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The British Columbia Labor News May 12, 1922

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Array THE
Issued Every Friday
.
Devoted to the interests of the International Labor Movement
rSubscription: $1.50 Pet Year-l
I Se Per Copy J
Volume I.
Vancouver, B. C., Friday, May 12, 1922
Number 27
ALTA. MINERS SEND
OUT APPEAL FOR
SUPPORT
On Strike Against Big Reduction  in Wages ��� 10,000
Workers Are Involved
IOWA FARMERS OPPOSE
OPEN SHOP MOVEMENT
At the fifth annual state convention of the Iowa Farmers' union,
held recently at Des Moines, resolutions were adopted taking a pot shot
st enemies of labor and denouncing the open shop.
"We will throw our influence
against the sweat shop and the alleged open-shop movement," the resolutions say, "by patronizing the union
label wherever possible, realizing
that the result in both cases is industrial slavery for working people
in our cites snd a decreased buying
tonal candidacy of Bon. Smith
Brookhart, progressive exponent of
the fair deal for producers.
Aska for Moral and Financial
Support���May be Long and
Bitter Fight
United Mine Worker, of District j P��*er on their part for the surplus
18 are appealing by mean, of a cir-! food product- of our farms. *
color letter to all organized labor; Farmers and workers of Iowa are
throughout the Dominion of Canada I Romg down the line together for
for support in their fight against |-ocial and industrial justice. They
the unjust wage reduction proposed are almost s unit back of the aena-
by the coal owners. This fight ie
being unneceasarily prolonged by the
operators .who are holding up tbe sit
tings of the conciliation board by
different pretexts, and which, the miners believe 'are only attempts to
starve them out. The appeal which
ia being sent oat to all organized labor in Canada ia aa follows:
To All Organized Labor Throughout
the Dominion of Canada.
Fellow Workers:
Yoa are, no doubt, aware that the
Miners throughout Alberta and East
era British Columbia are oat or
strike against a 50** reduction in
wages, and the arrogant attitude of
the Coal Operators their effort to
create open shop conditions fair Mine
Workers. Yoa will realize that if by
any chance they are successful in
their attempt with the UnJted^Mine
Workers it wfll only be a question of
time before the whole Trade Urfym
movement -will be  affected  in Jnke
INDUSTRIAL STRIFE
PROVOKED BY
SPY SYSTEM
ion
Underground Organiza tions
Have   Grown   Rich   and
Powerful at Employ-
era' Expense
manner. '
In view of this we are appealing
to every Trade Unionist in the country for moral and financial support
believing as we do, that this fight is
their fight, and it behooves all to
help in any way possible.
We farther realize that; owing to
business depression for the past
twelve months, the various Local Unions wfll not be overburdened with
Vila-      am      siva     WW   wvw*va��aw-��<iB       **-*���--*-*-*Tl        ^     "��� ���
funds.      However,  any  assistance '   Messrs. Woodsworth   and   Irvine
they can render will be of great help
in caring for the most necessitous
Wa have about 10,000 members
with their dependants who will need
assistance if we are to carry the
strike to a successful conclusion. ,
It is oar opinion that the Operators,
are in for a lengthy suspension o
operations believing that through
starvation and want they will be able
to force tha worken to accept their
conditions.-
Owing to the extent of the strike,
which affects the whole continent, w
cannot expect much financial assistance from our International organization; hence we are forced to appeal
to every Trade Unionist for assistance in a fight which every one familiar with the labor movement realises L
is nothing more than an attempt b-
the employing classes to force down
wages and create open shop condi
tions throughout the Dominion.
All donations ahotid be sent to
Robert Peacocky atfr^tyyu-asuser.
District 1^. 118, Tjifiterf Mine Workers of America, Box 1844 Calgary
Alberta/  Canada.
Trusting this communication will
receive consideration and action.
You rs fraternally,
E. G. WILLIAMSON, President
WILLIAM RYAN. Vice-President
ROBERT PEACOCK, Secretary-
Treasurer.
ROBERT UVETT. International
Board Member.
LABOR MEMBERS
BUSYATOTTAWA
* i
Woodsworth and Irvine Make
Themselves Heard in House
of Commons
Numerically the Labor Party is
"small potatoes" in Parliament. Nevertheless, it is making ita voice heard
and is succeeding to an extent out of
proportion to ita size.
During the past week Messrs.
Woodsworth and Irvine, who comprise the "party" succeeded in obtaining promise of action in regard to
unemployment to the extent that the
government agreed to hold a conference between the federal and provincial governments on the subject.
This accomplishment was even greater than might appear in view of the
fact that the old-line parties were
disposed to "pass the buck" and take
the attitude that unemployment was
first a question for the municipalities
secondly for the provinces, and lastly
for the federal -government.
Our Baseball Competition
NO FREEDOM
WITHOUT OWNERSHIP
countered by pointing to the f set that
the problem was a national one, and
the former contended that "a government which does not provide for the
primary needs of the people in the
matter of food, clothing, and shelter
has failed to earn the loyalty of the
people." Both suggested unemployment insurance aa one of the remed-
FRENCH WORKERS
OPPOSE POINCAIRE
Poincare's    Actions    Help
Start Anti-Military
De mons tr at ions
to
STREET CAR MEN
GAIN THROUGH UNITY
PARIS���A wave of war talk has
fbfa-^i stirred ap by' Premier Poin-
caire's Bar-de-Luc speech threatening
i to act independently of the Allies if
necessary in enforcing reparations
collections.
Immediate advance into the Rhur
regions is urged by the conservative
right wing, while the Socialists are
seising on the address to stir op anti-
militarist demonstrations, declaring
the government is preparing for war
and the workers mast voice a protest to check it.
So-'ialist journals are printi. <-;
black streamer headlines declaring
"Poincaire Wants War," while th.>
conservative Temps asks "What after
all, is the use of remaining at Genoa?-
CHICAGO���organised street car
men celebrated the twentieth anniversary of the installation of their
nnion in this city. International
President Mahon waa the principal
speaker. The membership of the union is 19,000.
When the union was organised
wagea were as low as 12** cents
an hour. The maximum rate was
tl cents. Today the rates range
from 69 to 82 cents.
There waa no limit to the work
day, which Usually averaged 12 and
14 hours. Today the work day is
eight hours on week days with
eight hours' pay guaranteed, and a
six-hoar Sunday work day in train
service aa near as possible.
Coupon boxes will be closed every
Saturday at 10 am.
LABOR CONDITIONS IN
SWEDEN GROW WORSE
Labor conditions in Sweden are reported "growing worse," with lockouts in the longshore, sawmill and
leather industries, by Assistant Trade
Commissioner Sorenson of the United States Department of Commerce.
There are 150,000 unemployed.
Sorenson reports also a Swedish
contract made with the Russian Government for delivery of 60,000,000
crowns worth of steel and iron goods
agricultural implements and textiles.
On April 7 a shipment of 38,000,000
crowns of' gold was received from
Russia.
Corbin. B. C���The mines at Cor-
bin are closed down tight, even the
fsas and lights are shut off. One
hundred and four aaaa are on strike.
Labor Spies  Foment  Distract
and Hatred in the Hearts
of Employers
There can not be even an approach
to industrial peace in this country
until the labor spy systems have been
eliminated root and stock, declares E
H Fitzgerald, Grand President of the
Railway snd Steamship Clerks,
Freight Handlers, Epress and Station
Employees.
In a startling exposure of the labor spy, Mr. Fitzgerald produces documentary evidence in support of his
contention that during periods of
peace in industry the spy systems are
industriously at work fomenting distrust snd hatred in the hearts of employers.
Thrive ita Strife.
Were the "rule of reason" to control industry for even one year, says
Mr. Fitzgerald, thousands of men who
now thrive on strife that they help
promote would be compelled to go
to work at something useful and respectable. Scores of underground organizations have grown rich and powerful at the expense of the employers, which, Mr. Fitzgerald declares,
is the same as saying at the expense, interests.
Ramon P. de Negri, director general of the national railways of Mexico, says:
"He who thinks he can be called a
free man without being the owner
of what his efforts produce is simply a miserable fool. Liberty and
freedom consist in receiving that to
which one has a right, and in fulfilling that which honestly creates a
duty as a result of right."
"No exploiter is morally solvent,
though he may have enormous
Wealth, aad at the same tiine ao
worker can ba free if he is not
the owner of his bread aad his
children's  bread.
De Negri came up from the ranks
and is still a member of the International Association of Machinists.
of the workers and in a very definite
sense at the cost of the public.
Planting Seeds of Dissention.
Mr. Fitzgerald is in possession of
letters sent out by various spy agencies prior to the calling of the strike
of miners, in which they uniformly
discouraged the thought of peaceful
settlement and kept hammering into
employers the need of taking steps
for their protection. The "step"
suggested was the retaining of a spy
system to look after the employers'
Russian Delegates at Genoa
Occupy Centre of Stage
GENOA���The biggest shock of
Genoa has not been alone the .spectacular things the Russians* have
done���but what they look like. , '
World diplomats expected to see
wild-eyed men. with long hair and
matted whiskers, with knives in their
teeth and pants in their boots. And
they were shocked to find the Russians were not freaks at all.
When the Russian delegates first
arrived in Genoa there were many
jokes at their expense and a disposition in some quarters not to take
them seriously. Now, needless to say,
the attitude toward them has changed
entirely. From the moment they announced their treaty with Germany
they have shown diplomatic cleverness and have proved their right to
be treated at least as equals in one
of the greatest diplomatic' games
ever played in Europe.
They have occupied the centre of
the stage and the spotlight has never left them . "
Strictly Proper 1
Far from being disheveled fanatics,
the Russians in appearance rank well
up toward the top of all delegations.
Almost without exception they are
well dressed, and on all formal occasions their attire is strictly proper
to the last detail. The propaganda
effect of this has been very great,
for adherence to convention means
much in European official circles.
I', total quantity, whiskers among
the Russians are much less than in
many other delegations.
The five leaders of the Soviet delegation���Tchitcherin, Krassin, Litvin-
off, Joffee and Radowsky���are all
men of the highest education. Their
linguistic abilities are amazing. All
speak Russian, German, French. Italian and English, and aome several
other languages. They not only speak
these languages but speak them correctly.
AU  Distinguished.
Tchitcherin's English is flawless.
At the opening session he read his
speech in Russian, and translated it
into French, then into English and
finally into Italian.
The Ave chief delegates sre all
about 60 and of distinguished appearance. Tchitcherin, a nobleman in
the old regime, waa in the Czar's
diplomatic service. He was educated
in Russia and in Berlin and Paris and
haa a doctor of laws degree. He is
one of the moat powerful members
of the Soviet Government. Alone of
the five delegates Tchitcherin is nor.
married. He ia above average height,
slightly stooped, wean a closely cropped mustache and imperial and looks
like a college professor.
Krassin for 25 years haa been one
of the leading electrical engineers
in Europe. He was born in Siberia.
While a prisoner there for political
activity he helped to build the Trans-
Siberian Railway. He was one of the
original founders o -the Bolshevist
party in 1903 and has been active in
it ever since. He is a tall man, with
a close-cut iron-gray beard.
Radowsky Active
Radowsky, one of the most interesting of the group, was born in
Bulgaria and educated in Swiss, German and French universities, obtaining a bachelor of laws degree from
the University of Paris.
He has been a Socialist since he
was 15 years old and has been expelled from Bulgaria, Germany and
Russia for Socialist activity.       '
He was one of the leaders of the
Russian revolution in 1905, and was
jailed in Roumania for Bolshevism in
1917.   "
He was rescued by 85 Russian soldiers, who took him to Russia, where
he became one of the Soviet leaders.
Now Radowsky is President of the
Ukrainian Soviet Republic. He is
short and stocky, with smooth face
and a keen sense of humor.
Litvinoff, a college professor,
taught many years in the Berlitz
School of Languages in London. He
is one of the most remarkable linguists in Europe, speaking practically
all languages. He is of average physique and has neither mustache nor
beard.
Joffea is a lawyer of high standing
having a doctor of laws degree from
tha University of Munich. His whiskers are. white and luxuriant. Lt
vinoff and Joffee are Jews, but the
other three are not, though there
are several among the subordinates
of the delegation.
Their ability to speak languages
gives the Russians s great advantage
at the Genoa conference. Another
great advantage is the fact that, excepting the British, they come better
prepared with documents and figures
than the other delegations. They insist on taking time to answer proposals and questions, but when they
answer they back up the answer with
such facts and figures that Allied
delegates are dased.
The Russians, from Tchitcherin
down, are the hardest workers at the
conference. They Ire at it night and
day, holding conference among themselves, and with the Allies and with
the Germans, and the rest of the
time searching records and preparing
documents.
The amount and character of the
propaganda they torn oat is amazing.
There is always something for the
journalists at the Russian headquar-
Tradea Unionists and Labor Party Sympathizers Show Great
Interest in our Baseball Competition    Young Folks Also
Help ���Over $400 in  Prizes for Coupon  No. 2���
labor Newa to be of  Greater Services to the
Workers in Their Everyday Struggle.
WE have been agreeably surprised at tbe reception given
to our Baseball Competition.    The number of coupons
received have been increasing day by day, but the big
day is yet to be heard from.    In fact at tbe time of writing
(Thursday noon) we have received enough returns to satisfy
ua that the venture ia going to be a huge ancceaa.
Tradea unionists attending the business meetings of their
local unions, find it convenient to drop their coupons in the
boxes of both the Labor Hall and the Labor Party headquarters.
We are expecting, however, to upon up another convenient
place in a short time.
Not only are Trade Unionists and Labor Party sympathizers taking advantage of the competition, but the two organizations of young folks in the Labor Leagues are joining in and
boosting.
r. $400 in Prizes. f
While we go to press too early to announce the prise money
for next week, we can safely announce that it will not be less
than $400.
A great many are taking advantage of the "free** coupon,
and this will help boost our prise money quicker. We hope
our readers will continue to take advantage of this, ao that we
can increase our prise money to four figures before the month
ia out.
As we stated laat week, we want to make this paper of
greater service to the workers in their everyday struggles
against plutocracy. You can help us in that mission by boosting the baseball competition among your friends.
TO ORGANIZE
PROFESSIONALS
University Socialist Federation
Says Professional Workers
Must Get Into Movement
LONDON���Organisation of technical and professional workers was
discard at the last session of the
University Socialist Federation conference in Great Yarmouth recently
by Major Church, general secretary
of the National Union of Scientific
Workers.
He stressed the two aspects of
such a task; first to prevent the work
of professional men and women becoming an anti-Socialist weapon in
theTiands of the capitalist class, as,
for instance, in the case of planning
slum dwellings and the production
of more and more efficient means of
destroying life; and, secondly to organise them for their own economic
protection.
The view expressed by several
speakers was that the mass movement
of the working class, was the only
method of achieving Socialism, and
that professional workers had to
find their place in the movement.
MILLIONAIRE GUN
TOTER ARRESTED
SOMERSET, Pa.���In the role of
gun fighter D. B. Zimmerman, millionaire president, of the Quemshon-
ing Coal Company and late Republican boss, has given Somerset County a new thrill. Incidentally, he has
gotten himself under arrest and
caused the organization of the remaining non-union miners in the
country. He threatened to kill one
of the miners 'organisers.
The gun play took place on the
main street of his own mining town
of Ralphton, and is rendered specially significant by Zimmerman's great
local prominence and his frenzied reiteration of his threats to kill.
A GREATER NEED
FOR SOLIDARITY
Tom Richardson Addresses the
Winnipeg Tradea and
Labor Council
Perfect organisation, cultivation
of the sense of "one-ness" among
tha workers, irrespective a\ . -liner
differences of opinion, and elimination of ''parochialism'' which had
led to divisions in the past, are essential if working class progress is to
be made in Winnipeg and elsewhere
throughout Canada, declared Tom
Richardson, veteran trade unionist,
of Vancouver, and erstwhile member
of the British House of Commons, in
the course of an address delivered at
the Trades and Labor Council meeting at Winnipeg recently.
Invited by President Geo. Wright,
to address the delegates, Bro. Richardson made an eloquent plea for
solidarity. He told of many incidents coming within his purview during more than thirty years' experience in the Labor movement, and
emphasized that the well-directed effort that is made at the present time
by capitalism everywhere to wrest
from the working class advantages
gained through years of bitter strug
gle, created a greater need for solid
arity today than ever before.
Tom Richardson is busy addressing
meetings every night on behalf of
the Independent Labor Party. This
party has six candidates in the field
for the provincial elections.
The .Workers' Party has placed
three candidates in the field. ' The
Socialist Party is yet to be heard
from. There are ten seats in Winnipeg.
tors, snd always somebody there who
can speak any language. The other
day ona of Radowsky's assistants
gave a statement to English, Spanish,
French, German and Italian correspondents in succession, and each correspondent said his language was
spoken perfectly.
One of the most interesting .reactions to the Russians' personality is
the almost universal belief among
other delegates and journalists that,
however mistaken they may be in
their social and political ideas they
are sincere men, earnestly trying to
accomplish the regeneration of Russia, slong more advanced lines than
ever before attempted in history.
If Russia succeeds in getting the
-full recognition she demands, it wiD
ba due in a great measure to the
character and ability of tha men sent
j here from > Moscow.
BRITISH MINERS WILL
WIN EVERY SEAT
Referring to the approaching elections in Great Britain, Frank Hodges,
secretory of the Miners' Federation,
says:
"The miners will make no mistake
when their opportunity cornea," he
declared. "Out of 400 Labour candidates that are putting ap, the miners are running 68, and they will
win every seat they contest because'
of their burning desire to pass judgment upon the authors of their misery."
MORGAN INTERESTS
CREATING STRIKES
���. WASHINGTON���J. p. Morgan *
Co., at the centre of tbe Wall Street
web, dominates the railroads and the
coal mining industry of America
through interlocking directors. The
cos! strike �� a strike against this
Morgan control of millions of human
beings dependent upon coal wages.
The impending railroad strike is a re-
���volt against the same oppression.
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PAGE TWO
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA LABOR NEWS
THE TEA
THE B.C. LABOR NEWS
Published every Friday at Labor Hall,
319 Pender Street West
Vancouver, B. C.
Telephones Seymour 7495-7496
PRESIDENT HARDING ASHAMED
Subscription Rates:
11.60 per year by mall la Canada
92.60 per year outside Canada
'the union, hut the (onion has been
j benefitted to the extent of several
i thousand new members.
Aiding the mine-owners in   their
fight, is the  Pennsylvania railroad,
the big anti-union outfit and tbe no
. torious United States Steel corpora
tion.    This  much the  United  Mine
Workers have discovered through the
propaganda being put out by the operators.    Hence the fight becomes  a
r real and determined effort at union
[ smashing by giant corporations.
And, of course, the striking min
1 era are trying to conduct a bloodless
: strike but the mine-owners will not
tolerate it. Attacks are being made
I on pickets and on organizers. In
j fact, four organizers were saved by
' a hair-broeath from being lynphed
[at Ralphton, Pa., this week. Fight-
| ing, however, has been the steadiest
job the miners have had, and they
can no doubt hold their own with the
henchmen and gunmen of the operators.
The miners are only asking for the
President Harding has a bad conscience. He is ashamed of himself
for having snubbed the little children
who made a pilgrimage to his doorstep' to ssk justice for their perse-1
. r | -aa-   ai.aaaara��� mw ar   aailljr   _-AIIIg   1UI    lilt-
cuted  parenta-fhe political  prison-, continuat*on  of  ^   ls,2l   wale  of
ers still held in American cells. None j
but a man secretly ashamed of him
H. W. WATTS -  Editor and Manager
FRIDAY, MAY 12.
MILLION DOLLAR JACK POT
The Conservative party came out
in its true colors this week when it
opposed a reduction in the militia es
timates at Ottawa. Although the
estimates were only reduced from
91,400,000 to $1,000,000, there is no
saying what action would have been
taken were It not for the fact that
the Liberals could not afford to lose
the support of the farmer members.
The Progressives wanted a more
sweeping reduction but compromised
with the government's amendment.
General J. A. Clark, member for
Burrard, put up a pitiful plea on behalf of ex officers out of a job who
wanted to teach the youth of the
country the "noble art of slaughtering human beings. These men,
he said, want to pass on the knowledge gained at the front, meaning,
of course, the use of poison gas,
barbed wire entanglements and all
the rest of the butcher devices used
in the "war to end war."
To our mind a million dollars for
the training of militiamen is just one
million dollars too much -.nd could be
used to greater advantage to "make
the country a fit place for heroes to
live'in." Anyhow the Liberals decided they must not entirely forsake
present day institutions so they put a
million dollars in the jack-pot to
gladden the hearts of big business
whose property may need defending
in the near future.
self could put forward the silly excuse which President Harding makes
in his hasty public apology for a
callous act.      <?
If the children had come to Washington of their own volition, the
President explains, he would have received them gladly at the White j
House. That would be a masterpiece of brutal cynicism if anyone
but Harding had uttered it. Imagine the bewildered, scattered and
impoverished children of imprisoned
workingmen packing their bags and
buying railroad tickets to Washington, entirely without the aid or guardianship of their adult friends!
THE UNITED FRONT
PRODUCTION FOR PROFIT
Since the Trades Council delegation interviewed Attorney-General
Manson on the subject of relieving
the. unemployment situation in the
province, word has gone forth that
certain pieces of Highway will be
constructed, but we are also informed that there cannot be a great
amount of necessary work done on
account of the lack of funds in the
provincial treasury.
Here, then we have a sample of the
utter destitution of present day institutions.    Surrounded    on    every
hand with vast natural resources and
potential wealth, the workers are unemployed    because   somebody   else
holds the title deeds to the property.
"Opportunities   sre    plentiful   and
anybody can succeed in this country
who wishes to," we sre told.    This
most be entirely false if workers are
���   prevented  from  grasping  that  opportunity   because   somebody   else
says whether or nay they shall work
But even when permitted to work,
the toilers are used for the production of profits for an idle plutocracy.
That must be so, otherwise how could
the stores and warehouses be full of
things to eat and wear, produced only
by the labor power of the workers,
while these self same workers cannot buy back what they have pro-
dueed.   Having produced more than
they can buy back with the wages
received  from the  exploiters, they
are turned away from the factory
and mines, hungry, ragged, insulted,
desperate and angry���outraged with
contempt and threats while they and
their loved ones starve and shiver
though the workers are willing   to
produce plenty for all.    The wages
of those  working are slashed and
the situation grows in intensity.   Is
it any wonder that the workers curse
the wage and profit system?      It it
any wonder that thousands of us are
trying, day by day, to make the toiling masses realise that this kind of a
system most be changed���most be relegated to the scrap heap and a system of production for use instead of
'for profit inaugurated in ita place.
While there is not the slightest
reason why any worker should oppose the Soviet government, we feel
that the suggestion pat forward by
the communists to capture the
American Federation of Labor and
European Trades Union movements
for the purpose of affiliating them
with the Third International, is not
only a waste of energy, but very dis
ruptive tactics.
It is admitted that the workers
must be educated to their true position in human society in order to
bring about their emancipation, but
there is no good reason in the world
why we should have to affiliate with
the Third to accomplish that.
The rank and file of the trades union movement, so far as British Columbia is concerned, are radical and
need no dictatorship from communists as to what action they shall take.
True, there are a great many work
era who need working class education, but the tactics of the communists not only tends to ,repel those
who haw yet to be educated to their
true posnion in human society, but
also to.dmide the forces that would
otherwise work harmoniously toge-
ther. ��    -
Every once' in a while some demonstration takes place in the labor
movemen|   that   indicates   that  the
wages.    The operator.--, however, offer a reduction, hence the strike. The
miners did not earn a living under
the 1921 scale, how can they accept
a decrease?       Figure:   produced  in
the  U.   S.   Congress  recently  show
that the  miners   in  the  bituminous
fields worked an average of 125 days
in   1921.    The  wages approximated
$700, or about $1?.50 a week.   Figures for the six yeai period prior to
1921  show that  rite average  wage-
earned amounted to $873.74 a year.
Fortified by their industrial po��i
tion these wealth-stuffed ���eaches have
the legal power and the legal privilege of having these workers starved, jailed or shot if they demand a
decent    wage.    With    t\e    profit.;
wru-i: from the hides of these workers -he capitalist lives in  insulting
luxur,- and inso'er.t tyranny,   while
miserv and want are the rewards given   lhe   toilers  for producing   the
wealth of the world
for**t-eparations, should gain very
materially by the Russian-German alliance. Thc econo.nic situation will
clear up fast even should the conference fail. It would, tiowever, gain a
better right of way were it possible
to agree to the Russian proposals.
This,, however, is not possible with
such a crew of b< wilder* d and antiquated henchmen haggling for the
continuation of a broken down bankrupt system.
The next conference that is needed
is a conference of workers of the
world to agree to a "unitei1. front" to
rid the world of the profit-hungry
horde who now rule with an iron
hand. A great reorganization effort
is needed. Any society that is rot-|
ten with mocking injustice and
cruelty should be reorganized clear
down to its foundations. Present
day capitalist foundations and institutions are monuments of misery,
slavery and injustice. In their place
the workers must institute a system
of society based on production of all
tbe good and useful things of life
for social service���for the needs and
welfare of. the whole human family.
Trades Union Directory
I Secretaries are requested to keep this Directory up-to-date
Vancouver Unions
VABCOUVEB TBAOTI AMD Z.ABOB
OOPs-ClL���President. A. J. Crawford;
Secretary. P.- Bengough. Office 301
Labor, Hail. 31 > Pender Street Weet
Phone Seymour 7495. Ifeeta In Labor
Hall at 8 p.m. on the first and third
Tuesday ia month.
BtnUMa-Q TBADBS COOXCTIr���ChslnB-n:
O. C. Thom. Secretary, Boy Msssscsr,
Offles 210 later Hall. Meets first sad
third Wednesday la swath st Labor Hall.
BAKBBY BAT.BSsfBM, Local No. 371 ���
President, J. Brlghtwell: Secretary, W.
powron. 1819 Burns Ave. Meets st
319 Pender Street West on aecond
Thuraday of each month at 8 p.m.
lazwsBT,   raoum,   cbbbax.   aid
SOIT DBIWK WOBBBBS���President.
P. P. G.-ug-h; Secretsry. W. H. McLean. 203* Broadway Weat. Meeta
at 31* Pender Street West at ��� p.m.
every third   Tuesday In month.
^T?*0----**' Voc*x asi���President, John
Xl^w-i':_8*-c,'eur*'- Geo. ��� Annand, nit
Albert Street Meets at Labour Hall
at �� p.m   on first   snd  third Friday^
tti0*^??**-.? ****��� saa���T=rSridenTrE:
_��_.&��_.* _8��"��aary.  Evan  McMillan;
 rMTBB-AT-OBAI.  TJTsTIOB,
Local No. 120���President, C. E. Herrett; Seeratary, A. H. Jennie. 310
(amble Street. Meats Room 3IS. 319
Pender Street West, at 7:11 p.m. on
second and fourth Tuesdays tn month.
Bf-ACKSMOTMS,   DBOP   I-OBOBBS      S
--lal���HBa. Local No.  Ill���Prealdent.
J. Bartlett; Secretary.   Albert   Ar-
Meeta    at
 -   AMD  SEBf   mm-
PXaOTBBB, Local No. 4��a - President.
J. Smith; Secretary, B. Showier, lit
Pender Street West, Meets at Sit
Pender Street West at I p.m. on sec-
ond and fourth Fridays In month.
r-L-n-TBas, dbcobatobs sTpafbS:
HANOEKS. I.oesl No. 1S8.��� Preaident.
3. King; Fin. Sec, R. A. Baker: Bee. Bee.,
3. M��Millsa. 1��S Cerdsvs Street. MeeU
at 148 Cordova Street, at 8 p.m. on
second and fourth Thursdays In month.
3-X.B  -.STf-BBS. BBZIMIB. WS__J_V   m
DOCK   BO-tLDEBS,   Loral   No.   2404���
Preeldent. W. H. Pollard; Seeretary.
N. H. Vernon, Boa 329. Meets at Sit
Pender Street West. Vancouver, at I
p.m. on every Friday of month.
photo BBOBAvmai
President,   ~*   -mmm
Fill in Coupon No. 2.
Thanks for the boost in the baseball competition. Come again this
week.
"Millionaire must work," says a
"Sun" headline, referring to the sentence on young Dodge. This sounds
like an. advance message from the
"Dictatorship of the Proletariat."
w.
mer.  !04S   Snd   Ave.    W.
31* Pender Street Waat at  8 p.m. on
third Tuesday of each month.
ftgjjBBmtttac gap gawwaac
     Local  No. 84 ���
President, F. Looney: Secretary, Gordon Ed wards. 2728 Fifth Avenue West.
Meeta at World Building, Vancouver,
al 8 p.m. on Saturday of each weak.
at
aas ��� BUBSJr-BBS. Local Na Its-
President. P. Willis; Secretary. A.
Fraser. Room 303. Sit Pender Street
Waal. Meets at tit Pander Street
Wsat. at S p m on flrSt aad third
Mondays  of each month.
boot asr��~
Local, No. ttt ��� President. Thos.
Andley; Secretary. Tom Cory. 441
Vernon Drive Meets at tit Pander
Street Waat at t p.m. on flrat Tueaday
in month.
BalCX-ATBBS   MASOBS AMD TX.AUT-
EBEBS���Preaident, W. Kerr: Seeratary,
L. radgell.    MeaU at Later Hall ea lad
 a CBSSBSFT - ������.���_������������
Local No. 89���Preaident, Charles Keall.
Secretary, Alfred Hurry. 861 Thirty-
fourth Avenue Esst. Meats at 318
Pender Street West, at I p.m. on flrat
Wednesday In month.
PATTBBM     MSsTBBB    TnalasBs.57
Heya; Secretary, J. L. Irvine; Business Agent. E. A. Ooddard. 868
Richards Street Meets at Sit Pender
Street West on first and third Mon-
day in month at 8 p.m.
AN ENSLAVING CONFERENCE
Old   World   statesmen,   perfectly
aware as they must be, of the privation and misery of the workers, and
the general depression of business,
due, to a large extent, to the enor
mous debts each owes the other, still
cling tenaciously to the demand that
Russia pay up her pre-war. and war
debts.   Russia, however, looking en
tirely to the welfare rf the masses,
says that she will not turn the nation
into a great slave nation, doomed to
toil forever to pay tribute to foreign
creditors.   She would prefer to go
back to the barbed wire of the blockade and work out her own lonely
salvation, unaided by the Allies, rather than accept the chains of slavery for her people.    It is foolish for
these statesmen to expect that Russia would, of her own free will, put
a rope around her neck to carry out
tbe demands of the allies, when she
withstood four years of a war blockade in order to avoid slavery.
Russia needs the co-operation of
Local papers are still advertising
for donations of old clothes for ex-
service men to look for work in. This
sounds like an echo from that "rehabilitation" that was to have taken
place.
The big red flag with the dollar
sign which has been flying over the
Board of Trade Building denotes the
victory of the dollar plutocrats in
squeezing profits out of the hides of
the workers of the world.
The strike-breakers in the Montreal longshoremen's strike have been
turned adrift after faithful service.
A regular bosses' trick that the worker has not yet caught onto.
sad 4th Wedneaday ~j_ month.
__S-�����-TTBA_ *
TAX, XBOB   WOBBBBS, Local  No. tT
���Preaident. B. Bronnon; Raeretary.
Roy Maaaarar. Sit Pender Street Weat
Meats at Sit Pander Street Waat, at
S pa. ssnsaf aad foorth Monday.
Oeo.  Mosrat:   Secret!ry.
101���President.
 ���   Frank   Milne.
Box 411.    Meets at Sit   Pander Street
West at t p.m. every third Wedneaday
In   mnnth
If the workers produced twice as
much tomorrow as today, their reward tomorrow would still be a "living" wage. And the struggle to
"live" on that "living Wage" increases day by day.
"Notice: No more workers wanted" is a sign we saw the other day
on a factory gate. That notice
means To hell with every-man, woman and child out of whose labor we
can not make a profit.
In month.
CIVIC   BBOrXOTBBS,     Locsl   No.
Preeldent. 3. White: Secretary. O.
Harrison. Office lit Cordova Streat
West Meeta at 141 Cordova Street
Waat at t p.m. oa tha first and third
Friday In month. 	
CITT BATaX, BBDPXaOYB-Ht- Locsl No.
5�����President. H. A. Black; Secretary.
Aid. W. 3. Scrlbben. City Hall. Meats
at 141 Cordova Blreet West, at 8 p.m.
on  flrat  Wedneaday  of each  month.
CABJr-Sa-sTRB, BttOTB-BBMOOO, Local
412���Prealdent Oeo. H. Hardy; Secretary. W. J. Johnston; Hi-slness
Thom.   Office Stt Labor
Loeal Ko. 170 -Preaident, Bert Stlrskeoae;
Beeratary. J. Crowther; Bssiness A tent,
r .W. Welsh. Office SOI Labor Hall.
Meets al Sit Pander Street Wast at 8
a.aa. aa aaeoad and faarth Fridaya
poucsnosara rasBBA-noa. Local
No. 12���President. Roy A. Perry: Seeretarr, Alexander Murray. 1411 Tenth
Avenue We��t Meats at 440 Pander
Street Waat. at 7:30 p.m. on
Tuesday of month,
fourth
���.������. ���������������*__��������_. a l. o.
Okatnaaa, W. J. Bsrtlstt   Secretsry. Mrs.
W. Mahon.   Meeta la room SOS Later Hall
aa  the flrat aad  third  Thursday  in
"'   at S p.m.
rsflrrura pbessmtb a assistabts
Local No. tt���President. II. Longley;
Secretary. A. Hlaney. Phone Fraser
1S1X. Meets at 112 Hastings Street-
Vancouver, at 8 p.m. on second Tues-
__daj- |n month.
_.   W.
Agent  Ct.  C.          v....-  ��--   uauor
Hall.    Meeta second and fourth Mon-
day at S p.m. In Labor Hall.	
CABt-tBTlSi.    Ast_LOAMATBB.    ate.   1
Brsneh.���President.   T.   S.   Oeepe;    Busl
 Arent.   Angus   MerSween
B. 0. Webber.   I4S  10th Are
2nd sad 4th Tuesday at 8 f.
Seeretary,
V.    MeaU
.__  . ��� - ,.���, la F.L.P.
Hall.
Ms. S Branch.���Seeretary, W. Bray. SO
loth Ave. W. Meets 1st aad Srd Tees-
day al S p - . Id r.L.P. HalL 14S Cerdeva
St. W.
BSTT.BQAB BssTtOTBaB, Division Na
tt���Preeldent. A. N. Lowes; Secretary,
Charles Bird. S030 Union Straet
Meete at I.O.O.F Hall. IIS Hamilton
Street, at S p.m. on first Monday In
month.	
BAILWAT COBOVCTOaa. Division TToi
S47���Prealdent, O. W. Hatch; Seeretarr
3. B. Physlck 1158 Thurlow Street.
Meets at I.O.O.F. Hall on first Sunday
at   S p.m., and on third   Thursday at
BiiLWAT CABStt-t. lodge Bo. 5I.-Pr.ai
dent T. So-mere ills; Secreiary, B. J.
flanaom. 5680 Shsrbrooka St Meets 1st
sad Srd Fridays, In Cotillion Hall.
BAR.WAT -I-sA-iBnrsr. Local No. 144
���Prealdent. C. A. Mitchell; Secretary,
D. A. Munro. 70 Seventh Avenue Weat.
Meets at I.O.O.P Hall, Hamilton Street
at 7:30 p.m. on flrat Tuesday and 2:30
p.m.on third Tuesday.
CUAM-tASCBBS. Local No 357���President O. Thomas; Secretary, R. 3.
Craig. SS Kootenay Street Meeta at
Sit Pender Street Weat, at t p.m. ' on
flrat Tueaday In month.
other countries, but these other conn
���  _   ��,���   ___,._...-���   h.i   na-jtek, newi that great market, hence
workers can put-up a "united front," tf no�� tnMm .��� ^^ to m con_
hiaf    **i   -a..*-   ���#   aa.���   ���	
but in spite of this we are continually being reminded that we cannot
accomplish anything unless we become communists and Third Internationalists. In the meantime very
little attempt is being made by these
communists to educate the vast mass
of unorganized workers who help
keep the rest of us in subjection.
Russia had to adopt her own method of capturing the government,
but that isn't any reason why we
should have to adopt the same tactics. We want a "united front" and
we want the masses with us. but this
csn only be accomplished by sane,
diplomatic .and judicious actions.
There sre many thousands of workers to be educated before we can
usher in a hew society. That Is our
mission. We may sometimes get hot
under the collar on account of the
brutalities and indifferences of the
ruling class, but we' must at all times
try to avoid being led into a position
that will endanger the cause and de
feat the workers.
ARE THE MINERS LOSING?
Newspaper reports infer that the
miners' strike is drawing to a close
because non-union miners are working. It may be true that non-union
miners are working, but they are not
working under favorable enough
conditions to break tha strike by
flooding the market with coal. This
kind of propaganda shows that the
mine-owners are desperate. In fact
the loss of almost 100,000
miners would be enough to make anybody frantic. Of course, the, eoal
companies are saving money by not
having to employ gunmen' and spies
to threaten and watch the workers.
The mine-owners have laat the
first round of the battle. They started out with the intention of
are agreed to in conference, then separate agreements
will be made, irrespective' of' the
storming of the French or the Belgians. Russia needs gigantic supplies of machinery and various products, and conference or no conference, she is determined to have them
and, on the side, most of the nations
are falling over themselves to deliver the goods.
Aa far as the persistent demand of
the French, that Russia should restore the private property of the pin-1
tocrats or reimburse them for their
loss, there is nothing doing. Thousands of workers lost their homes and
their scant savings in the revolution
and counter revolutions, and if there
is to be any restoration of property,
these people should be the first to be
considered. It has never been the
function of statesmen or politicians,
however, to consider the needs of
the masses The bankers and great
capitalists of Western Europe insist
on their pound of flesh, and if they
do not get it they will be forever
scheming against Russia until the
workers in all other countries place
their ruling class where they can do
very little mischief.
The conference may not end entirely to the satisfaction of Lloyd
George and it certainly cannot to the
satisfaction of the French, but one
thing is certain, Russia will gain very
materially from it. Her treaty with
Germany and with the smaller na
tions is a distinct edvantage and must
of necessity forte the band of Great
Britain aad Italy ami area the United States. Treaties of a like nature
must he made with Russia, otherwise
Germany will benefit at the expense
of the other nations. Toe workers
fas Britain an*'"'
dard of living
the competition of the Ge:
ers, forced upon them by the
English newspapers carry news
items to the effect that prospectors
are returning to Vancouver from
Cedar Creek witf their pocfRs filled
with gold, looks like a C.P.R. press j
story for outside consumption.
The "effective restriction" against
Oriental immigration' might work
were it not'for the "underground"
route by which,a large number of
Orientals are always entering the
country. Between that and the
enormous birth rate B. C. may yet
lose its identity as a British province. ��
Btat-n-t-Aft Wo_U_a_*i, Local iii���
Preeldent P. W. MeDoniall; Seeretarr,
P R. Burrows: Busineaa Arent. EH.
Morrison. Office 148 Cordova Street
West, Meeta at 14S Cordova Street
Waat at t  p.m. even* Monday.
 BBS, Local No 18��� Preal-
dant. Percy Treviae: Secretary. Chas.
A. Watson. No S Fire Hall. Twelfth
and Quebec Streets. Vancouver. Meeta
at Sit Pender Street West.
OABsrasTT
a a warn.i. m
Si   SA
SOCIATIOB���Pre.-lefent C. F. _. .,
Secretary. Oeo. Gray. ItSS First Ave
C. Crals;
ver.   at Ml p.m. on flrat and   third
Sundays In month.
Street Weat.
Local
WOBBBBS.
 , No.   180
 President. Mrs. W.  Mahon; Secretary,
Misa May Ward,  477 Hornby Street.
Meats at Labour Hall at t p.m.    on
first Thursday la month,
MOTSTfc a B-tSTAVsVA���T BttVLOsBBB
Local  No. it���President W. Colmar.
Secretary. Andy Graham. 441 Seymour
Street    Meets at 441   Seymour Street
flrat  and   third  Wedneaday  at   S:S0.
Second and fourth Wednesday at 8:20.
x-s-MB-a, wood. wrmB a mbtax.
Local No. 807���President. A. B. Flnly.
SeereUry. A. P. Sunres. Stt Fifty-
seventh Avenue East Meets at SIB
Holden BulMlns. Vancouver, at t p.m.
on first and   third Fridays In month.
TBAMSnaS, Loeal Be. ��5S���President. W,
M. Brown; Secretary, Dirt Showier Office
tot Labor Hall. Meets second snd foorth
Wedsssdsy al 8 p.m. Is Labor Hal|.
Bats'BBS* T/BIOB��� Huslness A Kent. It.
Townsend. Meets at 1 p.m. every
Monday at 1<S Cordova Streat Waat
No
476���President,   Frank    McCann, -
Secretary. T. 3. Hanafln. SS78    Sixth
Avenue Wast   Vancouver.   Meats    at.
441 Seymour Streat. Vancouver, at 2:30
p.m. on flrat Sunday In month.
ITBABt ft OrBBATIsTO BMOtsTBBBS.
Local No. ��20���President, Joseph
Waelman. Meets at Sit Pender St.,
W. -Vancouver, at 7:30 p.m. on aecond
and fourth Tueadaya In month.
_ .Local No. 44���President H. J. Rhodes; Seeretarr. H. Walker. lOtt Pendrell Street. Meeta at
Room SOt. Sit Pender Street Weat at
" p.m. on third Wedneaday In month.
.OTT-EBS       AMD _
. BBS, local Wo. 88.���President. W.
Bayley; Secretary, A. Blrnle, Sttt
Commercial Drive. Meeta at Sit Pander street West at t p.m. on aaeoad
Monday in month.
���'*J3>
MINERS EVICTED.
DUBOIS, Pa���Miners have been
evicted from company houses of the
Kittle Creek eoal company at Bitumen near here. These workers lived
in that town for 10, 20 and 30 years
and have paid enough rent to buy
the town five tunes over.
The Miners' union immedistely
started toTniild tents and barrack:
for the families and citizens are
aiding in ^feeding and housing the
women and children.
The unions of Los Angeles will
participate. in~(he public burning of
$100,000 worth of redeemed Jnort-
gage papers early in August, when
the last $3,000 owed on the local
labor temple will have been paid.
Seven thousand dollars have just
been paid on this debt as a result
of a drive among the unions.  '
 , Brotherhood of. N-rialon No. SSO���President,
n. P. Boston: Seeretarr. H. A. B. Mac-
Donald, lttt Pendrlll St, Vancouver.
Meets st I.O.OT. Hsll oa aeeead and
Fourth Tuesdays In each month at I
p-m.
_QCOMOT1VB    FIMBM-ssT    ABB    BB-
OIBSMBB.   I.o-al   No.   858���President.
T. McKwen; Seeretarr. h. O. Campbell
744 Helmcksn street. Vancouver.
Meeta at I.O.OF. Hall, on flrat   and
third Thoradaya of each  month.
ft BCBCTBIO B*n,WAT BM-
M.OTBSB OT AMBBICA. Amalss.nat-
ed Association of, Division No. 101���
Prealdent R. RlKby; Secretary. F. E.
Grlffln. 447 Sixth Avenue Baat, Vancouver. Meeta A.O.F. Hall. Mount
Pleasant at 10:11 am. on flrat Mon-
day  and 7 p.m. on third Monday.
STOBB C-TTBBS. Local 182���President. C. Dolmas; Seeretarr. F. Rumble,
!��8 Got hard Street. Meats ta labor
Hall Vancouver at S p.m. flrat Tuesday In month.
���5*mAB-BBS (C.P.B. Byrtera Bo. II
���Chairman, W. M. Brlse; Seci-etary.
J,  Cunninsham.    Box  4S81.   Vancou-
��_        -a-Ulllll
ver. B.C.
Lorsl No. 38-52���Secretary-Treasurer.
B. Wisea: Basissjss Afvat W. Bans, SSt
Cerdeva Street Weat Meats at ISS Cor
dews Street West st 8 p m. sa firat aad
third fridaya in aeath.
PlCTtnSB OFSSATOBS, Local
No. S4S���President W McCsrtney.
SIS London BulMlns: Secretsry. O.W.
Saxled-. Sit London Building Meeta
at SIS London BulMlns on flrat Sunday In month at 7:30 p.m.
- ,_l_M_iM ' '  '	
TELEPHONE 	
A.IJB.E.W.   SeereUry.   Miaa   P.   roxcroft
Offles Booa 308 Labor P "
OPEKATOHS    _   _Md   TT
raft
Halt, 3l�� render
TAUOBa-UI-OW. Local No. 178���President.  A.  Mitchell;  Secretary, cftue-
Monday In month.
5^
of
Smoke the Old Reliable
Kurtz's
PIONEER CIGARS
Panatella
Monarch
INVINCIBLE-10 CERTS
AM Uaioa Mas. la Va
Local No. 147���President. A. Osborne
Secretary. A. D. McDonald, til Pender Streat Waat Vancouver. Meeta
at 8 p.m. on third Thuraday In month.
-CBIBIBTB. Bocal  ISS ��� President.
r���   �� . y q, Keefe;
Leo. George; Secretary.
Boslne-s Arent. P. Benrnurh; Office
lit Pender 8treet West. Meeta at Sit
Pender Street Weat at t.00 p.m. on
��������� ���-* third Thursday,
Loeal No.  148���President
.   A   Jamieson,   Stt
  BulMlns.    Meeta    at    Moose
Ran.   Homer Streat. at It   am.    on
"second Sunday in month.
rSDBBATBD SBArABXBS' CHIOS OI*
B. Or���President Dan Ctnlln: Seeretarr, W. Donaldson. 108 Mala St, meet
at 1 pm   -"-- **��� - " " ���
third Wednesday.
^?t^-!^0A^*I''':K',U "������PrMldent
a.-*'. ^'**��V\tB4wretarr and Busineaa
le-ZJhf-i ������"������U ,-rt haaaay tn eaeh
month at S p.m.
TBICAZ.     STAOB
���Local  118���President W. J
Park; See
retarr. O. W. Allln: Buaineas Aaeat,
Meets at 308 London Bulldlns at Tt��
am. on aecond Friday In month.
London
DON'T PATKONTZB LIST
Provincial Unions
VltmiBXA���-President. C. 8Ieverts
Denman  Street; I"
ward. 1SS3 Carlln
p.m.  on  first
It
Denman   Street;" Secratarr" it"wood-
ISSTjf"*'"^���
third   Wednesdays
n month at Tradee Hall. Broad Street
^o7,0*1* ���*Tpoo*""nc__. mnos,
201.���President.   O.   -_   Chrtstlsn;
tsry-lressarsr,   W.   H.   Oisrd      Bex   SOS
Meeta laat Bandar af month in Bear Trades
Hsll. Broad Street -����������- Traaas
The following places are run under
non-union conditions and are therefore
unfair to organised labor.
Stettler Cigar Factory, making Van Loo
aad Van Dvke Cigar*. ,
Capitol Cafe. 990 Granville St
White Lunches.
Maryland Cafe, 63 Hastings W.
El-ctriraJ Contractors.
C H. Peterson. 1814 Pandora St
Home k Rumble, Columbia St., New
The Chilliwack Electric Co- Ltd, *
2i__.il _2-i_. Box. **���-������ Brtnfea Rupert
2i?t��^.llifc<*)wr-___,*r-' H*-*- ���*-���   "*��**
and fourth Tuesdays of se_h montb.
*���Prealdent J. Lotman. Nelson;
Secretary. Felix Peaaral. Box 424 Nal-
 .��rasldent    Jamea    Ma-
Reveistoke; Seeretarr, Philip
. Box SSI. Revelatoka Meeta
at S p.m. at CSty Hall, Reveistoke, ea
the seeond and fourth Saturday ef
eaeh month.
tMe.   fl
Parker,
rTUds"eTr'i*��3^tsJ^TenurS^__ry"
B.   Morsaa. SIS Racine   Street     n��
Wednesday^ In ^ month    ^    1**^
Temple.
raataitaatar. .
-V
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA LABOR NEWS
The Labor News Baseball Competition
$400 IN PRIZES asjfegj
PAGE THREE
FD 17 17    f^ ri'TTP O XT Q   0NE FREE  COUPON   MAKED V
IV Cj Ej   \j VJ XJ ryj rS O   Allowed With Every Dollar Sub. A
Drop Coupons in the B. C. Labor News Boxes at Labor Hall, 319 Pender St. W.
and F.L.P. Hall, 148 Cordova St. W., or mail to Labor News, 319 Pender St. W.
Games Played Saturday, May 20th
Competition
Rules
Th��  folio win* rula-  _h-OI fonni tfc*
coiuy*itltle>jsi i
1. -US forecasts must be made oa
coupons   provided   by   tfce   B.   C.   .Labor
Bewa.
a   Bar conpoa which has been A
ed or matUated will be dlaaaaBBsa.
&    In the event at a tie. or ties, the
prizes  wiU  be divided   .anally  "
those tlelar.  Bat  shonld  the
arlsi ths B. C. tabor Bews tea
rixht to  rear
that tha ant ���
more thaa the -��� __  . .  	
prixs winners ada more thaa tha third.
4. T.stst date for leeelslas coupons
for thin com petition wfll ha Saturday at
10 a-uu oa the day tha ssaaaasa ant
eehadaled far. This saajMaa to coupons
re est ved by mail aa well aa deposited ta
COOPERATION
Patronize Out Advertisers and Tell Them Why
Coupon No. 2
COUPOBT  MOST BB  CUT���MOT TOBB
I enclose herewith SS seats for flee weeks' subscription to ths B. O. tabor Hews, together with tar
forecast of bassbaU results. I afree to abide by the
rale* of tha u sat sal aad wiU accept tha decision of
the judges M blndln* la everything pertalalaf to the
competition.       ��� *
ta  fan
Do you laaatsa the paper br ���ail eaeh week?
Home                     Away                                KOMB   AWAY
ABtasiCAk 1-M'aAVi.
Boston
Olevelaad
Waahtattoa
Chicago
Philadelp-ia
Detroit
at.  Beale
BreoUya
Chlcaro                       Boston
-.ttabaia;
Iiv Tork
tAOxVM COAST X.BAOOB.
Portland
Baa 1-reaclae.
1         Vernon
Batt  lake   O
Ssattls
AMBBIOAB ASSOOIATIOB
Toledo
Columbus
BoalevUle
Indianapolis
attaaeaaaUa
St. Fan!
Oalsarr
Vancouver
Baa_oatoa
Tacoma
Coupon No. 2
THIS COUPON MUST BB OUT���BOX TOBB
I enclose herewith 98 cents for Ave weeka' subscription to the B. 0. tabor Bewa,. together wtth my
fotoeaet of haeehaU resalts. I sgr.s to abide br the
rules Of tha contest aad will accept the decision of
ths Judges aa binding la .v.rythlng pertaining to the
comp.tltlon.
Bam.   la  fall
Address    ..
5.   State-as aa .  ��� 	
doaed or not played will ha struck off
coupons. The Brat of two games played by tn. same teams ea tha asm. day
will   be   taken  for  checking   .ore--~-*.
a   Tha    manag.ma
right    to    disqualify    aay    co
what ta> his opinion ia a good
cient  reason,  aad tt ia a ���"������
ditton af entry that tha
ILSON'S
CXS? SHOES
Wilson's Twin Shoe Store
157.159 HASTINGS STREET W.
w
RRAND'S
SEEDS
729 ROBSON STREET
Bo yoa receive the paper br ataU each woefct
Sou "" Away
AWHU_.lt -Jat-Hrl.
Boston
Cleveland
Washington
l*^tohtad__c ta
enc. ahaX
granted.
T.    la marking
column provided.
Pierre Paris
_��ry���f FOOTWEAR
SI HASTINGS STREET W.
^f-i*',***0*****************
CHINA and TOYS
DOLL   HOSPITAL
Millar & Coe
Limited
411  HASTINGS  STREET  W.
Chicago
Philadelphia
Detroit
NATI.BAt laBAtiUB.
Bt. Bonis
Brooklyn
Chicago
Aoston
Pittsburg
Bsw Tork
BAOITIO COAST DBAOUB.
Sacr.m.nt o
ana Braaelaeo
Portland
V.rnon
Bait tak.  O Seattle
AMBBIOAB ASSOC-ATtOB
Toledo
Columbus
Coupon No. 2
B COUPOB  MUST MM   CUT���NOT *	
I   enclose   herewith   SS   c.nts   for   flv.   weeks'   sub-
to th. B. C. tabor Bewa, tog.th.r wtth my
of haaehan results.    I agree to aside br tha
aad wltt accept the deelsloa of
; ta everything pcrtalnlaff to tha
touisvill.
Indianapolis
BUnaeapolia Bt. Baal	
WBSTBBB IBTBBBATIOBAt
Calgary
Vancouv.r
Win win or loss.
a.    Competitors     must     saclose     SSe
wtth  eaeh  conpoa.   which   will  eatttla
them to flv. WMks' sabecriptioa to the
B. C. tabor B.ws.
9. Mo two capital prizes will he paid
ta any aaa are eh to any oae eah-
htr.
10. employees   of   tne   B.   O.   taoor
BeWS cannot seas pets.
11. Me --possibility will ha accept
ad by the B. C. tabor B.ws far tha loss
or non-delivery  ef aar	
of poettaff win mot ha a
of delivery or receipt,
12. Prizes   axe
 Of prU.-winn.rs wiU b. pnb^
Uafcad to tha -*---��������� ���
13. Competitors wishing far a rs shea*
jaaat sac loco copy of tha ceapoa protested, tog.th.r with Baa Dollar far
eaeh _____ lasiaaad^ in aa
Men's  Furn.Mli.iigt* I *
Cuthbertsons & Co-1^
__   648 Granville    619 Hasting. W.   +
flfjAEGERg fl Potts* Small
sae  ��   ~~    _r__��_   x*v-_ ?  l; a ���*
HARKLEY&
AYWOOD
Ammunition, Guns
Fishing Tackle
69 CORDOVA STREET WEST
LIMITED
MEN'S WEAR
717 PENDER STREET W.
Just   Around   the   Corner   From
High Rents.
"protest."    If the
the  fan  wUl  ha
prize awarded.
14.    Coupons    received    without
aad address wm he -IssasllSsi
Edmonton
Tacoma
the judges aa
ta  fan
yon receive th. papr
Besu Away
 AMBBICAB tBAbUB
ipsr by mall each week?	
 B1MU Awlf
Coupon No. 2
THIS COUPOH* MUST BB OUT���MOT TOBB
I enclose herewith SS c.nts for flv. weeks' subscription to tha B. 0. tabor Unaa, tog.th.r with my
fotoeaat of baashaU r.sults. X agr.. to abld. by the
rui.s of the contest aad wm accept the deelsloa of
th. judges as binding In .v.rythlng pertaining to the
Correspondence
RICKSON'S
CENTS' FURNISHINGS
840 GRANVILLE STREET
 Wear Rca���a Streat
Mason & Bisch, ltd.
From   Factory .
I Pianos, Player-Pianos I
Phonographs
\ To Home I
728 GRANVILLE STREET
THE ROTARIAN SOLVENT.
compsti
Wains  ia  lull
Address   ..
Cl.v.land
Po yoa receive the paper br gag each week*	
Moms Away WOntx AW AT
AMBBIOAB IJAOUB.
DetTOlt
inpg laiATy-r
Brooklyn
Mew Tork
Bait tak.  O
attl.
AMBhi-AH  ASSaVli-HO-a
Toledo                         Columbus
tonuville               la-HaaapoUa
hU.ne.poll.              Bt-P.nl                                 ,
WBSTBBB  IBTBBBATIOBAt
Boaton
Olevelaad
Washington
Chicago
Phlladslphla
Detroit
Bt.   Bonis
BATIOWAt MtAOUB.
Brooklyn
Chicago
Boston
Pittsburg
Bacrsmsnto
Bew Tork '
PAOrirtO OOABT tBAOUB.
Portlaad
Baa Prancisco V.rnon
T~
Bait Bake
0 _____���	
IBTBBBATIOBAt    tEAOUE.
Calgary
Toledo
Columbus
touisvills
ladlaaapoUa
Minneapolis Bt, Baal
AMXBICAH ASSOCIATIOlf
Calfary
Tanconv.r
Edmonton
Coupon No. 2
rale, of the
the jaasn as
SB CUT���BOT TOBB
for   Ave   weeks'   sub-
to las B. O. tabor Mews, together ,
wsalts.    I MM to .bide by the
aa�� wm accept tha '
ta fan
Coupon No. 2     X
I  COUPOB  MUST BB   CUT���BOT TOBB
Free Extra Coupon with
every Dollar Sub.
la toil
Address   ...
Bo yoa' receive tha paper tar asajj aaah vmi?
gag Iway	
CAB tBAOUB.
Cl.v.land
Waahtattoa
r_T_E
Bt. tonls
Brooklya
BWisaais               Mow Task
ftODIO  OOABT tBAOUB.
TTT
IHWRItUR MIMUWi
TT
BATIOBAt tBAOTTE."
8t.   t ouls
Brooklyn
Bovtoa
Mew Task
PACmC  COAST  tBAOUB.
Toledo
O Bsattle
toulsvUle
Oalsarr
ttt. Baal
j,_��^*m^jnamMATUuij��
Editor B. C. Labor News;
At last we are given a Moses to
lead us oat of the economic wilderness. While the "best brains" of a
distracted world have been struggling
with a problem that was too much
for them, the Rotarians, closed shop
of intellect, have given us a perfectly simple and adaptable remedy for
everything that may be wrong:
"Smile, damn yoa, smile." That's
it. If you've lost the farm it took
you and your family all your lives
to build up���smile! Smile when you
are deflated, smile when you lose
your job, smile when you are sick,
smile when you are hungry���smile,
damn you, smile. There's nothing
like s smile, if you want to change
the cold hard facta of a miserable
existence for the glories of a rain-
bow-hu .d heaven, the Rotarians say
Can you understand now,why they
limit their membership to the very
elect of the business world?
CASPER F. HASTINGS
e     e     e
Editor B. C. Labor News:
In response to a letter from the
Metal Polishers' Union of Sackville.
N. B., informing the Trades council
of a strike at the Enterprise Foundry Co. of that city, the council!
took the matter up with the T. W.
McArthur Co. of Vancouver who
were handling the products of this
firm and received a reply to tha effect that they hsd, written the Fcun-
dry Co. the following letter:
Enterprise Foundry Co., Ltd.
Sackville, N. a
Gentlemen; Tbe Trades and Labor
Council of this city have entered a
protest against the conditions under
which Enterprise Ranges are being
manufactured in your foundry. The
claim is that you are unfair to organized labor.    <
Merchants Benefit.
We know nothing of these condi-
toitis leferied to. in fact, it is the
first intimation we have received
that you were experiencing any labor trouble. However, we wiab to
say we have always been in sympathy
with organized labor. At times to
the employer they may seem unfair
but on the whole we must admit
that by organization the labor man's
condition is very materially improved
in every way, financially and otherwise and who ia ths end benefits
more by this than the merchant.
It ia of course, not np to us to
say anything to advise yoa how to
handle your men bat we have received this complaint aad we are
passing it along for what it is worth,
snd we trust that matters will be]
arranged ia a manner that wfll be
satisfactory to all parties interested, I
and we will be glad if yoa wfll advise us.
Tours very truly,
W. T. McArthur A Co.. Ltd. 1
Ull  D ELECTRIC
m u ��� n COMPANY
Headquarters far All
ELECTRICAL GOODS
414 HASTINGS STREET W
-I****
HJWWCHOE
GOOD CO.
shoes *��-"������ Ltd.
Sn GRANVILLE STREET
THE CAMERA _ ARTS
KU1/A1V5 Developing
Picture Framing
610 GRANVILLE STREET
GEO. B. IfEBFOOT
SUITS -  Men's
Made to    Clothing and
Measure     Furnishings
ISS HASTINGS STREET EAST 1
M. J. Cameron
Clothes
for
Men
Cordova
Street
West
THOS. FOSTER* CO., LTD.
Fashion-Craft
Burberry
O'Coats
QUALITY
CLOTHES
Dm ward
O'Coats
��%SSn 514 Cranvllle St.
E.C.KILBY
HOSIERY
Specialist
IS GRANVILLE STREET
YALE
H. STARK
Prop.
Hast,
Street
���tint.  WilOJc.
Wert kJ   STORE
W.S. CHARLTON* CO
LIMITED
Specialists in
Young Men's
Clothing and
Haberdashery
CO.
f
602
Granville
Street
Olllll til MM I .��������.. M*M
f J. A. Flett, Ltd. I
HARDWARE,
4-     Teals, Cutlery aad Sporting
J     339 HASTINGS STREET VV.    |
*** I** I ��� ��IU tHI M H H H I ��������
S. H. HARNOCK
Vancouver
Hardware Co.
Limited
867 GRANVILLE STREET
W. C. Stearman
"The   People's   Hardware   Merchant'
* Monarch Malleable*
l-Tbe   Stay   Satisfactory J
SIS GRANVILLE STREET
PLANT        SP
RITCHIE'S [)
Seeds
Bulbs
The Best PiWtir^ble''
872 GRANVILLE STREET
BSBBSB.BBBBBB*____^___^_^_______________________-aa_e___-_______-____MB-----f
bc. Barber Supply and
SOWHUESyLTD.   s��-^-*-
Supplies
D. K. BOOK, LTD.
CORRECT CLOTHES FOR
MEN
137 HASTINGS STREET W.
ft! Hastings St. ^Shaving
West
We OatSt the F.s��nly
Hs^��sT the AMERICAN
rSffiS? Boot Shop
r   S41 GRANVILLE STREET
J* t��ILLA8rTl & D.
Do ,*�����������* Clothes for Men
Men's and Boys' Clothing
and Furnishings
117 HASTINGS STREET EAST
Cornett Bros.-
& Clark
SHOES
Wa    specialize     in
Mea's    and    Boys'
Reliable
S3 HASTINGS STREET E.
���
One free coupon with every dollar. I
SALSgpVS
HARDWARE   MERCHANTS
132 HASTINGS STREET WEST
f-iRAWFORl-\
V-'BatteryCoJ-'
Limited!
SSS HOWE STREET
��Soymoar S33S
owrrzER-^
���JBros-tLtd.   ^
Everything in
Music
���
��� I
3
' il
.   f
v
1
���'I ���
-
I
��
���
RAGE FOUR
a   i =
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA LABOR NEWS
Blue Bird Washing Machines
Selling Now at $175
There's money in using a Bluebird Washer, even when yon
have to pay the regular price of $210, for it. but now that you
can boy then at the sale price of $175, they are an investment
much too good to let pass unheeded. Made ia Canada, easy and
economical to operate, and instead of rubbing away the
material aa yoa do when washing by hand, these just wash the
dirt out of tbe garment. Washing this way gives three tunes
the lfie to the gannent.
SPECIAL   DEMONSTRATION
Bring some dirty clothes and have them washed while yoa
wait, and see for yourself what a wonderful machine the
Bluebird ia $25 cash puts one in the home, and $20 monthly
pays the balance.
^^njajggiiyjgg g^jypa"-jflf>
SOUTH VAN. YOUNG
FOLKS ORGANIZE
Active Campaign Started  for
New Members���Social and
Educational
imiiiiiiii;:ii��i��ii;:iiii:;:
��iHi����nm��iii��:immii����
"LAID OFF"
T-o Short Words. Brid_int tine Gulf Batwaea
COMFORT aad POVERTY
Have yon protected yourself and your family against such
an emergency, with a SAVINGS ACCOUNT���tbe most valuable
Asset a man can have for the "RAINY DAY."
We STRONGLY RECOMMEND yoa to start such an account
AT ONCE, at one of oar City Branches.
HASTINGS AND SEYMOUR. Caa. S. Harrison. Manager.
A Abbott       sBaia a. XStb Ave.       Main a. Broadway
Yaa   Will   Receive   Prompt   aad   C���if���s   Attention
Union Bank of Canada
. P.S.���If yoa are living in a community not provided with
Banking facilities, address as by mail, and we will be glad to
guide yoa in respect to "Banking by MaiL"
munaammum
::;iii:i:mi:i:;:::ii:::::;:itniii;:;;;i:
HALLS TO RENT
IN THE LABOR HALL
Largei
Rates to societies
tei
I; good sr.Sfsast.sai
by day. weak ar wialb. m
P. R. BENGOUGH,
ROOM 308 LABOR HALL SIS PENDER STREET W.
74SS-74SS
v TdcpMK Scjmv 7495
THE UNION PIUttTlNG CO.
"More Than Printers"
LakaxHaO 319 P��*r Street West
Twenty of the young labor stalwarts of Sooth Vancouver got together last Friday night; adopted a
constitution and by-laws for the
newly organized South Vancouver
Labor League and made ready for an
extensive campaign for new recruits.
The new organization will cater
chiefly to those people interested in
the welfare of the working-class
movement and who are desirous of
educating themselves, yet it is not intended that social functions shall be
neglected. Lectures, debates and
impromptu speeches by the members
are being arranged for the educational meetings to be held on the
second and fourth Fridays in each
month.
Anyone between the ages of 15
and 25 are eligible for membership
and all the workers of South Vancouver who have young people eligible for membership and are interested in their education should send
them along to the meetings of the
League. The young pr.uple are out
for educational work itd therefore
anyone interested in thc labor movement, no matter of what wing, should
join up. There is no t;me like the
present for the young people to get
together and prepare themselves for
the great struggle ahead and this organization affords c great opportunity for those who wish for an educated democracy.
The League will hold a business
meeting tonight (Friday) at 8 p.m.
prompt at 6262 Chester street, just
off 49th Ave. E. Next Friday there
will' be an educational meeting at
the same address.
For particulars of the meetings,
etc., please phone Fraser 397Y1 or
Fraser 190X1.
Until further notice all meetings
will be held at 6262 Chester St.
ODD BITS
(Conducted  by  Sydney  Warren)
OREGON LBR. WORKERS
FIGHT 10-HOUR DAY
Tbe Labor Legislature of Yucatan,
Mexico, after aa investigation by a
sub-committee, has adopted a resolution calling on President Harding
and the Governor of Texas to free
Mexican radicals new being held here
aa political prisoners, according to
a recent announcement by Barry Weinberger, counsel to tbe Mexican political-..
ROWLANDS
Concert Band
at the
Capitol
SUNDAY���9 P.M.
SILVER COLLECTION
av
Robson Dairy
The Home of "Birt's"
Graded New-Laid
EGGS
1124 ROBSON STREET
Have your NEXT SUIT
maiie by���
Perry & Dolk
TAILORS
Rooaa 13, 18 Hastings St. W.
Neat to T���Mages
ARE YOU TIMING
0FDANCD.GLESSONS?
Oa\__BCt_s_C      asss^SBBBsBs��y,      OTss-BTtl|#     iM
FBir- DANCING
BOYCOn AGAINST
JAPANESE GOODS
Urged  to Rid Siberia of the
Murderous Army of
the Mikado
LONDON���Tbe boycott of "all
things Japanese" by international labor is strongly urged by tbe National
Hands-Of Russia Committee to fight
tbe Japanese in Siberia.
Tbe appeal to international labor
is signed by representatives of the
6,000,000 British workers organized
ia the Tradea Union Congress and
tbe Labor party.
Tbe Japanese record in Siberia is
one of "repression, outrage and murder." it is charged. Attached to
tbe appeal to the organized workers
of the worid ia a statement by M.
Kushnariov, envoy of the Far Eastern Republic in Moscow, in which
tbe Japanese forces of occupation are
charge with bestial atrocities committed oa innocent men and women.
Meat significant in tbe appeal is
the statement that the British International Transport Workers' Federation baa already entered into negotiations with Japanese workers with a
view toward counteracting the invasion of Siberia. Worken of Europe aad America sre urged to contribute toward the spreading of anti-
intervention propaganda among tbe
Japanese workers.
AUSTRALIAN -LECTION
The by-election to fill the Yarra
seat, rendered vacant by the death
of Frank Tudor, leader of tbe Labor
Party ia the Federal Parliament, re-
salted as under:���
James Henry Sea-fin (Labor) 12.520
Andrew Davidson (Natjonalt) 3.469
Frederisk Smyth (lad.)      ifj
Majority for Labor
8,924
Drive aad Dance at the F.
L. P. headqeaiteri en Saturday
���W-
Over 5,000 lumber workers are on
strike in Southern Oregon against
the 10-hour day and reduced wages.
This strike, which is being conducted
by the International Union of Tim-
berworkers, is unique inasmuch as it
has the business communities, the
governor of the state and public officials on the side of the strikers and
against the lumber trust. Four
mammoth kitchens are being operated in the strike district and more
than 250 miles of steel on the Southern Pacific railway are being picketed.
!
,    THE PRICE OF PROGRESS
The brutalities of progress are
ca'ied revolutions, but when Ihojy are
ended, this fact is recogn��_*dd, the
human race 1 as been chastised, but
it has moved onward.
VICTOR HUGO.
THE TIGER AND HIS TAIL
Unemnfoyment is Capitalism's tiger. -From an infant cub he grew to
be an opstreperous youth until now
he has reached full maturity. All
the while he haa been held by his tail
At first he didnt seem to mind it
much,, ait* later he merely growled
when occasionally it was palled too
hard, but now he is turning around
to see who is at the other end doing
the pulling and once be shakes his
tawny mane from his eyes���well, he's
going to have a certain Fat Man for
dinner.
see
AS   IT   WERE
FOR MEN ONLY
MACE.-WI_.SON SHOE CO.
41* GRANVILLE STREET
P. O. -nd Pa.de
Smarn
MISS AGNES MePHAIL
Miss Agnes McPhail, of Southeast
Grey, the only lady member in the
House of Commons, spoke in favor
of the Royal Commission for Nova
Scotia mine trouble. She declared
that Cape Breton jails allowed prisoners forty cents a day for food, but
that the British Empire Steel Corporation allowed only 19 cents per
day per head to feed the families
of the coal miners.
She declared that a reduction in
wages of thirty-seven and a half per
cent, did not appeal much to them at
Ottawa, when the wages' were for
workers in Nova Scotia, but that it
would be thought a lot if the reduction waa taken off the salaries and
indemnities of the members from the
Premier down.
MEXICO'S DEBT LOW
Mexico leads the world in tbe
s of its per capita debt. The
official figures of the the report of
the International Financial Conference, the Brussels conference of July 1921, shows the national debts are
as follows, per capita:
Mexico   |     24.34
United States ....    235.96
Canada  . .._.      290.00
Italy   ,     396.|0
Germany     797.67
England   ,     824.78
France . 1,114.26
A boost now is better than half a
dozen later on.
One free .coupon with every dollar
subscribed to oar baseball competition.
Extra copies of tbe paper will be
forwarded to any of oar friends who
wish to band them to their neighbors.
If it is so that the Jspaneae current strikes the British Columbis
coast,  it must be hitting as below
the belt from all weather indications.
e     e     e
Reverend Robert Forman, noted
Anglican clergyman, would impose a
fine upon all non-church goers. His
contention is in fact that of many
others with a "parish mind," namely
that all should do as they do and if
not a law or laws should straightway be  passed to compel  them to
mend their ways.
* e     *
Frank and Maud McCoy only took
recourse to the law when they were
unable to agree on the division of
their profits accruing from a bootlegging enterprise and law refused to
arbitrate. Who said justice was free
for the asking?
e     e    e
General Clark, M.P, Burrard, took
great pains, in opposing the reduction
in the military drill spropriation, to
show that the U. S. did not win the
war and that Canadians had a good
share in doing the job. Well, perhaps they did, but why this continual
harping. Most people are sick and
tired of the last war or any other
war and don't give a tinker's damn
whether the Yankees go.t more lead
pumped into them than the Canadians or vice versa.
* *    *
The recent case of the crew of a
Seattle sailing schooner being henpecked by the skipper's wife was a
version of the "She Wolf" and most
of the crew preferred the male species.
* * *
The reduction in the naval appropriation of one million dollars and
1400,000 from the military drill estimates is justified in the light,of
ordinary common sense. When we
consider the fact that Canada ranks
lowest among the sheep raising conn-
tries of the world having over twenty-four milion sheep less than England with certainly a greater pastor-
age area and add to this the fact
that less than ten per cent of Canadian cattle sent to the abbatoirs are
fit for export purposes, something
should be done with funds besides
filtering them away on a second-
class navy or in tha tinsel and display of s large training force simply to please the vanity of a set of
boot-clicking and swash-bnckling Imperialists who seem to regard Canada's funds as fair game.  .
a    ���    ���
Dr. Camille Laviolette, well-known
Montreal physician says he ia convinced that all spiritualists are mad
and suffer hallucinations of the organs of hearing. We don't know
who is crazy���the over-credulous
who imagine another' worid filled
with table-tipping and horn-tooting
spirits or the person whose intolerance prevents aim from having an
open mind. However, it waa not so
very long ago that Marconi tbe inventor of the wireless waa thought
mad, and a little farther back the inventor of the telephone and soon
down through history. We have improved in one way only, we refrain
from boiling in oil those who disagree
with us and the reason for this may
be the high price.
see
GOVERNMENT BY INTRIGUE
THED.HUNTERCOMPANY
MEN'S AND BOYS' CLOTHING-
FURNISHINGS, ETC
74 CORDOVA STREET WEST
Imperial Trunk
and Leather Goods
33s -Hastings street west
Lace. Nitro aad Taagatoa Lamp*
THE ELECTRIC SHOP
IX HASTINGS STREET EAST
Retail Electrical Suppliea and
Fixtures
C.D.BRUCE
Mas Ckfat gj Ftrasfags
COR. HOMER AND HASTINGS
THE
LADIES
STORE
_**���***
���t��
~ 417
HASTINGS
ST. WEST
Seymour 3902
BURNS DRUG CO, LTD.
Attention
732 GRANVILLE STREET
IB ths Block Wit
Phone Seymour    606
N
EW \rORK
X   Company
(Vancouver's  Popular  Credit
Hsejee)
Refined Wearin, Apparel for
MEN AND WOMEN
143 HASTINGS STREET WEST
black* hat STORE
WHITE
Largest Exclusive Hatters in B. C.
COR. HASTINGS AND ABBOTT
ARNOLD & QUIGLEY
Trade ia
Oar  Upstairs   Clothes
Shop    aad    Save    Year    Dollars
540 GRANVILLE STREET
TOWNLEY & WARD
GRAMOPHONES. PIANOS, ETC
443 HASTINGS STREET WEST
T��- gootery
Aid. Pettipiece is working like a
trojan on the city council for the
workers. Help pot some more of
his kind there by joining tbe Labor
Party.
Whatever may be the outcome of
the Genoa Conference, the fact remains that the meeting itself is B*.
better than any of the other patcb-
ing-up congresses that hsve been
held dace tha Armistice. With
possible exception of the Soviet delegates, none present at Genoa, are
there by direct mandate of the people
whose country they apeak for and
whose word they pledge.     We be-
Womeo's and OUn. Shoes
E-saCluRiw ely
681 GRANVILLE STREET
lieve the principle of government by
conferences, whether they be at Versailles, Cannes er Genoa, to be fun
damentally wrong.
It may be argued that Soviet Russia acted from a point of expediency
aa a part of her admitted retrenchment to meet capitalistic economic
conditions, hot this excuse cannot
be made for other nations attending.
In England, for example, the opposition . asade by the British Labour
Party waa not against holding the
conference bat in fact against limiting its scope. We think this a mistake. Diplomacy of one sort or another haa been the historic substitute for popular representative gov
eminent sad Labour should be the
last to acquiesce in it, let alone approve, rather the working class mem-
ben of Parliament, in whatever country they may be, should strive to
pot aa end to tins whole business of
government by intrigue.
Wayne, Alta.���After the proposal
being dory ratified by the respective
locals, amalgamation of the three local unions of the U. M. W. A. at
Wayne, into one big loeal. was effected aft a mass meeting ef the
era oa April 23rd.
BOGARDUS - WICKENS
Paint Wallpaper Glass
Lewis Piano &
Phonograph House
THE HOME OF THE PHONOLA
Meaart Pianos
1044 GRANVILLE STREET
Outfitters for Men
WM. DIGK LTD.
"Year   Money's   Worth   or   Youi
Money Back"
45-49 HASTINGS ST. EAST
E.S0D&
OoavealeaS
PIANOS
PboMt-raphs
The KENT PIANO CO-W.
556-560 GRANVILLE STREET
Hastings
FurnitureJiCo.
41 HASTINGS STREET WEST
Phone Seymour 3867
FULTON'S STYLE SHOP, LTD.
MEN'S SUITS. OVERCOATS,
RAINCOATS
Blade ta Canada
me.dy-to--.ar or BUde to Tonr Order
���at  Maker to  Wearer���On
Oaly
61* GRANVILLE STREET
KNABE���CHICKERING���WILLIS
PIANOS   AND   PLAYER   PIANOS
THE BOWES MUSIC HOUSE
Excluaive  Piano  Dealers
506 DUNSMUIR STREET
Hotel BaUatag
The Ingledew
Shoe Co.
Quality Footwear
Far tha Whale Family
666 GRANVILLE STREET
LATIMER & SONS
Limited
H ardware. Sheet Metal
550 MAIN STREET
r 221���Day or Night
NUNN & THOMSON
FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND
EMBALMERS
S31 Homer Street
Paddock ��oot
���*���       989 GRANVILLE    SIlOD
Corner    Nelson    St. T
| SHOES "f^ff-
J.N. HARVEY
Goad Clothinr       111    Haatiaga
H.ts   aad   Maa's     _"""'������,** _
Faraishiaaa ,,��____"�� 3��'
Center _ Hanna. Ltd.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND
EMBALMERS
Priv.le Ambalance Service
1049 GEORCIA ST.      SEY. 2425
Rankin & Cherrill
EVERYTHING ELECTRICAL
55 HASTINGS STREET WEST
Seymour 7600
I
���--if il wit. fWsa."���
BROWN BROS. & CO.
FLORISTS AND NURSERYMEN
a. B. Bey.' OSS B ST8
OKLAHOMA CITY���Over $400
worth of tickets to the Mike Gibbons
prise tight were ranc*--!t_ here in
one day following the tublicatioa ef
a resolution by the Oklahoma City
Trades conncil declaring Gibbons unfair to organised labor In the erection of apartmenta in SL Paul, Minn.

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