BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

The British Columbia Labor News May 5, 1922

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcln-1.0309312.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcln-1.0309312.json
JSON-LD: bcln-1.0309312-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcln-1.0309312-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcln-1.0309312-rdf.json
Turtle: bcln-1.0309312-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcln-1.0309312-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcln-1.0309312-source.json
Full Text
bcln-1.0309312-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcln-1.0309312.ris

Full Text

Array tt\
Issued Every Friday
BRITISH
Devoted to the interests of the International Labor Movement
(Subscriplion: $1.50 Per Year!
Se Per Copy J
Volume I-
Vancouver, B. C, Friday, Ay 5, 1922
_____        i     1.1~ 11
Number 26
OUR
Hungry Children Must
Be Fed Says Council
Trades Coast*?! Stirred Up Over Unemployment Conditions in
City���Will   Make   Another   Effort   to   Force   Hand   of
Authorities ��� Brow/arias   Organized   Again ��� Union
Label Socials Hug* Success���Presentation Made
to Dels. Maids-las Dolk and Mahon
At  the   regular  meeting  of  the j children���naming them���to tell the
Trades and Labor Council held in the I Commissioner what they had for sup-
Labor Hall. Tuesday evening a com-1 per the night before.    They replied
auttee of  unemployed    asked    the ���nothing.    She   told   them   to   tell
council" to Tfall a 24-hour strike to'the  Commissioner  what they    had
bring pressure to bear upon the an-j had for breakfast that morning and
thonties  to  provide   unemployment; they answered���nothing. These peo-
relirf.   One  ot tbe  committee' in- pie in South Vancouver were stop-
-*���#
CHICAGO CLOTHING
WORKERS GET SCALE
.
formed the council that all maintenance and relief work had been cot
off and they bad been refused permission to beg for food-
Coming up before the council later
in the evening    the question
ping automobiles and entering storei
asking for food. The unemployed do
not want doles, they demand full
work at Trades Union rate of wages
���failing this full maintenance. The
strike weapon, he said, should be the
asked, if this committee of unem-I last weapon used. There are other
ployed had been elected by tbe Un-1 things to be done before resorting
employment Committee of 25.    DeL! to a  strike,  but  if the  authorities
Hardy reported that the committee
waa not. bnt bad been elected at a
meeting of the men who invaded
Water Street Wholesale booses the
day previous and had held a meeting in the Loggers' Hall since being dispersed by the police.
DeL Nixon (Carpenters) waa of
the opinion that tbe suggestion
should have come from the properly constituted Committee of 25. Tbe
situation was serious, bnt waa a piece
ef foolishness to expect results from
s 24-hour strike after the experience the labor movement in tbe city
had gaee through in other strikes
and the amsaaat condition of the labor
market It was a situation that must
be relieved by the government and
the council should take it np irame-
. ..lately with the government aad not
allow them to shelve it-
Ha Fewer   T.  Call
jDel. Ilerriett asked if the Council
had the power to call a strike and
tt was answered ia the negative.
DeL Pettipiece aaid that it was. a
question that affected a great many
people. The cutting off of relief for
the 700 seen involved 3.000 children
aad that waa a terrible situation.
The peer devils do not know
what to da They adopt the first
msthoss that cease into their heads
ia eider to obtain feed for their
wives and children. There is aay
amount of coaaUacUve work to be
done if the government wiU only
nuke ap its mind ta have it done..
Tbe eounUy is in need of roads in
the worst way. Tbe city council depended oa the Provincial and Federal governments to provide the means.
The Federal government was willing
to do Rs share, bat the Provincial
will not yield then we may have to
adopt the last weapon.
DeL Rankin said there was no
question about the destitution and
tbe only way out of it was by means
of cold storage. A bank manager
had stated that unemployment was
a necessary evil and this wss all they
cared about it. But a great many
workers forgot their own position
when they got a job and never bothered about what the future might
mean to them. He thought that the
province could finance constructive
work by issue of money, just as
had been done in Jersey, some South
American countries and Russia. ,
" Worker slo Blame.
Another delegate  said    that    if
some kind of relief was not provided the unemployed might take discontinued on page four
LABOR PARTY
SOCIAL SATURDAY
TwHsssj
A telegram had been sent to John
Oliver to have dm relief work kept
on but he had rafaead to consider
the request. Old John is not aware
of the privation aad mauiy
he dees net feel tt aad he
to believe it. Federal money ia
available to build a highway throogh
the essoinee hat tha authorities at
Victoria havat vision enough ta
start this work or to get
of a
In times of stress all the
ties think ef is doles and the dole
is a curse. sB tt does is ta
suss ot of people. The
vince Ii Stocked full of natural re-
bet they are allowed to te-
aefl their
.sanding snch a hi.
"S-wigice that the
War el-ill   -B_ni_rt_>   aiaLBj II
a��e~a_aaj ���__nas��� |������aa
laee them, bnt if
toed rasas were b
aflt these farm-
era could bring hi
taetr own pro-
dace aad seB it at a
reaeooaoie price
to the people.
Ihe City Council
said DeL Petti-
���*������   __..__ ...���.i  ,-
piece, were propoani
g to spend *70���-
000 ea sewer wed
��� and there wm
saore ia sight.   He moved that inas-
aroch as the Trad
ea Council were
puwulem to can a It hear strike.
ofr���m    m   m^_____A-___B>
ha appointed to
take up tbe subject with the authori
ties to   lis il    i
���mi Bill    relief
wtth fuD power to
act.
DeL Hardy  (Carpenters) cited e
ease in Seeth Vaan
mver when a wo-
Good Social Program Arranged
by Party at Its Hall for
Saturday Evening
The Vancouver branch of the
Federated Labor Party will hold a
Social and dance in its hsll at 148
Cordova St., W. on Saturday evening commencing at 8 p.m. The
program consists of musical selections, songs, refreshments, card
games snd dancing. All members
and their friends are invited. No
charge for admission. -Collection
wfll be taken up. Bring along some
caked or sandwiches.
No. 4���COUNCIL
CHICAGO���Peace in the clothing
industry of Chicago has been reached through an agreement signed on-
behalf of 35,000 employes of thc
Amalgamated Clothing Workers of
America and the Federation of Clothing Manufacturers. The new agreement and pay schedule became effective on May 1 and extends for a
period of three years, or until April
30,  1925.
The agreement provides for a 41-
liour week. Wages will range-from
$35 to $47 per week for men and
a minimum of $28 for women on
different classes of work. Applications for additional employes shall be
made direct to the union and a reasonable time allowed for procuring
same.
The manufacturers had demanded
a 2." per cent, reduction in wages
and u 48-hour week.
A. F. OF L. TO WIDEN
FIELD OF ORGANIZATION
FOUR BREWERIES
ARE RE-ORGANIZED
1921 Wago Scale Renewed and
Closed Shop Conditions
Granted
Organizer McKenzie, of tbe Hotel
and Restaurant Employees Union,
with tbe help of President Crawford
aad Secretary- Bengough of the
Trades and Labor Council, haa succeeded ia again placing British Columbia breweriea in the nnion shop
concerns. A month ago the Trades
and Labor Council threatened to
place several breweries on tbe unfair
list unless these companies allowed
their employees to organise and sign
ap an agreement wtth them. After
several conferences, the breweries
have allowed the men to organise
and agreements have been signed at
the 1921 scale of wages snd closed
DELEGATION GOES
OVER TO VICTORIA
Ottawa Sends $50,000 to Feed
Hungry Children in South
Vancouver
The Trades and Labor Council,
with the backing of the City Council
and the Board of Trade, is making
another attempt to get the Provincial
Government to take immediate steps
to provide constructive work for the
unemployed.
Taking the matter up with the City
Council, that body authorized Aid.
Pettipiece and Aid. Scribbens to proceed to Victoria with President Crawford, Secretary Bengough and Del.
Neelands, M.L.A., and press for an
immediate start on public works.
This delegation left Wednesday nitfht.
To Feed the Children.  ~
After hearing the story about hungry children at the Trades and Labor
Council meeting Tuesday evening,
Del. Mrs. Dolk got in touch with
Mrs. Ralph Smith, M.L.A., and told
her the story. "Are we going to
stand idly by and see these childrer.
starve," said Mrs. Dolk. "We certainly are not,*' said Mrs. Smith, and
immediately wired to Ottawa. A
short time afterwards word was received from Leon Ladner, M.P., to
the effect that $'>u,000 had been
granted to help feed the children of
South Vancouver.
The City Council is also making
strenous efforts to give employment
to those in need. A considerable
amount of sewer work is being
started, extensions are to be made to
playgrounds in the city, and in all
probability a lot of road work wil'
be started in the very near future.
The Trades and Labor Council has
asked the daily newspapers to open
up a subscription list to help feed the
many hungry children in the city.
This is being done.
Widening of the field of organization among hitherto unorganized
workers; plans for effectual resistance of the injunction method of
strike-breaking, and measures looking to the elimi-tion of bitter an-
(ag-*misma now exigent in the unorganised Labor Movement, arc, among
the important things whi.*h will occupy the attention of the 42nd annual
c\ n- ention of the American Fudera-
fi-.p of Labor the call for which has
been issued by President Samuel
Gompers. The convention takes
place June 12 and ensuing days at
Freeman Avenue Armory, Cincin-
i.ati.
Suppression of the freedom of the
press, wholcs-le jailing, for adherence to radical opinions, and hunger
strikes are some of the items in the
latest news coming from Poland.
GUNMEN ACQUITTED
OF TWOJURDERS
Detective Tools of Mine Owners Are Given License to
Murder at Will     ""
WELCH, W. Va.,���C. E. Lively,
Buster Pence and William Salters
of Sid HatfHd, former chief of po-
o Sid Hatfield, former chief of police of itatewan, by a jury in the
Criminal Court here. McDowell is a
coal opera*, .s' county.
The three men were indicted by
the McDowell County Grand Jury
last August on charges of having
murdeped Hatfield and Ed Chambers
mine war leaders on the steps of the
court house here on August 1, 1021.
The same three gunmen, Lively,
Pence and Salters,, were acquitted
of the charge of having killed Chambers by a jury here on December 17.
After the two Mingo miners' leaders got to the Courthouse, with the
women accompanying them, they saw
a group of about seven notorious
Baldwin-Felts agents standing at the
head of the steps. These men opened
fire, Hatfield receiving the first volley and Chambers the second. Salters, it was said,, then stepped over
Hatfield's body snd poured more
bullets into Hatfield, while Lively put
his revolver back of Chamber's ear
and put out the last flicker of life.
The killing of Hatfield and Chambers was a sequel to the battle of
Matewan in May 1920, when Hatield
and a group of miners drove off a
large force of Baldwin-Felts detectives after they had killed Mayor
Testerman. Seven detectives and
three miners were killed.
The Mexican government has just
nipped in the bud the plan of certain
Wall Street interests to scquire the
immense Terrasa estate of 6,000,-
000 acres by placing a nominal value
on the land and purchasing it for
division into small farms.
SEND IN THE NEWS
INDUSTRIAL UNIONISM
FAVORED IN CHICAGO
The .Chicago Federation of Labor
���idopted a resolution favoring inrus-
trial unionism and requesting the
American Federation of Labor to call
conferences of international unions
for the purpose of arranging to
"amalgamate all the unions in the
respective industries into single organisations, each of which shall cov
er an industry." Discussion was long
snd heated, bnt the vote was 113 to
87 in favor of the resolution.
Organizer McKenzie's efforts with
the Kamloope Brewery, which has
been unorganized for a long time, is
tbe most notable result. The Vancouver Brewery, the New Westminster Brewery and the Vancouver Bottling Works, s branch of the New
Westminster Brewery, have all
signed np aad bow manufacturing
their beer under nnion conditions.
The Fernie and Victoria breweries
have always been ran under nnion
V "
Who was the writer of the song,
"Ireland Must Be Heaven"?
March Of The Hungry Men
In the dreams of your downy couches, through the shades of your Pampered sleep,
Give ear; you can hear It coming, the tide that is steady and deep���
Give ear; for the sound is growing, from desert and dungeon and den;
The tramp of the marching millions, the March of the Hungry Men.
As once the lean-limbed Spartans at Locris, last ascent,
As William's Norman legions through Sussex meadows went,
As Wolfe assailed the mountain, as Sherman led the wsy
From Fulton to Savannah���as they, and more than they,
So comes another army your wit cannot compute,
The man-at-arms self-fashioned, the man you made the brute,
From farm and sweatshop gathered, from factory, mine and mill,
With lever and shears and anger, dibble and drift and drill.
They bear no sword or rifle, yet then- ladders are on your walls,
Though the hauberk is turned to a jumper, the jambeaux to overalls;
They come from the locomotive, the cab and the cobbler's bench,
They are armed with the pick and the jack-plane, tbe sledge and the axe
and the wrench.
strong,
ink with ��ng.
And some come empty-handed with liniters
And some come dumb with sorrow, snd some
But all that yon thought were buried are
And they carry a brass-bound scepter���the
Through the depths of the Devil V darkness, witR thadifttat stars of light
They are coming while yen slumber, and they come with <he might of Right;
On a morrow���perhaps tomorrow, yon will waken and see then
Ton will band the keys of the cities t* the ranks of the hungry men,
v___^Jm_|��* ��*���*���*��-���*.
'brsas^prnpoaing stick.
To Help Build Up a
Bigger And Better Paper *
Circulation of Paper to bo Built, up  Through  Medium of
Baseball Competition Starting This Week
With this week's issue, The British Columbia Labor News
launches a baseball competition for the purpose of augmenting
the circulation of the paper.
This step haa been urged by many of our friends, and their
support, with that of the thousands of workers interested in the
Trades Union and workers' political movement, makes it almost
certain that the small prise offered in this week's competition
will be steadily increased from week to
Labor News versus Brass Check Press
By means of this competition we hope to be able to place
the news of the International Labor movement in the haaids of
thousands of people who base hitherto received their information through the Brass Check press and its distorted and prejudiced news items.
Competitions of a like character are being carried on in
the city by periodicals that serve no useful purpose, ao far aa
the toiling masses are concerned, hence worken who are convinced that the Labor Newa serves a real and bo-endal need,
should take advantage of this competition commencing with
this issue.
At the Service of the Workers
All monies received will be used to increase the prize
money. The prestige and profits accruing from the increased
circulation and the commercial advertising that naturally follows, will be used to build up a bigger and bettor paper containing newa of the worlung class movement in this and other lands,
but at all times the Labor Newa will be at the service and in
support of the workers in their struggle against plutocracy.
To Show Mankind a Greater Destiny
The very highest service any person can render is to help
light the fires that show mankind a greater destiny���a new
social order, with poverty and misery abolished. That is our
mission. Will you join with ua? Fill in the coupon and sub*
scription blank on page three and sand it in. Then get your
friends to do likewise.
SOUTH VAN. LABOR TOO YOUNG AT 13;
LEAGUE FORMED
,:
Young   Folks   Organise   for
Social and Educational
Purposes
A branch of the Junior Labor
League was organized Monday in
South Vancouver. This growing organization of young folks, connected
with the progressive labor movement,
urges all union men and labor party
sympathisers to encourage their
youngsters to join the league. All
young people between the ages of
15 and 25 are eligible for membership.
The league arranges for picnics,
summer camps, hikes, and socials, besides carrying on educational work
along socialist lines.
HELEN KELLER ON
FAMINE RELIEF
Russia Betrayed  for Holding
Up Ideal of World Peace
and Brotherhood
New York���Helen Keller, often
described ss the most wonderful woman in the world, who was born deaf,
dumb and blind, in sending $100 to
the Friends of Soviet Russia for fam-
in relief, writes:
"Whatever may be'the defects of
the Soviet government, the crime
committed against Russia by the allies are so flagrant and abominable,
they deserve the condemnation of
mankind. In history they will take
their places with the partition of
Poland, the massacre of Armenia and
the invasion of Belgium by the Germans To my mind, the outrages
against Russia are even more shameless because America, Great Britain,
France and Japan have been loudest
in their professions of zeal for world
peace and security, while their deeds
have been one unbroken record of
hypocrisy, violence and treachery
since the armistice . . . For
upholding the ideal of world peace and
brotherhood, Russia has been betrayed, blockaded, invaded,. her provisions ravaged/ her citizens starved and
revfled.'**.y,!i^l-le-policy of suppression" and misrepresentation pursued by the newspapers and selfish
interests has hardened the hearts of
Americans toward that stricken land
. . . And the worken! How
easily they have been deceived and
beuddled by the powers thst exploit
them!   They seem to P-t into their
���
Junior
New
League   Starts
Drive
ill V;
Following s banquet on April 15th
to which s hundred guests sat down-
to celebrate the fourth anniversary
of the Junior Labor League, that organization ia commencing in Vancouver a drive for new members to
share its good times and good work.
Now in its fifth year, tbe league is
a going concern, full of enthusiasm
and pep. Any person between the
ages of 14 and 25 may become a
member by calling at 929 11th Ave.
East, at 8 p.m., Friday, or may obtain full information by phoning
Fair. 1610 at any time.
The league offers all the advantages of any young people's organization in regard to hikes, summer
camps, study climes, socials, educational debates and discussions on
topics of the day; and last, bnt not
least, congenial companionbip. Send
your boys snd girls; bring a friend;
come yourself. Anyone between 14
and 25 ia welcome. Remember the
place and watch this paper for further announcements.
LOS ANGELES���Walter Yarrow,
adviser of the Oil Workers' Union
during the recent strike, hss received an invitation from the Governor
of Yucatan to take charge of the
development work of a new oil
field in thst state.
In a local election of town officials
at Clovis, N. Mexico, last week, the
labor ticket, supported almost solidly by the trade unions, won s clean-
cut victory over the citizens' ticket.
little
Atta Boy!
"The stork hss    brought
peach." /
Said the nurse with s delighted air.
I'm mighty glad," the father said,
"That it didn't bring s pair."
AN   ACCIDENT
Too look tired?"
"WeH it's hard work carrying a
bod ot bricks op to tbe third story.'*
"Have yoa been doing it long?'*
"Ne--I start tomorrow."���Simpli-
cisaimus (Munich;.
Henry Ford has established tbe
five day, forty boar week, for his
60,000 automobile workers, with a
minimum wags ef $0 a day.
'
'.
���
m
^
1
'ran
I
masters' keeping not only their tools
bnt also their heads and hearts.." V
.
PAGE TWO
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA LABOR NEWS
.    !
:' ; ;
l8e Vehind/^
THE TEA
factory, which is one of the largest
in the Federal district.'*
Thus the strike comes to an end.!
The interesting thing about the end .
ia that it was brought to a conclusion
becaase "the owners had been unable to reach an agreement with the
workmen." /
The workers of Mexico occupy a
ODD BITS
(Conducted  by  Sydney   Warren)
THE B.C. LABOR NEWS
THE CONFBHENCE OF
DIPLOMATS.
With economic conditions stagnant
j in all countries, with the possible- exception of France, the diplomats at
Genoa continue to haggle at the con-
: ference   over  things  that  mean   a
ett___ ! great deal to the eliminating of indus-
; trial depression.
With the exception of Russia and
Official Organ of the Vancouver Trades
aad Labor Cooncil aad Affiliated
Unions.
Control Committee: F. W. Welsh. P.
Published every Friday at Labor Hall
319 Pender Street West
Vancouver, B. C.
Telephones Seymour 74*'5-74��6
Subscription Bates:
$1.50 per year by mail to Canada
$2-50 per year outside'Canada
H. W. WATTS -  Editor and Manager
FRIDAY, MAY 5.
INCREASING BITTERNESS
In spite of the.fact that there is
i still considerable unemployment,
both Federal and Provincial governments have cut off further relief.
While it is admitted that single men
have been enabled to "take a chance"
on tbe prairies, married men witli
families arc not always in a position.
;
j the Scandinavian countries, the so-
j called statesmen are battling solely
in   the interests  of the  plutocrats.
They   demand   the   restoration,   by
! Russia, of the private property confiscated during the revolution, back
j to the original owners, while a'l these
j nations have been busy confiscating
; property these many years.    History
is  replete  with  stories of the  "annexing," "protecting," and capturing,
or  in   other   words,   confiscating   ol
property in national exploits into the
lands of each other.   These diplomat,
demand the recognition by Russia of
all pre-war debts, yet at the same
time, the debts of every country arc
so enormous that a complete repudia-
nor   is   it   always^��*>*s���"  for, ^ ^ fc     admitt��ad
them to make these trips, hence we **"_*
find a large number of unemployed i by various statesmen to be the key
still in our midst. Unemployment j to the revival of prosperity. France,
am.one women and girls has been very I blocking almost every move of a
slightly relieved, and when one �������''-1 satisfactory setUemeht, is herse'f so
siders the struggle these have had to   .        ... , j __ .    _    _
esistduring tW past winter. havi���g  ""�������Uy embarrassed that she has
received no aid from the government
we l-egin to feel that present day in
not even been able to pay the interest
on the debt she owes Britain.    Wit!
st-; it ions and civilization are nothing j her cities full of the landlords, counts.
el�� but a mockery and a fraud.     | cotlrt officials, Cossack officers and
Thousands of virile and strong-i
limbed men a few years ago answered a call to "make tbe worid safe
for democracy" and to "preserve the
rights of small nations*' etc and after
this had been supposedly accomplished a reconstruction cry was set up
to "make tbe land a fit place for
heroes to live in." Reconstruction
schemes were started, tut within a
few short months were dropped on
one excuse or another, snd heroes
now wander the streets looking vainly in search or work, while advertisements are placed in tbe daily
Press for others, begging for old
clothes and shoes to "make heroes
fit to look for work in."
If tbe authorities wish to avoid
serious trouble, machinery for unemployment relief should be started at
once to take care of the situation.
The bitterness that always comes
with unemployment and poverty is
increased year by year. The worker
feels that the brunt of the hard times
falls upon him, while he has but a
small share of the prosperity of
good times. The injustice of the system that causes this is apparent to
him. He may not know how to
remedy it. He may not think clearly about it. but he feels it. And
as b result there, is developed a bitter spirit. One of these days he
will go "over the top'' again with
blood in his eyes, but this time it
will be a Canadian plutocracy who
will be cleared out of the way to
"make the land a decent place for
heroes to live in."
THE   MINERS'  STRIKE
Something unlooked for and very
much  to the dissatisfaction of the
statesmen of the old Russian regime,
she continues to fight on their behalf
in the hope of a reward for services
rendered.
Lloyd George knowing the hostility
of France to Great Britain, continues
to allow France to block the progress
of the conference in spite of the fact
that two mil'ion British workers are
to-day walking tbe streets looking for
employment Fettered with Mess that
are utterly ineffective, these statesmen, with their bellies full of good
food snd good wine, flounder along
trying to clear up a mess of their
own making, that ia practically impossible so long ss tbe god of private
property remains tbe basis upon
which a settlement shal' be made.
And in the meantime, the masses who
perform the useful work in human
society, live and work, only with the
permission of plutocrats, while .food
and clothing in abundance lie under
lock and key, and natural resources
and machinery for the production of
more, lie idle.
Should the conference fail, as
there is every indication that it will,
the economic situation will make but
slow improvement. But Russia, unhampered by fossilized politicians.
will rebuild and get back to s normal
condition, even without the finances
of the Allies, far quicker than any
other nation.
It looks as though the time wss
mine owners has happened in the **���*_;***. rot*en ��** for * con,P,ete
general strike of miners in the Unit- repudiation, by the masses in every
ed States and Canada.      Not only country, of the tactics and machina-
are the members of the United Mine
Workers of America standing solid
against the wage reduction, but almost a hundred thousand non-union
miners hsve downed tools. This
was the big surprise. Men who have
stood loyally by tha owners for many
yean and in some cases since tbe
early nineties, have joined the nnion, men who were held in subjection
by gunmen snd county officials have
at mat braved these threats snd joined in the strike, even men who have
violently opposed every effort to organise them have at last answered
the call.
Possibly tbe discord that existed
in the union before the strike gave
tha owners hope of an easy victory,
bnt their hopes have been shattered.
The Lewis and Farrington factions in
Kansas and other districts atm united
solidly against the bosses. Tbe miners in District 18 comprising Alberta
snd Eastern .British Columbia who
were divided between the One Big
Union and tbe U. M. W. A. Sre again
all united in the U. M. W. A. as well
aa a great ���majority of the non- anion miners, all solidly opposing
the owners.
But probably the worst blow of
all is the setting aside of injunctions
in the notorious Weat Virginia fields
where tbe mine owners obtained injunctions ordering tbe abandonment
of miners* tent colonies and preventing tbe U. M. W. A. from taking
'steps to unionize these fields. This
bTr*""1 -n spite of tbe fact that the
U. S. government threatened sll
kinds of injunctions.
All these things are ia indication
that the 1300,000 miners are patting
ap flm biggest and beat fight in
their history.
tions of so-called statesmen. The
power to govern and shape the destinies of the nation must be taken
ont of the hands of -ruling-clam
henchmen and delegated by the
worken to members of their own
class. Then, and only then, will the
suffering and misery of the toiling
n-i-lions be abolishe-'.
THE MEXICAN WAY.
TIS SPRING
To be wise is to be discreet, yet
powerful position by their possession j who  wishes  to   be  wise  when   'tis
of political power.    This power* en- Spring?
ables them also to guard against any
danger that the Federal adminstra-
tion of the big plant at La Abeja
might become a bureaucratic despotism supported  by the police power
of the government.    The organize.!
workers have detachments of their
forces  in  the  government  itself to
guild the interests of the nomares.
THUG RULE.
Some 300 miners are to answer
charges of "treason" in West Virginia, the first batch now facing trial
in Charles Town. Just 63 years ago
John Brown made his famous raid at
Harpers Ferry within five miles of
where these miners are on trial for
their lives. Another John Brown is
in the list of defendants being tried
by the new slave power that rules
in this section at the coal kings.
What these men are charged with
is an armed march across the hills
against the armed thugs of the coal
companies. It waa not the first
march of its kind. These marches
have occurred a number of times
in the last 20 years. They are inevitable under the murderous regime
maintained ;.' by the mine owners.
When owners of mines are privileged
to employ armed thugs; when these
thugs are often vested with police
powers by public officials; when the
salaries of sheriffs and deputies are
paid by the' coal companies; when
these creatures bully and assault and
Idle curiosity is the busy body of
the world.
��� ���    ���
Many a woman has promised to
obey her husband at the altar.
��� ��� ' ���
Love is blind, it's just as well.
��� ���    ���
THE VALUE OF SIN.
We stood on a street corner the
other evening and listened to a man
tell of his redemption from sin, and,
aa he recounted with fervor and detail his experiences with Old Nick,
we were half-convinced that sin ir
itself must have aome value. For
instance, if the law of action and reaction holds good then it would follow that in the measure we have
sinned so may we experience the
blessings of salvation. A man who
ia just good would hardly experience
the same thrill in being made better
that comes to one who has been bad
and changes to best. Anyway, who
wants to save a man whose only
vices hsve been chewing gum and
loving his own wife.
��� ���    *
Backwash.
Such is fame! When Dr. Einstein, discoverer of the theory of
Relativity, waa voted the freedom of
the City of New York, several aldermen asked afterwards, "Who is this
guy, pinstein, anyway?" and it war
whispered that some of them though*
kill on the slightest provocation, the! **�������honor WM beln��' bestowed upor
mining villages of West Virginia be- j *-����**a��r Einstein. Isxy, his mother
come little hells. I c*Ued hiln' *u-d wh��_had won local
To call this foul regime "govern-| renown as a boot-legging sleuth,
ment" is to do violence to the English j    . *    *    *
language. The village and county' Mary Garden in resigning as di-
governments where this situation pre- rector of the Chicago Grand Opera
vails are bureaus of the mine owners.
The latter direct them as they do
Company states that    her   fighting
blood   urged  her to  stay,   but  her
their personal offices. Terror broods' reason compelled her to resign,
ever the lives of the working masses.j Mary's is another prop to the con-
Law is the will of the armed thugs, j tention thst intellect is an erratic
Justice is merchandise.' Human life! sprouse to an artistic temperament,
haa no value. The schools, the especially when matched with red
churches, the newspapers, places of: hair,
amusement, the stores and even Fed
eral   postoffices  are dominated  by
this thug regime. .   -
Play Ball!  Make it four
A little boost by everybody at the
present time will help a whole lot.
Old John Oliver should go back
to the farm. That will mean one
hog less at Victoria.
Scientists have found that 750,000
species of insects inhabit tbe earth.
which takes no account of the lobbyists who swarm about Ottawa.
Ralph Connor thinks a cure for
world unrest is "deep religious thinking." And suppose we take Ireland,
the Catholics and Protestants, as an
example.
If the BaUantyne pier cannot be
built without the laid of detectives,
then the Government should hire the
North West Mounted Police and the
militia to carry on construction work.
A united front is .an excellent slogan, providing it is urged by those
who believe that the front is directed
against the capitalist enemy and not
against other organizations of tbe
workers.
There is s strike in the textile industry of New England and there
waa s strike in one of tbe largest textile plants in Mexico. The strike in
New England is still in progress,
while the strike in Mexico is settled.
It may be of interest to mention
that the worken of Mexico have their
political party and have a powerful
group in the Mexican Congress and
groups in the state legislatures. The
textile worken of New England have
no snch power.
Announcement is now made in
Mexico City that the government
"took control of tbe textile factory
La Abeja, the employes, of which
have been on strike for many weeks.**
The reason offered for this action ia
that "the owners bad been unable to
reach aa agreement with the workmen, whose idleness bad resulted in
sympathetic strikes aad several disturbances. Aa administrative board
baa been appelated to operate tbe
The shooting of the two constables
in the Longshoremen's strike at Montreal is no doubt the work of "ping
uglies" paid to stir up trouble. No
ardent trade unionists would use a
gun under the conditions existing at
that
With all her faults. Mrs. Ralph
Smith >oves the children. Her appeal
on their behalf obtained $50,000
from Ottawa. Premier (?) Oliver is
too mock of a crabbed specimen of
humanity to have done tbe
The 47 onions that declined to go
on strike with the Amalgamated Engineering Union ia Great Britain,
have been locked ont by tbe employers The employers should be
thanked for acting as industrial union
When If. Bartbou, head of the
French delegation at Genoa, waa
photographed shaking hands with the
Soviet leader, Tchitcherin, he demanded in explosive French, that the
film be destroyed lest Frenchmen
seeing tbe picture might think him
a friend of the Soviet. Really,
there is little ground for such apprehension. We believe most people,
including the French, now realise
that diplomatic hand-shaking and
soft-mouthed palaver is only upon the
surface and should be taken as it is
intended���at face value only.
��� an
There ia something quite sensible
in the Japanese arrangement whereby a divorce can be obtained without
heavy expense or long de'ays. -Our
laws concerning divorce were never
intended to assist working men and
women to free themselves of the
tradegy of an unhappy marriage, but,
in the main, were for the convenience
of the wealthy classes, whose amorous intrigues often landed them into
difficulties from which divorce was
an easy escape. I
��� ���    ���
A Westminster magistrate has decided ed that a marriage between a
soldier in custody and a girl, performed by the military is legal. Aad
why not? Haa not the Church today surrendered practically every
vestige of its spiritual integrity to the
capitalistic State. until it has become bat an appendage to R? What
etas could s Church thst pleaded for
recruits, blessed war brides, prayed
with martial last for military victories aad acquiesced to every outrage
civilized decency, expect?
Sir Alfred Mood, whom British Labor calla tbe "Minister of Ill-Health"
speaking about tbe shortage of
houses, -recently declared, "Surely
the newly-married should be so happy
that they can enjoy living in one
Municipalities are now depending
upon profits from the liquor trade to
provide them with revenue. Looks
aa though this is one of those necessary evils we hear ao mack about
Tbe scheme might be broadened to
include all natural resowitia, thereby increasing tbe benefits to tbe
.dK.3&
Smoke the Old Reliable
Kurtz's
PIONEER CIGARS
Panatella
Monarch
INVINCIBIE--10 CENTS
AU Uamm
aa Va
Vancouver Unions
vawcotjveb trades and labor
COr/WCIX.���President. A. J. Crawford;
Secretary.   P.   Hengough.     Office   SOS
. Labor Mall. 311 Pender Streat Waat.
Phone Seymour 7495. Meeta In Labor
Hal! at S p.m. on the first and third
Tassdsy ia mnnth
BrniaOraO TSAOES COUMOrXr���Ohalrasa,
O. a Thom. Secretary, Boy Hanaacsr.
Offles 810 Labor Hall. Meets first and
third Wedaeeday la month at Labor Hall.
. Local No. 271���
President. J. Bright well: Secretary, W.
Howron. 2811 Hums Ave. Meets at
SIS Pender Street Weat oii second
Monday of each month at j p.m.
st.  raova.   cebbal  aid
SOrT DBIWZ WOBKBBB���President,
F. P. Gpug-h; Secretary. W. H. McLean. 2035 Broadway West. Meets
at 31S Pender Street Weat at 8 p.m.
every third   Tuesday tn month,
aaaaaaa- ra~-ra��A-nowA*ir r-fioa,
Local No. 120���President, C. E. Herrett; SeereUry, A. It. Jennie, 120
Cambie Street Meets Room 211, lit
Pender Street West, at 7:15 p.m. on
second and fourth Tuesdays In month.
uAonaiTn, naor roao:
���B-taPsaa, Local No. 151���Preaident,
W. J. Harriett; Secretary. T. Mcllugh.
1S�� Sixth Avenue West. Meets at
311 Pender Street West at I p.m. on
third Tuesday of each month.
sks a KBiarcma. Local No. im���
President. P.- Willis: Secretary. A.
I'*���iser. Room 301. 311 Pender Street
Weat. Meets at 311 Pender Street
West, at 1 p.m. on first and third
Mondays   of each month.
BOOT A WD IIOI W OBSESS' UWIOl*
Local No. 506 ��� President, Thos.
Andley; Secretary, Tom Cory, 446
Vernon Drive. Meets at 319 Pender
Street West at 1 p.m. on first Tuesday
in month.
BBICKLATBBS. MASOBS ASD PLAST-
EBEB9.���President; W. Kerr; Secretary.
L. Psdgatt. Meela al Labor Hsll on Snd
and 41b Wedneadsy ta Month.	
bbidok. btbuctobal a obba
TAT. IBOW WOBKBSS, Local No. 17
���President, B. Bronaon; Secretary,
Hoy Masaecar, 211 Pender Street West.
Meets at 311 Ponder Street West, at
8 p.m.. second snd foorth Monday.
BOOKB-WDBBS, Local 105���President.
Oeo. Mowat: Secretary, Frank Milne,
Box 411. Meets at 311 Pender Street
Weat at ��� p.m. ovary third Wednesday
In month.
CIVIC EMPLOYEES, Local No. 28���
President. J. White; Secretary. G.
Harrison. Office 148 Cordova Street
West. Meets at 148 Cordova Street
Went at 8 p.m. on the first and third
Friday  In  month.
CITY KALI, BarJ-,OTBBa' Local No.
59���President, H. A. Black; Secretary,
Aid. W. J. Scribben. City Hall. MeeU
at 148 Cordova Street West, at 8 p.m.
on  first  Wednesday of each  month.
CABi-a-rrzn*. BBO-rasaaoon, Local
452���President Geo: H. Hardy; Seeretary, W. J. Johnston: Business
Agent, G. C. Thom. Office 304 Labor
Hall. Meets second and fourth Monday at 8 p.m. In Labor Hall.
CABPENTEBS. AMALGAMATED, Ho;~~l
Snack.���President, T. 8. Coopa; Business Arent. AofOS MacSween; Secretary,
a 0. Wobbsr, 148 1Mb Ave. W. Meeta
2nd sod 4th Tueaday st 8 p.m., in F.L.P.
Hsll.
Ko. t Branch.���Secretary. W. Brsy, SO
IBIS Are. W. Meeta 1st sad Srd Tueaday si S p.m.. in F.L.P. Hsll, 148 Cordovo
8t. W.
ClOAaassVaaaa. Local No. 357���Presl-
dent. O. Thomas; SeereUry, R. J.
Crala. 3�� kootenay Street. Meats at
ill Pender Street Weat. at I p.m. on
flrat Tueaday in month.
IT
. Local
President, D. W. McDougall: Secretary,
F. n. Burrows: Busineaa Agent. K.H.
Morrison, office 148 Cordova Street
Weat Meeta at 14S Cordova Street
Weot at  6   p.m.  every Monday.	
Local No. 18��� President, Percy Trevlse: Secretary. Chaa.
A. Watson. No. 8 Fire Hall. Twelfth
and Quebec Streets, Vancouver. MeeU
at 111 Pender Street Weat.
Local  No.   1(0
 President, Mrs. W.  Mahon; SeereUry.
Miss May Ward. 477 Hornby Street.
Meeta at Labour Rail at 8 p.m. on
first Thursday In month.
botbl a
Loeal "No. 28���President, W. Colonel;
Secretary. Andy Graham, 441 Seymour
Street. MeeU at 441 Seymour Street
first and third Wednesday at 8:30.
Second and fourth Wednesday at'8:30.
LATMEBS. WOOD, WEBB a METAL,
Local No. 207���President, A. B. Flnly,
SeereUry, A. P. Surges, 821 Fifty-
seventh Avenue East. MeeU at SIC
Holden Building, Vancouver, at 8 p.m.
on first and   third  Fridays In month.
, Local No. 44���President, H. 3. Rhodes; SeereUry. H. Walker. 1008 Pendrell Street. Meeta at
Room 801, 811 Pender Street Weat, at
8 p.ra. on third Wednesday In month.
Brotherhood of. Division No. 320���President.
CI. P. Boston; SeereUry. H. A. B. Mae-
Donald. 1222-Pendrlll St., Vancouver.
Meets at t.O.O.r. Hsll oa second and
Fourth Tueadaya In each month at 8
p-m.	
awd  aw-
OlSBaUUr. Local No. 666���President,
T. McRwen: SeereUry, H. O. Campbell
744 Helmcken Street. Vancouver.
Meets at I.O.O.F. Hall, on flrat aad
third Thnrsdsys of ears, month.
AeeociATxon,
Local No. 38-52���Secretary-Treasurer.
B. Niton: BoslaoM Agent W. Burns. 188
Cordova Street Weat Marts st 169 Cor-
dors Street Wool, al S p.m., oa first sad
third Fridaya la month
J OnUTOM, Local
No. 348���Presldant, W. McCartney.
IIS London Building: Secretary. O.W.
Raxted. 310 London Building. Meets
at 110 London Building oa flret Sunday In month at 7:10 p.m.     ;	
lAWCB-Or-WAT
_WAT
LocaJ No. 1ST���President. A. Osborne
Seeratary. A. D. McDonald, til Pander Street Weat, Vaaeouvar. Meets
at 8 p.in. on third Thuraday la month,
President.
Leo. George: SeereUry. J- o. Keefe;
Business Agent. P. Bengough; Office
Sit Paader Street Weat. Meeta at lit
Pender Street West at 8.00 p.m. on
second and third Thursday.
MOOXDBBi, Looal SSI���President. John
Brown; Secretary, Geo. Annand, 1166
Albert Street. MeeU at Labour Hall
at 8 p.m. on  first   and third Friday.
BLSOMB-ISIS, Lodge SSS���President. K.
H. Robb; SeereUry, Evan McMillan;
f"��'n*ws Agent, p. Bengough; Office
*����� Pender Street West. Meets at
J~b'._r Hall at 8 p.m. on second and
fourth Tuesday.
BULK   DBIVEB8     AMD    DAXBY~
-f ST**.F,,'-,Loca- No- '���'���President.
J. Smith; Secretary. B. Showier, 111
Pender Street West. Meets at 111
Pender Street West ait 8 p.m. on aeeond and fourth Fridaya In month.
PAnrraas. dzoobatobs a VAi_a>
HANOEBS. Local No. ISS��� l'realdenl!
J. King; Fin. See., K. A. Baker; Roe. Boo.,
3. McMillan. 141 Cordova Streat. Moots
at 148 Cordova Street, at 8 p.m. on
second and fourth Thursdays In month.
i-tls narvaae, bbidob, inuar a
BOOK BT7ILDEB8, Loeal No. 2404���
President. W. H. Pollard: Secretary.
N. H. Vernon, Box 320. Meeta at ill
Pender Street West, Vancouver, at I
p.m. on every Friday of month.
moTo bsobatbbs- Local No. 54 ���
President. F. Looqey: Secretary, Gordon Hdwards. 2723 Fifth Avenuo West
MeeU at World Building, Vancouver,
at 8 p.m. on Saturday of each week.
i-lasts-sbs a cbmbbt raniBBsi
Local No. 89���President. Charles Keall,
Secretary, Alfred Hurry, 811 Thirty-
fourth Avenue Kast. Meets at 111
Pender 8treet West, at 8 p.m. on first
Wednesday In month.  	
FATTBBW      BTAB_BS���Fresideat,     57
Heys; Secretary. J. L. Irvine; Business Agent, K. a. - Goddard. 861
Richards Street. Meeu at Sll Pender
Street West on first and third Mon-
day  In month at 8 p.m.
FLua-BBs ana   steam   i-xrmna.
Local No. 170���Preaident, Bert Stirahcotne;
Secretary. J. Crowther; Buaineas Arent,
F .W. Welsh, Office 301 Labor Hall.
Meeta at 810 Pender Street Weal, st 8
p.m. on aecond and fourth Fridaya.
mliobbczbs raDaaanoar;    Lwal
No. 12���President, Roy A. Perry; Secretary, Alexander Murray, 1484 Tenth
Avenue West. Meets at 440 Pender
Street West, at 7:30 p.m. on fourth
Tuesday of month.
FABLUMBITTAXT COMMUTE���T. k h. "0.
Chairman, W. J. Bartlott   Secretary, Mrs.
W. Mahon.   Moots in room 805 Labor Hall
ea  the first and  third  Thursday  In
month at 8 p.m.
PBxacnro fbebsh-eb * absistavts
Local No. 69���President, 8. W, Myers;
_Pee-retary, E. B. Stephenson, Box 894.
Meeta at 112 Hastings Street, Vancouver, at 8 p.m. on second Tuesday In
month.
BAILBOAD EsfPLOTEES, Division No.
59���President, A. N. Lowes; Secretary.
Charles Bird, 2030 Union Street.
MeeU at I.O.O.F Hall, 515 Hamilton
8treet, at 8 p.m. on first Monday In
month.   .
BAILWAT COSDUCTOBS. Division No.
267���President, O. W. Hatch; Secretary
J. B. Physlek 1156 Thurlow Street-
Meets at I.O.O.F. Hall on first Sunday
at 2 p.m., and on third Thursday at
8 p.m.
SATLWAT CABMEN. Lodge Ho. 88.���Prosl-
dont, T. Sommerrillo; Secretsry, B. 3.
Ssnaom, 5680 Shorbrooke St. Moots lit
snd 3rd Fridaya, .In Cotillion Hsll.
MAELWAT TB-XWaraa-,   Local   No.   144
���President,  C.  A.  Mitchell;  Secretary,
D. A. Munro, 70 Seventh Avenue West.
MeeU at I.O.O.F Hall, Hamilton Street
at 7:30 p.m. on first Tueaday and 2:10
p.m.on third Tueaday.
BOCIATIOW���President C. F. C Craig;
Secretary. Geo. Gray, 1638 First Ave.
Eaat MeeU at Eagles' Hall, Vancouver, at 2:10 p.m. on first and third
Sundays In month.
TSAMSTEBS, Local No. 655���President, W.
M. Browa; Secretary, Blrt Showier. Office
���OS Labor Hall, Moots second and fourth
__________ si 8 p.m. ia Lsbor Hell.
���1MB" VaTXOV���Busmeaa Agent, R.
Townsend. Meets at 7 p.m. every
Monday at 111 Cordova 8treet West
SOFT DBIWK DIBPEMSBBB' T/B.OW,
No. 676���President, Frank McCann.
Secretary, T. J. Hanafln. 2S76 Sixth
Avenue West, Vancouver. Meets at
441 Seymour Street, Vancouver, at 1:11
p.m. on first Sunday In month.
BTEAM k OPEBATIWO BMOIWBBBS,
Local No. 620���President, Joseph
Weelman. Meets at Sll Pender St.,
W. Vancouver, at 7:30 p.m. on seeond
and fourth Tuesdays In month.
AWD BLECTBO-
I, Loeal >0. 88.���President, W.
Hay ley; Secretary, A. Birnle, 111!
Commercial Drive. MeeU at 111 Pender street West at 8 p.m. on seeond
Monday in month.
BTBEET S ELECTRIC BAILWAT _
PLOTEES OF AkfliBICA, Amalgamated Association of, Division No. 101���
President. R. Rlgby; SeereUry, F. E
Griffin. 447 Sixth Avenue Eaat, Vancouver. MeeU A.O.F. Hall, Mount
Pleasant at 10:16 a.m. on first Mon-
day   and 7 p.m. on third  Monday.
STOWS CUTTBBS, Local 162���President, C. Dolmas: Seeretary. F. Rumble,
196 Gothard Street. Meeta In Labor
Hall Vancouver at 8 p.m. flrat Tuesday In month.
TBLBOaAFHBBB (C.F.B. BysUm Wo. 1)
���Chairman, W. M. Brlse; SeereUry,
J. Cunningham. Box 4821, Vancouver, B.C.
TELEFHOHE OrEBATOBS ��� Local TT
A.IS.E.W. Secretary. Miss F. roxcroft
Office Boom SOS Labor Ball, IIS Ponder
Street,   ���* ������*,
��� OsTTOW, Local No. 176���President. A. Mitchell; Seeretary. C. McDonald, P.O. Box 60S. MeeU at Sll
Pender Street West, at I p.m. on first
Monday In month.
TFOOBAFniCAL. Local 226���President
C. H. Collier; SeereUry and Busineaa
Agent H. N. Neelands; Office 214 Labor Hall. Meets laat Sunday In eaeh
month at 1 p.m.
TXBATBICAL     STAGS
���Local 111���Prealdent W. J, Park; SeereUry, G. W. Allln: Business Agent
MeeU at 301 London Building at I.SI
a.m. on aecond Friday In month.
BTrrmCZASB. Local No. 145���President.
Bowver: Seeratary A Jamieson. 101
London Building. MeeU at Moose
Han. Homer Street, at II a.m. on
aecond Sunday la month.
Ident. '
' -snow or
a. C���President. Dan rani In: SeereUry. W. Donaldson. Ill Main St. meet
at 1 am. flrat and third Wednesday.
DOKT PATRONIZE UST
The following places are ran under
non-union conditions and sre therefore
unfair to organized labor.
Stettler Cigar Factory, making Van Loo
and Van Dyke Cigars.
Capitol Cafe, 930 Granville St
1 n\la���-������.     _    _,- ���  nli ���  a
Maryland Cafe, 63 Hastings W.
Electrical Contractors.
C H. Peterson. 1814 Pandora St
Hume A Rumble. Columbia St., New
The Chilliwack Electric Co., Ltd,
Provincial Unions
-ICTOBIA���President, C. Hie vert i. 1721
Denman Street; Secretary E. woodward, 1283 Carlln Street Meats at I
p.m. on first and third Wednesdays
in month at Trades Hall, Broad Streat.
In montti m
ioToaiA r
201.���Presit
VICTOBIA TYPOOEAPHICAL *OKOV. So.
201.���Prenident. C. K. Christian; Boors
tsry-trassarer, - W. H. Oiard. Bex SOS.
Meets Isst Saadsy of month la Hew Trades
Hsll. Brood Street
I BXrFBBT���Prenrldent. 8. D.
McDonald. Prince Rupert; SeereUry,
G. Waddell. Box 152. Prince Rupert
MeeU at Carpenters' Hall on seeond
and fourth Tueadaya of eaeh month.
I���Prealdent 3. Lotmaa, Nelson;
Secretary. Felix Pexeril, Bos 114 Nelson.
-Prealdent Jamas
thle. Reveistoke; SeereUry, Philip
Parker. Box 214, Reveistoke. Meeu
at I p.m. at City Hall. Revolatoke, ea
tha second aad fourth Saturday ef
each month.
��� Preaident. H.
ftaadaea. 411 Royal Avenue; SeereUry,
R Morgan. Ill Regina 8treet Now
Westminster. Meats second aad fourth
Wednesdays In month at f attar
Temple, New Weat-lnste-. % %
I .
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA LABOR NEWS
���' I
���
'    ��� ' ���' *.f.
r ���
PAGE THREE
The Labor News Baseball Competition
Opening Prize $150 �������*���,�����_,. $,gg
I? 1> 1? 1?    4PiT\iTTl>r\iXTC   ONE F*WEE  COUPON   MAKED V
r IV Ej Ej   KjVJ %J r\J L\ &   Allowed With Every Dollar Sub. A.
Drop Coupons in the B. C. Labor News Boxes at Labor Hall, 319 Pender St. W.
and F.L.P. Hall, 148 Cordova St. VV., or mail to Labor News, 319 Pender St. VV.
Games Played Saturday, May 13th
Competition
Rules
Coupon No. 1
coupon most an cot���not Toaa
I enclose herewith SS cento for flvo weeka' subscription to the B. C Labor Bows, tofether with my
forecast of baseball results. I agree to abide by the
talee of ths contest aad WiU accept the decision of
the J-adses as btaataf ta everything pertalalaf to the
competition.
Coupon No. 1
this coupon must be cot���mo* tobb
I enclose herewith SS cents for ftvo weeks' subscription to the tt. O. Labor News, to_��t]_.r with ma
forecast of he Saba II results. X afro, to abide hy the
ruleo of th* contest aad will accept tha decision of
tbs judgres aa blading la evatythlas
CO-OPERATION
Patronize Our Advertisers and Tell Them Why
ILSON'S
-J" SHOES
Wilson's Twin Shoe Store
157-159 HASTINGS STREET W.
W
a.
rl*St    to
what ta bis oplaloa Is a gOOC
cleat isaaea. aad tt la
ditlon of entry that the
Same   la   lull
AAJ-MSS    ..
De yoa receive the paper hy mall each week?
Worn*
Away                           I0U   AWaV
ABTBBICAW LSAOITB.
������
VbtUdslphla
St.  Louis
. Maw York
Detroit
waahlnfton
Cleveland
NA-nOMAX. T-BAOUS.
Pittebnry
aoataa
Cincinnati
Brookljrn
-
Chicago
MOW Tork
Ve���ion
SeatUo
Salt  Lake   0
San   Francisco
Sacra���onto
Los   Anffeles
INTBBBATIOBAL   LXAOUS.
Syrscusa
ncadlas
1          ���
Buffalo
Jersey  City
[
Bochostor
Mewark
WWSTSBB  lBTBaSATIOMAL
Vancouver
Edmonton
Tacoma
Calgary
���;���
Coupon No. 1
im MvTW must an cut���not toss
enclose   herewith   SS   cents   for  Svs   weeks'   snb-
asilpMaa to the B. C. Labor Wows, together with my
forecast ef ba.ob.ll results.    X acre, ta abld. by tha ,
af th.  conust  aad  WiU  accept the  decision  of
ta ovorytainr .partatalag to the
ta fan
apes by matt each waaSt..
AatBBiCAB LEAGUE.
~F51aa away
Saw Task
Detroit
Cleveland
HAfidiiAi BBoRnr
Brooilyn
competition.
Sum   in   lull
Address    ..
A
	
Do yoa receive
th. paper hy maU each ���aakT
Hoaw
Away                                   HOME AWAY
A*ra___Aw Xaaaora.               _
Fhl'adelphia
St. Louis
1
*ew Tork
Detroit
Washington
Cleveland
NATIONAL LEAGUE.
Pittsburg
Boston
Cincinnati
Brooklyn
Chicago
Vow Tork                          j
PACIFIC   COAST   LEAGUE.
Vernon
Seattle
Salt  Lake   O
San  Francisco
i
Sacramento
Los   Angeles
|
INTERNATIONAL    LEAGUE.
Syracuse
B tatting
i
Buffalo
Jersey City
v
Bochsstsr
Newark
WESTERN   INTERNATIONAL,
Vancouver
Edmonton
Tacoma
Calgary
RRAND'S
SEEDS
723 ROBSON STREET
Pierre Paris
wo, FOOTWEAR
SI HASTINGS STREET W.
���***���:********************
I AEGERe
with
them to Sv. WMks'
a. a Labor
S   Wo two capital pa lass will ha paid
oat la aay oae week to amy oaa aah��
P
o
%  648Gram.aU    619 Haslimga W.
��� tUMtmiMHMMtllllli
Men's Furnishings
| Cuthberi sons & Co-1
CHINA and TOYS
DOLL   HOSPITAL
Millar & Coe
419  HASTINGS  STREET W.
Potts & Small
LIMITED
MEN'S WEAR
717 PENDER STREET W.
Just   Around . the   Corner   from
Hich Realm
HARKLEY&
AYWOOD
Ammunition, Guns
Fishing Tackle
69 CORDOVA STREET WEST
Coupon No. 1
THIS  COUFCN  MUST Da  CUT���NOT
X enclose b.rs���lth  SS cents for flvo  l
scription to ths B. C. Labor Wows, ttgeSwar with
forecast of basehan results.   X sgro. to abide hy th.
rule, of the contest  aad wfll accept tha Sector!oa af
the judges as binding la everything pertalalaf to the
competition.
aad aaan-na ���XO ho dl-s-aliasd
Vew Tork
intra C6AST league.
Vernon                       Seattle
Salt  X-ke  O           San Fr.ncl.co
Saer.i_._to                Lo.   Angeles                          1
Jersey City
ewark
INTERNATIONAL
Vaneouv.r
Edmonton
Cslgary
Coupon No. 1
COUPON MOST
a.   herewith   SS
to the B. O. Labi
of baseball results.   X agree to abide by the
aad Wttl accept the decision  of
for flvs  weeka*  sub-
with BUT
She 1081081
aa binding in
to the
ta fan
aa pea ree.lv. tha paper ay mall each waekf-	
away                             lAatB   aWaT
ABTSaiCAB LBAOUB.
rkllaatolphto            at. Loml.
af* mT Tork              . Detroit
WaahiBftos              Cn��T*Uad
W.���-    1-     /nil
Address
Do yoa receive the paper by maU each weak?	
Home                  Away                           RMU. aWa��
aaranioav -aaaa-.
Pniladolphia            St. Louis
VOW  York                Detroit                                   (**
Washington              Cleveland
WATIOBAX. XaBAOUB.
Pittsburg                   Boston
Cincinnati                 Brooklyn
Chicago                      Daw Tork
PACIFIC  COAST  LEAGUE.
Vernon                      Seattle
Salt  Zake   n            Ban Francisco
Sacramento               Loa   Angeles
INTERNATIONAL    LEAGUE.
Syracuse                   Daadtes
Buffalo                     Jersey City
Rochester                  Newark
-
WB8TBSW  IBTBRRATIONAL
Taacoaver                Edmonton
"1
Tacoma                       Calgary
Coupon No. 1     X
COUPON MUST Bl
I  sa sloes   har. with  as  cento  far  flv.
���ertptiy to th. B. a labor S.-,
1 "f****** ���* eseehan results,   i a*re. to
rulss  of the  contest  aad wfll accept tha
aa binding la everything
���S tha
Correspondence
WORKERS' BROADER VIEW.
Editor B. C. labor News:
Almost from the beginning of what
has been termed "acquisitive" society
the problem of the worker haa been
to secure a more equitable share of
the tilings he produced and leisure
to enable him to enjoy his rightful
gains. He is still seeking both of
these objects, but perforce most take
a larger view of life if he is to make
any headway against his powerful
enemies. What he needs is a wage
sufficient to enable him to become
a political, a social and a moral factor ia the community, that he^may
have a voice in determining how society shall develop so that all men
shall receive something of those
things that make for culture, education and refinement. Among the
thinking rank and file of organized
labor the question is being asked:
"Why must the wage earner lose the
best which life is worth living for?
Why must he continually work, wither and decay for the bare physical
necessities of life, food, shelter and
clothing? Surely, he must have s
fuller destiny than this involves. If
so, it remains for hhn to go and win
it. Whatever the worker gains will bc
by bis own unaided effort Labor
must therefore be self-reliant, strong
in the knowledge of its righteous
cause and intelligent enough to take
the things that by right belong to it.
EMERY G. FOSTER
RICKSON'S
GENTS' FURNISHINGS
840 GRANVILLE STREET
Near Rolscssa Street    -
U      D ELECTRIC
m U ��� ��� COMPANY
Headquarters for All
ELECTRICAL GOODS
414 HASTINGS STREET W.
Mason* Bista
-roan   Fafilory-.
s. Player-Pia
LTD.
Fr
I Pianos,
I       Ph<
-Pianos
Phon
7X8 GRANVILLE
;Ogqpi__j
'ILleYtreet
 *\	
MURPHY CHOR
good  T*   Co.
SHOES **��*> Lt(|
882 GRANVILLE STREET
DEAD WEIGHT OF GOVERNMENT
THE CAMERA & ARTS
iWaJArYJ Developing
Picture Framing
���10 GRANVILLE STREET
M. J. Cameron
Clothes r-_^__
JOT h      Street
Men     ____
J-r
CEO. B. KERFOOT
SUITS ���    Men's
Made to    Clothing and
Measure     Furnishings
ISS HASTINGS STREET EAST
THOS. F0STIR& C0_ LTD.
Fashion-Graft
Burberry
O'Coats
DurwanJ
O'Coals
One Store
Only
QUALITY
CLOTHES
514 Granville St.
E.G.KILBY
HOSIERY
Specialist
628 GRANVILLE STREET
W.S. CHARLTON & CO.
LIMITED
Specialists in
Young Men's
Cloth ingand
Haberdashery
v
082
Granville
Street
ta fan
H-EZ
j__ aaaa aaaa
_____uaa>va.
Wttabmry
Uya
MCmc  COAST  X.BAOUB.
Ur-r-BAtATttBAL  t-atHttB.
jwrnam;
Oslaaey
Haw Tork
aittak-rg
WaataaaW        .     Broeklja
Cbicaao                      Bow Tork
������aaaa                    BeatUo
1
aatt Sake C          Baa Tiaaalan
I
!
��--c*~                  _ua___
a-tala                   ana Ctty
���Bilistass                B.wark
a-aaTaaa? ibtbbbatiobai.
 _._..                           ���    i
Editor B. C. Labor News:
Organized government lays upon
the backs of the people a dead and
crushing weight. It is eating the sob- j
stance of industry���into ita insatiable maw ia going the beat and first'
fruits of creative energy. It would;
be interesting and profitable were
LABOR to undertake to show just
how many millions of pa rashes are
fattening on the body politic and
the yearly toll they take ia taxes.
That would bo a revelation worth
while. I believe it is not going too
far to aay that government is maintained for the benefit of those who
do thc governing. With mighty few
exceptions the latter are vain, ignor-
aad inefficient, not to aay autocratic. We mast free ourselves of
this incaboa before we 'can get anywhere. The simple fact that every-'
body is being drained to meet tha
growing demands of government ia r
sufficient to cause intelligent men |
and women to look about them for
aome remedy for aa altogether bad
situation. Wc should get back to
the Jeffersonian ideal that thc heat
governed people is that which is
least governed.
C. HARTLEY GREENOUGH.
W. C. Stearman
The   People's   Hardware
ft Monarch Malleable^
S13 GRANVILLE. STREET
RITCHIE'S [Bulbs
"The Best Procurable"
Cn GRANVILLE STREET
H. STARK
a CHOE
Waat k_J     STORE
11 MW I It I I M fr**l I I I I I I I | | |
J.A.Flett,Ltd.ii
HARDWARE
Tools,   Cutlery   aaid   Sport in,     .
SSt HASTINGS STREET W.
niiiinnnii i iii i ii i ii il
S. II. HARXOCK
Vancouver
Hardware Co.
Limited
867 GRANVILLE STREET
D. t BOOK, LTD.
CORRECT CLOTHES FOR
MEN
137 HASTINGS STREET W.
b.c. Barber Supply and
SUNDWEUTD
applies
CIS1*
Weat
HONEST
SHOES
AT
HONEST
PRICES
the AMERICAN
Boot Shop
541 GRANVILLE STREET
Some folks crawl throogh life.
Some ride throogh. Toast arc thrown
through. Some art bora aad die aad
never knew they were here.
Try year lack aad give as a boost.
T.HILL/?._D
O. ���*;��� -�� Clothes for Men
Men's and Boys' Clothing
and Furnishings
117 HASTINGS STREET EAST
Cornett Bros.���,
& Clark j
We    specialize     in      CIIACC
""rt. _?i. Boy*' MUM
Reliable -_-____   I
S3 HASTINGS STREET 1 I
CRAWFORTA
Battery Co.A-'
���SO HOWE STREET
8335
CWITZER
^Bros^ Ltd.
I  Everything in
Music
���
���
'���a
-"-a
v-J_|
��� ���
"
I 1
"J
���
#1
,
a lite-*
PAGE FOUR
���t ���;���
sfr-
,.
���
THE BBITI8JEE COLUMBIA LABOR NBWS
Blue Bird Washing Machines
Selling Now at $175
There's money in using a Bluebird Washer, even when you
have to pay the regular price of $210 for it, but now that you
can buy them at the sale price of $175, they are an investment
much too good to let pass unheeded. Made in Canada, easy and
economical to operate, and instead of rubbing away the
material aa you do when washing by hand, these just wash the
dirt out of the garment. Washing this way gives three times
the If ie to the garment.
SPECIAL   DEMONSTRATION
Bring some dirty clothes and have them washed while you
wait, and see for yourself what a wonderful machine the
Bluebird is. $25 cash puts one in the home, and $20 monthly
pays the balance.
��,ffi^"*��g...S Jtegfo.ffP��"g��� j
MILITARISM COSTS MORE
THAN EDUCATION
When the British government endeavored to reduce the educational
grant by $80,000,000 per year, Morgan Jones, the ex-teacher from Caerphilly and Labor M.P., pointed out
in the House of Commons that it coat
$60 per pupil per year for primary
education while it cost $2,500 per
year per pupil to train nav|* cadets.
Mr. Jones declared, "The fight of
tomorrow as between nations is not
going to depend so much on guns or
! battleships as on the efficiency of the
young in the schoolroom and the laboratory."
nniiiniimiiiiiiiiiiiiihinmiuiiiiiiiiiiuniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiHiiimiimiiiniiiiiiiTtT
"LAID  OFF"
Two Short Words, Bridging the Gulf Batwaea
COMFORT aad POVERTY
Have you protected yourself and your family against such
an emergency, with a SAVINGS ACCOUNT���-the most valuable
Asset a man can have for the "RAINY DAY."
We STRONGLY RECOMMEND you to start such an account
AT ONCE, at one of our City Branches.
HASTINGS AND SEYMOUR.: Geo. S. Harrison, Manager.
Cordova A Abbott        Main A 25th Ave.        Main A Broadway
Where   Yoa   Will   Receive   Prompt   aad   Courteous   Attention
Union Bank of Canada
P.S.���If you are living in a community not provided with
Banking facilities, address us by mail, and we will be glad to
guide you in respect to "Banking by Mail."
Hiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimm����i��ini��i��H��i��iii����i��i��mi��Miii����iiiiiiiii��iiittt
REFORMED
He's cut out the moonshine and
smokes,
He's living a 'model man's life;
He's disgusted with his former pals���
soaks;
He's in love with    another    man's
wife.
Put your coupons in the boxes located in the doorway of the Labor
Hall, 319 Pender St., W., and the
F. L. P. Hall, 148 Cordova St, W.
HUNGRY CHILDREN MUST
BE FED SAYS COUNCIL
Continued from page one
HALLS TO RENT
IN THE LABOR HALL
Large aad small; good accommodation; easy rant.   Rates to societies
by day, week or month, oa application to:
P. R. BENGOUGH, Secretary.
ROOM 30S LABOR HALL 319 PENDER STREET W.
Phones Seymour 7495-7496
T
Telephone Seymonr 7495
THE UNION PRINTING CO.
"More Than Printers"
Ubor Hall 319 Pender Street West
Recent reports emanating from Re-
val that furious famine riots are
occurring in Samara, Russia, and
that American Relief Administration
stores there have been demolished
and one A. R. A. representative
eaten by the famine stricken rioters,
have no foundation in fact, according to a cable "received at A. R. A.
headquarters.
ROWLANDS
Concert Band
aad assisting soloists, at the
Capitol
SUNDAY���9 P.M.
SILVER COLLECTION
Robson Dairy
The Home of "Bin's"
Graded New-Laid
EGGS
1124 ROBSON STREET
LABOR AT OTTAWA
Labor's two representatives at Ottawa continue to battle for the principles they were sent there to promote. Woodsworth, according to
one press correspondent, is proving
himself prolific in controversial resolutions. His motion to confine the
activities of the North West Mounted
Police to unorganized territories was
defeated by a vote of 108 to 47.
With the two Labor members there
voted 31 Progressives, 13 Liberals
and 1 Independent. Among the Progressives supporting Woodsworth
were Miss McPhail (who seconded
the motion) an.' the Hon. T. A. Crerar.
Boost the Baseball Competition.
One free coupon with every dollar.
Coupon boxes will be closed every
Saturday at 10
Have your NEXT 8UIT
made by���
Perry & Dolk
TAILORS
Room 33, 18 Hastings St. W.
Next to Pant ages
ARE YOU THINKING
OF DANCING LESSONS?
Il�� yoa aaa tasea la aa aslta. -��**_*
to tMCt* taaa aow. aa* ao pat-
FENN'S DANCING
ACADEMY
L
Extra copies of tha News can be
obtained from news stands in the
city.
Work diligently and be honorable,
and when you are dead the world
will ask: "How much did he leave?"
Yesterday tha balmy breezes
Banished every thought Of freezes;
But today the springtime poet
Wears an overcoat���yoa know it
Nothing To Fear.
Irate Golfer----You must take
your children away from here, Madam���this is no place for them."
Mother���"Now don't you worry���
they cant 'ear nothin' new���their
father was a sergeant-major, 'e was!"
���London Opinion.
A kiss is a peculiar proposition.
Of no use to one, yet absolute bliss
to two. The small boy gets it for
nothing; the young man haa to steal
it. and the old man haa to bay it.
The baby's right, the lover's privilege, the hypocrite's mask. To a
young girl, faith; to a married woman, hope, and to aa old maid, charity.
tic action and the authorities would
be to blame. They had the right to
work and were not to blame for thc
condition of affairs.
Del. Pettipiece said that the working classes were to blame for present conditions and were now paying
for their own stupidity. The workers have no rights except those
they can force from the powers that
be. All governments are in power
by and with the consent of the workers.
Del. Bengough said that, he was in
favor of a committee wsiting upon
the authorities to see if the unemployed were going to be allowed to
starve to death. If they admit that
then we will know what to do.
Del. Welsh said that bis children
would not go to school without getting breakfast while there was plenty of food around.
Another delegate said that the
strongest plank in the pre-election
platform of the Liberals was Reconstruction.
Another delegate suggested that
some lectures by an advocate of
birth control was badly needed in
the city.
The motion carried and Dels.
Crawford, Bengough, Nixon, Fraser
and Neelands were elected.
Breweriea Organized
Del. Crawford, reporting for Del.
McKenzie said that all the Breweries in the Province, Kamloops, New
Westminster, Vancouver and Victoria were now organized as a result of
recent efforts by the Trades Council.
Progress was-being made in connection with organizing the unfair
dairies.
Aid. Scribbens addressed the council and informed it that the press
had misrepresented him when the
statement was made to the effect
that he had opposed day labor on
the Public Conveniences project. Del.
Bartlett said that he hoped Aid.
Scribbins and Pettipiece would pull
together on the Council as the workers wanted all the help possible
from working class representatives
on all governing bodies.
Union Label Daaea Success
Del. McDonald informed tha council that the last Whist Drive and
Dance was a huge success and had
shown a surplus of $124.74. No
more would be held until the fall
but in the meantime the committee
would arrange for picnics. The Label committee recommended that tha
surplus funds from all tha Dances
with the exception of $50 be tamed
over to the Building" Fond. This
was adopted.
Del. Hardy said that a vote of
thanks should be tendered the committee for ita able work. Not only
had the funds helped the council
bat,the social side of the question.
wss of great help. Never before in
the city had he seen such successfu'
socials. The vote of thanks was given .
DeL Welsh reported that the General Hospital Board had turned down
the proposed carnival and it was now
off.
Undertaker Needed.
Del. Pettipiece said that the General Hospital should not be blamed
for the failure. The onus was noon
the city council which needed an
undertaker and not a carnival committee. The council should have arranged for tha carniva' instead of
turning it over to Oa hospital board.
Mothers' Paasioas.
Dal. Neelands said that ha had in
terviewed the Mothers' Pension
Board on the subject of widows not
receiving proper allowances and had
been informed that the board was
living np to the regulations laid
down-
Del. Pettipiece said that the action
of the council had resulted in a
considerable number of those who
had been struck off from the receipt
of pensions being put back again.
The thing, however, was administered on a charity basis and a lot of
busybodies are for ever prying into
the widows' business and have them
in a continuous state of holy terror
for fear, pension will be cut off.
A fundamental change was needed
in the working of the Act to take it
off the charity basis.
Del. Matheson moved that the Parliamentary committee go into the
matter and prepare amendments to
the Act that will bring it more in line
with the needs of the dependents.
Del. Mrs. Mahon pointed out that
there were no special funds provided by the government for this pension and that it could be withdrawn
at any time.    Motion adopted.
Reports of Unions.
Del. Clark (Machinists) said that
the men had returned to work in the
C. P. R. shops Monday after a shut
down of ten days. Negotiations for
a new wage scale were now going on
and looked favorable for the men.
Del. Herrett (Barbers) said that
work was slack but the union had
negotiated a new scale to go into
effect in June to the benefit of the
barbers.
Del. Neelands reported that the
printers had signed up another shop
for the 44-hour week which would
have considerable effect upon the
rest of the firms who were still unfair. He regretted however to note
that the baseball program had fl**en
given to an unfair firm, it previously having been done by a union shop.
Del. Crawford said that if that
was the attitude the Baseball Association was going to take, organized
labor could easily afford to stay
away from the games in the city.
Strike Breakers Stopped.
Del. Halliday (Bricklayers) reported efforts of a labor recruiter
from San Francisco advertising in
the Daily Province for bricklayers
for that city where a strike was in
progress, and those hired not being
informed of same.
Del. Hardy reported that the
Trades Council had taken the matter
op with the Immigration authorities
who had proceeded to stop the men
from going across the line and the
recruiter went back.
Del. McMillan (Painters) reported work pretty fair.
Del. Green <Steam Engineers) reported strike at Ballantyne Pier ended and men back at old scale, a
shop committee and aome concessions
on working conditions being granted.
The job was kept" clear of strikebreakers, the anion men baying groceries for those who had to be kept
off the job. A Barns detective advertised for men to work in canneries and then persuaded them to work
on the Ballantyne Pier as well as
signing them np to report back to
him as to what took place on the
job for a $1.00 a day over their
wages.
New   Westminster   Strike.
DeL Moodie (N. Westminster Carpenters) said the anion was having
trouble with, the contractors. Efforts were being made to reduce
wagea bat the men refuse to work
at a reduced scale.. Two of the biggest contractors are paying the
scale.
Del. Thom (Carpenters) said he
was requested to bring before the
conncil the changes needed in the
Compensation Act. He pointed oat
that men do not coma under the compensation act when working for private, individuals on tha day labor
Plan- and that a majority of the accidents happened under these conditions, hence receiving no compensation. Tha Carpenters' Union wanted
all employees to come under the act
The Parliamentary Committee was
instructed to draft an amendment' to
the act.
F-roeantaUae. Made.
President Crawford informed the
council that he had been asked by
the Label Committee to make a presentation to Dels. Mrs. Dolk and Mrs.
Mahon for their aaisksa daring the
past season on the Label Committee.
They had bean tireless workers and
it waa largely due to their efforts
that the whole affair had turned out
such a snrrsss, ' The delegates were
then presented each with a neat
and nicely fitted solid leather hand
bag.
DeL Mm Mahon said that ���. she
waa too fan for words. She appreciated tha gift /
Mrs. Dolk said that aha felt that
aha had been greatly helped on the
fahments by Dels. Andy Graham anjl Tim Hanofin.
FOR MEN ONLY
MACEY-W1LS0N SHOE CO.
419 GRANVILLE STREET
Batwaea P. O. and Pender Street
Phone   Seymour  3938
THE D. HUNTER COMPANY
MEN'S AND BOYS' CLOTHING,
FURNISHINGS, ETC.
sTsaflaaattara  far
74 CORDOVA STREET WEST
Imperial Trunk
and Leather Goods
S3S HASTINGS STREET WEST
BOCARDUS - WICKENS
Paint Wallpaper Glass
Lewis Piano &
Phonograph House
THE HOME OF THE PHONOLA
Mozart Pianos
1044 GRANVILLE STREET I
Laco,  Nitro aad Tungsten
THE ELECTRIC SHOP
12 HASTINGS STREET EAST
Building
Retail Electrical Supplies
Fixtures
Outfitters for Men
WM- DICK LTD.
"Year   Money'.   Worth   ar   You,
Money Rack"
48-49 HASTINGS ST. EAST
CD. BRUCE
Limited
Mai's Qhjsmmf ad Rngfaft
COR. HOMER AND HASTINGS
Eclsen&BriiiiswickPfcoDwgraphs
PIANOS
Coav.nl.at
Tie KENT PIANO CO, Iii
558-560 GRANVILLE STREET
THE
LADIES
STORE
_**"**���
��*���*���
417
HASTINGS
ST. WEST
Phone Seymour 3902
BURNS DRUG CO, LTD.
732 GRANVILLE STREET
oak with ma cio
Seymour    906
NEW VORK
Ot-fisai   1   Conn.;
(Vancouver's   Popular  Credit
Hee-ee)
Refined Wearing Apparel for
MEN AND WOMEN
143 HASTINGS STREET WEST
BS* H*I __��
WHITE
Largest Exclusive Hatter* ia B. C.
COR. HASTINGS AND ABBOTT
Hastings
Furniture Co.
41 HASTINGS STREET WEST
Pbone Seymour 3997
FULTON'S STYLE SHOP, LTD.
MEN'S SUITS, OVERCOATS,
RAINCOATS
a��a-7-t��.��a�� or Haa* to To
oatr
919 GRANVILLE STREET
KNABE���CHICKERING���WILLIS
FIANOS   AND   FLAYER   PIANOS
THE BOWES MUSIC HOUSE
Eaclasive Piaao Dealers
509 DUNSMUIR STREET
Dansmalr Hot.1 Bnlldinr
The Ingledew
Shoe Co.
Quality Footwear
Far the Whole Family
999 GRANVILLE STREET
LATIMER & SONS
Hardware, Sheet Metal
550 MAIN STREET
ARNOLD & QUIGLEY
Trade ia
Oar   Upataira   Clothes
Shop    and     Save    Year    Dollars
540 GRANVILLE STREET
TOWNLEY ft WARD
GRAMOPHONES, FIANOS. ETC.
443 HASTINGS STREET WEST
Cor.
ia gootery
Seymour 221���Day or Night
NUNN .THOMSON
FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND
EMBALMERS
531 He���r Street
Paddock goo*
.Ranvhie   SHOP
999 GRANVILLE
Ceraer   Nelson
i's and Children's Shoes
Exclusively
991 GRANVILLE STREET
SHOES *���- +J**
J. N. HARVEY
Good Clothin*        ��_7    Hastiag*
Hals    and    Men's      -TJ-'w"."   a.
FaraMBlag* ���,��J_2r St*
At the recent elections in Finland
1,297 Socialists and Communists were
elected to various offices in 369 communities, according to a report in the
Christian Science Monitor. In the
same communities 1,900 bourgeois
candidates were elected. In 1920 331
communities elected 1441 bourgeois
candidates and 1,373 Socialists and
Communists. The decrease of the labor representation is attributed to
tha split between the Socialists and
Communists.
The Alberta Federation of Labor
has been requesting for years that a
suitable fair-wage clause be inserted
in Provincial Government contracts.
Without the blare of trumpets or the
beating of drama the thing has now
been done by the Farmer-Labor government. All future contracts wfll
contain the clause and at least one
large contract, already let, has the
fair wage feature embodied therein.
London���A political revolution,
entirely bloodless, baa been carried
through successfully by the Labor
Government of Queensland (Australia). It haa abolished Rs Second
Chamber by a painless
Center * Hanna, Ltd.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND
EMBALMERS
Privalsj Ansbula���<:��� Service     !
1049 GEORGIA ST.     SET.- 242S
Rankin & Cherriu
EVERYTHING ELECTRICAL
SS HASTINGS STREET WEST
Phon. Seymoor 7990
~���** aty ��� wkn Flfwers ���
BROWN BROS. 4 CO.
FLORISTS AND NURSERYMEN
b.  '   s.y. oeaaeTs
Canmore, Alta.���Peace and quietness prevail* in tha miners' camp
here, and a moat determined spirit
exists among the miners to fight the
operators' proposals to the Inpt ditch.
Every -man is ont, even the Chinese
that have been employed around the
mine to tha number of SO.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcln.1-0309312/manifest

Comment

Related Items