Applied to Retail Merchants
A 8plcndid Paper Contributed to the B.C. Board Convention Last
July by Mr. L. Dashwood Jones, the Board's Solicitor.
We have aecured a very exhaustive
article on the Bankruptcy Act treated
especially from the retail merchant!'
standpoint, from Mr. Dashwood Jones.
Mr. Jones delivered *n address at the
New Westminster Convent on last summer on this subject, and we have made
arrangements with him to reproduce his
remarks, which have been added to and
brought upto-date. Owing to ts lengtn
it will appear each month until concluded
and should be preserved for future reference.
Gentlemen of the Retail Trade:
Your executive has asked me to
eome here today and run over tho
Bankruptcy Act with you I am
sure thai Bueh an Ac! as tins should
have been passed years ago, and
now that il has been passed 1 trust
thai you individually, and as an
association, will see that it is kepi up
to date and in keeping with the
nee,is of the country. ! hope that
during our short talk, you will find
the subject of interest to you, for,
notwithstanding the fact that Bank
ruptcy is tantamount to liquidation,
it is, nevertheless, when taken from
a legal standpoint, a more or less dry
topic!
I will first of all endeavour to give
you a shori history of Bankruptcy,
as I know it afterwards a not too
lengthy resume of the Acl itself,
because I do not believe that you
care very much about the internal
workings of the Act (which only
comes into effect after one becomes
bankrupt, and the Acl brings into
existence   bj ial   officers,   called
"authorized trustees," who take thr*
worry off your shoulders in such an
.vent . but what you are particularly interested in is how to prevent
bankruptcy, and what the effects
nnd the results may be. With reference tO the former. 1 would vent urn
to say thai the speaker just preceding me (on accounting) would be
able to give you many more hints
as to how to prevent this unfortun-
"i)ou,1 cry, Willie.    I'll piny Indian with you."
"B-b-hui you won't do grandpa, you've been sculped
alredv."
ate occurrence, than I. And bear in
mind this, that it is not only your
legal department or your accounting
staff that you have to consider when
preventing bankruptcy, but your
buying, credit, selling and all other
branches of your business activities;
because as you know, an ounce of
prevention is worth more than a
pound of cure.
To begin at the beginning, the
word bankruptcy comes from two
Latin words, hankus, meaning a
table or counter, and raptus, broken.
For in ancient times when money
lenders were unable to meet the
calls of their creditors, the latter
would, in many eases, take the law
into their own hands and put the
money lender out of business by
breaking up the table at which he
was tised to sit when doing his business hence bankruptcy, which is the
status of a debtor who has been declared by a judicial process to be
unable to pay his debts. In this connection there is another word sometimes used indiscriminately in tho
same sense, that is insolvency. But
the two words have, in a legal as
well as commercial usuage, a distinct
signification, For when a debtor's
financial liabilities are greater than
his means of meeting them, he is said
to be insolvent, but be may nevertheless be able to carry on his business affairs by means of credit, and
may be fortunate to regain a position of solvency. And even when
insolvency becomes public and default occurs, a debtor may still avert
actual bankruptcy if be is able to
effect a voluntary arrangement with
his creditors. A debtor may thus be
insolvent without becoming bank"
rupt. but of course he cannot, be
bankrupt without being insolvent,
for bankruptcy is a legal decree of
his insolvency, and operates as a
statutory system for the administration of his property, which is thereby taken out of his hands.
The law of bankruptcy is of ft
purely statutory nature, and in early
times, before any such statute was
in existence, individual creditors
were left to pursue their remedies
by such means as the law or practice of the community might sanction, and which was generally of a
very drastic character, for we find
under the old Roman customs, tho
creditors of a man might, as a last
resort, oul the debtor's body into
pieces, each taking bis proportionate
share. Although this might or
might not have been stated too liter-
allv by the historians, there can be
** *
no doubt that the power of selling
the person of the debtor, and those
WM :\2\
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Mi
P.  BURNS A CO.,  LTD.
Shamrock Products
Hams,   per   !!>
Hams, boned and rolled, per Ib
Bacon, 6-8, per H>.
Dominion Hants, 8-31,10-16, per lb.
Dominion Bacon, 6-10, per it>. ..
Dominion Bacon, 10-14, per lb
.11
,48
,58
. 8 *
.40
and roUed
lb.
er Ib. .    .
U cases
jo cases
Dominion Shoulders, boned
Cooked Hams, Shamrock, pe
Ayrshire, roiled shoulders, t
Lard. No. 5,  1- to case ....
Luni, No, 3, »" to case
Lard. No, i, cartons, 15 lbs.
Lard, No, 1, cartons, 80 lbs.
i'onipoun<i, Carnation, No.
Compound,  Carnation.   No.  !
Dripping, beef, 4 lb. bricks
Mincemeat, kits, 88 Ib. net, per U>.
Meat Loaf, per ll). .
Pork  pies,   per  doz. .    ,
Pork roast less with dressing, lb
Baked ham, with dressing, per u>.
Cooking oil, j gal. tins, 40 iba, per u
Creamery Butter, 3hamrock, carton
carton
Cheese.  Canadian,  large,   per ll1
Cheese.  Canadian, twin, Ib.
Smoked fish, kippers. 208,  per '
Smoked fish, kippered salmon
20s.  per  lb	
Smoked eod, 80s, per lb.
Head  cheese,  j  lb.   tins,  each
Jellied tongue,  per tin .
Selected  fowl,  per ib,
Selected chicken,  per lb.  . .
12 25
12 80
lb
10a and
> 6a
» 10
.l*H
,20
.45
, .!•>
.">*■
.17M,
,49
31 *S
.31*4
10
14
40
THE   ROYAL   CROWN   SOAPS.   LTD.
Vancouver    Price    List—F.O.B.    Vancouver,
or  New  Westminster.
Terms Nett 30 Days.
Royal Crown Soap, Ss, bos ol Lto, U-av* i 13
lloyai Crown Soap, la bos oi  100
Golden West Soap, 8s, t«>\ of hi
\\ nite Wonder, box of 1H)
i.iiieii (unaisuped>. box of '• "
Ro) al I !ro*a n Saplha, box oi I
lloyai Crown  Naptha,  nea   large sls<
' box of  100
Klondyke (irrapped), n>v of 18
Klondye (unwrapped), box oi .'
Primrose (wrapped), box ol 88
Lxtra Hard (unwrapped), box ol
lOnglWh Blue Mottled, box of SO
Royal Crown  l*owder, 1Mb., box ol M
Royal Crown l-owder, I rb.,  box of W
Golden  Weal   l*w*rd*r,   l-ll .  !->v  of -li
Royal Crown Cleanser, <»>v. of II
Ro) al i'' t»* '.. Lyi
Ro) ai < *roa n Pot
" Imi\ of 88
Liquid Aimni I
Liquid  Blue. 1    -
"Apex'' Soap l"!.i
i *roa n Oatmeal
Klei Ii •
-;,*.,: Brand I   i»tl
Seal   Brand  l*a»l
6 U
I
8,15
i. •.
i ."
• '
: do
\S hit,-   S«,in   >,..i p     ,n    '*.\   ,,1   |20
'inhlen   Iviiie   Siiup.   t>*.   |hi>\   uf   \H
r. • few |   (unwrapped)    box •>'  100 »ii i
White Swan Naptha, box of 100
While  Swan   Naptha,   large else,  i»'v
..f loo
(*1lnta* •■   Montreal (wrapped), box of
Rid < *fown, box of - i
Uoldoit l .»■   box of I
Ittue Uotth d   box ol N
Itluc Mottled   box i I 10
While  Hwnn   Washing   l*owder,  6  Ib
box "• -t :
I'vndra) i  U •■   box ol II
I't-ndra) «• l*owdered   Ammonia   box of
M i
Pnndray'i   Water   G'an.    Egg   Pre»*rv*r
. | , •  • ■.■    I . .... 5
•
•\   Ol    If
red   v ■■
I  Ol
Ub
it :
Surtdrie*
.1
' l«
: h
I
i ••
4:<•
*.,■<«   i
1  V
l.til
in bar-
?~>V    Ol    .
Me-    md ■
M<   I   -     •
u rite fo
». ,\ <
,i
b»X  nt
l Hot*   H
I       .,    :' - i \ <• i
'.        i "troa n ^ a thins Poa i
r<-U.   p«f   lb
Royal   Crown   Washing   I'ownW
■ {Is,    \:-r    lb
Royal  Cwwn Cleanse*  in  barrels,  lb
Royal Crown Cleanse* In '* barrels, n<
TeirnsSQ  I'limnmi   In   barrels
No   | RngUeh Kofi Soap in banreia, It*
No   5 KtaflUfi ■- ■" 8    ;   In pal I   Ib
S ■   s i -•■•>•■■ i   •■  "  fl   • p ir» barrels
•-. •      i ■ .'. ■        Mid K   ip In bbts . g*l    .    ■
'.' .'   |   lint**! I. ■ |     ' > «»:    ■   t f:>    •,-.*
p*f ,- : 11
D
' i i
HAND CLASPS
I often wonder why some people
shake hands. A man was introduced
to me not Ion? a?o. and when I
elasped his hand in greeting it felt
as if T. had hold of a dead fish. II«-
said he was plad to meet me but I
didn't believe it—his handclasp pave
his words the lie.
The other day a folder came to
the  house   nnd   caw   me   the  same
feeling that the week handclasp did;
there was nothing hark of it Thm
was a pood story of a high »'ln-i»
product told in j-nnr printing ami
on cheap paper, It didn't grip and
leave an Impression to make me tie-
sire what it advertised.
1 recently read of a man who buys
raw furs.    The usual bnyer of raw
nirs n mis out ;t elu*si> ii*>?  tti
country, wherever be thinks be ean
pet Jus supplies, This man was not
of the usual type '!•• had ins printer produce ji fine bookie! in colors,
printed on high grsde paper, with
an interesting lot of story on each
pai*e.   lie received i" per eent more
returns than from anv other cam
paigU It carried a hearty hand
clasp    The Steriing Mark.
Geo. A. Campbell & Co.
Tower Building 500 Beatty Street
VANCOUVER, B.C.
MANUFACTURERS
MEN'S
CLOTHING
All Goods .Made on the Premises,
Prices based ou replacing values.
Specialists in
GUARANTEED INDIGOS AND
SOLID WORSTEDS
MADE IN B.C.
Our Customers Receive Silent Salesman Gratis
with Every Order of One half Gross.
iSavi ^
Youa    [
SlCMT.
IMK1 I     4
NlflVES [
BY USING)
-TMtr>      S"
LlRapid - Nfjdle -Thrfader
r.»x-j
«^f=^l
; -. J
-*<-»*eC3li    "^    '   ' '',.!
*j>OTri(_	
,*,,      w4n    *••*+•*
1
a
\\ttwl    *****   »ii**^*^
RAPID NEEDLE THREADER 00
429 Pender Street Vancouver, B.C.
_^tm^ •>•>
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILED
Mi
av
I
I
of his family, into slavery, was one
which was habitually practised in
Rome and in Greece among the nations of antiquity. But as trade began to develop, and savagery gave
way to more humane methods, imprisonment was the limit of punishment inflicted on one who was unable to pay his debts. This practice
continued until comparatively recent
times, when it also was abolished, or
practically so. For we find that
without these better methods of enforcing payment of debts, it would
have been impossible for the commerce of the world to have attained
its present proportions, because commerce is founded on credit, and
though credit could not have existed
without the power of enforcing the
fulfilment of financial obligations,
on the other hand, remedies against
the debtor's person and those of his
family, are not only inconsistent
with the growth of opinion among
civilized communities, but are in
themselves worse than futile, inasmuch as they strike at the root of
all personal effort on the part of u
debtor to retrieve his position and
render a return to solvency possible
Hence the necessity of devising some
system which while just to the creditors, is not unduly harsh upon the
debtor, a system whieh discriminates
between    involuntary    inability   to
meet obligations, and wilful refusal
or negleet to do so, and whieh so
cures creditors, as between  them
selves, an equitable share of such ut
the debtor's assets as may be available to meet  his liabilities,  provid
ins also for the difficulties which
arise between creditors interest.
No branch of the law furnishes a
better illustration of the way in
which legal rules are modified by
the mora! sense and business interests than the one we are now regarding. Modern bankruptcy legislation is I ased upon the theory that
financial ruin comes upon multitudes
of honest and capable business men,
and   although   it   has   been   termed
"commercial death,'1 the Act should
nevertheless, be welcomed as filling
a need whieh the business world of
Canada could not go very much further without The first Bankruptcy
Act was passed as long ago as 1512,
in the reign Of Kins Henry VII!.,
the gentleman you will  remember
who had BO many wives, hence, no
doubt, the necessity of such a its-
tutel The law then, however, was
in its infancy only, giving the Lord
Chancellor power to seize and divide
a fraudulent debtor's estate among
his creditors, It was not until the
reign of Queen Anne that the principle of granting relief to the bankrupt was given. Since the first Act
in lol'J. BOOttl 40 different Acts of
Parliament have been passed, slowly
bringing up, expanding, and modify
ing the system of bankruptcy until
we come down to the present day,
ami   our own   Act,  which  is  taken
partly from the English Act now in
force, and  partly from other Acts.
In the Red
and Yellow
Package
gffytlNvV *••****■ / i*> ,
*sm a J F h I vPV     1     i jp la   I ^B
ccnor en co   ».uo n Mtm ilftjin fimA III
Contains enough for four adults.   Made In the foUowing styles   Macau
Ready-cut, Spaghetti, Vermicelli.
Packed 16 oz. nett   Tested Recipes on Package.
Kelly Confection Company, Ltd.
VANCOUVER,   B.C.
"INGERSOLL"
CREAM   CHEESE
Spreads Like Butter
|*r Rl io llu !>• lib *
Si ■ ■       on io thi I   iw um ■■'
Urquhart & Co. Ltd.
\)\n\ ributom
98 Powell Stcct, Vancouver!"
Phone s j tnoui   120(1
CONTAINS NO ALUM PUKE AND WHOLESOME
NABOB Baking Powder is a pure phosphate baking powder, giving
good results in every baking.
cCc7/ your Customers to save the Certificates for Wear-Ever Aluminum
KELLY, DOUGLAS & CO., LTD.
_^_^^^^^^2iS!»S 921
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
323
\\
holesaleni report bdsinees good   clinea in  American  refined,  whieh    in the East and should prove a good
.in.! steadily increaseing in volume, from  latest   reporl  has settled at
doubtless   owing   to   the   opinion $6.50,   and  local    quotations   will
among retail merchants thai many doubtless decline in the near future, syrup has arrived from the East and
commodities have reached a level Other staple declines are noted in Is quoted at a reduction over last
where it is Mite and profitable to aoap and corn flakes, the latter hav-
huy ih larger quantities than hereto- ing dropped 30c per ease. Prunes
fore and raisins have tinned up some-
Country trade is exceptionally what, owing probably to a larger
good, and there is satisfaction in export demand. A shortage of first
wholesale circles regarding the out- grade walnuts is also reported. An
look generally. The mosl noticeable interesting feature during the week
• \'-iit in staple commodities is the was the arrival of a shipment of
recenl decline in ihe price of sugar, Louisiana'* Blue Rose" rice, the first    tas are scarce and firm in price
whieh is now quoted -«t $11.50. There ever reported on the local market.    There is a scarcity of good roasting
has been a rapid succession "f de- This is high grade and very popular    grades, and local demand is normal.
Seller.
A shipment of new season maple
year s prices.
Tea The spring tea markets show
more strength, particularly on Ceylon and Indian teas, hut local conditions are not showing any very marked improvement.
Coffee—.Javas, Mochas and Bogo-
GROCERY PRICES CURRENT
The following nre prices quoted for principal lines of leading wholesale firms.    Prices quoted are necessarily
subject  to  market  fluctuations.
RAMSAY  OROS. A CO.. LTD.
Family sodas, packages   p<-r dot | j ^
'■•.•'    • la. IIni   <.» it 10
I ■  Cream Sodas packages  it< i
i •... m H Kins   pei kages, doa I U
IP,    Wwrti ■.', Swop I   III* til In,  j'.t' knai
;■••.!..* (|
'. ' i     \ » s. .r (.-.J   Suit!   HlecUltS    ?nr,'\   carton,   per   ij.-n : ;..i
Chocolate liars   aaaorted klnda, ! doi
i" .i n>\. j..t i» >\ ID
E.   W.   GILLETT   CO,   LTD
Royal Yeast—
k)l    |
.111
In
•
Ptrf
timed
Lye
*   <
lot   I
t ii *s r ?
I -i
ir.'i i
Mag
c   Oa
king
Pow
de
r—
11r-;   i-(l in
per .-!!>**
: io
4 os., 4 dot
I   US .    I   il-'*
I <>« ,    4   .tin
II >>* .   I  doa
IS nr,  : dos
1   Hi .   4   dot
1 lb., I doi
"!   lb . I 'i"f
."> in .  |. doi
ppffini discount of 5 i>,,i" cenl allowed on
Pits <'««,.- of more of Magic Baking
Powder,
p
• r do*.
1 'f>
1 s 5
1  \,,
» 9S
4 00
!> sit
Caustic  Soda  (Granulated) —
""> n>   wooden pails
."•ii iii   wooden  pails
No iu wood on fast's
' lb   can 1st era  1100 lbs   In • aae I
in u>  canlstors (loo 11»*»  In case)
Viin n>«  iiim drums
100 il* ,  barrels
per lh
IK',
.11
17
15*4
Cream   Tartar—
per do*
\ u>   paper pkgs (' dos   In casol      2.26
'■ u>  papei pUfjS •' ilea iii case)       ':!"
per cane
< doi   'i lit   paper pkKs; 2 dos   u*
lb,     IMtpOl'    pi K'   .     nSHOI ted I"   I*1
per doi
H lit niHn wiiti screw coven (4 doi
In    CA8C 5.40
r Hi square canisters (Vi dos. In en bo)      «'.'
10  b  v lei  i i*< t                     .     . .Ti
35 lb   wood< n pall                         .11
100  lb   lined  Kegs .88
Magic  Soda—Case   No.   I—
l ("jit iSO j ii. pa< kages) 7 15
"i cases or more                                .. f.05
Bicarbonate   of   Soda—
••,•: lb  kegs, per keg                  .     . 7.90
100 lit   bai ■• la per barrel 86 80
KELLY,   DOUGLAS  A  CO.,   LTD.
Nabob   Products
Alum.   i*s,  dOS - "5
l:..r.iv. 'ia dot                                        • .78
Tartaric Acid, 14s, do*  2 00
Baking Powdsr, (4 II oz, doz     J 85
Making Powder. 48 18 oa, doa  8.76
Baking Powder,  II IHs, do*  8.00
Pnkin* Powder, fi Ss, doa       ... 16 50
fVlery Salt glass doi .80
Coffee,   Is,  Is,  Ib         88
Coffee,  oh.  n>  RS
en..nn of Tnrtar,   *in, dos                   , 2 25
Baking Bods, 60 Is, case      S 30
1 sklng Soda, 1 1 i»s, doa                    . .80
Custard  Powder,  do*                         ■ 1.40
ouick  Tapioca. doi                      .     . 1.40
Cbocolate  Pudding,   dm 14n
Allspice, No  I, tms. doz                        . 1.08
rbiii  Powder, smell,  do*  l.oo
Cinnamon   '.' os. Una doa                 ■■ 1.18
Cayenne Pepper, 3 tins, doi      1.18
1 'loveasmall   dos                               • • 1.58
Dinger, small, doi                           1.1*3
Mnce, small, doi                                ••  ■ 1.15
Nutmeg, small, doi                     1.10
Paprika, small tins, .lor    1.2K5
Black  Pepper, tins, doa .                   • IslS
White I'apper, tins, do*. . 1.26
Pastry Spice, 3 tins, doz       1.28
PI isiiiifr Bplce. doa , No. 8        1.10
Marjoram,    Mint,    Poultry    Dressing,
Parsley.   Sntr>\   Savory,   Thyim\   Tu-
mertc, tins, dos, .                      - 1.25
Curry Powder, 4 0*, glass, doz  2.so
Fhttracta fall flavours), 2 or, <i«7  2.10
Kxtrn-'t.s  fall flnvours).  4  0*1,  dos       .. 4 7"i
F^xtracts fall flavours), 8 os., iloz  9.00
FJpaom  Salts,   '^s. dor. *>0
I'Yuit   Colors,   2  Ol .   dor..           .     175
iHntrt fChocniate, Rosa Pink, Lemon,
Vnnilla,   White.   Almond,   Orange),
doi              • MO
Jelly ro«dcr.  doi. 1.83
ii (ini*.   free witii 1 grosa)
Mustnrd.    Ms.   dor            2 4ft
Mustard,  Hs, doi  ••"
Mustard.   Is,   dor    9.00
Ca.stor Oil,  2 oz.,  doz    3.25
t'astor Oil,  4 oz.,  doz    4.00
Salt Petre, lis, doz    1.50
Sulplmr,    lis.   doz _...     .75
Tea, Green Label, is. lb 48
Tea, Green Label, lis, per lb 10
:■'•..  iii. packages     45
.'1 lb.  packages  45
Tea. de Luxe,  Afternoon, 1 lb HO
Tea. de laixe.  Afternoon,  '.j  lb., per lb.      ,61
l.t'iuonaite   Powder,  doz     2.40
Vinegar,  doz    2.76
THE  W.   H.   MALKIN  CO.,  LTD.
"Malkin's   Best"   Products—
Pakinj- Powder,  48-12s, per doz  3.00
11-2^8,   per  doz  9.35
12-5s.   per  doz  16.85
Coffee.   48-18,   per lb 56
Cream of   Tartar, small tins, per doz  1.75
Custard Powder, 12 oa tins, per doz. 3.2."i
Extracts  (all  flavors)   12-2 oa,  doz. 8,50
12-t oi. per doz.                 4.75
Glycerine,  18-2 oi.  bottles, per doz. 1.75
12-4*01   bottles, per doz  3.25
Homey, 84-10 or. Jars, per doz  3.25
24-18 oz   jars, per doz  4,00
24-2  or.   tins,   per doz  7.00
12-5 oz. tins, per v!oz              17.5n
Jelly   Powders,   '   oz.,   all   flavors,   doz. 1.30
Lemonade  Powder,   12-8 oz.  per doz. 2.40
Mustard,   12-3s,  tins,  per doz  16$
12-8s. tins,  per doz  4.60
24-ls. tins, per doz  9.00
12-5s, tins,  per lb 60
Spices and  Seasonings:
Celery -alt. 18-Ss, taper bottles, doz. 2.10
Curry Powder, 12s, taper bottles, doz. 2.25
Allspice, Ss, per doz. tins  _  1.06
Cinnamon, Ginger, Black Pepper,
Poultry Dressing, Sage, ground,
Sage, rubbed, Savory, Thyme, Tumeric, 3s, per doz. tins   1.16
t'lo\(\s, Mace. 3s, per doz  1-35
Marjoram, Mint, Nutmeg, Parsley,
Pastry, mixed, Pepper, white, Pepper Cayenne, 3s, per doz. tins   1.25
Paprika. Chili Powder, Curry Powder, 3s, per doz. tins  1.78
Whole Nutmeg In cartons, per doz. .65
Whole   Pickling,   In  cartons,  doz  1.00
Tea,   100-ls.   per  lb 55
fiO-Us,   per  lb 5,1
::o-is and 20-'js, assorted, per lb. . .(M'i
12-Rs,  per lb 66
Vlnegnr,  24-quts.,  per doz    2.65 1,02 J
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
325
As an indication of lhe uncertain
i\ existing in the minds of both the
manufacturing aud retail trades regarding fall conditions, the showing
of initial lines of fall clothing now
on il"" way is probably the latest
ever recorded.
h is imt, however, tins uncertainty
alone that has delayed the manufacturers putting <>ut their fail lines,
but also the fait thai they have been
sn inisy refiiiing spring orders which
had been cancelled, or which had nol
been pla • ■d si thr usual time.
It is probable that the trade will
buy very conservatively for fall, and
n is advisable that they should 'I"
sn, as tall prices sre down from 20
to in'i. aud readjustment of clothing prices ih nol yet completed. The
majority or retailers did nol b\iy al
the time when the) would normally
have been anticipating their sprint*
requirements, Those who tiki so
later on cancelled the bulk of their
orders, and thus when ihe spring sea
sun opened, had bul s small percentage of goods required for a spring
season in stoek, and these stocks
were inadequate even for a season
that was su much below normal, As
a result the trade generalb sneaking
was, not prepared for the exceptionally good season experienced around
Easter time. Now the factories are
busy working overtime trying to fill
tlu-ir orders, whieh are accompanied
by instructions, or rather supplications, urging immediate delivery.
As there are but three months left
IU which to make up goods for fall
delivery instead of the period being
distributed over six months, it is advisable thai the retail trade place
their orders during May. To force
clothing factories to work overtime
next September and October is but
increasing manufacturing costs, and
il is not in the interests of the trade.
With reference lo styles, information comes from \'ew York that designers arc working overtime to
evolve something new in young mens
styles. (J in difficult to forecast
what this will be, bill it is certain
thai a distinct novelty .stimulates
sahs, although it will have to be
something absolutely "in vogue" lie-
fore retailers ean be induced to.stock
it  this year.
Neckwear No matter how good
trade is in the retail stores, and tliere
are some reiuarkahly good days right
along, the retailer does not care to
look further ahead than his immdi-
ate needs, and sometimes he buys so
sparingly for these that he would
not be able, if he wanted to, to make
a special drive on any one line of
merchandise. This applies to neckwear as to other lines, and as a result
it is impossible to make any calculations on what conditions will prevail
during the coming month—we know
what today's business is, but have
no means of ascertaining what tomorrow's will be.
Manufacturers are searching the
market for novelty ideas that will
put a little more life into trade. So
far, the new narrow shape is the only
thing that has been uncovered, and
while they may have stimulated
business to a certain extent, the orders for them are nothing compared
to what would have been received
for such an inovation a year ago.
Straw Hats—Many orders are being received for straws. Sailors, in
sennet straws and of a medium block,
are going to be the best sellers from
all indications.
Panamas are being called for at
country points, prices on these and
straws show at least 1"> per cent below last year.
BUY AT HOME
We wish to congratulate our contemporary, lhe "British Columbian,"
oi New Westminster, in 11*» long ,,s-
tablished policy of hitting the public
square in the eye and telling them I i
"buy    al   home."     In   this   it   has  a
warm advocate and supporter in Mr,
W, I-'. I:il', the secretary of the New
Westminster Branch of the Iv M.A.
The following very apl article recently appeared in the newspaper
named, and it n ill surel) meet with
the approval of ever)one w ho believes in building up his own community !
The local merchant deserves to
have  the   first   opportunity  of sup
plying the requirements of the <!is-
tricl in which he is loctaed. If the
buyers at his store would be content
I" have him conduct his business on
the same basis as a mail order house
he  would   be  able  |o  compete  with
them in every respect,   If Jones, tho
merchant, kept only samples and
catalogues on his premises, and sold
from these for delivery ten days
later, cash in advance, he would be
able to under sell the Eastern house.
Imagine going into a corner store
for a pair of overalls. Jones exclaims: "Yes. we will sell you a
pair of overalls. Here is a picture
of them. They will cost you the
listed price, plus the carrying charges
from the manufacturer to the Coast,
plus the cost of the postal order commission and you ean expect to get
them iu tell days time. Call here and
see if they have arrived in that time
but pay your money now."
If the local merchant conducted
his business in that manner his customers would be indignant, Bul
would he not be justified in doing
so, for his largest competitor transacts his business in precisely that
way. and the same people do not
object. They obtain a catalogue
every spring, It is filled with pictures and listed prices. They select
their purchases, write out an order,
wait ten days, go to the express office, pay the carrying charges and
pack them home—and think they
have done a good stroke of business.
When they do patronize their local merchant, it is to buy something
they want in a hurry. They expect
him to keep his shelves stocked with
a variety of merchandise for their
selection. They examine each article
at will, order it delivered at their
homes -and pay for it in thirty days
time, or when they are ready to do
so. They expect the merchant to
store goods from their convenience,
to make deliveries, and finance their
buying—-and expect to pay nothing
for the service.
CONVENTION.
The Bread and Cake Manufacturers' Association of Canada is holding a Convention and Exhibition in
Toronto, October 3rd to 8th.
A cordial invitation is extended to
every Baker in the West. mmsmm**.
V
I
326
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
M.
Genuine Wiss Shears
_%-Lsr
o
-rf..'   • y^»-r»..
V
NOW IN STOCK
Also
/">
Genuine Kraeuter
Pliers
BIG STOCKS
RIGHT PRICES
PROMPT DELIVERY
MACPHERSON & TEETZEL
WHOLESALE HARDWARE AND STOVES
1290 Homer Street
VANCOUVER, BC
^I^IIIS formula is known throughout the length and breadth
of Canada where IV11 "English" Taint is used, as tin-
paint with the record iov permanence, covering capacity and
economy.
The various tests to which it has been put by practical
painters all proclaim B-H "English" as the Taint which
offers the greatest n-sistan■■■«• to wear and tear.
A thoroughly reliable •'Surface Saver" for all purposes,
"Save the surface
and you save all"
-^
Eftry (,tn /t,j|   ■>   ngntd gtit1t»nlttd fatrrulo       A
formula   tlhtch   hoi   bttn   prttyrtd   la   bt   iht   (oiitil
formula far Canada's vlgawu cllmttt     It •' vii"
BUttronci»/ qualiiu
BRANDRAM - HENDERSON
I I Mill |>-
WfJMHMMM
Montreal, Halifax, St. John, Toronto, Winnipeg, Medicine Hat, Calgary, Edmonton, Vancouver. 1921
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
327
1
f
f».*      ■•,
0
Taking an b basis ti,, figures for
the first three months of the y ear. il
is evident that quite b targe number
of merchant*1 are enjoying a substantial increase in turnover, although
profits are nol ss greal in proportion
as last year. Merchants report a
good demand for Reasonable lines,
and reeenl price declines are said to
have had a Btimulatiti* effect. Th<
fiawmill and logging supplies busi
loss is being sdversel"i affected by
high freight rates In sum. sections
hardware merchants report that
farm products are in man) cases l><
inn sohj for less than their cosl oi
production, and the farmer is reluct-
ant to buy hardware which has not,
as lm claims, declined in the san ■
proportion. Builders sri still holding up activity. . \; • cling lower
pri <s iu buibbrs' supplies. Paiul
is moving well owing to seasonable
requirements and reeenl declines iu
price
Nails   Aalthougl   I In '    is -i fair
di Miami, principal!) foi small orders
there    Will    be    little    lUOVCIIlCUt    lllltil
building bc! i\ it ii s  gi I   undor  "*• a>.
Prices remain steady al the decline.
Wire   nails,   $6.50   base;   cut   nails, garden tools  moving  well.    Screen
$9.50 base. uoo*sand windows active with prices
Carriage  Hardware—A   10$   re- unchanged.
diction reported in various lines ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■^■■■■■i
of carriage hardware, including axle OBITUARY
clips, shaft couplings, and axle clip,
yokes, J- A- Flett
Building     Taper    takes    another A  nativ(i  ((f ,,ni(.(l (-ountv<  Qnt.,
dr°P< farred bem8 quoted at  $1.40 and  regident   here  since  1889,  Mr.
r"1!- u,!il Tial" :" slnn' .John A. Kleit. head of the hardware
,!ar ,rn" i,!h! -M,1,i s''•,•1 Decline1/^ ln.m 0f j, A. Flett Ltd., 339 Hastings
a  point;  base now quoted at  $4.00 Street West. Vancouver, passed away
I""'' l0° |i,s- after an illness of several months*
Padlocks   Several  manufacturers (i |i-iinn    Ti-.. deceased was identi-
have redu 1 pries 10%. Eied   with   the   hardware   business
Sporting Goods   Retailers report practically the whole of his 62 years,
good demand for fishing tackle and and prior to coming to British Co-
baseball supplies. iumbia conducted an establishment
Builders' Hardware -Trices fairly of this order in North Dakota. Years
steady, with little demand.    No im- ago Mr, Flett was proprietor of sev-
provemenl looked for until labor eral hardware .-tores in Vancouver,
conditions are more satisfactory.
< 'oal (Ml declines 2c a gallon,
but eventually sold them all, except
that at 339 Hastings Street West.
Polarine quoted at $3.95 case and    Mr. Flett took a keen interest in
Rovalil >' |3.55 per case
government   and   civic   affairs,   al*
Poultry Netting and Wire Cloth—    though he never aspired to public
Prices    unchanged,    with   demand    office.   His death will be mourned
sfr«oiLr     Retailers report exceptional
,i ■' \ ity in these lines.
!..su n   Mowers  and   all   kinds  of
by a number of friends, both in civil
and business circles.
HARDWARE PRICES CURRENT
The following oro prieei quoted for principal lines of lending wholesale firms.   Prices quoted are necessarily
subject  to  market  fluctuations.
\ Wii.s   r, '.ii   IVrichl   ■- lo 139 I
\>. KS   h.c .    \... p.     %\        ......
•''•'■'       1 ! iiiblc   bll    .i\e«.   Ulilt.O ■!'■ ll     |26.
' ■ i  hunitM h nxo*   $14 00 rioi       ' '•■'
i'Oi, .| ,i\,.», nnhai tll« .i.  j'.''   •■ ! - I
VXIW    li.-it. Ii.  |22 10 lo $41*
O. MIS      « '; ,,x,       5     . ;-.
liM    i ■]..«    |1    • I)  | •
' u.tiv:   i ii .   rawhide » ■'■>     H '        :
i ul, |3 I.'. Id
H< 'I.ts.   r UUll VOK    (In   fill   l' '• '' '<■•   '
ml MtnnllOl   110 1" 6 Of   '."Mi    loi     • "'«
I In l   ..M ii I.',, in _ in    ofi (tai   ,. :i, nnd '. nip
till loturtlm,  ll •<»  10' .   -ai IIhi
H 'I.ts. m \i-||i SV.     . nnd unmller UP lo
1     III      luIlK'.     ll'MM     |l>        t»f(     llflt       <>\'!      11 11   ,     IP**8
18   ofl Hal; \ nnd   ,. Ip** 10'    "ff Hal
Ui H.'l'S   s'l'i i\ i •    i,—s ....     i if Hal
111 U.TS, TIRE i" •••< W vaa '"' on .ill
holla foi  broken packages.
I* ' Mm, hi: \ via; Vm 1.0 " to 5,000 ;• ;.
$58 nn |„i   |,< 00  feel
U' "i,'ins.  it \ n*:i'   SO gale • ?!; ■'•" ''■"'M
BUILDING i- \ ri'.i; Tai red |1 10 lo 1: 10
pei roll According o> qualll - Plain,fl 00
lo }.1 lo par roll
BUTTH I'liiti-a. "Mi, antique copper ni"'
dull hrnasflnlsli :" \." pel pair, 88c;
:iU\:ii... per pair, |3i , i\'  i1'. pei pair, 82c
HUTT'-i \\ rough I Heel No 804 ."•.v.." •.
ti SB per doa ii'-.v!'.. 12 *fl pei doi . !•'. \ r •
n n pei  doi
'■ \Ki'i:i   KELT   id oi. 5011). $l BO roll
CATCHES, i'I'I'Ui iMil i Old oppor .n"!
'lull  liiii. >,  11111...h.   ?! ..;   |ni   .In/.,
CHAIN"   Coll   B,  electric  weld,3-16,  $20 50
j,..  too n»s ; t,. ji'.i 50 per 100 lba.;8-16, 116 50
•     Iba .   ,, \i i .'in per 100 lbs.; &, *»13.00
■ .    too lbs
i'm vi.N   r.ogglng.B-lOxM, *:'it each; :sxii,
<;    |  ,.,■, h
CHOITKW8 FOOD Universal, Ko. 0, $2.21
, ,, i.. i niveri il N ■ I, 12 ''■' each; Universal,
\n •; s:: ^ each; Universal, No. 5, $+.69
, iph; Honu1   No  55, $2.30   each; Home, No.
i'hVkns UARHELL No. 0, $11.00 each;
S'o '. $11.50 each; No -. 12 T."> each; No. 3,
$11 it" each.
.•u:vis. M \ 1.1.1: \ci.i:   Per Ib . 22a
CLOTH 128 l,l\'K. WIRE Per doi ; 50 ft,
JI :'":  lOOfl , JT 80.
DRILLS Bll sin !.. Hi', off new list;
LtlitckDinlth '•• in. :i:Me.  off new list.
ka\ irruui'i'iii -Per 100 feet, .sm . $9.61;
10 in . $12 29; 12 in . $15.10.
kh.ks Greal Western, 50 .">', off list;
Imperial   50 5 .   off list.
IJ.INOES    Per   ii>>z.   palm    Heavy   strap,   1
Inch. $2 40; Binch, $S 00; 6 Inch, $3.26; 3 Inch,
fi i".
CORRUGATED TEE- Per doaen pans -
i meh $1.85; 6 Inch, $8.83; 8 inch. $6.16; 12
Inch, $12 15
HORSE SHOES Iron, Nob, 0 to 1, $11.00
per 100 lbs ; Iron, Nos, - and larger, $10x75
I,,." loo Iba
Ii;, .... SAD, C< 'MM' IN Per I10 lbs —
0 ir-i  .mil over, $30.89; 3, I and S H>s. $23.37.
KNOR8, kim  DOOR  Japanned, $4.06 per
KAMI' CHIMNEYS A. per case 8 do-/,.,
Ji.T.'i per dos.; A, per doz., $2.00; B, \n>v case
6 do*., $1.95 p.T doa.; B, per doa,, $2,-30,
LANTERNS—Short or IntiR' globe, plain,
$16.50 doa ; Japanned, $13.00' doz.
l.AWN   MOWT5RS Trojan,   12   lnch,$7.76;
n Inch, $8.26; 16 inch $8.75; Model K. '
blades, il inch. $11.75; 16 Inch, $12,25; is
inch, $13.00; Model C, 4 blades, ii Inch,
$12-.S0; 16 inch, $18.00; is inch, $18.60; Blue
Bird BB, I blades, 14 inch, $14.25; 16 inch,
$15 00; IS inch, $15.60.
MATTih'KS - pick, $16.W per doz.; Cutter
$16.00 per doz.
\A11.S. WIRE—Base $6.60 f.O.b, Vancouver;  Cut, base,  $9.60 f.o.b,   Vancouver.
KETTINO, POULTRY—Per roll—2 x 12.
$2.10; 8x24, $4.15; :vx;!ii. $4.80; 2x60, $9.15;
1x12, ■<! 60; 1x24, $8.10;  1x36, $11.46.
NUTS Ppr WO lbs advance over List—
Square, small lots, $3.05; square, case lots,
$5.06; hexag m, small lots, $8.80; hexagon,
case lots. $.""> ;;n.
PICKS -Clay, 6-7 lbs.,  $u.r>o per doa,
PINE TAK 1 gal., $1.20 each; >, ga,l,$4.68
per do/..; '< gal,, $2.88 per doa,
PLASTER OF PARIS-  $8.30 per 100 Iba,
RIVETS AND BURRS—Black ca rtage, 61b,
Packages, less L"_M-jr; Off list, cupper rivets,
No. s, l.'ic p,,r lb.; assorted copper rivets and
burrs,   No.   S,   "s   to  %,   45c  per  lb,;  assorted
coppered rivets and burrs, No. 8, % to :;i,
i.'ic per lb.; copper buns, No 8, 70c per lb.;
ciiiioe".d burrs, No, 8, 40c per lb,
ROPE SISAL BA3B British manila, base,
l',i'iic; pare manila, base 26c. 32S
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Ma
SAWS.BUCK—Happy Medium. $16.60 per
doz; lance tooth. $22.36 per doi.; Happy
Idea. $20.00 per doz; Trine,, Rupert, $24.76
per doz.
8CRSWS—upright flat head. 65c off list,
bright round head, SOc off list; Brass flat,
50c off list; brass round,   '•'"' off list.
SCREWS,  3ET-4$C off list
SCREWS, CA-P—-16C Off list.
SHOVELS AND BPAD.18OH or Fox.
$17.25i per doz.; Jenes or Bulldog, $90.00 per
doz.
IRON, BAND—Per 100 lbs,—IH In h, $6, *>;
1*4 inch. $8.00; 1 inch. $8.00.
[RON, BLACK SHEET—'Per 100 lbs.—10
gauge, $7.25; 14 gauge, $7.00; 1S-S0 gauge.
$8.10; 26 gauge, $8.85.
IRON, GALVANIZED SHEET—Per LOO lbs.
—28  gauge,   American  or   English,  lie 18;   24
gauge, $9.66; 18 and 10 gauge, $$.«.
SOOOP8—Per doa.— Moos,,. No ', $26.00;
No. 6. $27.00; No. 8, $38.04); No   10, $8*1.00
All above in black finish.
SOLDER—HxMi, case lots, 17 Vic per U>;
less. 28V>c per lb,
SPIKES, PRESSED—Per 100 lbs.—K in.-h.
$s 50; 5-16. $;■ 50; 4 inch. $s mi.
STAPLES—Galvanised feme. 18*60 t>.-r 100
lbs. in full kegs; galvanized poultry netting)
$10.50 per 100 lbs. in full 'Kegs.
TACKS—  Carpet.   7"c  off  new  list.
TOOLS—Harvest, 60/2 off new list
WIRE. BARBED— i\.r roil—4 point, cattle,
80 md. $8.26; 4 iw.int. nog, 80 rod, $•; 75
WIRE. PLAIN, GALVANIZED—Per 100
lbs—No. 9. $7.80; No,  12. $7.50.
WIRE. o. A A.—Per 100 lbs.—No IP, $7 10;
No. ll. $7.80; N... 12. 17 25.
WRINGERS—Domestic,   $98.40   per   dm .
Ottawa. $80.00 pei   il>>x , Cem. $SS'"<> pel" il"<
Sunlight $TB 80 per doa
WASHING   MACHINKS    IVifeetioii   hl>« -
trie    $110,041;   lew   pressure   water   motor,
$23.20;  Vacuum,  $22.70;  Canada  First.  $18.80
VISES,   VVARRJBN   SOLID   BOX      $1   lbs.
$16,60 each; 50 lbs. lis 26 each
PAINTS   AND   OILS
Martin  Senour Co.  Ltd.
ENAMELS,    vrii (MOBILE
i inlmary  I *oloi S
Si  gallon
>*  gaUoi*
l»18 fa lion
Cardinal Red
'.4  gallon
"■■*   Ration
lit",   if-iillitn
ENAMELS,   ENGINE
i Ordinary coloni
•*  gallon
\  gallon
l-U gallon
Seal let
!t  gallon
1h  gallon
l-H ration
knamki.. m vktivs u urn:
l gallon
4   gallon
•.„  gallon
"i»  gallon
]-'i; gallon
Decors 11Vp Enamel
I   gallon
■■:  gallon
*  gallon
Bach
II 18
VI
45
|   -'.
1.01
57
:,.i. h
$1 18
gQ
<:>
: M
: l I
II
* SS
I 88
95
It
5 88
1-8 gallon
Enamel, Hath, tintlsts, f' 50 p«i doi
PAINTS
Martin  S*nowr,
Ordinary colon in i icai  cans
Martin   BeftOUJ   p..nit   paint
jklartln  Senoui   Neutoni  white
Martin  SenOUl   Neutonc color
Mai tin Senour rt>> u palnl
site, s\ in  \\ iiiuutm.  a hits
Shererln Williams, colot
'ii.-rwin  Wllliama  poroh
H <•; s* m w llllama, flooi
PITH
Bulk,
Hull..
Bulk
Tina
fins
Hi*
ihi
Its)
ijn'si:i;i> oil
r..m   ", !•■ '.. barrels
Boiled, 1 (■> I hai r»t*
i.i: vi» u HIT*" in •
1.0O0   lb*    t'<   I   ton
i gag than  I  Ion
TPRPBNTINB
i  barrel  i"t»
VARNISHES
KtaJHIC,   No    I
KUstli     v« ■    I
I \"  Linoleum
IV Marine (tnai
Pr*|« Hard «»u
i \    Pumli ure
I JC.|\|1'I .'1
u .»
IL
Oalti
I<
i
let
Pei
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100 lb
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NEVER GIVE UP                  And through the chaos His wisdom Knowing that Providence mingles
arranges the nip.
Never give up; there are chances       Ever success, if you'll only hold And of nil maxims, the bftt as the
and changes,                                         on. oldest,
Helping the hopeful a hundred to    Never  give  up;  for  the  wisest  i§ Is tlie stern watchword of "Never
one,                                                          boldest. give up!"
The Martin-Senour Co., Limited
MANUFACTURERS OF
High-Grade Paints and Varnishes
p
British Columbia Factory; 1505 Powell Street, Vancouver
Phone High 422
Deal With Our Advertisers:    They Make Thia  Official Publication Possible at $2.00 a Year.
rii]i|||illiiiaiiillllllll8W*|l|8MiWi|IHB>1)ltllliilijiWlili.iiiii
■   -
._^^___^_ THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
321)
Unusual Sale Window Displays
from Canada and the U.S.
Catching the Early Morning Train
The Hudson's Bay Company, Win-
ttipeg, Man,, devised a novel way of
attracting attention to their early
morning specials. The background
tn out" of their show windows was
that of a typical rural scone, with
painted trees, an occasional house
and tilled land. A miniature railroad track was laid over the green
crepe psper covered floor and an
electric train ran round and round
the track. The itenia comprising the
special sale were announced by price
tic kits mi standards while a large
sign down in front advised one to—
"Take the tram to Bconomyville.
Tickets good only from nine until
ten."
"Never More" Bargains
The Oianl Clothing Store. London,
Ont., decorated their sale windows
with long streamers, each containing
the picture of a raven.  The caption
tn each streamer was "Never More,''
hut beneath this was a different
message, as per the examples given
below:
" in! losi d w ith terrific Buddeu-
cess."
"To hare walls and empty counters."
"The beginning of the end.   We
quit.     No sham."
The Purpose of Stock Talcing
Almys. Montreal, heralded their
quarterly stocktaking sale with a
large window card, cut out to form
two open pages of a large ledger.
Across the ledger was the title of
the sale in question, visualising, of
course, the* particular purpose of
their quarterly stocktaking sale."
The Golden Anniversary Setting
Bryson, Qrahame, Ltd., Ottawa, Out.,
celebrated their fiftieth anniversary
with a big sale. Kadi show window at the rear was enclosed with
a blue cut-out, bordered with narrow gold panels, The middle of the
cut-out was devoted to a suitable inscription pertaining to the sale, while
drooping down from either side were
chains of orange trailing blossoms.
Tin* sale offerings were attractively
Bet mit. on individual pedestals, with
small stands in between containing
clusters of rich black grapes, apples,
Oranges nnd pears. Chains of the
orange flowers also hung from each
pedestal on which merchandise was
displayed.
The Parrot as Mouthpiece
Sheldon's. Edmonton, Alta., called
attention to their low prices by a
sitrn outside their store, between the
window and the doorway. The
painted Bign was that of a small boy
cr-axing a parrot to say, "At Sheldon's it costs less. Anything von
need."
Blacksmith on the Job
Grafton & Co., Ltd.. Peterborough,
Out., employed especially attractive
showeards to put across their semiannual sale. Bach window card depicted a blacksmith working at his
anvil, with the following apt caption
below: "Grafton's semi-annual sale
smashes the II.C L."
Raton's.  Toronto,  Ont.. advertise
their chief bargains in the daily pa
pers, but each day there are small
odd lots that are not worth while
advertising. Visitors to the store
are encouraged to search through
the store for surprises by way of
price reductions. This pleases the
natural feminine bargaining instinct. Each odd lot is placed in a
conspicuous position on the counter
of the department in question, accompanied by the following explanatory card: "Not advertised in the
daily papers."
8 * 11«11111118 8 8 81811111II11111111811M111111111 tl 11S
'Place yx>ur
SPRING
ORDE<R
through
your
Dealers
LOWEST PRICES K>
ALWAYS RELIABLE
Ctmltrb
lllimillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll
je behind h
\\nVl" 'llpr-
\v\e*B^-*****--*BWV
TEA
The supreme quality and constant repeat business
on "MALKIN'S BEST" makes it the most
satisfactory and profitable TEA to stock.
The W. H. Malkin Co., Limited
VANCOUVER    NANAIMO    VICTORIA 330
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA KKTAILBB
Mm
<i
B        '
I I
■■-■ i
If **
NUTRITIVE VALUE
/■■In eminent health authority has recently said:
44 Without question, the addition of
Yeast to Bread is one of the chief
reasons why it is an Ideal Pood; and
why, with the addition of milk, it
becomes a perfectly balanced diet."
This is due to the rich content in Yeast
of the precious Vitamine, water soluble B,
now recognized as an essential food factor
FLEISCHMANN'S YEAST
More than a leavener
Aids in the assimilation of your Bread,
and adds health and growth-promoting
value.
It is far richer in vitamine B than any
other available substance.
Its presence ensures that quick
and easy digestion that makes
bread the most prized of all foods
$i
' '      i
THE FLEISCHMANN COMPANY
>i
Fleischmann's Yeast
Fleischmanns Service
m^^^-irnt»mm»«iim«^
mtimmnmnimwvimstmnui'm «1
1921
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
331
APOLOGY
Owing to the printers strike, we have been unable
tomake this issue aa full and complete as usual, for
which we crave the indulgence of our readers.
BAKERY SECTION OF R.M.A. FORMED
A mu section of (lie Retail Merchants'Association
has bean formed in \ sneouver, comprising the baker
and confectionery trade, Up to 11 * * - present time about
fort) of the bakers, both manufacturing and retail, in
Vancouver have joined the section and it is expected
lo make it province-wide, taking in membership from
ail over British ' lolumbia.
Tin- objects of the si ctioti will be identical with
those previously covered by the Bread and Cake Manufacturers' Association of British Columbia, which functioned very actively particularly during the closing
year of the war in co-operation with the Pood Board.
A considerable amount of work was also dune in connection with provincial legislation and numerous regulations governing the industry. This work will In
future he carried <>n l<_\ lhe Bakery Section of the Retail
Merchants' Association.
An important factor in the situation is the protection afforded to bakers joining the Retail Merchants'
Association againsl prosecution for nonpayment of so-
called Luxur) Taxes on goods whieh fall within the
luxury class under the taxation which has gone into
the discard with the bringing in of the new budget, in
this connection readers are referred i<» the following
paragraph i
Luxury Taxes on Confectionery Go.
Sir Henry Drayton has killed the Luxury Tax.
His iiiw budget places the objectionable impost entire-
l\ in the discard, and in future the man who makes or
sells iced cakes, confectioner*). or any other commodity
which previously was deemed to he taxable as a luxury
at lo per cent, is now entirel) Free From any queries as
'" \\ bother he is taxable or not.
It is, In.uever. iineertaiii whether the Government
will allow the removal of this objectionable tax to be
made retroactive, thai is to say. whether bakers and
confectioners who have not paid the luxury tax on
sales of these commodities up to and including May
I'Mli will be now exempt from paying.
It will be remembered that the Retail Merchants'
Assoieatioil are now fighting this fuse at Ottawa, and
have advised Lakers ami confectioners nol in the meantime to pay the tax until the case is decided. No decis
ion has vol been reached and it is theroofrc not eertain
whether the Government will insist upon payment if
the decision goes against the Retail Merchants' Association.
It is, however, quite sure that from now on the
manufacturer of iced goods, fancy cakes and all other
commodities of that nature will not be required to pay
the Luxury Tax.
So far as taking out a Manufacturers' License is
concerned, the question is dealt with in another pari
of this journal. The Association is taking the stand
strongly that a man who is manufacturing to sell retail
over his own counter to the puhlie is not a manufacturer
and therefore should not be subject to a Manufacturers'
License tax. 1'ntil this matter is straightened out, it
is not sure what attitude the Government will take on
this question.
THE FOOD AND DRUG ACT.
The following information, supplied by the confectionery, biscuit and chocolate industries of Canada,
regarding the various features of the Food and Drug
Act affecting the industry is given by the secretary.
(1) Date of labelling. The final date has been
fixed as January 1st. Vd22. after which all packages of
two ounces or over (sealed) must have printed in clear
type on the front panel of the label the "nett weight.
cf contents." Packages unsealed do not come under
the Act. Goods heretofore sold by count can so be
continued. For instance—a package might contain
twelve, sixteen or eighteen biscuits aud be labelled as
such, if such has been the custom. An endeavor to
negative the purpose of the law by changing the recognized methods from weights to count will not be allowed.
(2) Name of buseuit contained in the package, as
well as the manufacturer's name must appear on the
front panel of the label to leave no uncertainty in the
mind of the buyer as to contents.
(3) An article must not be called by a name which
is deceptive. For instance, Arrowroot biscuits must
contain the standard proportion of arrowroot in its
mixture, or it will be considered a fraud. The use of
the word "honey'' cannot be used unless tho quantity
of pure honey contained in the mixture guarantees its
quality. This applies to all articles where the word
used implies that the article is other than it really
is. l.n this connection applies also the use of a name of
another country, where the intent is clearly made t<>
imitate the product of that country. To illustrate:
"English Plum Pudding," if made in Canada, must
say in addition to the manufacturer's name, "English
Stvle Plum Pudding." 332
THE BRTTTSI1 COLUMBIA RETAILER
Mi
i
l
I
The Bakers' Favorite
GOVERNMENT   BRAND
ream of the West
PLOUR
THE HEDLEY SHAW MILUNG COMPANY, LIMITED
MEDICINE HAT, ALBERTA
Phone Seymour 2245 Affiliated witb MAPLE LEAF MILUNG CO.. LIMITED
Vancouver Office: 510 Hastings Street West
Your Cakes' Reputation KSroEwS
Your business flourishes or fails on the reputation of your cakes. Their
tastiness is largely dependent on the uniform quality of the shortening thi*
fatty richness lliat goes into them.
Tlie uniform smoothness with whieh Bakers   Cottolem
in the mixers, the redueed amount necessar** and the fsel thai   I   •
all la!    saves time and money,
The richness of Bakers' Cottolene makes it n   •  • ■■■»■>  to u****
only 12 ounces to get results equal to those obtained with lf» omi
of other shortenings,
Perhaps you have never "gotten around" to trying Bakers'
Cottolene?   Let us ship you a trial order.   Prices on request.
GH jug FAIR BANK company;
MADE IN CANADA
MONTREAL
MsCOTTOLENE
Packed in Tierces, Half Barrels, Tubs and Pails.
■■'. >■«.■ .-.	 1921
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
333
BUTTER SPONGE CAKE
1   pound   of  lUgar,   10   eggS,   10
ounces of butter, '_• pint of milk' 2
teaspoonfuls of baking powder, l1?
pounds of flour. Beat the sugar
and fgg* together a few minute's, as
if lor sponge cake; melt the butter
and heal it in; add th*- milk, then
the powder, and then the flour, and
stir up well.    Flavour if desired
Bake twenty-five minutes at good
heat.
COCOANUT JUMBLES
l large cocoanut, grated; -1 eggs,
1 pound and -1 ounces of sugar, |'%
pound of butter, 1 tabh spoonful of
rose   water.     To   every    pound    of
flour us1' 2 teaspoonfuls of yeasl
powder.   Use enough flour to make
;is  soft   dough  as  you   c;m   handle;
Kent the eggs very light, then add
the sugar, next the butter" the rose
w ster, the coi oanut, arid lastly the
yeasl powder, sifted in thoroughly
with  the  flour,  roll  oul   about   1-3
of an inch thick aud cut with a
jumble cutter and then bake in a
quick oven.
JELLIED COCOANUT BUNS
These are good for the quick lunch
counter trade. For them von need
scalloped pattypans about 1 inch in
depth and in size to sell at 5 cents
••aeh.
1 pound of lard or butter and lard,
VA pounds of powdered sugar, 1
ounce of good baking powder, 2
pounds of flour, 4 eggs, 1 pint of
milk (more or less). Sift the baking powder in the flour, cream the
butter, sugar and eggs, add the milk,
give it a stir around, then add the
flour with the baking powder in it
and half mix- then add a fair show-
no- of shredded cocoanut and finish
mixing, adding what more milk may
be needed to form a mass the same
tightness as best pound cake, or a
little slacker. Then with a spoon
nearly half fill the pattypans with
the mixture, hollow it a little in the
middle and put in a teaspoonful of
some good fruit jelly, then put on
top of the mixture, to % fill the
pattypan; dust them with powdered
sugar and sprinkle them with water;
then bake in a solid heat to take on
a nice rich brown. Some bake these
a rich <••?£ color. If you wish them
a higher color than the 4 eggs give
them, add egg color as your judgment directs. These may be made in
any size pattypan.
SPICED SUGAR CAKE
»
10 pounds of flour, 4 pounds molasses, 3 pounds brown sugar, 3
pounds lard, 2 ounces ground cinnamon. 1 ounce ground allspice, 1
ounce ground ginger, 1 ounce ammonia, 1 quart water. Sift the ginger and spices with the flour, rub
in the lard, mix in the sugar and
make a bay. Powder and dissolve
the ammonia in the water, stir it into
the molasses and make all up to a
stiff dough. Mold well, roll out, cut
into cakes with a large round cutter,
place them on well-buttered tius and
bake in a warm oven.
KIRKLAND & ROSE
IMPORTERS  AND  MANUFACTURER'S  AGENTS
Bakers' and Confectioners' Supplies
AGENTS  FOR
MILKSTOCK
\ iu ■ Separated Milk in Powder F*orm,
DIAMALT
» re-   Mali Extra I for Baki n
CHOCOLATE
'ur Confectioner) sad Cake Work.
CSStfSCCS
Fla-mr'nt***, Harmless Colors, Essential Oils, etc.
PAPTR   GOODS
ol :iii kinds, Lace Mats. Charlotte Russe Cup
Cake Ornaments, et.
130 Water Street.
Manufactured  hy  CANADIAN  MILK PRODUCTS  LTD,
Toronto, I anada.
Manufactured   by   THE    AMERICAN    DIAMALT   CO.,
Cincinnati, Ohio.
Manufactured   by   THE   COWAN   CO.   LTD.;   Toronto,
I 'ana'lu,
Manufactured by W. J. BUSH & CO. LTD., London, Eng.,
and Montreal. Canada,
•^Oftcfi'gff'lK^iftiff^"
Manufactured by MANSELL, HUNT, CATTY & CO. LTD,
London, Eng., and Montreal, Canada.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Almond's Limited
VANCOUVER, B. C.
IMPORTERS OK
Bakers and Confectioners'
Machinery  and   Supplies
TICKETS AND   LABELS
MADE   BY  SPECIALISTS.
a specialist, In any calling, Is one equipped to produce results promptly, satisfactorily and economlcaily.
This Is where our plant differs from the average printing office. We cany in stock many tons of colored card
hoards for Immediate use. At one operation, with our
modern specialty machinery, we print tickets in two
colors on front of ticket and on the back; number each
ticket the same or consecutively and perforate sheet
both ways; or we can print your tickets and re-wind
Into rolls to suit, each ticket numbered consecutively
nnd correctly. We make bread labels In two colors for
the price of printing one color, in quantities, and put
up Into rolls of 5.000. We make the tickets for the
B.C.B1, Ry. by the millions; for the North Vancouver
Ferries; for the Government Amusement Tax, also up
In the millions, nnd all kinds of theatre tickets. May
wa not be of service to you.
NICHOLSON, LTD.
Phone  Bayview 353
2092 2nd  AVENUE  WEST VANCOUVER,  B. C.
Deal With  Our Advertisers;    They Make This  Official  Publication  Possible  at $2.00 a  Year. 334
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA RETAILER
Mi
WILSON BROTHERS
Established 1890
Our Motto is " SERVICE"
We cannot offer to sell you goods cheaper than any other firm is in a position to do, but we CAN
give actual facts to prove that it is
ECONOMY
to deal with us
£?£«?£ WILSON BROTHERS. VICTORIA. B.C.
CREf-faY'(i|t? BUTTER
SHAMOK BAND
Stands for the Highest Grade Butter
It is our endeavour to maintain the Highest Standard, and you can safely RECOIL
MEND this brand to your customers.
Reliability goes with SHAMROCK BRAND
P. Burns & Company, Limited
VANCOUVER
CALGARY
EDMONTON
•:»]
I
il
EFFICIENCY Brand Heavy Rubber Footwear
Brown and White.
HIP, STORM KING
and KNEE BOOTS
THREE, FOUR and SIX
EYELET LUMBERMEN'S
WE ALSO CARRY A LARGE STOCK OF "MALTESE CROSS" BRAND BOOTS   LUMBERMEN S
-AND LIGHT ROBBERS. Send Your Ru»h Orclcr» to Us.
Gutta  Percha & Rubber,  Ltd.
526 BEATTY STREET, VANCOUVER. m YATES STREET, VICTORIA.
mvmmimwrtymwiMmwjitm PARAGON
VICTORY
FLOUR  MILLS
***COUV£fl    *^
SELECTED HARD SPRING WHEAT
FLOUR
FAMILY  PATENT
Victory Flour Mills, Limited
806 BEACH AVENUE VANCOUVER,  B.C.
Phones: Seymour 3242   3243—3244
Constant Demand
for
Grape-Nuts
SggftsESSr7
Twenty years of established recognition as
an exceptional food—
Universal interest and appreciation which
make Grape-Nuts a household word everywhere-
Persistent advertising direct to the consumer—	
A liberal sales policy-
Insure profit for the grocer who keeps well-stocked on Grape-Nuts
Canadian Postum Cereal Co., Ltd., Windsor, Ontario, Canada
Grape Nut
* Compound raid* „f y^
*>tl»
,      A FOcod"
^-"S::rr.——
■"• * •• mm,
'4
m
J •.-*-*•
i
a
/ 0>
A Seasonable Product
<•> <*>
THHE QUALITY OF SWIFTS    PREMIUM    HAMS AND BACON IS OBTAINED BY SELECTION
AND THE MILK    SWIFT S PREMIUM    CLUB.
MADE IN CANADA. GOVERNMENT INSPECTED
DON'T FORGET TO LOOK FOR THE BLUE TAG   ON  OUR     PREMIUM     HAMS      NOT  NECKS
SARY TO PARBOIL "
«
Swift Canadian Company, Limited
Vancouver       New Westminster       Victoria        Nelson        Calgary        Edmonton
ii
SUPPLY YOUR CUSTOMERS
APEX" SOAP FLAKES
Guaranteed 100% Pure
Especially Suitable for use in all Types of Washing Machines
SOLD BY THE POUND IN BULK NO WASTE
Price: $4.75 per case—25 lbs.
THE ROYAL CROWN SOAPS, LTD.
I
VANCOUVER, B.C.
1 - -» '—■—■■—'—n	

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