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The British Columbia Labor News Sep 23, 1921

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Array c,Watym
THE BRITISH
Issued Everv Friday
Devoted to the interests of the International Labor Movement
[Subscription: $1.50 Per Year!
5c Per Copy J
���
I
Volume I.
Vancouver, B. C-, Friday, Sept. 23rd, 1921
Number 9
SAYS MINIMUM WAGE SETTLEMENT NEAR
PROSECUTION WAS !      IN TEG STRIKE
ST.JOHN CAR HEN
HAVE UNION BUS CO.
A JOKE
Trades Council Hears More About
the Stettler Cigar Factory
Court Case.
Arrangements Now Being Made
to Conduct Series of Socials
During Winter.  '
One More Big Firm Signs Up and
Joint Council Makes
Award.
Recognition of thc 44-honr week, with
_ rale of wage,s fixed at 90 cents an
hour to obtain until June JO. 1922. is
contained in an award of the Winnipeg
Joint Council of Industry, given out last
week as the outcome of an application
made by employing printers of the city
whose plants are now operating on thc
44 hour basis.
At the regular meeting of the Vancouver Trades and Lalior Council held in
lhe Lalior Hall Tuesday evening. Del.
NVhcatcroft, of tbe Cigar Makers' Union,
informed the council that the Minimum j Typographical
Wage Board had lost two more counts I made the basis for settlement with mem
ST. JOHN'���As an outcome of the
trouble between the manager of th.
Power Company and its employees a
company has been organized to run a
line now covered by lhe street railway
at the same rate as the company charges.
New cars have been received which will
accommodate about twenty people comfortably and transfers will bc given
over the different routes traversed.
The company is composed of the
former employees of thc Power Company, and has as its president F. A.
Campbell, president of the Trades and
Lalior Council.    The service is now in
MINIMUM WAGE LAW
EVADERS ARE FINED
The  finding  suggests  that  while  the   ��Pera,,on and  *��* *Tom"e ol   l*'"*
terms   fixed   refer  particularly   to   tla. |-�� vast improvement over that .urnishe.l
Union   they   mpht   be I''>  ,hc ��-���P��y. w.lh which the ...cor
in its charges against the Stettler Cigar
Co. for violating thc act. He said that
the rase had been continually held up
lor the past three months on one pretext
or another and that the BoarcTs siohci-
lor���Mr- "Ftw-urian���had practic^tfy
turned Un-" affair into **joke bfc^He way
he *na7l allowed the company to beat
the rase. He informed the council that
n. nib. rs of the Board had signified
their intention of asking the government to appoint another firm of solicitors,/
V^S^fjtntiaJIs for Dels. Newberry. Shipley aiy l.uken, ofg^e Boot and Shoe
WoVcpra* Union were received and dels., _{
obligated.
X"*coromunication was received from
the Blnghampton. N.Y., Typographical
Union   placing    the    Endicott-Johnson
Shoes   and   thc   proprietory   medicine
���>_> _���      ���    .��       ._.        . ���   i- . LOS    ANGLI.hS���-Koscoc
Swamp,Root   on the unfair list, on ac-       .    ,,
_.._.<��� _. _. _" _��� :._.- -r .i_   Arbucklc.    who    stands   charged   wi
consCVt the open shop activities of the i ,     . ,       .      .
J_��- ^.R-A thrm. -rtarlM _re sold in    mwdtt m Sm  Francisco  for the dca
porators were lately employed.
liers of  the   Pressmen's and  Bookbinders* unions.
a
One More Signs Up
The eleventh week lias brought about
another great, victory..l"br theTocked-out
pointers**!!, the boot and t job offices.
Thc Public Press has coine to tcrrns^
with the unions and reopened its plant
on a 44-hour basis.
The signing up of thc Public Press
has taken twenty-three members of thc
Typographical Union off the lock-oot
roll; this brings the number of members
working on 44-hour basis to over sixty
per cent of the total union .membership
FOSTER RETURNS
FROM EUROPE
WASHINGTON.-The first judg
ment in a civil suit since the District of
Columbia minimum wage law for women was upheld by thc courts has been
obtained by two restaurant employees.
who were awarded nearly $500 back pay.
The girls alleged that a District restaurant proprietor paid them less than
$16.50 a week, the minimum wage, and
entered suit for the difference. They
were awarded a verdict for the full
sum with costs.
It is understood that thousands of
hotel chamlx-rmaids, laundry employees,
waitresses and department store, clerks
will .bring suit on similar grounds and
that District employers who failed to
oboy the law will have to pay over
several hundred thousand dollars in
wages.
N.S.W. STATE OWNED
' INDUSTRIES PAY
PAINTERS HOLD
THEIR CONVENTION
ARBUCKLE FAVORED    ���
REDUCING UNION WAGES
owners.   'Both these ankles are sold in
Vancouver.
stated   that  the   Endicott
sold by a merchant in the
Hastings Street, and urged
t for shoes bearing the Union
���Label
#   Unfair Dance Hall
Actifta upon a communication from
Local ly, 'Brotherhood of Carpenters,
A. MeEaen., who runs a dance in the
Odd Mfj^n Han at Masn iei Hii.lli
Avenue was placed on the unfair list
by the council for not employing union
nv
Dri/ McDonald reported that the
Laln-I ICommitti e recommends that the
council '���sJu-W request to all organiza
tions using
two ilrlojra
held in the
tembe. 29.
ard. label or button to send
r's to a special meeting to bc
abor Hall, Thursday. Scp-
M45 p.m., with the object of
discussing  project of  reservirlg a hall
for the season for holding dances, whist
drives aM*JtmH>ke-s, and  for   forming
corrtmwlcrf for same.   Recommendation
endorsed.  '   \ JT
"        A c/mnninication was received from
- the swing shift committee of thc Local
St��t> Railway-men's Union re changing
present sysum of work to a system of
' alternate day and night work.    As this
is a Jwrely internal matter affecting the
rrtern��ers of the union only, the council
/oflyjpfd its sen-ice as mediator on the
" ��� question.
���'Machinists Progress
Del. Bengough reported that the International Association of Machinists
had made arrangements with the^Axucl-
gamati'd Engincerinir (Machinists) Society. <tt Great Britain, wth a rnember-
__-_r*P of 470.000. whereby union cards
will be exchanged by both organisations.
Thc same arrangements were being
made with the Mexican Machinists'
Union. 60,000 strong. He pointed out
that President Obregon of Mexico was
a member of the International Union
and that five Mexican cabinet ministers
were union men. He also stated that
the Mexican government had made the
Machinists' Union its commercial agents
for the purchase of union-made machinery in the'U.S. and Canada.   ��
Del. Cory of the locked-out boot and.
shoe workers, was asked if Leckie's
carried any other make of shoe and he
informed the council that the firm handled ihe "Just Right" shoe and others of
which he did not know the name, but
if the union label shoes were asked for
the workers cannot go wrong.
BOARD OF TRADE
ENDORSES COUNCIL
The Vancouver Board of Trade, comprising fourteen hundred business men.
endorsed the proposals of the Economic Council of Greater Vancouver
after throe hours of debate and speech-
making on the subject Tuesday. The
general concensus of opinion was that
something of such a nature should be
adopted ia order to attempt a relief of
the imempfoyment problem facing the
community for the winter.
(Fatty)
th
deatl
of pretty Virginia Rappe, is one of thc
motion picture stars placed on organize)
labor's unfai" list recently following th.
attempt to reduce wages and lengthen
hours of the studio crafts.
Arbuckle is not only an actor on con
tract,  but  is  heavily  interested  in   thc
movics financially as a producer.
Circulars sent to organized labor
liodies throughout thc country after thc
studio lockout contain Arbuckle's name
as one of thc big movie figures fighting
the workers.
Arbuckle's salary at present is said iv
he $5,000 a week.
CALGARY MOVIE OPERATORS RACK AT WORK
Moving Theatre Operators and Musicians who were ou strike at three Calgary theatres last week were back at
work Saturday, having \ come to an
agreement with the owm rs. It is understood that thc. employ es have been
taken back on the old scale of wages,
pending thc result of negotiations which
will be instituted at once.
Thc hours of work is the chief point
of contention. Thc musicians in returning to work have agreed to accept a six-
hour day instead of five and one-half
hours.
AN ANTI-UNION 00.
BEING PROMOTED IN CITY
Tbe Yellow Taxi Cab Company which
is being organized and selling shares in
YancouvcTis part of the same notorious
anti-union company operating in Chicago. This firm fired all its union drivers last year and is alleged to, have
obtained such a control over the city
council that it can break all city laws
with impunity. The speed limit is said
lo lie broken by every driver, and many
pedestrians have been injured, but thc
company still continues with a free
hand.
Union taxi cab drivers in that city recently organized a co-operative Taxi
Cab Co., and are making good inroads
into the business of the Yellow Taxi
Cab Co.
Received First-hand Information Seventh Largest Organization in
From the Rank and
File.
William Z. Foster, one of the leaders
of the steel strike in 1919, arrived in
New York recently in much the same
silent way he made his start for a
F.uropean tour last winter. Nobody
seemed to recognize him on the Rroon-
land, nobody questioned him and the
lynx-eyed ship news' reporters apparent-
American Federation of
Labor.
DALLAS. Texas.���The twelfth convention of thc Brotherhood of Painter',
Decorators and Paperhangers of Am
erica has been held with 300 and more
delegates here representing the 12*,0J0
organized painters of the United State..
and Canada.
George F.  Hcdrick of Albany, N.Y
ly did not sbe his name on thc passenger | gcricr_,  presidenti  opcnt._   the  conven
list.
t.on.
Foster has been in Russia, Italy, Ger- j in ^ ,_., dgh, years Hedrick said.
many, France, England and the Scan- ,he membership 0f thc union llad grown
dinavian countries observing  European J (roJn g, ^ ,_ ,10000    of ,hc ,,0 ������.
tcrtiational organizations affiliated with
thc American Federation of Labor, the
labor in the crucible of revolution and
in the throes of thc post-war period.
He comes back more than ever convinced that in thc development of thc
economic movement lies thc greatest
strength of thc Working class and that
any political expression of the American workers must come out of the
unions.
Young Workers Lack Restraint
He. spoke of some of thc defects of
the new leadership of European labor,
one of the most serious, he said, being
the lack oft restraint of thc younger
men. He described how in Germany
and Italy the workers were continually
called on strike, how often at intervals of only two or three days, for
Mooncy, for Russia, because some
leader had been assaulted and for hundreds of trifling incidents in th'c course
of events. The workers have struck
time and again and nothing has happened. They have become tired of
striking.
And yet. Foster said, in all these
European countries the power of the
workers is there and the rank and file
is ready, if only the leadership is, to
strike and assume control of industry,
and Foster believes that this possibility-
is not remote, for, with mending times,
with better harvests, with more resources
at their command, thc organized workers can strike more telling blows than
now, when the reaction is at its height.
He had some words of advice for in -
tcrnal wranglers and factionalists who
have destroyed thc power of so many
labor unions, or folly committed in thc
name of, ft-tt-li'tion and so  forth, that
Brotherhood of Painters is the seventh
largest, and the third largest in the
building trades department, lieing surpassed only by the Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners, with 3,521 votes,
and the Brotherhood of Electrical
Workers, with 1.420 votes. The painters have 1,133 votes.
Last Eight Years Successful
He stated that during the past eight
years the organization had been more
successful" in organizing the non-union
men in thc trade than during any other
equal period. Sixteen organizers are
now employed by the brotherhood, each
of whom is assigned to a district and is
under the supervision of the general
officer of that district, of thc general
president and the general secretary-
treasurer.
"The labor movement is honeycombed with spies who take an active
part in transacting the business of the
unions of which they arc members
while- receiving pay from detective
agencies or corporations," Hedrick declared in conclusion, after telling the
j members that in thc future they must
watch their step.
"These agents are ready whenever
the occasion offers to spread discontent
and distrust among the membership. At
thc same time they report regularly to
their masters. Our future can bc made
secure only by holding our local unions
intact so that when thc opportunity presents itself they will be able to combat
the open shop and resist future reduc-
(jf Poi^i*- at our Win
J    >���>/���  '   ���'.��� V
mmand."
STREET RAILWAYMENS
CONVENTION FAVORS DEBS
ATLANTA, Ga���The Amalgamated
Association of Street and Electric
Railway Workers today unanimously
indorsed a resolution requesting President Harding to grant an immediate
pardon to Eugene Victor Debs, imprisoned in the Federal penitentiary, not
far from the scene of the convention of
the powerful street car men's union.
The resolution was presented byJ
President Mahon, in the form of a request for permission to send a telegram
to Harding, asking that the veteran
Socialist, a union official, be released
from the United States prison. Jack
Mooney seconded the motion, and it
was approved with a unanimous dicer.
N
SEND EN THE NEWS
..    'tions in our wage scales with every ounce
will con* better, from the. lips or the   ^._
very industrious pen of lhe man himself. v.
While he met the "big guns"���Lenin,
Zinoviev, Radek. Trotzky and the like
���it Was with the common herd of the
workers that Foster mingled while
abroad, and they, he said, are "all
right"
BRITISH ONIONS NOW
HAVE GENERAL
STAFF
Enterprises Conducted by Labor
Government Are Real
Benefit to People.
By \Y. Francis Ahem.
(Federated Press Staff.)
SYDNEY. NSW-State-owned en
terpriscs conducted by the Labor Government of New South Wales arc not
only rendering efficient service to thc
people and protecting them from tin
profiteers, but are returning substantial
profits to the  Lalior government.
The state-owned bakery,  which  sup
plies  all  government   institutions���hospitals,   asylums,    jails,   etc.���not    only-
supplied bread at -'.��� cents per 2-pound
loaf   cheaper   than  private  bakers,  but j trades.
returned the government an added pro ) In taking this step the congress,
fit of (2.000. The state bakery has now j which represents about 8.000.000 work-
enlarged its activities and is supplying ; ers, has created a general staff which,
the people of Sydney and suburbs with j theoretically, is the last word in feder-
cheap bread through municipal markets ' al.ng the highly- complex and often di-
recently opened by the Labor govern- I vergent craft unions. The new execu-
ment. ! tive  is  popularly  termed  "the  general
The state-owned Monicr pipe works,   staff." and displaces the old.parliamen*-
New Executive  Plans to Unite
Unions for Industrial Action
and Organization.
Thirty-Three  Representatives  to
Have Broad Powers to Promote Common Action.
LONDON. ��� Thc British Trades
Union Congress at its session at Cardiff, decided to have a new executive
body, composed of representatives of all
industrial groups, with broad powers, to
act   to   solidify   all   the   closely-related
which makes all the governments' concrete pipes, conduits, etc, has made a
profit to the end of last June of $180.-
000. The state brick works is also
highly profitable. Not only has it supplied all the governments' requirements
at $3 per 1.000 cheaper than private
yards, but the employees receive yearly
in wages $70,000 more than they would
have received if working for private
brickmakers. On top of this the brick
works have made an added profit of
more than twice the capital cost of thc
undertaking.
The state drug shop supplies all hospitals and institutions, medicinal lodges
and friendly societies with drugs cheaper than private drug stores, and makes
an added profit of $10,000 per annum.
The state metal quarries show a profit
of $170,000. The trawlers and other
state-owned enterprises also show substantial profits.
The benefit to the people is, oi course,
more real than apparent, shoe thc presence of the state-owned'enterprises Is a
powerful factor in compelling private
capitalists to keep their prices down in
order to compete with the state shops.
RAILWAYMEN PREPARING
FOR STRIKE ACTION
tary committee, whose usefulness passed with the development of thc Labor
party, which assumed the political functions of the Trades Union Congress.
Tbe new executive council is created with the purpose of bringing about
a fusion of closely related groups such
as the transport workers, miners and
railroad men, that will prevent repetition of such a fiasco as the recent failure of the Triple Alliance to support
the miners.
The council is organized on thc industrial plan; it will consist of 33
members, representing 18 trade groups,
as follows:
Makeup of Conncil
Section A.
Mining and i-uarrying ..'. _.   3
Railways    .     3
Transport (other than railways)    2
Section B.
Shipbuilding    .     1
Engineering,  |oundry.  and   vehicle
twilding -*- .    ',,   ....... I
Iron   and   stceL  arid  minor   metal
trades  '. ,  ���    2
Building, woodworking, and furnishing  ..._ , : 3
Section C.
Cotton      2
Textiles (other than cotton)     1
Clothing    -     1
Leather and boot and shoe  , .....   1
Section D.
Glass, pottery and  chemicals,  food,
/drink,  tobacco,  brushmaking,  and
distribution  _    1
Agriculture _ , -     1
General workers  ,    4
Section E.
Printing and paper     1
ment the reserve finances of these or
ganizations.
, -*   ���
UNEMPLOYED ARE SOLD
ON AUCTION BLOCK
NEWARK. N.J.-Begining with October 1, union carpenters of Newark.
Montclair. Bloomfield and the Oranges
will get an increase in wages from $8
to $9. Thc new scale will continue to
April 1, 1922.
Meetings Next Week
For time and place of
MONDAY
Iron Workers
Carpenters, Bro.
Electrical Worker-
Jewelry Workers
Seamen's Union
TUESDAY
Barbara
Carpenters, Amal.
Locomotive Engineers
Machinists' 692
Policemen's Union
WEDNESDAY
ployees
Brieklayers
Hotel A Rest. En
r'l Union
see Trades Union Directory
THURSDAY
Label Committee
FRIDAY
Postal Workers
SATURDAY
Photo Engravers
SUNDAY
Moving Picture Operators
Railway Conductors
Filers and Sawyers
Soft Drink Dispensers
\
On the principle of "In time of peace
prepare for war," the railway unions
arc making ready. Advice is being
given each individual member to carefully conserve personal finances, to secure supplies of food, fuel and clothing and other household necessities, and
to each local union to conserve union
funds by eliminating insofar as is possible every unessential item of expense, j Public employees  *.    1
This  preparedness  wave   is   extending   Non-manual workers    1
itself to district lodges, joint protective' Section F.
boards and system federations, and in ; Women workers      2
addition efforts are being made to aug- j p.^ rf Hew CounoU
!    The duties of thc council are summed
up  in  a  special  article  in the  London
I labor organ, the  Daily Herald, as  fol-
I lows;
"It will br thc duty of the council to
~~ I co-ordinate industrial action when taken
BRIDGEPORT,   Conn���More   than j by affiliated unions.
"2,000 persons  saw  Sam  Lavit. a  local j    "Joint  international   action   is  to  be
unionist, "auction" six wage slaves here j promoted   by   the   council   maintaining
last week. . relations  with  thc  movement  in  other
*��rcs- j countries.
Most of Ihe audience were jobless and j    "Inter-union  disputes  will  bc  matter
prices   hovered   around   the   $5   level. k0r the council, which is to help to pro-
Chester Taylor, 25. married, no children, i motc a settlement
out   of   work   eight   months,   and   15      "But in the duties which the consti
months in the army, brought $4.50.   Al  , tution definitely imposes on the council
exander Carosine. 24. married, two chil  ; two are 0f outstanding importance,
dren, once in the navy, now out of work      -'i, AM promote common action by
months, broug fl,e tradc mion moverocnt M gwleraI
questions   .   .   .   This  gives  the  congress executive for the first time tbe
responsibility of taking the initiative in
moving for improved conditions.
"The other especially notable duty is
NO UNION���NO UNION
WAGE SAYS JUDGE
Unless workers are members of a
union they are not entitled to enjoy the
benefits of wage scales and working
conditions that are obtainable only
through organization, ruled Judge Frank
E. Stevens, in the City Court of Cleveland, Ohio.
This extraordinary decision came in
a suit brought by a carpenter tp collect
salary based on tbe union scale for his
craft. Judge Stevens said that he had
not assisted in getting the scale and
could not claim compensation under it.
The rate of pay was established
through efforts of the union," be said
"Unless you belong to k you are not
entitled to take part in tbe benefits.**
that the council 'shall assist trade unions
in the work of organization, and shall^*
carry on propaganda with a view to
strengthening the industrial side of the
movement.   .   .   ."*
FEDERATIONIST UNDER FIRE
A. S. Wells, editor of the B. C. Federationist, has been summoned lo appear
in court'Monday on a charge of inciting to violence, etc.. through the publication of "Left Wing Communism," a
pamphlet from the pen of Lenin.
LONDON.���An attempt to limit the
right to strike  is being made by the
Imperial   Commercial   Association, of
which Lord  Inchrape is president
The Co-operative National Bank of
the Brotherhood of Locomotive Eng in
ccrs at Cleveland, which was established
in November last year has increased its
cash deposits from $650000 on the
opening day to $9,572,000 on August 1st
of this year.
��.'"���'
..     ���     I.
���
m . ..... . ��*�����*��*-���-���-���----------------------------------------------------------------���
&,.
     .
���
PAGE TWO
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA LABOR NEWS
THE B.C. LABOR NEWS
Official Organ of the Vancouver Trade* !
and Labor Council and Affiliated
Unions.
Control  Committee:   F.   \Y.   Welsh,   P.)
K. Bengough, and W. J. Bartlett.
Published every Friday at Labor Hall,!
319 Pender Street West
Vancouver, B.C.
Telephones Seymour 7495-74%
Second Class mai'ing privileges applied
for.
Subscription Eates:
11.50 per year by mail in Canada
32.50 per year outside Canada
Advertising Rates upon application
H. W. WATTS  -   Editor and Manager
FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 23, D.'l
THE MINIMUM WAGE
After many years of effort on the
part of organized labor a law was enacted in this province establishing a
minimum wage in various industries
for girl-. Now, alter many violations
of tlie act, pressure has been brought to
bear on thc Minimum Wage Board to
prosecute a firm in the city of Vancouver--tbe Stettler Cigar Factory -with
the result tliat the firm was so charged.
These were made against the firm over
three months ago, but through various
juggling methods, best known to the
legal fraternity, it has only been beard
in court  just recently.
These methods gave one the impression that something was "rotton" in the
"State of Denmark,** and the result of
the trial to this date has confirmed our
convictions. Thc report in last weeks
issue of the Lalior News shows how a
girl employee of the company swore
before the court that she was receiving
$14 a week, whereas the books of the
company showed a payment of only $10.
When the girl made this statement Mr.
Fleishman, solicitor for the. Minimum
Wage Board, immediately dropped the
case, although he knew that the girl
was perjuring herself. The payroll of
the firm was in court, which would have
helped the prosecution, but the solicitor
sidestepped and closed thc case which
gave a victory for the company. During the week two more counts against
the firm, from thc original charges were
heard and were defeated by the prosecution.
Since this trial commenced, girls
working for thc firm are alleged to have
stated that they are getting eight dollars a week in wages, and yet the employers cannot bc convicted of violating
the. act, on account of either the incompetency of the solicitor or pernicious
practices  of  the   fraternity. .
A somewhat similar case is. referred
to elsewhere in our columns regarding
thc violation of the minimum wage law
in the District of Columbia, U.S.A.,
where the firms were compelled, by the
court to pay restaurant employees nearly $500 in back pay.
That is the kind of a conviction we
need here, but it apparently cannot he
obtained with the present solicitors.
Organized labor should attempt to bring
pressure to bear upon the government
to appoint solicitors capable of making
a conviction, when the goods arc on
thc table. If the government will not
do this, then it must st.-.ud condemned
as not wishing to see thc law enforced.
methods of production, than from slashing wages or kicking out union officials.
Labor's complaint today is that it is
being treated as' a mere commodity,
bought and sold on the market, at the
cost of production like all other commodities. Thai condition of affairs can
��� nly 'tend to one thing, and that is more
agitation, more unrest and the continuation of the industrial conflict upon a
larger scale, and maybe eventually to a
bloody revolution*. This must be averted at all costs, not only by the workers
but by the employers of labor. There'is
nothing to lie gained by a bloody revolution, but when people are hungry and
miserable, hot-headed agitator- can get
the heed of the masses at a moment's
notice, and no amount of sane reasoning will avert a calamity.
ODD BITS
(Conducted   by'Sydney   Warren)
117/.-17" HURTS MOST?
It is not to die. nor even to die of
hunger that makes a man wretched.
Many men have died, all men must due ;
but it is to live miserable, we know not
why; to work sore, and yet gain nothing ; to bc heart worn, weary, yet isolated, unrelated, girt in with a cold
universal Laissez taire.
���Carlyle.
IT'S YOUR JOB
Because   the   particular   industry   in
which some workers are employed, has |
not yet been invaded by Asiatics, they
look upon the efforts of thc Asiatic Ex- ���.
elusion  League, as in no way concern- '
ing  them.     But   a  little  reasoning will. :
or should, easily convince them that the ;
Asiatics  have  made great  inroads  into ,
many   industries   during   the   past   few!
years   and   nobody   knows   when   theirs !
will be the next.   An unemployed logger .
was heard opposing the league, but when '
he  was given the  offer, of  seeing, for
himself, the hundreds of Japanese log
ging camps on the coast of British Co- I
h.mbia. he began to see light.
Where are all the white fishermen that
used to line the Fraser?   Where are all
the white shingle and sawmill workers? '
Displaced  by  Asiatics   who  are,   slowly
but  surely, creeping into even   line of ;
business   and   crowding   out   the   white .
men.    It is time wc look a tumble to
ourselves  and  took  a  hand   in  the  job
of excluding thc Asiatics, otherwise we
will lie excluded ourselves.
WAOE SLASHING MUST STOP
This month will practically see an
end to the falling cost of living, but
from all indications wage reductions
will continue to be attempted by the
employers of  lalnir.
For many and various reasons the
cost of living cannot go any lower,
chief among these being the taxes
levied against all commodities to pay
for the recent European blood fest. Figures supplied by thc Department of
Labor show that thc cost of living covering a list of 20 staple articles of food
is still $3.50 a week above the pre-war
prices of 1914, but thc drop during the
past two months has only been a few
cents in comparison to over a dollar in
June.
It now behooves labor to buckle to
and organize a strong and united offense
against further reductions. This defense must be immediately put into
action against wage conflicts now in
operation, and thc fullest financial and
moral support given to the striking or
locked-out workers.
A great many employers of labor have
adopted the "open shop" policy and the
wage-slashing idea from anti-union propagandists from across ihe line, without
giving any very serious thought to the
part labor can play, if it so desires, in
curtailing production. 'A dissatisfie'd
wage worker, whether organized or unorganized, docs not make a good and
efficient worker, and this naturally
works to thc detriment of the employer.
This point should lie thoroughly threshed
out by all wage scale committees with
the employers of labor and if necessary,
ways and means worked out for better
and more efficient methods of production. A great mariy firms would obtain
better   results   from   re-organizing   its
McLEAN FLOORED THEM
Some spirited attacks were made
upon Neil McLean, British M.P., who
addressed several meetings in V'ancou
ver on Friday and Sunday of last week,
on account of his attitude in daring to
oppose Asiatic immigration into Canada. Need it bc said that these lame
efforts were made by thc followers of
the Socialist Party. McLean, however,
handled them nicely and floored them
on every occasion.
Although it was a situation to be lamented, that a man. of his calibre, who
h*vs served the working class faithfully,
should be subjected to t'.ie abuse by
such a narrow-minded- clique, there is
a great-deal of satisfaction in the knowledge that trie big audience, on< every
occasion, were overwhelmingly in favor of thc speaker's attitude toward the
vital and pertinent questions of the day.
In fact there is every indication that
the workers of Vancouver. ay., and of
the Dominion and the world, arc far
from being in accord with the Socialist
Party proposition of not doing anything,
but abolishing the wage system. There
are a thousand and one things that can
lie done to relieve the damnable conditions confronting society today, and as
these conditions are tackled one by one,
so will the workers rally to organizations
that take the matters in hand, increasing
their power with every victory, until
thc working class, organized and united,
with a common understanding of the
needs of all, will sweep into power to
thereafter right the wrongs of the
wealth producers. ���
M. A. Macdonald. M.P.P.. says thc
Meighcn government is "a dead government waiting to be buried," but the exceptions are so few as to be negligible.
R. P. Pcttipicce has been nominated
to contest the New Westminster riding
as the Labor Party candidate. It would
bc a petty piece of business for thc
workers to vote against him.
There seems to be nothing new in
sight for a campaign issue. Politicians
are busy hunting up old issues, which
will be brushed up and used as- "red
herrings" to land them at the pie counter.
Tom Richardson will contest the
South Vancouver riding for the Federal
election on thc Labor Party ticket
against thc "friends of labor" now being trotted out as candidates.
THE i'OT AXD THE KETTLE.
It is one of those paradoxical facts I
t-hat he, who makes others forget their j
sorrows, often cx|xt-i-t.ccs greater ones
himself. The, case of Roscoe ''Fatty"
Arbuckle only serves to illustrate how-
Success under the present system destroys even its possessor. "Fatty" Arbucklc is a capitalistic success. He
achieved the success business men like
to talk about, and magazine and newspaper editors are so fond of prattling
to their readers. Arbuckle achieved this
success by making people laugh. He
made fortunes for his exploiters and
succeeded in retaining some of what he
made for himself. Having this fortune.
he proceeded to use it in the primary
way that Capitalism provides, namely, as
a means of vicious indulgence. Now,
after his expose, wc read of ministerial
bodies denouncing the whole moving pic-
lure business as vile and iniquitous.
What twaddle! Arbuckle is not the
moving picture business. As a matter
of fact the moving picture business is
not any worse than many other business
savi- only that its mistakes and indiscretions are brought into thc lime-light
quicker. But, aside from this, what
claim to honor have these professional
pulpit pounders, who have permitted
their creed and church to bc made a
mere appendage to the system that unmade Arbuckle? Their palavering is
like the barking of an old toothless dog
���who barkes but cannot bite!
THE SUPREME FAILURE
Jack London once said: "The greatest ;
tragedy of the Capitalist System is that '
it has failed���miserably, ignobly." A
glance over the-daily newspaper reports
will soon verify his statement. Today.
after nearly five years of wholesale
butchery, camouflaged as a "war for
democracy and peace," the following
facts testily to Capitalism's supreme
failure:
Knglaml at war in India and about to
renew fraticidal warfare in Ireland.
France waging war in Asia Minor and
fomenting war between Russia and Poland and Roumania.
Spain engaged in imperialistic adventure in Morocco.
Greece doing the same in Turkey.
Bolivia and Peru brewing over an
old  feud.
Panama and Costa Rica at loggerheads.
China and Japan with strained relations.
"Gawd's country" with civil war in
West Virginia and thc preliminary to a
scrap in Mexico going on.
Meanwhile a set of impotent twaddlers, calling themselves thc League of
Nations, are meeting at Geneva trying
to formulate some means of preventing
what under Capitalism is inevitable, and
laboring under the delusion that it can |
be done.
POLITICAL POWER
By S. HIRSCH.
In thc centre of thc Nevada desert
there is an "Oasis," Las Vegas by name.
This "Oasis" i. kept on the map by
thc shops of the Salt Lake R.R. Co.
It has a population of about 4,000.
There are two drug stores, a bank, several groceries, butchers, clothing stores,
etc. Las Vegas also has dance halls,
gambling houses and a "red light district." There are also several garages,
two hospitals, and in short, everything
necessary  to   make  a   full-fladged  city.
Now in this city there are two classes;
the shop-men and the "citizens."
Thc city administration consists of a
Mayor and four Commissioners, and
never, in the history of Las Vegas, has
a shopman been elected to office; although they are, as usual, in the majority. For as a rule, the working man
prefers to be ruled and governed by his
oppressors.
Last May an election of city officials
was held and thc shopmen woke up.
and decided to try their strength.    .
They nominated a ticket, as follows:
For City Mayor, a blacksmith; for the
first two Commissioners, two machinists; and for the Second two Commissioners, two engineers. Wonder of
ders, the full ticket was elected, and
with a big majority.
Thc "citizens" who own the local
presses, tried everything from slander
and abuse on, but the giant had decided
once for all to test his strength. So
he quietly went to the polls and cast his
solid vote.
You can imagine the surprise of the
"citizens." at the result of their "so
sure" election.
On June 1 the newly elected officials
were duly inaugurated.
In honor of the victory thc Machinists' Union gave a banquet, which will
long be remembered in  Las  Vegas.
Fellow workers, why can't you all fol
low the example of Las Vcgns?
There are a great many talented men
in the ranks of the workers. How long
are we going to be ruled and governed
by our enemies, and be content with
the laws they make for us?
Wake up! It is time to show our
strength! Show them that wc are capable of self-government.
���Our industrial organization needs,
and must have, political organization.
Trades Union Directory
I Secretaries are requested to keep litis Directory up-to-date I
Vancouver Unions
PASS THE MUSTARD!
Charlie Chaplin received a royal welcome upon his arrival in England. The
English people have been used to welcoming so many other people, whose
only claim to applause was a high-
sounding prefix to their name and the
letters of the alphabet tailed on to it,
that Charlie's welcome was quite fitting
and proper. He, at least, had earned
their plaudits.
Dcmpsey won a prize fight and got
$300,000 for it. Mme. Currie, who discovered radium was given a subscribed
dole of $100,000 for her services to humanity. What was that we heard about,
"If you really have ability and brains
you will lie found out and rewarded accordingly?"
Thc Prince Rupert Pulp & Paper Co.
is locating a mill in Prince Rupert and
thc Trades and Labor Council of that
city asked the city council to insert a
clause in the agreement between the
city and the company barring Orientals
from employment. A motion to this
effect came up in the city council but
was- defeated upon division. The company, however, has assured the council
that 80 per cent of the payroll would
be white.
NEW YORK.���Typographical Union
No. 6. known as "Big Six," will demand
a wage increase of $5 a week for all
members employed on week work in
book and job printing offices, to* take
ettcct October I. when the union's present contract expires.
Early this year a devasting famine occurred in China, and local religious
bodies were vociferous in proclaiming
the plight of the Chinese and collected
funds to assist them. Today a frightful
famine rages among the Russian people
yet but scant mention is made of it by
these same religious people and nothing
has been done by them to assist in alleviating it. Can it be that a particular
form of government allows these Christian people to assist the yellow man of
China but prevents them from doing an
act of charity to their white brothers of
Russia���or, alter all, it is just another
case of "Servant obey thy Master?" j-
A PSALM OF LABOR
By Ada M. Stimson
For centuries I have served mankind.
For ages I have borne thc burdens of
the world.
I have stirred the earth. I have made
it to bring forth increase.
I have caused the desert to blossom
and changed the wilderness into a garden.
I have garnered thc grain. I have
fathered the fruit.
I have fed thc world. I have provided food  for all the people.
I have tamed wild beasts and made
them the servants of man.
I have woven fibres into cloth and
fashioned garments. I have clothed
people. i
I have hewn down mountains and
transformed the rock into'human habitation.
I have felled the giants of the forest
and made them furnish comfort and
protection  for man.
I have gone down into the bowels of
the earth and forced her to give up her
treasure.
I have wrought in the glare of the
furnace undaunted by the hissing of
steam and clanging -of  steel.
I have enriched the nations. I have
produced the wealth of the world.
But my eyes have been blinded and
my hands have been shackled. I did
not see that thc wealth I had created
was mine; nor that the good things of
life belonged to me.
But the scales are falling from my
eyes.    I am beginning to see.
I will arise in my strength. I will
break my chains.
I will take what belongs to me. I
will lay hold of my own.
I will bring comfort and abundance
to all. I will bring peace and joy to
the multiude.
AH mankind will be blessed. All thc
inhabitants of the earth made glad.
'For I am greater than greed. I am
mightier than mammon.
I am LABOR.'
VA-TCOUVER ' TRADES AWD LIBOl
COUM-H.���President F. W. Welsh;
Secretary. I*. Bengough. Office SOS
I_bor Mall. SIS Pender Street-Weat.
Phone Seymour 7495. Meets In Labor
Hall al s ,,ni. on the first and third
Tuesday  in month.
BUILDING TRADES COUNCIL Chairman.
O. C. Thom. Secretary, Bey at-iaeear.
Office   -10  Labor  Hall.  MeeU  first  and
MILK   DRIVERS     AllD     DAIRT
PLOYEES. Local No. 4(4���President.
J. Smith: Secretary, B. Showier, Sll
Pender Street West. Meets at Sit
Pender Street West at 8 p.m. on aec-
ond and  fourth   Fridays  In  month.
FAIBTERS. DECORATORS * PAPER.
HANGERS, Local No 13s ��� Preaident.
J. King: fin. Sec. K. A. Bmi.tr; Iter. See,
J. McMillan. US Pordova Street. Meeta
at  148 Cordova   Street, at ,8 p.m.    on
third Wedneaday In month at Labor Hall. "." J1"���**- BRIDGE.
-_..-.^-..y_-������.- ,-���. ��� m�����?^1��� BOCB builders. Loca
KERT 8ALSSMKB,   Loeal   No. J'l���       President.   W.   II    Pol Ian
President. H, Curtis; Secretary. W
I'.iyni-s. 327 Eleventh Avenue Kast.
Meets at 319 Pender Street West on
serond Monday of each month at 8
p.m.
BREWERY. FLOUR. CEREAL AHD
SOFT DBUfl WORKERS���President.
F. P. G/ugh: Secretary, W. H. McLean. I'":!. Broadway West. Meets
at 319 Pender Street West at 8 p.m.
every third   Tuesday In, month.
BABBEB9V" t-TTa-UrATIOatAX. UinO-i.
Lih-��1 No. 120���President. C. E. Her-'
rett: Secretary. A. It. Jennie.
i'.inline Street. Meets Boom 313. 319
Pender Street West, at 7:15 p.m. on
second  and fourth Tuesdays In month.
BLACKSMITHS. DROP FORGERS ft
HELPERS. Local No. Ill��� President.
W. J. Bartlett: Secretary. T. Mcllugh.
���1888 Sixth Avenue West. Meets at
319  Pender Street West at    8  p.m.  on
third Tuesday of eaeh  month.
BOII,Baii8-_llB��7 I*0��   8U^
IIS ft HELPERS. Local No. 194 ���
President. R. Lynn: Secretary. A.
Fraser, Boom 303, 319 Pender Street
West. Meets at 319 Pender Street
West, at 8 p.m. on first and third
Mondays   of eaeh  month.
BOOT   AND   SHOE   WORKERS'   TJHIOW
Loenl No. 505 ��� President, Thos.
Andley; Secretary. Topi Cory. 445
Vernon Drive. Meets at 319 Pender
Street West at 8 p.m. on jrlr'st Tuesday
In   month. ,/
BBJCXLAYEBS. MASORB AB D PLASTERERS.���President. W. Kerr; Secre.ary.
I. Padgett. Meeta at Labor Hall on 2nd
and   4th   Wedneaday   'n  month.
BRIDGE. STRUCTURAL ft ORNAs-EH-
TAX IRON WORKERS. Local No. 97
���Prisidrnt, B Bronaon; Secretary,
Roy Masseear. 319 Pender Street West.
Meets at 319 Pender 8treet Weat, at
H p.m.. second and fourth Monday.
second and fourth Thursdays In month.
"""[ABa* ft
1 No. 2404���
. Pollard; Secretary.
N. H Vernon. Box 320. Meets at Sit
Pender Street West. Vancouver, at I
I- in on second and fourth Fridays of
month.	
PHOTO _firoa__.Ta��M-~LWr N^
President. F. Looney: Secretary. Gordon K>lwards. 2723 Fifth Avenue West.
MeeU at World Building. Vancouver,
at H p in on Saturday of each week.
PLASTBBBBft ft'CWatnWT F-BYBBBBB
IxK-al No. 89���President. Charles Keall.
Secretary.   Alfred   Hurry.   8S1   Thlrty-
.     fourth   Avenue   Kast.     Meets    at     319
*2�� j     Pender Street West, at 8 p.m. on flrat
Wednesday  In  month. 	
I PATTEBB MAKBBS ��� -ProaHeat. 57
Heys; Secretary. J. L. Irvine: Business Agent, K. A. Cloddard. 858
Richards Street. Meets at 319 Pender
Street West on first and third Monday  in  month at  8  p.m.
PLUMBERS   AM D      8TEA11      FITTERS.
Loral Xo. 170���President, Ber. Slii.h--.im*;
Secretary. J. Crowther; Bnainesa Agent
F ,\V. Welsh. Office 301 Labor Hall.
Meeli at 319 Pender Street Weat, al S
p.m. on second and fourth Kridaya.
POLICE1
No.  12-
BOOKBINDERS. Loeal 105--President.
Geo. Mowmt: Secretary. Frank Milne,
Box 411. MeetB at 319 Pender Street
West at 8 p.m. every third Wedneaday
tn month.
CIVIC EMPLOYEES. Local No _s
President. J. White; Secretary, a.
Harrison. Office 148 Cordova Street
Weet Meeta at 148 Cordova Street
West at 8 p.m. on the first and third
Friday  In  month.
l"�� PEDERATIOM. Local
-President. Boy A. Perry: Secretary, Alexander Murray, 1484 Tenth
Avenue West. Meets at 440 Pender
Street West, at 7:30 p.m. on fourth
Tuesday of month. 	
PAIU.IAMTHTAKT COMMPTTE^T ft L. C.
Chairman, W. J. Bartlett   Secretary, Mrs.
W. Mahon.    Meets in room 305 Labor Hall
oa  the   second   tad   fourth   Thuraday   la
month at t p.m.  ���*���
POSTAL   WORKERS     President.    D.    J.
McCarthy;    Secretary.     O.   E.   James.
1348 Odium Drive.    Meeta at 44* Pen
der  Street  Went.   Vancouver.
P.m. on last Friday tn month.
at   7:30
Local No. (9���President. 8. W. Myers;
Secretary. K. B. Stephenson. Box 894.
Meeta at 112 Hastings Street. Vancouver, at 8 p.m. on seeond Tuesday In
month.
BAiXBOaTf) BM*F_OYBBS, Division No.
59���Prealdent. A. N. Lowes; Secretary,
Charles Bird, 2030 Union Street.
Meeta at I.i Mi r Hall. SIS Hamilton
Stree*. at 8 p.m. on first Monday In
month.
CITY HALL BSOrXOYEBB' Local No.
59���President. H. A. Black;, Secretary.
Aid. W. J. Scrlbben, City Hall. Meets
at 148 Cordova Street West, at 8 p.m.
on   first   Wednesday  of  each  nionth.
BAaXWAY COMDUCTOBS. Division No.
287���Preaident. (I. W. Hatch: Secretary
J. B. Physlck U5C Thurlow Street.
Meets at I.O.O.F. Hall on flrat Sunday
at 2 p.m., and on third Thursday at
8 p.m.
Local
452���President Ceo. H. Hardy; Secretary, W. J. Johnston: Business
Agent. G. C. Thom. Office 304 Labor
Hall. Meets second and fourth Monday at 8 p.m. In Labor Hall.
CARPENTERS, AMALGAMATED. No. 1
Branch.���President, T. S. Coope; Business Aa-en.. Angus Msi-Sween: Secretary.
R. C. Webber. 146 19th Are. W. Meels
2nd and 4th Tuesday at 8 p.m., in F.L.P.
Hall.
Ho. 2 Branch.���Secretary. W. Bray. 60
Ifi.h Ave. W. Meets l��t and 3rd Tuesday a. 8 p.m.. in F.I..P. Hall. 148 Cordova
SI, W.
RAILWAY CARMEN. Lodge No. St.���President. T. Summery ills: Secretary. B. J.
Sansom. 5B30 Hherbronke 81 Meeta lat
and 3rd Fridays, in Cotillion Hall.
BAIL WAY TBA-BftrftE. Local No. 144
���President, C. A. Mitchell: Secretary.
D. A. Monro, 70 Seventh Avenue West.
Meets at I.O.O.F Hall. Hamilton Street
at 7:30 p.m. on first Tuesday and 2;3t
p.m.on   third  Tuesday.
CIGABM���KERB. Local No. 357��� President. O. Thomas; Secretary. R. J.
Craig, 38 Kootenay Street. Meeta at
319 Pender Street West, at 8 p.m. on
first Tuesday in month.
B-.~CTB.C-Xi W0BKBB8, Local 213���
President. D. W. McDougall; Secretary,
F R. Burrows; Business Agent, K.H.
Morrison, Office 440 Pender Street
West. Meets at 440 Pender Street
West  at   8   n.m.  every   Monday.
CLBBKS Local No. 279���
President. A. P. Glen; Secretary. O,
T. Brown. 3119 Twenty-seventh Ave.
West. Meets at 319 Pender Street
West at 8 p.m. on first and third
Tuesdays.
BAWBO-X. mBBi ft BAWYBBS* AB-
SOCIATTOH���President C. F. C. Craig;
Secretary. Geo. Gray. 1*38 Flrat Ave.
Kast. Meeta at Ragles* Hall. Vancouver at 1:30 p.m. on flrat and third
Sundays  In  nionth.
TEAMSTERS. Local No. oYV���President, W,
M. Brown; Secretsry, Birt Showier Office
809 Labor Hall. Meeta aecond and fourth
Wedneaday  at  8  p m.  in  Labor Hall.
Don't  forget that tbe Laker New.
can  do year printing jobs.
Upon a vote being taken among the
employees of the AnyQX Copper Mining
& Smelting plant on thc qticstipn of accepting a reduction in wages or closing
down the plant, the men at the mine
voted 76 against and 224 in favor of the
reduction. At the beach plant thc vote
stood 133 against and 4459 in favor of
a reduction. ;
Wa can pat the anion label on ami
give you union-made water-marked
paper for your printing jobs. Tarn
it into the Labor News.
FIRE FIGHTERS. Local No. 18��� President, Percy Trevlse: Seeretarv. Chas.
A. Watson. No. 3 Fire Hall. Twelfth
and Quebec 8treets. Vancouver. Meets
at  319  Pender Street  West.
Local   No.   ISO
..President. Mrs. W.   Mahon: Secretary.
Ada Hawksworth, 1518 Fleming Street.
Meats  at   Labour Hall   at  (  p.m.    on
first Thursday In month.
HOTEL ft	
Local No. 28���President. J. Cummlngs;
Secretary. J. W. vanHook. 441 Seymour
Street. Meets at 441 Seymour Street
at 2:30 p.m. on second and 8:30 p.m.
on  fourth Wednesdays In month.	
SEASgEMB' UHIOB���Business Agent. B.
Townsend. Meets at 7 n.m. every
Monday at  183 Cordova  Street Weat
SOFT PRINK DISPENSERS' TUnON.
No. S78���President. Frank McCann,
Secretary. T. J. Hsnafln. 1378 Sixth
Avonue West. Vancouver. Meets at
441 Seymour Street, Vancouver, at 1:19
P.m. on first Sun-lav  In month.
TEAM   ft   OPERATING
Loral No. 820���President. Joseph
Weelman. Meets st 319 Penijer St..
W. Vancouver, at 7:30 j in on second'
and fourth Tuesdays in month.
JEWELLERY WOBKBBB, Local No
42���President. J. E. Dawson, Secretary.
K. T. Kelly. 1850 Hastings Street Kast.
Meets seeond and fourth Mondays in
month.   319 Pender Street.
| SHEET METAL WORKERS Praaldon.. E.
Ferrio Secretary. H. 3. Harlmira Business Agent. A. J. Crawford. Off lea, 911
Labor Hall. Meet* secoid aad fourth
Thnraday  at  ���   p.m.   la  Labor  Hall.
LATHERS.   WOOD.   WIRE   ft
Local No. 207���President. A. B. Flnly.
Secretary. A. P. Surges. 829 Flfty-
sevemth Avenue Kast. Meeta at 315
Holden Building. Vancouver, at 8 p.m.
on firat and third Friday In month.
rrHOORAFKOCBS. Local No. 4 I-- President. H. J. Rhodes: Secretary. H. Walker. 1008 Pendrell Street. Meets at
Room 309. S19 Pender Street Weat. at
8 p.m. on -third Wednesday In  month.
Brother"
LOCOMOTIVE   EHOIHEEBS.
hood of. Division No. 320���President.
O. P. Boston; Secretary. H. A. B. Mac-
Donald. 1222 Pendrill St., Vancouver.
Meets at I.O.O.F. Hall nn aecond and
Fourth Tuesdays In each month at 8
p.m.	
LOCOMOTIVE FIREMKir AMD IV-
OIBEMBB, Loeal No. 858���President.
T. McKwen: Secretary. H. O. Campbell
744 Heimeken Street, Vancouver.
Meets ��t IO.O;F Hall, on flrat and
third  Thursdays  of each   month.
LOBi  _     _ 	
Local No. 3K-52���Secretary-Treasurer.
II Nixon; Baalneaa Agent. W. Bu.hu. 183
Cordova Street West. Meets at 183 Cor
dora Street Weal, al 8 p.m.. oa first and
third Fridays la month.
BtOY-BO PMITUU OPBBATOBB, Local
No. 348���Prealdent. W. McCartney.
310 London Building: Secretary. G.W.
Saxted. 810 London Building. Meets
at 810 London Building on flrat Sunday In month at 7:J0 p.m.	
a--r-TBBAB(���M>F-WAY
ft BAIXWAY SBOF LAROORERS.
Lneal No. 187���President. A. Osborne
Secretary. A. D. McDonald, 991 Pender Street West Vancouver. Meets
at 8 p.m. on third Thai-day In month.
BTEREOTYPEBS
TYFEBB, Local Bo. SS.���President. W.
Bayley: Secretary, A. Blrnle. 1*19
Commercial Drive. Meeta at 81S Pander Street West at 1 p.m. on second
Monday  in  month.
ft ELECTRIC RAILWAY
PLOYEES OF AMBBICA, Ainilgamat,-
ed Association of. Division No. 191���*
President. R. Blgby: Secretary, F. K.
Grirfin. 447 Sixth Avenue Bast. Vancouver. Meets A.O.F. Hall. Mount
Pleasant at 10:15 a.m. on first Monday   and 7 p.m. on third  Monday.
8TOBE   CUTTERS.    I .oral.    181���Prealdent. C. Dolmas: Secretary. F. Rumble,
198  Cot herd   Stretrt.     Meet*   In   Labor
Ball Vancouver at\ 8 p.m. first Tues-
_ day In moh^lrT \ '
TELSPHOrTE OBEKAfOM ��� Laeal "ft
A.I.B.E.W. Secretsry, Ml** T. roxcroft
Office Boo** 30* taker Uu\ 119 Pander
St-at.  Wart.    A/^
AELOBS' UHIOB, Local No. 178���President. R. A. Lawson. 1961 Seymour
Street: Secretary C. McDonald, P O.
Box 503. Meet* Mill Pender Blreet
West, at 8 p.m. on first Monday la
month.
YFOOBAFBICA-.. Local 119���President,
C. If. Collier: Secretary and Business
Agent.  R, N. Neeland*;  Office 314 La-
bor Hall.    Meet* laat   Sunday In each
month  at  2 p.m.
TBEATBICAL      STAOE _
���Local 118���President W. J. Park: Secretary, G. W. Allln: Business Agent.
MeeU at 308 London Building at 9:39
a-m. on second Friday In month.
aaTAC-MHaE-E, Beast 19B���President. W.
J. Clark; Becretvry. J. G. Keefe: Business Agent, P. Bengough: Office 118
render Street West.    Meets    at    119
Pender Street VI-it at 8 p.m. on aecond
and fourth Thursday.	
_rtWC-Aa*al7~Loc*l   No.   145���President.
Bowver:   Secretary  A    Jamieson.    108
Ixindon   Building.    Meeta    at    Moose j
Hall,   Homer Street, at 10    a.m.    on
second Sunday In month.
Provincial Unions
YICTOBIA���President. C. Sieved*. 1711
Denman Street: Secretary *f_ Woodward, 1153 Carlln Street. Meets at S
p.m. on first and third Wednesdays
In monhh at Trades Hall. Broad Street.
B-ACBTJT-STB.   Lodge   �����_��� President. J
H.   Bobb;   SeereUry.   Kvan   McMillan
Business Agent. P.  Bengough:   Officei
.119  Pender Street     West.     Meets     at
Labour Hall at 8 p.m. on second   and :
fourth, Tuesday. .  j
Irfi��e. IS-���President, John I
SeereUry.   Geo.  Annand. 115S i,
VICTORIA TYPOGRAPHICAL UKIOrT. Be.
201.���President. C. K. Christian; Secretary tr-a-un-r    W.   H.   Osard.     lira   209.
.   Meets laat Sonday of month in Sew Trade*
Hall    llroad  Striet
FSsIHCX BUFEBT���President. . S.~T>.
McDonsld, Prince Rupert: SeereUry,
G. Waddell. Box 451, Prince Bupert
Meets nt Carpenters' Hall on second
and fourth Tuesday* of each month.
���President
   J.  Lot man, Nelson;
Secretary. Felix Pezeril. Box 824 Nelson.
Brown
8 p.m
Albert Street    Meeta at  Labour^ Hall .".���EXfrrOBB���President    James    Ma-
at
on first   and  third Friday
ABB     OIL
UBIOB OF B. C��� I resident. Dan Can-
lin: Secretary. W. Donaldson. 108 Main
Street at 7 p m. (irat and third Wednesday.
th-ie, Reveistoke: Secretary. Philip!
Parker. Box 234. Reveistoke. MeeU
at 8 p.m. at City Hall. Reveurtoke, on
the seeond aad fourth Saturday of
each month.
'
I
Build a bigger and better business by
employing I'N'IOX men, and advertising in The New.s.
  l President.
Knudsen. 402 Hoyal Avenue; Seereur
R   Morgan.  313  Regina   Street     Ne*
Westminster. Meets "��m<I and fourth
Wednesdays    in    mnntnV at    -.aboard
Temple,  New  Westminster.
& .
-
v'
���i
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA LABOR NEWS
PAGE THREE
I I
Y
flllllllll|llllllllll||IMIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIII��lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll-��������t-����I�������� j -��--��. x        t T TT       ���_���     ' '_.
WHAT OTHERS SAY I i Eur��Pean Labor Is Uniting
NEW
In these columns there will be printed every week the I
leading editorials from other newspapers and magazines hr!p,ul |�� Labor's PW**
**, unit;/,  which  was   fostered  in
YORK.���That   unity  is  more
than   <lis-
the im-
l������llllllll����ll!l��imUIUimillimillim5: mediate aftermath of the world war,by
, the Third International, is dawning up-
ion   the   workers   of   Europe,   now   pre-
A POLITICAL BLACKLIST
THE RESERVE ARMY
Machinists,  said to the men:
"Within six months there will lie mil- |'-'
A practical demonstration of the
working "our"of the iniquitous Hann.i
ruling un the Canadian National Railways i- provided in the case of Mr.
Inliii I'lamm-id, who ran as a Labor can -
ihdate in opposition to Hon. Charles
<>���)-. in the Edson constituency in the
���������iiit provincial election. Alter Mr. lions of men ready to take these same
Diamond accepted nomination un July | jolis at 40 cents an hour."
I ltd.he was officially notified that he He went on to say that he was doing
was dismissed from the service of the
railway where In- had liecn employed as
a bridge carpenter. Alter the election,
Mr/Diamond's position not having been
filled in tin meantime, he was re-engaged hut ��a< compelled to start as a
new man. his six years, of efficient service ii'>t to count in the matter m"
seiiioni;. Hut the worst part of the
win '
Liability to Soviet Government
"The   Communist    International   has
lieen a liability rather than an assitf to
the   Soviet   Government."   Cahan
"That fact becomes more evident every
.   day.     At   thc   request   of   Krassin   the
In rejecting the protest of the navy  pared  lo clasp hands again. �� one:oi , ^.^ Govcrnr_ent was oUiged to cM,
yard   worker  at   Washington  against a j the   impressions   that  Abraham  Cahan
reduction   of.   wages.  Secretary'   of  the ! editor-in-chief of thc Jewish Daily For
N'aiy Dctiby. according to a representa-   ward, brought back with him from Her
live of the International Association of   '���" an<l Paris.
The practical collapse of the Commun-
the men a "service" by reducing their
wages, but the striking thing about this
episode  is  the   frankness  of  this   Fed
eral   functionary   in   beckoning   to   the
millions  of   unemployed as  a   threat   if
thc men refused to accept the reduction j dependent Socialists, Communists, Men
without a contest. sheviks  and  others  that  come  and  go
Among these millions, are undoubtedly ; through  the  German   metropolis.
International, serviceable to the
Russian Communists in the early stages
of their struggles, but now conceded
by some of its adherents to be a liability
rather than an asset to Russia as well
as to lhe Socialist movement of other
countries, was another conviction gain
ed in the nine weeks that he spent in
Berlin  meeting   Majority  Socialists.  In-
ni.iuy who helped to make up thc seven
liiiiiii-s is contained in the fact j million majority for the administration.
ii,i   luiiig employed  foj a  short I Among   the   protectants   before   Denbv
thai
time Mr. Diamond was again notified i were undoubtedly men whd contributed
that he was dismissed from the service I to this majority. It is a grim piece oi
because he had accepted nomination as . irony in the face of these facts that
a political candidate. In other words j the Secretary of the N'avy threatened
il would appear that this worker is I to draw upon the ranks of the miserablcs ]
blacklisted by the Canadian National a sufficient numlier of desperate men
because he exercised his right as a: to displace the protesting navy yard
i iti.cn.
Tiie Labor News has in the past pro
tested against this infamous intcrfer-
ince with the citizenship of a large
i.nmber of Canadian workers. At best
the ruling is without the slightest justi
Interviewed Rank and File
During   his   visit   abroad.   Cahan   did I
limit   the  range  ot   his  investigation  to I
interviews with thc leaders of the var  I
ious factions, but  made a  special effort
to get the views of. the rank and file.
"\\ hcrever  I   wont  I  heard the  same"
j clamor for unity." Cahan declared. "The
i rank and file is tired of the useless and
purposeless   expenditure   of   effort   involved    in    the    dividing    of    Socialist
forces.    I'nited. the Socialist parties of
(nation and no parliament with any regard for political right would permit
such an iniquitous order to remain in
force in connection with any citizen of
the country. But the phase of thc
ruling brought into relief by Mr. Diamond's experience is nothing short of
startling. A blacklist has been estab
lishcd against a class of workers, and
for no other reason than the exercising
of a right of free citizenship. It is a
serious situation and one which should
be taken into consideration in the com
ing federal campaign. Thc railroad
workers should send a letter to every
candidate' in every constituency demanding a written reply to a question of
what their attitude will be in the matter
if they are elected. This and every
other method should lie used to have
this outrage against'the political liber-
tics of a large number of Canadian citizens abrogated.���Alberta Labor News.
workers.
The knowledge that Denby knew his j
power and that he would use it if ne-   .-
(Germany   would  have  been   able  to  go
ahead with their plans, with respect to
which there is no fundamental difference of opinion.   Divided they have per-
cessary must have galled the committee.'
The episode is a cross section of an inhuman system that recruits a surplus
1 arm) of unemployed for use against the
workers at times when their needs are
most acute.
mitted   the  control   of  national  affairs
to rest in the hands of the enemy."
On   the   matter   of   Bolshevism,   the
W e commend it tor the consideration i ... _
. _.     ..       .,    ,   ^ ���      Independent   Socialists  are   even   more
of our readers.���The New York Call.      ��� .       ,.        .     w  . _    . ,.       .
violent than the Majority. Socialists, lie
said,   but  both   regard  thc   Corpmuni-t
experiment   in   Russia   philosophically.
They are also agreed that Communism,
and  particularlyi ihtfl'fNjmmtnifst-lnUr
national, is bankrupt.
BASIC ELECTION ISSUE
LEGALLY JUSTFIED"
When the people of this country were
being urged to join the League of Nations they were assured that the mandates of the league could lie enforced
through thc use of "automatic economic
pressure."
Just how much there was to that
statement is best shown by the present
Greco-Turk war. It is admitted that
without arms and munitions supplied by
British, French and American manufa"-
turers this war would come to an early
end.
Lloyd George and Briand "deeply deplore" this war���and say so right out
in open meeting. However, there is a
"but" which reads like this; "But they
have agreed that it is quite all right for
private firms to supply arms so long
as the Greek and Turk nationalists desire to fight it out." In this statement
they are seconded by our Ambassador
Harvey, speaking in behalf of thc munition makers of this country,
Just so! "Twas ever thus. Pacifists
have all along contended that most, if
not all, wars were kept going largely
because of the activities of the munition
makers. This is the first time, however,
that the official representatives of the
late Allies have admitted it and then
attempted a justification.
As thc years pass the conviction is
slowly being driven home that if war
is to come to an end, it Xriil^be only
through thc efforts of thc men and women who work in munition factories.
They will have to refuse to do the
work. It is quite certain that so long
as dollars can be coined out of making
death dealing instruments, capitalists C_-i
be found to finance the factories and
diplomats and statesmen to justify thc
trade.
Will workmen ever quit making the
tools used to take thc lives of their fellows?���Seattle Union Record.
Use    union-made   paper   for   your
letterheads.     Give ua  your order.
Labor against Capital���that will bc
lhe basic issue of the forthcoming federal general election. Let the politicians and party newspapers camouflage
it as they will with talk of tariff issues,
anti-waste, and other old election cries,
the election will be a testing time, when
the electors of Canada will be called
upon to decide whether the wealth-producers of the country shall rule, or
whether the era of greed, the era of
rule by wealth-owners shall be continued. Many unthinking ones
disposed to disagree with the foregoing
assertion at first. They will make the
mistake common to thousands in the
past. They will fail to recognize what
people comprise the respective classes
into which the country is divided at
this time.
Let us examine the division.
Whom do we include in the category
ol capital? That question is easily answered. Big business, special privilege,
monopoly, etc.. the average man will
answer. He will forget to include Liberals. Conservative, Anti-Wasters, Independents, and a host of other reformers,
all of whom claim to have a panacea for
the eonomic ills from which the nation
suffers, but who always when returned
to power, fall into the same old ways,
pandering to special privilege, monopoly
and big business. Such party politicians
have no soul aliove the rule of wealth,
and let Canadians returns to power our
capitalist-ridden coalition under Premier Arthur Meighcn. or let them elect
Mackenzie King and his Liberal cohorts, and the result will be the same.
Big business which for years has had
a strangle hold upon our parliament,
will continue the evil tenor of its way.
The capitalist knows no politics.    It
makes  no difference to him what  old
line party is in power.   He has tested
them all, and all succumb to thc influ- j
ence of wealth, and the wealthy.
On the side of Labor in the forthcoming election fight, and for all time,
should Ik- ranged the wealth producers
of the nation. Every man or woman
engaged in productive work is in the
category of Labor whether he nr she
acknowledges it or not. The retail clerk
has a community of interest with thc
farmer; the bank clerk with the bricklayers ; the teacher, with thc painter, and
each with all thc rest
If the workers of Canada, when election day comes, decides to cast a vote
in their own interests, sufficient voting
power is held within the ranks of the
category of Labor above defined to
sweep from parliament the last vestiges
of capitalist domination.���Western labor News.
off all plans for propaganda in England,
thus admitting that the International
must reason with conditions, something
that in the first flush., of victory was
entirely   overlooked."
"The Independent Socialists are rapidly dwindling away." Cahan said, "and
the old Social Democratic party has won
out. With Noske and Scheidemann removed from their leading places, and
with a growing realization that it is
/oily to remain divided when working-
class interest demanded a united Socialist leadership, the way is gradually
being paved for a reunion of the Socialist forces.
"The Communists still adhere to their
revolutionary phraseology, but it lacks
the force and conviction that seemed lo
have inspired it originally. The abortive revolution staged last March unquestionably helped reduce the strength
of the Communists, which was never
large enough to cause much concern "
Wild Phrases Are Denounced
Referring to a statement made by a
group of Socialists in America that the
party is weakening because it is not
radical enough, the reporter asjfcul him
whether he thought the party was becoming too conservative.
"The membership of the party has
decreased ..for quite opposite reasons,"
Cahan replied. "This is thc most reactionary country in the world. To fly
into thc face of this reactionary spirit
with revolutionary declarations is to
play into thc hands of the enemy. There
is nothing more absurd nor more childish than to imagine that a more 'radical'
stand will win in the face of the reaction."
TRADE   UNIONS   IN  RUSSIA
The most enlightened and advanced . who actually performs work for which
code ol labor laws in the world are expert knowledge is required shall be
those which are now in force in Soviet ��� paid at the expert rale even if fie has no
Russia. These regulations apply to all educational diploma,
state, civil, military, and private under j Apprenticeship of two to three years is
takings, institutions and businesses exist- provided for.
will be !i,g ,,',1",1 ���*e.-��*iie>ry of that republic. I Bonuses are paid to workers who ex-
They are reprinted Irom a pamphlet is- jceed the prescribed output
lied and circulated by thc International
Labor Office maintained by thc League
of  Nations, at Geneva. Switzerland.
It will be noted that the trade union
movement plays a very important part
in connection with wages and conditions.
These laws went into effect July 1,
1��20. about the time it is claimed oppressive tactics toward labor organizations
were instituted by the Russian workers'
government. *>.
The following are provisions of this
code:
All work in the Russian Republic is
fixed at 8 hours by day and 7 hours by
night.
The normal duration of work for persons employed in offices or intellectual
occupations is fixed at 6 hours a day. In
case of night work, five-sixths of an
hour shall count as one hour.
The duration of work for minors between 14 and 16 years of age shall not
exceed four hours.
The work of young persons below 18
years shall be fixed at 6 hours.
Persons below the age of 18 shall not
be employed at night.
Standards of production are provided for "whereby every worker shall
perform a fixed amounut of work which
shall not fall below the standard of output established for the class and group
lo which he is assigned."
These standards of output, however,
are established by local committees in
accordance with  the general  standards
Overtime is limited to four hours a
day and only permitted if the trade
union regards overtime as necessary.
Welfare regulations are laid down for
all factories.
Employment is practically permanent
after a six days' probation period for
wage-earning employes and two weeks
for office workers and intellectual occupations.
Workers can be dismissed only for
four reasons, including the clo:��ing down
of the plant, a month's absence, end of
contract or poor production, and then
must have a two weeks' notice.
Over in Montana a woman is being
tried for the murder of her eight'husbands. If this is so, she should be stopped before  she  forms the habit.
Of thc 45,430 employees of the English Co-operative Wholesale Society,
only 200 have declined to join a trades
union. The board of directors of the
co-operative society has now decided to
discontinue the employment of these
few non-unionists, so that the unionization of its stores and factories may be
complete.
CHICAGO���Forty-two members of
Bakery anad Confectionery Workers'
approved by the Labor Commissariat and j *oca' uni��n No. 2 of this city have been
must be approved tiy thc competent trade : held in $840.1100 bail on charges of con-
union and enforced by the local trade [ spiracy in carrying on a strike against
| union councils and thc labor depart- j a rcduction of wa
ment.
Wage rates shall be drawn up for each
branch of employment by the trade
unions and approved by the Labor Commissariat
Women who perform the same work
receive the- same wage as men.
A wage earning or salaried employe
What about your subscription?
***��:��� mmi-mwmmmmWtm
��� i
HALLS TO RENT
IN THE LABOR HALL
Large and ���mall; good accommodation; easv rent.     Rates lo societies
��� by day, week or month, oa application lo:
��� P. R. BENGOUGH. Secretary.
1 ROOM 30S LABOR HALL 319 PENDER STREET W.
��� Phones Seymour 7495-7496
CALIFORNIA OIL WORKERS
NOW ON STRIKE
BAKERSFIELD, CaL���Eight thous^ j
and workers in the San Joaquin Valley
oil fields struck last week, when opera-!
tors refused to enter into agreements i
with the union. R. H. Fraxer, vice-presi- j
dent of the California District Counsel
of the Oil Workers' Union, announced.!
The strike does not involve the workers in the Royal Dutch Shell Company.
tw hich has already reached an agree- j
ment with the union, or the Standard
Oil Company, which refuses to recognize the union.
IN DEFENCE
To correct any misunderstanding which may have arisen
from atatementa made by the
enemies or rival* of the Local
Branch of. the Almagamated
Society of Carpentera and Join-
era, the officers of the Society
are compelled to announce that
they are not. aad never have
been, under any kind of suspension from Headquartera.
Signed
T. S. COOPE
W. TAYLOR
W. BRAY
F. L. BARRATT
DON T  PATRONIZE  LIST
The  following placet are run under
non-union conditions and arc therefore
unfair to organized labor.
BALTIMORE.���A trolley motineered   Stettler Cigar Factory, making Van Loo
and conducted by a single human got j ...   *n<* V?n !��*'Ci*"s,.
wild on , slight grade and crashed into | g& <g�� % ��g* ^
a regular car.   Result. 14 persons severe-���! White Lunches.
ly injured   Women bore the brunt of j Electrical Contractors.
the bruises.   This type of car is called j c  H- Peterson. 1814 Pandora St.
"the safety car." so named probably be- i HuTne & Rumbl'>' Columbia  St.. New
cause it keep, down the overhead of ^^^ -^ ^
the company in economy of operation.'        Hwadc, B.C.
-���!
BUSINESS MEN, ATTENTION !!
YOUR GOODS are on SALE :
Quality Circulation���Buying Power
8H0ULD be voir first consideration
The manager of this paper would be pleased to
talk business with yoti.
8 PHONE SEYMOUR 7495
-f'KCimia��Sa-ni'__M_HM_MHM_MHMH
���
*
���
-���-tap
I   . ���������'
*     "4
��� <*
-
PAGE FOUR
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA LABOR NEWS
"I
City of Vancouver
Are You Entitled to Vote For I
Mayor and Aldermen 1
UNLESS YOUR NAME IS ON THE CIVIC VOTERS'
LIST YOU ABE NOT
IF YOU ARE DESIROUS OF VOTING AT TIIK NEXT CIVIC
ELECTION*. MAKE SIRE THAT YOUR NAME IS ON THE
LIST. THE FACT THAT VOL' WERE ON LAST YEAR
DOES NOT GUARANTEE THAT YOU WILL BE ON
THIS YEAR.
IT IS NECESSARY FOR EVERY VOTER WHO WOULD BE
CERTAIN OF A VOTE TO INSPECT THE VOTERS LIST
WHICH IS NOW OPEN FOR INSPECTION AT THE
OFFICE OF THE CITY CLERK, CITY HALL.
WARNING���Holders of Agreements to Purchase are required
to make application each year to be placed on the Civic Voten'
Lilt, whether they were on last year or not.
TENANTS are requested to ascertain if they are on the List,
and if not on, to make application.
TENANT does not include a Lodger, Boarder or temporary!
occupant of rooms.
THE CITY CLERK'S OFFICE  WILL BE OPEN  DURING THE
REGULAR CITY HALL HOURS. AND ALSO FROM 7 P.M. TO 9
P.M.,  TUESDAYS  AND  FRIDAYS,  DURING  SEPTEMBER.  TO
RECEIVE APPLICATIONS.
DO NOT DELAY���MAKE SURE THAT YOUR NAME IS ON
THE LIST POSITIVELY CLOSES ON SEPTEMBER 30
If you are deprived of a vote on election day, the fault will) 5
be yours.
W. McQUEEN, City Clerk.
JUNIOR LABOR LEAGUE
NOTES
The meeting held by the JUnion Labor
League last Friday night in thc Pender
Hall to inaugurate their third winter
season- was well attended, and the dance
afterward, though not so well patronized, was good. Wm. Ivens, M.I. A., of
Winnipeg, was the speaker of the'evening, his subject being "Labor in thc
New Era." An interesting discussion
developed after the address.
The league will meet Friday, September 23, at 929 Eleventh Avenue East,
at 8 p.m. It will be an educational
evening and the discussion will centre
around the topic, "Why the Workers
Kick" A full attendance of members
will bc necessary for next week's business meeting. For information regard
ing the league phone Fairmont 1610 or
Fairmont 3023L.   -
On Free Speech
We know a man who says he believes
in Free Speech and yet every time we
express an opinion contrary to his own.
he interrupts our argument with a torrent of verbosity. If wc persist in our
belief, as wc sometimes do, he grows
irritable and petulant like a spoilt child
���and yet he says he believes in Free
Speech. Most people do believe in Free
Speech, but some of them think it is
only free to themselves. We spc?k of
f.ee enough ourselves to listen and hear
frceenough ourselves to listen and hear
that which is*not in accord with our
own ideas. Free Speech, like all good
things, should be practised as well as
preached.���S.W.
SEVEN-DAY WORKING
WEEK SOUGHT BY
RAILROADS
Canadian    Railroads    Want    to
Abrogate All Working
Agreements.
Straight Time for Sundays and
Holidays Also to Be Imposed on Workers.
I     Establishment    of    thc     seven    da>
I working week, and abrogation of working agreements which have been in op-
I eration tor forty years or more, will be
! attempted by  Canadian  railways if,  as
i is anticipated, an effort is made on this
' side of  the   International   Boundary  io
put  into effect   the  recent  decisions  of
; the   American   Railway   Lalxir   Board,
Canadian roads in the past have claimed
that   their   policy   must   be   guided   b>
United  States   railway  policy  and   lor
this reason railway workers throughout
Canada are making preparations to resist  the  imposition  ot  such  wholly  inequitable   working   conditions   as   it   is
projiosed to  force upon American railroad  workers   by   virtue  of   the   Labor
Board's decision No. 222. docket 47?.
Seven Day Week
The moat far reaching, reactionary
and ami labor decision in thc opinion
of all those acquainted with the railway
labor situation is that affecting rule No.
6. Thc decision requires that all cm
ployecs necessary to the operation i
power houses, millwright gangs, heat
mating plants, train yards, running repairs, and inspection forces, who'are
regularly assigned to work Sundays and
holidays will bc compensated on lie
same basis as on week days. This me*ir.��
they will lie paid straight time for w rk
on Sundays and holidays, and furtht-r-
r ire. it means that the very object .��� i
which thc penally wage was fixed years
ago. thc reduction of Sunday and holiday work to a minimum compatible with
absolute necessity, will be removed. In
short, this decision means nothing more-
or less than thc establishment of the
seven day week, and so far rts railways
are concerned, the entire elimination of
statutory holidays for a large class of
workers.
A Few Smiles
CAUSE AND EFFECT
"Didn't the bride look  stunning?"
"And didn't the groom look stunned."
-Judge.
CURSES!
1     Ardent Admirer���What did the young !
'lady say when you gave her the flowers? j
J    Messenger Boy���She aaked the young
fellow  who was sitting with her if he
' didn't   want   one   lor  his   buttonhole.���
1 Boston Post.
MUTUAL ASSISTANCE
A customer entered the small town
| barber shop.
"How soon can you cut my hair?" he
asked of thc proprietor, who was seated
in an easy chair, perusing the pages of
a novel.
"Bill," said the barlier, addressing his
errand boy, "run over and tell the editor
I'd like my scissors if he's done editin'
the   paper.     Gentleman   waitin*   for   a
! hair cut."���Edinburgh   Scotsman.
. The proper study of mankind is man,
but thc most popular is woman.���Life.
iniMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimm
FOR NEARLY
FIVE MONTHS
The Allied Printing Trades have been engaged in a atrenuoua
fight against th* introduction of th* "American Plan" into Vancouver. Tbe fight ia still going on and they need the support of every
individual who believes in fair working conditions and the maintenance of the present standard of living.
A Job For You
Nearly everyone at some time haa th* placing of an order for
printing, or can influence a proapective purchaser. So* to it the*.
that th* offices listed below ar* favored with yours or your friends'
patronage. They ar* all union offices, and a boost for th* label is a
boost for yourself or your fellow trad* unionists.
ARCADE PRINTERS.
Homer  Arcade.  Foot   Homer.
BLOCHBERGER. F. R..
SI* Broadwa/ East.
CAMBIE PRINTING CO.
321 Camhie Street.
COWAN A BROOKHOUSE,
lilt H*w* Street.
CROSBY * BISSELL.
500 Beatty Street.
DUNSMUIR   PRINTING   CO..
437 D-Msnuir Street.
EVANS. CHARLES A..
1686 Kingaway.
FOLEY-MITCHELL,
IM Haatinga Street Wast.
JEFFERY. W. A.,
2168 Parker Street.
KERSHAW, J. A-. *
684 Seymour Street.
MAIN PRINTING CO..
3851   Main  Street.
McLENNAN.McFEELEY,
99 Cordova Street East.
MORRIS, J. F���
Rear, 523 Granville Street,
426 Homer Street.
NORTH SHORE PRESS,
North Vancouver.
PACIFIC PRINTERS,
500 Beatty Street.
SHOEMAKER ��t McLEAN,
North Vancouver.
SEYMOUR PRESS,      .
632 Seymour Street.
SUN PUBLISHING CO., LTD.,
137  Pender   Street.
VANCOUVER JOB PRESSES,
737 Pender Street.
WARD A CO.. LTD-,
315 Homer Street.
Keep This List For Reference
L
Allied Printing Trades of Vancouver
��� m nn nn mm -i t---ttititii	
The Reason Why
We are sometimes led to believe by
the kept press that the so-called "preat
and responsible" governments keep
their pledges of honor. Thc governments
of England and France assured their
Wearc sometimes led to believe by
people that they would leave off with any
further interference with Russia's government. England went so far as to
sjgn a trade agreement with Russia.
France, however, would not do this but,
after VYrangel's failure, announced she
would let Russia alone. Despite this,
recent press reports brought tiut thc
information that France had demanded
that Poland and Roumania make war
on Russia. Aid to do so was promised
both nations. Each, however, refused,
probably having thc fate of Wrangcl and
Dcnnikin visualized before them.
Thc reason for all these secret expeditions and backstair intrigue against Russia was blurted out at the time of thc
Murman Expedition by the chairman of
thc British Irtysh Corporation Limited,
who, addressing the stockholders of that
company, is quoted as saying, "For financial reasons the overthrowing of So
vict rule in Russia is necessary . . .
A start has already been made. There
are allied expeditions in thc North, thc
Murman oast. Archangel and in Siberia."
And in thc London Financial News of
November 11. 1919, there appeared this
tid-bit. "In thc city it is realized that
events are shaping more and more toward an international suzerainty over
Russia, modelled on the British surveillance of Egypt. SUCH AN EVENT
WOULD TRANSFORM RUSSIAN
BONDS;JNTQ THE CREAM OF THE
INTERNATIONAL MARKET."
The above arc British opinions. The
British capitalist class have not charfeed
them one iota and France's latest action
only puts them into practice.���S.W.
ON THE JOB
A man was brought ��� into court lor
the  illicit  distilling  of  whisky.
"What is your name?" asked the
judge.
"Joshua,"   replied the  prisoner.
"Joshua?" repeated lite judge. "Ah!
Arc you the Joshua who made thc sun
stand still?"
"No. sir, judge," was the answer. "I
is the man who made de moon shine "
NEEDED LIGHT
It was a sleepy village, and its fire
brigade was anything but up-to-date.
One night a fire was announced by thc
violent ringing of thc alarm bell, and
the sleepy brigade arrived at the scene
of action to find the burning building a
mass of smoke. No Hamcs were visible
from the outside.
The captain made a careful survey.
Then he lit his pipe and started to
smoke. <
"We'd better leave it alone and let
it burn up a bit," he said. "Then we'll
lie able to see what wc arc doing."
WAS H00EED AND D0CEED
The stranger in New York gazed at
the magnificent hotel. "A remarkable
building,"   he   commented.
"Waal, yes; and I may say. sir. that
I helped to build it," said thc guide.
"One day, while working about 500 feet
up, I slipped. Even now I can hear
thc shrieks of the people below. I ���
thought my last hour had come, when I
my trousers caught on a friendly nail.
The position was dangerous, and it was
an hour before I was rescued.
"When pay-day came along I found
that my money was short, so I went to
the cashier. 'Sec here,' I said, 'my
pay's short this week. How's that?'
'Oh.' he replied, 'they've stopped yon for
the time you were hanging on thc nail.'"
Dignified and Appropriate
PRINTING
miiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiimiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiini
Satisfaction
That's what our
customers get.
Our customers will find our prices as
reasonable as our product is good.
Whether a big or little order���
We Guarantee Satisfaction
and want your future business
o
Not what we say
But what we do
makes test-
Performance speaks
The last word
and the best
i:iii:;iiii;;i;ii!::iiniiii::i:i:::r.:i::;i:i:::;:i:;i:;::ui:i:ii:ii;ir.;i;iiimtn:
Try us with your NEXT order
The British Columbia
Labor News
Telephone Seymour 7495
319 Pender St. West
NEW YORK, N.Y.���The policemen
and firemen will make another effort to
have their pay increased from $2280
to $2,500 a year. Through' their association they recently filed petitions with
the Board of Estimate asking for the
raise. The Legislature last winter passed a bill giving thc men in both departments $2,500.    Mayor Hylan vetoed it.
LONDON.���The amalgamation of
the London and West London Societies
takes place next month. The new society, which will retain the name of thc
London Co-operative Society, will commence with a membership of roughly
116.000, by far thc largest co-operative
society in thc United Kingdom.
LILLE. France!���Thc textile workers -
of Lille. Roubaix and Turcoing struck as
a protest against a proposed cut in
wag.*. The metal workers, municipal
employees street cleaners and restaurant workers joined the ��� strike in sympathy, placing more than 60,000 on
strike.
���
si
More than 2,000 automobile owners
in Chicago appeared in court in one day,
charged with violating the recently enacted ordinance requiring them to carry
their identification cards bearing their
names and descriptions and the same of
their machines. The minimum fine is
$10.
' Get on top of your business.   Do not
let it get on top of yon.
j    To "get  business"  you  want   to   go
! after it    Put an "ad." in the News.
Give your fellow trade unionist a
i square deal���boost his union label, card
[or button.
We do job printing.
Be   particular���demand   the      union
, label, shop card and working button.
The B. C. Labor
|Vj ATA TQ   Official Paper, Vancouver
A l C W'1u>,   Trades and Labor Council
SCOTLAND'S POPULATION
SHOWS SMALL INCREASE
Scotland's population, according to
the preliminary' report on the census is
4,882488, of whom 24448,403 are males
and 2.533,885 females.
The increase on the 1911 census total
is 121,384, the smallest interccnsal increase on record.
The excess of females over males is
442456 mor^than that ascertained by
the previous census, and greater than
the ascertained excess at all preceding
censuses.
The follow ing is the population of the
principal burghs:���Glasgow. 1.034,069.
increa-. 25,582; Edinburgh, 420481 decrease 3.765; Dundee. 168417. decrease
8,134; Aberdeen. 158.969, decrease. 4,922.
{
Tin- wind must blow, nnd
blow���if the craft would
go, and go.
]
ONWARD
Delivered One Year, $1.50
Devoted to the* interests of the
International Trades Union
movement
Fill out
and mail-
Coupon
NOW
Here's my $1.50; aend
TheB.C Labor News
to me for one year
Name ���'
The B. C Labor News j5^
Room 306, Labor Hall, 319 Pender W.   j ca*_
Vancouver, B. C. I	
T"   I

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