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The British Columbia Labor News Mar 24, 1922

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Array ���
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THE
Issued Every Friday
. "-   '���'���   ���'
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y.    ft
I
Devoted to the interests of the International Labor Movement
fSubacriBtion: $1.50 Pte Vearl
t Scl-crCcpy J
Volume I.
Vancouver, B. G, Friday, March 24, 1922
i
Number 25
Trades Council Wants
Breweries Organized
Bricklayers Affiliate with Council���Carpenters Still Obtain Old
Scale off Pay���Resolution Wants Breweries Placed  on
Unfair List���O.B.U. Obstructs Organisation Work--    v
Another Effort to be Made to Organize Brewery
Workers in City.
i An application for affiliation waa
received from the Bricklayers Union
at the regular business meeting of
the Trades and Labor Council Toes-
day evening. The application was ac-
ce;>ted.
Delegates from the Hotel and
Restaurant Employees' Union, Musicians Union and Bricklayers Union
were obligated.
A communication from the Stove
Mounters International Union informing the Council that the Enter-
prize stoves are on the unfair list
. A carload of these stoves are now
being handled by T. McArthur k Co.,
of Vancouver.
Reporting for' the organization
committee, DeL Pettipiece informed
tbe council that he and President
Crawford had approached the Street
Railwaymen's Union on the subject
of affiliation with the Council and
were given a favorable reception.
The union now has the matter under
consideration. Other unions will be
visited in the near future.
Under the heading of reports from
unions, Del. Thom, of the Carpenters,
informed the council that the Master
Builders had mSde use of the daily
press in an attempt to reduce wages,
but the workers hsd stood pat snd
the contractors found that they were
not in a position to put it into effect.
Carpeners are therefore still setting
the old pay and will not accept a reduction at this time. He was glad
to see the Bricklayers back in the
council and hoped they could get together in the threatened trouble
Del. Smith (Bricklayers), said-hat
the trouble was only imaginary The
builders resorted to the press to bluff
the workers but cannot make it stick
at this time.
Del. Skinner, reporting for the
Typographical Union, said that th*
strikers were still making steady progress and asked the dels, to see that
all printing was done in union shops.
DeL Graham reported conditions
favorable and urged organised labor
t ocontinue to ask for the union shop
card and button in restaurants.
Uaf air Bear
DeL Davis (Pile Drivers and Wooden Bridgemen) introduced a resolution calling attention to the fact that
beer was being produced in all breweries in the province, awith the exception of Victoria, by unorganised
labor anv desired it to be placed on
the unfair liat.
Del. McKenzie (Hotel and Restaurant Employees) while favoring the
resolution, thought that St waa a
little too sweeping in its nature, and
was of the opinion that it would be
far better to give, the owners fair
warning before taking action. He
stated that he had made several attempts to organise the men and
while many were favorable, a few
One Big Union followers had disrupted every attempt, although they
themselves did not organise the men.
The Victoria breweriea had been 100
per cent organized''or a long time
and he was perfectly willing to make
another attempt to organise the men,
although he might be again obstructed by the disrupters.
Dal. Welsh (Plumbers) said that
the breweriea had been fair to organised labor for a number of years
snd if the men were not willing to
organise then the management were
not to blame.
Gettiaa Together Again
DeL    Pettipiece    (Typographical)
made an amendment to the effect
* that the resolution be forwarded to
r t&e breweries informing them that
it would be deal with a month hence,
the council in the meantime to make
efforts to organise the men. He
)   pointed  out that the whole  labor
movement   had  recently   been
been informed that the men were
scared to talk organisation because
the O.B.U. element informed the
boss and had caused men to be
canned.
Two Weeks Grace
Del. Hardy (Carpenters) made an
amendment to the amendment to lay
the resolution over till the next council meeting, the executive in the
meantime to take up the matter with
the brewery workers and the breweries.
Del. Bartlett (Blacksmiths) favored the amendment because he
thought the brewery owners wanted
the O.B.U. to stand in the way of
International organizations, and the
amendment would give the bosses
notice that the council meant business and would not let anything stop
in its way of organizing the workers-
Del. Bengough (Machinists) stated that he and Del. Crawford had
attempted to hold a meeting with the
brewery workers some time ago and
although there was a goodly number
who wanted to join the union, they
were scared that someone would tell
the boss and they would get fired the
same as others had been.
DeL McKenzie stated that the
management .of the Kamloops (Rainier Beer) Brewery had practically
told him to go to hell when he started to organise the men.
Del. President Crawford stated
that he would drink water even if
it kills, rather than be sidetracked
from organising the brewery workers.
The amendment to the amendment
carried.
To Take Over News
The council went into executive
session on the question of taking
over the ownership of the B. C. Labor News. 'A referendum now before
the unions on the question of being
completed, the matter was laid over
until the next meeting of the council.
MONSTER LABEL
TRADES SOCIAL
Big  Turnout and  Surplus  al
Union Label Trades Laat
Dance
A monster Whist Drive and Dance
wss held by the Vancouver Label
Trades Committee in "conjunction
with the Printing Trades in the Cotillion Hall last Friday. These
monthly events have been getting
more popular with each one, but that
held last Friday practically staggered
UTHUANIA WANTS
UNION-MADE GOODS
Government    Asks   Machinist
Union to Purchase Equipment for LjtJHMUass.    ���~
WASHINGTON.���Following upon
the success of the Mexican government in negotiating purchases of machinery and railroad equipment in
the United States through the International Association of Machinists
and their banking connections, the
government of Lithuania has opened
the committee. Forty-three tables correspondence with the union to
were used in the Whist Drive and j ascertain the possibility of a like
more could have, been used, hsd the arrangement. The machinists have
cards been available. The dance 1 charged no commission, and have
floor was packed and the time waa'been satisfied to place tbe orders in
extended an hour in order to give shops employing union men. Mil-
c very body a rattling good time. All i lions of dollars' worth of American
the committees were kept on the'machinery has been produced and
jump and were pretty well fatigued j shipped to Mexico, during the past
when, it Was over. Del. McDonald
had charge of the door and was assisted by Dels. Hanafin and Herriet.
Del. Mrs. Dolk had charge of the
refreshments and was assisted by
Dels. A. Graham and Mrs. Mahon.
H. W. Watts had charge of the
Whist Drive and wss assisted by Dels.
Wheatcroft and Hardy. Del. Skinner had charge of the dance floor!
and was assisted by Dels. Myers,
Trotter and Warde and Miss Margy
Black.
Priae Winners
year, under this agreement.
If an agreement is made with the
Lithuanians, it is likely that the machinists will seek to enlarge their
European business through an active
canvass on the,, Continent.
PILEDRIVING JOB AT
ESQUIMALT UNFAIR
The Whist prises and winners were
as follows: Ladies first prise, leather
covered post card album, made by
membeaa of the Bookbinders Union,
and won by Mrs. F. Gray, score 123;
ladies seeond prise, a Dyer Kiss, won
by Mrs. F. Gilbert, score 122; ladies'
booby, manicure set, won by Mrs. W.
Ford, score 81.
Gents' first prize, union made hat,
won by Mr. A. B. Curran, with a
score of 124; second prise, card case,
made by Bookbinders Union, won by
F. W. Welsh, score 116; booby prise,
The pile driving work on the Esquimau drydock hss been placed on
the unfair list by the Pile Drivers'
Union, and the Victoria Trades and
Labor Council, on account of the attempt by the sub-contractors, McDonald, Watson A Wither, to reduce
wages. It is understood that the
Lyall Construction Co. favors the ol<
scale and an effort is being made
effect a settlement.
PRINTERS MAKING
STEADY GAINS
Mexican Workers Are
Using Political Power
Yucatan Celebrates
Legislature
Controlled by
 200  Labor
MERIDIA, Yucatan, Mexico- ���
Felipe Carrillo took the oath ef office
laat nionth as Constitutional Governor of the State Of Yucatan, to which
office he was elected last November
for a term ot four yean, by a Socialist vote representing' 90 per cent
of the voting population.
An entire Socialist administration
ia now in control of the state government, and* the tens of thousands of
henequen hemp Workers, who comprise the vast majority of the citizens, are rejoicing snd expressing
their love for Felipe, aa everyone
calls him, their hero. Said one of
them, speaking the other day:
"Capitalism, which bound the
worker with ropes of henequen, is
today officially hanged with thst
same rope."
Carrillo is Preaident of the Socialist party of the Southeast, which
comprises the membership in the
states of Yucatan, Campeche, Tabasco and Chiapas. He is also secretary-
treasurer Of the Mexican Federation
of Labor, and when he waa elected
Governor waa a member of the lower
house of the National Congress.
PaUtleal St-aggi. Ended
In his inaugural address Carrillo
said:
This is a great day for all work-
re, a day of happiness and con ten t-
ent, because today one of the great
of the Socialist party is realized, the gaining of control of political power. Today oar struggle for
political power .ends, sad we begin
off Socialist
Goes Back to the
Free���Big  Ubor Bloc in
Council. ia On* State
the work of putting into practice the
Of Socialism."
The entire state ia in festival array; aad many guests are ia Merida
attending the inauguration, including
Francisco Serrano, the newly appointed Secretary of War; SO of the
IM members of the Socialist block
ia Congress aad the Socialist Governor of the adjoining state of Cam-
e The State Legislature and the
mu nici pal it ies of Yucatan had offered
the freedom of the state aad cities to
Eugene V. Debs, snd much regret is
expressed here because the state of
Debs* health would not permit him
to make the journey.
Fr��* Electric Ufnt
As a part of the celebration new
public uti lities were placed' in operation in various towns and villages.
In the pueblo (village) of Halacho,
a new electric plant was opened,
which wiU supply light and ice to
the citizens free of charge. In Mex-
eanu a fund for Russian famine relief waa started.
Thirty thousand acres of land in
various parts of the state were returned to the peasants.
The Legislature is composed of 16
representatives, sll of whom, under
the new administration, are members
of the Socialist party, aa ia every
mayor snd every other elected official in more than 200 towns snd
villages throughout the state.
Steady progress is still being made
in connection with the Printers' Ipek-
hair"^~woTbVTw. Cate?, score _*J_ Vancouver.   Union shop.art
kept busy doing work formerly done
by non-union shops, and this has depleted the ranks of the locked out
printers.' The International assessment has been reduced to 5 per cent
and the organisation has over one
million dollars in its strike fund at
he present time.
JOBLESS WOMEN
IN DIRE STRAITS
Girls in Serious Straits in Van-
couver *��� No Relief
Given
91.
Winner af Special Priae
The special prize, consisting of a
suit of tailor made clothes, wss won
by Mrs. F. Scott, who was the holder
of ticket No. 82. Mrs. Scott is the
wife of a union barber. The cloth
and trimmings for this suit was donated by the Tailors Union, and the
tailoring wss donated by Hartley F.
Storry and Co., 650 Granville street.
The dance netted a surplus of
$175.00.
WORLD HUNGRY FOR
GOODS, WORKERS STARVE
NEXT SOCIAL FOR
THEATRICAL TRADES
The Trades and Labor Council has
granted the use of one of its halls
daily to the unemployed women of
Vancouver. An effort is being made
to organize them in order to bring
the serious situation home to the
authorities. Among those present at
the meetings are many girls living in participate.
single rooms away from their par- cents 60c.
ents, and these are naturally in dire
circumstances because the authorities make no provision for the relief
of single girls and women. Some
girls have been out of work for many
months and others manage to do a
The next Whist Drive and Dance
to be held under the allspices of the
Union Label Trades will be held in
conjunction with the Theatrical
Trades in the Cotillion Hall, Friday,
April 14th. Besides the usual good
whist prises, the dance will be continued until 2 a.m. to enable, all the
members of the Theatrical Trades to
Admission  ladies  25c,
EP.
ON ECONOMY
SEAFARERS ARE BEING  I
VERY POORLY TREATED
The Federated Seafarers' Union of
B.C. is protesting" against the quality
few odd jobs to keep the wolf from ^ ^ quanUty _f food bei__ doled
"Despite the fact that the world
is hungry for goods, there are two
millions of our people on the border
of starvation, while seven milloins
are living on weekly payments provided by those who are working."
With this solemn and appalling
sentence, J. R. Clynes, M.P., summed up his indictment of the British
government at a recent meeting. He
reviewed the * government's callous
breaches of promises and the neglect to use its power for remedial
measures. "Things might have been
very different, now," he said, "if
statesmen had had forethought and
wisdom had beea exercised. The
underlying cause of the present
trouble was the'folly of the ministers on the one hand, aad, on the
other, their fear of disturbing the
existing order or disorder of the present social and economic system.
out to the men on the ships of the
Canadian Merchant Marine. When
he Canadian Highlander docked this
week the men again complained, and
it was pointed out that mush and
the door.
Three weeks ago 60 girls were laid
off from the Stettler cigar factory.
These same girls, along with eighty
others, had been laid off two months
previously, and had been re-engaged
for one week.   During that week Se ^tTar W5? ' **�� ?��*   U\
majority of them managed to earn F"** .!** **' �� ***�� *���_���*
about |7.   Many other firm, in the H ����?* ,n *e ***?*? wh*n
city hsv. laid off large number. tfff^A^MfJR
girls, hence the situation needs at- ]<"*__.dW1��, 1? J. * J^Jl
���_-j;-~ ��_- .��.���. v. __,_�� ..,��!,-.-{��-_. *�� I��**e ��� ��*f4����ee fund for the 12
tending to at once by the authorities. I_ ^^ im��-iM-.-j #-. ,_#���.
Mrs. Woodsworth. Lorimer, Booth !]nOT/ho 7"* '""-J0"*! for-_���fl^
and Graham are taking active part. ** to wotk on ** Canadl*B Winn*T
in organising the women.
RICHARDSON GOING EAST
An agreement is being negotiated
between the stevedoring companies
and the International Longshoremen's Union. Ihe only changes
asked for by the companies are in
connection with working conditions
affecting a small amount of the work.
BAKERY SALESMEN
Bakery Salesmen are holding a
smoking concert in the Labor Hall
Tuesday evening.
with s non-union fireman. The
dance netted a surplus of $43 and
$208 was collected for the defence, the B. C. Labor News.
Get your printing done on Union
Made  Watermarked  Paper through
Tom Richardson, ex-labor me.-ober
dis- in the British House of Commons, Is
rupted and how that it was getting leaving for Winnipeg next week. He
together again, an effort should be;is willing to accept oae or two meet-
made to reorganise the breWery ings in B. C. en route, provided same
workers before taking drastic action, can be arranged immediately.   Wire
If the men refused to organise then
It would be ap to the management
to get some who would, or be placed
on the Unfair list
Del. Showier (Teamsters) said that
the boss didn't give as a month to
decide, he clubbed as right away.
The breweriea were working their
truck drivers to death aad he had
B. C. labor News.
DENVER, Colo.���Because they refused to obey s court order to return
to work in the meat packing plants,
27 striken, including one woman,
ware sentenced hy District Judge
Morley to jail for terns ranging
from one to SO days.
Union Label Trades Monthly
Whist Drive and Dance
THEATRICAL TRADES
Friday, April 14, 8 p.m.
Cotillion Hall
Whist Drive 8 to 10 Dancing9.o_!
Tickets:   Gents156c; Ladies' 25c
British Ubor Member Replies
to the King's Speech in
Parliament
Jack Jones, Labor M.P. in the
British House of Commons, made the
following reply to the speech from
the Throne which needless to say
was not reported in the daily press
"We are going to have reform of
the House of Lords. Gentlemen who
are sitting round are going to be
lords. Lord help us. Ihe hereditary
principle is going to be made permanent. Those of us who are not
fit to govern wfll eventually be offered "jobs. Probably we may be 'axed'
to be Lord Chancellors, and thai we
will get the Geddes' sxel The House
of Lords is going to be reformed. We
are in favor of reforming it. Some
of us here sre going to de-form it!
We are going to mend it by ending
itl There ia only one place for it,
and that is oblivion,* particularly
when we get a Lord Chancellor of
the kind that we have got now, who
is a hooligan with a halo. We are
being insulted by those who pretend
to know more than we do. Labor is
said to be unfit to govern, but 'we
have seen an example of Government
here. We have heard the explanations of the Prime Minister, and the
policy pursued by bin party. The
right hon. gentleman stated that
sfter three years of conferences we
are practically where we were at the
beginning, and they are asking the
country to get them out of tlie mesa.
Labor is not St to govern. There is
not a word ia this Royal Speech
which is not a contradiction of tbe
policy laid down by the Government
three years ago. Every word of this
speech is sn absolute contradiction
of the promises made to the people of
this country.
Fil for
ants? Wast ia going to happen to
us? The Government have no policy
of s definite ihaweter to meet the
existing situation hut economy. On
what lines is economy going to be
exercised? I saw economy at work
today. I saw the Royal coaches going along the Strand and Sown
Whitehall. Waa that economy?
There were gilded coaches, thousands
of troops snd bands playing. Ia
that economy? All gilded popinjaya,
and they were operating for all they
were worth. Where ia the real
economy? (Interruption.) Hon.
members opposite do not like this,
but they have got to have it
Mr. Speaker: The hon. member
should understand that he ought to
address me ia the Chair snd not hon.
members opposite.
Mr. Jones: I cannot help noticing
the faces which hon. members are
making.
Mr. Speaker: I should like the
hon.^member to cultivate a little of
the courtesy which other hon. members show to him.
Mr. Jones: I think when people
talk about economy they should remember the kind of economy which
is generally practised by the Government. I aaw today an exhibition of
extravagance which I very much regret I aaw the Royal Procession.
That waa an exhibition of extravagance in view of the fact that hon.
members of this House have been
called upon to vote for economy. If
we cannot afford to give our children
a decent education, we cannot afford
great processions ef people who,
after all. are useless to the. community.
Take the men who fought in the
war. In my own constituency the
allowances of these awn sre being
put down from SO to 40 per cent
Where is the land fit for heroes to
live in now? (Interruption). It is
quite easy for fat men to talk, aad
fur man who have made fortunes out
of the war to make grimacea at me,
hat what does all this mesa, This
Royal Speech ia aa insult to the intelligence of the workers ef this country, What do the statements made
by .-embers of the Government
What do the people ef tha
expect with two million unemployed aad tea million depend-
AMBITIONS OF JAPAN'S
MILITARISTIC GROUP
"The militaristic group in Japan,"
says Margaret Sanger, "is strongly
opposed to me and my principles of
birth control.
"A quota of 100,000,000 ss the
population for Japaa has been set by
this group. There are 57,000,000
now. They said that with a population of 100,000,000 they -wfll have
the right to speak in world affairs.'
-The 'right to speak* as voiced by
tbe militarists can he interpreted but
in one way: The power to speak in
a way that, with their immense population, wfll brook ao argument
"If Japan refuses to take birth
control, if she will not accept tt ss
her national policy, I think her plana
sad intentions are obvious."
���
"������'���I
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The Federated Labor Party hss
started s membership drive. Dues
for husband wife are See for three ���"���"���
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1
PAGE TWO
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA LABOR NEWS
��� i
A R-G PRODUCT
*BeJW,��
*^_S^_\a
Baking Powder
ODD BITS
(Conducted  by  Sydney  Warren)
IHE BX. LABOR NEWS
Official Organ of the Vancouver Trades
and Labor Conned and Affiliated
Control Committee: F. W. Welsh, f.
R. Bengough. and W. J. Bartlett
l   Month   al    Labor
Hall.  319 Pender  St.  West
Vsacs-w. B.C.
Telephones Seymour 7495-7496
StSOps
tz&o:
year by mail In Canada
r year oute.de Canada
application
H. W. WATTS - Editor and Manager
LOOK BEFORE YOU LEAP
Although the workers in South
Africa were brutally clubbed into
taking direct action against the powers that be, we are again reminded���
as a result of the defeat���that all the
forces of so-called law and order are
marshalled against the workers whenever they rise up in arms against the
ruthless economic conditions of the
the protection given strikers by legislative and military forces.   When we
look back to the many times that the
military and police forces have been
used against strikes in Canada, and
of the recent attacks upon strikers
in Rhode Island and West Virginia,
and of the ferocious display of military force in Newport, Kentucky, we
seriously ask the question "when will
���' labor throw aside its petty differences j
! on the political and industrial field:
! and line up solid against the unscrupulous ruling class of the world?"
All the necessary machinery for
solidarity is at hand in the American
Federation of Labor, which with a
little fixing can easily be utilized for
a United Front
In the Labor Party we have an or
ganization through which the workers can elect working class representatives to the legislative chambers. Instead of dividing labor by
means of hair-splitting differences
and wild dogmatic tactics, out* efforts
should be directed to gaining the
confidence of the masses in order to
obtain their support for Labor candidates at all elections.    If the La
Join the Labor Party.
Put on your fighting togs���Spring
is here.
VnmntW***m'   lt ���i*,,t __! po,ntediT��or movement has not moved fast
out however, that adherents to the  enough for you> it _, up to yon to
Foorth International (Anti-pariia- ^ j-^ jt and .^ it move fMter
mentariaas) took an active part in ���_ your cominllnity
the strike from its inception and
ny dynamitings took place more
nth before tbe battle, which
resulted iii the enrolling of over 2,-
000 special constables and the introduction of aeroplanes for patrol work
anad transfer ef troops from Pretoria. It amight also be pointed out
that the Nationalists led the workers
to believe that the government could
he overthrown aad that a new gov-
by General Herttog���
right the workers' cause.
Whether or not this was taken seriously by the workers is a, question
that cannot be answered here, but
we note that the Nationalists left the
brant of the fighting to the strikers,
who were attacked by all the modern
instruments and tactics of warfare.
hr>��
THE COAL MINERS  REWARD
The proposed 25 per cent slash
in miners* wages in both the United
States and Canada is nothing else
but a campaign of greed upon the
part of the mine owners. Most miners have been working short .time,
even as low as two days a week for
���y months, not on account of high
keeping up the price of coal,
hat because high prices have kept
down consumption. The labor cost
ef producing s ton of coal amounts
to aa average ef f 1.97. The cost of
transportation is not ao great as to
add another %S or 18 to the price
paid by the consumer. The proposed
cat will reduce the labor coat of producing s tea ef coal 49 cents. That
amount wiD no doubt he added to
the mine owners' profits, while the
miners' wages will he brought down
to between *J.50 sad $4.50 a day.
aad ia the case ef hoys sad helpers
to ss lew as f 1.45 a day.
When we realize thst 600 Uvea
are lest every year ia the anthracite
mines of Canada and the U. S. A.,
and that .20,000 miners are injured
"Where does the 'Province' get
'Jiggs',** roared a Vancouver parson
from his pulpit Profound theological conundrum.
Unemployment ia being gradually
reduced but it is now in order for
the authorities to prepare for next
winter.
The new Minister of Labor appears
to be closely following in the footsteps of Gideon Robertson. The only
difference we have noted is that Murdoch uses a little more patriotic
bombast
The two big victories recently
gained by the British Labor Party
gives them a representation of 74
in the House of Commons. No wonder Lloyd George is afraid of an
election contest
Samuel Hill, Seattle capitalist, has
been awarded the third-class Order
of The Sacred Treasure by the Emperor of Japan. We call this mean
considering the fact that Sam has
always been a first-class lover of
cheap coolie labor.
Business and professional men
have been hard hit during the past
winter. A few more winters of the
same treatment will just about convince them that a revolutionary
change in the present system of
wealth production is needed.
Down in Texas someone has invented a "truth serum" which renders the subject unable to lie.    If
there is any of it left after Uncle
every year, it appears to he nothing 8m j, WpWed_ ft woM ^ , capiUll
else than an  outrage to allow   the Wea to ^ ,_..��� qu|mtft-. for ���, np_n
to remain any longer in taei __, -m-.*   ' .__  v_.i.��i..iana   shiftv
our  side-stepping  politicians,  shifty
hands of private corporations. Either ^ preddenU and uncouth oi, ^
the mines most he nationalized   by       motem
the   government   or  labor   will   be'
forced into battle for the confisca
tion of the mines.
MEXICO LEADS THE WAT
It is quite a relief to learn that
the long spurned Mexican has advanced to the point where he has
The Russian Church has decreed
the confiscating of church treasure
for tbe benefit of famine sufferers.
When those who pretend to represent the ''Meek and Lowly One" are
remiss in their duties, it is good to
find at least one government that has
laid aside his gun and haa ased the the courage to remind them.
ballot to gain control of the powers i 	
The Federation of Labor Unions
of Kwangtung Province, China, has
a membership of 400,000. It engineers strikes, walkouts sad wage lain quite the approved trade-
ashion. It has succeeded ia
raising wagea from 20 to 50 per cent
la the as
of government. Mexico today leads
the way on the Ameriraa continent
for laher lagishntiua Net only do
we find labor in control of tlw Congress, but we find that moat ef the
Minister, are old and triad Tsj0es
Unionists and Socialists.
One of the big things we note is
ALL NATIONS PROVERBS
"Beware of him who has nothing
to lose."���Italian.
"There is no law but has in it.a
hole for him who can find It"���
German.
"Good ia the delay thst makes
sure."���Portuguese.
"Justice oft leaps to the side where
the purse hangs."���Danish.
"Submitting to one wrong often
brings on another."���English.
* ���    ���
GOOD TASTE AND POVERTY
Good taste, we have been told, hai
been since the time of the "Big
Wind," an inherent virtue to which,
our blue-blooded "aristos" have hac
a closed market.
Consider the luxury and expenditure which attended the marriage of
Princess Mary to Viscount Lascellei
while, almost with the very Shadow
of   Westminster   Abbey   itself,   th*
pangs of hunger and destitution art j
felt  by  thousands  of  workers,  and;
throughout  the  length  and  breadth
of not only England, but the whole
Empire,  millions of producers, whs I
have  produced  too   much,  are   now
vainly asking the privilege to earn
the bare means of sustenance.
We hold no ill-will towards the
royal couple for we know they are |
but pawns in snobocracy's game, but
lot us forebear to speak of good taste <
while we have Whitechapels and
Bethnal Greens to remind us that the
price for this tinselled display is paid
for by the wilted and brutalized lives
of workers, men, women �� and
children.
��    ���    *
MIND AND MORALS
Some people are continually looking for immorality in short skirts
and bare backs, and in the excitement
they lose sight of the source of all
immorality. The grand court ladies
of Louis XIII's time wore long skirts
but their morals were certainly none
the better for it It is a curious
truth that in many of the South
Pacific islands the more clothes a woman haa on the less virtue she possesses. We have seen women going
about garbed in grass girdles but
having qualities of virtue unknown
to their native sisters, who, aping the
white man's way, mistook clothes for
mTprality and went about in Mother
Hubbards but little else.
Immorality ia not in the clothes
we wear but the thoughts we think.
��� ���    *
SPRING'S LESSON
Spring effects people in different
ways���some write doggerel verse,
some beat carpets, and still others
embark upon matrimony or new
business ventures. But the one thing
Spring does for all of us is to cause
us to give out, to expand.
Springtime is Life-time!
It is the growing and blossoming
season when a world resurrected
from winter vibrates with new life
and color. It is the mating season
when the harmonious seeds of union
are sown. *'"   -,
The death of winter holds no terrors for Nature, for she has learned
that winter is but the first step towards Spring. Perhaps we too will
some day learn this lesson and take
oft* Death's masque to see Love's
smiling eyes.
a   a,   a
HULET M. WELLS
The arrest and imprisonment of
Hulet M. Wells, of Seattle, who was
to speak here on behalf of the Russian famine sufferers, affords s clear
example of the sinister purpose
which. Canadian immigration restrictions serve.
Had Hulet M. Wells been a dope
runner, a boose emissary or a brothel
house procurer he would have experienced little, difficulty in entering
Canada as this ilk enter and leave the
Dominion at will. Wells,' however,
waa none of these, but an intelligent
worker, who had visited Russia, Snd,
at the invitation of Canadian workers, was coming here to solicit aid
for the Russian famine victims. At
the border he was debarred as an
undesirable and when he persisted
and entered the'Dominion and. Spoke
for the Russian Famine Relief at
New Westminster, he was arrested
and charged with violating the immigration restriction laws.
Almost st the same time "Butcher"
Gregorie Semenoff," arriving here
with s young woman said to be
"Mrs. Semenoff," ea route to the
United States to raise funds for s
fresh slaughter in Siberia- were per-.
functorily detained for s few dsys
sad then sUowed to land aad take
up his residence at a local hotel. A
henchman of the Siberian Attila
violated  Canadian   immigration  re-
113 WORKERS STILL
IN AMERICAN JAILS
Industrial Workers aad Farmers Given Long Sentences
for Opposition to War
A new and revised list of the political prisoners remaining in Federal
prisons was made public by the American Civil Liberties Union aa a
result of personal investigation at
the prisons and correspondence with
prisoners and their attorneys
The list shows a total of 113 prisoners, one in Atlanta, three at McNeil's Island, Wash., and 109 at
Leavenworth, Kan. Of the 113
prisoners, 95 are members of the I.
W. W. and 10 are tenant farmers
convicted of anti-draft activities in
Oklahoma and Northern Texas.
Oklahoma Fanmors
In 1917, before and after the draft
act was paased, there was considerable agitation among the farmers of
Oklahoma and Northern Texas
against the draft Several organizations among the farmers adopted
anti-draft resolutions, and many of
their members were active in opposing the draft. Some organized to
resist its enforcement by arms Chief
among these organizations was the
Working Class Union, organized in
1916 to improve the condition of the
tenant farmers. Fifty-six fanners
were indicted under Section 6 of the
Penal Code and the Espionage Act,
and all were convicted. Fifty-one of
them were sentenced to one year and
a day. Five of them got long sentences. Four of the five are still at
Leavenworth.
Long   Sentences
An indictment was returned July
28, 1918, at Guthrie, Okla., against
Walter M. Reeder, B. F. Bryant and
five others for anti-draft activities
of a year previous. Each was sentenced to six years; which the Court
of Appeals affirmed.
In May, 1917, 57 farmers were indicted at Luders, Texas, under section 6 of the penal code for conspiracy to resist the draft act by arms.
They were tried in September and
October. Having been sentenced to
six years imprisonment, three of the
men are still in prison. <
Trades Union Directo
I Secretaries are requested to keep this Directory up-to-date I
!___(
Vancouver Unions
TOUSeiXa���President I". W. Welsh
Seeretary. P. Bengough.' Office SOS
Labor Hall. 319 Pender Street Weat.
Phone Seymour 74S5. Meets In Labor
Hall at 8 p.m. on tha first aad third
Tueaday in month.
_. Ttnal SSI���President. .
Brown; Secretary.   Geo. Annand. lilt
Albert Street    MeaU at Labour
at 8 p.m. on first   and third Friday.
BUILDINO TSAOB8 COUNCIL���Chairman.
O. 0L Ihaw, Secretary. Bay Manas car.
Office Sie Labor HalL MeeU first sad
third Wednesday la
st aaasaarsw. Local no. iti���
President. J. Bright well; Secretary. W.
Bowron. 2813 Burns Ave. Meets at
31* Pender Street West on second
Monday of each month at I p,m.
obbbsl
_ -Prealdent.
K. P. GjMigh; Seeratary. W. H. McLean. 2035 Broadway Weat. MeeU
at 315 Pender Street West at I p.m.
every third   Tueaday tn month.
fATIOMAX UHIO-v
Local Mo. 110���Prealdent. C. E. Herrett: SeereUry, A. R Jennie. 120
ramble Street. MeeU Room 311. 110
Pender Street West, at 7:15 p.m. on
second snd fourth Tuesday* In month.
ARMY OFFICIAL BACKS
C. O. FOR PARLIAMENT
WINCHESTER, England���"I have
never missed an opportunity of
speaking, as a brigadier-general, on
behalf of the pacifist if I respect
him," said Brigadier-General Thompson, D.S.O. (Labor candidate for
Bristol), at a meeting in. support of
A. W. Haycock, an objector during
the world war, Labor candidate for
Winchester.
"I. hsve been 26 years a soldier,**
continued the general, "but I have
never met a soldier who did not respect a real conscientious objector."
One conscientious objector has already been elected to Parliament on
the Labor Party ticket at a by-election last spring.
WASHINGTON.���The American
Federation of Labor affirmed its defiance of court injunctions in labor
disputes At a meeting of the executive council of the body here a resolution declaring against abiding by
court injunctions was adopted.
strictions in coming from California
to meet Semenoff. He was also detained but allowed to return to the
United States within but a few days.
In view of the above it must be
plain that our immigration restrictions are enforced only against those,
who, conscious of the calamity Capitalism has bi-oughjt to the world's
workers, seek s change.
It may be regretted by some that
Hulet M. Wells chose to violate tbe
immigration laws since his legal position has thereby been jeopardized,
but if by so doing it will focus the
attention of Canadian workers to the
viciousnees of our immigration restrictions, it will serve a purpose.
Smoke the Old Reliable
Kurtz's
Pioneer
Panatella
Monarch
i.
AH Uaioa Made ia Vi
TUT THE NEW
W��1NCIBI��-10 CERTS
Cigar, J-.t Pot mm tha
BLAC-BISTTMB. DBOP rOBOSSS A
SrSXaPxaa l.ocal So. 1 SI��� President.
W. J. Barflett: Secretary. T. Mr Hugh.
1*�� Sixth Avenue Weat. MeeU at
3IS Pander Street West at I p.m. on
third Tueaday of each month.
xmoH  aairauiXD
a B-BIaPBBS, Loral No. 194���
President. P. Willis; Secretary. A.
Fraser, Room 103. 31 > 'Pender Street
West. MeeU at 31 > Pender' Street
West at S p.m. on first and third
Mondays   of each month.
Local No. SOt ��� President. Tims.
Andley: Secretary. Tom Cory. 445
Vernon Drive. MeeU at 313 render
Street Weat at S p.m. on first Tuesday
In month.
afASOBTs awn flast.
EBEBS.���Presideat, W. Kerr: Secretary.
I. Padcstt. Meets at Labor Hall oa Sad
snd 4th  Wedneadsy  *n month.
>���. sThntTUBiL a okbt.
TAL mOW WOBKBBS, Local No. ST
���President. B. Bronsen; Secretary,
Roy Ma-secar. 31S Pander 8treet West.
Meets at 31* Ponder Street West, at
8 pm- second sad fnorth Monday.
. Local 105���President.
Oeo. Mowat: SeereUry. Frank Milne.
Box 411. Meets at 31* Pender Street
West at S p.m. every third Wednesday
In month.
CIVIC BsTfUITBBS Loral No. 28������
President. J. White: Secretary, O.
Harrison. Offkw 148 Pordova Street
West. Meets alt 14S Cordova Street
West at S p m on the first and third
Friday   In   mnnt
errt sajax.
5�����President.
Aid. W. J. Scribben.
at 14S Cordova Street
on first Wednesday
Local  No
ack; SeereUry.
Hall.   MeeU
.'est. st * p.m.
each  month.
BBOOD, Local
452���President Geo. H. Hardy: Secretsry. W. J. Johnston: Busineaa
A sent. fl. C Thom. Office 304 Labor
HalL Meeta second and fourth Mon
day at S p.m.  In Labor Hall.
CABPESTXBS    AMALGAMATED.    Wo.    1,
Branch.���President.   T.   8.   Coops;    Bnalf  j
���ass  A rent.   Aagas MarSsresa;   Reeretary.'���
a O.  Webber.   14S  19th Ave. W.     Meeta
Sad and 4th Tueaday at S p.m.. ia F.L.P.
Hall.
Sa S Branch.���Seeretary. W. Bray. SO
ISth Ave. W. Masts 1st aad Srd Taos-
dsy st S p m . la F LP. Hsll. 148 Cordo-a
St. W.
Local No. 357���President. O. Thomas; Secretary. R. J.
Crals. SS Kootenay Street. Meets at
31* render Street West, at ��� p.m. on
first Tueaday in month.
Local Ill-
President. D. W. MrDourall: Secretary.
F. R Barrowa: Business Agent. K.H.
Morrison. Office 14S Cordova 8treet
West. MeeU at 14S Cordova Street
West at S   p.m. every Monday.
MTBB* Local No. 13��� President. Percy Trevise: Secretary. Chas.
A. Watson. No. 1 Fire Hall. Twelfth
and Quebec Streets. Vancouver. MeeU
at SIS Pender Streat West.
QABatBWT WOBBSBS, Loral No. ICO
President. Mrs. W. Mahon: Seeretarv.
Miss May Ward. 477 Hornby Street.
Meets at Labour Hall at t p.m. on
first Thursday la month.
Local No. 2,8���President. Harry Wood:
SeereUry. Andy Graham. 441 Seymour
street Meets at 441 Seymour Street
first and third Wedneaday at 3:10.
Second and fourth Wednesday at t:10.
ua-a-aa. wood, wras a
Local No. 107���Prealdent, A. n. Flnly.
SeereUry, A. P. Surges. SI* Fifty-
seventh Avenue East. MeeU at lit
Holden Building. Vancouver, at S p.m.
on first and   third Fridaya In month.
Local No. 44���President. H. 3. Rhodes: Secretary. H. Walker. ICO! Pendrell Street. Meeta at
Room 309. SIS Pander Street Weat. at
S p.m. on third Wedneaday In month.
loco*-ottvb aaaniaaaa.   Brother-
hood of. Division Na W*���President,
n. P. Boston: SeereUry. H. A. B. Mac-
Donald. 1222 Pendrill St.. Vancouver.
Meets st I.OOf Hall ea aeesad sad
Fourth Tueadaya In each month at S
p-twu	
SIMSmaa. Local No. (50���President.
T. McEwen: Secretary. H. O. Campbell
744 Helmet-en Street. Vancouver.
Meets at I.O.O.F. Hall, ea first and
third  Thai-days of ears
deva Strssl Went, at S p m. ea
third Fridays la
Laeal
No, 143���Prealdent. W. McCartney.
11* London Building: Secretary. G.W.
Saxted. lie London Building. Meets
at 110 London Building on flrat Sun-
day In month at 7:10 p.m.	
S-UBrrBWAsTCB-OF-WAT
a BAIT.WAT
Local No. 1*7���Preaident. A. Osborne
Seeretary. A D. McDonald. 9*1 Pander Street Weat. Vancouver. MeeU
at * n.���l on third Thuraday ta month.
. Lodge SOS���President. E.
II. Robb; Secretary. Evan McMillan;
Busineaa Agent. P. Bengough; Office
319 Pender Street .Weat. MeeU at
i-bo',r_?*���'����� �� t*V on second aad
fourth Tuesday.
Local Na 4(4���President,
J. Smith; SeereUry. B. Showier. SIS
Pender Street West. Meeu at SIS
Pender Street West sat S p.m. on m
gad and fourth Fridays ta month.
faibtsbs. decobatoms a r,
HANGEBS.   Loral   So.    138 ���
3. King: Fin. See- B. A. Baker; Kee. Bsa,
3. McMillan. 148 Cordova Street. Meals
at us Cordova Street, at S pm. oa
second and fourth Thursdays ta month.
DOCK Bu-LDEBS. l..��oal No 2404 ���
President. W. H. Pollard: SeereUry.
N. H. Vernon. Box lie. MeaU at 11*
Pender Street Weat. Vancouver, at S
P-m. on every Friday of month.
Local Na 54 ���
President. F. Looney: Seeratary. Gordon Edwards. 2721 Fifth Avenue West.
MeeU at World - Building. Vancouver,
at 8 pm. on Saturday of each
Local No. *9���Prealdent. Charles KeaU,
Secretary. Airred Hurry. 1*1 Thtrty-
r.nipth Avenue East. Meets ��� at SIS
Pender Street West, at * p.m. on flrat
Wednesday In month.
Heys; Secretary. J. L Irvine: Buainesa Agent. E. A. Goddard. SSS
Richards Street Meeu at 11* Pender
Street West on first and third Mon-
day  In  month at S p.m.
PL
Local No. 170���Presideat. Bert Stirsheoae;
Seeretary. J. Crowther: Basinssa Agent
F .W. Welsh. Office 301 Labor Hall.
Meeta at 31* Pender Street Wast st S
p.m. on aecond and'foorth Fridaya.
FOLICBIS-MW --D-BATIOW. Ixacal
No. 12���-Preaident. Roy A. Perry; Secretary. Alexander Murray. 1484 Tenth
Avenue Went Meets at 44* Pendar
Street West, at 7:1* p.m. on fourth
Tuesday of month.
PABLIAMSMTABT COMMITTE���T. S L. 6.
Caatraua, W. 3. Bartlett   Secretary. Mrs.
W. Mahon.    Meets ia room 305 Labor Hall
en  the  flrat and  third  Thursday  In
month at S p.m 	
SBIBTIBS t**ISSSsrWB~a aSSfSTalvr-_
Local No. �������President, & W. Myers;
Secretary. E. B. Stephenson. Box 894.
Meets at 112 Hastings Street. Vancouver, at 8 p.m. on second Tueaday ta
month.
_. Division Na
5*���President, A. N. Lowes; Secretary,
Charles Bird. 1030 Union Street.
MeeU at I.O.O.F Hall. 515 Hamilton
Street, at S p.m. on first Monday ta
month.
BAIT-WAY COMDVOTOBa. Division Na
2*7���President. O. W. Hatch; Secretary
J. B. Physlck 11SS Thurlow Street.
Meets at I.O.O.F. Hall on first Sunday
at 1 p.m.. and on third Thuraday at
8 p.m. ,
BAILWAY niain, Local No.  144
���President   C   A.   Mitchell;   Secretary.
D. A. Monro, 70 Seventh Avenue Waat.
Meets at I.O.O.F Hall. Hamilton Street
at 7:1* p.m. an flrat Tuesday aad 2:10
___a_Sn third Tossday.
r���President C. F. C. Crals:
SeereUry. Gea Gray. IslL First Ava
East. MeeU at Eaglee* Hall. Vancouver at 1:30 p.m. on flrat and third
Sundays ta month.
TKAMBTEBS. Loral No. SSS���Preaident. W
M. Bra���a; Secretary, Birt Showier Of fire
SO* Lsbor Haa MeeU sseead aad fearth
Wodsssdsy at 8 p.aa. la Laher Han.
jtustneea Agent. R.
Townsend. Meeta at 7 am. every
Monday at 1*1 Cordova Street Weat
No.
dbisk  pnrsssiBS1   vanow.
C7S���President.   Frank    McCaaa.
Sixth
Secretary. T. J.  Hanafin.  117*
Avenue West.  Vancouver.   MeaU    at
441 Seymour Street Vancouver, at 1:1*
p.m. on first Sunday In month.
Local No" ��20���President" _
Weelman. Meets at 11* Pen<Jer -St.
W. Vancouver, at 7:1* p.m. on second
and fourth Tuesdays In month.
Laeal Wn. as���-President. W.
Bayley; Seeratary. A. Birnie. 2��2��
Commercial Drive. Meeu at 11* Pander Street West at 8 p.m. oa second
Monday In month.
_ Local 1*1���President. C. Dolmas; Secretary. P. Rumble.
19* Gothard Street Masts ta Labor
Hall Vancouver at ��� p.m. flrat Tueaday In month.
I <C -M. System Bo. 1)
���Chairman. W. M. Brtse; SeereUry.
3. Cunningham. Box 4SS1. Vancouver. B.C.
OPEBATOBS
A.LB.E.W.   Secretary.
F.
SI*
��� VWIOB. Loeal Na 178���Prealdent, A. Mitchell: Secretary. C McDonald. P.O. Box 5*1. Meeta at II*
Pender Street Weat, at S p.m oa flrat
Monday In month.
.. Basal ISS ��� President.
Lea George: SeereUry. 3. G. Keefe;
Business Agent P. Bengoogh: Office
11* Pender Street West MeeU at lit
Pender Street West at *.*��� p.m. on
second and third Thursday.
. Local 11�����President
C. H. Collier; Secretary and Business
Agent. R. N. Neelands; Office 114 Labor Hall. MeeU Mat Sunday ta each
month at I p.m..
lent W. 3.
-Loeal 113���President W   J   Park:
ratary. O. W. Allln:  Business Ag���
MeeU at 208 London Building at  ��:!���
ascend Friday la mania.
Provincial Unions
Local No. 145���-President
Bowver: Seeretary A Jamieson. IH
London Building MeeU at Moose
Hall. Homer Street at 1* in, on
second Sunday la month.
B. C���President. Dan Canlln: Seere
Ury, W. Donaldson. MS Main St.. meet
at 7 p.m. flrat and third Wednesday.
DON'T PATRONIZE LIST
The following places are ran under
non-union condition* and are therefore
unfair to organised labor.
Stettler Cigar Factory, making Van Loo
and Van Dyke Cigars.
Capitol Cafe, 930 Granville St
wa sill*  sUUIKJKS.
Maryland Cafe. 63 Hsstings W.
Bectficsl Coatra-tors.
C H. Prterton. 1814 Pandora St
Hntne tk Ramble, Columbia St, New
The Chilliwaek Electric Co.. Ltd,
IT1S
VICTOBIA��� President. C Sieve
Den man Street: Secretary K. .
ward, list Carlln Street MeaU at ���
p.m. on first and third Wednesdays
ta month at Trades Hall. Bread Street.
V
BAT-WAY CABMKW. Ledge No. 5*.���P-el
dent T. Som-er-ills: Secreiary. B. 3.
Saasona. 6*30 8herhrooke Si Meets 1st
aad Srd Frldsys, ta OstUllea Hall-
CWAT BM-
OF AJSBBICA. Amalgamated Association of. Division Na 1*1���
President. R. Rlgby; Secretsry. F. KA
Griffin. 447 Sixth Avenue But Vancouver. Meets A.O.F. Hall. Mount
Pleasant at 1*:1C am. on flrat Mon-
day and 7 p.m. on third Monday.
VICTOBIA   TTrOOBAFHICAL HTCOS.
201���Preaidsnt   O.   K.   Christisn
lary-treasarsr.   W.   H.   Oasrd.     |
Masts laat Bander ef wsslh tamm
Hsll. Bread Street
-Praawdaat a D.
McDonald. Prince Rupert; Secretary.
O. Waddell. Box 451. Prince Rupert
MesU at carpenter** Rail en second
and fourth Tu is dsys ef ea-
���Maat 3.
Becreury. Fella Peseril.
son.
. Nel son
Baa 424 Nel-
thie. Reveistoke: Beeratary. Philip
Parker. Box 114. Reveistoke. MeeU
at ��� pm. at City Ball, r
' aad  fourth
I
1
I \
_p.
' .
���
���
1
���V.,'.a
���'���I
r
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA LABOR NEWS
\    >
PAGE THREE
iiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniii iiiiniiiiiiiii'i mi in iiiiiiiiiii; mnanmm
!
"LAID OFF
-*    ' ~      Tv�� Short  Words. Bridging the Calf  Between
COMFORT aad POVERTY
Have you protected yourself and your family against such
an emergency, with a SAVINGS ACCOUNT���the most valuable
Asset a man can have for the "RAINY DAY."
We STRONGLY RECOMMEND yon to start such an account
AT ONCE, at one of onr City Branches.
HASTINGS AND SEYMOUR. Geo. S. Havrltaa. I
Cordova * Abbott       Mala A 25th Ave.       Main A
Where   You   Will   Receive   Prompt
Union Bank of Canada
P.S.���If you are living in a community not provided with
Banking facilities, address os by mail, and we will be (lad to
guide you in respect to "Banking by Mail.*'
Progressives and Labor
Not Playing Politics
ittmiit' iiimiinv" Btttma 'rr
By   W.  Irvine.  Labor MP.  far
(Editor's note.���This is the first of, tion.   It stt ma that the determining
a series of articles on the proceedings,: factor aa to who shall be in the oppo-
of tbe Dominion Parliament from a ���; sitioo is the pnaJtiaa occspied oa the
Labor member's point of view.) j floor of the  house.     If, then, the
Ia commenting on the early stages f anacta had decided to acatter their
of tbe New Parliament at Ottawa, it members over the house, aome direct-
is better to pass over the opening ly to the left of the Speaker, and
scenes.   The leas stud about this the some to the left centre, etc- there
I better.    It was a poat-feodal tableau would have beea ao official opposi-
! relished only by officialdom, but had tion.   As to what would have happen-
! little appeal and leas meaning to the j ed in parliament had this been done
rank and file.    The whole perfor���i-
.lance waa a positive bore to tbe pro-
ALBERTA FARMERS
LAUNCH NEW PAPER
Another link in the chain of an
independent progressive press is to
hand in the first issue of "The U.
P.A." At their recent convention
the United Farmers of Alberta ad-
_ gt-essives, and seemingly was ao to
Everybody knows Parm! Yes, R. most members of tbe other group-.
Farm.    Pettipiece,    of    Vancouver.j    The   New   Government,   although
Well, congratulations are in order,' without a party majority, will have
for  the   old   war  hone   haa  put   it  nothing to fear if it follows a courag-
and
wiU furnish a strong basis for i
other very funny speculation.
A  Great His ill 11
As it is. the Hon. Mr. Meighen
happy, because he was bora to
things, and throughout his life he has
been far more of a
decided
over. He was elected to the^ Van- eons policy. The propesrivea ������jy^^ ^ ^^ Jo* u^
couver city conned on the fifteenth Labor groups are not in parliament', _.__T_ *,=_,-, __I1Mu, mxA __-���
ball* That makes seven Cijy L pUy pities to the popular gaUeiy. �� ^ t^OOu f�� o*on^'iTlhcaS
Councillors   between   the   Teg  and!��Jito oppoe merely forthe sake of **** ***** ** ^Ll^SJ
opted . resolution, b, a pr.ctietUlT j S^^^^^rSaTL ""^U ^ O1I,P0t,*- * " "**_ """I,0'*' ** --���U oo^otliTnaXIro bow
unanimous vote, approving a W>\��ftth* TypographcnU Union.���W. U.^the King government will gather fa . ^^ to a^^mu i. ,���*_,.
posal   from   the   Central   ExeciJtive  Pnate**- j strength aa the session proceed*, but j^ food lKjUUSm<i .^ ^-j timKd
for themselves ia repudiating
from the Central Executive ���
that, in view of the increasing demand for a provincial paper to interpret the movement of the United
Farmers of Alberta, "The U. P. A.
as an organisation should wholly or
at least hold a controlling interest
in any such plan or scheme of or
ganization as the Board of Directors
may think best."
In pursuance of this authority the
first number of "The' U.F.A.** has
appeared, bearing the date of March
1st. It is published in magazine
form, twenty pagea ��� liberally
sprinkled with advertising���and will
this will  be so  only by the sheer!
W.    Carter.    Miners'   Federation,1 merit of the legislation brought for
waa elected by the British Trades
Union Congress as fraternal delegate
to the next annual convention of the
Trades and Labor Congress of Canada. Messrs. E. L. Poulton. Boot k
Shoe Operatives, and Herbert Smith,
Miners' delegates to the next con
vintion of the A. F. of L.
Luis N. Morones. president of the
Mexican Federation of Labor and
chief of the Bureau of Supplies of
the Obregon government, says: "It
is my observation both as a trade
union officer and as an officer of the
appear until further notce twice a
month.     It is edited by W. Norman | government* that tbe Mexican people
Smith,   who   for   the   past   twelve j snd their government were never in
months has had charge of the U.F.A. closer relations of sympathy and un-
Publicity  and  Educational   Depart- derstanding than today.
ment.
It commences with an assured circulation of 37,000, representing the
entire U.F.A. membership; the membership fees having been increased
at the above convention to provide
for the same being forwarded
to each.
Often have critics of the capitalist
order of society pointed out that the
central wrong of the system is not
poverty, bnt the power which ownership of the industries gives to the few
over the lives of the many.
No more glaring example of that
power could be asked than the general lock-out declared by employers
throughout the whole country of
Denmark on February 15. No fewer
than 150,000 workers thus had their
chance of earning aome sort of a
living deliberately snatched from
them. The bone of contention ia the
employers' demand for a 20 per cent
reduction in wages, with longer
hours.
Although public services, newspapers, and seamen are not affected,
the lock-out is considered the biggest j sions. one of the richest prizes
labor struggle in the history of the the oil worl. have been put up
country.
ward.
Gloriously Indefinite
The speech from the throne is usually part of tbe frills in tbe opening scene, and ia not taken seriously.
There is. however, a marked improvement in the speech delivered at tbe
opening of the present parliament. It
was a longer speech than is customary, and, while gloriously indefinite
!on most things that were mentioned,
it was more or less specific in some
I things.
His Majesty declared in his speech
.that tbe worst is over in the industrial  depression;  and  definitely  re-
I fuses to accept responsibility for unemployment, relegating it to the pro-
the position of aa official opposition.
PRINCE RUPERT
COUNCIL NOTES
CO-OPERATION
Patronize Our Advertisers and Tell Them Why
WILSON'S
C*S?* SHOES
\\ ilson's Twin Shoe Store
157-159 HASTINGS STREET W.
RRAND'S
SEEDS
72S ROBSON STREET
< M11 e ��*******************
JAEGERE j
Men's Furnitahingi* I ���
Cuthbertsons & Co-1��
648 Granville    619 Haatinga W.
���tt***********************
Pierre Paris
���� FOOTWEAR
SI HastingsVtreet w.
CHINA and TOYS
DOLL   HOSPITAL
Millar & Goe
Limited
419  HASTINGS  STREET  W.
HARKLEY &
AYWOOD
Ammunition,   Cutis
Fishing Tackle
69 CORDOVA STREET WEST
The   Oriental   and   some   of   his
| habits   received   considerable   attention at the regular meeting of the
i Prince   Rupert   Trades   aad   Labor
i Council.   The action of -lodge Grant.
Tbe   Building;' Trades  Council  of
of Vancouver,  in  referring to the
v^-Ja^munleh.^^ of  S^** ���* OtUsw tha
y
the
New York   has''-, approved    of
$100,000,000 project to build
for    working    people.       President
Crowley, of the Council, says that
representatives  of  115,000  building ^j^j
trades workers voted without a dissenting voice to participate in    the
great undertaking.
Athens ��� The Greek government
has opened a systematic campaign
against the workers. The Home
��"ecretary announces that the General Confederation of Labour is
henceforth to be regarded as illegal.
No. 2 Mexican
turn will throw it back to the Dominion. In this way, tbe problem is
always on the "fly" between the
authorities, and is never allowed to
rest long enough in one place to get
The Russian electrification plan
involves the building before 1930 of
about 10 large power stations with
a total of 1,000,000 horse-power.
The province of Alberta haa authorised the erpenditnre of $900,000
for public works in order to help the
unemployed.
MOSCOW.���The Baku oi, conces-
in
at
auction by the Soviet government.
TN these days Goodenough falls
*    JL^.      by the wayside
/^C-aaC. and Dothebest
is first at_the tape.
L��
BUILD FOR THE
FUTURE
ADVERTISE IN
THE B.C.
LABOR NEWS
You soanetint.es get tared of tbe>
matter yaa are mains;.    When y
like that, call us inn.    W.
of Ihe opportunity lo
Satisfaction
Your satisfaction is worth
the* the seefit aa
to us
Have the
Union
Label
on   your
Printing
It costs you
nothing.
We may have aome profitable
suggestions on the very job
you have in mind.
A     phone    call���SEYMOUR    7495���from    jam
would be one of the Hast appreciative calls we .
received.      "imply   say   yoa   are   willing   ta
PRINTING .r ADVERTISING with ...   Thank you.
V T.l���t P-       ���    7JQC
IffMpiswc XJhmtm   1410
THE UNI^N PRINTING C(X
"lVfbre Than Printers"
Um BaH
319 Pevkr Sired West
Something was said of the low
prices for farm produce���a painful
fact known to most people long before His Majesty took his pen in hand
to tail oa about it; there is to ha a
change in the customs tariffs, hot it
is not said whether thst change will
be up or down or sideways; there is
to bo a co-ordination of the Government-owned lines of railways, whatever that may imply, also another
co-ordination of the departments of
defence: the natural resources question is to be settled providing that the
provinces concerned will accept the
proposal of the Government, which
proposal is not stated; the deliberations of the disarmament conference
are to be submitted to parliament,
and it waa also announced that delegates had been appointed to the
Geneva conference and that there is
to he a postal conference between
Canada and the U.S.A. This sums
up what ia contained in the speech
from the throne.
Farmer aad Labor
The Fanner group is likely to be
in substantial agreement with a good
deal of the legislation proposed, but
it is certain thst both farmer and
Labor members sre in fuller agreement with much that ia not proposed.
The farmers waat parliamentary reforms such as snll give the ���*'^��Hir-~
people control over their own political affairs. They want markets far
their produce, and a wheat pool,
while the Labor members are at the
moment concerned most with thc unemployment problem. In these matters tha throne is either silent or
hopelessly st variance with the expressed arms of these organized
groups It ia possible, however, that
the Government amy by pressure rendered possible hy, tha peculiar political alignment in the Houae. st least
sa attempt to deal with these
matters of urgency.
Faeaaaea DarKas Office
The decision of the Farmers not
to take the official opposition is
really an innovation of great significance. There were three courses
possible to be taken. The Farmers
group might have taken the opposition, or they might hare refused it
snd allowed Urn Conservatives
take it. or again they might
it themselves and at the
rented the
Uvea from taking it.
Th*   Farmers   choae   the
aad in doing aa hare not only
aa o*i-*a_laat exassple ia their co-
ude.  hat  have   indirectly struck a telling blow at the
applications of a number of Orientals for naturalization wss endorsed.
The sentiment was expressed that
any effort to create and maintain a
high standard for Canadian citizenship should be supported.
A committee was appointed to
make recommendations to the authorities at Ottawa for better control of
the "drug evd." It is felt that regulations could   he  made  that  would
poppy products in Canada. The addict should he regarded and treated
as a sick man. Jail sentences aad deportation was Tjrcommended tot.
dealers aad peddlers.
A number of asattenI of local interest were dealt with. Mr. J. Campbell, of the Labor Office, wm present, and gave an addriaa on the unemployment question, urging that
private citizens contemplating any
early  start  on  the
MEXICAN PRODUCERS
UNITE POUTICALLY
The
aad StWaajatJBg of a
common front politically by the
farmers and workers of Mexico has
been accomplished recently when a
national confederation of the following groups and pasties was launched.
Union of Labor Parties, the National
Agrarian Organization, the National
Co-operative groups aad the Socialist organizations. This means that
practically all the organized work-
are and farmers have united in one
great pofiHrsl party.
It is understood that the miners of
District 18 are balloting sa the
question of a strike ea April 1st.
Tha UJI.WJL ia taking a strike
ia the United States at the
time and tha result there will
no doubt he tha same. However, in
the U. S. the UJLWJL aad the si-
teen standard railway
farmed a coalition, sad this
salt hi the operators coining to
terms before April lat, if they see
thst s strike on the railways also
would be a catastrophe:
la Caaada the railwaymen wiD
give the miners then* moral support
snd it is understood that a refusal
to move coal from distracts where
coal was being mined by non-union
miners, would be only imp cased as s
but resort.
RICKSON'S
CENTS' FURNISHINGS
840 GRANVILLE STREET
Near Robeoa Street
U      R ELECTRIC
m u ��� ���*��� COMPANY
Headquarters for All
ELECTRICAL GOODS
414   HASTINGS   STREET  W.
THE CAMERA & ARTS
K"DAKj Developing
Picture Framing
610 GRANVILLE STREET
M. J. Cameron
Clothes     c^.
for {
Men
Wast
E.CaKILBY
HOSIERY
Specialist
S28 GRANVILLE STREET
W.S. CHARLT0N& CO
LIMITED
Specialists in
Young Men's
Clothing and    Granville
Haberdashery        Street
662
W. C. Stearman
-Tha
'a   Hardware.   Merchant'
A dividend of < per cent, has bean
to declared hy the Toronto Labor Temple  Company.    The  annual  report
showed that 19X1 had been the most
year in the history of tbe
the fact that un-
the salens which are tenants hi the
bufldincbad
���{Monarch MalleabU^
���13 GRANVILLE STREET
plai*t���:   r <���-*��#.*.*_
RITCHIE'S [b3!I
"The Best Procurable"
872 GRANVILLE STREET
b.c. Barber Supply and
SONWMES,LTD.   ���*-���-���-
6THasting*St. CK*1**.?*
West        ^"Supplies
I WsO-tft tha Fan.il���
THE AMERICAN
HONEST
Jaf Ot5
***** Boot Shop
541 GRANVILLE STREET
SALSBURY'S
HARDWARE   MERCHANTS
1�� HASTINGS STREET WEST
Potts & Small
LIMITED
MEN'S WEAR
717 PENDER STREET W.
Just   Around   the   Corner   From
High Rents.
Mason & Bisch, ltd.
���From   Factory.
I Pianos, Player-Pianos
Phonographs
l���������������������a To Home ���>���
728 GRANVILLE STREET
MDRPHY CHOR
GOOD CO.
shoes asy"" Ltd#
882 GRANVILLE STREET
GEO. B. ITERFOOT
SUITS       im Men's
Made to    Clothing and
Measure     Furnishings
IBS  HASTINGS STREET EAST
THOS. FOSTER* CO, LTD.
Fashion-Craft
Burberry
O'Coats
QUALITY
CLOTHES
One Store
Durward
O'Coats
on,;"5 514 Cranville St.
STARK
YALE *S
s
HOE
305 Hastings
Street Wast  k_J     STORE
***** 1 ���<'���!������ ��t I' I i 11 II I I I I I H >
iiJ.A.Flett,Ltd.ii
HARDWARE
11 it
Tools, Cutlery and Sporting    ��� >
Goods
;    339 HASTINGS STREET W.    ���
. .ii i HU . H | 1 | | 11 i.i,n,M"*.*-1" '
S. H. HARNOCK
Vancouver
Hardware Co.
Limited
887 GRANVILLE STREET
D. K. BOOK, LTD.
CORRECT CLOTHES FOR
MEN
437 HASTINGS STREET W.
T-HILL'T.....
o. *# Clothes for Men
Men's and Boys' Clothing
and Furnishings
117 HASTINGS STREET EAST
Cornett Bros.
& Clark
We specialize in
Men's and Boys*
Reliable
33 HASTINGS STREET E
CRAWFORT"*.
Battery Co. J-f
650 HOWE STREET
i Sayaaewr 833S
Switzer
Bros-Ltd.
Everything in
Music
���
���'da.
"T__-
��� J
)
^ -:-
I
v-__i
H
���;:m "���','' a" ��� " ���
;  *'    . o
���   ���- '.������������.: ���������'       ," ' ��� ��� ���
PAGE FOUR
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA LABOR NEWS
:
j
(���:��� Cftftft} '������ *ft*T'''ftft
t
,    ....
I'i '
Blue Bird Washing Machines
Selling Now at $175
There's money in osing a Bluebird Washer, even when you
have to pay the regular price of $210 for it, but now that you
ean boy them at tha sale pries of 9175, they are an investment
much too good to lot pass unheeded. Made in Canada, easy and
economical to operate, snd instead of rubbing away the
material aa you do whan washing by band, these just wash the
dirt out of tha garment. Washing this way gives three times
the Ifie to the garment.
SPECIAL  DEMONSTRATION ,
Bring soma dirty clothes and have them washed while you
wait, sad see for yourself what a wonderful machine the
Bluebird ia Stt cash puts one in the borne, aad $30 monthly
pays the balance.
i^tiucKon s jfeg (lunipan , ffi��
First Impressions of
Ottawa By Woodsworth
ROOM 308
HALLS TO RENT
IN THE LABOR HALL
���nail; good arrsmmsdatisai easy real.   Rates to societies
by day, week ar meath, on apallcatlaa to:
P. R. BENGOUGH. Secretary.
LABOR HALL 318 PENDER STREET W.
7488-7488
MACHINISTS START
ENGINEERING GUILD
���
���.
BBSS"   -
Members of the Vancouver Machinists' Unions have organised a
Co-operative Engineering Guild and
propose to enter into competition
with firms doing machine work on
boats and in mills snd mines. The
organization is incorporated under
tha Co-operative Associations Act
snd looks forward to a busy season.
The idea ia patterned after the
National Building Guild in Great
Britain, which haa many million dollars worth of contracta at tha present time.
Trade Guilds are springing up
everywhere In Great Britain and the
idea Baa spread to the United States.
A Furniture and Furnishinp Guild
haa just been launched with head-
quartera st Manchester.
Tha -London and Glasgow Tailors*
Guild reports splendid progress while
even aa experiment ia being made in
Agriculture. Five hundred acres has
just been taken over by two guilds.
Tha Coventry branch of tha Amalgamated Engineering Guild has taken
tha initiative towards organizing a
national engineering guild. It is
proposed to call a national confer-
at aa early data.
ROWLANDS
Concert Band
Capitol
SUNDAY���9 P.M.
SILVER COLLECTION
Robson Dairy
The Home of "Bin's"
Graded New-Laid
EGGS
' 1124 ROBSON STREET
Hare your NEXT SUIT
made by���
Perry & Dolk
TAILORS
Room 33, 18 Hastings St. W.
Neat to Pa_.t_|j,-s
ARE
YOUIITOING
OF DANCING LESSONS?
��� ��aaa_~<
FENirS DANCING
ACADEMY
L
MEXICAN SOLDIERS
HELP STRIKERS
Law Compels  Bosses  to  Pay
Strikers for the Tina Lost
Daring Strike
All goes well with the labor movement in Mexico City.
A unique situation in connection
with s taxi strike in that city has
just been disclosed to local unionists in a letter received here from
J. W. Kelly, who is connected with
the Mexico City office of the International Association of Machinists. He ia wall known to trade
unionists here.
Kelly relates that the taxi drivers
walked out in a body when the
companies tried to enforce some
objectionable rules. Here is the
unusual factor of the walkout.
Unique   Pickelinf.
The strikers were permitted to
use their employers' machines in
which to do picket duty.
In connection with the strike s
demonstration wss held in front of
the national palace and a number
of shots were fired. The soldiers
were immediately called out to
protect the strikers.
One striker waa killed, and still
using the company cars his fellow
unionists   held   a   monster   funeral
which street car and all traffic
stopped while tens of thousands lined the route of march.
Ross Pays  Strike Pay
With the strike finally ended the
taxi drivers are now back on tbe job
snd have obtained all their demands.
In addition they sre given pay for
the time they were on strike, this
being a provision of the Mexican (Constitution. ,.  \
At the time the letter was written
a second strike was pending against
the street car company. It. the first
strike, which waa settled several
months ago, tha company discharged
Fernando Leon, a anion officer, for
activity on behalf of- the workers.
When the strike was settled the company wss required to pay Leon
11.250 (American money) for discharging him snd calling him a Bolshevik.���Seattle Union Record.
in
MARCHING MINERS TO
HAVE TRIAL IN APRIL
CHARLESTOWN. W. Va..���Judge
J. M. Woods, of .the Jefferson-Berkeley Circuit Court, has designated
April 24 as tha date for beginning
the trials of the striking and marching miners of Logan and Kanawha
counties, several of whom were indicted for treason: which were transferred to the court house here under
change of venue. One hundred and
twenty-five of tbe men will be
brought to this county at different
times for tha trials. A dozen of the
men sre under indictment for murder in connection with the slaying of
a deputy sheriff. Tha trials will he
the most important of tha kind held
bars since John Brown and his followers ware triad hare for treason in
laat.
ATLANTA, Ga.���Organixed
car men have signed last year's   _
with tha local traction company.
Some years ago I remember walking along Parliament Hill,, wondering what it would be like to be one
of the legislators of Canada; today,
looking from the Inside of my office
out over the Ottawa river, I .must
confess to feeling very doubtful
about what an Independent member
of parliament can accomplished.
Ottawa   Dominated   by   Whips
Each member is supplied with office accommodation in tbe buildings,
and with every facility for carrying on his work. The first lesson
that I learned, however, in coming
to the house, was that as aa lade-
pendent, or Labor man, I had really
no part in the scheme of things as
they are. Tha rooms, for example,
hsd already been divided np among
the three whips. Each whip assigned rooms to tbe members of his
party. There are now recognised in
Ottawa, three parties, the Liberals,
the Conservatives, and tbe Progressives. I, unfortunately, belong to
none of these, snd ao my name stood
without any room having been assigned. While other men were able
to get to work immediately, I had to
wait twenty-four hours for something
to happen. I then went to the Sergeant-at-Arms and explained the
situation. He waa very courteous,
indeed, but seemed at a loss to know
what to do, since all the office accommodation had already been assigned to the three whips. I protested that I did not come here to
represent any one of. the old parties, and I did not propose to be
under obligation to any one of the
three whips. Finally, however, the
Sergeant at-Arms requested the Progressive Whip to yield one of his
rooms, since it had been granted
more or less on the understanding
that the Progressives were responsible for the Independents and nondescripts. So in the long run, I find
myself very comfortably housed,
though how I am to get on in this
machine without s whip, beats me.
Never before did I realise the important position of s "Whip" in the
life of our parliamentary affairs.
stays
*��� Not only is provision made for facilitating our work, but we have a
host of officials to safeguard us and
our papers. I find myself, these
dsys, the possessor of s big bunch
of keys���keys to the office, keys to
the desks, keys to the post box, keys
to the desk of tbe House, etc These
weigh heavily in my trouser pockets;
and again these keys are to me somewhat of a parable, for what is a
member of Parliament except a man
who occupies a privileged position.
He is supposed to do this: in order
that be may serve the public, in reality, I fancy, it becomes fairly easy
for s man to identify the public interests with his own. I am endeavoring to get sll these preliminary
meditations "off my chest** at sn
early date, lest I should succumb to
the atmosphere which seems so prevalent here- It may be true that the
road to hell is paved with good intentions; wherever I wind up at, it is
well for my friends st least to know
at what end I started out.
Labor in the Left Win..
One cannot bnt be struck with the
fact that the mechanical arrangements of the House have very much
to do with the actual political lineup of the representatives. The government, of course, occupies the
seats on the right hand of the speaker. There they sit in long rigid
lines, and where they can be readily
marshalled at will; perhaps this is fitting. Not so the arrangement on tbe
speaker's left hand, for here in the
same long rigid lines sit the Conservatives���the ancient opposition to
the Liberals. Next to them, separated only hy s single aisle, b the
large group of tbe Progressives, and
further on again, almost a part of the
Progressive group, the men who owe
their allegiance to Labor, Mr. Irvine
_��f Calgary and I are seat mates. I
fbave the honor to occupy a front
bench, left wing, farther removed
from the speaker. Beyond me there
are s number of unoccupied desks;
in imagination, I try to picture these
ia future years, filled with Labor
members. Even as I do so, however,
I can hardly fancy the formal arrangements of this boose permitting
the labor men to accomplish a very
great deal.
It has been interesting for me, in
conversation with some of the Farmer members, to note how their ea-
thusiasm is dampened by Oa actual
realities of parliament. It is much
more difficult to be able to accomplish things here, than in the freedom of outside life. It strikes one
that this is a well oijed machine, that
oae la expected to follow tbe
tomed  grooves   to play the
ftitxooi-e Our -lati-ertiRers and Tell Them Why
rales permit ef very little individual
initiative. Evan an eld labor man
confided to me that he had found
himself helpless, sad so he
cided to go in with the
Only sa a member of a group did he
consider that he could accomplish
anything.
Oeiatag af tha
On Wednesday the H<
bled at three o'clock; all the ancient j
formalities  were  adhered  to.       A
clerk read a message from the Governor-General's secretary, inf<
the   House   thst   His
Deputy would attend at the Senate
Chamber st three o'clock to open the
Session, snd following the reading of
thb message, the members
moned to the Senate Chamber by the
1 Gentleman Usher of tha Black Rod.
Thb functionary who announced hb
arrival with three resounding
oa the door of the Commoi
receivta* with the
by the Sergeant-at-Arms.
After thb most dignified proceed-
dignified manner to the Bar of the
ing, we all proceeded in a
Senate. Thb august body,
ed of the Bob Rogers snd Amie
Bensrds, impressed one ss s very de-
scripit institution, indeed. One
felt very much ss on viewing the inmates of a workhouse, -thst these
poor old chaps had only a few years
ahead of them, and so sre not to be
envied their haven of quiet- The
message from the representative was
couched in ancient forms���"Gentlemen of the House of Commons���
I have it in command to let yoa
know that Hb Excellency does not
see fit to declare the causes of hb
summoning the present Parliament
of Canada until the speaker of the
House of Commons shall have been
chosen according to the law; bat tomorrow, st the hour of three o'clock,
in the afternoon, Hb Excellency will
declare the causes of calling thb
Parliament." We then trooped
back, snd elected s speaker. Following thb the speaker held a reception; the punch was declared to be
excellent. I fear I shall not be able
to take full advantage of tbe opportunities offered within the Parliament Buildings for gratifying a connoisseur's taste, bat of thb "more
later." Thus ended our first days
work.
The second day's work wss similar.
A stage performance with the Black
Rod and Sergeant-at-Arms, snd s
trip serosa the building to the Senate followed. The Governor-General, however, wss present in person.
snd the so-called elite of Ottawa,
sad indeed of Canada, were oat ia
fall force.
The social papers contain descriptions of the brilliant event, with the
Red Chamber a blase of colors, brilliant uniforms, handsome gowns, etc.
From the standpoint of a labor aaaa,
the whole performance waa distinctly illuminating. Whatever we may
any ss to the need for efficiency ia
conducting the business of thb country, it does seem ridiculoius that we
should have one hour on Wedneaday
and another hoar oa Thursday of
pure formality, and then that
should adjourn until Moaday.
I recognise the fact, of
that most men, including myself, find
plenty to do outside the time actually spent in the House, but at the
same time, thb ancient ceremony,
with all that it involves ef class dis
traction and ostentation, seems much
out of place in an institution which
b supposed to administer the affairs
of plain  democratic citizens.
Class asssjsSS
On every side there b manifest a
wide divergence between the standards maintained by the governing
classes, snd those which these classes
would impose upon the rest of the
community. For example, I find that
it b frequently the custom for members living in the East to leave ea
Friday fox a week-end with their
families, returning Monday afternoon or evening. An hour spent in
the House b sufficient to secure them
from forfeiting s day's pay. Thb b
very convenient, indeed, for professional men, who are able to maintain their business offices, and regard the House of Commons ss more
or less of a dub, attendance at which
b helpful in facilitating the conduct
of their private affairs.
Ia contrast with thb, I could not
but notice a sign, prominently plae-
led oa one of the buildings which b
being need for constructive purposes,
"Any man leaving week before tbe
whistle b blown, will be discharged-*
to
MACEY-WDSi-NSeOECO.
4I�� GRANVILLE STREET
r. a. am
mD.PMraraiPANY
74 CORDOVA STREET
NU'r,
-��GAM_L
Paint Wallpaper Claaa
Imperial Trunk
SSS HASTINGS STREET WEST
HE ELECTBC SHOP
IS HASTINGS STREET EAST
Lewis Piano &
Phonograph House
THE HOME OF THE PHONOLA
1044 GRANVILLE STREET
Outfitters for Men
**" DICK"*.
awe Mewey-a West* er Tenr
HASTINGS ST. EAST
CD.BRUCE
���a*
COR. HOMER AND HASTINGS
THE
LADIES*
STORE
V*
O&0
%��
411
HASTINGS
ST.
BURNS DRUG CO, LTD.
732 GRANVILLE STREET
EW VORK
NSY
(V,
143 HASTINGS STREET WEST
iw RENT PIANO CO, lit
GRANVILLE STREET
Hastings
Furniture Co.
41 HASTINGS STREET WEST
FULTON'S STYIE SHOP, LTD.
HEN'S SUITS. OVERCOATS.
RAINCOATS
��l�� GRANVILLE STREET
KNABE--CHICKERING��� WILLIS
PIANOS   AND   PLATER   PIANOS
THEBOWES MUSIC HOUSE
The Ingledew
Shoe Go.
Quality Footwear
Far lis. Whs*. F.sailr
wSC GRANVILLE STREET
SS* HM m
iR-C.
COR. HASTINGS AND ABBOTT
LATIMER & SONS
Hardware, Sheet Metal
~HA1N STREET~~
fl
ARNOLD _ QUIGLEY
540 GRANVILLE STREET
TOWNIEY ft WARD
GRAMOPHONES. PIANOS. ETC
443 HASTINGS STREET WEST
IB pootery
221���Day or Night
MINN 4_ THOMSON
FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND
SSI
WASHINGTON.
throogh the A. P.
recognition ot the Me.Ices
by the United States.
of L. fo
Wwhcr's ui CUtu's Sites
C81 GRANVILLE STREET
Paddock Boot
���*���       999 GRANVILLE    SllOD
I Gaewer   Nalaaa   St.���_���.-__&.
SHOES '-.fcj"*- I
I
The Federation ef Labor Ui
of 400.000.   It
in   quite  the  approved
It haa succeed
20 to SO per cent ia the
The   organised   waikaia   ef
Angeles have eaNhlkhed i
tive laundry.    It is the fiat
label laundry in that day.   They al-
tive
to
factory aad
South Vancouver
Co-Operative
J.N. HARVEY
127    HaatJags
OlJ'y.'t'-^ St.
Center �� Hanna, Ltd.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND
1040 GEORGIA ST.      SET. 2425
IUniin �� Cbemull
Ms-PR BKRKU
STREET WEST
���aHaw_."���
BROS.�� CO.

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