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The British Columbia Labor News May 26, 1922

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Baseball Competition Prizes $900
Issued Every Friday
Devoted to the interests of the Ihtef national Labor Movement
Volume I.
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fSobacriplion: $1.30 Pet Yearl
L Sc Per Copy
IRISH LABOR PARTY
TO CONTEST SEATS
Issues   Manifesto   Demanding
That Militarism be Crushed
By Civil Power
.Thomas Johnson secretary of the
Irish Labor party for 300,000 organized trades unionists in Ireland
and for "tens of thousands" unorganized, in sending a copy of this*
program upon which the Irish Labor
party will fight the forthcoming Parliamentary elections, tells us that although the position st the moment is
too delicate for him to make a detailed statement, the labor movement
in Ireland is facing the perils of the
times with courage and determination and is attracting widespread
sympathy snd support.. Its manifesto demanding that the Dail shall "accept the responsibilities of government or confess its impotence and
make way for the people," demanding that violence and militarism be
crushed by the civil power and that
the sovereignty of the people shall
be recognized, has been widely published and has already had great effect.
"We take our stand against militarism because we know that the military spirit will surely be exploited by
"the: reactionary elements in defending the tyrannies of capitalism and.
the entrenchment of the old order."
The Labor party has a list of 21
candidates for the June election; but
thus far, no other candidates have
been snnounced.
Vancouver, B. C, Friday, May 26, 1922
Number 29
C.P.R. ADVERTISES FOR
BRITISH MECHANICS
Th Western Labor News reports
that a delegate to the Winnipeg
Trades and Labor Council had been
informed by a friend, who Claimed
to have a clipping of the paper, that
the C. P. R. had been advertising
in Manchester, England, for mechanics, offeringuSO cents an hour, passage paid, and a guarantee of 12
months' orprk. The Council instructed the secretary to write to the
Amalgamated Society of Engineers
informing it of the three days a week
system which was in vogue sll over
the country.,, and that 50 cents an
hour was not the union rate.
MINE OWNERS USE
- BOMBING PLANE
Aviator Gets $400 for Three
Days'    Work   Bombing
Miners on Strike
International Triide Union
League Issuer Manifesto
T
d irifie  Union  League Issues   Manifesto  to the
of th? Vi
The aviators who dropped gas and
explosive bombs on the miners army
at Blair Mountain were employed by
the Logan County Coal Operators'
Association, Horace Haines, Columbus, Ohio, aviator testified at the
Blizzard treason trial.
Haines declared he dropped several explosive bombs loaded with slugs
while acting as observer and bomber
for the state forces. He dropped
the bombs after his machine had
been fired on by the miners, he said.
Haines said he was sent to Logan
County\by the 'Johnson Airplane
Company of Dayton, Ohio.
"I received a salary of $400 from
the Logan County Coal Operators'
Association for three days' work,**
Haines said on cross-examination.
International
Workers of the World���Calls Upon' Them to Resist with
Every Means within Their Power the Wars Winch
Even  Now  Threaten  to  Break  Ont  Afresh���
General Strike Favored
THE International Trade Union League, with headquarters at Amsterdam, comprises organizations of wage workers, both national
������ml international. Its membership, seconding to records of the, various
organizations, numbers about 24,000,000 duly elected representatives
met at Rome in the latter part of April last to consider the problems of
labor in the present and near future.
There was free and full discussibB, so that'when action was decided
vpon it should be deliberate, fully conscious of possibilities and consequences. -
It is in such calm snd determinste mood that the congress took a
stand against war and militarism in  _.e document printed herewith.
COMRADES!
The world war that, according to
assurances  of the chauvinistic and
nationalistic governments, was to be
the last war and waa to inaugurate
an era of peace and prosperity, is
at an end for more than three years
by virtue  of a series of so-called
peace treaties imposed by the victors
upon the vanquished.
Instead of the announced prosperity, economic chaos and misery is'
reigning in all countries such as the
world has not known for centuries.
caose today millions among you are
without work, there possibly may be
workers under the false impression
that a new war would bring prosperity to the working class. The direct
cause of j the poverty .which is manifest today all over the world is the
treat war, and new wars would mean
more and still more bitter poverty
for the" masses of the workers. History) teaches that the progress of the
workers hss always been impeded by
capitalistic wait.
I  It is yon who carry the heaviest
FINNISH WORKERS HOLD
BALANCE OF POWER
There are 80 Socialists in the present Finnish Diet out of a total of
200. Their number permits them to
wield the balance of power and, as a
result, the Central party has been
forced to yield concession after concession to the Finnish working class.
With the pressure exerted by the Socialists, political prisoners of the revolution, jailed by the White Guards,
hsve been gradually released from
prison. Rights hsve been restored
to 20,000 snd of the original 45,000
in jail, only 1,600 remain.
Oae free coupon with every dollar.
RAILWAY CLERKS
FOR AMALGAMATION
Coupon boxes will be closed every
Saturday at 10 a.m.
LABOR SPY IS
GUILTY OF ARSON
SO. VAN. LEAGUE
HOLDS PICNIC
Young   Folks   Made  Trip   to
Lynn Valley for Games  .<
and Rambles
The members of the South Vancouver Labor League spent a very pleasant evening last Friday at 339 58th
avenue east at the first monthly social meeting of the organization.,.
There was a large turn-out andPmVlo7m ***"? I-fla ta At"
everybody voted it a great vp&adKf* tempt* to Discredit and
Crush Unions.
SANV FRANCISCO.--Caught red-
handed as an incendiary in his effort to fasten on union labor the
stigpa of crime, J. C. Emerson, notorious labor spy and manufacturers'
agent provocateur, has been found
guilty of arsen at Martinez, Cal., as
a result of a conflagration at the
Associated Oilv Company plant on
October 5. Emerson will receive the
indeterminate sentence from two
years to life imprisonment fixed by
the California statutes for the offence.
Emerson, who wss employed at the
plant as a guard, will be recalled as
the employers' agent who in the
Stockton, Cal., lockout in 1914 tried
to plant 'dynamite in the room of
labor leaders, among them Tom
Mooney, in the hope of discrediting
the workers in the eyea of the public.
Though indicted as a result of the
1914 episode, he was never convicted
because of the influence brought to'
bear by the interests which he served
snd which were trying to destroy
tbe unions.
The picnic to Lynn Valley on, jr
Wednesdsy was a huge success. The
members together with friends left
on the 10.40 ferry, reaching their,
destination about noon. After lunch
the participants set out to enjoy
themselves to the full. Members of
both sexes, joined in the games and
rambles. All were tired but supremely happy when they made
tracks for home at 9 o'clock.. Everybody present claimed it to have been
a most successful outing.
The League will hold an educational meeting at 8 o'clock prompt
tonight (Friday) at 6262 Chester St.
The Educational committee reports
that it has drafted a programme
for the season and will Introduce it
to the members tonight. i~"~-
The young people in South Van
eouver are getting behind the South
Vancouver Labor League and the future looks hopeful for this organisation..
For particulars of meetings, etc.,
please phone Fraser 397Y1 oa Fraser
190X1. Notes of the activities of
tha League will appear in this paper from week to week.
No trace of the hoped for peace! in [��*-*���-����������� ���** mflitarism    in time    of
peace, the militarism that, serves solely capitalism, nationalism and imperialism. It is yon also whose
bodies in war serve as cannon fodder.
It is your life by the aid of which
capitalists and imperialists solve
their problems by transforming them
into armed conflicts.  ' a
For the higher (dory and honor
of the national ana international
capitalism you send your children to
death.
To   Proclaim   General   Strike
The Congress   has    charged    all
trade onion organizations affiliated
barren   manifestations,  with the International trade Union
aU step* calculated
to struggle aglavtiniilitaritun and to
A PHILANTHROPIST
NEW ORLEANS���A New Orleans
lumber dealer, interviewed upon re-
, turning from a trip through Georgia,
Alabama and Mississippi, reports' Negro wages on the land averaging 90
cents a day. When asked about the
wages of the men employed in his
New Orleans mill and yard he replied:
"I pay my men at least $12 a week
although I hsve bad pressure brought
against me by my associates to cut
this rate.and although I pay more
bow than most mills and yards in
this vicinity. Bnt I don't believe a
man ean get along today on leas
than that, even though he is an illiterate Negro."
all parts of the world the struggle
continues for the booty of the last
war and preparations are going on
for new conquests. In spite of all the
fine promises of disarmament, millions of soldiers remain in arms, the
production of war equipment is going on unchecked in its old way and
a new world conflagration is in preparation. We state that these new
wars will be far more murderous and
terrible than the one that waa called
"the last of all wan."
Government conferences! Peace
congresses! Disarmament conferences:    sll
powerless against the new threaten-^ League to��
ing wars.
Only our power in the world is
capable to prevent further war: the
internationally    organized    working
class-
To Wage War Against War
The Congress of the International
Trade Union League held in Rome on
April 20, 1922, and the days following hss snew manifested the will for
peace of the working class in the
name of the millions of worker* organized in it. We declare it the
duty and the task of the proletarian movement to wage war against
war and militarism with all the
means at ita disposal.
We resolve to prevent any new
war menacing mankind by the proclamation of the international general
strike)
Workers   af   AU   Countries
To you, organized in the trade nnion centrales of your countries snd
through them affiliated with the international Trade Union League, the
congress issues the argent appeal to
enter the straggle against militarism.
Do not believe that war can improve yoar living conditions.      Be-
Convention    Demands    Recognition for Russia���Favors
Industrial Unions
prevent any threatening wax by the
proclamation of the general strike.
This decision will be of value only if
yoa support it with all yoar power.
Yputi organizations are powerless
unless ei-tch of you agitates tirelessly for the peace of the world
against militarism and capitalism.
In fact, every summons to action
against threatening war is futile on:
less all without distinction are ready
to stop work.
WORKERS OF ALL COUNTRIES I
Get together, nationally and internationally'^Oppose to the league of
all chavinists the international solidarity of the worken of all countries!
Rally around the banner of the
International Trade Union League in
the struggle against mflitarism and
war.
Be^e*.eadfast fighters, watchful
snd ready for any sacrifice to make
the crime impossible!
The Internationa] Trade Union
League counts upon yon! Down with
militarism!    Down with war!
Down with capitalism!
Hail to the International of Peace!
Hail to the International of Labor!
Dallas, Tex.���American recognition of Russia and immediate opening of trade relations in order to
give employment to American workers was demanded here by the con
vention of Railway- and Steamship
Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express
Station Employes.
The convention indorsed the amalgamation of craft onions into industrial unions, each to cover a single
industry. *
Declare for Public Ownership
Public ownership of public utilities
such ss railroads, express compsnies,
mines, ship yards, light and power
plants, telephone and telegraph lines,
wireless telephone and telegraph stations, irrigation and drainage lines,
elevators and storage warehouses
and nulls, was declared for snd congress was memorialized to that effect, ft)
"ft
5E3
ENGINEERS FAVOR
MINE-RAIL ALUANCE
Organisations Are Lining Up
for a Big Alliance of Mine
aad Transport Worker*
Cleveland, O.���The advisory board
grand international division, Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers,
has unanimously approved the joint
alliance wtth the miners and longshoremen formulated by representatives of the sixteen railroad labor organization., the United Mine Worken of America, aad the International Longshoremen's Association at
their conference held in Chicago Feb
22.' The protective agreement drafted by the Chicago Conference haa
already been ratified by the mine
worken and longshoremen, snd. by
the following railroad onions:
Railway Signalmen of America,
International Brotherhood of Boilermakers and Iron Shipbuilders,
International Brotherhood of Blacksmiths, Drop Forgers snd Helpers,
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of Railway and Steamship
Clerks, United Brotherhood ' of
Maintenance of Way Employes
and Railroad Shop Laborers.
The joint agreement does not
commit the railway worken to a
sympathetic strike. It provides for
a conference of the allied labor unions whenever "any one or group of
the associated organizations is made
the victim of unwarranted attacks,
or its integrity is jeopardized."
mtr.amn.ita #m%.-._-*.:
MONUMENTS TO DEAD THINGS
GERMANY���Practically ah metal
worken in Bavaria are idle as a result of strikes and lock-outs which
an due to tha refusal of lsborers
to accept the 48-hour week instead
of 46 ss heretofpre.
Six yean ago Police Sergeant
"Pat" Collins and his brother "Mike"
set sail for America, Tat" paying
tha ocean charges for both. Tat"
felt certain he would have no difficulty in catching on to the ways of
America and climbing the dizzy ladder to.-fame snd fortune. "Mike"
was not so sanguine as Tat," and
when the former got as far as the
Statue of Liberty his reluctance' to
become a citizen of the United States
became a resolution. Then was a
boat going back and "Mike" climbed
aboard. Maybe "Mike" had heard
the remark of H. G. Wells when his
imaginative eyes first beheld the
stern lady holding aloft the torch
of freedom: "Ton Americans are always erecting monuments to dead
things."
Anyway "Mike" went hack, and
today he is President'of the Irish
republic.
Try yoar lack snd give as s boost.
MINE OWNERS PAY
DEPUTY SHERIFFS
348 Specials in One County Are
Used Aganst Striking
Mi
SOMERSET, Pa���Three handled
and forty-eight special deputy sheriffs appointed since April 1 receive
their wsges 'directly from the mine
operators of Somerset County in
flat violation of the laws Of Pennsylvania. The men an selected for appointment by the operators sad take
their orders from the men who pay
them.
, This revelation ia made in the coming issue of the Penn-Central News,
the co-operatively owned Labor pa
per controlled by the miners of central Pennsylvania, snd is confirmed
by the independent investigations of
the American Civil Liberties Union,
which hss two representatives in
this strategic and newly unionized
coal region.
This system of private payment of
public servants mskes the sherrifTs
deputies a strong-arm crew for the
openton   and   renden   impossible
even-handed execution of the laws.
furthermore it is directly contrary to
Pennsylvania law.
The sheriff has refused to deputize representatives of ths miners, alleging that his other deputies would
start shooting st ths protectors of
the workings-ten snd a civil war
would result.
1 Mr. Henpeck had just received a
note signed ^The Black Hand," and
the BBBBBBJtr stood waiting.
"Deer Sur," said the missive.
"Send us one thousand dollars or
we wfll kidnap yoar wife." .
Henpeck pondered a moment snd
then wrote this reply:
"Dear Black Hand: I haven't the
thousand dollars but I am interested
in yoar proposition."
FORD ATTACKS
BUSINESS ELEMENT
Greed of Manufacturers Keeps
Busineaa Depression
In Existence _
DETROIT, Mich. ��� Henry Ford
says that business could be made
good and the cost of living reduced
if it were not for the shortsighted
greed of manufacturers and merchants who persist in clinging as
near to war prices as possible.
"A cleric in a shoe store, after he
had waited on me today, asked me
when business was going to pick up,"
said Mr. Ford.
" 'How much would you charge s
man worth $100,000 for a good pair
of shoes?' I asked.
" 'About $13,' replied the clerk.
" Ton sold the same pair of shoes
before the war, didn't you, for $6?'
"The clerk said that was correct
'"Well,' I replied, 'business will
pick up snd be good just as soon ss
you pot the price of those shoes st
$7.'
"There is no sense ia present
prices," said Mr. Ford, "I hsve compelled everybody who sells material
to me to sell it at pre-war prices or
a little more. When I cut the price
of ay car a year ago I refused to
pay more thaa what I am bow paying for materials. That ia what the
public should do refuse to buy at
present prices. The thing caa be
done, too.
RELIGIOUS FIGHT
DEFEATS LABOR
Bi��   Business   of   New  South
Wales Turns Trick on
It n*tay be that beauty is only skin-
deep, bat some of the ladies seem to
pot it on thicker than that
"We won't work for yoa
yoa can produce a testimonial from
your last slave." This is the response of the Knockaderry branch of
the servant girls' union to the loeal
Farmers* Union decision to demand
a testimonial of her former employer
from each applicant to
servant girt.
Making  Basin... Pay
"Manufacturers sad merchants
caa cut prices if they waat to. Whan
I determined to cut the price of our
ear, the man who waa at that time
treasurer of ths company told me
that I hsd reduced the touring ear to
less ��� thaa the cost of production.
'Weu, if yon think so,' I replied, 1
wfll just cut $10 more off the car,'
aad I old. He figured As* we lost
dose to $18,000,000 on the csrs already in stock aad I don't know how
many more millions daring the year.
We did not lose anything. We made
money.
"That is the way I believe in running a business. I cut ths pries of
the car at s time when we were
selling aU wa could make. Bat if
prices can be cut I believe always ia
cutting them. It is good business
to do so.
"Right now the steel mills are run-
By Frances  Ahern
Labor's defeat in New South
Wales was due in the main to the
launching of a campaign of sectarianism by the political parties opposed
to labor. Big business wss determined to defeat the Labor Government at all costs, snd st the 11th
hour turned the issue into a religious
fight between Protestants and Catholics.
Tolerance is Cause
Because of their tolerance for all
religious liberties the Labor Government and candidates in the field
were accused of being in league with
the Catholic Church, and that the
latter was planning to secure con- i/
trol of the Legislature of the state.
Malignant lies snd poisonous literature were distributed, declaring that
the hand of Rome wss behind the
Labor party.
Cuts m wages have already been
made, and further decreases an to
follow. The houn of labor an being increased from 44 to 48. Unemployment is growing. Much labor
legislation will be repealed.
The position of the parties in the
new Parliament ss a result of the
elections is: Labor, 87; Democrat 1;
Anti-Labor, 43; Farmers' Party, 8;
Labor, being opposed to coalitions,
refused to join with the farmers to
carry on the government and resigned.
RAILWAY CONDUCTORS
FOR POLITICAL ACTION
Cleveland, O,���The 87th grand division meeting, Order St Railway
Conductors, hss ratified s resolution
authorizing the officen to co-operate in any progressive political movement^ and to support financially any
candidate or movement which is
Pledged to labor's economic snd civic
ideals. The convention overwhelm-
h>_rly approved the action of President L. E. Sheppard in participating in the conference for progressive
political sction formed in Chicago,
February 22.
��� "'3
ning at only part capacity, though
every railroad in the country needs
rails. We need rails on the D. T. *
L Bnt so long ss rails are more than
$40 a ton we shall ��ot buy . ntt.
well use tbe ones ws've got until
they are arora down to wires before
*e wfll pay _��,_- thsn $27 or $28
s ton. , ������ '���
"ft I
PAGE TWO
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA LABOR NEWS
p
��� a
THE B.C. LABOR NEWS
Published every Friday at Labor Hall,
319 Pender Street West
Vancouver, B. C.
Telephones Seymour 74957496
Subscription  Bates:
81.50 per year by mall In Canada
$2.50 per year outside Canada
H. W. WATTS - Editor and Manager
FRIDAY, MAY 26
THE NEW CONFERENCE
Germany is left out Of the new
economic conference to be held at
The Hague. One of the chief questions which the conference will have
to deal with is the trade alliance of
Russia and Germany. It will not
be possible for the Allies to break
this alliance/ hence Poland will have
to join in the-ajlian^e in order that
a direct overland trade route might
be established between the two countries. Poland will hardly dare oppose this trade pact, hence the
forthcoming conference will be taken up with alliances by many nations
with Eussia upon Russian terms.
The tremendous possibilities offered by Russian reconstruction will
open the way for an economic revival all over Europe. Big business
is angling after this now and the
diplomats will be given orders to
take whatever concessions Russia is
willing to offer even though it endangers the "Democracy" of their
own countries.
MILITARISM   IN   SCHOOLS
Although the reduction in naval
and military estimates for Canada is
somewhat gratifying, we must not
be led away with the idea that militarism is being abolished.
Militarism is just as rampant today as it was during the war, and we
need only look at the military training that is now going on in the
schools to realize that the young generation, is being prepared for cannon
fodder.
. After school hours the boys are
again inveigled into the uniform of
soldiers, -Boy Scouts or naval cadets, to be trained in the militaristic
antics that are so necessary in the
struggle for world markets and profits for plutocrats.
In ten years' time���if this naval
and military holiday lasts that long
���these boys will have grown to manhood and will then be ready, just as
their fathers were, to be thrown to
the Moloch of capitalism. Then the
anguish,' misery, suffering and sacrifices will be repeated, as in the last
great war, and the reward will be a
larger measure of luxury' and idleness for the rich and glory, medals
and poverty for the poor.
WAR AGAINST WAR
We publish in this issue the manifesto against war and militarism issued by the Congress of the International Trade Union League (Amsterdam).
It is a remarkable document, remarkable from several points of
view. It shows that labor has
learned a great deal since 1914. It
has become alive to the solidarity of
the working forces of all countries.
It has travelled far from the paths
of nationalism toward the goal of
true internationalism.
In sober, yet forceful language, it
tells the worken that they always
bear the burden of capitalist wars
and that their vital interests call for
unremitting struggle against all militarism, against all wars -for capitalism.
It ib a document of class consciousness without using that phrase.
Not a mention of Socialism, of the
name of Karl Marx. But there is
the spirit, burning with an unwavering flame. This spirit shows labor
the path it must travel without reckoning the cost.
It is, or should be, also a warning
to the powers that be. The worm is
turning at last. The old ways of
fooling labor will no longer avail.
This manifesto, translated into every language understood by labor,
should be printed and circulated by
the millions until every worker has
learned its lesson.
Then neither courts nor jails will
thwart labor's determination. Sedition laws will become as futile as
paper bullets against steel walls.
Moscow has also a lesson to learn
from this manifesto. Are those issuing it in truth traiton to their
class, agents and hirelings of the
bourgeoisie? Or is it not time for
a sincere retraction and solem'n
apology?
and invention is used exclusively for
the welfare of every man, woman
and child, whose skill and labor have
produced all tbe good things of life.
The   privileged   owning  class  are
the only people with any rights. That |
right  entitles  them  to  plunder the'
resources and exploit the  toilers.
The waking hours and energies of
the multitudes of the world are consumed, in the struggle for bread���
not art, not science, not literature,
not philosophy���but bread, to save
their plundered lives.
For century after century the
blighted multitudes have staggered
across the stage of life, the "victims
|$>f a privileged plundering class.
Now, however, the workers are demanding a new social order in which
we shall have our place in a brotherhood of glad and unrobbed workers
���in the mellow sunshine of justice,
with truth and civilization and all the
good, best things of life for all of us
���wher. our children may not only
bud but bloom, unblasted by poverty,
and rise to the full glory of happy
maturity, and where ex-service men
and aged toilers will not have to beg
for bread and old clothes.
OUR CIVILIZATION
INTOLERANCE.
Members of the Grand Army of
the Republic���American Civil War
veterans���have come out for the deportation of Lady Astor because of
some remarks she is alleged to have
made in reference to the civil war
(Lady Astor is a Virginian hy birth)
and the soldiers' bonus. On the
strength of their demand for the
lady's expulsion, it must be said that
the old veterans have kept even step
with the spirit of America. Deport,
exile, banish, burn in oil, fry in fat,
dnw and quarter everybody that yoa
don't happen to agree with. This
is tha spirit of America���but not
only of America. The same intolerance is displayed in other countries against minority opinion and
expression. If you cant do'the
goose-step you will have to do the
lock-step. If you don't swallow this
dogma, rod, line, bait, hook and sinker, to the dungeon with yon. If
you refuse to subscribe to this first
paragraph, periods and commas included, yoa dont belong to oar international and well bnak np yours.
It is no longer a question of take
it or leave it, bat take it or be
damned.
Boost tils Baseball Competition.
Join the Labor Party. ,
Empire Day has come and gone.
The, British Empire, we are told,
stands as the stalwart champion of
the best of our civilization. The ancient creed���might is right���died,
we are told, when the German Empire succumbed to the creed of the
new world���right is might.      '
On the very same page of the paper in which these unproved assertions are made we find an appeal
being made for old clothes snd boots
for 3,000 ex-service men now resident in Greater Vancouver in order
to enable them to go to work. This
not only infers that the men who
helped to demolish the old creed are
today not only in need of clothing
but also food and work.
If this is the best that can be done
for the "empire builders" then we
have certainly got to do a lot of
spade work to improve the "best of
our civilization."
The stores and factories are filled
with clothing and boots,, while
countless thousands are insufficiently
clothed and yet we pnte in arrant
nonsense about "rights" and "civilisation."
Food is rotting in the country, either because the commh_h>n mer-
chant is overstocked, the com' storage plant is overloaded or the freight
rates are prohibitive.
There have been' many instances
recently where farmers have left
their produce in tbe bands of the
railroads because the freight charges
were more than the produce would
sell for on the market. In New
Brunswick farmers are selling potatoes at 40 cents a barrel and no buyers. On the prairies the farmers
cannot get enough for their produce
to even vegin to pay the interest off
their mortgages.       v
If we have reached that stage of
civilization where it does not pay
the producer to raise foodstuffs to
feed the human family, then there
can certainly be nothing to brag
about. If the ex-service man has to
beg for old clothes, while new ones,
in countless thousands, lie idle in
stores and warehouses, what rights
have w<* to brag about?
The Empire and civilisation is bat
a meaningless phrase, and will remain so until all the natural resources of the empire aad aU science
Everything is divided equally. The
rich man has the twin-six and the
poor man haa the six twins.
Conan Doyle says he can talk with
the dead. That's nothing. We often
talk with those who are dead���from
the neck up. ^
So the government is going to increase the tax on the poor man's tobacco and the rich man's checks. It
might be termed capitalistic equality.
French armies will not march
into Germany on June 1, we are informed. Surely the army has not
turned Bolshevist and refused to
march!
The Krupps have entered info a
contract to supply Russia with agricultural machinery. That's one harvest the International Harvester
failed to reap.
Headline reads "The Sun is on
sale tomorrow." No, it's not another
of our natural resources in the hands
of a trust, but the possibility is by
no means remote.
ODD BITS
(Conducted  by   Sydney-Warren)
Through the special efforts of Aid.
Pettipiece, the day labor plan_on city
work is being put into effect showing
that it takes real labor councillors to
prevent reckless and inefficient expenditure of city finances. ���
Sir Charles Gordon bemoans" the
fact that America places more importance on oil concessions than
bleeding humanity. Sir Charles has
been a long time finding that out, but
America is not the only country.
France wants Internafibnal capi
talists to finance a loan -to Germany
in order that Germany can hand it
over to France. We will then have
to work > harder in order to fill the
coffers of the' capitalists. Peace,
perfect peace.
Chicago police have admitted that
at least one of the fires alleged to
have been started by trades unionists
was started by boys ^at play. A confession has also cleared the union
leaders of the killing of the two policemen. The daily press, however,
is silen. on these admissions.
About 80 per cent, of the taxes*;
levied for the Canadian Budget are
for the payment of the interest on
our debts. So we will have to scrimp
and scrape for another year to pay
this mosey to people who are spending most of their time touring the
world and taking life easy.
There is room for divided opinion
but no room for divided action.���
Sidney Hillman at the Amalgamated
Clothing Worken Convention. In
these 12 words the whole philosophy
of union solidarity is tersely stated,
and he who has not learned it has
not learned the elementary principle of solidarity.
THE SHAM BATTLES
D. M. Kennedy, Progressive mem-
bet of parliament for West Edmonton, introduced a bill in the House
of Commons to amend the criminal
code by striking out the objectionable
clause adaled lstt year which freed
en Edmonton millionaire who was
charged with a serious crime. The
bill w.-ts laid over until the next session by agreement of the tories with
thc government, in more than one
instance it baa already been proven
that when the privileged Interests
need protection th sham battles of
the political wings mean nothing and
grits and tories alike come to tbe
rescue of their masters.���Alberta
Labour News. /
And So It Ever Was
Oh, that Youth   knew, and    Age
could!���from .the Ffcnch.
ass
Labour's Holy Grail.
Man is said to be eternally at war
with his ideals. If he seeks to live
then he often jeopardizes his life,
or at least pays his price in social
ostracism or public calumny.
It haa been much the same with
Labour's advocacy of world brotherhood. For yean we have been striving for an international spirit among
the world's worken. We have said,
and truly so, that the worken of all
countries are exploited by the same
set of masters, more particularly
now that Capitalism has grown
world-wide in ita ramifications and,
therefore, international fellowship
was a necessity.
But is our economic identity the
sole basis for internationalism?
Are there not other things to be
considered?
In British Columbia, Oriental and
White worken are exploited by tbe
same set of bosses, yet has the Labour movement made any headway
in promoting a fellowship feeling
between yellow and white worken?
We have not, nor do we intend to
in the future. And even had we
educated the Oriental worker to realize that his economic interests and
oura were identical, we could not
have developed a spirit of internationalism, because we' regard ourselves as racially superior to all colored races.
Perhaps we are���but dare we hope
that these people will take economic
equality from our right and accept
racial inferiority from our left?
It is not the purpose of this article to disparage the ideal of internationalism^ but merely to suggest
that it signifies more than simply
economic identity.
World-fellowship has- been the
Holy Grail of the Labour Movement
almost since its inception, but the
Blood in the Cup has always been
White Blood.
see
Oar  Penal   Barbarity.
Sir Lonier Gouin'a figures to the
Federal House, that in Canadian
Penitentiaries there are at present
IS inmates sixteen years of age, 63
of seventeen yean and 82 of eighteen years, certainly affords a striking example of the barbarity of our
whole penal system. -No *one, who
has not been in gaol himself or
known intimately its victims, can
form any idea of the vile degradation to which society condemns its
law-breakers in the hope of reforming them. That youths of the above
ages should be among the victims entails society to a debt, compared to.
which   Germany's   war   indemnities
are insignificant.
���    ���    ���
Propriety and "Bobbed" Hair.
A Chicago father was arrested
last week for beating his daughter
because she "bobbed" her hair and
dressed "jaxzily." He was but giving vent to an age-old tendency to
suppress that which is not in harmony with our ideas, only he resorted to the primitive method. He
should have organized a "Society for
the Prevention of Female Eccentricities," that would have had a pre?
amble, secretary, committies, and all
the rest of organisation red-tape. In
time it would have induced a majority of like-minded law-makers to
pass legislation to innocnlate their
particular ideas of propriety into the ^
rest of the population. He would
have been a reformer, then���now
he's called a cruel father and fined
$100. But, getting back to the point,
"bobbed" hair on a girl is really no
worse than a kittenish moustache on
a man.    Now is it?
Vancouver Unions
VAWCOUVEB TBADES AND LABOB
OOUBOXL���-President, A. 3,. Crawford;
Secretary. P. Bengough. Office 308
I-.Uir Kali. 319 Pender Street West.
Phone Seymour 7495. MeeU In Labor
Hall at 1 p.m. on tha first and third
Tueadsy in month.
BUILDIWO TBADBS COUNCIL--Chairman,
O. O. Thoaa. Seeratary. Bay Masaecar,
Offles 210 -Labor Hall. Meets first sod
third Weil���assay la month at Labor Hall.
The Furniture Guild of Great
Britain, operated by the anions on
the same plan as the Building Guilds,
has met with phenomenal success.
The first guild, opened a few months
ago on $1,250 capital in Manchester,
is being swamped with orders. Ihe
Guild ides is spreading to snch a
great extent that Trade Union Guild
Councils are being organized all over
the country.
It is an affront to a united front
to divide and then preach the virtues of unity.
ST 8AI~SltBB, Local No. 371 ���
President. J. Bright well; Secretary, W.
Bowron, 2149 Burns Ave. Meets at
319 Pender Street West on second
Thursday of each month at > p.m.
1ST, r-COOB, CESKIL
Son DBUrx WOBBBBS��� President.
I*. P. Gpugti; Secretary. W. H. McLean. 2035 Broadway Weat. Meats
at 119 Pender Street West at S p.m.
every  third   Tueaday in month.
atiobal onion.
Local No. 110���President. C. E. Herrett; Secretary, A. K. Jennie. 110
<'amble Street. Meeta Room 111, 119
Pender Street Weet. at 7:16 p.m. on
second and fourth Tuesdays In month.
blacbsb-tbs.  nsor rosossi    a
BILriBf. Local No. 151��� President,
W. 3. Bartlett: Be cretary. Albert Ar-
mer, 2041 2nd Ave. W. Meets at
311 Pender Street Weat at I p m. on
third Tuesday of each month.
B B-SLrSBa. Local No. 114���
President" P. Willie; Secretary, A.
Fraser, Room 103. 119 Pender Street
Weat MeeU at 119 Pender Street
West, at S p.m. on flrat and third
Mondays   of eaeh month.
BOOT ABB BBOB WOBBBBS' UBIOB
Local No. BOS ��� Preeldent. W. K.
Whlteway; Secretary, Tom Cory, 445
Vernon ��� Drive. Meeta at 319 Pender
Street Weat at 9 p.m. on first Tuesday
In month.
EBEBS
MABOBS ABO PLAST-
W.   Kerr;   Seeratary.
I.   Pad��a��t     Bests st Labor Ball oa Sad
snd 4th Wednesday ja tenth.
.TBBa, MAI
���Preaident,
BBIBOB. BTBUCTUBAI. B OBBAMBB-
TAX IBOB WOBBBBS, Loral No. 97
���President, B. Branson; Secretary,
Roy Maaaeear, 119 Pender Street West.
MeeU at 111 Pender Street Weat, at
0 pea, seeond and fourth Mondsy.
BOOKBIB'BBBS, Local 101���President.
Geo. Mowat: SeereUry. Frank Milne.
Box 411. Meets at 119 Psnder Street
West at t p.m. every third Wednesday
In month.
CTVTC BB-rXOTBBa, Local No. 28���
President. J. White: SeereUry. O.
Harrison. Office 141 Cordova Street
West Meets at 149 Cordova Street
West at S p.m. on the first and third
Friday  In  month.
CITY BLALL SB-K>OTBSS* Local No.
59���Prsaldent. H. A, Black; Secretary,
Aid. W.J. Scribben, City Hall. MeeU
at 149 Cordova Street West, at 9 p.m.
on  first  Wednesday  of  each  month.
eaar���bttbbsT
JOOB, Local
452���President Oeo. H. Hardy; Secretary, W. J. Johnston; Business
Agent. G. C. Thom. Office 104 Labor
Hall.    Meets second and fourth Mon-
day at 9 p.m. In Labor Hall.	
CAEPEMTEBS. AMALGAMATED. go. 1
Branch.���President T. 8. Coops; Business A rent. Angae - MsrSwesn; Secretary.
R 0. Webber. 140 19th Ave. W. Meets
2nd snd ate Tueaday st S p.m., la F.L.P.
Hsll.
Hs. 2 Branch.���Secretary. W. Brsy, 00
10th Ave. W. Meeta lat and Ird Tuesday at 8 p.m.. In r.L.P. Hsll, 149 Cordo-a
Bt. W.
CIOAJBMABSBa. Local No. 157���President, G. Thomas; SeereUry, R. J.
Crals, 1* Kootenay Street Meets st
119 Pender Street West, at I p.m. on
first Tuesday In month.
BX.SCTBXCA-, WOBBBB8, Local 213���
President, D. W. McDougall; Secretary,
F. R. Burrows; Business Agent, K.H.
Morrison, Office 149 Cordova Street
West Meets at 142 Cordova Street
West at  9   p.m.  every  Monday. ���>.'  ,
Local No. II��� President, Percy Trevlse: SeereUry, Chas.
A. Watson. No. 1 Fire Hall. Twelfth
and Quebec Streets. Vancouver. MeeU
at 319 Pender Street Weat.
OABMBsTT    WOBBBBS,   Local   No.   160
 President Mrs. W.  Mahon; SeereUry,
Miss  May Ward,   477  Hornby  Street.
Meats at  Labour Hall at * p.m.    on
first Thursday In month.
BO�����_ a BBSTAOBABT BBIPLOTBZB
Local No. 29���President, W. Colmar.
SeereUry, Andy Graham, 441 Seymour
Street. Meete at 441 Seymour Street
first and third Wednesdsy at 1:30.
Second and Tourth Wednesday at 2:30.
WOOB. wrsi a
Local No. 207���Prealdent A. B. Flnly.
Secretary. A. P. Surges. 129 Fifty-
seventh Avenue Fast. MeeU at lit
Holden Bulldlnt*. Vancouver, at 9 p.m.
on first and   third Fridays In month.
-UTHOOBAPBSBS, Local No. 44���President, H. J. Rhodes; Seeretary, H. Walker. 1002 Pendrell Street. Meets at
Room 109, 219 Pendter Street Weet, at
9 p.m. on third Wedneaday In month.
Brotherhood of. Division No. 220���Prealdent.
i'. P. Boston; SeereUry. H. A. B- Mac-
Donald, 1222 PendHII St. Vancouver.
Beets st I.O.O.F. Hsll ea sseead sad
Fourth Tuesdays In each month at ���
p-m.	
-.OrsrugorrVB
Local No. 458���Preeldent,
T. McKwen; SeereUry. H. O. Campbell
744 Helmcken Street, Vancouver.
MeeU at I.O.O.F. Rail, on flrat   aad
third  Thnredaya ef eaeh  month.
Local No. 31-52���Secretary-Treasurer,
B. irixea; Saalaee. Agent. W. Bans. 159
Cerdeva Street West Meets al ISS Cordo-a Street West, at S p.m.. ea first aad
third Fridays la "
No.   24S���Prealdent,    W.
T-ocal
McCartney,
210 London Building: Secretsry. G.W.
Seated. 210 London Building. MeeU
at IIS London Building on first Sun-
day In meath at 7:10 p.m.
MBCI-Or-WAT
k BAH.WAT SBOP
Local No. 107���President. A. Osborne
Secretary. A. D. McDonald. 991 Pender Street Weat, Vancodver. Meets
at 9 p.m. on third Thuraday In month.
aAOBlBlBTB. Loeal IBS ��� President,
Leo. George; SeereUry. 3. O. Keefe;
Business Agent, P. Bengough: Office
lit Pender Street Weat. MeeU at 111
Pender Street West at 2.00 p.m. on
first and third Thursday.
st--r-CI���BB, Local No. 145���President.
Bowver; SeereUry A Jamieson. 101
London Building. MeeU at Moose
Hall. Homer Street, at 10 a.m. on
aecond Sunday in month.
MOOX.ni.BS. Local 881���President, John
Brown; SeereUry. Oeo. Annand. 1251
Albert Street Meets at Labour Hall
at 1 p.m. on first  and third Friday.
It-LOBXBZBTS. Bodge SSS���President E.
il. Robb; Secretary, Kvan McMillan;
Busineaa Agent, P. Bengough; Office
219 Pender Street    Weet.    Meeta    at
Labour Hall at 9 p.p.. on second   and
fourth Tuesday.
ULI  DSinil     AID    DUBT     IB>
FZ-OTBBB,  Local  Na  404���President
C. Yates; Secretary. B. Showier, 319
Pender Street Weet MeeU at 111
Pender Street Weat ac I p.m. on see-
ond and fourth  Fridays In month.
raiBTsaa, bboobato-UI a fapbb-
HANOEBS. Loral No. 119��� President.
3. King; Fla. See., a A. Baker. Bee. Bee,
3. McMillan. 141 Cordova Blreet. MeeU
at 141 Cordova Street at I p.m. oa
second land fourth Thursdays In month.
TO.B DBXTBBS, BBIBOB, WBABT B
DOCB BUXLDEBS, I-ocal No. 2404���
President W. H. Pollard; Secretary.
N. H. Vernon, Box 120. MeeU at 211
Pender Street West Vancouver, at I
p-m. on every Friday of nionth.
KOTO BBOBAVBBS' Local No. 54 ���
President, F. Looney: Secretary, Gordon Kdwards. 2722 Fifth Avenue Waat
MeeU ait World Building, Vancouver,
at 9 p.m. on Saturday of each week.
  ' O "���WglT' a inisranr
Local No. 19���Prealdent Charles Keel],
Secretary. Alfred Hurry, 111 Thirty-
fourth Avenue Eaat. MeeU at 319
Pender Street Weat. at I p.m. on first
Wednesday In month
VAT-BBS     MSBBBB    BrisHasS.     57
Heys; Secretary, J. L Irvine; Business Agent K. A. Goddard, III
Richards Street MeeU at 119 Pender
Street West on first and third Mon-
day In month at I p.m.
PL
Local No. 170���President. Bert 8tirsheome;
Secreiary. 3. Crowtber; Iluaineaa Afent,
F W. Welsh, Offles 101 Labor Hsll.
Meets at 910 Pender Street West, st I
p.m. on aeeond snd foartn Fridaya
BOUOB-SBB-S rBDBBJ-XOB. Loeal
No. 11���Preeldent. Roy A. Perry; Secretary. Alexander Murray, 1414 Tenth
Avenue West Meets at 440 Pender
Street West, at 7:10 p.m. on fourth
Tuseday of month.	
PABXIAMEKTABT COMMITTE���TTTlTO.
Chairman, W. J. Bartlett   Secretary, Mrs.
W. Mahon     Meeta In room 905 Labor Hall
aa the first and  third  Thursday  tn
meath al S p.m.   	
FBIBTTBO PBBais-BB B ABB-BT-lBTB
Local No. 09���President. H. Longley:
Secretary, A. Blaney. Phone Fraser
131X. Meets at 111 Hastings Street,
Vancouver, nt 2 p.m. on second Tues-
day In month.
BAILBOAD BMFLOTBBB, Division No.
59���President, A. N. Lowes; Secretary,
Hharlew Bird, 2030 Union Street.
MeeU at I.O.O.F Hall, SI 5 Hamilton
Street, at I p.m, on first Monday In
month.
BAILWAT COBDUCTOBS, Division No.
207���President. G. W. Hatch; Secretary
J.   B.   Physick    1150   Thurlow   Street.
Meets at I.O.O.F. Hall on first Sunday
.   at   2 p.m.. and on third   Thursday at
9 p.m.     '
BAILWAT OABMBB, Lodge Bo. 59.���Preei
dsnt,   T.   Sommervills;    Secretsry,   B.   3.
Ssnsom.   5010 Sherbrooke  St     Bests  1st
snd Ird Fridaya In Cotillion Hall.
BAXXWAT  TBAXBMBB.   Locsl   No.   144
���President.   C.   A.   Mitchell:   Secretary.
D. A. Munro, 70 Seventh Avenue West.
Meets at I.O.OTF Hall. Hamilton Street
at 7:30 p.m. on first Tueaday and 1:10
p.mon  third Tuesday.
BawTaTtaZ, FILEBS B BAWTEBS- AS-
SOCIATIOW���President C. F. C. Craig;
SeereUry. Geo. Gray, 1039 First Ave.
East. MeeU at Eagles' Hall, Vancouver- at 2:10 p.m. on first and third
Sundays in  month.
TEAMSTEHS. Locsl No. OSS���Preeldent, W.
M. Brown; Secretsry. Bin Showier Office
SOS Labor Half. Msels iseond snd fourth
Wednesdsy at 8 p.m.  In Labor Hall.
 ' OsTtOV���-Business Agent, R.
Townsend.     Meets   at  7'   p.m.    every
Monday at 111 Cordova Street West
SOFT   BBIW*K   DISFBBBBBB'    VBIOB,
No. 070���-President, Frank MeCann,
Secretary, T. J. Hanafln. 2270 Sixth
Avenue West, Vancouver. Meets at
441 Seymour Street. Vancouver, at 2:30
p.m. on first Sunday  In month.
STEAM   B   OF-BATIWO   BBQIHBBBS.
Local     No.     020���President,     Joseph
I     Weel man.      Meets at 211  Pernjer    St.,
*    W. Vancouver, at 7:20 p.m. on second
1    and fourth Tuesdays In month.
  ABB       	
TI BBBS, Loeal Bo. 88���President. W.
Bayley;   Seeretary,   A.     Blrnle,     2011
Commercial  Drive.    MeeU at 211 Pender Street West at  I p.m. on   second   .
Monday In month. ^*>��
BTBSBT B ELBOTBIC BAILWAT
rXaOTBBS Of AMBBICA. a niAlira mated Association of. Division No. 101���
President. R. Rigby; SeereUry. F. E.
Griffin. 447 Sixth Avenue Bast, Vancouver. MeeU a of. Hall. Mount
Pleasant at 10:11 am. on flrat _
day* and 7 p.m. on third Monday.
.--,__, . Local 101���Prealdent, C. Dolmas; Seeratary. F. Rumble,
190 Gothard Street. Meete In Labor
Hall Vancouver at I p.m. flrat Tues-
day In tootvth,���__.	
TBLBQBA-BSBS (C.F.B. By stem Bo. 11
���Chairman, W. M. Brlee: Secretary,
3. Cunningham. Bos 4111, Vancouver. B.C.
TELEPHONE OFBBATOBS ��� Loeal Tf
A.I.BE.W. secretsry. Miss J. rexcroft
Offles Boom IS! Laher Ball, SIS
Street .West
TAXX.OBS- UBIOB, I.oe.1 No. 179 - President, A. Mitchell: SeereUry. C. McDonald; P.O. Box SOI. Meets at 219
Pender Street West, at t p m. on first
Monday In month.
T-rrOOBAFBXCaX.,Local 210���Presidsnt
C. H. Collier; SeereUry and Business
Agent R N. Neelands; Office 114 Labor Hall. Meets laat Sunday In each
month mt t p.m.    	
TBBATBICAL     STABS	
-Local 119���President W. J. Park; SeereUry. G. W. Allln: Business Agent,
MeeU at 109 London Building at 920
am. on aecond Friday In month.
 ' DBIOB OB
ildent. Dan Can!In: SeereUry, W. Donaldson, 101 Main St, meet
at T p.m. flrat and third Wednesday.
SUBSCRIBE TODAY
The Only Union He
Abbott aad Cerroll
MARYLAND CAFE
Open Day aad Night.    Qualit
ia oar Motto
63 HASTINGS STREET W
Sey 1253
DONT PATEONIZE LIST
The following places are run under
non-union conditions and are therefore
unfair to organized labor.
(Stettler Cigar Factory, making Van Loo
and Van Dyke Cigars.
Capitol Cafe, 930 Granville St.
White Lunches.
Electrical Contractors.
C H. Peterson. 1814 Pandora St
Hume a* Rumble.  Columbia St.. New
I The Chilliwack Electric Co., Ltd,
Provincial Unions
vTOTOBlA���President, C Sievertx. 1721
Denman Street; SeereUry K. Woodward, 1212 Carlin.Street Meats at I
p.m. on flrat and third Wednesdays
In month ait Trades Hall. Bread Streat.
VICTORIA TTPOORAFHICAL UBIOB, Be.
201.���Presideat, 0. K. Chrlstlsn; See���-
tarr treasurer. W. H. Oserd. Baa SOB.
MeeU last Ssnday ef awalh ta ]
Hsll. Broad Blreet
**?P*JS__ ,MVZmm/*���grmMant, 8. tX
JfcD_*n_L<,'.,pUn*:* !_-*____ Seeretarr.
O. Waddell, Box 411. Prince Rupert
Meets at Carpenters' Hall on second
and fourth Tueadaya of mOk month.
 �����Preaident  3. Lotman. Nelson;
SeereUry, Felix Peserll, Box 114 Nelson.
 -President Jamee Untitle, Reveistoke: Secretary. PhlUp
Parker. Box 114. Revelatoka MeeU
at I p.m. at City HalL Revelatoka oa
the second aad fourth Saturday ot
each month.
BB ��� Preeldent   H.
Knudsen. 401 Royal Avenue: SeereUry.
!LJ_toI____-' 'I! -_���*���*"��**��� ���traat    New
Weet���Inster. Mar^        . - -
Wedniefsye    ta    month    at
Temple.. New WaJ-*- -
I* *.?
v.
,
THE BRITyH COLUMBIA LABOR NEWS
'���������:'.
I       '
PAGE
The Labor News Baseball Competition
$900 IN PRIZES 5_SJ. ;,.,fig
FDT17    rr.TTPn\TC   0NE FREE  COUPON   MAKED V
I\Ej Ej    KjVJ U r VJ LV i3   Allowed With Every Dollar Sub. -A
Drop Coupons In the B. C. Labor News Boxes at Labor'Hall, 319 Pender St., W.
and F.L.P. Hall, 148 Cordova St. W., or mall to Labor News, 319 Pender St. W.
Games Played Saturday, June 3rd
Competition
Rules
Ths followin* raise shall govern the
competition:
1. AU forecasts must he made oa
coupons provided by the B. O. Labor
Bewa.
S. Any conpoa which haa been altered or mutilated wIB be disqualified.
X la the event of a tie, or ties, the
prizes wiU be divided equally between
those Using-, bnt should the asussslly
arise the B. C. Labor Bewa reserves the
right to rearrange the priie money BO
that the first priae wloners will receive
more than the second, aad tha second
prise wloners win more thaa the third.
4. Latest date for receiving coupons
for this competition win be Saturday at
Coupon No. 4
I OOOT-OB If OBI BB COT���HOT TOBB
I enclose herewith 35 cents for five weeks' subscription to the B. O. Bate* Bewa, together with my
forecast of baseball results. I sgree to abide by the
rules of the contest aad will accept the decision of
tha Judges aa blading la everything pertaining to the
competition.
Coupon No. 4
THIB COUPON MUST BB CUT���BOT TOBB
I enclose herewith 38 cents for Ave weeks' subscription to tha B. 0. Labor Bewa, together with aay
forecast of baaeball results. I agree to abide by the
rules of the contest aad wIU accept the decision of
the Judges aa binding la everything pertaalLuIng to the
competition.
la full
address      _	
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Vancouver
Bdmoatoa
Tacoma
Address   , _.���. - ,,,,,   , ,, 	
Bo yoa receive the paper by mail each week?	
Boms                     Away                                  BOM E AW AT
AJttliCAk LBAt.U*.
Bew Tork               Boston
St   Louis                   Chicago
1
NATIONAL LEAGUE.
Chicago                      Cincinnati
Pittsburg                   St. Bonis
Brooklyn                   Philadelphia
PACIPIC   COAST  LBAOOB.
Los  Angeles             V.rnon
Saa Bxaaelaoo        Oakland
Portland.                    Sacramento
IKTSBHATIONAL   LBAOOB.
Baltimore.               Beading
Rochester 1               Buffalo
AMBBIOAB ASSOCIATION
10  s-m.  oa the  day
scheduled for.    This applies to coupons
received by audi aa well aa deposited la
sosea
S. Bfstchse oa coupons draws, abandoned or not played wiU be struck OS
coupons. The flrat of two games played by the same teams oa the same day
will be  taken for checking fore eaat a.
a The management
right to disqualify aay conpoa afor
what la his opinion la a good and sufficient reason, aad It la a distinct condition of entry that the -aaaager-. decision shall be accepted aa Baal and
legally binding la aU matters concerning -this competition. Ho correspondence shall be catered Into or Interviews
granted. ,,-**.
7. Ia marking coupons place 0*088 ta
column provided, denoting whether you
think that team will wla or lose.
n. Competitors must sacloae 25c
wtth each coupon, which will entitle
them to Ave weeka' subscription to tha
B. C. Labor Bewa.
S. Ho two capital prises wiU be paid
ont la aay oae week to any oae subscriber.
10. employees of the B. O. Labor
Bewa cannot compete.      . ,
11. Mo responsibility will be accepted by the B. C. Labor Bewa for the loss
or non-delivery of aay coupon. Proof
of posting will act be accepted aa proof
of delivery or receipt
13.   Prises   are   awarded   on   the   rs-
sults   announced   by   Associated   free a
and names of prixe-wlnners wiU be polished la ths following issue of ���'
0. Labor Bewa,    As  sr *-
thereafter ch- -*"
prixe-winne-
13. Con-
must ���
teste
ea-
COOPERATION
Patronize Our Advertisers and Tell Them Why-
ILSON'S
few* SHOES
Wilson's Twin Shoe Store
157-159 HASTINGS STREET W.
w
RRAND'S
���    SEEDS
723 ROBSON STREET
. i	
**************************
JAEGER,!
'ft.nF __   ,   -������ :d *
P
O
T
619 H.atioga W.
Mens  Furnishing?
| Cuthbertsons & Co*
X   648 Granville
���***********************��i
Pierre Paris
'��& FOOTWEAR
SI HASTINGS STREET W.
CHINA AND TOYS
>-������������������ . i   i ���'���
DOLL   HOSPITAL
Millar & Coe
Limited
419  HASTINGS STREET W.
V
HARKLEY&
AYWOOD
Ammunition, Guns
Fishing Tackle
69 CORDOVA STREET WEST
Potts & Small
LIMITED
MEN'S WEAR    r~
717 PENDER STREET W.
Just   Around   the   Corner   From
High Rents.
iv.v<-ii7<5n>^'s
Mason & Risen itd.
���From  Factory-
PianOS, Player-Pianos|
Phonographs
*   To Home ,
728 GRANVILLE STREET
L
a-T
Indianapolis
Oolnmbna
-BJ  BO. a
st. Baal
Kansas City
��y
b a
WEST-SB"   IMTE
-A�� LEAGUE
Coupon No. 4
THIS  CO-POW  MOST BB  OUT���BOT TOBB
X enclose herewith SS cents for five ������eke' subscription to the B. O. Labor Bewa, together with my
forecast of baseball results. X agree to abide by the
rules of the contest aad wIU accept the deelsloa of
the Jadges aa binding la everything pertaining to the
competition.
Bams   ta   faU	
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AlkB-UoaM taAftva.
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St.  r-ouis                   Chicago
WAflOsflL taaAvB.
Chicago                   Cincinnati
Fittsburg                   Bt. Louis
Brooklyn                   Philadelphia
Boa  Angeles             Vernon
Baa Francisco         Oakland
Portland                    Sacramento
���XBTBBBATIOBAX,   U.AOVB.
Baltimore                 Beading
Bochester                  Buffalo
AJUEBIOAB ASBOOiaTIOB
Indianapolis            Oolnmbna                           i
Bt. Paul                     Bansas City
WB8TBBB  IBTEBBATIOBAL	
Calgary                    Taaeoaver
Edmonton                  Tacoma
\
r-GQUpon No. 4
��� CUT���BOT *
Ma for Bve ah	
Bewa, together with my
I agree Sa abide hy tha
I  accept the  decision  of
s-xb ootypoB snrsr mm our-^Bdr tobb   ~*f JC
I  enclose  herewith  Bt  oents  far  five   weeks'  snb-
BCrtptlon to the B. C. Labor Be���   ' --B ��-"==
fasatsst of haaebau reenits.   Ii
raise of the  contest  aad  will  S-__.,.   __,  ���__,,_,_
ths judges as binding ta evsrythlng' f��8*a_i-_f to the
ccmpetltioa.
Baaae la  fan  ���	
Ba yoa rscslve tha paper ay mail each week?	
wTt-
Bom.
way                             ___._   A
aaVkBiCAB x-saova.
Bew Tork
Soetea
Bt.   Louts
Chlcsgo
Chicago
fUsirtaaaH
Pittsburg
St. LonU
1
Brooklyn
Phtladslphla
PAcrrio ooabt bbaovb.
Boa Angeles    .       Vernon
Saa Pranclsco          o_�����^                                        _|_..
PortUnd
Sacramento
Balttmor.               *ss~la*
BechieSs*                BnBalo
ladleaeaou.            Oelamb-a
I
Bt. Paul
Xansaa City
Oalgary                   Taaeoaver
��-'���               *���*�����
Oalgary
���an
Bdmoatoa
Coupon No. 4  *
THIS COUPON MUST BB CUT���NOT TOBB
I enclose herewith 38 cents for five weeks' subscription to the B. 0. Labor Bewa, together with my
forecast of baaebaU results. X agree to abide by the
rules of ths contest aad will accept the decision of
the judges aa binding ta everything pertaining to the
competition.
Bams   ta  full      ��� ���....
Address
Bo yoa receive the paper by mall each weekt	
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AMBBICAB LEAOUB.
Bsw Tork
Boston
St.  Louis
Chicago
NATIONAL LEAGUE.
Chicago
Cincinnati
Pittsburg
St. Bonis
Brooklyn
���J	
Philadelphia
Los  Angeles
PACIPIC  COABT  LEAGUE.
Tenion
Baa Pranclsco
Oakland
Portland
Sacramento
IBTBBBATIOBAI.   LEAGUE.
Beading
Bochester
Buffalo
AMEBICAN ASSOCIATION
Indianapolis
Columbus
Bt. Baal
��ty |
Calgary
Taaeoaver
Coupon No. 4    X
��� COUPON  MUST BB  COT���NOT TOBB
Free Extra Coupon with
every Dollar Sub.
ta full
''          Cl.v.land
1    IB
.-ugton         Chicago
'.Mi
���iiladelphia        Detroit
l~l
NATIONAL LBAOOB
St. Bonis           Brooklyn
IB!
Chicago               Boston
m
Pittsburg           Bew Tork
lxl
i-ACIFIC   COAST   LEAGUE
Sacramento        Portland
1   IB
Ban Pranclsco    Vernon
1*1
Salt Lake 0.     Seattle
1   1*
Ao-SBICAN   ASSOCIATION
Toledo                  Columbus
1*1
Louisville          Indianapolis
1   1*
Minneapolis        Bt. Paul
1   1*
WESTERN    INTERNATIONAL
Oalgary               Vancouver
1   1*
Bdmoatoa          Tacoma
1*1
LIST  OF  PRIZE WINNERS
Coupon No, 2
No competitor submitted fourteen
correct forecasts.
The First Prize of $280 was Won
by S. Taplow, 611 7th Ave.'E., with
thirteen correct.
The .second prize of $180 was divided between seven competitors with
twelve correct. Each receives $25.70.
They are: J. Fulton, 840 Nelson; D.
W. McLean, 2649 Quebec; P. Whitehall, 1168 Hastings St. E.; Mrg. S.
L. Dixon, 1534 Balsam; Geo. McDer-
mott, 884 Bute; Thomas Holland, 42
Cordova St. E.; Mrs. M. Jessop, 3516
Main St.
Los  sagelse
Pranclsco "-''rlnTlfl
JBTB_tBAfiSB>--_   HJaSua.
DEBTS
The right of a revolutionary Government to repudiate responsibility
for treat) or financial obligations of
its tyrannical predecessors is one
universally admitted. �����
"The sovereignty of the peoples
is not bound by the treaties of
tyrants" is the classical declaration of the founders of the French
Republic.
As with France sc with America
The United States, after the revolution,   repudiated   both  the  treaty
obligations and the    debts of the
King's Government.
More recent examples may be cited.
When Cuba broke away from
Spain in 1898, the Spanish Government demanded that it should take
responsibility for the debts of the
Spanish regime in Cuba
America objected, and successfully.
"These," ssid the American
Peace Commissioners, "are debts
created by the Government of
Spain, for its own purposes and
through its own agents, ia whose
creation Cuba Bad ao voice."
That was true of the debts of Alfonso XIII. It is equally true of
the debts of Nicholas II.
The commissioners spoke also of
"the fallacies involved in treating
the obligations which a sovereign
may incur in the exercise of the sovereignty ss s part of the sovereignty
itself."���Daily Herald.
U      D ELECTRIC
���"Win COMPANY
Headquarters for All
ELECTRICAL GOODS
414  HASTINGS  STREET W.
MURPHY gHOE
GOOD    ^     CO.
SHOES �� *r'*r Lt(J#
* 882 GRANVILLE STREET
GEO. B. IfERFOOT
SUITS * Men's
Made to    Clothing and
Measure     Furnishings
1S5  HASTINGS  STREET EAST
THE CAMERA _ ARTS
MJi/AAj Developing
Picture Framing
610 GRANVILLE STREET
M. J. Cameron
Clothes   , Co,---.
JOT Q    Straet
Men
Wast
E.C.KILBY
HOSIERY
Specialist
628 GRANVILLE STREET
W.S. CHARLTON* CO.
LIMITED
Specialists in
Young Men's m.,
Clothing and Granville
Haberdashery Street
Never sue op a man as s brats
because of the aad leak his wife
He may ba a humorist.
W. C. Stearman
"The   People's   Herdware   Merchant"
Sole a seat for the
1 Monarch Malleable*
-'THe   Btay   Satisfactory J
���aaav
813 GRANVILLE STREET
PLANT        r Cp��V|��
RITCHIE'S [Bulbs
"The Best Procurable**
872 GRANVILLE STREET
b. c. Barber Supply and
SUNDRIES,LTD. _*��--
"havin
upplies i
(U Hastings .St. {{Shaving
���   I"
Wa Ootfit the Family      ""*
HONEST
SHOES
AT
_ THEAMERICAN
honest Boot Shop
___ii��___ X_sdted
f"   841 GRANVILLE STREET
SALSBURTS
HARDWARE   MERCHANTS
132 HASTINGS STREET WEST
THOS. FOSTER. CO, LTD.
Fashion-Craft
Burberry
O'Coats
QUALITY I Durward
CLOTHES I �� c<*-t8
One Store
Only
Ll ��
514 Cranville St.
STARK
YALE "-sa
CHOE
308  Hastings
Street Wast
STORE \
*4 I I II I I 111* I I *'l"r+4'l'<-. i ***
'������'��� J. A. Flett, Ltd.
ii     HaruwarE
"     Toole,  Cutlery  knd   Sporting
Goods
;;    338 HASTINGS STREET W.
I <*+ H< HI r* 11 HI + rH-H- r*t*
S. H. HARNOCK
Vancouver
Hardware Co.
Limited
867 GRANVILLE STREET
D. K. BOOK, LTD.
CORRECT CLOTHES FOR
MEN
_ 137 HASTINGS STREET W.
T.cJPLLCt-_d
Da *������*��� Clothes for Men
Men's and Boys* Clothing
and Furnishings
. 117 HASTINGS STREET EAST
.:.!
Cornett Bros.���,
& Clark n
�� SHOES
We    specialise
Men's    and    Boys'
,       Reliable
33 HASTINGS STREET E _____
/-iRAWFQRT*\
V-.BatteryCo.J-'
Umited
880 HOWE STREET
S33.S
cwitzer^
Bros., Ltd.
Everything in
Music
/,
i ���
1
<<-
m
y ���
w
h�� Bird Washing Machines
Selling tfow at $175
c There's money in using s Bluebird Washer, even when you
h ve to psy the regular price of $210 .for it, but now that you
c a buy them at the sale price of $175, they are an investment
n ich too good to let paas unheeded. Made in Canada, easy and
unomical to operate,-and instead of rubbing away the
iltcrial as you do when washing by hand, these just wssh the
' put of the garment. Washing this way gives three times
If ie to the garment. *
SPECIAL   DEMONSTRATION
ring some dirty clothes snd have thom washed while you
, and see for yourself what a wonderful machine the
bird is. $28 cash puts one in the home, and $20 monthly
the balance.
fl��^sj?J_ * Bi?�� G*!3?P*����
���*
Agenda For British
Labor Party Conference
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiimi:
"LAID* OFF"
Two Short Words, Bridging the Golf Between
I    COMFORT aad POVERTY
Have you protected yourself snd your family against such
an emergency, with a SAVINGS ACCOUNT���the most valuable
Ai let a man can have for the "RAINY DAY."       * .
Ve8TRONGLY RECOMMEND you to ���'
; A'   ONCE, st one M our City Brand f.
H. STINGS ��AND SEYMOUR	
C<  sieve 4k Abbott        Maia k I' '
W iere   Yoa   Will   Receive   Prompt   -no
il Jriion Bank of Canaua
*,&*���If you are living in a community not provided with
Bt oj-irig facilities, address us by mail, and we will be glad to
gu de you in reSpect to "Hanking by Mail."
LONDON���The preliminary agenda for the annual conference of the
Labor party, to be held at Edinburgh
at the end of June, have'just been
issued.
Affiliations
Among the resolutions are several
concerning affiliations to the party.
Stepney and Brighton and Hove have
given notice of a resolution: "That
the applicstion for affiliation of the
Communist party to the National Labor party be accepted." Stepney al
so proposes that the constitution be
amended to admit the affiliation <
the organized unemployed to local
Labor parties. Glasgow Trades Council will move thst the time has come
for the affiliation of the co-operative
movement with the Labor party.
Independence
Political independence is the subject of eight resolutions.
They all declare against any sort
of alliance between the Labor party
and any other political party. It is
pointed out that in a resolution from
Blackburn that the realization of Labor's program depends on independence, while Manchester^ indicates the
illusory nature of thej plea for cooperation with the Wee Frees for
the purpose of smashing the Coalition.
Stepney asks the conference to de-
ihat there csn be no alliance
"* "   - and    any    Capitalist
or in Par-
''Id not
���em-
��u*^iijff����iiinii����iiiu������iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitMiiiiiiii:iTiiiiiTiitiiiiiiti��>iiiiiiiii��t**A*
: :-Wft-i
organize
hot in al
Source Of
Political Strength
cil   St!.,
the  Parliai.  .
*J:��fe^jt��Jf-' into ������
any  other  politics
connection  with  arijr   .
contest.
Privy  Councillors " s
There are eight resolutions on thc 7 so ..
agenda dealing with the position of ��� resolutions.
members of the Labor party who are
Privy Councillors. Glasgow Trades
Council will ask the Conference to
call on all Labor representatives who
are Privy Councillors to relinquish
their positions as such, "and so destroy sll that remains of Labor's alliance with the capitalist political
parties during the recent war."
Gorton United Trades Council will
move:
"That this conference considers H
is against the best interests of the
Labor party for any of its members
to be members of the Privy Council,
and calls on the Labor party to demand that all members holding such
office immediately resign, failing
which they shall be expelled from the
Labor party."
Nationalization
The question of nationalization is
to be brought forward once more by
the Miners' Federation.
The resolution calls for the inclusion, in any.labor program for a general election, of the nationalization
of land, railways and mines.
Armaments
Armaments id international treaties are subjects of resolution from
Bradford, Sheffield and Bristol. The
complete abolition of armaments is
demanded, and, pending that, the nationalization of the industry.
That the government should free
itself from entangling alliances is
clared to be the only way to peace.
War Debt Burden
Several resolutions are directed to
" reduction ofWar Loan interest
���s.    Glasgow   and  North  East
'arc in favor of the reduc-
'   such   interest  by   1 1-2
FOR MEN ONLY
MACEY-WILSON SHOE CO.
419 GRANVILLE STREET
Batwaea P. O. aad Paader Street
Phone   Seymour   3938
THE D. HUNTER COMPANY
MEN'S AND BOYS' CLOTHING,
FURNISHINGS, ETC.
Headquarters   for   Ulnars',   Froapec-
tors' and loggers'  Outflts
74 CORDOVA STREET WEST
Imperial Trunk
and Leather Goods
338 HASTINGS STREET WEST
BOMTO-WICKENS
gatat Wallpaper Glass
Glass Dept-i 1000
Lewis Piano &
Phonograph House
THE HOME OF THE PHONOLA
Mozart Pianos
1044 GRANVILLE STREET
Outfitters for Men
WM DICKLTD
"Your   Money's   Worth   or   Yoar
Money Back"
45-49 HASTINGS ST. EAST
Laco, Nitro aad Tungsten Lamps
THE ELECTRIC SHOP
12 HASTINGS STREET EAST
���olden Building
Retail Electrical Supplies aad
Fixturea
]
ish  I.llmr  I'm ly   is  not  it
fefc'$-ganizati.n. '| Moreover it is
if any organization of hunt-ait beiiigs wil| ever attain perfection, in'v hat it will supply the needs
v\-_vr,    ;-*''~.  l��*'  -      ' f rr  c ~
of huma lity and be free from error,
lack Of   judgment and the other re-
hutraan frailty. But It, can
be saili'' otnout any fear of successful com* fadiction, thst the British
Labor. I irty'.is the greatest  Labor
ion in,, the world, in many if
respects. Msny hsve won-
defed atlthe tremendous strength of
the Psrvi and the solidarity of La-
fcor whtan 'prevaila in the politick!
field in 1 ie Old Country, insofar as
the orga ized workers are concerned,' wheri the time comes to.face the
enemyy \  \        ^  "
The Li for News is of the opinion
that any person who makes s study
ft
m
m
v.
v
, '��� % of thc B itish Labor Party and the
;    movemen.   jn   general   in   tha   Old
Country,  isf bound to come to .one
conclusioi , namely: that in its rheth
od  of 01 mnization,  its educational
policy, a d in the broadminded  in
telligenc. /of ita men, the strength
of Britisl Labor lies.   We have commented i i'these columns before on
the educi tional policy ol the Labor
Party an ��� the, thorough manner in
which   th ���   British   Labor   men   are
rini   themselves   for   the   tre-
liilous  espensibilities that are sure
Bonn-   lay rest upon their shoul
Il   is shout the method of
lilat i-n and the attitude of the
n   if tKe British Labor rnove-
ihait we, wish to touch upon
itisH �� Labor   has   its   "lefU,"
t#"   md centrists.''    As a mat-
of fa ,t it if doubtful if there is
ecospiiiic theory���with, one ex-
ieh   is *��� not   represented
membership of the labor
rthermore there is nothing
shoot   tha   manner
halfh
which'
methods
��� i
advocates   of   different
press themselves or carry
on their j propaganda, f  Members of
the I.L.P.. the Guild Socialists, and
advocates, of various other groups do
not compromise their views in any
degree. And yet in the same political organization are found those who
occupy a position on the extreme
right. The secret of this co-ordination of Labor's forces regardless of
the various views held by the Labor
Party's members is no doubt to be
found in the method of organization.
The National Labor Party of Great
Britain might be termed a political
federation of parties and Labor organizations of all kinds. There is
room in the Party for all schools of
economic thought and Labor philosophy, because every Labor organization is entitled to become a part of
it. Thus the Independent Labor
Party is sn affiliated body in the
same manner as is the Engineers'
Society or some other trade union.
And while each of the affiliated organisations may possess a different
viewpoint of its membership in proportion to its numbers and joins ita
efforts to the whole in the endeavor
to bring about a change in the order
of society. In brief, the function of
the British Labor Party is to provide
a- means whereby all the .working
class of Britain may find political
expression.
But even with a method of organisation which provides the opportunity for all Labor organizations to
unite on the political field, there is
still a tremendous need for the
broadminded intelligence of the men
who are called upon to occupy the
prominent positions in the movement.
And it is in this regard that the
Labor party of Great Britain appears
to be particularly fortunate. Men
who bold the most divergent views
are to be found in the vanguard of
the Labor Party fighting the old political order. Iii the matter of. methods snd theories they disagree, but
in in the matter of presenting a united
front to the enemy,they agree and
they conduct their fight from within
the one organization.���Alberta'Labor News. ft~*
insurance,
work-
.   t-pde
boards,
"*���*    -
.1  labor
'1           ll
* ". al-
-_/
**"
C.D.BRUCE
Limited
Men's Clothing and Furnishings
~-sssspssss��sssssssssssss-_-e___________,, ll
COR.  HOMER AND  HASTINGS
THE
LADIES
STORE
7*0��
8.**
417
HASTINGS
ST.  WEST
Phone Seymour 3902
BURNS DRUG CO, LTD.
Kail Orders Receive Special Attention
732 GRANVILLE STREET
In the Block With the Clock
Phone Seymour    606
Edison & Brunswick Phonographs
PIANOS
Convenient Terms  Arranged
The KENT PIANO CO, Hi
558560 GRANVILLE STREET
Hastings
Furniture Co.
limited ('
41 HASTINGS STREET WEST
Phone Seymour 3887 - ,
FULTWS STYLE SHOP, LTD.
MEN'S SUITS, OVERCOATS.
j RAINCOATS
/Made ia Canada
��eadj-to-w_a;
I*-omH___k��B:; to Wearer���Oae lToflt
Only       am
Stl
BeadT-to-w-ar or Made to Tour Order
*^---^��al_arvto Wears-   **���- ���-
^\a   0*,U>
619 GRANVILLE
fREET
cialist Party of Canada
STAR THEATRE
Sunday, May 2.8, 8 p.m.
SPEAKER:
R.  KIRK
v.
: THE EUROPEAN SITUATION OF TODAY
3
BELGIAN LABOR
PARTY IN SENATE
Make Big  Increase in Recent
Elections ��� Anti Military
Policy
AThe Labor party in Belgium increased its Senate representation as
ayreslft*"of the national elections of
November 20, although losing slightly to the Catholic party in the Cham
ber, according to various advices re
ceived. The ^.elections resulted in
the selection "ir'f|?52 labor senators,
as opposed to 11 in 1919, and 66
members of tbe lower chamber (30
per cent, of the total), as opposed
to 70. The Catholic party elected 81,
a gain of eight; the Liberals, 34, the
same as 1919, and other parties
elected five. The increase of Labor
senators this year js due to the
removal of certain^ property qualifications.
Membership  Increases
In the 1919 election the Labor
party had jumped from their former
strength before the war of 39 seats
in the Chamber to 70. (The membership of the party has increased
from 130,000 in 1914 to 720,000 today). The Clericals had 72 deputies
and the Liberals 35. The government was formed by a coalition
of all three parties, Labor holding
four ministries. An 8-hour law waa
secured, coming into force in October last, for industrial workers, and
within a year from then for commercial employees, and an old-age
pension act and a considerable un
employment fund were also secured
The Labor party had also squashed an endeavor of the government
to adopt an oppressive attitude toward Holland, and had stopped the
passage of munitions for Poland
through Belgium.
Againat   Militarism
The Belgian Trade Union Commission held a congress in September
for the study of the control of industry, at which a German delegate was
present. A patriotic demonstration
was organized against this. "The
profiteers.')' says the bulletin of the
Labor party, "who for two and a half
years have been operating in the
'occupied territory and selling German mercljjandise it 100, 200 and
even 600 gar cent profit, were the
loudest shooters against Labor's sacrilege in Inviting a Hun to their
congress."| LaDor replied on October 16 with a great demonstration
it which tit flag of the Young Labor Guard was consecrated. Eduard
Anseele, the labor Minister ef Public Works, waiVone of tha speakers.
The flag bore a\representation of a
soldier breaking jyb MP.
_ *-.<t\ .. .    "T*f-:
*****,        v '��� ':���"  ''    "'"���
Party  Platform
The first plank in the party's e'ec-
tion program wa? the reduction rJ
military service from 10 r jr.ths (17
in the cavalry) to six. The other
demands were workmen's compensation, sickness and unemployment
insurance, the regulation of home
employment, nationalization of railways and mines, the extension of the
8-hour day to agricultural workers,
compulsory technical training from
1 to 18 years of age, workers' control in industry and a tax on capital.
The Labor Party is now definitely
in opposition. The position is peculiar because no party has an abso-
lut majority either in Chamber or
Serajte, and no two parties can work
tc "tnef-t* The Catholics and Liberals re divided on the question of
the Fleming grievances; Liberals
and ' _.bor are at issue over the duration, of mfitary service.
NEW \~ORK
Outfitting   X   Company
L
Outfitting   X   Company
(Vancouver's Popular Credit
House)
Refined Wearing Apparel for
MEN AND WOMEN
43  HASTINGS STREET WEST
gjgft HAJ STORE
WHITE
Largest Exclusive Hatters in B. C.
COR. HASTINGS AND ABBOTT
KNABEJ-CHICKERING���WILLIS
PIANOS. j^ND   PLAYER   PIANOS
THE BOWES MUSIC HOUSE
, limited
Exclusive  Piano Dealers
506 DUNSMUIR STREET
Dnnsmnlr Hotel BalMlag
1 ��� ^y,  ���r=	
The kigledew
Styfe Co.
Quality Footwear
For the Whole Family
666 GRAIfVlLLE STREET ,
-ita .
R & SONS
imited
.Sheet Metal
ARNOLD & QUIGLEY
'Trade ia
Oar  Upstairs  Clothes
Shop    and    Save    Your    Dollars
840 GRANVILLE STREET
Ye Olde Timaa
Ui e and niece stood watching
the yc  ng people dancing about them
"I bet you never saw any dancing
like  this back  in  the nineties,  eh,
Unkie?"
"Once���but the place was .raided."
       i r
Egyptian police have been furnished with shields for back and chest
to protect them from missiles thrown
by rioters,.
*
ARE YOU THINKING
OF DANCING LESSONS?
IT yon are tnsre is no better time
to begin than aaw, and ao bst-
XttT  BfcWsi   tOT
Dsnclnr   ���csSsmr,  aranvH.e  and
Davie sftreeta.   There are Ivs haUa
' six lady and gsntlsmen teach-
aad lessons la clsss or la prl-
t are flvan. phone Seymonr 101
for a]
FENN'S DANCING
ACADEMY
1
aaa-vxLi- a_ro navia
101
TOWNLEY & WARD
GRAMOPHONES, PIANOS, ETC.
443 HASTINGS STREET WEST
Cor.  Blchards aad   Hastings
Have your NEXT SUIT
made by���
Perry & Dolk
TAILORS
Room 33, 18 Hastings St. W.
Next to Paritages
Phone S-y mou
NUNN&
1���Day or Night
OMSON
FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND
E*mALMERS     *
531 Homer Street
-. I'/r     -���-*	
Padlock Boot
���-E Shop
.NVILLE
Veleoa
For the Whole
Family
ROWLANDS
Concert Band
aad assisting loloitts, at  the
Capitol
SUNDAY���* P.M.
SILVER COLLECTION
HALLS TO RENT
IN THE LABOR HALL
Large end amall; good accommodation; easy rent.    Rates to societies
by day, weak or month, oa application tos
P. R. BENGOUGH, SeereUry.
ROOM 306 LABOR HALL 316 PENDER STREET W.
Phones Seymour 7495-7496   ���--
J. NrMARVEY
limited
Good Clothing
Hats   aad   Men's
Furnishings
127     Hss ting.
,.T��Waf    :a
gggj
Center & Hanna, Ltd.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND
EMBALMERS
Private Ambulance   Service
1049 GEORGIA ST.     SEY. 2438
Rankin & Cherrill
EVERYTHING ELECTRICAL
SS HASTINGS STREET WEST
Phone Seymour 7600
Telephone Seymour 7495
THE UNION PRINTING CO.
"More Than Printers"    .
Labor M 319 Pender Street West
"Say it with Flowers"-
BROWN BROS. & CO.
limited
FLORISTS AND NURSERYMEN
48 Blastings Bt. M. Mat. OB* ft Of
VM OranvUls Bt. Be j. USX*
Iii gootery
Women's and Children's Shots
Exclusively
Ml GRANVILLE STREET
V

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