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The British Columbia Labor News May 19, 1922

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N-R.F
���
Issued Every Friday
Devoted, to the interests of the International Labor Movement
LABOR
fSub��<-ris��ion:.$l..-*0 Pet Year*|
I fe Par Cosy J
Volume 'I.
Vancouver, B. C, Friday, May 19, 1922
Number 28
Purity And Steves' Dairies
Placed On Unfair List
SEEING CHICAGO
IN UNION TAXIS
STATE INSURANCE
GREAT BENEFIT
Tradea Council  Urges
Docs Good Work���Woman Organizer to be Ashed from
A. F. of L.���Labor Day to be Held ia Mahon Park-
Chinese Earn More Than White Mechanics on C.P.R.
AT the regular session of the Tradea and Labor Council held in tbe ] caeo    ,���,_    ,
Labor Hall on Tueaday evening, both the Purity aad Steves dairies  citizens   were
were placed on the unfair list.    This action wm'^en^jjter see-  contention    of    the    Amalgamated ately-owned  insurance companies is
era! attempts had. been made to organise the dairy employees?* The mat-  clothing    Workers    was    in    pro- ,u��stanced by the recent payment h
ter h-s been laid over time and time again, giving the employers every. g-^  Dy   a   apeetaeular  dash   over' -*������ Queensland Labor
opportunity to allpw their  men  to organize, but laat week the employers j the cit_.g 52-nijfa system of boule-' *-*->��**
refused to meet the Trades Council committee who were told to mind j yards today of a fleet of 125 union
Delegates  Demon-! Queensland Labor Government
strata to Combat Silence of        Pays Ont $155,000 in Mine
Daily Press Disaster
CHICAGO���The workers of Chi-! BRISBANE, Queensland.��� That
good many other j State-owned insurance offers more
informed   that   the j benefits to the people than the priv-
Government
its    State-owned    insurance
scheme, of compensations to the de~
their own business with the result that the Milk Wagon Driven and Dairy   taxis in which were packed the dele ! Pendente of the victims of the Mount
Employees Union asked to have these two dairies placed on the unfair list. ! t_tes and officers. It was a big boost
The Trades Council requests all union men to give ail the publicity pes- j for  union  labor and  counted  in  a
to pla^r any other union team on La- ,
bo'r Day.
Thanks  Fl
"���esses"e   Vvorkers
HOW THE CHINESE
WAGED BIG STRIKE
General Strike in World's
sible about these dairies.
Credentials were received for delegates from Brotherhood of Carpenters and Machinists Lodge 182. Delegates, obligated.
Secretary Bengough reporting for
the o-maiHtee on unemployment said
that Dels, Crawford, Fraser, Aid.
Pettipiece, Neelands, V P.P.,. Nixon
and Bengough interviewed the city
council on the subject of obtaining
immediate relief forSAhe many unfortunates in our midsA The delegation suggested a tag day, an appeal
by City Council, through the daily press for donationa to be used for
providing work by improving public
play grounds and parks, etc. This
was unanimously endorsed by the Finance Committee. Various kinds of
work haa since been provided which
has greatly relieved the situation.
Visit to  Victoria
The city council also delegated Aldermen Pettipiece and Scribbens to
proceed with the Tradea Council delegates to Victoria to interview the
Provincial government to urge the
immediate commencement of public
works. "The committee spent the
whole day withHhe Attorney General, the provincial secretary, the deputy Minister of Labor and officials
of the Departments of Agriculture
and Public Works snd resulted in the
adoption of many suggestions and
plans put into operations for the car-1
rying out of public works.      _
Del Ben'jOugh pointed out how
Mayor Tisuall 'had changed his opinion since laat year on'the question
of dolea He waa now in favor of
prpviding constructive work The
Attorney general was -also opposed
to the dole system.
The report waa received and dels
thanked for their good work
Work ansa's Cosapeasation.
In reporting for the parliamentary
committee Del. Bartlett introduced
recommendations from the Carpenters' Union for amendments to the
Workmen's Compensation Act to cover casual laborers who were not properly covered by the act. In the opinion of several of the delegates this
amendment was not satisfactory because it did not cover fully enough
the needs of the workers- and waa
therefore referred back to the committee.
Ta Orcanize Women
The committee also proposed that
the council ask the A. F. of L. for
a woman organiser to help organise
the women hi the various industries
in the city. Del Bartlett pointed out
that it was impossible to enforce the
minimum wage became the girls
, were afraid to apeak oat for fear of
losing the job even though miserable wagea were paid. Once organised these womea Would ba able to
enforce the wages provided under
she Act. The recommendation waa
adopted. -   .
. The Parliamentary committee also
requested the Trades Council to ask
the Provincial government to appoint
a tradea council official aa a Notary
Public aad a commissioner for registering voters. Recommendation was
adopted.
Del Herriett reminded the council
that he was a commissioner for taking affidavits.
Dal  Mrs  Dolk  reported  meeting
with a committee from the New Era
League to request the appointment
of bb innspeetor for meat and milk.
Laher Day aa Mahaa Park
Del Bartlett reporting for the Labor Day Committee aaid that arrangements were being made to hold
sports aad picnics in Mahon Park on
the first Monday fa September. All
unions are requested to send delegates to a meeting to he held oa this
subject fa the Laher Hall, Wednesday. May SI.   Del Showier mid the
Dairy Employeca Union had a good ia probably the  quickest  aad
baseball team aad would be willing | successful    general    strike    in   the
large measure to overcome the ailent
treatment that the local newspapers
are according the convention-
It was a boost in particular for the
Del McKenxie. Hotel and Restaur-! ��"��'-^��__��   Brotherhood of Team! j disaster limit
.   _.     .       . I, .-      :_*        j *v   : sters. Chauffeurs and    Stable    Men
ant  Employees Union informed the     ..7  .      .... .     .    _, ��� ���,.,-.
, ,, '   .     . . .  _, ��� which has built1, up a local of 3.000
council that the International Brew- ��� ,, Is  .      -___.
______ .   .   ��� _.     __ ; chauffeurs in a winning fight against
ery Workers extended sincere thanks_. ��� ,    ...   .....
__-���_-__��� - - _ _    I the non-union concerns. In this fight
to Dels Crawford and Bengough for j chie^B militMt Wegt SMe di-trfcl
their serv.ee. in reorganising the L ^^ ^ mim ^ dfiren tf)
workers of the fourbrewenesm the j^ hj,L R WM ^ , fcoott fo_
province. Del Crawford said th��t he ^ metaI tnd^ ^^ the Uxis werp
wished he had aa muck leverage over   Mde fcy Bnion labo_ fa locjJ ^^
the dairies as he had over the brew- ; 	
erics. '
Less Pay Thaa Chinese
Under the heading of reports from
unions it waa pointed out that no-
tit es had been posted up fa the C. P.
R. shops of another close-down from
May 18 to 29. These mechanics are
not earning enough to keep body
.and soul together, the closing down
���nd short time having been going on
for two years. When the men were
receiving their fast pay it was noticed that the Chinamen working for
Continued on page four
| Mulligan mine disaster which occurred last September when 75 men
lost their lives.
Private insurance companies
mould have, been liable for only
$25,000, because they had a fixed
The Queensland Government paid out $155,000. In addition, large sums of money were
raised by popular subscription and
invested in trust funds by the Government for weekly distribution
amongst the children of the deceased
men to provide for their education.
American Unions Finance
Russian Clothing Factories
Amalgamated Clothing Workers Will Help Fiance a Million
Dollar Corporation Comprising Workers-���Factories Worth
Five Million to be Turned Over to Corporation���
Russia Needa Capital
THE FIFTH biennnial convention of the Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America assembled in Chicago laat week, unanimously approved a plan submitted by Sidney Hillman, general president, to
help finance a million dollar American corporation which workers wiD
control to finance a group of clothing factories and textile mills in Russia worth $5,000,000, obtainable as s concession from the Soviet Government.
The offer was made to Hillman during his visit to Moscow and Petro-
grad last fall, where he conferred with Lenin and other Russian leaden.
Hillman was silent o nthe matter until a practical plan to finance it'was
devised.
Union Votes  $15,000 for Shares,   'all  men and women in the country
HORSESHOE f_y
SCENE OF OUTING
inior   Labor   League   Takes
Pleasant  Sunday  Hike���
Membership   Campaign
Now On
On Sunday last the Junior Labor
League held an outing which was
by far the most enjoyable of the several successful ones organized this
season.
TV party left at 11:3$ by
tbe Weat Vancouver ferry, and
proceeded from Ambleside along
the    North    Shore    to    Point    At-
Onielr*.*  -nrl   M��at  k____'kh,80n*     ���Min*    ******    **�����    hik~
quickest and Most Successful | e��� aoon p^ Atkinson behind them
Boost the Baseball Competition.
HAWAIIANS NOW
FACING EXTINCTION
The Amalgamated voted $10,000
for the campaign to get 100.000
workers in America to buy one share
of common stock at a par value of
$10, to buy $15,000 in share's for
the organization. About $10,000 in
shares was subscribed by individuals
on  the spot.
who desire to help those living under
conditions impossible to describe and
thus to  put the  whole  world back
on  a  way of reconstruction.
No Partisan  Issae
After his recommendation had
been sanctioned in a remarkable
demonstration that lasted for 15 min-
"We    are our    brothers'    keeper j utea> *n which ^^ of "Three"cheers
000.   When Capt   Cook   discovered
land arrived at Horseshoe Ba^a BtvlUielslands fa 1778, he estimated the
�����_,�� m'    a, a. a   a a as__a -���      "    T*5 .____*__ .    _A~**_l*a_��   r\nn ���   m& _ _*
SEATTLE. ��� First-hand accounts
of the gigantic industrial upheaval,
which shook South China to the core,
successfully challenged British power
in Hongkong and-won for seamen
more wages and freedom to organise,
are reaching America slowly through
this port.
Not only fjiinese printers, but
guilds of molders, patternmakers,
electricians, boilermakers. street ear
men, harbor boatmen and shipyard
workers went out en masse and the
outpost of the British Empire was reduced to impotency by their refusal
to turn,the wheels of industry.
Demand Big Increase
Briefly, the strike waa to gain a
30 per cent, wage increase for seamen earning over S3 a month and a
40 per cent, increase for those earning under. The strike grew fa volume for several weeks before it completely permeated the south Chinese
porta Suddenly it came to a dramatic climax about March***, when the
British governor ordered- the Chinese
Seamen's hall closed.
Immediately great boatloads of the
strikers sailed away from Hongkong
for Canton, under Chinese rule, nearby, and refused to return until their
hall waa reopened. Thereupon fellow
workers fa other guilds, principally
workers in the three Hongkong shipyards, aad well organised dty workers fa transportation, electricity and
other Vital industries, sent formal notice to the government of the colony
that unless the strike waa settled the
seamen'a demand satisfied aad the
union hall opened, all industry would
Bailee*
The government waa given 48
hours' notice to rip sal the order fa
council declaring the seamen's anion
an unlawful society snd to meet the
other deouada. Whan the government failed to meet As situation the
guilda vent out, practically to a man.
closing down all Hongkong activity.
The answer of the government
follows:
"Notice is heresy given that aa the
government has issued a notification
announcing a complete settlement ef
all the' seamen's demands sad sn
agreement has been signed by both
-oartiea, members should raau������ srork
at oae*.-*
That marked the closing of what
tie before 4 o'clock The weather
was ideal and the surroundings
most delightful, the picnickers' enjoyed themselves to the full, until
a halt eras called at 5 o'clock for
supper.
Pleasant hours were spent in boating on the quiet waters of Howe
Sound until preparations were made
for return. The homeward journey
waa made by way of the P. G. E.
connecting with the West Van ferry
and on arrival in Vancouver all voted tbe day a very pleasant one.
The secretary ia now receiving applications for membership, snd will
give full information to those interested on receipt of a postal to 148
Cordova St. W., or a phone call to
Fair 1610. The League's executive
has an eye to the summer season
and it is said that they intend to
let nothing go by fa the way of summer p.-times.
Tbe League meets tonight (Friday) at 929 Eleventh Ave., W., and
as there is no time like the present
to get acquainted a hearty invitation is extended to all to drop
around and meet the members.
DETROIT���By combining their
voting power the worker* made an almost clean sweep fa tha municipal
election held at Nile*. Mich., laat
week. They elected the mayor, city
clerk, dty treasurer, three supervisors, sad one alderman. One of
their candidatea for alderman waa defeated hy only three votes and s
recount waa ordered. The labor'_,������,, ^ ^
ticket wm bitterly opposed by the*
only daily paper Ia the dty.
White Men's Ways Have Not
Proved Healthful to That -
Easy-Going Race
WASHINGTON���Efforts sre'being made in Hawaii to save the remnant of the once populous native race
which during a century of contact
with the white man has steadily been
diminishing until now it is threatene
with extinction.
j White men's ways have not proved
healthful for the islander���simple,
kindly, easy-going Polynesians���and
they now number not more than 23,-
population at 400,000, a figure prdb
ably too high. A century ago, American missionaries in the islands estimated the population at 1-42.000.
Trying to Chock Death Rate.
Queen Liliuokalini's plaintive song
"Aloha Oe" has proved a prophecy.
Disease and  vice,  imported by the
white race, have taken a fearful toll
among the island people.
JAPANESE LABOR
BEING PERSECUTED
The Edmonton Branch of the Labor Party has changed Ra name to
the Canadian Labor Party.
world's history. The aftermath of
the strike wm marked hy scenes of
great joy and enthusiasm among the
Chinese workers. Great crowds surrounded the seamen's headquarters
oa Dee Veeax road oa the return of
tbe  union's  signboard   from   police
First the rod flag, the union flag
and then the Chiasm five-col or flags
were hoisted sad dipped three thnm
Thaa ap west tha symbol of th*
union's strength, the si to board. accompanied hy gnat roars of applause. Bat someth ing was ���_j*~g
(In   salami tafa*   ChrTB..i aoon
Militarists    Are    in    Absolute
Control of the Japanese
Government
MILWAUKEE, Wis.,���"Socialists
and radicals fa general in Japan are
being persecuted and hunted down
by the militarists who are in absolute
control of tbe government," sai<
Mrs. Victor L. Berger, back from a
trip through Japan, China, the Philli-
pines and Hawaii.
"The common folk themselves are
indifferent to the imperialistic ambitions of their ruling class and have
become thoroughly awake, politically
speaking,'' said Mrs. Berger.
"China," she said, further, "is not
as backward as one might think, labor organisations there are well developed, especially fa South Chins.
Internal strife is preventing s healthy
growth fa that direction. The power
of the Chinese labor union was evi-
cess of the recent
seamen's strike; which tied up 165
ships fa the Hong Kong harbor .
"Even the Phillippines has a federation of labor, although it still hn
more the form of a benefit society.
Labor conditions tilers are hardly of
the beat. Street ear conductors in
Manila are getting T6 seats a day
Aa far m I arm able to ascertain
wages fa the piovinccs range from
$7 to 91S a month." '
whether we like it or not," Hillman
declared in a remarkable address of
one hour and half duration which
worked the delegates up to a high
pitch of inspiration.
"I appeal to you in the name of
humanity to set loose a new force,
overturn the obstacles that have been
placed in Russia's path and get others to follow your example that civilization may be saved for labor and
everybody else alike.
"Let us serve notice thst economic
help of this country to Russia and to
sources other than Wall Street and
the channels of banking,"
He made a plea for support from
SO. VAN LEAGUE
HAS GOOD START
Young   Folks  Building   up   a
Social and ��� Educational
Organization
Last Friday night, a most encouraging meeting of the newly formed
South Vancouver Labor League was
held at its clubrooms, 6262 Chester
Street, when a good number of new
recruits joined up. Conveners of
committees were elected,and the enthusiasm shown at the meeting
speaks well for the young people who
sre desirous of carrying labor propaganda into a working class district
like South Vancouver.
The members are all active trying to get recruits but there must be
hundreds of people in South Vancouver who do not come in contact with
them and if these people would send
along their young people to the meetings at 6262 Chester Street���just
off 49th Ave. E.���it would be very
much appreciated. Anyone wishing
information about meetings should
phone Fraser 397Yl or 190X1. Notes
.of activities will appear from week to
week in this paper.
On May Day, the 24th inst, the
members of the League intend going on a hike and picnic on the North
Shore. Anyone wishing to go along
should get in touch with B. Lindsay]
at Fraser 326L3.
CHICAGO UNIONS MAY
CALL GENERAL STRIKE
��� -���"  i   /
A  Savin.  Cla-as.
"Pa. why ia a wife called the
better half?"
"In order, my son. that she may
not get tin impression that she's
the whole thing."
|,
plied the
of fire-j hfan
James Larkin. the Irish tabor
leader, haa been released from the
New Tork prison, pending another
trial.    Step* are being taken to have
, mm    deported
trial.
before    tha   second
CHICAGO���Referendum ballots
on a proposed strike May 22 have
been submitted to the 32 unions in
the Chicago building trades council by unsnimous vote of the delegates to the council at a meeting on
May 5. The resolution calls for a
strike on all jobs where non-union
men are employed or where men are
working under police protection.
It ta a blow at the so called Citizens Committee to Enforce the land-
is Award which has been importing
non-union workers snd spending
$65,000 a week and more on guards
and "investigators" employed fa connection with non-union jobs.
MONTREAL���According to recent statistics compiled by tha industrial establishment inspectors,
there are 13.188 children between
the ages of 14 and 16 employed in
the industries fa  Montreal.
.  "   -
Boss���Hera, where have you been?
Plug���Getting me 'air eut
Bos*���Wotl fa my time!
Plug���Lor* blimme!     It grew fa
your time, didnt HT
for Soviet Russia" were heard amidst
the clapping and stamping, Hillman
warned the delegates:
"I warn all those who are thinking
that they can make this action a partisan issue that they are not helping
Russia. We have our differences of
ovinion about political theories, but
we are united first to put a stop to
famine and starvation and then to
help  reconstruction.**
Hillman predicted that the union
would be severely criticized and its
action misinterpreted.* He denounced
as cowardly those who were attacking Soviet Russia rather than helpiag
her at the present time of peril to
the entire civilised worid, which, he
asserted, would go under unless Russia was helped to her feet.
The curse of the peace made at
Versailles, as well as the cause of the
war in which millions were slaughtered, waa due to the fact that the
people of the world permitted a few
to do their thinking for them.   ,
as     .   ________ aa---���.s_.i _al
nswai rosier Kaeeasstwessea
"The world has paid a terrible
price for these mistakes," Hillman
declared, but it can take this opportunity to save civilization by adopting a real policy for reconstruction.
"This is not to take a position for
or against Bolshevism, but against
starvation in Europe and to give hope
to all the peoples of eastern Europe
and Germany," he declared. . "Europe is only divided today between
the great masses looking for life and
a small clique that would rather see
the whole world go under than see
a new theory of living tried out."
What Russia needed most now, he
said, was capital and investment,
such as he hoped the American workers would snake in the proposed million-dollar co-operative corporation,
would be secured by the Russian
Government.
Hillman asserted that the actual
value ofthe properties that the Soviet
Government would turn over to ao
American co-operative waa 10.000,-
000 gold rubles, that preference
would be given in supplies of raw
materials and labor power and that
the Russian Government would guarantee the return of the American
money invested if the enterprise was
not successful.
WiO Send Esparto
Experts, he said, would be immediately sent over to check up the reports already made by engineers aad
economists upon the practicability of
the project.
Ranking on his intimate knowledge
of the American clothing industry,
particularly about the Chicago and
Rochester clothing markets, which
have been phenomenally successful
under the joint administration of the
factories by the union and manufacturers under the collective bargaining practice fa vogue here, Hillman
asserted that the linking of American
capital and administrative ability
with Russian brawn would be successful.
Predicts Saseaas.
He said that with poor materials
millions ot units of clothing were already being turned oat by th* Soviet
factories under great handicaps. The
possibilities of the situation, he declared, were limited only by tbe
ability ot the corporation's executives, which, he said, would always
be in labor's control.
Deal forC.t that tha
����� ea yaa, pefatfa, j^_
II
*���***
in }
m
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'
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA LABOR NEWS
Ii"'
THEiBX. LABOR NEWS
Published every Fridiiy at Labor Hall,
819 Pender Street West
*"*WHn' B> C-
Telephones Seymour 7495-74%
Subscription Bates:
tl.no per year by mail fa Canada
$2.60 per year outside Canada
II. W. WATTS ���  Editor and Manager
FRIDAY, MAX 19
LLOYD GEORGE FAILS.
The failure of the Genoa Conference to arrive at any definite reconstruction, by no means signifies
a defeat of the progressive element.
When the conference was first proposed by Lloyd George he saw an
opportunity of reviving his lost prestige and of being returned at the
head of the government in the next
general elections. As time went on,
the Tory element clipped his aspirations, by demanding what practically
amounted to aggressive action
against Russis. This he finally
agreed to, but when the conference
opened the'initiative of the Russians
completely upset his calculations.
He was beaten from the start with
his program of enslaving Russia,
while appearing Jo help her.
Being a so-called diplomat he saw
a way out of the predicament by
throwing the blame over to France.
France, dogmatic and militaristic to
the last, easily fitted into this place,
but even this did not give Lloyd
George his place in the sun.
The demands upon Russia were
fsr too raw. The Allies wished to
enslave the Russians just as they
have done their own people and the
people of other countries. They demanded the payment of the debts of
Imperial Russis and the restoration
of private property, overlooking entirely the fact that property confiscated from the Entente, during
and after the war, still remains in
the hands of the Allies. If it is
reasonable to expect Russia to return the property of capitalists, surely it is ressonable to expect the same
from the Allies. But this does not
work out to the satisfaction of the
would-be diplomats. They want to
see Russis crushed, because she is
experimenting with a new idea, that
if successful, would mean the bringing about of the collapse of the capitalistic system in their own countries. This naturally, they intend to
fight tooth and nail, but it is funny
to note that at the same time capitalists and their agents of all countries have been extremely busy trying to get concessions from the Russians. In many cases these concessions have been granted, and to-day
Russia is making faster progress for
economic reconstruction than most
other nations.
But Russia does not intend to allow these concessions nor Allied diplomacy to become the means whereby her mssses will be enslaved by
the capitalistic system. Her compromises are merely the means by
which the Russian masses will be
freed for all time from the bonds of
slavery.
THE CHICAGO BOMBINGS
of the United Textile Workers of
America.
It may be true that some of the
Chicago unions sre officered by ex-
convicts. Decent and progressive
men have been waging a .losing fight
against a type of criminal who has
fastened himself upon some unions.
They have continued in power
through terrorism maintained over
members. The active member who
rebelled against the criminal type
������fti'i-QBJ-k his life in his hands and
man;y such 'Wen have been brutally
beaten by sluggers.
It must also be borne in mind that
this type is also the reactionaries.
They sometimes pose as loud-mouthed radicals. They are the tools of
the bosses during peace and use insane tactics against them during
strikes. The class-conscious radical
is never involved in these tactics.
He realizes that nothing can
be accomplished of a beneficial
nature by destroying life or properly ,but the reactionary bosses tool,
who becomes a power in the urion.
incites to violence whenever the
whim dictates.
Such things cannot always be
avoided, the agent or provocateur is
a slippery customer who often soft
soaps the members of his union into
placing him in high office where he
can successfully watch the interests
of the bosses. They are to be found
in most cities where organised labor
is strong. There sre suspects in Vancouver, but it is not an easy matter
to prove. It is important however
that whenever such conditions prevail in any city the membership owe
it to themselves and the future of
their organizations to "clean house."
To permit such a situation to drift
is to invite disaster and defeat.
learned their lesson and will not
fight another war, but the trickery
of governments and diplomats is
still to be contended with, hence no
one csn say whst the workers will
do it) the next crisis. \
Now   for  the   Hague   Conference
and the same demands upon Russia.
The ex-Kaiser is now gardening
for '.a hobby. Maybe he ia trying to
discover why the worm turned.
As long as labor is willing to vote
for a "living" wage, aa advocated
by politicians, that is sll they are
going to get.
Making the world safe for petroleum seems to be the permanent task
of those who warred to make it safe
for democracy.
DIPLOMACY  AND WAR
Over 200 men identified with the
Chicago unions sre in jail, suspected of being implicated in the bombing of several buildings and the
slaying of two policemen. This results from the attacks made upon organised labor by a so-called Citizens
Committee who want to force low-fthe,r troubles.
In the meantime the workers look
on.    They produce tha commodities
The American and Allied capitalist class have gained right and
left from the war which they- so
constantly told us was holy. They
have got rid of the strong competition of German commerce by placing
control of Germany's industrial life
in the hands of the Reparations Commission. They are getting control at
very cheap prices of German and
Austrian industries and are using the
starvation wages which sre all that
the German and Austrian workers
can force them to pay, to beat down
the standard of living of the Allied
and American workers. They have
completed the process of getting
control, for use as valuable fields, of
the backward lands and weaker peoples of the earth, by dividing up the
German colonies among themselves,
just as thieves would divide up the
loot of any other robbery. The
French capitalists have got the iron
of Alsace-Lorraine, and the coal of
the Saar Valley, and not content with
that, are taking still more coal from
Germany as a tribute at below the
world's market price. The German
ships and cables have been divided
up among the victors as loot of the
holy "war for democracy." The
capitalists of the different nations
hsve got valuable parts of Turkey,
including especially the rich oil region of Mesopotamia, which has gone
to Great Britain, and is of especial
importance to her because oil is tha
most efficient fuel for ships.
Not satisfied with the "fruits" of
the last war, threats snd insinuations of another war have been emanating from the Genoa Conference.
Thus we see that the one hobby of
diplomats, no matter what ths eon-
sequences to others, are always
looking forward to wars to clear up
er wagea on the building tradesmen.
We have had so many instances of
terroristic tactics of a like nature
being carried but by provocateurs,
that we are inclined to that theory
in the Chicago case. In fact a day
or two before* the bombings, news
reached us to the effect that employees of strike breakers were responsible for the bombs which created
a panic In the Blackstone Valley Textile strike sone of Pawtucket, Rhode
Island. The bombs exploded in the
Jenekes Spinning *' Mills. These
charges were made by the president
>fim' "  ��� ���  -*      ' -
'      %      ���    ' .    ���   -    "    ",
".���   '���-_������     /
;*-
'W:
for the markets over which wars
are fought; they fight the wars in
order that the ruling class might
continue their plunder, and when
the war is over the workers either
stand guard over the conquered territory or sweat and toil to produce
goods for the new market
Will the workers continue to look
on while this state of affairs continues? Every once fa a while a
ray of light appears that seems.to
indicate   that   the    workers    have
Chicago police are given orders
to kill all suspicious persons in the
labor trouble. We wonder if that
means labor spies and stool pigeons?
It seems that the sun shines
brighter on pay day than at *ny Other time. This is right, for it makes
it possible to put a little sunshine
into the lives of tradesmen and creditors.
The miners in the United States
and Canada are standing firm.
There is no truth, however, to the
rumor that the mine owners will dig
coal to keep the home fires burning.
Canada is going to retain its navy.
Maybe the boats will be used to
smuggle whiskey into the United
States. Discarded American subchasers are being used for that purpose.
There is one thing .the flood
around Winnipeg did not do, and
that is drown- the aspirations of the
political parties. There ���seems to
be every likelihood of s four-
cornered fight in many constituencies.
ODD BITS
(Conducted  by  S>-dney   Wan'en)
The Knockout
"I am of the opinion that Capitalism has received a mortal injury,
and can never regain ita pre-war
strength and vitality."���Leonid Krassin, Soviet Trade Commissioner.
France is going to discuss the payment of her debts with the United
The world is said to< resemble a
bee hive. We flatter ourselves. Bees
.have many characteristics which we
have yet to develop and just now
many of these are quite unknown to
us. For instance, bees keep their
drones only until they have served
a purpose snd then do away with
them. We create drones that serve
no useful purpose and then pension
them off together with most of their
relatives. No bee that works starves
and all bees have a chance to work.
Consider our topsy-turvy economic
system, with its appalling waste fa
unemployment with consequent destitution and degradation, and you will
readily see that this world only resembles a bee hive in the noise it
makes. Ita organization ia far less
efficient and certainly more cruel.
��� ���    ���
DO YOU KNOW���
A Frenchman said he had to kill
someone, so  he chose a journalist.
And they said he was crazy!
��� ���    ���
Chief of Police Anderson says the
city cannot discriminate between
beer clubs and social clubs. Neither
can the members.
��� ���    ���
A Vancouver furniture company
advertises a new line of baby cribs
in the following informative way
"Get ready for the Rush, etc."
��� ���    ���
Two Royal City youths were sentenced to two years hard labor for
attempting to steal money out of
milk bottles. They would have met
with better success hsd they operated
on a larger scale.
��� ���    a	
The proposal to cut the salaries of
States.    In other words, she is going   ��� _ # ..
_    ��   .      . .        a - ?   v    Jud-��ta- refusing to retire, to $1  a
to find out how long a period she
can be given in which the workers
of this and several other generations
can be urged to toil and sweat fa
order to pay the vast sum.
The Amalgamated Clothing Workers convention turned down affiliation with the Third International
and favored affiliation with a united
Labor party for political action.
Taking into consideration their past
efforts on behalf of Russia, it shows
year ia good, but ���amy. not superannuate them without the option. Science says a man's mental faculties
increase even after his physical powers are fully matured, but fa the
case of some of our judges, their
brains become fossilised with legal
technicalities and the only remedy is
compulsory superannuation.
���    a    ���
Which?
Among the "nabobs" snd people
who are in good circumstances gener
that   the   Amalgamated   is   working ^   ^   hirthtmU   _   low>   whj.e
along sane linea
The defeat of the British Csbinet
over the question of pensions for
teachers is not the first defeat the
government has met over the Geddes
committee report. This report has
been used to a very large extent by
the Labor Party in the last four or
five by-elections, and Labor defeated the Coalitionists. The next
defeat will be a big one at the general  elections.
LABOR IN AUSTRALIA
MAKING BIG GAINS
The recent elections in Salzburg,
Austria, for the provincial Diet
showed sn increase of 2 per cent,
in Social Democratic strength and
a decline of 60 per cent fa
the strength of the pan-German.
These results, political observers ia
Vienna say, indicate that a general
election held at the present time
would result in a decided Socialist
victory.
This opinion seems to be concurred
in by the pan-Germans, for recently
two men belonging to that group,
both army officers, were arrested for
organizing a conspiracy to asssssfa
ate various Social Democratic leaders .
among those who sre least able to
rear their children fa s proper manner, the stork is na frequent a visitor
as unemployment*. Ia it because the
former prefer poodles to babies and
the latter go ahead on the theory that
misery loves company, or is it because our wealthy classes are good
or careful���or both?
DEFENDS TRADE UNIONS
If brevity is the soul of wit, the
present style fa skirts is deserving
of much mirths-.
Edmonton plumbers sre still on
strike against a proposed wage reduction.
The Winnipeg Builders' Exchange
have locked out their mill hands in
an attempt to reduce w*gea.
see
The Bakers' Union of Calgary is
conducting a strike against Shelly
Bros who are seeking to run an open
shop.
Whiat Drive aad Dance at P. L
P. HaO, Saturday evaninC.
cfag   ���   p.m.     Admission   25c.
SUBSCRIBE TODAY
PHILADELPHIA���In an address
fa this city Lady Astor, the first woman member of the British parliament, announced herself s strong advocate of trade unions���"institution?
that pull up society."
In explaining that England encourages trade unionism, she urged "continuous consultation between capital
and labor" aa being far more desirable than "international lockouts
and strikes."
MINERS' LEADERS ARE
SERVING WITHOUT PAY
SPRINGFIELD. Ill���Officers of
the United Mine Workers of Ameri-
cs sre today serving voluntarily
without pay. The executives, both
elective snd appointees, have agreed
they will aid the miners* cause financially by serving fa their capacities without drawing any salary until the nation-wide coal strike is sealed.
The  Allen   Theatres fa   Calgary
have been placed on the unfair list.
The Naaa Have Itt
are bow  proposing
They  are bow
month  year.   AR  fa
rent days aay "aye."
a   13-
favor  of  IS
Whist Drive aad
P. Hall.  Sat nrday
mam ���
Too Onl, Unio.
Mist- ao
MARYLAND CAFE
Day and Night.   Q-alit
ia war Motto
HASTINGS STREET W
Say II
I Secretaries are requested to keep this Directory up-to-date I
Vancouver Unions
���awco-was -rmapas abb labob
OOUBCXL���I'resldfat, A. J. Crawford:
Seeretarr. P. Benioagh. Office SOt
Labor Hall. Si* Pender Street West.
Phone Seymour 74J5. Meela in Labor
Hall at S p.m. on the flrat and third
Taeeday la ���oath. ���	
BOIUDIBO TBAOBa COUBCtt���Chs-nnan,
O. 0. Tnmn, aserslair, Bojr Msssssar,
Offles 210 Laker Hsll. Meets first and
third Wednesday la Mirth at Laher Bag.
 ST BST.BBaTBB.   Local  No.  371���
President. J. Bright well; Secretary. W.
liowron. Jill Burns Ave. Meets at
31* Pender Street West on second
Thursday of each month at j p.m.
rXaOOB,    CBXBAL    ABB
.-_r__ WOBBBBS���President.
P. P. Gpugti; Secretary. W. H. McLean. 1035 Broadway Went. MeaU
at 31�� Pender Street Weat at I p m.
every third   Tuesday In  month.	
SATIOBAL   UBTOB.
Local No. 1>S���Preeldent. C. E. Herrett: Secretary. A It. Jennie. 310
��� ���ambie Street. Meeta Room Sit. 319
Pender Street West, at 7:11 p.m. on
second snd fourth Tuesdays In month.
CBSs-RMS. DBOP POBORBS k
nUSU, Local No. 1S1���President,
W. J. Bartlett: 8e crelary. Albert Ar-
mer. -Oil 2nd Ave. W. Meets at
SIS Pender Street West at I p.m. on
laird Tueaday of each month.	
���nriniLD-
B MBZ.PBBS. Local No. 194���
President. P. Willis: Secretary. A.
Fraser. Room SSS. Sll Pender Street
West. Meeta at Sit Pender Street
West. aC S p.m. on flrat and third
Mondays   of each month. ���
union
Local No. 5S5 ��� President. W. K.
Whlteway: SeereUry. Tom Cory. 415
Vernon Drive. MeeU at 31 > Pender
Street West at S p.m. on first Tuesday
In  month.
MOuiDBal, Loeal tSl���President. Joha
Brown; Secretary, Geo. Annand. ISIS
Albert Street. Meeta at Labour Hall
at g p.m. on first  and third Friday.
BtaonsriBTa. Lodge see���r-resideriTTE:
H. Robb; Secretsry, Evan McMillan:
r.*i ~*,-'������,. *aeat. P. Bengough; Office
Sit Pender Street     West.    Meeta
I**>0._ri1-U* **��� ��� P-m- o" second
fourth Tuesday.
MXLK  BBXVBBS    AMD    DAXBY
Tt?^f",��,'oc;.1 N'�� "4���Preeldent.
J. Smith. SeereUry. B. Showier. Sit
Pender Street Weet. Meets at Sit
Pender Street West at I p.m. on a"
ondand  fourth  Fridays in month.
at
aad
3. Bias: Fin. Bee., R. A. Baker: See   St
3. MsMUIsa.   148  Oerdevs Btrssl.    iteeui
at  14S  Cordova   Street, at I p.m.    on
socond and fourth Thursdays In month.
*1��LJrm��2m��iJ��x?99' wsasr _
DOOM BUXLDBBS, Locsl No. 1404���
E**fW��n*a W. H. Pollard: Secretary,
N. H. Vernon, Bo* SS0. Meets at Sll
Pender street Weat, Vancouver, at ���
P-m. on every Friday of month.
PHOTO BBOBATBBB' Local No. 54 ���
President, F. Loonfy; Secretary. Gordon Edwards. 1713 Fifth Avenue West
MeeU ad World Building. Vancouver,
st S p.m. on Saturday of each week.
._ a obbebbt r in is nana
Local No. 89���President. Charles Keall.
Secretary, Alfred Hurry. 861 Thirty-
fourth Avenue Kant. Meets at Sit
Pender Street West, at S p.m. oa flrat
Wednesday In  month.
I1SDFLIBT.
Tf PP*���President, W. Ksrr; Secretary.
I. 1'adfeti Meets st Leber Hsll sa Sad
sad 4th Wednesday {a
Local No. 17
B. Bronson; Secretary.
Roy Massecar. Sll Pender Street West.
MeeU at Sit Pender Street Weat. at
��� p m. second and fearth Monday.
101���Prealdent.
Oeo. Mowat: Secretary. Frank Milne.
Box 411. MeeU at Sit Pender Street
West at S p m. every third Wedneaday
In month.
CTVTC BBDPLOTBBS, Local No. 28���
President. J. White: SeereUry. O.
Harrison. Office lit Cordova Street
West. Meets at 14S Cordova Street
West at S p.m. on the first and third
Friday In month.
Local No.
St���President. H. A. Black; Secretsry.
Aid W. J. Scribben, City Hall. MeeU
at 141 Cordova Street West, at t p.m.
on first Wednesday of each month.
. Local
452���President   Geo.   H.   Hardy;   Secretary.   W.    J.    Johnston;     Busineaa
A sent. G. C Them.   Office Stl Labor
Hall.    MeeU second and fourth Mon
.day at S p m   ta Labor Hall.
CABPENTEBa AMALGAMATED. Be. 1
Branch.���Presides., T. U. Coops; Past
aess A rant. Aagas MscSwoea; Secretary.
B. O. Wester. 1��S ltlh Ave. W.    Meeta
, Sad sad 4th Tueaday st S p.aa., la r.L.P.
Hall.
Ba S Biases���Secretary. W. Bray, SO
ISA Ave. W. Meete 1st sad Srd Toes
dsy si S pa. U r.L.P. Hsll. 14S Osrdsva
St. w.
CIO-JSMABBma. Loral No. 357���President. G. Thomas; Secretary. R. J.
Crals. SS Kootenay Street. Meets at
SIS Pender Street West, at S p.
first Tuesday la
Local US���
President. IX W. McDougall: Secretary,
F. R. Burrows: Business Agent. K.H.
Morrison. Office 148 Cordova Street
West. MeeU at lit Cordova Street
West at  S   p.m. every Monday.
Local No. IS��� President. Percy Trevlse: Secretary. Chas.
A. Watson. No. S Fire Hall. Twelfth
and Quebec Streets. Vancouver. MeeU
at  Sit Pender Street  West.
Local  No.  K0
���.President. Mrs. W. Mahon; SeereUry,
Mlas May Ward. ��77  Hornby  Street.
Meats at  Labour Hsll  at  S  p.m.    on
first Thursday In month.
Local No. 28���President. W. Colmar.
Secretary, Andy Graham, 441 Seymour
Street. MeeU at 441 Seymour Street
flrat and third Wednesday at 1:30.
Second and fourth Wedneaday at t:S0.
Local No. 107���President. A. B. Finly.
Secretary. A. P. Surges. Sit Fifty-
seventh Avenue Kast. MeeU at lit
Holden BulMtas. Vancouver, at I p.m.
on first and   third Fridays In month.
Local No. 44
dent. H. J. Rhodes; Secretary. H. Walker. IMS Pendrell Street. MeeU at
Room Stt. Sit Pender Street West at
I p.m. on third Wednesday ta month.
Brotherhood of. Division Na 310���President.
G. P. Boston: SeereUry. H. A. B. Mae-
Donald. 1222 Pendrlll St.. Vancouver.
Meets si I.O.O.P. Hsll ea sseead sad
Fourth Tuesdays la each month at I
p-m.
loc-mott-IT
WtMMMMM. Loeal No. ��S4���President.
T. McKwen: Secretary. H. O. Campbell
744 Helmcken Street. Vancouver.
MeeU at I.O.O.P. Hall, on flrat
third  Thsrsdsys ef
Local Na SS-S2���SecreUrv-Treasurer,
���fises: Bests im dgeat, W. Bares. ISS
al 151 Oerdevs attest Waat. at S pa oa
third Fridaya la
No.   -Ml���President.     W
"Local
McCsrtney.
SIS London Building: Beeratary. O.W.
Seated. SIS London Bulldlnr MeeU
at SIS Leasee Building on flrat 8un-
day In month at 7:31 pat.
nas_fiJB^
r-we-r
Local Na. 1��7���President. A. Osborne
Seeretary. A. IX McDonald. Ill Paader SU sat Wast. Vancouver. Meets
at t n.m. en Bills. Thuraday te month.
B-aUSUBIBTB. Loeal US ��� President.
Leo. George: SeereUry. 3. O. Keefe:
Business Agent. P. Bengough: Office
Sit Pender Street Weat. MeeU at Sit
Pender Street West at 8.00 p.m. en
* aad third Tharsday.
PATTBBB     ���-rTBBl    Ttultaal. 5~
Heys; Secretary, J. L. Irvine; Business Agent. K. A. Goddard. 851
Richards Street. MeeU at 111 Pender
Street West on first and third Mon-
day  In  month at  t  p.m.
ABB
Locsl No. 170���President, Bart 8tire_come;
Secretary. J. Crowther; Ruainees Agent.
P .W. Welah, Office 801 Laker Hsll.
Meets at 810 Pander Street Waat. st S
P-- on aecond and fourth Fridaya
POtlCEMBB-S rBDB&ATIOB. Local
No. 11���President. Roy A Perry; Secretary, Alexander Murray. 1414 Tenth
Avenue West. Meets at 440 Pender
Street West, st 7:S0 p.m. on fourth
Tueaday of month.
rSaq.TSMftstTABT COMMUTE���T. II.'.
Chairman, W. 3. Bartlett   Secretary. Mrs.
W. Mshon.    Meeta la room 805 Labor HaO
ea  the first and  third Thursday   in
*  al t ��._.
ranmno __bss__bb a Aiiis-rAa-Ts
Local No. 49���President. H. Longley:
Secretary. A. Blaney. Phone Fraser
1S1X. Meets at 111 Hastings Street.
\ancouver; at 8 p.m. on second Tuesday In month.
BAILBOAB   BMPLOTbBS, Division No!
*>������President, A. N. Lowes; SeereUry.
Charles Bird. 1010 Union Street
Meeu at I.O.O.F Hall. BIS Hamilton
Street, at S p.m. on first Monday ta
month.
BASXWAT COBDUOTOBS. Division No.
S47���Prealdent. G. W. Hatch: Seeretary
J. B. Physics 1156 Thurlow Street.
Meets at I.O.O.F. Hall on first Sunday
at   2 p.m.. and on third  Thursday at
BA-LWAY CABttB*. Ledge aaTtV^KSi
deal. T. Soaas���ills; SeereUry, W 3.
Seasons. 5880 Bherbrooke St . Masts 1st
sad Srd Fridaya, ^MjMoa Hsll.
aaAXLWAT TBA1BMBB.   Local   No.   144
���Preeldent.  C.  A.   Mitchell;   Seeretary.
D. A. Munro, 70 Seventh Avenue Weat.
Meets at I.O.O.F Hall, Hamilton Street
at 7:30 p.m. on flrat Tueaday and 3:30
p.m.on third Tuesday.
B BA'
SOCIATIOB���President C. F. C Craig;
Secretsry. Oeo. Gray. 1ISI First Ava
Bast, Meets st Kagles' Hall, Vancouver at in p.m. on flrat and third
Sundays  In month.
TEAMSTEkS. Local No.  055���Preaident.  W
IL Brews; Secretary. Rirt Showier Offiet
SSS Laser Halt. Meets seeond snd fourth
Wedaesday at 8  p m.   In  Labor  Hsll
SBAB-BsTS' UB.OW���Business Agerrt. R.
Townaend. Meeta at 7 p.m. every
Monday at 143 Cordova, Street Weft
soft Dsnti DisrasrsEBS'
No. 871���President. Frank McCana."
Secretary. T. J. Hanafln. 1171 Sixth
Avenue Weet, Vancouver. Meets at
441 Seymour Street, Vancouver, at 1 10
p.m. on flrat Sunday In month.
.  m orxBATino ava:
Local     No.     (10���President,
Weelman.     Meets at Sit Pender   .
W. Vancouver, at 7:3! p.m. on aaeoad
and fourth Tuesdays In month.
Joseph
TIPBBS. _,ocsl Bo. 88.���President. W.
Bayley: Secretary, A. Blrnle. t*It
Commercial Drive. MeeU at Sit Pender Street West at t p.m. on second
Monday tn month.
a BZ.BCTBXC BAH.WAT
Or AMIIBICA, Amalgamated Association of. Division No. It]���
President. R. Rlgby: SeereUry, P. u.
Griffln. 447 Sixth Avenue Bast, Vancouver. MeeU A.O.F. Hall, Mount
Pleasant at 10:15 a.m. on first Hon-
day  and 7 p.m. on third Monday.
STOBTB   COTTBBS.   I.oeal     181-President. C. Dolmas; Secretary, F. Rumble,
194  Gothard  Street.     Meets  In  Labor *
Hall Vancouver at   ��� p.m. first Tuesday In month.
_J (C-JS. Byatem Ba 1)
���Chairman, W. M. Brlse: SeereUry.
J. Cunningham. Box 4111. Vancouver. B.C.
TELEPHONE
OPERATORS
B^cretiiry,
Miss   P.   Pe-croft
Offles Boom 301 Labor Ball. Sll Tender
fltreet    Weat
Streat,  Wast*
'tJBIOB. Local No. 178���Prealdent. A. Mitchell; SeereUry. C. McDonald. P-O. Box SIS. Meets at Sit
Pender Street Weat. at ��� p.m, on flrat
Monday In month.
_BAPBTOAL.Ix.ral IIS���Prealdent
C. H. Collier; Secretary and Business
Agent, R N. Neelands: Office S14 labor Hall. Meeu laat Sunday la eaeh
month at S p.m.
���Local lis���Presideat W. J. Park; Seeretary. O. W. Allla: Buainesa Agent.
MeeU at ttt London Building at ��3l
am. on aeeond Friday ta month.
Laeal No. 14S���President;
Rower: Sect alary A JamUaan. SSI
Leaden Building. Meets at
HalL   Homer Street, at IS    am.
nl   in fti-t fl.
O���-President.
taiTe-W.
at T 1-1
r/arxoB ot
Dan Caalta: Secre-
ItS Mala St.. meet
third "
PATBOHIZB LIST
The following places sre run under
non-union condition* and are therefore
unfair to organized labor.
Stettler Cigar Factory, malting Vaa Loo
and Vaa Dyke Cigar*.
Capitol Cafe. 930 Granville St.
White Lunches.
Oectrieal Contractor-.
C H Peterson. 1814 Pandora St
Home _  Ratable,  Colombia   St..  New
The Cbiniwadt Electric Co. Ltd,
a    , ��
Provincial Unions
TICTOBIA-���President, C. Slevef-tS. lilt
Denman Street; SeereUry R. Woodward. 1153 Carl In Street Meats at t
p.m. on flrat and third Wednesdays
In month at Tradea Hall, Broad Street.
VIOTOBIA TrPOOaAFHICAL TJaTIOB, Ha
!0L���Presides.. 0. K. OhrlsMaa; Secretary treanrer W. H. Otard. Baa SOS.
MeeU laat Sandsy ef ssntt ta New Tradea
Han. Breed Street
-B-VCB BOFBBT���Preaident. 8. D.
McDonald. Prince Rupert; Secretary,
G. Waddsll. Box 451. Prince Rupert.
MeeU at Carpenters' Hall on aaeoad
and fourth Tueadaya of eaeh month.
-Presideat  J. Lotman. Nelson;
Ssc���Mary. Felix Petertl. Box SS4 Nsl-
-Praeldent Js
this. Reveistoke; Seeratary. Philip
Parker. Bos SI4. Reveistoke .Masts
at ��� p m at city Hall. Revaistoka aa
tha aeeond and foorth Saturday ef
eaeh month.
1��� President, It
Knodsen. 403 Royal Avenue: Seeretary,
R Morgan. SIS Rtgtna Street New
Westminster. MeeU seeond aad fearth
Wedn seders In month at
New We
Temple.
1
<e
*&���"*
'._,;'
%��� f:
R  i
' 'rf.
KJ
���
**���>_��
i^M
_U
�����**���,
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA LABOR NEWS
������"f
PAGE THREE
The7��bOr Newts Baseball Competition
���ft' -w  5;. S;    .   , ;: ���*���, -j-    .
^170 First Prize - - $400
yL/JELrO 2nd^200, 3rd $100
I? "___>��� 1?':l>^^'_^f TO-HlMhC   ONE FREE  COUPON   MAKED V
r IV Jb ISf^^V/ U i 'IJrarW'iJ   Allowed With Every Dollar Sub. --V
Di-op <;oupoi/f5 in, the B. C Laborjftews Boxes at Labor Hall, 319 Pender St. W.
and 1.1.1* ifl|all, 148 Cordova St.
or mail to Labor News, 319 Pender St. W.
.'!h ��� 'h ���  .
Games Played Saturday, May 27th
Coupoii
Coupon No. 3
THIS COaTPOH MUST BB CUT���WOT TOBB
I enclose herewith SS cents for Ave Weeks' subscription to the B. C. Labor Bewa, together with my
forecast of baseball resorts. X a_.es to abide by the
rales of the contest aad will accept ths deelsloa of
the Judges aa binding la everything pertaining to ths
competition.
Competition
Rules
The following rales ahali gov
competition:
1.   All  forecasts  must   be
coupons  provided  by  the  B.   C.  labor
News.
a. Aay- coupon which haa been altered or mutilated will be rtlsaqatiaod
3. Xa the event of a tie, or tiea, tha
prises will be divided equally betaeaa
those tlelng, bat should ths necessity
arise tha a. C. Labor Hews laasrvsa ths
right to rearrange the prise WOaey aa
that the Slot prise winners will receive
more thaa the aaeoad. aad tha
prise winners aria mots thaa the
4. Latest date for receiving
for this competition will be Saturday at
10 a-m. oa the day the aiatnhaa are
scheduled for. This applies to coupons
received by mall aa well aa depoaltad la
boxes.
5. Matches oa coupons draw-, abandoned or not played will be struck oB
coupons. Tha Brat of two gamaa played by the sams teams oa ths same Say
will  be  taken for caecslag forecasts.
OPERATION
Patronize Our Advertisers and Tell Them Why
WILSON'S
"" c*3��* SHOES
Wilson's Twin Shoe Store
157-159 HASTINGS STREET W.
Pierre Paris
!��_ FOOTWEAR
51 HASTINGS STREET W.
_os   Angeles
tBAOUiX
ksh_tytjg.
Calgary
Bans
la foB
Coupo
o.��,    I
Jm*?
toget-ar*vjrlth _&
s to abide by the
Chicago
UBT
__g__g
-���-
Calgary
Yaacoever
Bams   la  full
Address   ..
ski	
Bo yoa receive
ths paper hy mail each we
Borne
Away                              __6l_EA**AV
ambbicaM LBaAVI.
Washington
Bew Tork
Detroit
Olevelaad
Chicago
Bt. Louis
BA-10BAZ. LEAGUE.
Cincinnati
Chicago
Mew Tork
Boston
Philadelphia
Brooklya
FAOiriC  COAST Z-BAOUB.
Boa  Angelas
San Francisco
Portland
Salt Bake  C
Oakland
Vernon
-HTEBBATIOBA-.    LEAGUE.
Baltimore
Bewark
Xochester
Toronto
JraSalo
Syracuse
WBSTBBB IBTBBBATIOHA-.
Edmonton
Vancouvsr
Calgary
Tacoma
1
a The management
right to disqualify aa
what ia his opinion la a good aad aufft-
to disqualify aay coupon for
a good aad sufficient reason, aad tt la a distinct condition of entry that the manager, ds-
olaloa shsll be accepted aa final aad
legally blading la aU matters concerning- this competition, Bo correspondence shall be entered into or interviews
granted.
T. Xa martrlag coupons place cross ta
column provided, denoting whether yoa
think that team will win or loss.
0. Competitors must enclose 35c
with eaeh coupon, which win entitle
them to five weeka' subscription to tha
B. C. Labor Bewa.
S. Bo two capital prises wIU be paid
oat ia aay oas week to aay oae subscriber.
10. Employees ot the B. V. Labor
Bsws cannot compete. . ���-,
11. Bo raaponslblUty will be accepted by tha B. C. Labor Bewa for ths lose
or non-delivery of aay coupon. Proof
of posting will not be accepted aa proof
of delivery or receipt.
12. Prisea are awarded oa the results   announced   by   associated   Prsaa
RRAND'S
SEEDS
7S3 ROBSON STREET
JAEGERg j
Men _ Furnishings I *
Cuthbertsons & Co. |2
-UMITBD IT
648 Granville   CIS Hastings W.
**************************
CHINA and TOYS
DOLL   HOSPITAL
Millar & Coe
419   HASTINGS   STREET   W.
Coupon No. 3
B COUPOB MUST SB   CUT���NOT TOBB
I saeloaa herewith SB cente for five weeks' aub-
scrlptloa to the B. C. Labor Bewa, together with my
fata as at of basebsU results. X agree to abide by the
soles of tha conteat aad win accept the deelsloa of
tha Judges aa binding la everything pertaining to tbe
*�����;
af the
fsU
[o. 3
far Boa
____*
Ra
te
���fa
Bew Task
PACirlO
T
tt
M
���a
,
N
>.' ���
Iff***
wrr
Ba yoa receive tha paper hy mail each weekf	
���Mae
Away                             ttOsti A
AMBBICAH LEAGUE.
Washington
Bew Tork
Ostrolt
Olevelaad
..   ,1
Chicago       >
St. Loula
MATIOBAL LBAGUB.
Cincinnati
Chicago
Bsw Taik
Boston
Philadelphia
Brooilyn
PACinO  COAST  LEAGUE.
Los Sagelea
Saa rranolaco
Portland
Salt Baas O
Oakland
Ternon
IBTEBBATIOBAL    LBAGUB.
Baltimore                Bewark
S-o-haatar
To���>ats
Buffalo
Syracuse
WBSTBBB IBTEBBATIOBAL
Calgary
Taeo-a
Coupon No. 3    X
Free Extra Coupon with
every Dollar Sub.
Of priie-winners wiU *be published la the foUowing issue of the B.
O. Labor Bewa. As soon aa possible
thereafter ohscks will be iasusd ta tha
prize-winners.
13. Competitors wishing for a rs shack
must enclose copy of the coupon protested, together with One Dollar lor
each coupon reviewed ia aa anvslope
marked ���-protest.'* If the protest la
talnsd the lee will be returned
priae awarded.
14. Coupons   received   without   i
aad address will be disqualified.
Horn.
COB-ECT COUPOB BO. 1
Games Flayed Saturday, May IS
____.
BICAB  LEAGUE
Philadelphia   St. Boala
Bew Tork        Detroit
|X|
Wasbington      Cleveland
NATIONAL   LEAGUE
Pittsburg
Boston
Clnclna-m
I   II
Brooklya
Chicago Bew Tork
 PACIFIC   COAST   LEAO.
Vernon
Seattle
Lake O     Saa rranclsco
Sacramento      Boa Sageles
 IMTEB-ATIOHAL   LEAGUE
JS
m
Syracuse
Buffalo
Jersey City
_!__!_
Bocheater Bewark |X|
WESTEBB   IHTBDBATIOBAL
Vancouver
Tacoma
Edmonton
"Calgary
II
LIST OF PRIZE WINNERS.
Coupon No. 1.
No competitor submitted fourteen
correct forecasts.
The First Prize of $100 is won by
W. Mace, 717 41st Ave. E., who submitted thirteen correct forecasts.
No competitor submitted twelve
correct forecasts.
The Second Prise of $50 has been
divided between three competitors
who submitted eleven correct results.
They are: L. Hayes, 542 Clinton St.;
J. Lawson, 3046 Granville St, and
T. Goodall, 865 7th Ave. E., all of
whom receive $16.65.
Of Coarse.
She���"John, do you believe in long
engagements?"
He���"Sure, why shouldn't a young
couple be happy as long as they
can?"
fan
Tw~T
eaeh week!
Bew Task
Cleveland
________________________
NATIONAL LBAOUB.
Chicago
Brooklya
nemo coast league.
ttf-M.kAFi.q__l.  LbaMtb.
IBTEBBATIOBAL
Austria: Tenant Law.
The Tenant Law waa enacted as
a war measure to prevent landlords
from arbitrarily increasing rents
and ejecting tenants, and all efforts
to alter it, so thst rents can ba increased adequately to keep pace
with depreciation, have been violently opposed by the social demo-
-crats, with the result that rents are
perhaps cheaper in Vienna than in
any city in the world .
HARKLEY &
AYWOOD
Ammunition, Guns
Fishing Tackle
������ CORDOVA STREET WEST
Potts & Small
LIMITED
MEN'S WEAR
717 PENDER STREET W.
Just    Around    the    Corner    From
High Rents.
RICKSON'S
GENTS' FURNISHINGS
840 GRANVILLE STREET
Near Robson Street
Mason _ ta, ltd.
72S GRANVILLE STREET
U      D ELECTRIC
m u i n COMPANy
Headquarters far All
ELECTRICAL GOODS
414 HASTINGS  STREET W.
THE CAMERA _ ARTS
ftUl/Aas-j Developing
Picture Framing
610 GRANVILLE STREET
Ma J. Cameron
ClOtheS       .Ceswa-B
JOT Q   at-aa��
Men     ���^���
E.C.KILBY
HOSIERY
Specialist
624 GRANVILLE STREET
W.S. CHARLTON. CO.
LIMITED
Specialists in X
Young Men's
Clothing and   Granville
Haberdasher*?      street
W. C.  Stearman
"The  People's   Hardware  Merchant"
Sole Aa-eat for the
iMonarch Malleable
f
���13 GRANVILLE STREET
PLANT         |Bi
RITCHIE'S!:
Seeds
Bulbs
"The Best Procurable"
���72 GRANVILLE STREET
PORTLAND, Ore.���With s show
of solidarity that has seldom been
equalled among lumber workers in'
the northwest, ths sawmill workers
at Klamath Falls, Ore., snd northern
California are holding firm in their
demand for tha retention of the 8-
hour -day, after a strike of nearly
three months' duration.
_B. c. Barber Supply and
ISUNDR-ESkWD.
New York���County Judge Taylor of Brooklyn suggests thst the
-tankers' association "establish a
code of ethics snd writs it in bis,
bold type that "the laborer is worthy of his hire."
The Nora Scotia legislature haa
again turned down ths eight-hour
bill introduced by s labor member.
Whist   Drive  and   Dance  at  F.   L
P.  Hall,   Saturday  evening, coat as sa-
S   p.m.     Admission   25c.
is   C^1"
West
Specialists ii
having
uppl.es
I
Wa Oul6t Iks Family
the AMERICAN
*��gj Boot Shop
HONEST
SHOES
AT
C
541 GRANVILLE STREET
SALSgURY'S
HARDWARE   MERCHANTS
1S2 HASTINGS STREET WEST
MDRPHir CHOP.
GOOD    ^     CO,
shoes ssr* Ltd.
���Sz^GRANVILLE STREET*
GEO. B. KERFOOT
SUITS       ���* Men's
Made to    Clothing and
Measure     Furnishings
ISS HASTINGS STREET EAST
THOS. FOSTER* CO, LTD.
Fashion-Craft
Burberry
O'Coats
QUALITY
CLOTHES
One Store
Only
Durward
O'Coats
514 Cranville St.
r- ���*-
STARK
Prop.
YALE H
305 Hasting. WHO-tir
Street Wast  k_f     STORE
' "M.HIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIHI��
;: J.A.Flet-,Ltd.::
Ii        HARDWARE
���>     Tools.  Cutlery  sad  Sporting
C~aV
;;     339 HASTINGS STREET W.    f
*HI*��l��Mllllintll��i��T��+
S. H. HARNOCK
Vancouver
Hardware Co.
867 GRANVILLE STREET
D. K. BOOK, LTD.
CORRECT CLOTHES FOR
MEN
137 HASTINGS STREET W.
T-HILL'Tsd.
D. M"m- Clothes for Men
Men's and Boys' Clothing
and Furnishings
117 HASTINGS STREET EAST
Cornett Bros..
& Clark     	
.���arvs shoes
Wa
Men'!
33 HASTINGS STREET E.
���BitteryCa
���SO HOWE STREET
sr��335
SWITZER
Bros, Ltd.
Everything in
Music
\
���
I
���1
ftm
���v
Wt
\m
������rw
v4
m
/"��� ���**
��� ' i ���
'     - l"; ���
PAGE POUR
... '.i      f
.���'*,'Vr-?*'i\���'���':""' *","'���'v'."-.-"' .'K''^^.|''.V,;���i*^-:''���''������|v���V^���*'������'"v��� ���'���!'���"!���.<<'*;>:;�����.
w
I
n;
���
_t
h'a
**   e'
Br*' '
CSV."
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA LABOR NEWS
I
i.
���
Blue Bird Washing Machines
Selling Now at $175
There's money in using a Bluebird Washer, even when you
have to pay tha regular price of $210 for it, bat now that yoa
can bay them at the sale price of $176, they are an investment
much too good to let pass unheeded. Mads in Canada, easy aad
economical to operate, and instead Of rubbing away ths
material as yon do when washing by hand, these juat wash the
dirt oot of tha garment. Washing this way gives three times
the Ifie to the garment.
SPECIAL   DEMONSTRATION
Bring some dirty clothes and have them washed while yoa
wait, and see for yourself what a wonderful machine the
Bluebird ia $25 cash puts one in the home, and $20 monthly
pays tbe balance.
L
w^tfB^^^ ggg g���p��"�� jflfe
*nininiiiijiiiiiiii��iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii��iiiniiiiiiniiiMi��iiuini��iiiini*nt|T
"LAID OFF"
Two Short Words, Bridging the Gulf Between
COMFORT aad POVERTY
Have you protected yourself snd your family against such
sn emergency, with a SAVINGS ACCOUNT���the most valuable
Asset a man can have for the "RAINY DAY.",
We STRONGLY RECOMMEND you to start such an account
AT ONCE, at one of our City Branches.
HASTINGS AND SEYMOUR. Geo. S. Harrison, Manager.
Cordova a. Abbott        Maia a. 25th Ave.        Main A Broadway
Where   Yoa   Will   Receive   Prompt   Sad   Courteous   Attention
�� Union Bank of Canada
P.S.���If yoa are living in a community not provided with
Banking facilities, address us by mail, and we will ba glad to
guide yoa in respect to "Banking by Mail."
iimiiiiiii��Miiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii������iiiiiiiiiiiiiii��niiiiiiiiiiiin����iimiii��miiu
Notes From Otta\va
By J. S.*Woodsworth
���~*~~
HALLS TO RENT
IN THE LABOR HALL
Large aad small; goad accommodation; easy rent.    Rates to societies
by day, weak or month, oa application tot
P. R. BENGOUGH, Secretary.
ROOM SOS LABOR HALL Sit PENDER STREET W.
' Phones Seymour 7495-7496
Telephone Seymonr 7495
THE UNION PRINTING CO.
"More Than Printers"
Labor,Hall 319 Pender Sired West
Daring the past week ths most
important matter, from tha standpoint of Labor, was the motion introduced by myself, calling upon the
Government to assume responsibility in the case of unemployment.
The discussion occupied s considerable portion of time, but wss rather
crowded ont of the papers by the
sensational motion of Mr. McMas-
ter, which came later on tbe same
day. ���   ���
It was rather interesting thst se~t*4
eral of the Liberal members endorsed
my motion. It eventually went
through without division. This will
doubtless fix a larger measure of
responsibility upon the Federal Government, and will have ita weight
in determining the policy which will
be adopted at the forthcoming conference on unemployment and kindred questions, which has been promised by the Federal Government.
Tom Moore Writes:
Among other comments on this debate I - quote the following letter
from Mr. Tom Moore :
"Allow me to extend on behalf of
the Trades and Labor Congress of
Canada, our thanks for the assistance
rendered by your introduction, yesterday, of the resolution on unemployment.
"It was very noticeable that immediately you started to deal with
this question that all except thirty-
six of the Liberals left their seats,
showing their lack of interest when
matters affecting labor are to be discussed.
Definite  Remedial  Actios.
Your presentation of the case was
so clear and forceful that all present must have been impressed with
the need for action. This, 'to my
mind, waa fully demonstrated when
the Prime Minister apparently changed his attitude and finally decided to
support your resolution.
Though the passing of this resolution -may not result in immediate
remedial action, yet, I am convinced
that the cumulative effect of discussion on the floor of the House,
of the problems with which the workers are faced, cannot help bat ultimately bring about definite remedial action.
At any time that I can be of assistance in furnishing additional information yoa may require on these
subjects, I will be only too glad to
do so.    Assuring yoa of oar appre
ciation of tha assistance you are rendering." _       ;
Down  ta Business
Some of ths old timers tall as that
there is more intelligent discussion in
this House, thaa tla-re has been for a
great many years. In the past, much
of the debate haa bean purely political; now questions sre being discussed on their merits. While there
{are few man'of outstanding ability.
the general level is higher than be-
j fore. There ia also, I-am informed,
more serious attention given to business. One French gentleman, an official of the House, in discussing the
situation, summed it up in these very
significant words: "There is now no
bar in the House."
Of course no one can tell, under
these circumstances, what a day may
bring forth.    The government must
proceed very warily. There may come
a time when on some particular question, the Conservatives and the IV
gressives may unite, or perhaps more
likely, when a section of the Liberals
may unite with the Progressives. Thi
must be the nightmare    which frequently disturbs the quiet hours'of
the Premier.
Amendment  to tbe  Immigration  Act
Our amendment to the Immigration Act has gotten one step further,
and ia now to be sent to a special
committee. The same action was
taken in regard to the amendment to
the Criminal Code. In the discussion in the committee of the whole,
I urged that Canadian-born Britishers, whether English Canadians or
French Canadians, should unite to
relieve their own British born fellow
citizens ,of the disadvantages under
which they now labor, on account t-
their being born in England or in
Scotland.
Curiously  enough, the    first    to
come to my support was Mr. Jacobs,
by nationality a Jew. The House ap
peered on the whole, quite favorable
to the resolution.
While some of us sre inclined to
wonder if we sre getting anything
done, we are informed by Old Tinier?
that there is an altogether different
atmosphere in the House this year
that the older politicians are at their
wits' end to know how to steer
through under the new -conditions
which prevail. I fancy that few of
the common people of Canada hat-
realized joist how easy it hss been in
the past for corporations to "put it
over."
THED.HUNTERCOMPANY
MEN'S AND BOYS' CLOTHING,
FURNISHINGS, ETC.
ssf ������ ��� l) esJ_U*T# ffl       I OT       sssQJMV-l  *       o\fmm*nnn\\mrmWm
tors' asd -ssggS-S* OutSta
74 CORDOVA STREET WEST
Imperial Tlunk
and Leather Goods
338 HASTINGS STREET WEST
Laco, Nitro aad Taagstea Lamps
THE ELECTRIC SHOR
12 HASTINGS STREET EAST
 aXeldea Balldtag	
Retail Electrical Supplies and
Fixtures
Lewis Piape^r
Phonograph House
THE HOME OF THE PHONOLA
Mosart Pianos
TO
1044 GRANVILLjE STREET
M
Outfitters for Men
^M. DICK. LTD.
"Your   Montr's   Worth   or   Yoar
Mooey Bach" ���
45-49 HASTINGS ST. EAST
I
S
Mson Or 1155*1^
Convene,
____    -      \>'*J^
��� Oonv.iilent T.-ns' __ma*��f <  ''''
W#TPMlfo%tk
558-560 GRANVILLE STR
rWI
CD.BRUCE
Limited
Men's Clothing and Fggjgjwfi
COR. HOMER AND  HASTINGS
-��'
THE
LADIES'
"��&>
��&.��
417
HASTINGS
ST. WEST
4 FULTON'S STYLE SapCwfD
MEN'S SUITS. dVERCOATS.
RAINCOATS      J* -__ _
stade la Canada   .ft   J
Baady-to-wear or Vase t&oXFtiami
m  Maker to  Wsai-r-fOne -ToSt
VOatT^"^**
���It GRANVILLE STREET
Phone Seymour 3902
BURNS DRUG CO-LTD.
attention
732 GRANVILLE SlTREE
Phone Seymour ' 606
N
EW
Oa.fitting   X,f
(V
House)
Refined Wearies
MEN AND
143 HASTINGS STRl
The Australian Labor Party has
demanded many reforms in the army.
It favors practical abolition of trial
representing all non-labor elements.
Two competition prizes are offered
this week. After the fund is increased, we will introduce a third.
Join the Labor Party.
ROWLANDS
Concert Band
aad assisting soloists, at the
Capitol
SUNDAY���* P.M.
SILVER COLLECTION
Robson Dairy
The Home of "Bltt's"
Graded New-Laid
EGGS
1124 ROBSON STREET
Have your NEXT 8UIT
mnde by���
Perry & Dolk
?   TAILORS
Room 33, 18 Hastings St. W.
Next to Paatagea
PRINCE RUPERT
TRADES COUNCIL
First Lady Delegate Welcomed
To Trades Council from
Civic Employees '
The Prince Rupert Trades and Labor Council welcomed its first lady
delegate at the meeting on Tuesday
night in the person of Miss H. E. Hil-
chey representing the Civic Employees' Union. ).
G. B. Casey gave a report outlining the plans and policy of the newly formed anion. Seven anions in
all were represented at the meeting.
It was decided to ask Hon. A.
Manson, minister of labor, to take
the necessary steps towards adopting and recognizing the Union rates
in all parts of the province as ihe
fair wage standard for all govern-
ment work and all other undertakings, public or private, subsidised by
the government.
A committee of three was appointed to wait upon the hospital board,
the city council aad ths Central Labor Council asking them to endorse
a plan for ths operating of all public hospitals snd nodical attendance
as provincial institutions supported
by the government along lines similar to the operation of the schools.
Caafa
on Labor Matters.
ARE TOU TIMING
OF DANCING LESSONS?
�����'
������.*'
FENN'S DANCING
ACADEMY
in
President S. D. Macdonall gave a
report telling of a cordial reception
received and success achieved st the
conference wtth the Board of Trade
when he had asked for' a joint committee with the board on labor matters. It was decided that President
Macdonald, Aid. R. A. McLeod and
Len Dewhurst would represent ths
Trades and Labor Oouncil on tha
joint committee with tha Board of
Trade.
Hospital Rssol.tioa. *
Following ia a copy of the resolution presented by the Civic Employees Union snd adopted by tbe
Trades Council.
Whereas a number of hospitals in
this Province are reported to be in
a penurious condition owing to the
lack of finances necessary to the
proper and efficient maintenance and
operation of the institution,
And whereas the charges for the
treatment of patients work a decided hardship in many cases, apart
from those who are unable to pay
at all,
And whereas there is a persistent
demand on the part of many that
the Government should become responsible for the maintenance and operation of all Public Hospitals,
And whereas the services of the
Medical Profession is inseparable
from that of the Hospitals,
Therefore be it resolved by this
body in regular meeting assembled
that we petition the Provincial Government to immediately' appoint a
commission under the chairmanship
of Mr. E. S. H. Winn of the Workmen's Compensation Board to make'
a thorough study of this question.
We believe the experience gained
through the administration of the
Workmen's Compensation Act would
enable a commission under Mr.
Winn's direction to outline sn effective policy or plan to ths Government. If feasible wa would recommend that the scheme ba financed
on an Income Tax basis arranged to
cover all costs in connection with
Medical or Hospital treatment.
Be it farther resolved that a copy
of this resolution be forwarded to
the Hospital Board and the City
Council.
Ta  Prince  Rupert
In oar Baseball competition exception to oar rules will be made in
the ease of mail received from coast
points between Alert Bay and Stewart. Coupons coming from such
places will be accepted np to 6 p.m
Saturday.
France very frankly tells ths Unit-
ad States Government thst it can
never pay the 15,000,000,000, for
the very good and sufficient reason
that it. hasn't the money to pay with,
fifty.
Whist   Drive  aad  Dance
P.  Hall,  Saturday evening.
dag ���
at P. L
Coupon boxes will -he closed ever-
Saturday It 10
PUBLIC OWNERSHIP
The Public Ownership League of
America announces the publication,
henceforth, of a regular monthly magazine devoted to "public utility
problems and social progress." The
magazine began publication with the
February number and enlarged to a
sixteen pacer in March and will hereafter be increased to 32 pages.
Pablic   Utility   Problems
The magazine will contain in successive numbers, the addresses that
were delivered at the Public Ownership Conference held in Chieabo last
fall. These addresses were by the
leading utility experts, managers
and superintendents of the greatest
and most successful publicly owned
utilities and leading students of these
problems in America. Municipal water works, including the great $376,-
000,000 of New York City; municipal electric light and power plants,
including the truly remarkable Hydro-Electric System of Ontario, bow
the largest electric generating and
distributing system In the world; municipal gas plants, successful municipal street, car lines���ia short all
phases of municipal ownership will
be covered most thoroughly.
The price fat $2.00 per year and
comes free with membership in the
Public Ownership League. Sample
copies and fall particulars may be
had by addressing "Public Ownership,'' 127 N. Dearborn St, Room
14S9, Chicago, Illinois.
buck. HAT1
WHITE  "���
Largest Exclusive Hatrers ia B. C.
COR. HASTINGS AN^
ARNOLD & QUIGLEY
Trade ia   i
Our   Upstairs   Clothes
Shop    aad    Save    Yoar    Dollars
540 GRANVILLE STREET
���
TOWNLEY & WARD
I
GRAMOPHONES, PIANOS, ETC
443 HASTINGS STREET WEST
, Cor. aieaa-as aad
Hastings^*
FurnteM_
4\ HASTINGS STREET WEST
Phono $aymaarJh%%        *
KNA&E���CHICKERir
PIANOS   ��tjND   PLAYf
THEBOWESMIJStOOUSE
.Exclusive  Piano  Doafa.
1 llfotRS7^
Phone Seymour 221���[fey or r4i,ht
NUNN&wlOMSON
FUNERAL DIRECTORS A*tOv
EMBALMERS ftftfr
S31  Homer Street .-3**V
 ' '''   ��� .' ���!><:>���'���
IS poottjry
Women sand
Esdi
Ml GRANVIi
PURITY AND STEVES
POT ON UNFAIR LIST
Continued from
BC.
the C P. R. wars receiving more
wages than the mechanics. They
were car cleaners and in spite of the
fact thst ths Railway Carmen and
Returned Soldier organisations had
taken tha matter ap with the C. P. R.
Chinese still displaced watte men
and were now earning mors money,
throogh steadier work. It was point-
id out Oat the Canadian National
Railways employed white men for ear
cleaning. The council decided to
��ke the matter np with Mr. Grant
tall aad tbe Board of Directors in
London, Eng. .
Del Oliver informed| tha conncil
tthat extra gangs were] being hired
for 80 cents and hour {and charged
$1 a day for board.
Now  Westminster
Del Noodle S-.i1 the. New Westminster Carpenters were still on
strike against-wage reduction. Another meeting was being held with
the bosses^ J,
The Musicians reported being determined to stick ont j for the |5
wage scale as against'the $4 offered by tha Parks Board.
The Painters Union reported most
ef their men working.  |
Maryland   Cafe   Off   Unfair   List
Del Graham reported negotiations!
for the placing of a Union House
card   ia   the   Maryland   Cafe,   was
again  being  made and, asked  that
this place be taken off the tpnfair IM
should the house be sign
cafe has bow signed op
the unfair list
The parliamentary 0
been reorganized and
pointed to take uptv-.._��� ���������.-
that came before the council at various times. The chairmen were: G.
Hardy, Workmen's Compensation;
Mm Mahon, Minimum Wage; Mrs.
���  ��      ���   'ft -_
This
ta off
Padflojc
"���-       989 GRANVILLE
Corner    Nelson    Si.
SHOES F~ *���
JJUJAtf
ij*r'^'~
Good Clejthiar       I27
f Hat. aad  Meayr JT_riK____f
Farnishifk.     ><M��JJ-I*��
St.
-��_
'i iifti
CENTER i Hanna,Lml
FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND H
EMBALMERS  . "
Private Ambulance  Servic
104* GEORGIA ST.     _EY.
���
���*
Rankin & Cherrill
EVERYTHUfG ELECTRICAL
U HASTINGS
.
Pensions;^ Ben-j
lion; J Nlxjpjhy Unem}
ployment Insurance; AM
City  Council;  W.   Bsrtleg,   School
Board; R. H. NaeunA New Legist
lation.        -f $1 j,
The Parliamentary Go____ittaa w_fl
the firstaThvrsday in June,
rfi
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