BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

The British Columbia Labor News Jan 6, 1922

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcln-1.0309306.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcln-1.0309306.json
JSON-LD: bcln-1.0309306-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcln-1.0309306-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcln-1.0309306-rdf.json
Turtle: bcln-1.0309306-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcln-1.0309306-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcln-1.0309306-source.json
Full Text
bcln-1.0309306-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcln-1.0309306.ris

Full Text

 BRITISH COLUMBIA
A
[ Issued Every Friday
Devoted to the interests of the International Labor Movement
NEWS
[Subscription: $1.50 Per Year!
5e Per Copy J
Volume I.
Vancouver, B. C, Friday, January 6, 1922
Number 23
I   m
CALGARY ELECTS
FIVE LABOR MEN
More Labor Party Men Added
to    City    Council    and
School Board
The workers of Calgary have followed np their success at the Provincial and Federal elections by adding three more Labor candidates to
the City Council and two more to the
School Board Trustees.
Andy Davidson, George Batchelor
and Bob Parkyn, all Labor Party
candidates, were elected to the City
Council for two years, which, with
two Labor candidates elected last
year, gives Labor, five men on the
Council, all of whom are members
of trade unions. ��� Should two other
members of the Council, who usually
vote with the Labor members, continue that practice, Labor will control the Council. Andy Davison was
, second in the final count. P. R. was
used.
Both the Labor Party candidates
for the School Board Trustees, Tom
Riley and R. B. Gale, were elected
and along with Mrs. Carson elected
last year as a Labor candidate, will
make up the three Labor trustees.
POPLAR GETS RELIEF
THROUGH SENTENCES
London���The people of Poplar, the
London borough whose Socialist Mayor and councillors went to jail because they refused to collect an unjustly levied tax, will gain 300,000
pounds a year because of the courage
of their local officials.
This is the net result of the jailing of George Lansbury, his son and
daughter-in-law, and a number of
others, including Mayor Sam March
and the Labor majority of the borough government. Poplar is s working class section of London, with a
population of 162,000.
Unemployed Problem Again
Up Before Trades Council
Organized Unemployed Address Council and Ask for Co-operation  to  Impress  Authorities  on   Dire   Needs  of  Many
People���Council to Continue Efforts���Public Works
Needed���Christmas Parcels Go to West End Rich
Officers Nominated
A delegation of organised unemployed attended the regular meeting of the Trades and Labor Council meeting in the Labor Hall Tuesday evening and asked for the cooperation of the Trades Unions, in
... ,___ i pressing for governmental action in
Induce   your   friends   and   ����*)��-! reIief _f tfae memployed problem.
bors to vote for the Labor candidates for aldermen and school trustee.
Do the right thing this time; vote
Labor.
JUNIOR LABOR
FOOTBALL CLUB
Good Showing Made by New
Team���Active   in   Many
Other Ways
The Spartican Football Club, an
auxiliary of the Junior Labor league,
has been getting into the limelight
lately on account of its success on
the football field.
It was organised just previous to
the present season and has alreadv
won five games, made one draw and
, lost three. It has also reached fifth
place in the Junior Football Alliance
in which there are ten teams.
Besides the above, three members
of the team played an international
game last Monday, on the Scottish
team, beating the English team five
to one. McLean, of the Sparticans,
scored one of the goals. Two members of the Spartican team played in
the Junior Alliance game against the
sailors of H.M.S. Raleigh and defeated the sailors four to one.
The team is composed of Knutsal
(goal), Lindsay (Capt.), Higgs,
Brown, Mundy, Paton, McConnell,
Hollingsworth, McLean, Morrison and
Taite. The executive is composed of
T. Snowden (trainer), Bob Higgs
(manager), F. Higginbottom (secretary) and J. Richardson.
'They play the Mount Pleasant
Methodists next Saturday at the K.
E. High School at 2.30.
Tonight (Friday) the Junior Labour League will hold an educational
meeting at 929 11th Ave E. Members and others interested are invited to be on hand at 8 p.m.
Whist aad Daace
Thursday, Dec. 29th, the league
held a whist drive aad dance, the proceeds of which were allotted to the
benefit of the J.L.L and Spartacan F.
C. The affair was a decided success
and will be repeated on Thursday,
Jan. 12th. at Cotillion Hsll. Dancing and whist will ensure everyone a
good time, so a large turnout is expected.
Aay further information rosy be
obtained from Fair. 1610 or Fair.
8040.
SOME RECENT
ELECTION FIGURES
Big Majorities Polled in Calgary and Winnipeg for
Labor Candidates
The votes cast in the constituencies in the recent Federal Election
where J. S. Woodsworth and Wm.
Irvine, the Labor candidates were
elected, are as follows:
Winnipeg Centre ��� Woodworth,
7,774; Wilton, Liberal, 4032; Mclvor.
Conservative, 4034; Dick, Independent, 2314; Anderson, Lib.-Conserva-
tive, 1120.
Calgary East���Irvine, 6424; Smith
Conservative, 4156; Duncan Smith,
Liberal, 3571.
Shaw, thc Farmer-Labor candidate
for Calgary West beat R. B. Bennett,
the government candidate, bq 16
votes, polling 7269.
Those who believed that the revolution was just around the corner
probably understand that it went up
a dark alley before it was able to
reach the corner.
WOODSWORTH AT
COLUMBIA SOON
Diplomacy is the art of concealing what yon really mean by not
tellinga direct lie and inducing the
other fellow, who does not believe
yon, to pretend that yon are telling
the truth. When two or more who
practice this trade get together yon
have���well, you have diplomacy.
Municipal     Candidates     Will
'Address Meeting in Ref-
ence to Campaign
J. S. Woodsworth, M.P., will speak
in the Columbia Theatre next Sunday evening, Jan. 15. This is the
last chance that Vancouverites will
get to hear Mr. Woodsworth for some
time, as he expects to leave for Ottawa at any date.       -t-
Labor Party candidates will speak
in the F. L. P. Hall, 148 Cordova
Street W., on Sunday evening at 8
p. m.
Another meeting will be held in
the General Gordon school on Monday evening.
At a rally held by the party last
Monday night J. S. Woodsworth gave
an interesting talk of the activities
of Winnipeg workers during the recent campaign, showing what can be
done b*y a little effort on the part of
everyone to put labor candidates into
office.
The committee was composed of
representatives from the organized
unemployed of Vancouver Centre,
North Vancouver and South Vancouver. They pointed out that the
unemployed was a menace to all
those who were employed, because
they could be used to batter down
present wages and conditions.
A South Vancouver delegate said
that he would not scab but the situation had become desperate because
the municipality was able to meet the
needs of only a small number of the
unemployed. South Vancouver had
860 organized unemployed, one of
the latest being a banke teller.
Another delegate complained of
the situation among the single men
at Hastings Park relief camp, but
his complaints were based on conditions which were alleged to exist
more than ten days ago.
OPEN SHOP DRIVE
LOSING   GROUND
The committee appointed to try
and square up the trouble between
the unfair attitude of the" Maryland
Cafe towards the Hotel and Restaurant Employees Union, met with fail-
' ure, so this place is now on the un-
! fair list of organized labor. This
: place is attempting to operate on
the "open Shop" plan, and if suc-
ployed problem needed solving and **^M- wi�� *** ��*�� opening wedge
the profits from the liquor business ��� fOE oth*n- Organiser McKentie re-
could very well be put to use in this Port*- �����-* -** "��P*a shoP" campaign
respect The B. C. Electric was get-' on th* P*��cific Comgt *** b**a V���'
ting $450,000 from the government' t"--"* defeated, all but five cafes
for the change in the "rule of the j remaining in the recent' big fight in
road." and it was the intention of *����� c5ty of Stm^1*' <^4{tioai in
the company to take two vears to' Vancouver are faay favorable con-
make this change by means of their s,d��nn* *-��* ���>��**�������� depression,
present employees, but the unem- j Al* for thf Un-on Hous�� Card,when
ployed might be relieved by putting j !������~onixing restaurants,
them to work on this and cleaning;
the job up quick. Referring to some FAIIf) I 1 DAD Ml CM
of the criticism of the Hastings Park rUUIm LADVu lllljfl
camp, Del. Bartlett said that he had j
heard from many who had been there ARl*    Fl Fl   lFII
that  the food and shelter was  far laalll   l_l_l_*l_-1 Lil/
better than some of the unemployed , 	
allege it to be, and he was quite  Edmonton Workers Put Three
MEXICO DEMANDS
UNION MADE GOODS
(By Federated Press)
WASHINGTON. ��� Wanted ��� A
strictly union-made outfit for a cafeteria to serve 5,000 persons.
That's the suggestion which the
Mexican government has sent tha In-
tenational Association of Machinists
here. The cafeteria is to be installed
in ohe of the government departments in Mexico City. The machinists sre trying to find American
manufacturers who can supply the
cooking and serving apparatus and
utensils from shops fsir to organised
labor.
Extreme   Destitution.
A woman delegate informed the
council that there was extreme destitution among a great many women
and children in the city and urged
co-operation with the committee
which would meet again February 7.
In taking up the question the council decided to appoint delegates to
go into the situation with the unemployed in the various districts and
report back to the council at the
next business meeting, but with
power to act on anything needing
speedy attention.
Public Works
a
Del. Mattson said that one of the
best ways to help relieve the situation was for the beautifying and
building up of the province by means
of public works. A public causeway
across the Second Narrows was a
very desirable piece of work and
would be an asset to the province.
Del. Hardy pointed out that the
frades Congress had favored National
Unemployment Insurance, and that
this measure Was to be pressed for as
soon as the House at Ottawa convened.
Del. Bengough said that the council had been working on the unemployed problem for the past four
months  and   had   been  in   constant j
prepared to accept the statement of
Aid. Scribbins and trades unionists.
Feeding the Plates
Del. Showier said that he had
been informed by a driver that it
(.was a crime the number of parcels
that were sent from the Province
"Christmas Fund" to high class
suites in- the West End instead of to
the poor for whom it had been advertised.
Mrs. Dolk said that the woman
delegate on the unemployed committee had been in attendance at the
meeting of the minimum wage
Board and had stated that the Trades
Unions had outlived their usefulness.
Mrs. Dolk pointed out that the only
place where the minimum wage law
was being enforced was where the
women were organised in unions.
Girls are being forced to work 1
hours  a  day,   below   the   minimu;
School Trustees Into
Office
wage, and being unorganised,
fired if they reported this to the mi
mom wage board.
. -X  Wat-knag  far  -Pia"   Money
Mrs. Mahon reiterated this
pointing out that most of the girls'
who are breaking down the minimum
wage act are those who are working
just for "pin" money or for clothes.
Tbe real working class girl suffers
because of this and is unemployed
because she has to ask for enough
to feed and clothe herself on and
oftimes to pay room rent.
The committees appointed to meet
with the unemployed were McMillan,
Neelands and Coghill for South Vancouver and Crawford, Welsh, Graham and George for Centre. Members
of the executive will get in touch
with North Vancouver..
The Hotel and Restaurant Employees Union asked the council for
James East, the Labor candidate
for the Edmonton City Council, was
elected in the recent elections there.
He obtained second place with a
vote of 4,968, the first place going
to an independent candidate with
5,814 votes.
S. A. G. Barnes, Labor candidate
headed the polls for the Board of
School Trustees with 4,652 votes,
and two other labor candidates were
elected to the Board, giving Labor
three seats out of four. Not a single Labor candidate waa on last
year's Board. -
/The Edmonton Trades and Labor
Council moved into its new and larger headuarters last week. Among
-the speakers who addressed the meeting were Hon. D. A. Ross, Labor M.
P.P. and Minister of Labor, and
Mayor Duggan.
touch with the municipal, provincial | h.e,P.,_n straiKhtening out trouble at
and federal governments, i
Del. Coghill said that the last session of the Provincial legislature
was supposed to have been a special
one to deal with the unemployed
problem, but judging from the number of unemployed in the city and
province nothing had been done.
Wants Quick Action
the Maryland Cafe. Dels Crawford,
Dolk and McKenzie were appointed
Nomination   of   Officers
The following delegates were nominated for the various offices for the
coming term, further nominations
and the election to take place at the
next regular meeting.
President: Welsh (declined), Craw
Del. Bartlett said that the unem- ford, Hardy.
__iiiiiiiiiii��iiiiiiiMii��iHiiiii��ni����iiil��iiiiiii��iiiiiiiiiiii��i��iiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiinm_;
il
WHIST DRIVE and DANCE
���of 1
Under Joint Auspices ef
Junior Labor League and Spartacan
Football Club
Thursday, January 12th      Cotillion Hall
Whist: 8:15 Dancing: 9 to 12
Tickets: Gents, 55c; Ladies, 25c
THE BIG? ISSUE AT THE CIVIC ELECTION
PUBLIC WELFARE VS. CORPORATE INTERESTS
FEDERATED LABOR PARTY
CANDIDATES FOR ALDERMEN
PETTIPIECE, R. P.
(621 Lahawsad Drive)
TROTTER, W. R.
(929 Eleventh Avenue Cast)
FOR SCHOOL TRUSTEE
McINNIS, ANGUS
(3544  Prince  Edward  Street)
PLATFORM OF THE PARTY
THB FEDERATED LABOR PARTY ht
af sacariag i-duatrial Ugialsllss. aad the
stie operation of tha Manns af wealth
NEW YORK JOINS
PACKERS'STRIKE
(er Fifty Thousand Are Now
Involved   in   Eleven
Cities in U.S.
Four ^thousand workers in New
York andVJersey City meat packing
houses controlled by the "Big Five"
-Ithe ArmoV, Swift, Morris, Cudahy
and WilsonV companies���went on
strike recently in protest against
the refusal Of the employers to continue collective bargaining in the
industry.
Strike in 11 Cities Now
The  -walkout   here   came   several j
WINNIPEG LABOR
GETTING CONTROL
Now   Have   Members   in   Provincial,    Federal    and
Municipal Offices
Will Vancouver swing into line
with with Winnipeg, Calgary and Edmonton in the present municipal
campaign? Although it is a question
that can only be answered on election day, it seems to us that it can
be answered better when we realise
that these other cities are leading
Vancouver in the placing of labor
candidates into office.
Winnipeg leads the way with six
labor aldermen, four school trustees,
four members of the Provincisl Legislature and one member of the Federal House.
That city has made great strides
during the past three years and along
with Calgary and Edmonton are on
the map so far as Labor is concerned.
Other parts ot Manitoba are also
forging ahead. East Kildonan has a
Labor reeve, three councillors and
three school trustees. East Kildonan
has one labor councillor and St.
James has one.
Besides the four Winnipeg Labor
Legislators, Manitoba has seven
others from various parts of the
country.
SCRIBBINS RESIGNS
FROM LABOR PARTY
Criticized for Actions on City
Council   at   Business.
Meeting of Party
At a heated business meeting of
the Federated Labor Party Tuesday
evening considerable criticism was
made by members upon Aid. W. J.
Scribbins fojr voting for the B. C.
Electric Ry. agreement made with
the city council last year and also
for calling in the police at Hastings
Park unemployed relief station to
eject certain individuals.
Members of the party took exception to the agreement made by the
City Council with the B. C. Electric,
giving the company authority to
raise its car fares to enable it to
make six per cent, profit. It was
pointed out that the company could
use all kinds of subterfuges to show
that its profits were below 6 per cent.
The following ^resolution was
passed at the meeting to guide all
Labor candidates in  future actions:
Public   Ownership
"The     Federated     Labor     Party
stands for the collective ownership
and   democratic   operation   of    the
means   of   wealth   production    and
_    .a.    .  a      * _. a _. i   i holds that the city should own and
days after the .strike of butcher work- _
r | operate all public utilities and should
| have power to acquire and  operate
{ whatever businesses the citizens, by
ers in' Chicago and ten other Western
packing centres. This was brought
about by the refusal of the "Big
Five" to continue the so-called "Alts-
chuler agreement," which provided
for impartial arbitration between
the employers and the workers in
case of disputes, -tie agreement ran
out last September. At that time the
union asked for its renewal, but the
employers refused.
Between 49,000 and 50,000 workers are now on strike, in the meat
packisjg industry.
There was quite a lot of non-
starters in the present mayoralty
campaign bat no dark horses. Its
five thousand . to on^-thonsand in
many cases.
referendum, consider to be in the
public welfare. The action of the
candidates of the party for civic positions will be determined upon these
questions by this declaration."
The next day the secretary of the
party received the resignation of Aid.
W. J. Scribbins from the party, thus
leaving him a free lance in the present campaign.
Public
i
from Labor's
Vice-Pres.: Herrett (declined).
Bartlett, Thom.
Seeretary: Bengough, Mahon (declined), Nixon (declined).
Treasurer: Showier.
Sgt. at Arms: Fisher (declined),
Wheatcroft (declined), Warde.
Trustees: Bartlett, Nixon, Mahon,
Jenni, Skinner.
Statistician: George.
Washington���One and one-half
million more jobs for adults would
be thrown open to relieve the unemployment situation if child labor were
eliminated, Secretary of Labor Davis told the United Press.
r Columbus, Ohio.���A forerunner of
what may be a nationwide plan to
force the "open shop" in coal mines
was seen here in the act of the Southern Ohio Coal Exchange in serving notice on John L. Lewis, president of the United Mine Workers of
America, that Ohio operators would
I not meet him at Pittsburg January
6th.
Union Label Trades Monthly
Whist Drive and Dance
METAL TRADES
Friday, January 27, 8 p.m.
Cotillion Hall
WT-_M Drive 8 to 10 Dancing 9 lo 12
'i Tickets:   Gents' 50c; Ladies' 25c
\
m
j
���__���
'I
i
)
=__________a
-_. ��
������>
���
%*
PAGE TWO
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA LABOR NEWS
i
TEA
THE FINEST
The W. H. Malkin
Co., Ltd.
Vancouver
Naiiaiuici Victoria
ODD BITS
(Conducted  by   Sydney   Warren)
THE BX. LABOR NEWS
Official f _��a of tha Vancouver Trades
and Labor Council aad AffiUatad
Unions.
Control 'Committee: F. W. Welsh. P.
R. Bengough. and W. J. Bartlett.
1-ahKshsd   Oaca  a   Mo-lb   at   Labor
Hall. 319 Paader Si. Waat
Vancouver. B.C.
Telephone�� Seymour 'OS'-Wo
Subscription Bates:
���1.50 per year by mail In Canada
���2.50 par year onts.de Canada
Advert���lag Bates upon application
W. WATTS -  Editor and Manager
FRIDAY, JANUARY ��.
Angus Mclnnis. who is running again
for school trustee, also lost by a few
votea.
This year, however, there is every
indication of all of them getting
seats, provided Labor goes to the
polls instead of staying at home and
leaving it to George. The poll will
be.heavy this time on account of the
race for mayor, and the plutocrats
will be out in vast numbers in order
to select their favorites, so it behooves labor to go to the polls in
full force, also in order to offset the
plutocratic votes that will not be
cast for the labor candidates.
Both R. P. Pettipiece and W. R.
Trotter are members of the Typographical Union and well known in
the city, and need no further introduction.
Angus Mclnnis,'the F.L.P. candidate for school trustee, is a member
of the Street Railwaymen's Union in
the city, is a smart young man and
a,student of many years' training in
the Labor movement. His election,
and that of the Labor party candi
STRIKE AVERTED
By a vote of 814 against 503 the
employees of the B. C. Electric Railway Co. of Vancouver, New Westminster and Victoria decided to accept  the  award  of the   Arbitration,  ���  ��� . ,  	
Board which means a reduction in ; dates for aldermen will, we are sure,
wages of 10 per cent. While a pre- j be in the best interests of the city
vious vote gave every indication of a j of Vancouver.
strike, this failed to materialise upon j Neither the Labor Party nor the
a strike vote being taken. The men j Trade Union movement has any offi-
have not accepted this reduction will-  cial candidate in the field for mayor.
ingly. but realize that under present! 	
conditions a strike would in all like- j MAKING A GOOD START
lihood be of long duration and weak-; Franc_ _nd ^^ a_e ^^ _
en the union thereby eliminating all j dip!oIMtic fight over Ger||U_ ���,���__
chances of an early recovery of lost  ^    EngUnd aUo wants t_ ..he,p.,
���*Ton-[- " j Russia, but France is strenuously op
Which?
Which will you be.
Bond���slave or free?
Through the year's span
Which will you heed���
Honor���or Greed,
Mammon���or Man?
���Berton Braley.
Debs,  World   Citizen
On Xmas Day Eugene Victor Debs
was set free but denied his American
citizenship. When questioned regarding his loss, the veteran American Socialist gave an answer that
will remain a classic.   It follows:
"My citizenship? Where my star
war, behold my sun! I am not a
citizen of the United States, but a
citizen of the world.
"It is not strange that a man
should lose his citizenship in a system that condemns him as a felon.
There is a consistency about ��� that
which is perfectly admirable.
"A man who is a convict for his
convictions is everywhere a citizen
in good standing.
"He is a citizen by virtue of his
own God-given inherent sovereignty.
The only man who loses his citizenship is a man who renounces his principles, abdicates his manhood and is
an apostate to his ideals."
���     ���     ���
New   Lamps   for   Old.
Science's most recent discoveries
add proof to the contention that there
is nothing new under the sun. General ignorance alone accounts for the
novelty. M. Loisel informed the
Acadamie des Sciences, Paris, that
he had discovered in the mineral waters at Bagoles, a new" substance
which shows powerful properties of
radio-activity. He has given the
substance the name "Emilium."    Al
QUESTIONAIRE FOR
CIVIC CANDIDATES
Trades Council to Quiz Aspirants   for  City   Offices   on
Questions Vital to Labor
The Vancouver Trades and Labor
Council is submitting the following
to all candidates in the forthcoming
civic election, with a view to securing for the information of the workers in this community the attitude
of the respective candidates towards
these issues:
We suggest that these questions
be repeated at meetings of the various candidates.
Answers to these questions will be
printed and circulated among organized labor.
Are you in favor of the eight-hour
day, and the forty-four hour week,
with the union rate of wages paid
to all civic employees?
Are you in favor of the insertion
of a clause in all contracts let by
the City, covering the eight-hour day
and forty-four week and the union
rate of wages?
Are you in favor of all civic work
being done by day labor and the
abolition of contract work wherever
possible?
Will you, if elected, do your utmost towards securing the immediate
installation of Comfort Stations in
this city?
Are you in favor of having the
City Charter amended so as to enable the citizens to elect the Police
Commissioners instead of the present method of appointment?
Are you in favor of a Municipal
owned Hydro Electric Plant?
Are you in favor of the cancellation of the license of any business;
operated by Asiatics, in which white
help is employed?
Are you in favor of the cancellation of the license of any business
operated by white people, in which
Asiatiss are employed?
Will you,   if  elected, do all  that
Trades Union Directory
I Secretaries are requested to keep ibis Directory up-to-date I
Vancouver Unions
vas.coov-a -imams amd	
OOOaTCXXa���Pr����� :dent F. W. Welsh.
Secreury. I'. Bengough. Office SSS
Labor HalL 31�� Pender Street West.
Phone Seymour 70S. Meeta In Labor
Hall at > p.m. oa tha first and third
Taasday ta aaoatk
-roxLonro miw cot-men--Chstxaaa.
a a flans. fsi.euiy. Say Maaaarsr.
Omae SIS Laser Hall Meets first and
mm Wedaeatsy ta assess sa Lakes ataa.
Presidrnt. 3. Brightwetl: Sa-a-retary. W.
Bowron. ISIS Burns Ave. Meets at
Jit Pender Street West on second
Monday of each month at I p.��s.
F. P. Ginuh: Secretary. W. II McLean. ISIS Broadway Wee*. MeaU
at (19 Perder Streat Wast at S p m
every third   Tueaday In month.	
Local No. 1XS���Preaident. C. K. Herrett: Seeretarr. A R Jenn:e. US
Camble Street. Meets Room SIS. SIS
Pender Street Weat. at 7.It p.m. on
seeond and fourth Tuesdays la month.
ft- ,���   t__Jf_***�� ��*}���President. Joha
���J^"; ***��-reury.   G��0- Annand. IMS
Albert Street.    Meets at Labour Hall
_____< p.m. on first  and third Friday.
'h "VUUfi ****��� eSS--PTeeldea.t.J.
H. Robb; Secretary. Evan McMillan;
����laes�� Agent. P. Bengough: Office
?i*i__a!?,-r..8tT~t    Wae_l_eeta    at
.^bVieid:^ ����� - "���*-����� ���
 ,  Loeal  No.  lit���President.
W. J. Rarflett. Secretary. T McHugh.
MM Sixth Avenue Weat. Meeta at
SIS .'Paader Street Weat at S p m. on
third Tueaday of each
President.  R.   ~
Fraser. Room SSS. SIS Ps-derVStreet
Weat. Meeta at SIS Psndee Street
West, at S p.m. oa flrat and third
Mondays   of each month
' Local     No.    SSS ��� Preeldent.
A-d'.ey. Secretary.    Tom    Cory,
Vernon   Drive.     Meeta at  SIS  F���-���.
Street Weat at S p.m. on flrat Tueaday
in  month.
naiw-aa   asm-	
 IsUM,  Local   Xo.   4(4���President.
J. Smith: Secretary. & Showier. Sit
Pander Street West. Meeta at lit
Pander Street Weet at t p.m. on second and fourth Fridaya In month.
PAXSTTa-a. -aSsDOmATOS-S a S>4
-aameai. Local No 111-
3. Kins*: Fla. See- a A. Baker: _
3. McMillan. 14S Cerdeea Sweet. ������
at lit Cordova Street, at S p m. ea
second and fourth Thursdays la month.
Boca* sUHl ����������� laocal No. Sett���
President. W. H. Pollard: Secretary.
X. H. Vernon. Boa SIS.* Meets at Sit
Pender Street West.   Vancouver,   at t
p���L on every Friday of month.	
���OTO snsWa-aVataUr* Local No. It���
Prealdent.. F. Looney: Secretary. Gordon Blwards. 17IS Fifth Aveaao Weat.
Meets at World Itulldlna. Vancouver.
at S pm. on Saturday of each
its
laocal Xo. ��������� Pra_den, Chariee Keall.
Secretary. Alfred Harry. Stl Thirty-
fourth Avenue East. Meeta at Sit
Pender Street West, at t p.m. oa flrat
Wedneaday la month.
iaf    MSsTsT���   avtnaattaa,    O.
Secretary.  3.   U   Irvine:   Boat-
ran
Heys: _  .
nesa Agent. E. A. Goddaid. Stt
Richards Street. Meeta at Sit Pander
Street West on first and third Mon-
day In month at I p.m.
 . Local No. tT
a Biaasie: Secretary.
Roy Maeaeear. Sit Peodu Street West.
MeeU at Sit Pander Street Went, at
��������. ascend end fearth Meaday.
 .   Local   l��t���President.
Oeo. Mowat: SeereUry. Frank Milne.
Bos til. MeeU at Sit Pender Street
Waat at t p tn. every third Wednesday
In month.
posed to the plan, having spent more
! than    England    in    financing   wars
The make-up of the King cabines[ aganist Russia.    America and Japan
THE NEW GOVERNMENT
has every indication of being the nucleus of another reactionary machine. While we had some hopes
that the Progressives might line up
with the government in an effort to
offset the reactionary section of Lhe
Liberals and help release the country from the grip of the manufacturing and financial interests, it
seems as though the farmers were a
little skeptical of their leader. Mr
.-.re not going to come out of the
Washington conference on good
terms. China appears to have every
reason to be up in arms over the
"agreements" being formulated by
the same gang of spoilers. Russia
is alleged to be preparing for an attack upon Finland-'. Spaniards and
J Greeks are fighting In Africa, and so
'are the Spaniards and Moors. .Serbs
���and  Albanians are fighting in    the
Crerar and decided to take no chances j Balkans. England is fighting the
in throwing their best. spokes-men! Moplars and Northern Tribes of In-
into the machine which might betray i di*-   Tne Wababites are fighting the
them.
The chances Tor industrial reforms
or beneficial labor legislation ia very
alight in onr opinion, ao it behooves
tabor to get together at once in the
formation of a strong, virile   labor
Shammer in Arabia. This is just a
little of the progress we are making
in the year 1922. Wars, preparations
for war and war clouds. Millions
starving in various parts of the world,
with food and clothing piled high in
most at the same time M. Calmette,
Deputy Director of the  Pasteur In-i -..,'   ~~ ���.���	
stitute, announced that he had found i Voo^ possibly can  towards the elim-
a means of making the microbe of! ,na>lon bf the   Hr"" """'   ' tl"
,uuK, .iiut- uiuur ��"" iwiu -iiu ciouiing piiea nign in
movement, capable not only of hold- factories and warehouses. An acute
ing Ua own on the industrial field unemployed situation in practically
bat also of capturing the powers of, every ..country and the "diplomats"
     ...  ...   --        -     I __,,! "statesmen" absolutely incapable
of relieving the situation.    And we
call it civilization.
government at all the forthcoming
elections with the object of legislating in its own interests.
POWER OF UNITY
Calgary today gives one of the
beat examples of unity in the labor
movement that any city in the Dominion has shown.
In spite of the fact that it was
practically  the   birth-place    of   the
tuberculosis (the Koch bacillus) in
capable of causing tuberculosis, or
in other words making the microbe
produce its own antidote. Now if
some other scientist will come forward with a means by which ��� the
world workers will be forced to think
and act with greater intelligence
than has heretofore been the case, he
will be hailed as the greatest of them
all.
*    *    *
"The Order of the Bar"
James Buchanan of Buchanan's
whiskey fame, was made a peer, presumably for his services to the Empire. Only two people in Canada
were given New Year's handles. It
has occurred to us that the reason
for this must be that Baths are becoming too common and Garters are
almost universally worn. To meet
his contingency we suggest that, since
bars are becoming rare in Canada a
new order be instituted called "The
Most Gracious and Distinguished Order of the Bar." Canada, then, might
be able
drug ring" from thb
city?
(a) By the deportation, where
possible, of all convicted of drug
peddling.
(b) By the elimination of fines
and the substitution thereof of a
heavy jail sentence.
Are you in favor of a qnarterly
inspection of the housing accommodation of the Asiatics, with a view
to a more rigid enforcement of the
City Health and Building By-laws?
In view of the B. C. Electric Ry.
Co. having reduced its operating expenses by lowering the wages of its
employees, will you oppose any further concessions being made to this
Company until the street car Cares
are reduced in conformity with the
wage reduction?
CIVICBatTX-OTSIS. Local Xo. IS���
President. J. White: SeereUry. G.
Harrison. Office Its Cordova Street
Went Meeta at 141 Cordova Street
West at t p m. oa the flrat and third
Friday  In  month.
      Local  No
St���President. II A. Black: Seeretary.
Aid. W. 3. Scribben. City HalL Meets
at 14B Cordova Street West, at t p m.
on  first  Wednesday of each  month.
 -rasa, tuaortuuu-oox*. Loci!
4SS���President Geo. H. Hardy: Secretary. W. J. Johnston: Husinesa
Acent. G. C. Thom. Office Stt Labor
HalL Meeta seeond and fourth Monday atjjp���l^ta Labor Hall
Local X*. 170���Presideat. Bert Stirsheeae;
Secretary. J, Crswtber; Beaissss Acent.
P .W. Welsh. Office SOI Leber HalL
Meets st Sit Pender Street West, at S
yea, ee aaraed aad feerth Fridays.
(kXaltSSUUHO l*a*Ba~_���TIOM, Local
No II���President. Roy A. Parry: SeereUry. Alexander Murray. 1414 Tenth
Avenue Weat. MeeU at ttt Fender
Street West, at 7:3t p.m. on fourth
Tuesday of month.
PSBI.HMsTAaT commt���TB���T. >_.d
Csslnaaa. W. 3. Bartlett   Secretary. Mrs.
W. Makes    Meets ta reesa SIS Later Hall
ea  the flrat aad third  Thursday  la
awash at S a���-	
Local N-a ���� President. S. W Myers;
Secretary. R B Stephenson. Box ttt.
MeeU at 11! Haatlnsa Street. Vancouver, at I p.m. on aecond Tueaday in
month.
��� STI.aOSn MMmOTMBS. Division No.
St���President. A. N. Lowes; Secretary,
ftiarles Bird. ZtSt Union Street.
MeeU at I.O.O.F HalL SIS Hamilton
Street, at t p.m on first Monday la
month. ^
CAKr-Ua-Tna tMaLOSMtTSP. Be.
Siaaca. PusHaal. T. 8. Oeeae: ��
-���aa Arent. Aran a MacSa-asa: Seeretary.
a 0. Webber. IdS lttt Ave. W. Meete
r-id sad Stt Tuesday al t p as ia MP
Hsll
Be. t Branch.���Secretary. W. Bray. SO
lttt Ave. W. Meets 1st aad Srd Tees-
day at S a as. ia F LP. Ran. let Osrdsee
St. W.
.WAT OOBTDOCTOaa. Division Na
2(7���President. G. W. Hatch: Secretary
J. R Phyelck list Thurlow Street.
Meets at I.O.O.F. Hall on first Sunday
at S p.m.. and on third Thursday at
t p.m
 Local No. 1ST���President. G. Thomas: Seeretary. R. 3.
Cralc St Kootenay Street. MeaU at
sit Pender Street West, at I p.m. ea
flret Tuesday la
BAtLWAT -AXMKsT. Ledce Be. tt���-Preei-
dent. T. Soaaaaer-ille; Secretary, a J.
Seasesa. SSS0 Sherbreoke St Meeta 1st
aad Srd Pridaye. le CetilKoa HalL	
���PreeMent. C A. Mitchell; Secretary.
D. A. Monro. 7t Seventh Avenue Weat.
Meets at I.O.o.F_ HalL_Hamilton Street
at 7 Jt p.m. on flrat Tueaday aad S:St
won third Tea-day.
p ��� c
 _-_J���Preaident ���". F. <". Ctals.
So-foUry. Geo. Gray. ItSt Flrat Ave.
MEETING THE STRINGENCY
The next issue of the Labor News
will be published on Friday, February 10. This is done on account of
the business depression through which
we have passed, and which, from all
appearances, will continue  for   an-
TERRE HAUTE, Ind.���The Mayor
of Terre Haute, Charles R. Hunter,
in   a   personal   letter   to   President
Harding has asked for the release of
Debs,   whom   he   designates  as   an
"honest and honorable citizen" and
-    i "a  man  that we honor and love.**
to supply a  fair share of, The MtyoT ^ knoym j^^ 40 yw8
ifirn    anil     f!/an.raoniaaaa��     ���ai.l I -  -
Commanders and Companions, and
perhaps a goodly number of Grande
Dames.
One Big Union movement, that city I other month or two
ita O.B.I".. but in its place j    Not only docs the Labor News find
ia a solid industrial and political
movement. The trades anion movement there is not only solid, bat
strong. The Labor party has been
able ta cater election contests minus
the competition' and opposition of
the Socialist Party or another labor
Party. The platform of the Party
ia conformity with the
of production*" its one and
only plank It went into every election to win.
And what has been the result?
A labor representative far Calgary
in the Provincial House. Two Farmer-Labor candidates for Calgary
aad vicinity for the Federal House-
Five Labor members on the City
Council aad three Labor membt
on the Board of School Trustees.
Calgary smtkets ore obtaining power and their legislators are men aad
women who know their trot position
in human society.
it almost impossible to obtain business advertising to help cover the
coot of publishing the paper, but the
continual drainage upon the treasuries of the Trades Unions oa account
of wage reductions, threatened strikes
and relief to unemployed members,
has had its affect upon the finances
 . ���- , of the paper, and although the Labor
of the average worker.    It did not jfan i, not in debt at the present
make the "abolition of the present Time, if it continues to publish it wiU
incur a debt that will not be easily
covered. We, therefore, deem it bet-
tea ttTVut cTpensea by this method,
than to pUe up a deficit that will impede the1 "progress of the paper later
in the year.
It hi oar intention to resume the
weekly publication just as soon as
conditions warrant it. and inasmuch
���as Ubb may mean another two or
'three months, oa account of the first
three months of tbe year always being bad for business, we hope that
oar many readers and supporters will
bear with us for the time being.
If it is possible to build up our
Job Printing business, we wfll endeavor to issue the paper after each
meeting of the Trades Council. Your
help in this respect will be appreciated and will enable as to resume
the   weekly  publication   that   much
quicker.
.Steady   business    advertising   it
essential to the existence of al-
aay paper, aad this is what ait
THE CITY ELECTONS
While the scramble for the office
of Mayor has somewhat petered out
to just a few candidates, there is a
large number in the race for aldermen. Labor, however, is in the field
again with candidates for aldermen
aad" one for school trustee. Lost
year labor elected one alderman aad
' v loot oat only by a few votes, j
Washington���The Interstate Commerce Commission today refused to
permit Henry Ford to reduce freight
rates on coal 20 per cent, along the
line of his railroad, the Detroit, Toledo and Ironton, on the ground that
the reduction would discriminate
against other mining territories, the
product of which is sold in cities in
this territory.
as friend and neighbor, and says he
speaks for the great majority of his
fellow citizens in asking his release
in time to spend the coming Christmas with his family
  . Local   JIS���
Presideat. D. W. McDou��all; Seeratary.
F. R Burrowa: Business Acent. KM.
Morrison. Ofnee 14S Cordova Street
West. MeeU at ItS Cordova Street
Weat at t  p.an. every Monday.	
 . taoeal Na It��� Preel-
dsnt. Percy Ties las: Seeretary. Chas.
A. WMtaoa. Na I Fire HalL Twelfth
aad Quebec Streets. Vancouver. MeaU
at Sit Pander Streat weat.
 -���-,    i--, Laeal NoTiH
___Pres'.lent. Mia. W. Mahon: Seeratary.
Ada llawkeworth. SSI�� Fleminc Street.
MeaU at  Labour Hall at t pm.    oa
flrat Thursday la asonttu
 -President. Harry Wood:
SeereUry. Andy Graham. Ill Seymour
Street.    Meete at 441   ~
 ���,������-. Streat
flrat   aad   third   Wedneadsy   at   S:St.
Second end fourth Wedneaday at t:St.
The new Canadian nickel will not
boy any more because it is bigger.
These things arevonly sent to fool us.
are lacking. The four columns of
small advertisements in this paper ore
to be inserted only once a nionth and
were obtained through a contract
with the Labor Press Asosciation
of Seattle, ao are not a continuous
source of revenue. We feel sure,
however, that just as soon as the
merchants find conditions improving
they will seek the patronage of the
readers of the Labor News through
its columns. They cat their overhead expenses at the'present time by
catting down advertising and we must
follow suit by cutting out some edi
tions of the paper.
Poster rates were greatly increased on the first of January, which
adds to the expense,
hold a Whist Drive and Dance in the
Tbe Labor News will not go out of
existence; it ft in the field to stay,
and when it resumes regular publication we hope to make it a bigger and
better paper. In tbe meantime you
and your organization are urged to
lend financial and moral support to
make the weekly issue possible again
at on early date. i
a
Washington���Senator Tom Watson of Georgia, has offered to produce more than 100 witnesses before
the special Senate committee to
prove his charges that the American
soldiers were brutally treated, hanged without trial or shot and killed by
their officers ia France.
Vote for Labor Forty caadidatas
Hasp tha Cigar Makers of
-L      I ���    *   -*
Cigare
Kurtz & Go.
Employing
1878.
Ash for
PANETELAS    AND
MONARCHS
thereby giving a punch to
unf air shops.
10 CIGARS
Local No. I��T���President. A. B. Ftnly,
SeereUry. A. P. Surcee. ttt Flfty-
seventh Avenue Eaat- Meets at Sit
Holden Building. Vancouver, at t n.m.
aw flret and third Fridaya la month.
IHtllimtl. Local So. tt���Preei
dent. H. J. Rhodes: Secretary. H Wal
ker. let! Pendrel! Street, MeeU at
Room Stt. Sit Pender Street Weat at
t t��.m. on third Wedneaday In month
jfeeU at Eaclee* Hall. Vancouver at Z:St p.m. on flrat and third
Sundays la month.
. Lseel He. SSS���President. W.
; Secretary. Kit Bbselsr. Office
~        ���      ���"������. Agent* R.
 MeeU   at T    p.m.    every
.y at Its Cordova Street Waat
Na    ��7��~ Prealdent.    Frank ,
Secretary. T. J. Haaafla. SSTt Sixth
Avenue Waat. Vancouver. Mania at
ttl Seymour Streat, Vancouver, at SSt
p.m. oa flrat Sunday la month
  . Brotherhood or. Division No SSt���Preeldent.
rs. P. Boston: SeereUry. H. A. B- Mec-
PoaaML 1SZI Peadril! St.. Vancouver
Meet* at IO.O.P. Hall en assent sad
Fourth Tuesdays la each month at I
ta     	
!*q__ao-i-a   hb_bb_bm  asm  snt-
sWaTSIataST. Local No. ttt���President.
T. McKwea: Sail alary. II. O. Oamphell
Ttt Helmrken Stl eat.. Vancouver
MeeU at inor. HalL oa flret
third ������' *-----
 , in
 1 at 1*1 Cer-
l **�����*. at ��� p m, aa first sad
Have vour NEXT: SUIT
made by���
Perry & Dolk
TAILOHS
Room 33, 18 Hastings St. W.
Next to Pantages
Oeot_e:' SeereUry.  3. O.   Keefe:
 MSB Arent.  P.  Benirouirh: OtTlee
Sit Pender Street Went. Meeta at Sit
Pender Street Weat at t.tt p.m. aa
aecond and fourth Thoreday.	
MS���Preeldent.
VI
Bowyar; Seeratary A   Jam
XffsMi  Building    MeeU    at    Moose
Hall. Homer Street, at It am. oa
second Sunday in month.
rncatTBs ista_nuuMF��_rM_ro-
_*��� ,h^,,ff-,**,*-���,��� Dmm Caalln: Secretary. W. Donaldson. IM Mala Su meet
���I T P-av. am and third Wednesday.
Na     tit���Preeldent.
--.-in.    Meeta at Sit Pat-
\ancoiiver. at T.lt p m. on
and fourth Tueadaya to meath.
Bayley:  Seeratary.  A      Blrale.     Mlt
Commercial   Drive.    Meets at Sit
der Street Weat at t p m. oa
Monday In month.
ed Association of. Division No. Itl���
Prealdent. R. Rlgby: Secretary. P. B.
Griffin. t!7 Sixth Avenue But. Van-
couver. MeeU A.O.F. Halt. Mount
Pleasant at 10 15 am. on flrat Mon-
day   and T pm. on third Monday.
ITOaTB I, III I IBS. Local ltl���Prealdent. C. Holmes. SeereUry. F. Rumble.
IM Oothard Street. MeeU ta Labor
Hall Vancouver at   t p m. first Toea-
_day in month. ___^	
I fOJMt. Sjalim wo. l��
 .  ..   ... M.  Brine; Seeretary.
J. Cunntocham. Box till. Vancouver. BC.
r. .
l stt
snsSaP SSlSss. Laeal Na ITS   Pi eat
deal,  B   A   Lawaaa. itts     Sum ear
Street:  SeereUry C.  McDeoaM. P. a
Box ttS     MeeU at lit Pender Street
vt'set. al I p m. aa flrat   Mender la
 _  . Local Sit���Preeldent
C H. Collier: Secretary aad Sash.tea
Agent. R. N. Naaamada: Office ttt to
st w. 3. Park:	
 n:  Buelneee  Acent.
at Itt Leaden Building at a-.St
Friday ta month.
c
The following places are ma under
non-union conditions and are therefore
funfair to organized labor.
Stettler Cigar Factory, tnaking Van Loo
and Van Dyke Cigar*.
Capitol Cafe. 930 Granville St
White t-t-oitt
Electrical Contractors.       ��
C H. Peterson. 1814 Pandora St.
"ume k Rmnble. Columbia St, New
Wettminster. B.C
The Chilliwack Dectric Co, Ltd,
Provincial Unions
 Stt���President C Sleverts.  1T1I
Denman   Street;   Secretary    E.   Wood-
at ���
ward. IMS Carina Street. _.
am. oa flrat aad third *-~-
In month at Tradeo Hall. Broad Street.
vwioaiA   ftl
Ml.���PrteMsal   C.	
tary-lneseter.   W.   H.   Oiard.     aaaa   sen. a
S2?"____!,_f__.���, mmm S -*��� *>"���
Hall. Breed Street.
a   d.
McDonald. Prince Rupert- isiasii
G Waddell. Box ttsTprta*^.!..
Meets nt Carpeotere* IU11 �� Second
and fourth Tuesdays of eadh month.
 . .���-dent J. Lot���an. Neleoa;
SeereUry. Felix Peseril. Box Mt Nat-
 -��� Preeldent    Js_ 	
tMe. Reveistoke: SeereUry. Phllta
Parker. Box SSt. Revel stoke. Meeta
at t p m. at City Hall. Revetatoke. aa
the second aad foarth Satarday af
"--        ath. THE BRITISH COLUMBIA LABOR NEWS
PAGE THREE
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimnimmimiiiiim
"LAID OFF"
Two Short Words, Bridgiag tbe Calf Between
COMFORT aad POVERTY
��� Have you protected yourself and your family against such
an emergency, with a SAVINGS ACCOUNT���the most valuable
Asset s man can have for the "RAINY DAY."
We STRONGLY RECOMMEND you to start such an account
AT ONCE, at one of our City Branches.
HASTINGS AND SEYMOUR Geo. S. Harrison. Manager.
Cordova at Abbadl       Main a. 2Sth Ave.       Mala A Rrondway
Wears   Yaa   Will   Receive   Prompt   aad   Courteous   Attention
Union Bank of Canada
P.S.���If you are living in a community not provided with
Banking facilities, address ua by mail, and we will be glad to
guide you in respect to "Banking by Mail."
iiMiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiimn����nmmnnnmnnmnmnmH-m��
WHAT OTHERS SAY
In these columns there will be printed every week the
leading editorials from other newt-papers and magazines
THE DRUMHELLER STRIKE
DEBS. THE HUMANIST
is something rare in an inhuman
world. By being merely human he
has wrought what some would call
a   miracle   in   the   Atlanta   Peniten-
The exaggerated stories sent out j No man in the history of the Unit-
to the daily press regarding the strike j ed States has ever won the unique
of miners in Drumheller have turned j distinction that Eugene V. Debs re-
out to be the attempt of an enter- ceived at Atlanta. Debs does not
prising reporter to make much ado j call himself religions, yet he is toler-
about a peacefully conducted strike j ant of the faith of every human
against a company that has broken ; being. He is simply human, which
its 'agreement with its employees.
The press reports relating the fact
that union officials had been arrested
and bloodshed had almost taken
place gave the impression to the av-: tiary. Yet what he accomplished was
erage reader that tbe mine workers; the most natural thing in the world,
had resorted to violent methods. As j Criminologists, alienists, patholo-
a matter of fact, the strike has been: gists, and legal experts, to say noth-
most peacefully conducted and the. ing of prison wardens and chaplains,
arrest of a miner official apparently | have puzzled their brains and writ-
was the result of the activities of a ! ten books upon prison reform. They
newly appointed and over-zealous jhave classified and indexed crimes
J. P. and   criminals.     They  have  studied
It is gratifying to learn that the both with minute care for genera-
other operators of the Red Deer Val- tions. The so-called "criminal" has
ley  will   not   make  any  attempt  to, baffled them all.
reduce wages but will live up to the; Prison regime itself has become a
agreement with District 18, which thing of horrors. Ignorance, brutal-
does not expire until March of the ity, malice and hate have brooded
present year. The action of the Cal-! over the prisons. Men and women
lie mine in breaking their agreement have been broken and sunk to abys-
at this time is deserving of a severe mal depths by prison environment,
rebuke and it is to be hoped that the j Punishment has been 'the one resort
workers in other parts of the Prov- ��� of keepers for maintaining discipline,
ince will help the Drumheller miners j Men and women have become mis-
by refusing to purchase coal mined j shapen things, broken and barren of
by non-union  labor.    In the mean-j hope,  under this regime.    The pri-
robbers, murderers, and the wnole
variety of human driftwood which
capitalist society casts up have undergone a wonderful transformation.
The guards, accustomed to the old
s'ystem of punishments, have likewise been transformed.
��� Debs did not look down on these
men. Debs did not look up to them.
j He was one of them, no better and
' no worse. There was no sanctimonious preaching of "sin." Nothing
more than sympathy, affection, understanding and eagerness to give
of what he had to restore these men
to the human attributes which had
been burned out of them by the fires
of a living hell.
Eugene V. Debs, kissing a negro
murderer, and that negro in tears
as he shook���the hand Of the only
man that had been able to approach
him in long years of bitter and sullen despair, make a scene to move
one to the most profound reflections.
I How shallow js-the formal profession
of love and brotherhood and religion
and the virtues made by those who
never knew what it was to be merely
human, when contrasted with ^his
scene!   .
The Call has often referred to
Debs in these columns as the Great
Humanist. He is just that. He ac-
accomplished more in the two years
and eight months he was confined in
Atlanta Penitentiary than has been
accomplished in all the prisons of
the United States by all the "reformers" in our history. His experiment
has shown the way. Yet it was not
a conscious experiment. Debs was
in prison what he always was out of
prison, the elemental and human
being so rare in the history of the
race.
The workers of this country are
fortunate in having given Eugene V.
Debs to the nation to shame the pygmy minds and ape-men who have
never really left their remote shaggy
ancestors of prehistoric times.���New
York Call.
FRAME-UP RING
BUSY AT TRIAL
time District 18 is standing behind
the striking miners in their determination to resist a wage reduction
brought about by a breaking of the
agreement between the miners and
the employees.
sons have become offshoots of hell
wherein inmates have been turned
into beasts.
Yet, low as they might sink, they
are capable of rising and becoming
more  human than the society that
The  over-zealous  Justice   of  thej thrusts them behind the walls.    AU
Peace who swore in special constables
and placed firearms in their hands
should bc dealt with by the Attorney
General's Department. We do not
want any West Virginia tactics in this
Province and the tendency to incite
violent methods in connection with a
peaceful  withdrawal of labor  must
be nipped in the bad.���Alberta Labor .] in prison.
News.
Help increase the labor representation on the School Board. Vote
for Mclnnis.
that is required is to throw the textbooks of the criminologists, alienists, pathologists and legal experts
into tbe ditch and allow human beings to take charge of these hells.
Eugene V. Debs baa carried oat one
of the greatest experiments of all
time daring his nearly three years
It is admitted by all who know
the facts that the influence of this
man has brought about a remarkable
change in the Atlanta Penitentiary.
Forgers, petty thieves, dope addicts.
TN these days Goodenough falls
��� '-'       by the wayside
and Dothebest
is first at]the tape.
Attempts Hade to Influence Jury
Kb Anti labor Film
Acton* TriaL
SAN FRANCISCO���Its stench
foaling the air of San Francisco and
\ the State of California, the San Francisco Frame-up Ring has again dragged Justice into the mire and once
more organized interests make California appear before the world, a
vile-smelling buffoon simperingly
mouthing all her cheap, stock phrases
about "evenhanded Justice, impartially administered to those of both
high and low degree." This latest
frame-up is in connection with the
trial of "Fatty" Arbuckle.
Sheriff Tampers  With  Jury
During the balloting, Mrs. Hubbard declares, Fritze passed out to
reporters, officials and the defense
ballots indicating horn the vote was
going. The ballots indicated that
Mrs. Hubbard stood firmly for conviction. What happened then? Here
are tbe charges:
Private Detect.ea Ac t ive
T. W. Hubbard. Mrs. Hubbard's
husband, an attorney, is approached by Olive over the telephone who
demands that Hubbard instruct his
wife to vote for acquittal. When
Hubbard questioned bow a vote
could be passed to a juror, Oliva
answered:
"I can attend to that. Just give
the note to a member of tbe sheriff's office.**
"Fixer" Threatens to Raia Hubbard
Hubbard also charged that Oliva
warned him through a go-between
that if he did not do what he was
instructed, he would be ruined.
The woman juror also charged
that Lieut. William W. Lambert, of
1 the San Francisco police force and
' a MEMBER OF THE OLIVA FIRM
tried to communicate with her while
i in the courtroom oh several occa-
With the splendid examples of sue-1 sions_ she -^ substantiated by
cess attending public ownership of j Bailiff Harry McGovern. who said he
hydro-electric systems in Canada. ��� M_ Lambert watching Mm. Hubbard
with abundant water power at ourjon ^ jaror ^ Md ^a fro^t
door; with the cost of development j t_,t u.-^ -^ tryiag to get ���
fast approaching normal and with the ^^ ^ her Urflbert w cen.
certainty of greatly increased future \smd  ^   mo  by ^  poiice  Com.
mission  because of his connections
Correspondence
demand for electrical energy, surely
this is the time for action
JO.
BUILD FOR THE
FUTURE
ADVERTISE IN
THE B. C.
LABOR NEWS
Yaa
let tired of tbe
call .. in.    We
ef tha
Satisfaction
Yarn r sat isf act tea ia
to aa
We may have some profi table
suggestions on the very job
you have in mind.
Have th��
Union
Label
on   your
Printing
It costs you
nothing.
A phone call���SEYMOUR 7495���fron. yaa
wenld be one of I he most apprecU I i ve calls wa near
received. Simply say yaa are willing ta talk
PRINTING or ADVERTISING with aa.   Thank yaa.
TdcpMsK SejMoT 7495
THE UNION PRINTING CO.
"More than PrintersM
Labor HaO 319 PotW Street West
Cheap  Power  in  Winnipeg
Winnipeg with her hydro-electric
system reduced rates from twenty
cents per killowatt hour to three and
one-third cents per killowatt hour for
light, and one cent per killowatt hour
for domestic heat and power, leas ten
per cent discount; and reduced the
rate to large consumers for industrial purposes to one-half cent per
killowatt hour; and on a capital expenditure of 98,942,430.00 laid aside
in reserve $2,406,145, and also a
revenue surplus at the end of 1920
of almost $300,000.00. The Comptroller (Winnipeg) assured me that
this development never cost the Winnipeg taxpayers one nickel.
Toronto Saves $22,000,000
Toronto, on an expenditure of
$11,000,000 showed a saving in rates
to their own consumers in ten years
of $22,000,000.00, in addition to the
enormous amount saved the consumers of private company through the
forced reduction of rates. Engineers have estimated the cost of electrical energy at Vancouver to be less
than one-fifth of a cent per killowatt hoar.
Cheap Vancouver Hydro-Electric
The estimated cost of development
at Winnipeg for an initial installment
of 20,000 horse power was $3,250,-
000.00, while we have an estimate by
engineers of the cost of development
at Vancouver to be $1,365,000.00
for a 24,000 horse power, aad at a
lower rate per horse power for a larger development.
I am entirely opposed to any great
expenditure at the present that would
have to bo paid back with interest
by the already overburdened taxpayer, bat I believe wc should he
sufficiently progressiva to go forward
with a development when assured
that it will save millions to tha City,
and not cost the taxpayer one dollar.
ALD. J. J. McRAE.
On Sunday the New York World,
in a leading editorial, colled for the
release of all political prisoners in
America.. This is tbe first newspaper
of great circulation in this country
to make such a demand. A* hundred
aad forty-five men convicted under
the Espionage Act and other war
laws are still held in Federal prisons,
three years after the signing of the
Armistice, serving sentences of from
ten to twenty years.
_______ -i
A good game of whist caa be
played at the Junior Labor League's
Whist Drive and Dance next Thursday in tbe Cotillion HalL Good prix-
es; good mask.
\
with the Oliva brothers.
Sat on  Steps  Near Jadgtt'a
How brazen the efforts were to
"fix" the Arbuckle jury is revealed
in the comment of one of tbe newspaper men who was present at tbe
trial:
"Gas Oliva visited the Arbuckle
trial in company with Police Lieut.
Lambert. The two sat on the steps
leading up to the judge's beach. In
passing them the jurors were close
enough to brash their knees."
Besides her charges of intimidation. Mrs. Hubbard asserted that
Foreman Fritze and others used third
degree methods against her.
Fatty most stand a second trial
January 9 and this will afford the
millionaira anti-labor movie interests
another opportunity to prime witnesses and pervert evidence to assure
an acquittal.
I ahar Baiters Active
Union labor is interested in tbe
Arbuckle trial from another highly
significant aspect. While theatrical
stage employees were having their
woges slashed from one to three dollars a day at the Hollywood and Los
Angeles movie studios and their
working day increased from eight to
ten hoars, Arbuckle's employers, the
Lasky Famous Players Company
which led ia the assault upon organised labor, and other motion picture
interests were using huge sums, pay-
lawyers and oa nearly
to keep -Fatty"
oat of jail. Aad all the than the
moan was going up that the
of the organized
COOPERATION
Patronize Our Advertisers and Tell Them Why
WILSON'S
" ��t3Sr SHOES
Wilson's Twin Shoe Store
157-159 HASTINGS STREET W.
BRAND'S
SEEDS
723 ROBSON STREET
<<��������������..���������*�����������*���*��*�����������
::   I AEGERe :;
Men's Furnishingii I*   J [
;; Cuthbertsons & Co-|0 ; ���
Il   648 Granville    619 Heatings W.   ]|
HARKLEY &
AYWOOD.
Ammunition,��Guns
Fishing Tackle
69 CORDOVA STREET WEST
RICKSON'S
CENTS' FURNISHINGS
840 GRANVILLE STREET
Near Rabena Street
U      B ELECTRIC
muinC0MpANy
Headquarter* far All
ELECTRICAL COODS
414  HASTINGS  STREET W.
THE CAMERA & ARTS
M'DAMj Developing
Picture Framing
���10 GRANVILLE STREET
M. J. Cameron
Clothes ~
M 6
Men
Cordova
Street
Wool
E.C.KILBY
HOSIERY
Specialist
628 GRANVILLE STREET
W.S. CHARLTON. CO.
LIMITED
Specialists in
Young Men's
Clothing and
Haberdashery
662
Granville
Street
W. C.  Stearman
of dollars to obtain tbe
of a movie actor charged
with a brutal crime, not a dollar for
the men toiling behind the scenes of
cinema productions which bring in
fabulous sums, sumptuous profits.
"The   People's   Hardware   Merchant*
sole agent for too
* Monarch Malleable]
I
���IS GRANVILLE STREET
PLANT         _PQm_*_��_
RITCHIE'S BuliS
"The Best Procurable*'
872 GRANVILLE STREET
WASHINGTON. ��� Representative
Schall. Minnesota, has stated in the
House that proposed modification of
the present decree under which the
"Big Five" meat packers gave op
their hold upon thc food industry
outside of the meat business, would
within seven Tears turn the control
of the entire food business in the
United States over to the Big Five.
May* wc ask oar readers to take
notice of the advertisement ran by
the Kurtz Cigar Factory ia this issue.
When purchasing cigars ask for thc
Kurt-
Save  Thursday. Feb. 9, for tha
Federated Ubor Fatty Whist Drive
B. c. Barber Supply and
SUNDRIES,LTD
upplies
<U Hastings St. QShaving
Went
L
Wo Outfit   tha  Family
���SB? THE AMERICAN
HONEST BOOt ShOD
PRICES -r -  -"vf
L
Ml GRANVILLE STREET
SALSBURVS
HARDWARE   MERCHANTS
at AU
131 HASTINGS STREET WEST
Pierre Paris
ft:ft FOOTWEAR
51 HASTINGS STREET W.
CHINA and TOYS
DOLL   HOSPITAL
Millar & Coe
I Issssssd
41* HASTINGS  STREET W.
Potts & Small
LIMITED
MEN'S WEAR
717 PENDER STREET W.
Just   Around   the   Corner   Frosn
I Itch Rents.
Mason _ RiscMTD.
I From   Factory a
Pianos, Player- Pianos|
Phonographs
728 GRANVILLE STREET
MURPHY ��HOE
GOOD
fc-*     _-._
SHOES ��M_r*Ur
Co.
prices    Ltd.
882 GRANVILLE STREET
CEO. B. KERFOOT
SUITS       ���* Men's
Made to    Clothing and
Measure      Furnishings
ISS  HASTINGS STREET EAST
THOS. FOSTERS CO., LTD.
Fashion-Craft
Burberry
O'Coats
QUALITY
CLOTHES
One Sta���e
Only
Durward
O'Coats
514 Granville St.
YALE
H.STARK
305  Hastings
Street Waat
CHQE
TORE
MimiHIIIHIIIIIIIIIIH
! J. A. Flett, Ltd. f
'      HARDWARE
���     Tool*.  Cw-tlvry
Goods
339 hastings street w.
iiiiiihiiiuhmmiihiiI
S. H. HARNOCK
Vancouver
Hardware Co.
Lfasntoa.
867 GRANVILLE STREET
D. K. BOOK, LTD.
CORRECT CLOTHES FOR
MEN
137 HASTINGS STREET W.
T.JJILL^aD.
De A ���*������ Clothes for .Men
Men's and Boys* Clothing
'   and Furnishings
117 HASTINGS STREET EAST
Gornett Bro*
& Clark    _
Wc    specialise    in
Men's    and    Boys*
Reliable
33 HASTINGS STREET E
SHOES
CRAWFORr.
Battery Co.1-**
650 HOWE STREET
8333
SWITZER
Bros., Ltd.
Everything in
Music
I
��j' .
'
'   I    a
-.
,      .      '
���' ��*>
i
it:'
.   '���'���mm.   > I
.'       I       5
PAGE F01TR
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA LABOR NEWS
Blue Bird Washing Machines
Selling Now at $175
There's money in using a Bluebird Washer, even when you
have to pay thc regular price of (210 for it, but now that you
ean buy them at the sale price of $175, they ere an investment
much too good to let pass unheeded. Made in Canada, easy and
economical to operate, and instead of rubbing away the
material as you do when washing by hand, these just wssh the
dirt out of the garment Washing this way gives three times
the Ifie to thc garment
SPECIAL   DEMONSTRATION
Bring some dirty clothes and have them washed while you
wait snd ��ee for yourself what a wonderful machine the
Bluebird ia. $25 cash puts one in the home, and $20 monthly
pays the balance.
9 ' i-gUA-Ias*.
DEBS GREETED
BY THOUSANDS
*
o
BRITISH COLUMBIA'S
BEST BEER
For Over 30 Years
The Beer Without a Peer
Guaranteed Full- Strength
For Sale at All Government Stores
Vancouver Breweries, Limited
Do you dance? Help swell the
crowd at the Junior Labor League!
and Spartican Football Club Joint
Dance next Thursday in the Cotillion
HalL
South Vancouver Co-operators will
hold o Whist Drive and Dance in the
hall at rear of store next Wednesday evening, commencing at 8 p.m.
More   than'   4,000   new   members
KEEP TO THE RIGHT
AND VOTE
TISDALL
First Choice for
MAYOR
The man who has always given Labor
a square deal
r
Your Vote and Influence
Solicited for the Re-Election of
-
ALDERMAN
*
J.
i
���   ��� ������
a
S:
MRMaai
Leon Lotzkar fpr Mayor
Independent Labor Candidate
PLATFORM '
1. A Square deal far oar Relumed Soldiers and their Dependents.
2. Protection for Labor.
3. Provision lo ha ���ada for periods of unemployment.
a. rrovisnoa to do raaae ior penoaa ot unemployment
4. Reductions as far as possible ia the coat af living.
5. A plana tar the better protection of young women in the city
those   arriving   from  outaide   points.
7. Heavier Penalties far Dope Peddlers.
8. Opening at bars far hoar aad soft drinks.
9. The acsssissass-. af fvaa tpssch. free areas and free assembly
If elected will do mj hast ta bring about above msasarss and-ref<
VOTE FOR LOTZKAR FOR-FIRST CHOICE
Veteran   Labor   Leader   Haa
Made Thousands of New
and True Friends
Eugene Victor Debs, America's
veteran Socialist, was released from
prison Christmas morning after serving two years and eight months of
a 10-year sentence for violation of
the Espionage Act. At the request
of President Harding he went to
Washington direct from the prison
for a conference and was assured
by President Harding that his release waa Unconditional and that he
was not expected to depart from
his principles, convictions and ideals.
During his short visit to Washington he was visited by Samuel
Gompers and Henry W. Nevinson,
noted British journalist and editor-
of- the London Nation. Debs was
glad to learn at first hand of the
labor conditions in England, and he
requested Nevison to communicate
to the British working class his deep
interest in all of the Labor activities.
William S. Johnston, President of
the International Asosciation of Machinists, was also among the early
visitors. Johnston visited Debs once
a month while in prison. Senator
Borah and Senator Robert M. La
Follette also visited Debs while in
Washington.
Two of the last notables to visit
Debs while in prison were Charlie
Chaplin, the comedian, and Frank
Harris, editor of Pearsons Magazine.
Both of these also had a long chat
with Jim Larkin.
Swamped   with   Telegrams
Upon the publication of the news
of Debs' release, thousands of telegrams were sent to Terre Haute, Indiana, where Debs has resided all his
life. These telegrams came from
Socialist locals, from hundreds of
Trades Unions, State Federationjr
and Trades Councils, from a great
many executive boards of International and Independent Unions, from
hundreds of branches of the Workmen's Circle, the World War Veterans, the Workers' Party, free speech
groups, American Civil Liberties
Union and many other organizations
as well as from hundreds of individuals among the first of whom was
Helen Keller, the world famous deaf,
dumb and blind girl. Telegrams
were also sent by the striking packing house workers of Omaha, striking miners of Washington and striking milk wagon drivers-of New York.
Home   Towa   Petitions
During his incarceration, many
petitions were sent to Washington,
asking for the release of Debs. The
last petition went to President Harding a few weeks ago when 35,000
citizens of Terre Haute put their
names to a petition, headed by the
mayor and most of the business and
professional men.
On April 13th, a monster petition,
signed by 300,000 people was presented to bottt houses of Congress
and to President Harding. Numerous
organizations actively participated in
the campaign for amnesty���radical,
liberal, progressive, labor and civic
and military. Among the organizations active in the campaign were:
The Socialist party, the national
headquarters of the American Federation of Labor, practically all of the
110 big national and international
unions, virtually all of the railroad
brotherhoods, the Industrial Workers of the World, the Workers' De
fense Union, the American Civil Liberties Union, the World War Veterans, the Private Soldiers' and Sailors' Legion, and the Farmer-Labor
party.
Twenty-three other political prisoners were released at the same
time as Debs, leaving 135 political
prisoners still in thc various prisons.
Most of these arc anarchist. LW.W.
and radical farmers from Texas.
BELLS RING���CROWDS CHEER
Terre Haute, Ind.. Dec. 28. ��� To
thc rimring of thc bell of the city of
his birth, the blare of bands and the
cheering of thousand-, the man
whom the ten-orals of this nation
sought to silence by placing him behind prison walls returned ia triumph to his home tonight.
As thc sun went down the outlying towns began to pour their
working populations into Terre
Haute. Most of the workers were
miners and they came to hear the
man who had always been faithful,
not only to them but to all of the
oppressed, throughout the worid.
Mayor  Leads.
Others were led by Mayor Hunter.
Thc committee that he headed consisted of representatives of all classes in thc community���preachers,
doctors, business men. workers, etc.
But it was upon the solid ranks of
the workers that the eyes ef Debs
dwelt longest. He greeted his neighbors as only Debs can greet his fellows, but one sensed that these was
South Vancouver
Co-Operative
"Owned by tha Coa-eaeara'''
SMS Fraaer St. Phone Fra. 367
Robson Dairy
The Home of "Birt's"
Graded New-Laid
EGGS
1124 ROBSON STREET
COOPERATION
Patronize Our Advertisers and Tell Them Why
FOR MEN ONLT
MACEY-WIISON SHOE CO.
41* GRANVILLE STREET
Between P. O. aad Paader Street
Phone   Seymour   3930
:
CITIZENS
Conault Your Intereata.       Vote
for
McRAE
FOR
s   MAYOR   i
��� ���
'  Cheaper  Light  aad -Power,
2   Development   of   Irtduatriea,
j   Protection  ef  Citizens'   Rights.   I
��� ; 9
THE D. HUNTER COMPANY
MEN'S AND BOYS' CLOTHING.
FURNISHINGS, ETC.
for
74 CORDOVA STREET WEST
Imperial Trunk
and Leather Goods
338 HASTINGS STREET WEST
��:i;ii:;iii:��i��;iu��;����;;i;i��i����������m��
Vote For
F. ROGERS
for
Alderman
Eight   Consecutive   Years
on Council
I      Chairman of Board of
Works
ALWAYS FAIR TO
LABOR
n��iiMiii��m��iii����iMii��ii����i��iiii��nm
Laco, Nitro aad Taagatea Lamps
THE ELECTRIC SHOP
12 HASTINGS STREET EAST
atoiasa nanatag	
Retail Electrical Suppliea aad
Fixturea
CD.BRUCE
Limited
Ma's Chtto. ����� Fingfagt
COR.  HOMER AND HASTINGS
THE
LADIES'
STORE
V
HA
tf*
fcCfc
417
HASTINGS
ST. WEST
a great difference in his feelings toward those who were his neighbors
by chance and those who were his
brothers by choice in the great battle for industrial freedom that he
has been waging for so many years.
There were some among the
workers who had welcomed Debs
when he returned from Woodstock
jail over a quarter of a century ago.
Their heads were silvered with the
years that have passed, bnt they*' are I
still fighting, for the better day as
they were when Debs refused to bow;
to the tyrannical orders of the cap-,
italist courts in the great railroad
strike of 1894. This great outpouring was more than a personal tribute I
to Eugene Victor Debs. It was a
tribute to the cause of freedom
which Debs has been privileged to
focus for the eyes of millions.
Phone Seymour 3902
BURNS DRUG CO, LTD.
Mall Ordsra Bscslve Special Attention
732 GRANVILLE STREET
la tha Block With tha Clock
Phone Seymour    606
NEW VORK
Outfitting   X   Company
' (Vancouver's  Popular Credit
Houae)
Refined Wearing Apparel for
MEN AND WOMEN
143 HASTINGS STREET WEST
PRINCE RUPERT
TRADES COUNCIL
No Jobs in Mines of Northern'
British Columbia, Says
Correspondent
(By T. Ross Mackay)
The night of onr last meeting the
temperature dropped to 15 above
zero. Thiti with the holiday season
explained the absence of a few delegates with a good record for attendance. The general attendance
was good.
' Two members of last year's city
conncil. Aldermen Kerr ao_d McNeil,
were endorsed an candidates for this
year's council. Two new men were
also endorsed. Both' are active
workers in the ranks of labor. One,
Mr. Rod Macleod, ia secretary of the
Carpenters' and Joiners' Union.
other haa not yet deftnit
to run.
Attention waa called
paper reports of the great "minim?
activity in Northern B. C. with the
unfortunate result of bringing many
outsiders here in thc hope of finding
ready employment. Two nines arc
a large force of men. Few,
however, are leaving their jobs, so the
openings for new men arc few. Anyone thinking of coming here in the
hope of finding ready employment
wfll be well advised to write Mr. J.
M. Campbell; provincial government
employment agent, before doing so.
Relief work is being carried ea by
flaw dty, consequently we are having
onr own troubles ia keeping up the
of
black* im STORE
WHITE
Largest Exclusive Hatters ia B. C.
COR. HASTINGS AND ABBOTT
ARNOLD & QUIGLEY
Trade ia .
Oar  Upstair*  Clothes
Shop    aad    Save    Your    Dollars
540 GRANVILLE STREET
The Federated Labor Party wfll
hold a Whist Drive aad Dance at
the Cotillion Hall Thursday. Feb. 12.
** -
advertise
h. tbe Labor News?   A
TOWNLEY & WARD
GRAMOPHONES, PIANOS, ETC.
443 HASTINGS STREET WEST
Cor.  BMchards and   Hastings
T& fiootery
Omen's and Cnildren's Shoes
Y Eaclu.ively
MT GRANVILLE STREET
PHILADELPHIA.���Floy Brothers,
Mjllers of Pequa. Lancaster County.
Pa., contributed today the first carload of flour for Russian relief to
the American Friends Service Committee, Philadelphia. This gift was
promptly followed by another car
given by tbe Chamber of Commerce
of Pasadena, Cal., and a carload of
corn, the gift of the farmers of
Mountain Lake, Minn. Several small*
er Iota have already been received in
response to this urgent need.
As near as we can figure ont
China ia a "problem" of the same
kind that a building is which burglars intend to rob.
joined the Actors' Equity Association during the past twelve- months,
bringing the total membership op to
about 18.000, John Emerson, president of the organisation, reported at
ita quarterly meeting.
BOGARDUS - WICKENS
I, United
Paint Wallpaper Glass
Valat and wi_.
878 aiANVILLI
Glass Dap..: 10OO
Ltewis Piano &
Phonograph House '
THE HOME OF THE PHONOLA
Mozart Pianoa
1044 GRANVILLE.STREET
Outfitters for Men
WM DICK ltd.
'"Your   Money's   Worth   or   Year
Money Bach"
45 49 HASTINGS ST. EAST
E-ison & Bnn.sw.ck Phonographs
PIANOS
Ooavaaleat Terms Arranged
The KENT PIANO CO., hi
558560 GRANVILLE STREET
Hastings
Furniture Co.
41 HASTINGS STREET WEST
Phone Seymour 3807
FULTON'S STYLE SHOP, LTD.
MEN'S SUITS. OVERCOATS.
RAINCOATS
Mads ia Caasda
Ksady-to-wsar or Mads to Your Order
Prom   Maker to  Wearer���One Front
Oaly
619 GRANVILLE STREET
KNABE���CHICKERINC���WILUS
PIANOS   AND   PLAYER   PIANOS
THE BOWES MUSIC HOUSE
Exclusive  Piano Dealers
806 DUNSMUIR STREET
Dnnamnlr Hotel Building-
The Ingledew
Shoe Co.
Quality Footwear
For the Whole Family
666 GRANVILLE STREET
LATIMER & SONS
Limited
Hardware, Sheet Metal
550 MAIN STREET~
Phone Seymour 221���Day or Night
NUNN & THOMSON
FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND  "
EMBALMERS
531  Homer Street
Paddock foot
-*-      989 GRANVILLE   SllOD
Corner    Nelson    St. tt
SHOES '-%��-*
J.N.HARVEY
Good Clothing        1��7_ Hastiaas
Hats   aad   Mea'a     ____"w"7"  c.
Furnishing. *1�� T******  ***���
Center t Banna, Ltd.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND
EMBALMERS
Private Ambulance  Service
1049 GEORGIA ST.      SEY. 2425
I
Rankin & Cherrill
EVERYTHING ELECTRICAL
55 HASTINGS STREET WEST
Phone Seymour 7600
������'Siy il villi llwiws''-
BROWN BROS. & CO
FLORISTS AND NURSERYMEN
at. b.      mar. am awn
8KND Df THE HEWS
.      ��� '  ��� ���
I
a   ' ���

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcln.1-0309306/manifest

Comment

Related Items