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The British Columbia Federationist Nov 19, 1920

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Array INDUSTRIAL UNITY:   STRENGTH.
OFFICIAL PAPER:   VANC0IJVER"|riMieE3 AND LABOR COUNCIL.
POLITICAL UNITY:  VICTORY
TWELFTH YEAR.   No. 47
EIGHT PAGES
VANCOUVER, B. C, FRIDAY MORapiG.  NOVEMBER 19,1920
$2.50 PER YEAR
THE ISSUE
J. Harrington and C. Ste
phenson Defend Working Class Position
Candidates Will Speak on
%*.    Sunday at the
To any one accustomed to listening to the streams ot personal
abuse and charges of corruption
that are the inevitable ~accomps.nl
ment to the political campaigns of
tbe old political parties, the meetings of the Socialist Party of Canada must appear as "very unusual." Contrary to the opinion expressed In the columns of one of
our local dailies, there are quite a
number of citlsens who can attend
political meetings in the hope of
getting eome Information or knowledge, as was evidenced by the
crowd that filled the Empress theatre on Bunday last, when J. Harrington and C. Stephenson occupied the platform for the Socialist
Party of Canada.
S. Earp, also one of the candidates on the ticket of the Socialist
Party, acted as chairman, and
after his Introductory Remarks and
Information as to further meetings
to be held In different parts of the
elty during lhe campaign, called
upon C. Stephenson to address the
meeting.
Attacks Liberalism.
In spite of the fact that Stephen
•on was evidently unaccustomed
to the ordeal of facing an audience from the conspicuous position
Of a public platform, he succeeded
in bringing out clearly the essential differences and antagonisms ln
the Ideas of- Liberalism and i
elalism. Liberalism, once a great
progressive movement, is now decadent and bankrupt, with no liberating message for mankind,
which function has now fallen
upon the Socialist movement. The
Liberalism of current politics must
not be confounded with the historical Liberal movement, as the preeent day politicians were only con-
earned with the "facing In or out"
In the game tor spoils of office, and
were trading on the traditions of
the past. The roots of both Liberalism and, Socialism are to be
found ln the economic conditions
of their respective epochs. Marx
has said somewhere, that It is an
-axiom of political economy that all
true political representation must
be and can only be oiaod on definite economic incer&i.s. The meaning of this axiom ls of fundamental Importance. The economic conditions of the 16, 17 and 18th centuries gave birth to Liberalism,
arising out of the conflict between
the trading and commorcial classes
with the land owning class, and the
Institutions of feudalism. Individual liberty to acquire Individual
property; freedom of trade and
commerce; freedom of contract, so
that the great reservoir of serfs
might be tapped for Industry: and
equality, special privileges to none
(the only privileged class then being the feudal barons). These
were the political doctrines put
forth In. the struggle of the rising
(Continued on page I)
Control Both Houses in
State of North
Dakota
(By the Federated Press)
Fargo, N. D.—As a result of the
•lectons the Nou-partlaan League
Is in more complete control of the
North Dakota state government
than lt has been for the past two
years. The Farmer-Labor forceB,
ln addition to re-electing Governor
Lynn J. Frazier for the third term,
and the other state officer's, have
control of both branches of the
■tate Legislature.
Besides controlling the state government, ibo Farmer-Labor element has eleoted Dr. E. F. Ladd
United States senator. The industrial eommission, which has charge
flt tha state Industries, suoh as
Sour mills and elevators, the home
building association, the state
tank and other enterprises, will be
i entirely Nonpartisan after January
1, when William Lemke becomes
' attorney-general. At present, a
hostile attorney-gener'al blocks the
farmer's programme.
I
New Floor Pleases Crowd
and Enjoyable Evening
Spent by O.B.U.
Bome dance, some floor and some
orchestra, were the comments
after the O. B. U. house warming
dance last Friday night, as the
crowd of members of the O. B. U.
and their friends reluctantly left
the hall at 1 a.m. That the first
social affair held In the O. B. U.
hall after the new floor waB.laid
by voluntary help, by members of
the O. B, U. ls a credit to the mem.
bers and particularly the secretary,
who has worked so hard: to bring
the plans of the Central Labor body
to fruition, Not only was the dancing enjoyed by the crowd, but
there was plenty, nay an abundance of good things to eat, Including cakes and other toothsome edibles, and all kinds of fruit and coffee, and when the Interval for refreshments arrived, tlfese present
were able to obtain such refreshments as suited their palates.
J. Woods opened the entertainment by calling on E. Simpson for a
song, which was appreciated by all
present D. Gilbert then sang a
song, arid met with a deal of applause, and while no further items
of this nature were given, due to
the anxiety of everybody to try the
new floor, it ls to be hoped that
when the next social affair is held,
that the singers wilt again be on
hand.
During the evening tho picture that' was returned to the
Women's Auxiliary from the May
Day celebration, entitled "Lake
Louise," was disposed of by a
drawing, the winner being E. W.
HJorth; $28.56 was added to the
defence fund as a result. Fred
Parsons' orchestra supplied the
music, and now that the floor has
been tested, and credited with being ono of the. best dancing surfaces In town, there ia little doubt
that the hall will often be the
scene of similar gatherings to last
Friday's event Members of the 0.
B. U. who attended In such goodly
numbers last Friday, are all boosters and eager for another dance.
America Last of Nations
to Loan Money to
Poland
(By -Laurence Todd)
(Staff Correspondent for the Fed
erated Press)
Washington—Poland, defying at
once the League of Nations, the
Germans, ^he Russians, the Cze
cho-Slovakian Republic and the
helpless Lithunlans, and proceeding to thc gradual extermination of
tho three million Jews within her
now boundaries—Poland has just
received another present of $6,
000,000 In army supplies from the
government of the United States.
At the recent Brussels conference on International finance, it
was shown that bankrupt Poland
had given hui notes ad promises
to pay England, France, Italy, Sweden and other European countries
to the total of 480,000,000 francs,
and that even France—diplomatic
and military centre of Poland—
fused to furnish more. But the
United Slates had furnished to Poland 2,500,000,000 francs In goods
and loans. At the rate of exchange
existing at the time these loans
were made, the United States >is
creditor to Poland to the total of
about 1260,000,000.
It was shown, at the Brussels
conference, that the Poles would
probably quit their military aggressions against Lithuania and
other neighboring states when
they were refused further funds.
Now they receive another ray of
sunshine upon their war-making,
from the government of the United
States.
But Poland cannot pay those
bonds. She cannot even pay the
Interest on them for next year, unless we lend her the money with
which to pay. Her people are dying by thousands in every city,
from hunger and the diseases due
to hunger—typhus leading the list.
She is begging the world's charity
for her starving millions. The Red
Cross of Amrelca and of Europe Is
sending relief supplies. Her government can. not save even her
children from starvation and rickets and typhus, because all possible
supplies are sent to the Polish armies,- now holding foreign territory
ln half a dozen directions.
=p
Unemployment Question Is Serious
***«**« ««««««« *«*«««« «**•**    Ss      ****** ****** *«««««
What Have the Politicians to Offer?
THE unemployed situation in Vancouver and throughout,the province ia assuming alarming proportions. With
recollections of strenuous days in the year 1912 when findlay's cossacks carved their way to glory, and numerous arrests of labor, men were made, it would appear ta,he about time the supporters of law and order got busy
to relieve the situation, unless they are of the opinion,that ^ne recruiting of a machine gun section for the city will
be the solution in the event of hungry men, who while Buffering themselves from want, turn to anything to relieve
the'suffering of their dear ones. The city council has realised the-seriousness of the situation as is evidenced by the
fact that a three-hour session was held recently to deal Wit It-the situation. The city couneil cannot, however, take
care of the provincial situation, and unless that is cared for, thie city of Vancouver, whioh is the natural clearing house,
will be flooded with the unemployed. While the politicians ,are busy mud-slinging, there are thousands of men who
are unable to secure work. As work is the only way by wh Mi the working class can obtain the necessities of life,
what have the politicians to offer to the unemployed! The sending of a number of working-class representatives to the
legislature might be of service at this time, as they may be aftle to bring enough pressure to bear to have relief work
started to relieve the pressure to some extent! The estimate, Obtained from reliable sources, is that there are at least
seven thousand workers unemployed in the city. "Prosperity" has again struck British Columbia. Possibly the Oliver
Government or the Conservative party will spare enough time to deal with a situation that may become so acute that
serious results may ensue before the winter is over as a reailt of unemployment. At least the law and order crowd
cannot, after this, state that they knew nothing of the situation. If they want law and order, let them act, and act
now.  It may be too late when hungry men are compelled to act for themselves.
Donations to tho Defense Fund
Hedley  Metal Miners  Unit,  of
the O. B. U., 90.
■•„■"■, ■' Mi,.. *
Meetings in OM Hail
For the Coming Week
804 PENDER STBEET  WEST
MONDAY—Pilodrivcrs, Q. A. U. V. Campaign Meeting.
TUESDAY—Trades and Labor Council Special Meeting.
WEDNESDAY—General Workers.
THURSDAY—S. P. of 0..Campaign Meeting.
FRIDAY* -Women's Auxiliary.
SATURDAY—Dance, 9 to 12.
ONE BIG UNION OF GUTHRIE OPENS
ALL MAY
Australian Workers See
Necessity of Getting
Together
New Organization Takes
in Sheet Railwaymen
and Bail Workera
(Special to The Federatlonist, by
W. Francis Ahern, Australian Representative)
Arising out of what ls considered to be one of the most Important
industrial conferences held ln Australia, there has been formed a
new industrial organization embracing railway and tramwaymen
throughout Australia, to be known
as the "Australian Railways
Unton." The new organization Is
the first step In an important move
to form a "triple alliance" In Australia on the lines of the Triple Alliance ln Qreat Britain. The ultimate object, of course, ls the formation of One Big Union.
ThiB Important conference met
In Melbourne (Australia) during
September last, and was attended
by the Queensland Railway Union,
South Australian Railways and
Tramways Association, Amalgama.
ted Ral'Way and Tramway Association of New South Wales, Tas-
manian itallways Union and the
Victorian Rallwaya Union, and
other smaller organizations. After
affirming the deahabililty of forming One Big Union of railway and
tramway workers It was decided
that the head .ofllce of the new organization should be located at
Unity HaU. Melbourne, Australia,
The following ollicers were elected
as the flrst executive of the union;
President, A. Luckley; vice-presidents, T. Moroney, W. Lodge; secretary, W. Smith; members of the
Australian Council: R. Jowett, J.
O'Sullivan, P. M. Kinie'ry and P.
DufT.
One Big Union
The constitution of the organization is industrial as against craft,
embracng all gr'ades of offlwrs and
employees of, or in connection With
all railway and tram systems In
Australia. It Is by no means a
federation of state unions, but a
complete amalgamation; with a
uniform policy, membership tickets, or to be plainer, "One Big
Union of Rallwaymen throughout
Australia."
With modifications fot* geograph-
(Contlnued on page 2)
IT
Conscription   Supporters
Not Permitted to Rejoin Par^y
During the fights ln Australia
against conscription during the
war, many Labor supporters, Including members of parliament,
supported conscription, although it
was against .the declared objects
of the Labor Party, which stood
uncompromisingly for no conscription. They were immediately expelled from the party. Since the
war has ended, many of them attempted to get back Into the party,
but without success. When the
Australian Labor Party met in conference in South Australia, during
the third week of September last,
further attempts were made by expelled persons to get back iu the
party. Thc'conference unanimously refused to re-admit them, und
laid down a decision that stands
Tor all time, that no par-time traitors of Labor need apply for re-
admission to the party, dhe Austrnlian Labor Party ls uncompromising towards those former members who would have sold the manhood of the country as conscripts
to fight In oversea wars, and on no
acrxunt will it allow them to be
readmitted to thc party again.
Opponents to Newcastle
Labor Candidate Are
Scored by Speakers
An audience of 400 listened attentively to the speakers on behalf of Sam Outhrle, Labor candidate for Newcastle district, at a
meeting held last Saturday ia
Gould's Hall, Ladysmith, Thomas.
Doherty called the meeting to order and introduced Mrs. G. Corse
of Vancouver' aa the first ipeaker.
Comrade Corse took up various
matters of .vital Importance to the,
workers ln the present campaign,
among which was the housing
problem, better education problem,
unemployed problem and showed
where all these were not great
problems tf the legislators tackled
them as only a working class candidate knows how. -
T. A. Barnard,. labor candidate
for Nanaimo, also addressed the
meeting and reviewed the statements of the candidates who were
opposing Sam Guthrie, as tb their
qualifications to represent tbe citizens of Newcastle riding. When
opened up to public view from o,
working class standpoint, these
candidates could do nothing else
but line up with either of the two
old parties on every Issue as against
real working class legislation. He
pointed out that the capitalist system was bankrupt and tbat only
by a radical change, which the old
parties could not possibly support,
could the workers ever hope to
move on to emancipation from the
misery and degradation of capitalism. He pointed out that not
one supposed labor law that had
been'pficed on the statute bookB
by the old parties were being' enforced ln the interest of the workers, hence these were practically
valueless.
Sam Guthrie, Labor candidate
for the Newcastle riding, was the
next speaker and he started out
by telling how he had been nominated at a public meeting, whereas
the other candidates had been
nominated at a. private meeting.
Guthrie gave his views on reconstruction and pointed out how
everything that had been done for
the returned men had been but a
camouflage to hide the real poll.
cles of the government. His opponents were picturing terrible
things In connection with Socialism, whereas this message was one
of hope for the working clasa. Ho
dealt with the revolutions (bloodless) that had taken place bn the
Industrial field In connetclon with
labor saving Inventions, all of which
had only benefitted the ruling
class, He dealt with the various
ways millionaires had been made
and pointed out that It was impossible for these men to have made
their money by useful work or by
saving. It had all been made by
exploiting the working class. Labor has determined to stop thts
and lf returned to Victoria he will
represent nobody but the workers,
and work for anything in their interest.
Carpentera Move
The Amalgamated Society of
Carpenters & Joiners have removed
their head quarter's to 148 Cordova
street west. Business agent, F, L.
Barratt, Seymour 3491.
Piledrivers to Meet
All members of the Piledrivers
Union are requested to attend Monday meeting, November 22, to hear
committee's report on general fund
syBtem,
Thousands   of   Workers
Are Discharged and
Hundred Jailed
By Max Worth
(European Staff Correspondent for
,   the Federated Press.)
. Pftris.—Up six flights of steep
stairs in a working class district
ot Paris, I sat with one of the mill-
taut mnorlty among the railroad
workers and listened to his story
6%- the means that are being cm
plsyyad to throttle the labor move
uidtot France.
:;Hfe speaks wtlh authority. Since
tt* pay strike he has lost hl& place
anidj cannot flnd re-employment at
his trade; he hss spent three snd a
half' months ln prison on a charge
of, "interfering with work;" he has
scut his little girl of six away Into
thp country, with friends; and all
of: the time he has continued his
work of agitation for a better
world. Today he Is out of prison
ont probation, and the slightest Indiscretion on his part will return
hfm immediately behind the bars.
^Before the May strike," he explained, "the railroad workers
were the most radical among the
workers here In France. They were
prepared for the nationalization of
-the roads, and for a great deal
more, and they were steadily building: up a spirit of solidarity that
made them the most dangerous, to
the ruling class of France, among
all of the unions,
"That very fact threw the railroad
workers Into the front during the
atrlke. The purpose of the strike
W«s the nationalization of the railroads, and as a matter of course
It was the railroad workers that
took the lead.
"Tlie powor of French capital ls
well concentrated in the railroads,
and the masters among the capitalists made up their minds that the
time had come to make a stand.
They figured that It was a case of
tor never. Consequently, they
ed the railroad unions which
leading the struggle for the
ers.
-.. have spoken of the flne spirit
thsit we had developed. It did not
dCp'end upon any one man, nor
upon ftny small group of men, but
It depended upon a minority—perhapi In a third of the 750 local
unions there were certain of the
workera who stood out as the leader*
"Well, they proceeded to get rid
of "that whole crowd—they eliminated them from the railroad
business. Let me give you an Idea,
<_i the completeness with which
they did the Job. There are 400,-
000 railroad workera In France.
During the months of Msy and
Jnne, they discharged 22,000 and
nut 600 In prison. Today, among
all of the men who were the leading spirits In the May strike, practically none remain In the employ
of the railroads, and what is more,
lt Is almost mposslble for such men
to get a position elsewhere,
"Here In France, it ls the custom
tsjrglve a man who leaves a Job, a
letter or card of good conduct.
Without that, It Is very difficult to
fl»d employment. None of us have
tKoae cards, snd there sre only a
few among the smaller employers
who went men without references.
Furthermore, among the large cm-
p|Svers, there is a llBt—a black list
—r-ot all of the leaders among the
militants, and for us, It Is doubly
difficult.
''So you sec," my,, friend   eon-
Unned, "thnt there remain on the
(Continued on page SV      f
INDIA IN I HP
OF STRIKE
I
Thousands of Workers in
Many Cities Now on
Strike
Political Situation Creates
Anxious Moments for
Government
(By D. S. Rao)
(Written for the Federated Press)
India Is In the grip of a strike
tide. Coming, as It does, simultaneously wtth the political upheaval
that Is an outcome of the country's
decision to boycott the British Indian administration In schools,
courts and administrative functions, the Labor unrest Is of unusual significance. Industrial lifo
Is paralyzed by strikes In the centres of Indian trade and commerce.
In Bombay all of the postal car.
rlers, numbering over 1000, all
telegraph workers, numbering
about 800, have, been on strike for
revised wage scales for six weeks,
This means that mall delivery Is
virtually paralyzed. Correspondence remains undelivered, despite
the government's attempt to import strike-breakers to deal with a
situation which ls ever growing
more serious.
In Bombay also, as well ss tn
Calcutta, a strike of the gas work
ers Is in progress. Both cities are
reported to be in semi-darkness.
In Calcutta only three important
thoroughfares are electrically lit
Thousands of candles—16,000 ls
the report of a Calcutta correspun
dent—are being used to mitigate
conditions. In addition there Is In
Bombay a tramway men's strike,
tying up trafflc, as well as postal
and lighting service.
In Madras the principal oil companies have shut down as a result
of a strike of kerosene oil workers. The action of the oil strikers
has been endorsed by the Madras
OU Worker's Union, one of the
of the many powerful Labor unions
ln Madras.
In Almendabad, near Bombay, a
centre of the cotton milling industry, the workers in 29 mills went
out on strike against the wishes of
their union leaders. The dispute
had started over wage payments In
two mill." In tin city.
At Jamshedpur, whoie the Tata
Iron and Steel Company's Immense
plant  ls  situated,   strike  troubles
are evidenced ln aome departments,
(Continued on page I)
TAKE PUCE OF VANCOUVER LABOR
CANDIDATES OPEN
CAMPAIGN
Internationals Fill Places
of O. B. U. Men
Fired
About two week, ago membera
ot the PUedrlver. and Wooden
Bridgmen O. B. U. were working
on the government pier. Tbe contractor! (or which are Grant*
McDonald, On the company refilling to pay overtime ratei for
Saturday afternoon work the men
refund to work on Saturday afternoon-, and quit at noon. They went
to work aa uiurfl on the Monday
morning, and half bf them were
fired at night, and the rest on Wednesday. Their places were filled
by membera of the shipwright
union. A committee of the pile-
driver Interviewed the shipwrights
and were Informed by them that
they had orders from their business agent not to go oft the Job
for any one, while knowing that
the company had refused to pay
overtime for Saturday afternoon
work. Two foremen are working
12 hour shifts on this Job, which
Is alao aomethlng new, and which
the piledrivers object to. The position ls that members of an international Union have taken .the
places of men who were fired for
standing out for the usual conditions of Saturday afternoon work,
something that they themselves
have fought for In other branches
of the industry* Thus another example of how eraft unionism
works for "better conditions."
LABOR PARTY'S
t-«-.i..i,,|,.«lnlit.t.,»MtMt.,t,,tt'-»-«-*,.«M|Mtiit«»l m tgsia i ■ * ■—«!"»■■ m»i I I If"*"
FEDERATED LABOR  PARTY
WILL HOLD A BIO
WHIST DRIVE AND DANCE
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 1920
COTILLION HALL
Corner Granville and Davie Streets
Gentlemen, too
ItcfnwIiiiH'tii-t
Tickets at F. L. P. Hall, 148 Cordova Street West, and
Federatlonist Offlco.
Queensland Almost Wipes
Out Old Tory
Party
As a result ot the elections held
In the Stute of Queensland, Austra-
lia, on October 9 last, tho Labor
government Is re-elected to power
'or tho third time, which Is a re-
cord ln Australian politics, The
majority, however, is smaller, duo
mainly to thc fact that the election was waged on sectarian lines,
and much capital wus made out of
tho fact that several of tho Labor'
milliliters were Human Catholics.
Sectarianism has played an Important part In Australian elections during past years, and more
than onc government has been defeated because of It.
A significant feature of tlie elections Is thc wholesale smash of tlie
Tory Party—Us number's being reduced from 32 to 13. A Country
Farmera party, which came into
existence at tlio elections, secured
20 seats from the Tory and Labor
parties. Prior to the elections, the
strength nf parties was: Labor, 40;
Tory, (Conservative), 26. Today
as a result of the elections, the
parties stand ,a« follows: Labor,
39; Country Parly, 20; Tory, 13.
Ballots Cloke Dee. 16
The general executive board oi
the O. B. U, has decided that Dec.
16 ahall be the date on which the
ballot on the amendments to the
constitution shall close, and consider that two months, the time
allowed, Is sufflclent for all units to
have the vote taken.' The general
secretary has notified all units to
this effect.
Three   Candidates   Well
Received at First Big
Meeting
Danco Saturday
Everybody will have a good time.
Saturday night dance at O. B. U.
hall, 804 Pender street weat.   New
floor, good music.
VOTE DEC. 1
Old Party Labor Laws
Are Not Real
Efforts
Lumber camp and mill workers
of British Columbia might do well
during the present election campaign to take into consideration the
many measures they and their organization Lave beeu compelled to
take, In order to have the so-called
labor laws enforced in tills province. Labor laws have apparently
been placed on the statute books—
after years of labor agitation—
merely as a sop to stop this agitation, but in no case ln a rcul effort
for labor's benefit; Old party legislation Is tied up with the needs
of the capitalist class and unless
efforts are made to get real working class legislators into power,
this system of dummy labor laws
will continue. Clot behind the
working class candidates, not only
morally, but financially. If you
are on the voters' list, and now
living ln a different community
from which you registered,, you
can vote for' your preference In
that constituency by asking for an
absentee ballot In any polling
booth on election day. You will be
given a ballot containing the names
of the candidates In the constituency Jn which you wish to vote,
and you will mark your ballot according to your desires. This ballot is then sealed and forwarded
by the official to the returning officer of the district for' which the
ballot Is Intended. The names of
the various labor candidates should
be kept ln mind becnuso tbe party
affiliations of the candidates arc
not designated on the ballot. Cut
the list out of the Federatlonist.
Last, but not least, don't forget
that finances can be used to great
advantage In thin election. Oet
Oet your dollars to the party headquarters at once.
Berlin.—In connection with the
recent congress of Oerman pacifists In Brunswick, there was held
a convention of students fr'om all
parts of Qermany which resulted
In the organization of "The German Pacifist Students' Leugue."
The league already has groups In
the universities of Berlin, Frankfort, Bonn, Freiburg and Lunlch,
and Ib planning an active campaign
of organization.
Speakers Deal With Many
Subjects of Election I
Interest
The opening campaign meeting
of the Federated Labor Party held
In the Dominion hall last Friday,
was a huge success In every way.
Not a single Interruption took place
during the meeting, and all tha
speakers were very well received.
In introducing the speakers, R. p.
Pettipiece, who acted 'as chairman,
referred to the recent meetings
held by the big political parties. If.
people believed all that each said
about the other, he declared, they
would soon know the truth. He
maintained that there wat a marked apathy noticeable at all the political meetings of both Liberate
and Conservatives, and contended
that the people were "fed up with
the whole crowd."
'We can not expect to do everything at once," he added, "but it is
certain If you send representatives
of Labor to the legislature, there
will be a marked Improvement ln
conditions that effect the working-
man."
J. S. Woodsworth, who with
Messrs. w. R. Trotter and Thomas
Richardson, has been nominated on
the Federated Labor ticket, spoke
for half an hour on general Labor
topics. He referred to the absence
of a prominent Labor exponent, W.
A. Pritchard, whom conditions prevented from being ln the present
flght. Mr. Woodsworth mentioned
recent difficulties In Winnipeg and
pointed out that at present 50 per
cent, of the aldermen of that city
were Laborltes. This, he said, had
bettered laboring conditions in tha,.
prairie metropolis, and he was of
the opinion that lf Labor representatives were elected to the British
Columbia Legislature, It would not
be necessary for workingmen to go
begging "hat In hand" when legislation affecting them was desired.
He charged the government with
permitting lands to lie out of use,
the result being that eggs were Imported from China, mutton from
Australia and other products from
other' countries. And ye't, he contended, British Columbia was quite
able to feed herself and would do
so under proper governmental supervision. The credit of the country
must be placed behind the producer, t
Woodsworth dealt also with educational and medical matters.
Education was not free, he argued,
and lf lt was found necessary for
the soldier to be In good physical
condition, then was It not fitting,
that the civilian should also enjoy
good health, he asked?
The speaker concluded by stating that only radical changes
would prevent chaos. Revolutions
grew out of the misery of the common people, and with civilisation
collapsing in Europe, the citizens
of Canada could not sit idly by at>d
hope to escape. Unemployment
(Continued on page t)
K
BELGIAN IDE
Canada Turned Down by
Belgian Government in
Favor of Germany
Unemployed returned soldiers
who fought in the C. B. F. for what
England and' her military caste
called "the rights of small nations"
wit), It Is hoped, do a little deep
thinking otter reading the following news despatch. Belgium', on
whose behalf thousands of Canadians lost thoir lives, leads the way
tn trading with Oermany,
Ottawa, Ont.—Canada has lost
an order for 2400 steel railroud
curs which the Belgian government, through the Canadian" Trade
Commission, planned to place with
manufacturers In this country. In.
stead of "Made In Canada" cars,
the Belgians will ride tn coaches
of the "Made in Germany" variety,
when the order Is filled.
Advices to the Trade Commission
are to thc effect that Belgium has
placed the order with Germans,
and will pay for the railroad material with foodstuffs which are to
be supplied to» Germany.
Socialist Party of Canada
CAMPAIGN MEETINGS
SOCIALIST HALL—Friday the 19th.
IMPRESS TIIKATKK—Sunday tho 21st.
ASH HAM;--Monday the 22nd.
KBNDER IIA1.I.--Thursday the 25th.
SOCIAUST IIAU.-Friday thc 26th.      '
t
J PAGE TWO
TWELFTH YEAB.   No. 47
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST    Vancouver, b. a
FRIDAY November 1», IM
DOLLAR DAY
SATURDAY
BEAD   OUR   ANNOUNCEMENT
OF BARGAINS IN FRIDAY'S
WORLD AND PROVINCE
ARNOLD & QUIGLEY
546 GRANVILLE ST.
—VOTE FOR-
H. P. McCRANEY
LIBERAL CANDIDATE FOR RICHMOND
■t Toytond
SMunnur
$
DAY
-Specials-
A Small
Deposit
WUl Hold
Auy Article
Tumblers
Sets
of clear thin blown
glass; spaclal, »7C_
alx (or    I OC
D   L       C    a        Mufr- Bowl *nd p,atai
Baby bets s^.... 50c
DINNER SET
Blue Yuan—attractive octagonal shapes—rich
dark blue Chinese pattern—Special,
49-piece set, only . 	
—Millar & Coe—
LIMITED
Headquarters for China and Toya
419 Haatinga West     J?hone Sey. 475
$25
The best dental work at the
lowest price consistent with
its quality
SKILFUL, thoughtful treatment—the kind
everybody appreciates.. No unnecessary
suffering—just easily and quickly—alleviating
pain by bot). local and general anaesthesia.
Then, too, I specialize in modern Expression
Work—the kind people admire because it suit*
you.
Vlctoiy Bonda Acoepted at Far in Payment for
Dental Work
Dr. BRETT ANDERSON
60S HASTINOS ST. W. Oor. Seymour
Phone Sey. 3331
Office Open Tuesday and Friday
Evenings
DB.  BRETT  ANDERSON,   formerly member of the Faculty et tba
CsUegs of Dentletry. University of Southern California,  Lecturer
ob Crown ud Bridfowork, Demonstrator la Fhtawork and Opera-
Ht* Dentletry, Loral and General Aaaeothefila.
ONE OF THE FINEST TONICS
Good for Health Improves the Appetite
CHEAP PRODUCTION
Everyone knows that cheap gooda can only be procured
by using cheap material! and employing cheap labor.
CASCADE BEER
il produced from the highest grade materials procurable
■^Cascade is a UNION produce from start to finish.
VANCOUVER BREWERIES LIMITED
/■
HELP SOVIET RUSSIA
and SOVIET UKRAINE
Our brothers and sisters there need immediate Medical Aid. Mail your contribution at
once. If you are willing to help, write the Secretary for a subscription list.
M. POPOVICH,
Secretary, Medical Relief Committee for Soviet Russia and Soviet Ukraine,
Box 3591, Postal Station B.,
Winnipeg.
Enclosed please find the sum of.	
..Dollars towards purchase of
Medical Supplies for Soviet Russia and Soviet
Ukraine.
Name     ■— 	
Address • --	
ONE BIO UNION OF ALL
BAILWAY WORKERS
leal purposes, the constitution
closely resembles that of the National Union of Rallwaymen In
Oreat Britain, which is part of the
Brtlsh Triple Alliance, composed of
railwaymen, transport workers and
miner's unions.
The objects of the Australian
Bailway Union are as follows:
(a) To uphold the rights of
combination of labor, to improve,
protect and foster the best interests of Its members.
(b) To secure to railway and
tramway employees the full result
of theh* industry and labor, and to
obtain and maintain good working
conditions'.
(c) To use every endeavor to
provide for the safety of railways
and tramway work, and travelling.
(d) To establish magazines or
newspapers, and to assist tn the
establishment or maintenance of
any such Journals owned by bona
flde trade unions. or labor .organizations, or conducted In the Interests thereof.
(e) To assist kindred organizations, either In or out of Australia.
(f) To assist In the movement
for* the socialization of the means
of production, distribution and exchange.
<g) To provde and acquire suitable premises, buildings, offices or
propetry as may be necessary for
the purposes of the union,
(h) To r'alse funds by contributor, levies, line* and donations for
the objects herein specified.
(•*) To do all things condnolve
to the welfare and organization of
Greateit Stock of
Furniture
In Greater Vancouver
Replete in every detail
41 ButUfi ItoMt Wttl
railway and tramway employees.
The new union will take over an
Immediate membership ot more
than 45,000, but by tafiAftgthe
number of employees of fpejfail-
way and tramway systems of Australia, it is estimated that, thp organization will have a membership
In the near future of approximately 120,000 men. ",H«
At the conference, the CoIMring
motions were carried: ,HE
"That in order to achietfecom-
pletely effective organizaiUdn. ln
railway and tramway employment,
and to abolish craft and asliijonal
differences with their cons^ient
lack of unity In policy and.a^on,
the council recommends:   >:fjm
(a) That each state branch
should approach the craft unions
and request that the members of
such craft unions now employed in
the railway service be transferred
to membership in the Railway
Union, or. alternatively. ', \
(b) That all members of craft
unions In railway employment ba
transferred to the Railway Union
for' purposes of Industrial control,
providing that where suoh members are desirous of retaining membership In the craft union for benefit or other purposes', the necessary contributions shall be collected
and paid by the Railway Union to
the craft union concerned; and
(c) That all apprentice and
adult artisan entrant!. Into tha rati-
way service In future shall become
members of the Railway Union
from the date of their entry Into
the service, subject to the provision that current membership tick-
eta be recognised and allowed to
expire.
Protest Agalnat Teste
The conference also protested
against the present syBtem of eye
sight and hearing tests, which re
duced the pays and condition! of
those employees after years of ser
vice in the railwa% had been reduced: in status because oC deficiency in their eyesight and hearing,
claiming that such deficiency was
due to long service and the strain
of their nerves. Conference will
demand that such employees shall
be retained In other suitable work
at wages equivalent to what they
were paid in their former occupations.
Conference also passed the following motion: 'That the railway
workers of each state should be
VOTE FOR
LIBERAL
CANDIDATE
Sa. Vancouver
RUSSELL'S   PLATFORM-
I BEMEVE IN AND WILL ADVOCATE:
1. Strict enforcement of all statutory laws as enacted by th»
B. C. Legislature.
2. Every assistance possible to Land Settlers for productive
purposes,
3. The establishment of the Eight-hour Day, an Old-ag.
Pension Act; and fixed age for the same.
4. The Natural Re'sources of B. C. should not be handed over
to. speculators,, but should be safeguarded for the people; and a.
strong policy adopted whereby they will be transferred only ta
those who will.actually develop them and establish new indu»-
trles.
6.   The. abolition of the Poll-tax tor all British subjects.
0.   National Reserves of Coal and Timber.
T._ J wiU support the Beturned Soldier Movement upon every
possible occasion, and will advocate legislation for assistance to
tha dependents of returned as wol| as those of deceased soldier.
—not aa a matter of charity but as one of right,
8. I hold that there should, be only one Police Force for the
whole Province; also that there should b. Public Defenders a.
well as Public Prosecutors; .... ...
9. The Asiatic question needs more attention now than It
ever did before. I will support any legislation tending toward,
their exclusion and non-employment.
10. Free and Compulsory Education to the fullest extent.
11. Free Medical Examination of Health and Dentition, wtth
treatment for children of school age.
12. The Oovernment to late over and maintain all Publlo
School, and Hospitals.
11.   Maternity Beneflt. with.Free Hospital Service.
granted direct equal and elective
representation upon the board of
management of the railway department in each state, and believe,
that such a system would result in
immediate Improvement In railway
control, and be in the best lnteretss
of the publlo and of railway employees, and would assist In the
maintenance of Industrial peace;
and the council therefore directs
that the executive prepare a report dealing with this matter for
submission to the next council
meeting.
Conference also sent fraternal
gruUingM' to the International
Transport Workers Federation, and
expressed the hope that at no distant future date, Australia would
be represented at an International
congress of transport workers.
The general secretary of the new
organization states that It is the
Intention of the new union to link
up with other transport union, in
Australia on the same lines a. the
Triple Alliance ln England.
Seek Industrial Power
Commenting on the work and
aim. of th* an organisation, Mr.
A. BuekLy, pmldent, said that
while the union will strive for Industrial peace. It I. reiolved that
th. employee, .hall have a .hare
In th. amnagement of Industrial
concern.. "We hav. the case of
the Italian factories before us,
and we wish, if possible, to avoid
a similar happening here," he
added. ,W« have formed this
union tor the purpose of getting
industrial power. In the put the
railway men ha. been used by
every form of strike-breaker aad
loyalist movement to defeat their
comrade, ln other transport
unlona. Thl. would not b. allowed
ln the future. We have not oome
into existence for the holding up of
transport without seme very Just
cause, and Industrial peace will be
possible If the various governments
give oui> members a tali and square
go.
"In a .Uttle while a conference
of th. big transport unions will be
held In Melbourne, and thon employer, who are not prepared to
take Labor into their, confidence
have yet to be rudely awakened to
an entirely new set of industrial
conditions, and to be made to fall
.Into line with the r'ost. That from
thia conference is expected to emerge the most powerful national
unton In Australia is but a sign qf
the times, and the railway and
tramway men's attitude Is merely
consistent with the change In society's progress."
UNION-MADE
FOOTWEAR
When you go to buy a pair or shoes do
you insist on seeing ttie label? When
vou come to this store'you can get Just
the shoe you want and it will have the
label. '"*
THE   NEXT   TIME ','"*""
The Ingledew Shoe Company
SM GltANVILLE STKEET
"Union-Made Footwear"
Fresh Cut Flowers, Funeral Designs, Wcddfng Bouquets, Pot Plaifti -
Ornamental and Shade Trees, Soeds, Buibs, Florists' Sundries
Brown Bros* $c Co. Ltd",6
florists and ifoseaayiiEN
8— BTOBES—3 i •«
48 Hastings Street Bast 728 OranvUle Street
Seymour 988-672 Seymour 9513
FOOTBALL-
This season we ara better prepared than ever to take care
of football players.
High-grade English Jerseys In many colors and designs.
A splendid stock to choose from.
Be sure to seo tlie new Improved McGregor Boot.   This
boot ls a winner. All sizes in atock.
FOOTBALLS-
From the best English makers, including the genuine McGregor, the finest ball made. ■
EVERYTHING 1X>K TUE FOOTBALL PLAYER
TISDALLS LIMITED
018 HABTIXOfrST.'W. TEL, S13V. 153
VANCOUVER   LABOR
CANDIDATES   OPEN
OAMPAION
(Continued trom pal. I)
muat cease, and sane leglilatlon be
provided, he added.
Grills Opponents
W. R. Trotter flrtt took up the
question of land settlement, declaring that only the poor land was
left for ths pre-emptor. The land,
of the country must be made to
produce,, he said, and government
assistance was necessary.
The government was claiming
credit for* improved Labor oondlttona ln the logging camp, ot the
oountry. The Liberal, had no credit coming for any Improvement
along this line, said Mr. Trotter,
and he added that If th. Liberal
and Conserpatlve parties had* the
propei1 sympathy with the workers
they would be willing and anxious
to see them have their direct representatives In the Legislature, and
not be'working ln unison, as In
Newcastle, to defeat Sam Outhrle,
nominee of the minera ln that rld-
iny.
Unrest and Unemployment
Commencing his address with an
appeal to his hearers to remember
that world happenings were having
their effect upon local conditions,
Thomas Richardson, the third can.
dldate to speak, dealt with social
unrest and unemployment/ This
was a serious wastage, he averred,
and unemployment led to a marked condition of physical, mental,
moral and spiritual degradation.
The state owed a duty to the individual, he contended, and a permanent plan. for' the handling of
unemployment problems' mutt be
worked out.
Touching upon the liquor question and the recent referendum,
Mr. Richardson said liquor must be
procurable at cost price, he continued, and was answered by applause. The government should
not make any profit from Its sale.
Who Owns the Country
Jarties May, vice-president of the
Hampstead, England, I. L. P., and
an cx-member of the London
County'Counoll, said the ilrst thing
that struck him In coming to British Columbia was the wonderful
oountry, and the second that the
country appeared to belong not to
the people as It should be, but to
a lot of limited liability companies,
which halt neither soul to save
nor body to kick."
"The Labor man who votes for
wither party In this campaign is
simply licking the boots that kick
him," declared the speaker ln con*
elusion.
Among other speakers were:
Mrs. H. O. Taylor, who suggested
that sdme political house-cleaning
waa needed; Mi's. J. A. Clark, who
criticized the supposed legislation
of the.Liberals, and Mrs. O. Corse,
formerly a member of the Calgary
School Board, who pointed out the
ft rent Importance of better educational facilities in public schools.
RULERS THROTTLE
FRENCH LABOR.
(Continued from page 1)
railroads today only those who
were not nptlcably active In the
May movement, and such a situation can be remedied only In time.
But," he added, "there la another
side to the proposition. These
thousands who wore fired are
bound to flnd employment some-
whore, and when they do, they will
continuo the agitation. This game
is good only while there Is a big
supply of "uncontaminated" labor
to be used in replacing the men discharged. That supply, in France, is
minted."
Labor' made largo gains In the
municipal elections ln Scotland,
Two seats were lost to the Labor
party in Edinburgh, but- 20 wero
trained in Glasgow.
THB    ONLY    VmON    MADE
GLOVE IN 0. O.
Wholesale—Retail
Beit Quality—Right Pricei
VANCOUVEB OLOVE CO.
883 Carroll  Street.
Sey. 1250
bi iubi rev o»
VAN BROS.
WKJT TOO Att w»
-CIDER-
asd KoMlcoholie wiiM at an
UHIOH   WIN'S   ATTTOTIOH
WOMEN!
SATURDAY is BARGAIN DAY st
Famous. Real "From Maker to
Wearer" modes are reduced, in many
instances, to the merest fraction of
former prices. Come in—see all that
we are doing this extraordinary day.
From Mailer to Wearer.
Ballard's Fmiare Store
iom turn miix
Phont Sty. »>"
W. ahrays any ta stock a ,eei
■•laotloa of dining-room, parlor, kit*
ohta md bedroom farultuio, .ho
linoleum tad medium priced earpot
unuu. iw, eto. Wo oaa ean yoa
montr as wo an oat oi tho .1st tent
iUllMs
Dr. DeVan's French Pills
A reliable Regaining Pill lor Women, It
a boi. BOU at all Drag gtoroe, oi moiled
to uy oddreee oa receipt ol prloo. Tto
Scobell Drag 0... W. CoOMlaei. Oatarle.
PHOSPHONOL for MEN
Beetoioi Vim end Vitality; lor Monro tad
Brtlnl Inereoeeo "grtr matter;" a Tonlo
—will build yoa np. (1 a boi, or two lor
|5, at drag ttont, or by null on reeelpt
ol priee. Ttl BctttU DIM Oo.. St, Otl-
attatl, Oattilo.
KIRK'S
Guaranteed Coal
Means—
If our eoal is not satls-
factory to yon, after you
bave thoroughly tried it
out, we will remove what
coal is left and charge yon
nothing for what you have
osed.
Tou to be the sole judge.
Kirk & Co.
LIMITED
929 Main Street
FboMi Seymonr ltd ud MS
<   623
HASTINGS ST. W.
Near Granville
WORKING MEN OF NORTH VANCOUVER
•     VOTE FOR
B. CHUBB
Liberal Candidate
HE WILL DO THE BEST HE CAN FOR YOU
PRINCE RUPERT ELECTORAL DISTRICT
WORKERS
JIKGISTERBD  Of  ABOVE  DISTRICT ..
CAM VOTE FOR
J. H. BURROUGH
LABOR  CANDIDATE
IN ANT POLLING BOOTH IN a O.  ON DECEMBER UT
PATRONIZE FEDERATIONIST ADVERTISER!
NOTHING IS HOKE HEA1THF01
After a day's labor
than*
Bottle of
Great Sacrifice
Hat Sale
Q UR ENTIRE STOCK of this season's
" leading styles in Mint's Hats is now on
sale at prices unheard-of since pre-war
times. We were tha first firm in Vancouver to meet the popular demand for reduced
prices oa men's headwear. Since then many attempts have been made by others to meet the new
market conditions, bnt undoubtedly this store still
leads them all in real value-giving.
UNION MADE
HATS AND OAFS
No Hat in the Store over $8.75
With one exception—a line of velours
of very high grade, and these are reduced 15 per cent. AU the other line*
are cut to practically half former
priees and In aome cases more than
that Men who need a new hat of
cap should not miss this genuine sacrifice sale.
*%l.
00
Woltlmusen black
fedora and tele*
scope style* of
the newest designs and good
wearing quality.
At$4.75
At$6.75
48.75
NOTHING RESERVED
NOTHING HIDDEN AWAT
Absolutely everything from the best
grades down is an the blook. Come
and take your pick from such high
grades as Tress & Co., of London;
Stetson, Borsallno, Mallory, Knox,
Berg, eto. All this season's styles;
no stickers.
HAH. ORDERS
Since tho beginning ot this big hat
aale we have tilled many orders by
mail. We will shop for1 you and
guarantee satisfaction or refund
your money.
Regular $8 Wolthausen and Brock
lines, in black, browning green
velours; plain finish; all sizes;
smart styles; this season's stook.
Regular $10 American makes; silk
, and plain finish; all shades' and
sizes. These comprise many of the
the most popular lines.
Regular up to $15. Such well-
i known makes as Tress, Christy,-
Stetson, Borsalino, Knox, Berg,
Mallory and Vanity. Boautifully finished. Excellent quality.  All sizes and shades.
TWEED HATS—A lot of popular' colors and all good
materials. No hat at the money will fl>o f_fa
give Huch good satisfaction   «PO.UU
CAPS—Tress, Christy, Peek's, Canadian and Eastern
brands.   Some regular J5 value.
All clearing
at 	
regular *o value.
-75c, $2.50, $3.50
0*
VANCOUVER
lfc°
,#J>
61 HASTINOS EAST
Largest Battel* In the West
WINNIPEG
HAMILTON
L FRIDAY November 19, 1920
Vwblfth ye^r. ko. 47   THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST   Vancouver, b. c
PAGE TB-EW
""n iii1"
Lumber Camp and Agricultural Workers' Department of the One Big Union
THIS PAGE IS PAID FOR BY THE LUMBER  OAMP AND AGRICULTURAL WORKERS DEPARTMENT OF THE ONE BJ$UNION.   OPINIONS EXPRESSED THEREIN ARE NOT NECESSARILY ENDORSED BY THE FEDERATIONIST.
Parliamentary Inefficients
ON March 25th the Provincial legislature turned down the
proposal to establish an 8 hour day in the pulp, paper, and
lumber mills of the provinee.. Attorney General and Minister
of Labor Farris opposed the measure because, he said, "of the
need for fullest production of these commodities, particularly
at the present time."
He was supported in this action by Messrs Bell, Yorston,
Nelson, Duncan, Jackson, Cowper, Sloan, Oliver, King, Macdonald, M. A., Sutherland, Manson, Thompson, Anderson,
Macdonald, M. C.; Weart, MacLean, Pattullo, Hart, Barrow,
Whiteside, Walters, Pauline, Hall, Buckham and Fisher.
Major Burde who introduced the bill was supported by
Messrs. Pooley, Schofleld, Jones, McDonald, A; Mackenzie,
F. J,; Hancs, Giolma, Ross, Bowser, Rose, McKenzie, W. A.;
Hawthornthwaite, Willson, Mcintosh and Stewart.
At the same time the C. P. R. was trying to bring into the
eountry. 20,000 southern Europeans because they stated there
was a shortage of men able and willing to adapt themselves to
the conditions which were entailed in camp and construction
.work of the country;
As was proven at the time there were ample men in thc
eountry available for this work but who refused to take it be-.
i cajuse of the damnable insanitary conditions and the long hours
and poor pay.
Thc Minister of Health, and the combination Minister of
Labor and Attorney General whoso duty it is to enforce the
laws and protect the interests of the workers not only failed
criminally in these respects, but led the opposition to the enactment of the 8 hour day law.
Now a few months later there is a wholesale shutting down
pf camps and mills and the other industries, and many thousands out of work, and the certainty of bread lines being in
existence everywhere throughout the winter months.
Where was the vision of the "statesmen" who could not see.
a few months ahead and take action to minimize the evil effects
of a long work day and a system of working the employee to
the limit of his physical endurance.
Would not an 8 hour day, or even one of 6 hours, be a more
logical state of affairs than one of ten or twelve hours for those
who are working and semi-starvation for a large number of unemployed.
The political incompetents are endeavoring to get back into
office for a new term before the winter sets in with its thousands of unemployed, for they realize that it would be hopeless
for them to expect'to be re-elected once the workers fully
realized the position they were placed in and how little would
be done to assist them.
It is useless, however, to expect any better treatment from
any representative of the old political parties. They arc all
tools of the employing and financial interests and supporters of
the present inefficient social system.
Such benefit as it is possible to derive through parliamentary
action will only be attained by supporting those candidates who
are class conscious and whoso aim and object is to overthrow
the present system of production for profit, and substitute a
system of production for use, for only by such means can poverty and unemployment be abolished.
The main, instrument of working class emancipation will be
a strong united militant economic organization. One that recognizes that the working class and the employing class have nothing in oommon.
Economic power is the source and basis of all other forms, of
social influence. Consequently if the working class seeks to rise
to political (parliamentary) control of the governmental institutions of the country it must first build upon a basis of solidly
organized economic power—For all political or social influence
in every historical period is but the expression of the dominant
Economic interests—Consequently the possession of governmental control is not the deciding factor in securing industrial
supremacy, but, on thc contrary industrial supremacy if a class
is bound to ultimately insure political power and control of
governmental and social institutions.
To entitle to cast a vote in such an Economio organization
neither race, color, creed, nationality, or sex counts, but simply
the faet of being a member of the working class and having an
understanding of the position that class occupies in society-
Workers of the World, Unite on the Economic and
parliamentary field—you have nothing to lose but your chains
and the world to gain.
WANTED
Tem Pearay and Arthur Keland,
write general headquarters.
Angus Mccormick, previously
With Comox Log Co., headquartera.
Stephen Anderson, who ha.
elalm against R. 8. Dodge.
Thos. Lauder, claim No. 60169,
previously with tho Dollar Co. at
Union Bay.
m. Hell. H1120; P. A. Vlgner,
V1I0; P. a. Powell, James McLaughlin, H. Challender, K. C. ISO;
John p. Marr, John William., Alt
Malund,  M211, and B. Johnsson,
J, Strahlinsky and Roy Carnegie
, to communicate with the Coast
headquarter., .-' -
Herbert H. Pollard,, claim No.
11762, pr.vlou.ly with Whalen'.,
Port Alice.
Oeorge Peaks, claim No. 61447,
yr.vlou.ly with International Lum-
' ber Co., Campb.ll River.
Hazen Edgar Schrlever, elalm
No. 667S7, previously at eamp 6,
C, P, R. Tie and Timber, Cranbrook.
Ole Storkarn, claim No. ITJ12,
previously at Camp S, Tahk.
John Randall, claim No. 8600*,
pr.vlou.ly with  O'Nell,  Irvine  A
Flnt AM.
Flrat Aid Instruction Classes will
commence January 4. The Compensation Board will arrange classes previous to that date If twenty
or more will attend.
Mann, Salmo.
A. Brewer, previously with McKee & Campbell.
Any one knowing the whereabouts of Alex. Weis, last heard ot
at Klngsgate, B. C, January, 1910.
Please communicate with his
brother, Joe Weis, Box 82, Prince
George, B. C.
Wasyl Syrotluk, supposed to be
ln Vancouver, ls Inquired after by
Frank Ullman, of Cosmopolis,
Wash., U. S. A.
H, W. Mansfield send address to
Coast Headquarters,
D. Baker, late of Hidden Creek
mine, Anyox, has compensation
claim No, 66126; Oordon E. Dunbar, late of Red Gap, ha. claim
No. 60100; A. Ellison, late of Camp
1, Skookumchuck, claim No, 64811;
Job Talgart, late of Dorr Siding,
claim No. 66849.
At the last meeting of the Winnipeg district, it was unanimously
decided, not to take part In the
referendum Issued by the O. B. U.
on the Fort Arthur eonvention. The
meeting also went on record as in
favor of holding the Lumber Worker. General convention ln Vancouver ln January,
Fellow Worker Tom Walsh, secretary of the National Federation
of Shop Stewarts, of England, dealre. to convey hi. greeting, to the
Lumber Workers on this continent,
many of whom may remember him
at the tlm. he waa ln this country.
STRIKES
ACTIVE ENGAGEMENTS ON THE
FIRING LINE
Camp Reports
JACKSON BAT STRIKE
The workers of Lapan Co.'s oamp
at Jackson Bay are on Btrike. There
may be workers who will question
the wisdom of a strike at a time
when the camps are all closing
down, but to us who were on the
Job there was, under the circumstances, no other action we oould
take, as members of an aggressive
organisation ln the modern labor
movement.
Prior to the 16th-of this month
camp conditions were fairly good
and the wage scale as high as that
paid In most camps. On the evening of the 16th the following notice
was posted:    -
Op and after November 19 the
schedule of pay in this camp will
be as follows;   .  • .
Crew of yarder and skyline
swing, while yarding—
Cents
Per Log
•Hook tender  12
High rigger  11
Engineers   t%
Rigging slinger   1_
Chokermen  7
Firemen  6 _
Wood buckers  {,%
Wood splitters   6K
Signals '.  5fc
Knotters  ._*%
While moving or'. on other
work—
Per day
Hook tender  :.|9.60
High rigger   9,00
Engineers   '.  7.60
Rig slinger  .:  6.50
Chokermen  6.50
Firemen  , „ 4.50
Wood buckers  4.50
Wood splitters   4.50
Signals   4.50
Knotters  4.60
On small swing—
Per day
Engineers    |7.00
Firemen   4.60
Wood buck   4.50
Swing  reader—
Per day
Engineer  $7.50
Firemen    5.60
Wood  bucker  5.50
Pig men  7.00
Bull   cooks   5.00
Flunkeys   4.60
Filer  ; ;.... 6.60
Falters and buckers, $1.00 per M.
This meant a cut of from 91 to
92 a day; In addition, the yarder
and skyline men are asked to work
for nothing, Inasmuch as they were
askod to work contract at so much
per log ln a place where there Is a
1200 foot haul and an extremely
bushy country. They have been
yarding on this tree for a week or
more and the average has been
about 60 togs a day. This Is the
best average that thoy can hope to
keep up. Ab it would require an
average of 100 logs a day to maintain the scale previously paid, tha
new proposal really meant cutting
wages ln half for the yarder and
skyline crew. The other men were
to get a day wage at a big reduction.
Strange as lt may seem, we
agreed to this big reduction and
would, In view of present conditions, even have worked on the
contract basis, but we asked to be
guaranteed the reduced rate of
wages (the yarder and skyline
men), and also 60 cents more per
day. for the lower paid men, who
came under1 the last rate on the
contract schedule. . Our request
was met with a flat refusal and the
result ls we are on Btrike.
During the negotiations Klnman
told the committee that If they did
not get 80 logs per day to the pole
he would have to close down.    *
Fellow-workers, we make no
apology for our action and If you
are fit members of this or any
other working class organization;
if you are worthy of the name- of
men stay away from Jackson Bay,
but if you are human skunks, go
up there and go to work. Remember, that maybe in time the profit
grinding machines of the masters
will again need some Blaves and
then we will remember who were
men and who were skunks,
STRIKE COMMITTEE.
Prince Rnpert District Convention.
The first convetlon of this district was.held at Prinoe Rupert,
October 15 and 16. Delegates were
present from camps at Cumshewa
and Atll, Sedgwick Bay, and camps
1 and 6 headquarters, Buckley Bay.
Delegate White acted as chairman;
It was deemed necessary to take
definite action to combat the con"
trpct and piece work system which
was being operated In the district
Particularly because of Us speedup effect and the tendency to destroy the 8-hour day. A referendum will be Issued on the queatlon
of expelling members working by
these methods.
The substitution of the stamp
system instead of receipt, was favored. Also to embody clause 89
of the O. B. U. constitution Into
the rules governing the district,
and to favor clauses 80, 34, 86, 36
and 37 of the O. B. U. constitution
being altered to provide for conditions prevailing .In camp and
railroad industries.
It was decided to recommend the
payment of 920 a month to the
Prince Rupert C. L. C. as a contribution to the upkeep of the O.
B. U. headquar'ters there.
Camps in reasonable proximity
to each other were recommended
to hold Joint monthly meetings,
consisting of two members from
each camp.
That In future each employee
receive an Itemized statement of
his account before receiving payment.
A detailed financial statement
showed the coat of the Buckley
Bay strike at 11058.97, of which
amount S17.45 had been repaid by
member's who were assisted.
It was proposed that an employment office be operated tn connection with the district office.
A motion waa adopted condemning the Port Arthur convention for
the adoption of Resolution 16 of
their proceedings, as it was considered this was unwarranted interference with the local autonomy
of the lumber workers' organization, which was constituted ln accordance with the wishes of the
membership In conformity witJh
their needa as workers in their
particular' Industry.
The action of the lubmer work-,
era' delegates In withdrawing from
the convention, was endorsed.
A motion was also adopted that
if the   words   "not   according to
craft,", but "according to Industry,"
is deleted from the preamble to the
O. B. U. constitution, the central
executive board of the lumber
workeri to submit a referendum to
the membership on the question of
withdrawing from the O. B. U.
An immediate referendum was
fafb r'ed on the question that all
lumber workers' delegates to gen-
'errifr conventions' of the O. B. U.
must be elected by the delegatea of
the" lumber workers when in convention.
that all lumber workers* delegates operating In the Prince Rupert district ihall carry credentials issued by that district office,
to which al) reports must be made.
; Nominations for district executive were Fellow-workers While,
Morrison, Mclntyre, <3agne, McDonald, Rodgers, Morris, the four
highest t0 act, the next two to act
as'niternates.
Nominations for d'strlct serce-
tary—Burrough, Morris.
.Tlie next district convention to
be In June, 1921.
Fellow Workera Burrough and
Mclntyre were elected as delegates to the January general convention, with White and McDonald as alternates.
drury ixtm\ n. o.
Northern Pacific Logging Co.
At our regular camp meeting
held under date of October SI, considerable discussion took place regarding the referendum which Is
being taken throughout the camps
at this time, and ln all the discussions all members seem to view
the contents of this referendum as
being of a very serious nature and
far-reaching in Its effect.
iMiIt was moved that the minutes of
the,above meeting be forwarded to
.The Federatlonist for publication,
as being a true expression of the
sentiments held by the members
of this camp.
Referendum ballot read and
open for discussion.
• Motion before the meeting that
we go on record as strongly opposed to the actions and attitude
assumed by E. Winch and othor
delegates of the Lumberworkers'
Industrial Union to the O. B. U.
at Port Arthur. Since we, as members of the. Lumberworkers Industrial Union, are not allowed a Vote
unless we are In good standing, on.
any referendum Issue, we see no
reason why our delegatea should
be seated Jlintil they, wero in good
* Cann
HEADQUARTERS STATEMENT FOR OCTOBER, 1020
Receipts!
W. W. Webster, refund I         ,       <
F. LInder, refund  1.
C. L. C, Prince Rupert, re Fellow WoVJKf
Cranbrook District, on account	
Prince Rupert District, on account	
Prihce George District, on account	
Kamloops District, on account 	
Coast District, on account     . 4
Merritt District, for defense fund ...
The Pas District, re.Tethers' wages
Telegrams and Express paid*	
Balance on hand Sept. 30 	
20.00
71.09
100.00
814.14
439.00
200.00
100.00
232.95
9.00
60.00
10.97
63.70
86,610.85
Expenditures
Wages (part) ;   240.00
Rent and Light       26.72
Office supplies v         3*35
Postage  j ........ZZZZI      8o!oo
Organization, general      183.25
Literature:
Searchlight 1176.00
Russian papers      7.00
Subs 88
Bulletins -  300.00
Clarions      175.00
Soviet Russlas .'.:.  111.00
Ukrainian Labor News  100.00
Australian Pamphlets .!      8.74
Books      2.20
Express on papers      7.64
     887.46
Sundry districts, supplies and expenses „     828.39
Federatlonist:   On acct subscriptions, $530; pago, 9320     850.00
O. B. U. supplies     816.60
General Convention, July, expenses       810.00
printing circulars and ballots      623.73
A. Lundberg, account re Cann .'.     100.00
Premium on surety bonds  , -     156.00
Telegraph account       41.66
Exchange on cheques .'.  .85
Mimeographlc account I'.         4,30
Buttar & Chiene, auditors       86.00
Balance on hand October 31 ,.     676.64
standing with their per capita tax
to the O. B. U. Motion carried by
a unanimous vote.
Roll called with 60 members In
attendance. Delegate reported 100
per cent, union camp, with all
members in good standing.
DELEGATE H336.
DRURY INLET
Northern Cedar Logging Oo.
At a special meeting held on
Nov. 7, by the workers In this
camp, It was moved, seconded and
carried unanimously, .that this
meeting strongly disapprove of the
action taken by the L. & C. W. I.
U. delegates at the Fort Arthur
convention.
No satisfactory explanation has
been given as to why the per capita
tax had not been paid up to date,
and we strongly endorse the View
of the Port Neville workers, a report of which appeared In The Federatlonist on Oct. 29, as wishing a
closer affiliation with the G. E. B.
of the O. B. U.
(Signed)       Camp Committee.
OCEAN PALLS
Cump 17
At regular1 meeting on Oct. 31,
the following resolution waa passed—one vote only being recorded
against: "This camp goes on record as criticizing the action of
the propaganda meeting at headquarters on Sept, 26, in recommending to give 9600 to the striking
gas workers,. In view of the fact
that we were In arrears with per
capita."
(Note by District Secretary—No
further action was taken on the
proposal, as the gaa workers went
back to work the following day.)
KAMLOOPS DISTRICT
The following contributions have
been received for the Northern
Construction Company strike fund:
A. Friend, J. Fisher, A. G. MeDougall, Alex. Malllaux, 95 each;
Olaf Peterson, 83; R. Wood, J.
Brown, K. D. Morrison, J. Gibson,
W. Fletcher, Wm. Noors, 92 each;
A. W. Johnson, C. Sundian, Ole
Anderson, O. Poison, Carl Palm, E.
Johnson, T. Rourkc, J. Smith, H.
B. Hughes; J. Christian, W. D.
Pringle, C. Broom, S. S- Hobson, A.
Ott, J. Hundrick, D. Deli ale, John
Wauker," Ed. Jones, C. Silveo, Sam
Hill. A. Kantas, M. Makl, M. Bard,
C. Palola, J. Jefferson, H, Hezolgg,
91 each; H. Sullivan, 70c; F. Ferguson, 50c; M. McCallum, 25c; A,
Friend, 55c. Total contribution,
963.
FINANCIAL    REPORT    BY
NELSON DISTRICT
L. W. I. U. executive.report of
auditing books on Oetober,17, 1920.
From March 18 to September 30:
Dues collected ....81,284.60
Expenditures   1,042.21
Cash in bank   8290.45
Total   . Indebtedness     to
to headquarters  1,456.57
(Signed) ARTHUR BREEZE,
G. A. GULLY,
SAM JOHNSON.
Auditing   books   of   O. B. 'U.—
Financial report, March 18 to September 30:   .
Dues  collected   9977.00
Expenditures   827.90
Money paid to Sandon strikers      66.25
Balance in bank Sept. 30....9263.05
Owing to headquarters  186.40
96,610.86
KAMLOOPS DISTRICT
Strike still on In the logging
camps,of the Northern Construction Co. on North Thompson river.
There are no men working in any
of the camps. Everything looks
flne for winning back the eight-
hour day, as the solidarity shown
by the strikers and the pickettlng
done by other districts, ls sure to
bring the strike to a successful
conclusion.
Strike Committee. '
CAMP 1, FORT NEVILLE, B. C.
At the regular business meeting
of Camp 1, Port Neville,,the O. B,
U. referendum was discusaed and
voted on, the result being that all
the amendments to the O. B. U.
constitution carried unanimously.
Receipt!—
Dies —-—
Fees
OBANBEOOK DISTBIOT
flUtemont fer Anfart, 1880
Delegate's Remittance .......#860.10
Leu Commission and Expenies........!.   86.80
Buttons, ate.
Btltnoe, July UlBt .
884.00
6.00
•24.60
38.56
865.32
Expenditures—
Bent (8 mos.), Light snd Phont .—
Offlce Supplies snd Posttf* -	
Legsl Advice   u...^..*	
Delegate's Expenses, Oen. Cob. ~...........™—
Delegate's Expenies Dlst. Con. „„............—
Sundry Expenies .
Balance, Auguit 81st.
11,642.57
.      127.00
74.S5
81.30
8.60
68.86
103.40
1.66
1,088.12
Receipts-
Dues ^ _.._..
Pees
COOHBAHB DISTBIOT
Statement for Auguit, 1880
Delegate's Remittance —™„.-™
Less Commission and Expanses .
Buttons Sold 	
Balance, July 81st .
-...9161.00
.....   86.70
•1,542.67
...| 110.00
17.00
 ..      11.20
14.20
Expenditure!—
Wages
Rent and Light  	
OIBee Supplies and Postage .
Tahkina Log Co.  Topaz Harbor
Lapan Log Co. Jackson Bay
Firs, Limited, or Rees & Black .Whonnock
Metalliferous Mines _... Silverton and Sandon
(Slocan District)
Nor. Construction Co.... All Camps on North Thompson
WALK-OUT
Hemmingsen's Camp Cowichan Lake
McLeod Timber Co..
LOCKOUT
..Gambier Island
DISCRIMINATING
Cargill Co. of Canada, Broughton Island, actively
discriminating against union men.
United Grain Growers  Hutton
KEEP AWAY
Kaslo District—AH piece work; bum timber.
Prince George District
Flxturei .nd OOo* Repilre ....-
Sundry Expeniei ———	
Bilmce, Aogut Silt	
♦308.80
. 100.00
11.15
10.88
16.05
4.44
47.28
WmnPEO DISTBIOT
Statement for Aof.it, 1920
1308.80
Receipt!—
Duel    ........_........... .-. • 114.00
Delegate'.  RemitUnca  .  1172.00
Lm Commluion ind Expeniei     20.40
Collection! for Sask. Minen _ -
Collection!  for  Soviet Med. Fund —.
Balance, July 81it —.— 	
Expenditure!—'
Wagei
151.00
184.50
19.28
1.60
Rent Md Light .
Offlce Suppliei and Foetige .
Rem. T. W. Oo. .._._	
Organliatton
Taylorton Minera  _..
O. L. O. par Capita Tu .
Sick Relief 	
Sundry Expeniei n......	
Balance, Auguit Slit .
1430.04
19.00
41.00
7.40
,      07.00
.      58.50
.    127.00
10.00
.      15.00
0.00
14.08
Reeeiptl—
Duel   	
Feci
0VBBVB1 DISTBIOT
8Ut.rn.nt fat Auguit. 1990
Delegate'. Bemlttanee	
Lhi ComaliiloB ud Expeniei .
•480.04
...» (54.00
28.00
  438.83
Button!, Literature and Carda  - - 80.80
Workera' Fund ....    13.60
Refund re Conv. Exp. . .  5.00
Balance, July  Slit    81.57
1057.80
Ixpendlturea—
Wlgei   ._ „ .__ __ 270.00
Rent (2 moi.), .nd Light .__... — 70.40
OBce Suppliei .nd Poitac _.:   28.29
Organlutlon    .  — 194.60
Sundry Expenm . ...... 84.85
Conrentlon Expeniei   , 97.85
Balance, Auguit 3111  —   268.81
1957.80
FBIHOB BVPB1T DISTBIOT
Statement Iw Auguit. 1920
Receipt!—
Due.   __._:   • 158.00
Feci   ;  6.00
Delegite'!  Remittance    9803,61
Lei. Commluion and Expeneei     18.00
  766.61
Refund!     ——   8.45
Button, ind Cirdl —.—.    6.00
1957.06
Expendituree—
Wlgei                       ■      „ 190.00
Rent   _._ „_ .  25.00
Offlce Suppliei .nd Poltag.   20.29
Organlutlon  —      28.80
Strike Expeniei  .  „~  140.20
O. L. O. per eapita —  80.00
Remitted to Headquarter. .„._  200.00
Sundry Expenau ..—_ — 6.05
Overdraft, July Slot  96.17
Bilince on hand, Auguit 21it  281.55
9957.00
KAMLOOPS DISTBIOT
Statement (or An<nit. 1920
Receipt.—
Dun     !.: S 851.00
Feei   „„  14.00
Delegate'e Remittance  9177.40
Leu Commluion and Expen.cs       7.25
I,            170.15
Refund!    30.50
Sorlet Madlcal Fund   5.00
Bnttona and Card.  _  2.75
File Driven' Aueu.   ~ — 1.50
Balance, July Slit  266.16
1630.00
Expenditure!—
Wlgei _ 219,12
Rent, Light and Phone  81.55
Offlee Suppliei and Poatag. ... ... . 43.10
Organization  —   86.40
Winnipeg Defenie Fund ....  — 16.00
Balance, Auguit Silt ....    - 484.89
1880.08
PBIKOE OEOBOE DISTRICT
Btatement for Auguit,. 1920
Reeeiptl—
Duei    _ S -202.00
Feei  — —.,             14.00
Delegite'! Remittance   9303.00
Leu Commluion and Expenau      18.35
  284.65
Collection! for Mlnen' Btrike . .-  118.00
Oollectione for  Local  Strike      85.00
M. 8. F. Cheque Paid it Bank  05.50
Btltlo.1, Card!, Literature, Ho, —  20.80
Balance, July Slat .
151.1
Expenditure!—
Wagea
Rent, Light and Phon.	
Office Suppliei and Poatage .
Remitted to Saak. Minera :—
Remitted to Headquartera —
Sundry Expeneei	
Baianee, Auguat Silt	
•966.41
. 160.00
40.80
9.10
, 118.00
.   950.00
1.70
.   S92.S1
Receipt!—
Due.   —.—
Feei
roil teaboes distbiot
Statement fu Auguit, 1910
Delegatee' remittancu  ...—
Refund for general convention expeniei .
Striko collection. ..-.......—	
Literature
Balance July SI .
•960.41
I   91.00
6.00
2.00
187.20
124.05
2.60
131.42
Expendituree—
Wi«ee	
Rent
Poetage . . :.-—..—
Literature and telegrama *
Remitted to headquartera .
Balance Auguat SI —
•493.17
. (180.00
20.00
11.00
21.90
.    100.00
.   (10.27
.   Reeeiptl—
Duei    —
Feei
XELSOa DISTBIOT
(Utem.nt for Auguit, 1920
•493.17
...• 149.00
T.OO
238.07
Leei commluion —
Bilance July 31 ,
Expendituree—
Wagea      -   *   h i ..in
Rent, light, heat and telephone ' ,   18.80
Poitage     „   „        4.00
Organlutlon
Striko exppnlee
(391.07
...'•    81.00
Baluce Anguet 81
12.75
57.50
220.02
Reeeiptl—
Duee    	
Feel
THE PAS DISTBIOT
Stitement for Auguit, 1920
Delegite.'   remittance!   ._...|189.05
Leu commluion and expeneei —......     8,50
• 994.07
62.00
12.00
Balance, July 81 .
Expendituree—
Wagee
188.45
8.85
7.00
73.44
Offlco euppilee and postage .
Light
ExpeMoa re new office .
Sundry expeneea .	
Balance Auguet 81 -
(364.74
. 8160.00
8.80
1.00
. 16.67
.65
.    177.42
• 364.74
Correspondence
PARLIAMENTARY  ACTION
Fellow Workem: What are you
going to do at the coming election?
Are you, wherever' possible, going
to vote for working class candidates, or are you going to use the
lazy man's excuse and say, "What's
the uie?" Remember what happened to the proposed eight-hour
day bill in the Provincial Legislature last spring. It would have
passed If there had been enough
working class members.
A few days ago I was talking to
a man who said, "I am getting too
old to do much in the labor movement; I have not got. many more
years to work anyway." But the
other day I was talking to a young
fellow and said, "If I were you
with about forty years work
stretching ahead of me, I would be
woilcing day and ntgfft to get the
hours of labor shortened," and he
replied, "Oh, I would Join the O.
B. U. If I thought It would do any
good."
The working man who stays
away from the poll when he hus a
chance to vote for a candidate selected by the working class movement. Is In the same position as
the boy who wonld not join a
labor union because he said lt
would not do any good.
Elect working class candidates:
they will not pull off the social
revolution over night, but they can
greatly Improve thc conditions under which you make your living.
F. KNOWLES.
The master class say lf we don't
produce more the community will
starve. The trouble is we are facing an enormous world loss. How
great that toss Is no one knows. The
world ls like a merchant whose
books have been burnt with his
warehouse. Now, fellow citizens,
the lumber barons are shutting
down their mills and camps and
they are putting you on the tramp.
A good many of you have been
overseas and seen vast destruction
of human life and property there.
You thought you were fiprMing for
democracy instead of which it was
for the beneflt of the muster class.
Look around and with the shutdown of the camps nnd mills, see
how many of you have sufficient
fundB to keep you even over winter. For Ave years scores of millions vote drawn from useful production. To assist in the work of
destruction we not only lost a great
part' of the world's normal production, but also destroyed billions of
dollars worth of prior production,
in cities and towns wrecked,, coal
mines flooded, oil wells flred, ralh
ways and canals ruined, ships and
cargoes sent to the bottom. It Is
true, money has multiplied, it has
not been destroyed, but money ls
not wealth.    Production alone   is
MEMBERS    MAIL    AT    HEADQUARTERS.
Allison, Sam, Aldridge, Arthur
E., Atchison, R. S., Anderson,
Charles and Carl, Aben, C, Adamson, James,
Brooks, Mrs. J„ Baker, C. E.,
Blanchard, Ed, Bouschor, H. A„
Benedict, W., Bergford, C, Beck,
H. L„ Berg, Gust, Bradshaw, H.,
Boskko, J., Bogos, Joseph.
Conley, B. F., Courtney, A. G.,
Charlton, J„ Craig, Robert John,
Chychota, D., Corfleld, C, Cud-
more, Lome, Carlson, Gus A.,
Cairns, G., Campbell, Daniel R.
Donovan, Pat, Daniel, John F.,
Davids, J. M., Dalllng, Wm., Del-
ourioux, Frank, Dawd, Jim, David.
son, J. R., Demo, George, Denny,
Geoffrey, Dekowski  (papers).
Evans, W. R.
Foulds, Jack, Fielding, C. E.,
Fraser, C, Fallas, Carl, Foran,
James A., Fleckuk, J. G.
. Gustatson, Otto, Carbutt, Wm.,
Glllls, Sam, Gil), Levi J„ Gordon,
W. S., Gavin, J., Sf., Gus, EUck,
Green, C. E. and E. M., Ganter,
Dan, Glgleo, Ernesto.
Haster, George, Hayward, W.,
Hatton, A. W„ Hryn, F., Hodge, A.
S., Helseth, A.
Johnson, Wilfred annd A. H.,
Johnson, J. M., Jopp, Emil, Jones,
C. .R., Joursen, A., Jorburn, Howard, Jusslllune, J.
Karitsky, M. (parcel), Kennedy,
Andy and W., Karl, Oscar, "Kemp,
B., King, Rod, Kock, A., Kandruk,
B., Klevsk, M. A. (parcel), Ken-
drlck, Marshall.
Lcvine, J., Lindberg, J., Leclalr,
Pete, Low, Gordon, Lockwood, F.
8., Lundln, Oscar, Lawrence, Gene,
Lade, J. B.
Mattock, Charles V., Manchln,
Wm., Mills, Mora, Alfred, Madsen, Carl F„ Miller, Alex and C. L„
Matheson, Murdock, Mack, George,
Makl, J-, Mantle, Hugh, Martin, J.,
Mulr, K.  (parcel).
McMillan, Malcolm, McPhall, O.
W„ McCarthy, Austin, McDonald,
J. J., McBroom, George, McRury,
A., MeDougall, J. A., Mclntomlney,
John, McKnlght, H. H.
Noonan, Patrick (regis), Nyk-
vlre, Oskar, Nysberg, N., Newman,
Clyde.
O'Donnel), Wm., O'Keefe, John,
Orman, J„ Olson, E. H.
Petrowtz (parcel), Parks, W. H.,
Provincial, Steve, Parker, Harry
R., Pakyula, Arthur, Peterson,
Charles, Polvel, M„ Pros, M., Plaub,
W., Pennler, George J., Patterson,
John, Pembroke, Dan, Potter, W.
Roberts R.( Runje, Jack, Ridley,
Harold, RoBseau, A., Rennie, Alex.
. Simpson, Bert, Smoll, John, Saw-
chuk, M., SJursen, Kour, Singleton, Herbert, Steoslndln, Walter,
Senum, Ole T„ Smith, C. L., Born,
Robert, Simpson, James, Springer,
ThomaB, Springer, George (parcel), Smith, Albert G., Smith,
James, Sewell, W. H., Stark, J. M.,
Stcpanowskl, J., Stf-venson, Chas.
M.
Thompson, George W., Tremb-
ley, Eugene, Telgan, N. C, Taylor,
Wm. and parcel, Thompson, James,
Thornton, Joseph.
Vermursch, Camlel, Van Meato,
Mrs. A.
White, A. G„ Wundcrle, C, Went,
Isaac, Williams, Gilbert G., White,
Geor'ge, Wilson, P. G., Wilson,
James, Wlntrlp, Jack, Wells, Oeo.
Tandt, Elmer, Yeomans, Henry,
Zokoskl, Jos., Zoney, James E.
Registered Mali.
Blomgren, H., Carson, Gerald,
Collin. Gust, Davis, Wm., Gron-
seth, Nels, Hutchinson, T., Noonan,
Patrick, Seller, Karl, Sharpe, A. J.,
Watts, Hubert, WlUoughby, E.
wealth. All the world's money win
not buy any more than what le pro*
duced. Money Is only good ae a
medium of exchange; it ls useleae
as a producer. In our anxiety to
get a share of what is produced we
may offer a higher price in money,
If we have it, and we can watch
our money shrink ae the cost of
living rises. Your savings account..
If you have any, your Income alao Is
worth only half of what It wae ten
years ago. If there was no produc- '
tion these would be worth nothing.
In fact, they would not exist. You
alone are the producers, Cut when
the master' claae do not get their
proflt from the article that yon •
have produced, they simply shut
down the mills, camps, mines and
factories, because you have pro- ■
duced by your skill and labor power
a surplus of goods greater than the
market can immediately, consume.
The master class le organized into
One Big Union. So what Is tho ■
matter with the working class having an organization of the aame
kind, and by taking over the control of the tools of industry in some
legitimate way we will then get -
what we produce, Instead' of the
mere pittance which Is now given
to ub. The things we need are plentiful, the clothing, fuel and food,
and our ability to produce more Is .
unlimited. To create an artificial
demand by causing a scarcity'
through restriction of production. Is
the work of the master class. -They
love money; lt is their God. But
they do not love hard work; they
think it Is beneath them. They
reason among themselves that as
long as they get the proceeds and
you do the work, you are satisfied.
They are burning the world's candle at both ends. They tell you
that there Is work for all, but you
do not understand their meaning.
They mean that If you are not organized against them, and you are
a meek and humble wage Blave,
they will employ you, Vut they do
not state they will share the proflt
of your labor with you. They have
their skin game up their sleeve and
tell you not to organize; that they
are with you till the bitter end.
They mean they would be the gen- -
eral executive board of such an organization, and have full dictatorship, and that you be only the dues-
paying members of the rank and
flle. ' Let this soak In about your
shoulders. Even more serious than.
the demand for proflt, ls the restriction of production. The boss
figures that If you can be speeded
up, the number of wage slaves can
be reduced, thereby Increasing the
boss' bank roll. He tells you to
economize; also, that every .good
citizen must live simply and work
hard. You must eat less, and not
buy so many clothes, burn less
fuel, dispense with what simple luxuries you may obtain, until the supply exceeds the demand, and food,
fuel, clothes are plentiful, and then
he will reduce the cost of living.
In the sweat of your brows we must
get along on a mere pittance till the
world's Iobs be wiped out by our
toil. But say, fellow workers, how
many of these plutes who want to
Instruct you, do an honest day'a
labor? Not many,.even when they
are living on the best that nature
and labor produce. They have automobiles to ride In, while you
walk; they have the best sleeping
quarters, while they give you an old
board bunk with a donkey's breakfast to llo on, and you pack your
own bed. You wear dungaree's
while he wears broadcloth. Npw,
working men, unite, and don't take
whnt he wants to give you. If you
are m,t organized, and don't mako
any ieslntance to his greed, you
will never get out ot the rut you
ate In, Don't contract, or work
under a bonus system, or piece
work of any kind, because when
you do you are over producing,
thereby scabbing on your fellow
workers. Working men, join tho
union of your class, and show the
solidarity of labor. Workers, unite!
JOHN RYAN.
ORGANIZE!
If there is not an O. B. U. member on your job, write to the nearest district offlce, or the headquarters of the Lumber, Camp and
Agricultural Workers'' Department
of the O. B. U. at 61 Cordova Street
West; Vancouver, B, C, where you
wtll receive full Information and
assistance. Entrance fee $1.00;
monthly dues, $1.00; free transfer
If you carry a union card. Each
member is entitled to an O. B. U.
paper. If there Is a delegate on
the job a bundle of working class
papers and general literature is sent
weekly, or at frequent Intervals.
The aim of the organization Is to
educate as well as organize. Tho
O. B. U. card Is good on any job,
and you can transfer from one unit
to another, or from one Industry
to another, from one place lo another, without any transfer or rejoining fee. You hnve the direct
backing of every man on your particular Job. If necessary, In any
dispute with the employor, you.
have tho backing of all workers In
the samo Industry, and.'should occasion demand, al) workers in all
Industries act together to protect
their, mutual Interests. You help
them and they help you- Tho local
unit has co.nplete autonomy In
ktal affairs. The rank and file of
the membership control tho orii-tn-
Ization and th? officials. No rtrlke
can be called on or off except by
the men themselves who are directly c'oncei nod.
Seattle, Wash.—Elmer Smith,
whu was jailed nearly 12 months
ago on a charge of murder as a
result of the Centralla Armistice
Day conspiracy, and waB acquitted
In tho trial at Montasano, led the
Farmer-Labor ticket by 200 votes
for prosecuting attorney of Lewis
county, but lost to the Republican
candidate by 1&00 votes. Smith's
opponent ran behlrAl on the Republican ticket about 400 votes.
(By the Federated Press)
Seattle.—The superior court hai
granted a restraining order' against
the locul chief of police and tho
Senttle pallco department enjoining them from Interfering with tho
publication and circulation of tho
Industrinl Workers, organ of the
I. W. W. Suit was brought by H.
S. Kane, former editor, when tho
police department put a padlock on
the plant where the Industrial
Worker was printed.
Where Ib your Union button! *AGE POUR
"twelfth tear. no. 47   THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST Vancouver, b. c.
FRIDAY Novep'ber   19, l,_,
THE B. C, FEDERATIONIST
Publishod every Friday morning by Tbe B. 0.
FederationiBt, Limited
IA. & WELLS„
..Manager
iOHlce:   Room 1, Victoria Block, 342 Pender
Street West
I Telephone Seymour 5871
Bubscribtion Bate.: United Btate. and Foreign,
, 13.00 pur year; Canada. 12.50 per year, 11.50
I for six months; to Union, subscribing ln a
.   body, 16c per member per month.
Unity of Labor: The Hop. of tl. World
..November 19, 1920
THB DEAB PEOPLE are being much
thought of these days. The-working elass is also being paid a little attention, and when the rival candidates of
the old political parties have time to
spare from pointing out
THE ISSUE the other side's faults,
IN THE many promises are be-
ELE0TIONS ing made as to what
will be done for the
people if thc party which the speaker
represents, is only returned to power.
There is an old saying to tbe effect that
when thieves fall out, honest men get
their flue, and so far as this election is
concerned, we are willing to accept the
statements of each of the rival party
leaders about the other fellow, to which
we could add a littlo ourselves, if the
occasion arises, but as what they think
about one another is none of the working
class business, we will confine what we
have to say to the issue in the election
from a working class standpoint.
"..'* * a.
Nothing that we have seen would lead
m to believe that either of the old parties have1 anything to offer that will be
of beneflt to the working class. The Independents also eome under this category. ^They remind us of that portion
of the population commonly referred to
as the middle class; in other words, they
are a misfit, being neither one thing or
another. This being so, the question for
the workers to decide is, who to vote
for. The Socialist will have little difficulty in making hia choice. The trade
unionist,, who is not a Socialist, will be
distracted, and unable to make up his
mind amongst the barrage of verbiage
that is being let loose throughout the
Province, and it is to that type of workers that we desire to address ourselves.
The issue between the old political parties is not a working class issue. It
never was the business of the workers
to side with either section of the ruling
class, although they have done it for
centuries. The only issue that is of moment to the workers is a class issue—in
spite of Premier Meighen and other politician's protests. The great need of the
moment in working class interests, is education. This can only be carried out
by men who understand the working
class position. The future is fraught
with great possibilities, and at the same
time danger from action on the part of
the working class without an understanding of the forces that are operating in society. The trend of events in
Europemust be understood by the workers in this country. It is also necessary
that the position Canada holds in the
world situation should be understood, so
that mistaken action will not be taken
to the detriment of the working class
movement. While it may be said that
conditions will decide just what the
workers will do at any given time, it
must be understood that the conditions
referred to, also include the understanding of the working class, and the knowledge the membera of that class have of
the position they occupy in society, and
the trend of events throughout the world
and the relationship, and relative positions of the working class in different
countries. Knowledge is power, and an
understanding of the enemy's position
is at ill times of vital.importance.
* » ♦
1 The eleeting of men to parliament who
understand the working class position,
will not, however, bring thc milleneum.
It will not bring the present system to
an end. But it will give the working
class that which is needed, and that is a
means of spreading the working class
philosophy. Particularly in this country is education needed. For as wc have
Stated on previous occasions, the workers of this eountry can only tag along
behind the older countries of the world,
and that being the case, rash and precipitate action on the part of the workers
{would only spell disaster and unneeded
.suffering and persecution. The spreading of real knowledge and information
amongst the workers will prevent any
false moves, and that is the issue for the
workers in this election. The working
class, if alive to its interests, will endeavor to have those working class representatives who understand the position of
the workers elected. By this means the
work of education can be carried on.
The elected representatives of the working class will, by virtue of their position
as members of the Legislature, be able
to devote time and energy to the greatest work that they can undertake, and
that is to bring the information and
knowledge they have to the slaves in all
places. A igpte for a working class representative that understands his position,
is a vote for education for the workers,
if the working class in this Province understands this, we have no fear as to
ptrho they will vote for. This and this
alone is the issue in this election for the
iWorkers to bother their heads about;
,what the other fellows say is none of
their concern. They will, if elected, do
as they always have done, and that is
■attend to the business of the class they
represent, and the working class repre-
■•entatives will attend to their class interests.    That is all there is to it.
JUDGING FROM PRESS dispatches,
it would appear that the last white
hope of the anti-Bolsheviki forces has
got a similar drubbing to those given
Kolchak, Denikin, Yudenitch and others
that have appeared on
ANOTHER the scene as saviours of
WHITE the old system in Rus-
HOPE GONE     sia.   If all reports are
true, and we have
every reason to believe that they are,
then General Wrangel is no longer a
factor in the game that France joined
in to bring about the downfall of the
Soviet regime. It may be perfectly
true that Lenin has not followed the
route that some of the intellectuals have
mapped out for him, he, however, at
least, has with his colleagues and the
backing of the proletariat, given a demonstration of working class solidarity
that stands without equal in thc world's
history. His methods may not be usod
in auy other country, but that will be
because conditions will be different, and
the people of a different psychology, but
the fact remains, that in spite of all opposition, the Soviets still control Russia,
• »•'■»
With the removal of Wrangel's opposition, Russia will now be able to turn
its attention to the. providing of the
necessities of life for the people. Not
bacause of the faults of the new order,
but because of the necessity of fighting
to save the revolution, have the conditions been bad. Fighting against active
opposition, and tortured by the blockade
and the underhand efforts of the capitalistic nations for three years, naturally the needs of the people have been
largely neglected. The safeguarding of
the new order was the first' and paramount duty of the Soviet regime. That
accomplished, and if no further efforts
are made to destroy the Soviet government, the good work that has already
been accomplished will be augmented.
In' spite of the difficulties encountered,
much has been done to care for the
children and the mothers of the nation.
The efforts of British Labor has had
much to do with the stopping of active
opposition to Soviet Russia by the British government, and if the same force is
now given to the demand for the opening of trade relations between Great
Britain and Russia, another anniversary
of the revolution may see the Soviet
government in such a position as to demonstrate without any shadow of a
doubt, the beneficial features of tbe new
order, even although compromise is still
made with capitalism. No new order in
society was ever established over night,
and the co-operative commonwealth will
not be of mushroom growth. Soviet
Russia is only just entering on the road
to working class emancipation. The rest
of the capitalistic countries have still to
take the first step, and the lessons to be
learnt from Russia's troubles should be
of service to the proletarian movement,
and if that is done, the suffering of our
Russian comrades will not have been in
vain. Possibly those that wondered at
the Soviet government's action in making concession of 400,000 miles of territory to American capitalists, will now
see in the changed attitude of the British
press towards trading with Soviet Russia, the value of the move that was made.
For while the United States government
has not recognized Soviet Russia, yet the
powers behind the scenes have recognized the chance to make a little. This
will have a decided effect on British and
French policies towards Soviet Russia.
RETURNED SOLDIER problems have
been very prominent during the
past year or two, and while it has been
pointed out time and time again that
their problems are the same as all other
working class problems,
THE and   inseparable   from
RETURNED       the only working class
SOLDIER question, which is the
elimination  of  human
slavery under the cloak of the wage system, the returned men have not been
able to see it    Numbers have thought
it possible to change their conditions by
forming organizations on the lines of the
different returned soldier organizations,
that are becoming bo numerous that it
is hardly possible to keep track of them,
and the returned soldier problems are
no nearer solution than they were when
they flrst organized, and from every indication, the coming period of hard times
will only accentuate them, and increase
the difficulties that they have to face.
Experience is the only teacher, and the
experience that the returned men have
had, has taught .a few that their problems are working class problems, and so
interlocked with the questions that all
wage workers are faced with, that they
have realized that their place is in the
the ranks of working class organizations,
which tend tp bring the members of the
working  class together.    If,  however,
there are any doubts left as to where
the returned soldiers' interests are, they
are fully outlined in a dispatch from
Ottawa, which  appeared in the  local
press of Wednesday's ijsue, dealing with
the measures that may be taken to cope
with the unemployed problems, during
the coming winter.   The following is the
salient part of the dispatch referred to;
"Whatever Federal methods are
devised during the coming winter
months to cope with the unemployment situation, whioh threatens to
be acute in the urban centres, they
will bc adopted without particular
regard   for   the   returned   soldier.
Apart  from  the  care  of seriously
disabled men, which will be  continued   under   the   department   of
Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment for
some time yet, the returned soldier
in future will have to fend for himself, and is looked upon as having
been absorbed into the civilian class.
Any means which are devised by the
Federal authorities to deal with the
unemployment situation as a whole
and without distinction.". ff--
-t
When the troops returned from France
and Flanders, and returned to civililn
life, they found that they were compelled to become either wage earners, or
earn their living by fruit or some other
kind of farming. They have met with
unemployment and loss in farming projects. They have had all the evils of
the wage system to face, just as their
fellow workers, and they themselves wet
prior to the war and their going overseas. Many things were promised by
politicians and other "defenders" of the
Empire from the comfortable advanced
position of an arm chair, but none of
them have been fulfilled, and the Iot of
the men who did thcir bit has been only
similar, and possibly worse, than it was
before they went overseas. It will become worse as time goes on, and the unemployed situation becomes more acute.
We have no pleasure in stating this, but
it is the truth and must be told. Thc
returned men and others that have illusions about prosperity for workers under
the present system, must be made to
realize that under the present system,
that there can be no relief. That wage
slavery stands for the conditions that
now prevail, and will prevail as long as
the system lasts. If the attitude of the
Federal authorities, as stated in the dispatch will bring to-the returned men the
knowledge that they are members of the
working class, and in spite of their work
overseas, that the government and the
ruling class of this country cannot see
any difference between them and the ordinary wage slave, then it wiU be easier
for the working class to get* together
with a common object, and that, the
freeing of the human race frsm wage
slavery.
The opening day of the drive for
funds for McGill University, over a million and a quarter dollars were subscribed. A local paper gave the following list of principal subscribers: *
The principal subscriptions of the
day were: E. W. Beatty, $25,000;
Hon. John S. McLennan, $10,000;
Royal Trust Co., $10,000; Hon. Lord
Shaughnessy, $10,000; Dr. George E.
Armstrong, $5000; Sir Thomas and
Lady Roddick, $50,000; Hillcrest Con
lieries, $5000; Dr. W. W. Ghipmanj
$5000; Dr. F.-G. Finley, $5000; R. B,
Angus, $100,000; Lieut.-Col. Herbert
Molson and F. W. Molson, $100,000;
Lord Atholstone, $100,000; J. W. Mc*
Connells, $100,000; Dominion Textile
Co., Limited, $100,000; Sir Herbert,
Holt, $100,000; Francis McLennan andj
the -Misses McLennan, $75,000; MeDougall & Cowans, $50,000; Green-
shields, Limited, $25)000; A. J. Brown
K. C, $25,000; The Gazette Printingl
Co., $25,000; Pcnmans, Limited, $25,-:
000; Montreal Cotton Co., $25,000; Fj
Howard Wilson, $25,000; J. N. Green-'
shields, K. C, J. Gordon Grecnshields,
and Charles G. Greenshields, $25,000;
Sir Charles B. Gordon, $25,000; Chas.
R. Hosmer, $25,000; Eugene Lafleur,
K. C, $10,000; C. E. Neill, $10,000; E.
L. Pease, $10,000; Montreal Trust Co.,
$10,000; Steel Co. of Canada, $10,000;
J. C. Wilson, Limited, $10,000; National Drug & Chemical Co., $10,000;
Hugh Paton, $10,000; George Montgomery, K. O, $5000; Dr. Charles F.
Martin, $5000,
* We do not expect our readers to emulate the example shown above, but suggest that there is a deal of food for
thought to be found in the list.
The way the old political parties have
"adopted" returned officers as official
candidates, would indicate that there is
some idea that the returned rank and file
can still be camouflaged into voting for
this type of candidate, on the assumption
that they will look after their interests,
That all of the returned men are not
fooled is evidenced by the fact that they
have placed their own candidates in the
field; the next step will be taken when
they join with the working class political party.
, No, we have not forgotten our
"friend" Gideon Robertson. We still
have a remembrance of his activities, and
wonder how many wage slaves will vote
the old party ticket after they think of
Bill Pritchard and Bob Russell languishing in jail. Think of Robertson, you
working men, and then vote for more
of the same treatment for workers. who
have brains and courage enough to voice
their objections to tho present system of
wage slavery. [hi.
Where there is a choice of workinti
class candidates, the workers shoiiw
make their selection after deciding wh el
candidate is the best fitted by knowlct ft;
and ability, to present the case of ne.
working class, not in the House, but 1&;
carrying on working olass propagannal,
based on the Marxian theory of valgej,
the materialistic conception of hist
and tho class struggle.
We wonder what has happened to S
Gompers' reward your friends and styp.
your enemies policy. Sam backed the
Democrats, but the workers do not seem
to have heeded his advice, and the Democrats lost. If they had not have had
Sam's Bupport, we suppose that there
would have been no Democratic vote at
all. As a deliverer of the common stiff,
Sam is a back number.
There is no credit coming to either of
the old parties for thc Workmen's Compensation Act. It was only after it had
been demonstrated by the representatives
of the workers that it would be cheaper
for the employing class than the old
system; that either party would look
at it.
Working Men and Women.
The modern era of machine industry was preeed.d by th. .ra of
handicraft industry, under which,
the mean, of production were on
a small scale and comparatively
Inexpensive, The general rule was
that th. craftsman owned both
the tool, and the produce of his
labor. Both th. craftsman and
the petty trad.r tf th* period organized . th.lr activities on the
principle of work for a livelihood.
But as time went on larger holding, of property cam. to the employed, both in industry and trade,
and Investment for pr'oAt began
to be the ruling principle in the
new economio. system. The processes of Industry grew more extensive and roundabout, division of
Labor Increased, and the acale of
organization grew larger. The
competition of theso new pr'ooesses
of production made lt impossible
for the handicraftsman with his
simple toola and Individual efforts
to make a lvlng. Ke could not
produce cheap enough, and by
force of the new forcos of production had to become a wage worker,
and with other, like himself, be
organized in large bodies under the
direction of the wealthier masters.
At this point in history, whon the
world market and lnvostment for
profit dominate industry, the
craftsmen are now fully under the
control of business men. It can be
seen that the ruling cause of this
change ln the relations between the
craftsmen on the one hand, and the
trader, and master-employers on
other hand, was the increasing
magnitude 0f tlte material means
necessary to the pur'suit of Industry.
Thereby we have, beside the ancient form of land monopolization, a
new form fastened on society
through the monopolization of industrial plant, and of the apparatus of trade by business men and
investor, -for, whose proflt industry
and trades ls carried on.
It is when this state of affairs
arrives that a science of economics
become, necessary, as much in the
intereat of the wage worker as in
that of the business man. Economics is the science that deals with
the laws governing the production
and distributon of weatlh Economic laws determine what wages
shall be and the price of commodities. They determine the unequal
distribution of wealth; and their
working out brings good times or
bad times, brings wars that reduce
modern civilization to the level of
a rat pit.
The organized labor movement in
Great Britain has long realized the
benefits to that movement of a
study of history and economics for
its members, and for many years
has supported Labor colleges from
which the students go throughout
the country to oranize and teach in
classes. It is somewhat of a reproach on the oranized Labor
movement ln Canada that it has
neglected  to  follow tho   example.
However, the Socialist Party of
Canada Is doing its best to fill the
breaoh. All over Canada educational classes are being held, and
all they need Is the attendance of
working men and women. Read
the ad. of Local Vancouver No. 1,
8. P, ot C„ on these classes In
The Federatlonist. fn addition to
the history and economlo classes
already ruiming( a new class for
beginner. In economic, wtll me}',
at 3 p.tn on th. flnt Sunday ln
December, at 401 Pender street
east.
Com. and bring your friend..
Put a one-cent Ramp on  thl.
paper and mall It to a friend.
PANTAGES
Next Wwk
"SWEET SWEETIES'*
A Merr'y Musical Farce
Othw Big Fattawi
EMPRESS
Fbea. Seymour Mlt
NEXT WEEK
A Romance of Old California
"THE ROSE OF
THE RANCHO"
Featuring
EDVTHE ELLIOTT
.    "FELLOW-WORKER"
O. J. Mengel
Write, nil classes of Insurance.
Representing only flrat-claas
Board companies. If insurance
Is wanted, writ, or phone Sey.
5626.
ORlce   address,   308-9   Winch
BuUding, Vancouver, B. 0.
Labor and Socialist
Literature
IN ALL LANGUAGES
can be obtained at
THE INTERNATIONAL
BOOK SHOP
Corner Hastings and Columbia
Mall Orders   Promptly
Attended to
ECONOMIC AND
HISTORY CLASSES
S, P. OF 0., 401 FENDER 8T. E.
Economic class every Sunday afternoon, commencing at
3 o'clock.
History class every Thursday evening, commencing at
8 o'clock.
'An Elementary Economic Class for beginners will commence the flrst Sunday in December (the 5th), at 3 p.m.
These classes are of paramount interest and necessity to
the working class, and are conducted and assisted by
thoroughly competent instructors^-
ALL WELCOME NO CHARGES
Is Your Vote in NORTH VANCOUVER?
Then Make Sure of Real Representation at
Victoria in the Next Government
By Voting
V. V. Vinson
(Conservative)
Independents are
Useless Ornaments
V
OTE
INSON
"EVERY T STANDS FOB^VICTOEY"
J
DO YOU WANT
A NEW HAT?
NOW IS YOUR CHANCE
I have bought 200 travellers' Sample Hats at
half price, only one of a kind. The regular retail
price is $5.00, $6.00 and $7.00 each.    ;
FOR QUICK SALE
$3.50
w-Bbrummttt
18 asd 20 Cordora Street Wert
Worth Remembering About
ALLAN'S
DIAMONDS
We buy only Firat Water
Diamonds. Each stone it
carefully chosen by our own
Diamond experts, and it
must grade up to the Allan
standard.
The standard has been set high and it takes a
first-water stone to reach it.
Diamonds in the "loose" (unset) form or exquift-
itely fashioned in artistic jewelry designs.
The Hoom ot Diamond.
480.486 Granville Stnet
At Corner Fender
DENTAL PLATES
Excellent quality, perfect
fitting, correct articulation, pleasing appearance,
skilled attention, features
of dentistry at
Dr. Gordon CampbeD
Dental Art Tat'lors
805 GranvUle Street
Open evening! between 8 and 9
o'clock.
Oor. Bobson, Onr Owl Dntf Stow
Phone Seymonr S2S8
Stanley Steam
Taxi Co.
HENRY DAHL, Prop.
(Old time Lumberjack)
Prompt Service Fine Can
334 Abbott St.     Vanconver
Phone Sey. 8877.8818
Our Selling System
Quality in Fabrics
Style Correct
Price the lowest possible consistent with
value..
Two Stores
Society Brand
Clothes
Rogers Building
Fit-Reform
Clothing
345 Hastings Street
Burberry Coats
at both  stores
J. W. Foster
ORPHEUM
theatreIH
THE HOBO! OF OOOD
VAUDEVILLE
Matinee  3:80
Evenings  8:20
Ring up Phone Seymonr 3354
for appointment
Dr. W. J. Curry
DENTIST
Suite 801 Dominion Building
VANCOUVER, B. C.
TABQUCT
odbffcSooK
oaa
Get the
Love Habitf
Buy FURNITURE, STOVES,
BEDS, Etc., at cost. Our stook
la Big ,and so ar* our Bargains. Watch our Auction
Snaps. Furniture Bought and
Sold.
Love & Co.
AUCTIONEERS— DEALERS
Phone Seymonr 3745
570  SElMOl'It STREET
UNION MAN I
In that dark hour, when sympathy and beat wrvice count to
much—call up'
MOUNT PLEASANT
UNDERTAKING CO.
233 KINGSWAT, VANCOUVER
Phone Fairmont 58
Prompt Ambulance Service
Ottlee Been:   10 to 12 a.m., 9 to 5
p.m.   Evenings: 7 to fl p.n. Mob*
day, Wednesday and Friday.
Phona Say. 6a7«.
Dr. Willard Coates
Chiropractor aal Bragleai Physician
(Successor to Dr. John Oray)
30*91-32 P. Burni Bldf., It Baiting!
St., W., Vancouver, B. O.
(Between Pantagea Theatre and B. U.
E. R. Btauoa,
Phone Sey. 391     Day or Night
NUNN ANI> THOMSON
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
531 Homer St. Vanconver, B. C.
FIRST CHURCH OF
CHRIST SCIENTIST
ma Otalgia stnet
Sunday lervttet, 11 am. and 7.10 pm
Sunday    sohool    immediately    following
morning lerviea.   Wedneaday teatimonlti
Kiiia BU.pm»»r- ____ "°*
HARRON BROS,
Funeral Directors
and Embalmers
Funerals of Dignity at Fair
Priees
Falrvlew: Offlee and Chapel,
1198 OranviUe Stmt
Phon. Bay 3200.
North Vancouver: Offlc. and
Chapal, 128 Sixth St. W.
Phone N. V. 1S4.
Mount Pleasant:   Office aad
Chapel, 2128 Main St
Phone Fairmont 69.
O. HOLDEN CIGAR STAND
IS Hastlnga St _
O. B. V. OABD
Patnnlsa Than Whs Patronise Tsat
OENTBAL'S   BITOBTS    ABB
APPBEOIATEB
Tha telephone busineu ll now feel*
ing the effect ot tha atoppaga ef la*
duatry during tha war. Equipment haa
bean hard to gat, with tha reeult that
all ovor the oonntry applications for
telephones cannot ba filled. Ia Brit*
leh Columbia, however, thero la prat*
tlcally no waiting Hit. Tha girl al
Central ia doing her very beat to holp
oat in a difficult situation, and that
her effort! are appreciated la ahowa
by tho thoughtful consideration
whieh is being accorded her.
BBITISH  OOLDMIBA TELBPHOSB
COMPACT
M.F. EBY,B.A.,M.E.
BXPBBT PHYSIOTHERAPIST
Swedish Massage, Radiant Heat sad
Electrical Treatment! ot all kinds.
Phons Bay 87T0L.  Hoars fl te S -.At
Evenings.
999 BROADWAY WBST (Oor. Oak)
Tiki BaH lias Car
Don't Be a Drudge!
La Salle Extension University
(Home Study) offers yon the
chnnce you need for complete
training in Traffic Management,
Higher Accountancy, Salesmanship and other Special courses
that mean Higher Salaries.
Either sex. Any age. Convenient terms. Write or call for literature. District office:
701 STANDARD BANK BLDG.
Pbone Sey. 1709 FRIDAY November 1», 1920
TWELFTH TEAR.    No. 4T
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
. VANCOUVBfc B. c.
No  Extravagent
Statements Here
Paris gives you this chance to buy a better grade
of footwear at similar prices to what inferior
makes are selling for.
Surgical Footwear
Are Yonr feet
Bothering Ton?
If they are, I -wish that it
were possible to make you
come to see me, as I know
that I can give you relief.
Come in and find out what
I have to say, anyway.
Repairing
I have a large staff to serve
you, because I find that it
tfays to have experts on each
kind of work. A poor
workman spoils your shoes.
A good one makes them look'
like new.
We Hake Any atyle Shoe
to Tour Measure
ttO Men'. Boots for work
and dress, Begular fit
values—
$6.95
Regular to $6.00—200
pair, of Children's Shoes,
from 11-2,. at, pair—
$3.95
Regular to $(.00—100
pairs ot Boys' Boots: 1 to
6. 1-2, at, pair—
$4.40
Regular $9,00—110 pairs
of Women'. Pat.nt aad
Kid Oxfords, at, pair—
$5.95
About 90 pairs of Brown
Calf and Kid Oxfords;
regular $10.00, at, pair—
$6.95
SKATES SHARPENED WHILE YOU WAIT
P.Paris
51
Hastings
West
VOTE  FOR
JOSEPH MARTIN
INDEPENDENT CANDIDATE
Headquarters:
116 Bank of Nova Scotia Building       Phone Sey. 2275
F.L.P. NOTES.
Nakusp in tin Campaign.
F. L. P. delegates trom Sllvar-
ton, Sandon and Nakusp met In th.
latter city on Novermber S to tak.
up the subject of putting up a a
dldate for that constituency. Inconvenient boat service on th. Ar*
row Lakes prevented delegates at*
tending.from those points, but the
convontion wai assured of their
hearty support. After careful eon*
sideration th. convention decided
to nominate A Harvey Smith to
contest the riding. Inasmuoh as
th. riding comprised a great fanning oommunlty the question of call*
Ing the candidate a Farmer-Labor
candidate was discussed, but as the
oonvention bad no authority for
thl. the matter waa left ln abayence
and the following resolution adopt,
•d:
Resolved, That, In th. opinion
of this convontion, th. thn. ls rip.
for th. farmera and labor to lln.
up together, and, to this end, Invited the co-operation of the farm-
era of the riding.
A dlstriot committee was appointed, and Nakusp named as the
headquarters, and the following officers named: F. Ilsen, chairman;
H. M. Mutch, vice-chairman, and
J. W. Bailey secretary.
South Vancouver Campaign,
The campaign on behalf of Harry
Neelands, F. L. P. candidato for
South Vancouver ls progressing
with such rapidity that ther. ls ne
doubt of the outcome. The campaign committee and volunteer
workers ara busy every day arranging meetinga and distributing the
campaign literature. The committee has opened headquarters at
the corner of Thirty-second and
Main street; and this will be open
every evening duflng the campaign. The first big meeting of the
oampalgn waa held ln tho Teoum-
seh school last Monday, and was a
great big rousing success. Other
meetings have been held ln the
Fraser hall, Gllmore Hall, Burnaby; McBrido school, South Vancouver, and Moreton Hall, Edmonds, ahd all were well attended
and encour'aglng. During the next
week meetings will be held In the
Nelson sohool, Burnaby, November 19; Broadview Hall, Burnaby,
November 22; Carleton Hall, Joyce
Road, November 25, and Fraaer
Hall, Fraaer street, November 27.
Junior League Annual Elections.
Tonight (Friday) the members
of the Junior Labor Leaguo will
meet at 929 Eleventh avenue Sast
for a social evening. Th. olass ln
Industrial history will meet aa
i.sual at 7:80 p. m* Next Friday
the annual eletclon of officers will
take place at the F. L. P. Hall, 148
Cordova street west. Ballots will
be distributed tonight and any time
during the week to memberi on
application to the secretary, but
counting will take place at 7:80
p. m. prompt next Friday; ^There
will be no meeting of the Industrial
HfBtory class next week. Members
are particularly requested to be
present at the counting of ballots.
The meeting will adjourn when
oountlng is completed.
Fernle Campaign
The Fernie campaign, with T.
Uphill aa F. L. P. candidate, is going fast and furious. Last Monday
the Conservatives threw open their
Fer'nie platform to tha Liberal and
F. L. P. candidates. T. Uphill was
ln another part of the dlstriot, so
Sergeant Bray   oi'   Winnipeg was
F. h. V. Meetings to be Held in
Various Parts of the City ,
Next Few Says
Th. Vanoouver City campaign of
the Federated Labor Party ha.
.very Indication that a surprise
vote will be registered against the
old parties on December 1. An astonishing amount of interest la be-
ins manifested by th. worker, ln
this election, and the meetings ar".
given great satisfaction. Meeting,
commencing with this afternoon,
are being held ln the following
places: Women'a meeting, ln tit.
A. O. F. hall, Mount Pleasant, 2:80
this (Friday) afternoon; Cambridge
hall, Templeton drive, this (Friday) evening; Colonial theatre,
Oranvllle and Dunsmuir, and
Grandvlew theatre, Sunday evening; lire hall, Nootka and Twenty-
second South Haatings, Monday;
Britannia school, Grandvlew, Tuesday; Tennyson school, Xitsilano,
Wednesday; Dominion hall, Pender
street and King Edward high
school, Falrvlew, Thursday,evening.
A Few of the Big Sales
Offerings at Johnston's
THESE ARE LEGITIMATE UNLOADING SALE BARGAINS
LADIES'
LADIES and GROWING GIRLS' African Brown Calfskin Lace Boots, with
round toes and low heels. Regular
$8.50.   Sal. price  10.00
Little Gent's Gunmetal Calf Lao.
Boots, heavy weight soles and neat
toecaps; alias 0 to 10 1-2. Regular
$4.00.   Sale price  W.ll
LADIES' LACE BOOTS — Ladle*
"Julia Arthur" Black Kid Lac. Boots,
with plain toes and neat Louis heels.
This line haa sold regularly for $18.50.
Sale prlc.    ABM
LADIES—Ladles' 'Julia
Arthur* Black Kid Lac.
Boots, with black cloth
tops; a very dressy
boot with Goodyear
welted soles and Cuban
heels. Begular $11.50.
Sale price »0.00
BOOTS FOR ELDERLY LADIES—*
This particular line for elderly ladlM
h wonderful value; made of soft blaok
kid, cloth tops, round easy fltting toe.
and low heels. Regular $9.50. Sal.
prlc.  _ M*0O
GIRLS' BOOTS—Various klnda of
Girls' Gunmetal Calf Button Boots,
wide toes and aewn soles; slaea 7 to
10 1-2.   Reg. $4.   Sal. prlc. .....2.85
See Our Windows
For More
MEN'S
JOHNSTON UNLOADS
800 pairs of these $12.00
Brown Calf Lace Boots,
with or without colorad
buck tops; smart young
men'a styles with welted
soles, at f 7.SO
JOHNSTON UNLOADS   '
120 palra of these $9.0*
Brown Calf and Tan Calf
Lace Boots—mad. ov.r
stylish, fashlonabl. last,
by well known factories;
at f «.50
JOHNSTON UNLOADS
1000 pain Man'. Blaok
and Brown Calf Winter
Boots, soma have doubl.
■ole.; other, extra heavy
■ingle soles; all ahapei;
reg. $10 to $12. at....|S.M
JOHNSTON UNLOADS
500 pairs Boya' Goodyear
Welt Dreas or "Better
Wear" Boots—blacks and
tans; sizes right up to
6 1-2;- values to
$7.60, at	
$4
Children's H u r 1 b a t
Shoes reducwi as follow.: Infants' Fussy-
foot, sises 1 to 5....I2.25
Child's Cushion Soles; all
styles; sises 8  to 7 1-2—
Boots $3.t5
Slippers »S.eO
"Johnston Always Sells For Less"
CXI m*5ujn of titcBiq Ulcciric Boot
at tiw&ujii of tlicthq fclc
j[)MST0N$i
\J 409 HastingsST W   VANCOUi
a'"' Niw Westminster.
delegated'by the workers to tak.
hla place, but the Conservative
would not allow him to speak, and
because of this, the audience wonld1
not allow any one els. to apeak, ao
th. meeting broko up ln confusion.
Comrad. Bray then addressed a
great big meeting outdoors fr'om
the parapet of th. miner, hall.
Soldier, and workera are united to
.loot the Labor nominee.
Nanaimo Campaign
Th. Nanaimo camapign la mwt*
ing with hug. .uccess. An active
oommltte. and volunteer, ar.
busy and everything points tb I
successful conclusion. T. A. Bar*
nard la in good trim for th. scrap
and meetings will be held ln Nanaimo on th. following dates, with
Barnard at all meetinga: Next Sunday, Ros. Henderson; Wednesday,
Mra, 0. Corse; Sunday week, R. P.
Pettlplece; Tueaday, Nov. 10, J. &
Woodsworth ln the opera house
Newcastle Campaign
There I. no doubt of th. eleotlon
of Sam Guthrie, but juat to keep
thing, moving, the following meetings will be held in Ladysmlth,
with Sam Guthrl. a. the speaker,
aided by tha following: Saturday,
Nov. 20, Ref. Henderson; Saturday, Nov. 17, R. P. Pettlplee. and
Mrs. T. A. Barnard.
Dewdney Campaign
Th. oampalgn on behalf of Dr.
Curry for Dewdney, la making good
headway. Meetinga are being held
in various parts of the constituency
with the aid of Rose Henderson.
A meeting will be held at Fraser
Mills Sunday afternoon, at 2:80,
and at Coquitlam ln the evening,
and Port Moody Recreation hall,
Tuesday, Nov. 28, 8 p.m.
Women'. Meeting This Afternoon
A campaign meeting for women
will be held in the A. O. F. hall,
Main street. Mount Pleasant, thl.
(Friday) afternoon, at 2:80, on behalf of the F. L. P. candidates.
VANCOUVER MEETINGS
DURING NEXT WEEK
bill
U
PEOPLE'S PARTY IN
COMOX DISTRICT
New Party Formed to Combat Old
Party Candidate, in Comox
Biding.
At a representative meeting of
electors, held at Courtenay on Saturday, November 6, 1820, Thomas
Menzies was nominated to contest
the Comox electoral district In the
Interest, of the People's party.
This meeting waa largely attend
ed by farmera, loggera and worker, from all part, of tho district,
who have formed themselves Into
the "People's Party."
Mr. Menzies' nomination wa.
proposed by Colin MoFadyen ot
headquarter, (delegate for th. loggers' union), and seconded by R.
U. Hurford secretary of th. C. nox
Creamery Association), farmer,
and Included many farmers and
IArobwr workers.
Th. platform Includes many desirable and progressive planks In
th. Interest of wage workera and
working farmers.
E. J. PION WAS
THE CONTRACTOR
In th. reader advertisement re-
gardlng th. designing and construction ot the Broadway Cafe, In
last week'. Issue, th. contractor',
nam. wa* given as Vion. E. J.
Plon, w.ll known to many Federatlonist; readers, Is th. man referred to.
Progran In Lo. Angeles
Th. On. Big Union continues to
grow In Los Angeles and Southern
California. This week witnessed
th. opening of an O. B. U. hall and
headquarter, tn Lo. Angeles. Until now the unit, of the On. Big
Union had an offloa ln th. California building, and held their meetings tn various hall, as they could
be secured. Now there I. a hall
which Is always at the organization's disposal. Tha O. B. U. ls
just a ytar old In thl. territory,
Ther. ar. two unit. In Loa Angeles, General Worker. Unit andl1
a Clothing Worker. Unit, General
Transport Workers Unit, and next
week will see the establishment of
Worker. Unit. hav. been organl*
zed at San Pedro, Fresno and Sel<
ma. The new headquarters are at
til Germain building, 224 South
Spring street, Los Angeles.
F. Ii. P. Danoe Friday.
Next Friday evening, November
28, will be a big night with those
members of the labor movement
who are able to save sufficient energy and brain power left to take
a hand In the whist drive or exert
themselves on th. dance floor1 at
the Cotillion Hall. It Is possible
to have too much, even of the best
of thing, .and the chance to go to
a Labor party dano. and whist
drlva should prov. a welcome
change from the Intensive election
campaign that ia being carried qn,
A big crowd ls expected and a real
live, sociable time Is assured. The
whist will start at 8:15 p. m., the
dance at 9 p. m. The big Idea is
to oet the whole family on the job,
lf not your own family then somebody else's family. The prices ar'e
as ever, the prizes better than
ever and the crowd should be the
best ever. t
We patronize those who patron*
Ize ue
Men's Suits
at Half
Prices
William Dick finds that he can replace his stock at 50 per cent below last
year's prices.
He believes in a "square deal"—he
passes the reduction right on to you.
Come and see our windows-
over 1000 suits at just half regular prices
LOOK AT THESE PRICES
It means just  this
$20 Suits
$25 Suits
$30 Suits
$35 Suits
$40 Suits
$45 Suits
$50 Suits
$60 Suits
$70 Suits
$80 Suits
are $10.00
are $12.50
are $15.00
are $17.50
are $20.00
are $22.50
are $25.00
are $30.00
are $35.00
are $40.00
Our store ia
crowded to the
doors all day
long. Here's the
reason—
Our wndow display*
give you an honest Idea
of the value, you ar.
getting Inside.
Wm. DICK
LIMITED
4547-49 Hastings Street East
Tour Honey'. Worth or Tour Money Back"
Don't fall to see them.
Every* artlole leaving
Dick's at it. sale prie.
Is guaranteed Just aa If
sold In the regular way.
If It Isn't what you
want—bring lt back.
Full satisfaction assured or purchase prio*
refunded.
ACHIEVEMENT
DURING its term of dffice the Oliver Government has> beyond dispute, done more for the enfranchisement of women and the uplift of the child than possibly any other political body on
this Continent, and all in the short space of its four years in office. With confidence based
upon the knowledge of its having accomplished these things, it once more comes before the
electors and in particular, the women electors of the Province, asking that on election day, December 1st next, they cast their vote for all Liberal candidates, who stand pledged to support
and carry out the broad principles of Liberalism now in force, and which will be continued by
the Oliver Government when it once again takes its seat as the Government in power at Victoria..
The Oliver Government has given to the Women of British Columbia:
Woman's franchise.
The Mothers' Pension Act, one of the most important
acts for the beneflt of women ever placed on the statute
books of the Province.
'A minimum wage law for girls and women, raising
the minimum salary per week from the $4.00 paid in
•ome instances, to $12.75 and over per week.
Equal rights to the mother with the father in the
guardianship of minor children.
An amendment and improvement to the law respecting the maintenance of deserted wives.
Provision for the appointment of a superintendent of
neglected children.
A new adoption act, providing that a child adopted
by a family is given the full legal status of • ehild
born to the foster parents.
A juvenile court to which thc first woman judge in
British Columbia has been appointed.
A moro humane and considerate treatment of th*
inmates of the Girls' Industrial School and Boys' Industrial School has been inaugurated
An important amendment to the Marriage Aet, plat*
ing the mothor on equality with the father in the matter of consent to tho marriage of a minor child.
THIS LIBERAL ADMINISTRATION has revised and improved educational laws and regulations, giving better
opportunities to children in isolated districts to secure an education. Its Health Department has given valuable
assistance in the training of rural nurses. It has provided for venereal disease control. It has broadened th*
course in manual training, domestic science night schools and agricultural teaching. It has provided schools for
mentally deficient children, the deaf and dumb. It has established a school for the education of the blind, and a
provincial technical school. It has provided for financing the erection of buildings for thc University of British
Columbia, Its Health Department has given special attention to the work of fighting tuberculosis. The death
rat* from this disease has dropped from. 1.23 per thousand of population in 1917-18 to .82 in 1919-20.
N
The Oliver Government has more beneficial social and domestic legislation to its credit than
has any or all previous governments of British Columbia, and its efforts in this direction will be
continued.
YOUR VOTE FOR THE LIBERAL CANDI-
DATES ON DECEMBER 1st WILL ENSURE
A CONTINUANCE OF THESE GOOD WORKS /AGE SIX
twelfth year, no. 47      THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST  Vancouver, b. c.
FRIDAY November  19, 1120
UNION MADB
The M.T. Loggers' Boot
mu erdtn penonally attended to
Guaranteed to Hold Oanllu and Are Thoroughly Watertight
MacLachlan-Taylor Co.
Successor, to B. VOS A SON
M CORDOVA STREET WEST, VANCOUVER, B. G.
Next Door tb Logger.' Hall
Phone Seymonr BBS Repairs Done While Ton Walt
PATRONIZE FEDERATIONIST ADVERTISERS
"Performance
not
Promises*
But-
What about the
working man?
How's he mine to get on. What'll the Oliver Oovernment do
for him? Suppose you ask, "What has the Oliver Government
done for Lahor?" That way you'll get a hetter line on how
the Oliver Government look* at the working man.
Well. Principally, it established a Colliers' Minimum Wage
Board; extended the eight-hour day to about 6000 excluded
workers; extended the Wednesday Half-holiday Aot; established a Minimum Wage Board for women and girls—raising pay
in some cases from $4 to not less thaa $12.76 and $15.60 a
week; established a teohnical sohool; passed the Mothers Pen-
lion Act, providing for payment to mothers whose husbands
had died or become incapacitated; and many other provisions
were made for the betterment of your working conditions.
lake the Workmen's Compensation Aot—to which important
amendments were made as Ute as this preient year. It abolishes the whole system of private litigation. Provides that after
the flrst 3 days' disability the workman receive 56 per cent, of
his wage loss. Provides for medical attention (including
specialists) nurses, medicine, apparatus. Eliminates profiteering out of the misery and distress of workpeople maimed in
industry.
Look at the compensation paid to workmen. It now amounts
to over $2,300,000 and with pensions has run np to over
$4,000,000.00.
Over 760 widows and other dependents are receiving oheques,
totalling over $22,000.00 a month.
Approximately $1,000,000.00 hu been paid for medical surgi.
eai aad hospitajyreatment, including nurses.
The injured workmen chooses his own doctor and specialist!
are provided when necessary.
This session of 1920, the pension to widows was increased from
$20 to $86 a month, and to children from $6 to $7.50 a month.
The payment to ohildren is no longer limited to four in a
I f andly—Jt applies to all
And under the industrial safety regulations the number of
avoidable aoddents has appreciably decreased.
This is Liberal administration, animated by a spirt of sympathy wd fair-play, favoring neither the capitalist as such nor
labor—but la the interests of the community cut to give all
a fair and square deal. The Oliver Government has shown lti
sympathy for labor, not ln vain promises or empty word* tat
in aets—acts from whioh you are reaping fhe beneflt of today.
Whtt do yon waat—words or deeds? . If deeds, real better,
meat, steady progress, then
Vote the Straight Liberal Ticket
"Your Interests Demand If
HON. J. W. DeB. FARRIS, K.C.
Attorney-General and Minister of Labor
J. P. DOUGHERTY
M. A. MACDONALD, K.C.
CAPT. IAN MACKENZIE
ALD. JAMES RAMSAY
MRS. (MARY ELLEN) RALPH SMITH
MEETING AT
P. L, P. Candidates Present Their Views to
Citizens
Last Sunday evening saw the
second meeting of the Federated
Labor party since the campaign
for the election of the F. L. P. candidates to the provincial house
started. The meeting was- held in
the Colonial Theatre, Granville
street, and it was announced that
future Sunday meetings of the
party would be held in thc same
theatre. Features of the -meeting
were the particularly attentive
hearing accorded the candidates.
All the candidate wsre well received. Mrs. H. Q. Taylor occupied the chair.
While all the speakers took occasion to rap the government of
the day, individually and collectively, the first speaker, Mrs. Rose
Henderson, had, perhaps, the most
to say in regar'd to their policies
and lack of policy. She stated that
the point made by Mr. Trotter on
Friday night as to the Liberals
holding their first meeting over
Edwards' undertaking parlors was
well taken and that, being already
embalmed, all that remained for
the workers to do was to "bury
them that deep that they won't
rise on Resurrection day." (Laughter). The success of labor in all
recent elections right across the
country was a source of conslder-
Vancouver Unions
VANCOUVER TRADES AND LABOR
COUNCIL—President, J. M. Clarke;
vice-pros.dent, R. W. Hatley; iecretary
J 0. Smith; treasurer, A. 8. WelU;
sergeant-at-arms, E. Home; trustees,
Carr, VanruWen, Sievetwrig.it and Midgloy. Meets 3rd Wednesday each month
in the Pender Hall, eorner of Pender and
Howe streets.   Phone Ser. 291.	
ALLI£D    PRINTING    TRADES    council—Meets    seeond    Monday    in    the
month.    President, J. F. McConnell; secretary, R. H. Neelands, P. O. BoxJJB.
ENGINEERS EMPLOYED IN THE
Lumber Industry (camp and mill)
meet with fellow workera in that Industry. Organiie into the Lumber, Camp &
Agricultural Workers- Dept. of tho O. B.
U. Headquartera, 81 Cordova itreet weBt,
Vancouver.   Phone Sey. 78S6.
GENERAL WORKERS' UNIT OP THE
0, fl. U.—President, R. W. Hatley;
secretary, J. G. Smith. Meeta 1st Wed;
n«Bday in each month in Pender Hall,
cor. of Pender and Howe streets. Phone
Sey.   201
HOTEL AND RESTAURANT EM-
ployees. Local 28—Meeta every second
Wednesday In the month' at 2:80 p.m.
and evory fonrth Wednesday in the month
at 8:30 p.m. President, John Cummlngs,
secre (--y and business agent, A. Graham.
Offlce and meeting hall, 441 Seymour St.
S. Pbone Sey. 1681, Office hours, 8
ajn. to fi p.m.
INTERNATIONAL    LONGSHOREMEN'S
Association, 'Local 88-52—Offlco and
ball, 162 Cordova St. W. Meets first
and third Fridays, 8 pm. Secretary*
treasurer, F. Chapman; business agent,
B. Richards. 	
UU'JEKAATlUflAb JEWELRY WOKK-
era' Union—Meets 2nd and 4th Fridays, 205 Labor Temple. President, W.
Wilson, 2280 Granville Street; secretary,
E. T. Kelly, 1860 Bastings Bt. E.; re-
cording-iecrotary, L. Holdsworth, 689—
14th St. W., North Vanconver. •
UMBER, CAMP * AGRICULTURAL
WORKERB Dept. of the O. B. U.—
An Induatrlal anion of all workera in logging and construction camps. Const District and General Headquarters, 61 Cor
dova St. W., Vancouver, B. 0. Phone Sey.
7066. E. Wlneh, - general aecretary-
treaaurer; legal advisers, Messrs. Bird,
Macdonald k Co., Vancouver, B. C.; auditors, Messrs. Bnttar A Chlene, Vancou-
ver, B. O.
MARINE FIREMEN ft OILERS UNIT of
the 0. B. U. meet in their onion hall
at Roomi 8 and 4 Empire Hotel, 76 Hastlnga Sait, flnt and third Wednesday in
the month. President V. Ovens; vice-
pmldent, D. Carllni aeoretary, Earl King.
Phona Sey. 86B8,
rnona aer. wwh.
MILtWORKERS EMPLOYED IN THE
Lumber Itfflnitry, organise Into tha
L„ O. A A. Vt: Dept. of the O. B. U.
Millworkers, Branches meet as follows t
Tnuetm—Lumber Workers' headquarters, 61 Oordova Bt. W. Every Monday
Maw ^Mtmlniter—Labor Hall, cor. Royal
Aye. Md 7th Bt. 2nd and 4th Wednesdays at 8 p.tn.
Craser Mills—Old Moving Picture Thoatre, Maillardvillt. 2nd and 4th Thursday, 8 p.n.
Port Moody—Orange Hall, Snd Friday,
svsry montbj at 8 p.m,
MINK. MILt AND SMELTER WORK-
sn' Unit of tbe One Big Union, Metal
Uferow Miners—Vancouver, B. O., head'
ourttra, 61 Otrdova Straal Weft. All
worktn engaged In thia Industry ara
arged to loin ths Union before going sn
lh* job. Don't wait lo bs arganised, bnt
sqanUa ;
yonraslf. ____	
Pattern   *ake*s*   league   or
Morth America (Vaneonvsr nnd violn-
Uy)—Branch masts second nnd fonrth
Mondaya, Room 264 Lnbor Tampla. President, W*. Hnntsr, »1» Tenth Iv*. North
Vanconver: flnanolal sserstary, E. God-
lard, 868 Richards Btreet; recording see-
rotary, 3. •*>■ Russell, 926 Commercial
Drive, phona Hlgh.ls<UE, . . ,
O. B. U. tJttlT PILE DRIVERS, WOOD-
en Bridgemen, Derriekmen nnd Riggeri
of Vanconver and vicinity. Marts every
Monday, 6 p."., in 0. B. JT. Hall, ■ 604
Pender St. W. President, T. L. Hewitt;
flnanclal eeentary asd business agent, E.
Horn*. Phone, Seymonr 291.'
able apprehension. to tht old il^ie
parties, said the speaker. She <ne,-
viewed the candidates of the fttier
parties and claimed that the labor
candidates were by their recorftsjin
the labor movement, emlawtly
fitted to represent the worken ).of
Vancouver. ■ebi [
R. P. Pettlplece. who spoke ivekt.
stated that the F. L. p. was nWI;
the promising business—that dtftfl
safely be left to the old pattUti
He spoke at some length on' tt
unemployment problem, and cl&Mij
ed that what British Coluntw'
needs is not representatives vbo
will start "railway schemes" ilftd
hair-brained road clearing 'aYid
soup-kitchen ideas to relieve the
unemployed, but men who know
what's what and how to go about
the unemployment problem. Thp
country was absolutely under control of corporations and 'workers
have themselves to blame. Legislative action granted large areas
to the big Interests and legislative
action eould -restore them.
W. R. Trotter, the first of the
candidates tospeak, referred particularly to the manifesto of the
party and the clause on Natural
Resources. . Particular' notice
should be taken of the words Vre-
talned and operated on behalf of
and ln the interests of the whole
community. The words "arid operated" were not to be found in
the programme of any of the so-
called "major" parties. So long as
coal and other commodities w^re
purchased for profit and not for
use. Mayor Gale's, coal scheme apd
other people's worries nbout high
prices, ejp., would continue. While
we are striving to _get the whole
loaf, said the speaker,- we will continue to annex all the crumbs
possible. Our* platform states principles that will be followed, He
demonstrated the love, of Liberals
for Conservatives, and Conservatives for Liberals by quotlpg from
the speeches of Farris, Liberal,
and Ladner, Conservative. The cry
of both is, "If you*dpn't vote for
our six, vote for the other six, but
don't vote independent." c
It was some few minutes, before
J. S. Woodsworth, the next, speaker, could say a word, owing to the
long and continued applause that
greeted him. He stated he was
pleased that labor did not have
enough candidates up to inalce
a government, as labor did not
want to have the Job of cleaning
up the mess made by the old parties. He derided the idea that the
vote was useless, since more notice
would be taken of laborta propaganda generally if we had members
In the house. . *
The statement that labor Was
"better off than ever," cojhfng
from some quarters, also caraon
for considerable critlclsnt at
Woods worth's hands. ^ He poirfted
to. the howilngs of tlie press'ftr
more immigration .'and a BWgfer
population as a solution of ."the
present depression. He deniftnUfed
that we have no more p.opiiwfpn
coming here util we have mbs*?.
that are here . properly proofed
for, ahd owning, arid operatiif^/jSic
means of weaHh production.'       j
Mr. Tom Richardson, theorist
speaker, stated' it as' his belief tfiat
all the labor candidates ele^tgl
wouid take the initiative , JJLJjpP
house and would force dlsciidsipn
of working class, problems so /far
as a few labor members c<jvild.
The P. L. P. candidates were foursquare in their" opposition to the
present uneconomic arid unsocial
system. Among other items, he
demanded that civil servants should
have the1 full rights bit citizenship,
and that educational opportunities
should be free to every child from
elementary school to university.
He showed that the position of the
so-called "middle classes" Is really
the same as that of the worker's.
He deprecated the "grossly commercial view" taken of the value
of education, even by the workers
themselves, For the benefit of
those who worried about the high
living costs, he quoted an article
on the travels of a cargo of cocoa
from West Africa to Holland, Hoi-.
land to Llyer'pobl, Liverpool to New
York, New York to. Philadelphia,
and from there back to the public
ln Liverpool, and In each place
some ope made a profit. •
Things will be. bad and are bad
for the T^rkers in B. C. and It
would be" the, height of folly on
their part to miBS,thia.opportunity
for putting some of.theh' own cM
into the house to keep a check on
all their legislation, . particularly
when unemployment would be one
of the questions arising. ,
The three F. I* P. candidates for
Vancouver, Woodsworth, Richardson and Trotter will, in addition
to some others, ip.eak, at the flame
theatre next Sunday;.
'S
FREE DELIVERY
The natural resources of Britlah
Columbia have hardly been
scratched, and although the population ts ln need of more house accommodation, and can consume
more food and fuel, the Province
is filled with unemployed. Som,
system; eh, what!
. PROVISION DEPABTMENT
Slater's Sliced Streaky Bacon, lb. ....Mc
Slater's Sliced Streaky Bacon, lb Ole
Slater'a Sliced Ayrshire Roll, lb OOe
Slater'a Sliced Aysbire Bacon, lb 45c
Slater'a Sliced Boneless Roll, lb. -..60c
SPBOIAL
On Friday and Saturday we are going
to slaughter the    priee i ot - Slater's
famous Streaky Bacon.. Regular price
55c per lbr.-   Friday    and    Sntnrjlay
Slaughter. Price, lb.. —....Al Me
Half er whole slabs.
OBNUrai BIND LEO HAMS—SPECIAL
On Friday and Saturday wo will sell our
famous Hind Leg Smoked Heme, weighing
from 10 to 13 lba, 'Regular 58c lb;
Speeial, per lb.  .'.-...49 l*2c
BOTES BOTTER BOTTER
Our famous Alberta Creamery Butter
—nothing liner—on sale again Saturday morning from s. to tl o'clock
Regular 68o lb.,  special, lb 88c
PEAHBALEO BAOK BAOON
On sale on Saturday while they last, our
famous Peamenled Back Bacon. Regular
62c lb,.  Special, lb.  63 Mc
PIONIO HAMS
On sale on Saturday, whito they last,
our  famous  Picnic    Smoked    Hams;
regular 85c lb.   Friday and Saturday,
per lb :.  30 Mc
B. C. Fresh 'Eggs,' dosen   76c
Alberta Fresh Eggs, dosen 76c
B. G. Storage Eggs, dosen  86c
Finest Canadian Cheese, lb.  .— 38c
'          LARD   SPECIAL
Finest Carnation Compound Lard, on
sale on Saturday; regular. SOc .per lb.,
special, 3 lbe. for  : 760
FRESH MEAT DEPARTMENT
We havo secured a nice hunch of Fresh
Killed l'brk. Wo will put tho shoulders
on sale on Saturday and we have reduced
the price to 31 l-2c lb. From 6 to 0 lbs.
each.    Nothing better for roasting.
BOASTS OP BEEF
Finest Pol Roasts,  from, lb 180
Finest Oven Roasts, from, lb 18c
Finest Rolled Roasts, from, lb 26c
Finest Boiling Beef, trom, lb 16c
Finst Stew Beef, from, lb 16c
GENUINE LOOAL LAMB
On Friday and'Saturday we will sell our
Local Lamb shoulder...  Regular 32c lb..
Friday and Saturday,, lb 10 Me
Legs Loeal Lamb, lb.'.
Loin Local Lamb, lb.
38c
.,     31 l*2c
Local Lamb Stew, lb —200
POBK SPECIAL
Small  Roasts   of   fresh  killed   Pork,
■ practically no bone. Spocial lb. 88 l-2c
Cut from 2 to 8 lbs. each.
GROCERY DEPARTMENT
Fineat Pastry Flour '..- -...BOc
Nabob Tea. lb - 00t
Slater'a Tea, lb J»c
Orlaoo, lb - 36tl
Rolled' Oats,. 6-lb. sack .
DIVISION.
COMMITTEE ROOMS
LOCATION,
PBONSI.
1.
I.
0.
i.
I.
I.
7.
7.
I.
I.
If.
IL
If.
1011 Bebeen Street...
Basement of B. O. Permanent, 880 Feeder itmt...
4(6 1*2 Hastings Stmt Beat...
1001 Halting, Stmt, eonar Victoria Drive	
Santbaaat comer OUnton and Haittaf, Stmt.....
■000—22nd Ava Bait   ~
1786 VanaVUi Stmt - 	
1741 Broadway .
 fay. HU
 Ray. 7IOf
_..Hi|h. 17M
 .High, f
 Hl,h. f
_t0lh. IStOL
...Hltf*. 046
(16 Klagswsy, cann 15th Ava,
Iff llltk Avenue Eaat.
..Pair. 1881L
...Pair. 84(8
Oerner Twelfth Annua ul Laurel Stmt .
Mil Broadway  	
M41 mitt Ava HM 	
...Fair. 8817
..-Bay. 4261
....Bay. 4256
RFEE PAtER AND SOLTHITE WORK*
ere—Ten need tha Oamp Workera of
Sur Indnatry.  Thoy need yen.  Organise
gather ln the O. B. U. Induterial Unit
af yonr occupation.   Delegatea on overy
Sab, er write tha District Headquartera,
il Oordova It. W., Vanobuver. Entrance
lea. 61.00: montbly dual, (1.00.
IBRTaEd UauKiits. riooebs and
Featenora I.L.A. Loeal .Onion MA.
-II)
(erica
Heeta Ihe Ind aad 4th Fridays
...60c
ONIONS ONIONS ONIONS
On Friday and Saturday
100 lb. sack for  J2.00
60 lb. sack-for ,.—*• .......61-00
25 lb. sack for'.:  *-*.* 15c
SPUDS            SPUDS            SPODS
Highland Spuds; due keepers; only, per
100 lbs. _™_. *  tt-OA
THREE BIO STORES
113 Hastings St. E.; Phone Sey. 3262
830 Granville St.; Phone Say. 866
8260 Main St.; Phona Fair. 1883
KLELAND-DIBBLE   ENOBAV-
INO  COMPANY
Limited
FHOTO RNORAVEBS _...
COMMERCIAL  ARTISTS
Phone Seymour 7161
Third Floer.JJerld BUldlu, Tea-.
Veterans of -the Great War
NOTICE!
Wi will dye your great eoat bottle green, brown or black, take
off ahoulder straps, put on new
buttons and make It look like a
clvy coat, ill for 15.50. ,
Hull Ordera Promptly Attended
to.
7 Little Tailors
Ml Carrall Btreet
VANCOUVER, B. O.
Pan the Federationist along and      Honest John ll now bugy de-
help get new eubscrlberf. .     | *•">«'■>« >>'• honeety.
X-RAYS Locate Ills
Vancouver X-Ray
Institute
614 STANDARD BANK BUILDING
Taacnar ot Drugless Healing
FREE CLINIC
For    the    treatment    of    non*contBgloni
chronic   Ailments   by   Natural   Methodi.
The   clinic   Is   supported   by   voluntary
contributions.
Offlc* hours:    10-12, ud by appointmsnt.
Phone Sey. "77
SALE
Extra-ordinary
31ST ANNUAL STOCK-REDUCING SALE
NOW ON
Big Sweeping Reductions in AU Departments.
35 Per Cent. Reductions on All Men's Suits, Overcoats,'
Raincoats, Trouseri, Underwear, Sweaters, etc.   Special
Lines Out in Half.
Boyi' Department Similar Reductions
Clubb & Stewart Ltd.
Men's and Boys' Clothiers
2 Stores
309 HASTINGS W.        623 GRANVILLE ST.
—VOTE FORr-
Geo.S.Hanes
INDEPENDENT
NORTH VANCOUVER
* "* ^•^ihyjf&.*
Prealdenl, Wl_- ,-   .  -
tetary aad  easiness agent,  11.
corresponding aoor.tary, W.
teem MT Later Temple.
—  Heine;
Lee,   Odoo,
**t-%-*r-t*a_ Ultlofl tie. OK*
Meete leal Bunday ol each month al
I p.m. President, A. I. Iobb; .lee*
praaldant, O. H. Collier: aeeretary-treaa*
urer, R. H. Neelanda. Boi ((.
Jtitttlr  iro'tLtWalo  luiLwit
Employeea, Pioneer Division, Mo. 101
—Moeta >. O. P. Hall, Mount Pleases.
lit and Srd Mandaya at 10.18 a.m. and '
"""":•■*   Blgtyi   recording
Orian, 447—ett Aranue
p.m.    Pieeldont,
e.aretery, t. ~
     *.   Aldawayi   naeaelel
aeeretary and bnalneu agent, W. H. Cot*
trail, 4808 Dumfries greet; o«ee eorner
Prior aad Mela He* Paoao Pair. ((041*
JOCRNEYMIH TAILOBS' ONION OP
Amorica, Loeal No. HI—Meetings held
(nt Monday in each montb, 8 p.m. Pres*
Ideal, A. B. Oeteuby; riceprealdent, D.
Lawson; recording secretary, O, Me*
Donald, P. O. Bos 608; Inanelal seoreUry, T. Tompletoo, P. O. Box 608.
For
Information
Pbone
Boy. 7307
Headquarters:
GRILL ROOMS
Hotel Vancouver
YOU
ARE
WELCOME
Provincial Unions
SHOE REPAIR SERVICE
BETTER MATERIAL-BETTER WORKMANSHIP
And Tons $ioes Delivered on Time
Jut Phone, and We Will Call
THE HEW METHOD BHOE MAKING AND
REPAIRING 00.
837   OflRRALL  STREET
Juit Off Haatings SJqo Phone R-F 954
The only 0.ILU. Shop in the City        Boots and shoes
SKATES   SHARPENED   BV  AN   EXPERT
PRE-WAR PRICES
ONCE MORE
From 30 to 50 -.& REDUCTIONS
ON   PRESENT
Stock of Men's Clothing,
Furnishings, Boots and Shoes
See prices below.   Stock is being bought
quickly.   Shop early.
$68,000
SEE THESE PANTS
1500 PAIRS OP MEN'S WORK PANTS
You can't duplicate theee gooda anywhere ln town for $8.50. They are
strongly made, ln dark colors.   Selling at	
$1.95
Extra Special Overalls
A real bargain—75 doi. Men'a Overalls;
elastic braces, double atltched, heavy
weight, blue striped, in all A| QC
ileee.   Reg. $2.75, for *9 A tVO
Men's Furnishings Boots and Shoes
DItESS SHIRTS, with separate collar, nice patterns; regular »3.25, *0 OR
WORK SHIRTS, in good quality:
regular $2.00, for  *>.	
WOftK SHIRTS, of heavy wool, well made^ all
sizes; regular 13.00,
for .
MEN'S  WORKING   BOOTS,   solid;   all   sises.
T^™:. ; $4.95
MEN'S SHOES, black and brown, best makes,
including Walkover. Regular price A\0 CA
$15.00, for f. ^O.UU
WORK SHIRTS, dark grey, all wool and best
make; regular $5.00, d»»»  AA
HEAVY    RIBBED    WOOL    UNDERWEAR;
regular price $2.00, d>|   OB
UNDERWEAR, "Tiger" brand;     il   *JC
pure wool; reg. $3.00, for „ Vl""
STANFIELD'S PURE WOOL UNDERWEAR;
heavy ribbed; regular $3.75, *Q <7C
for *PA*e I O
PENMAN'S HEAVY RIBBED UNION SUITS;
all wool; regular $6.00, o>A  *JC
WATSON'S UNION SUITS; In medium weight;
IT*..™. : „.$3.50
76   DOZEN   MEN'S   SWEATER   COATS,   In
grey and brown; regular $3.75,      (>1   AB
SWEATERS, all wool, In all colon; *m *JC
priced from $6.»5 to * *9 0 el Q
HATS FOR MEN; regular to       *1   4B
$4.00, for  Via I 9
$1.25
11 made, all
§y&   Rubbers Given Away
7IOTOMA. B. 0.
VICTORIA ADD DISTBIOT TBADBS
end Laber Oonnoll—Heals Irat end
tklrd Wednaadere, Knllkta ef Prtkiaa
Ball, Morth Park Stmt, al I p.m. Praaldant, A. O. Plka; viee-pnaldent, 0, I*
Copeland; eeeretary-traaiurar, S. fl.
Weodward, P. O. Boa 308. Victoria, B.O.
PBIKOE BTTPI1T, B. O.
talNOK   BUPBRT   OBNTRAL   LABOB
COUNCIL, O. B. u—Matta atary Tnaa*
day In tke Helnty'ra Hall at t p.nwlleal*
Inia open to all O. B. V. numMta
retary-traaiurer,    11.    Booth,    Bea
Print. Bnpart. B. O. 	
PRINOE   RUPIRT  TBADBS  AHD   LA
Turner, Beeton
& Company, Limited
WHOLESALE MERCHANTS AND IMPORTERS
Diy Ooodi, Oenta' FurniiMsgi
VICTORIA, B. 0.
MANUFACTURERS OF "BIG HORN" BRAND
"TOWS, OVERALLS, Eto.
ber Council—MeeU aacond and lanrtk I.
Tnaadaya of each month, ln Carpentera' I     factotr organlied tmlei "Waited Garment Worken ot America"
Bell.    Prealdenl 8. D. McDonald; viae* I
"     .. .    .    writ..  .—.,,.   O.H   W.I. II     	
Pants
(00 FAIRS MEN'S PANTS; well finished, good
patterns; regular $0.00, *o Q{*
•00 PAIRS"MEN'S WOOL CRKvioT PANTS;
oolora blue, black and
regular $10, for 	
260 PAIRS MEN'S PANTS; extra heavy tweed
160 PAIRS MEN'S RUBBERB, else U   only.
Regular $1.86, Q^f>
150' 'PAIRS'  MEN'S    HIP    OUM    BOOTS;
IT-.--. : $6.95
Small Furnishings
ARROW COLLARS, all sixes.    Reg.   | f*-
prlce $6c, for    IOC
CANVAS OLOVES; regular price 25c, | B«
priced now     iOC
PRESIDENT BRACES; regular price OA.
$1.25, priced now '** OUC
MEN'S SILK TIES, assorted patterns; OB.
regular $1.00, for OOC
60    DOZEN   HEAVY   LEATHER   OLOVES;
_T^...-_:. 55c
60 DOZEN MEN'S CAPS, for dress or *Jt*._,
work.   Regular $1.60, for  I OC
60 DOZEN MEN'S WOOL   SOCKS',   medium
weight.   Regular 60c, QA.
for... - OUC
Men's Clothing
(0 MEN'S SUITS, dark grey- mixtures, well
5=^ ifig ™L™'™ $17.95
_.....™.„^vww M MBN.g BU1TS, in blue lerge, well made;
iov rjuiu. junii o x-aWTb; extra b«ATy tweea; _.„„•„. • .n nn ^m. a   a*. *%*
good make; regular,.. ^ gg ™»>[^ $29.95
"   pcord" best T5 MEN'S SUITS, In brown mixtures and' good
$5.95 r^:.."1!!".!!!:!!: $24.95
160 PAIRS' PANTS, English whipcord;  best
make; regular price $0,
for  —
5 PAIRS CHILDREN'S SHOES, lace and button, solid leather; sins 1 to 6 1-2. *|   QC
Regular price $3. for vie»/0
75 PAIRS BOYS' LECKIE SHOES, sizes 11 to
18 1-2.   Regular $4.75,
for	
60 MEN'S OVERCOATS, dark
friexe; reg. $30, for
PURE    WOOL    MACKINAW    fcOATS;
make; Norfolk style; regular      (IO QC
$22 for, each, only vluvw
MACKINAW COATS; regular $10   *£ QC
each, for  *O.UO
$3.95
Raincoats
mmidaati'X'■BilllT*sce'retaiT, Oao. Wad
dell, Box 271, Prince Bupert, B. O.
MEN'S SHOES, for dress and work; brown     200 MEN'S PARAMATTA   RAINCOATS,   all
and black.   Regular $7.50, *g   jge     elies; regular price $18.50, Ain AB
MEN'S HIGH TOP BOOTS',    Amherst    make,      250  MEN'S RUBBERIZED  RAINCOATS, aa-
solld leather.   Regular $16, *C QC     sorted patterns; regular $25,       4a1AQR
Don't confuse our address—between Columbia and B. 0. E. Railway Depot, on way.
to Carnegie Library, same side. Investigate. You'll save many dollars.
Old Country Bargain House
58 HASTINGS ST. EAST
NEAR COLUMBIA AVE
1 FRIDAY-
...November lt, 1110
. WEMTH THAR.   No. 4T
THB BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
VANoervER, b. e
PAGE SEVEN
CREDIT
YOUB PBOMISE
TO FAT IB OOOD
ENOUOH FOR US
Ladies'    $ DAY SPECIALS
Coats	
Large Variety, Begular $87.60
Special Tomorrow
$29.00
Latest Styles, in all desired shade*;
finest genuine Hudson Seal Collars.
Begular $69.60.   Special Tomorrow
$49.50
SPECIAL TEEMS FOB
DOLLAB DAT
$10 Down-$2,60 Weekly
Mien's
Hoats ~
Eeg. $60 All Wool Cloth Coats, *•{ (a
in latest styles and oolors, at *f JOeDU
Special Termi—$6 Down, $3.60 Weekly
"WE LEAD-OTHERS FOLLOW!'
«
coRHoneiesv
UTFITTINes
PATRONIZE FEDERATIONIST ADVERTISERS
To The Working Class Electors of
the Prince Rupert Electoral Dis
FOEEWOED
JH. BURROUGH was nominated to contest" this riding in
. the interests of Labor by a Labor convention, held in the;
0. B. U. Hall, Mclntyre Block, Prince Rupert, on Friday Oct.
29,1920.
In allowing hii name to be voted on, he made it plainly understood that he was standing on the platform of the SociaUst
Party of Canada, with no reservations or substractions therefrom, and it is on the principles therein set forth that the campaign, as-far as he is concerned, will be fought.
Therefore, the contest will be waged on a strictly class issue,
'and our candidate is put forward as a olass candidate, expecting and seeking support from no other scetion of the electorate
thanthat which recogtiiws the futility of attempting to.reform
the present system of wealth production in such a manner as
will beneflt the actual wealth producers.
stroke af a pen, If exercleed to
queatlon IU right t0 rule and exploit, or need to oontraat IU pro-
feeeed loy* for "Juetloe," "demooraoy," "aelf-determlnatlon," and'all
; THE CAMPAIGN COMMUTES!
The Candidate's Addrea*.
, The holocaust of death and. da*
structlon (nto whioli th«| capitalist
imperialism plunged ■' the *h«le
World in their ittsane'obinpetitlon
for domination In the world's markets haa nearly ran IU course.
Where lo the "new World" whloh
they promieed iM we would be Uy*
ins la when th* war waa wan?
What la tha position of th* work*
tag olds* now as compared to tha
days' bofore tht war?
The ethiggle foil existence Is
keener, th* chances of procuring
the prim* necessities ot existence
during th* coming winter ar*
blacker: th* whole outlook for the
claes that Bella ita productly* ability tor wages la more ominous and
full of dire portent than at any
tlm* Within til* memory of thoa*
now living,
Th* ao-oalled "rights" ot fr*»
speech, free press and free assembly have been proved to be but
privileges, recognlted by the ruling olass aa a matter of policy ln
th* "piping" tlmea of peace, to be I terns, ls feat nearing the abyss to-
cancelled In tlm*-of crisis by th* I wards which It 1* being Impelled by
of th* rett of th* high-sounding
claptrap wtth th* exhibition of
sordid greed and cynical disregard
of tb* elemental decencies so glaringly manifested tn IU acts. Indl
vlduals of th* working olass that
dar* to exercise auoh criticism hav*
been dragged rom their beds ln
the dead of night and thrown into
goal, or their movement* hav*
been dogged and reported froip
point to point Labor organisations that reftme to be pliant tools
tn th* hands of the employing class
ar* permeated with tbe hired stool
pigeons, spies and agents—prova-
cateur of a secret. polls* system
that bids Mr to surpass In 1U brutal, dishonest and corrupt methods
the "Blaek Hundreds" of Busssla
under th* Caere.
Beared on a basis of human enslavement, th* capltaliat system,
following all previous slave sys-
A Vital Issue
of the Present Provincial Campaign
Ww
U*»\
—the attitude taken toward rendering
financial assistance by the govern*
- ment to cities and municipalities.
TIME after time during the last four
years have deputations from the
Vancouver City Counoil and Mnnicipal
Councils nppealed for financial aid from
funds created by speoial taxation.
««#
Taxei
"SrtterWMrf*
.wnrovlnold^iatweek
*MB Annate ^aB_Z-h*** mm-
I special easels*Closeted «l*,JBatl»
I urs>nf   »the »«*.!, Mristw"* "i
The Record of
the Oliver
Government
In every case a deaf
ear was returned to
these appeals.
A LAST MINUTE
CAMOUFLAGE
*W<*PaJ*,?a
* ^fcinet^^
n
•eJS^il
* ***!_-_>.?a-__*xl-_l*'•-
f Ve»«,
[ Oil
«22
°n«i
^cv.-ant
Sep,,
*tni,__ I
•from Provinoe, November It) (Bern Sun, November IS)
Vote Vote
The Straight the Straight
Coniervatiw Ticket    TLp PAC|t|A|| A*    Cowervative Ticket
The Conservative Party
Assistance to Municipalities to help them finance, by way of share of provincial taxes cot
lecifyi, say, from automobiles and amusement tax of moving picture shows, or other
sources, and have these taxes collected by the Province to save administration expenses.
The above statement is not pre-election camouflage. It is the fixed position of the Conservative Party as adopted at its 1919 Convention.
Vote ihe Straight Conservative
Ticket
ON DEC. I
AND ASSURE YOUR CITY OB DISTBIOT OF A SQUABS
DEALoON SPECIAL PBOVINOIAL TAXATION
.the foroe* fen orated by tnd contained within iteelf. It li no long-
otk able to justify lti existence, for
Ht tan no lonyor most the needs of
*rtie society It has created. The
#»alth producer, divorced from all
'ttfle of ownership to the means of
wealth production, and thereby
• forced to sell their physical and
mental energies to ths owners of
Judustry at a wags that hovers
iaround ths cost of subsistence, are
starving In thelf millions—becauss
Were Is no gain In sight for ths
owners of industry In putting tham
U> work. Ths Inflation of the cur-
iWnoy lus Intensified ths distress
thy forcing the prices of commodl-
itlcs to the point where the wage received bt a falling labor market is
Insufficient to provide the bars
ncesiltlss. The raw materials, the
machinery, the will and ability to
operate Industry are present in as
great a measure as ever—and th*
need Is greater than ever—but Instead of revolving faster to meet
the Increased need the wheels of
Industry are slowing down and
stopping, Increasing tha distress
by throwing multitudes of unemployed onto a labor market already
congested.
Such ls the position in Europe,
and th* blaok shadow of th* approaching panlo Is making Its advent, f*lt ln Canadian Industry,
The conditions that now face the
wealth producers of Europe will
shortly fac* thos* of this continent.
In view of thes* facts, th* utter
futility of advocating reforms that
will leave untouched and unchallenged th* control and ownership
of industry by a small olass In ths
community Is obvious. Buttressed
And entrenched by th* fores* of
the state, the owning claas will see
to It that no reforms will be enacted that need oause it any anxiety.
The Issue Is a class issue, an Issue between the class that owns*
and does not work and th* olass
that works and does not own,
The present election ls ons of
the perlodlal opportunities accord'
ed Us of testing the growth of class
Intelligence In the mass of Wage
earners In B. C. Candidates representing th* different sections of
the population that derive thetr
sustenance from the exploitation of
labor are In the field, appealing to
tabor to grant a new lease of power1 and lifo to the system by which
they profit and labor suffers. That
is their real appeal, but, as always,
It will be camouflaged and disguised In a flood of flamboyant
oratory and specious argument,
designed to conceal the real Issue
from view.
The secret of   the power    possessed by the ruling class to exploit
Wor lies ln the possession of the
political,  repressive fore* of tht
.state, which lt can hold and retain
as long as a sufficient number of
^s' victims are    ignorant of    the
]auses of their    conditions.    That
tower can only be wrested from the
jUJers by an Intelligent    working
.lass, and the object of entering
he fight In this election, as ln all
,|t.h*>rs, Is to spread the knowledge
(p/'tho true relations between the
classes.    With that knowledge as
a .guide the workers will be quail-
[fled to act tn accord with their
jClaes  Interests;    Tho  workers  of
'fya European countries are forging
tead as never before. While
nada Is but "a village among the
nations," we have a task to per*
form which devolves upon us as
our Job. That is to prepare the
minds of our fellow-workers for
the coming change by the dissemination of a knowledge of the prln
olples of Marxian Socialism. Education Is our task. All wild talk of
"bloody revolution," "street fighting," "picking up the gun," etc.,
emanates from the frothy brains of
enthusiastic Idiots or from treacherous provacateurs. Our weapons
are thos* which appeal to men's
Interest, reason and Intelligence,
not to their passions.
Ownershlip and management of
industry by the workers, with Us
concomitant of production for the
usse and benefit of the producers
—or a continuation of the present
system of ownership by the non-
producers, with its wars, panics,
unemployment and destitution for
the workers; this ls the choice
which Is once agalln placed before
us. The Btrength of the support
given to the candidates standing
Squarely on this class Issue will
show us how far we have progressed In olass Intelligence and revolutionary spirit since 1916.
For the benefit of those enquirers who wish to know In detail
what kind of a society It is that
the Socialists wish to inaugurate,
It musts be ponted out that the Socialists are not In the business of
malting new Societies.
All Institutions, conceptions, mo
rals and ethics that have a social
Validity are the product of the manlier In which society produces and
distributes the wealth created. Under capitalism the dominant Institutions and codes of thought are
those of the dominant (capitalist)
class, owners of the means of
woalth production. Consequently
the Institutions and codes reflect
the wishes and material Interests
of the caiss that dominates. The
fact that there exists a mighty volume of protest agninst thc capitalist
syitem Is, therefore, evidence that
ItM development of the process of
capitalist production has evolved
fo$v intoroBts, a now psychology
.ami new points of view moro In
Konplng with thc developed mode
af, production than the Interests
fflft moral concepts that are accepted and Imposed by the dominant owning class,
i T*he revolutionary Socialist movement Is tho scientific interprets
Tlon of the factors that have creat-
T*iV. tlif movement of protest. Its
function Is to Investigate, analyze
affd explain the economics of social
^RVelopment, and Inasmuch ns Its
"conclusions, scientifically ^cached,
point to the ultimate ownership
and operation by the producers,
for themselves, of the whole socially operated machinery of production nnd distribution, It has become tho class-movement of the
producing class. That Is thc sense
ln which the term "revolutionary"
ts appllled to the Socialist movement, for the attainment of Its objective entails the capture of the
political power from the present
owning and ruling class for the
purpose of Inaugurating a system
of production under which the producer and the menus of production
will no longer be divorced.
This will be tho "social revolution."
CITY UNEMPLOYED
IS STILL XNOBEASmO
Olve a little encouragement to
our advertiser!.
Machinist* local Attempt, to atof
Strikebreaking ActMtM et
IU Memberi
Discussing the aubjeot of unemployment kt the regular meeting of
tha Vancouver (International)
Tradee and Labor Counoll, laat
evening, Del MoVety Informed the
delegatee tbat the queatlon was going to be gone Into at a meeting
of employers of labor, the city
counoll. and representatives of soldier and labor organisations at tha
city hall on Friday. It was pointed out that the lowest possible estimate was that there were at least
•,000 unemployed In the city, and
this did not include any of the
skilled workers whose olass of work
was always slack ln the winter.
Tho gravity of tho situation was
such that It could no'longer be ignored and this meeting will go seriously Into the matter of obtaining
immediate relief.
Tha place of Vice-President
Sully, who waa taking an active
part In tha strikebreaking; was
filled at the oouncll meeting by Del.
Herrlet of the Barbors; Two trustees, Del. Miss Shaughnessy, Hotel
and Restaurant Employees, and
Del. Bartlett of the Blacksmiths,
wars elected to nil ths places of
Dais. Oraham aad Harriett, resigned. Dels. Mrs. Fearn, and Mr.
McVety were eleoted as provlnolal
exeoutlve committee tor tha Tradaa
and Labor Congress.
Assayers, Prospectors and Surveyors
lte B.C. School of Pharmacy k Science
Crown Building, 615 PENDER ST. W. tUaitj.im
A separate Department, to give PRACTICAL training to Proipectore, Assayers and Surveyors has boon established la tM
above Institution.  '
INDIVIDUAL HELP IB OCR MOTTO.
Any man wko has ambition to improve Ua position will nnd tbe
opportunity here.
Thoss are PRACTICAL courses for PRACTICAL men by PRACTICAL Lecturers. It la not merely theoretical work which could
be obtained from hooks.
The department ts In charge of Mr. Stanley Vould* and Mr. B.
P. Wilson, D.L.8., who have went many yeara at the work.
For particulars write or call on the Principal, P J. RAIN.     '
NOTE—Ai e proof of onr methods, ths following ranlte wore obtained by at
during tbo put year: lit phot io Ua B. O. Lend Surveyors' Pinal; 1st
Slice in B. O. Und Sorveyoro' Preliminary; 1st pl.t.. In a. 0.-Univ. Affiled 1
clone Ent,* lit plnn ia B. C. Minor eai Hijor Pkenasey: 1st pies, (a A.
0. Lew Prellmlnsry. T7* . .
DRUGLESS
HEALING
DOWNIE
Sanitarium Ltd.
Fifteenth Floor Standard
Buk—Oor. of Hutingi
and Riohards
Phones Seymour 603;
Highland 2134-1.
^  By Algar Bailey
in "Faii-play"
Is thi dsy ef the ell fsmlly practitioner almost it an endf It the
swallowing ef multicolored concoction, ell sbspu sad sises ef
pills, the Injections ef Senas,
shortly te ceiMf As I sit la a
comfortable en chair, la u it*
auophero electrically obliged with
mesy thoussnds of volts, snd with
my sua tins hag es I labeled pore
osons sad convened with Dr.
Downle of the Seville Bieiterlsm
ef this city, I asked myulf Hose
amotions In ell sirlousnisi. Oen.
dldly, I tonus muy rsdloel
channel In the next few yeen la
the meaner ef Initios human aliments. I un Und of using sad
bosrlng ef multitudinous remiiUu
for oich end every dluiM which
meet the eyi at every end aad
tem—In tke pipers, stnet oan,
hoarding!, ston windows, droolers. I know thlt these concoctions in not the product of men
seeking te holp mankind. I know
thoy are bnt their moani of gaining a living from a erednleni public—niy. an Ignorant public.
Drngleu hilling ao pnctlnd by
mee who have made It a Ufe-lng
study ls eae of the meet marvellous
things I know ef. Tet ls It marvellous after ill? Is tt not nther
juit plain, common ssnse. which
my person ua undentand If he
cans to try? 1 conversed with sa
eld Isdy who. two weeks hefon,
bed beon ctrrlsd Into Dr. Downlo's
Seaaterlum—a cripple. She told
mo of four years of mliory sad
Plin; of fruitlessly trying doctor
after doctor in eeirch of relief. She
could hlf diy Hnd thi words to ei-
pnss hsr grstitodo to Dr. Downle
for tho wonderful csn sho wu
receiving, tatt thea the nurse
called her; she nee from bee
chair ud walked scroll the room
firmly ud yet with the lightness
of a child. Iho ta est I wit*
noised the treitment ef a women
whoie iptae wu tedly curved. I
ssw photographs ef what It had
beea l few weeks bofen. Ihe
ehengo wu mlnealeu. Whoe
the tnitmeut li ended she win be
et leut two laehu taller. I nw
e mu woll known ln business In
Vucouver ud who. becoming
crippled wtth rhoumatlim, wut
thero on ontcbee. Today he Is u
sprightly ss ever, ud his eratchu
sn forgotten.
It ta net menly, however, phyel-
cel dlsibuitln which en helng
io treated, radically every all-
meet known te the huaun fern-
Uy glvoi wsy enlckly ud sunly te
a coune of treatment it tbl hands
of this sblo mu. I road tostlmon*
lal after teitlmonlil from peoplo
who have bun cured ef troubles
amine- from tho stomach snd
lungs, from Insomnia, enema, and
■o on.
I hive ao other object la making
these statements ovor my name
thu thit of helping uajr fellow be-
Ingi. I cu do no mon thu tell of
whit I uw, of whit I know to bo
tho truth. If tho public do hot
care to help themsslvss after others
try te holp thom, lt Is bat their
own fiult lf thoy suiter. I cu
only My thlt I urgi everyone not
sitlsled with their itste of health,
or with tho medical treitment
thoy in receiving, to cell ud see
for themielvei.
AlOAR BAHET.
SoaP^
Is Economical The Coupons which
it carries •• redeemable for uicfd
articlaa — are a further economy*   ,
COWAN & BROOKHOUSE
PEINTEES,      PUBLISHERS,      STB*
EEOTYI'ERS   AND   BOOKBIMDEB9
Dnlsa nfflololi, writ! for prlcw.
rive dlTiarAOTION
We
For twaity Teen wa have tasaed tils Ualon Item* fee au anise air
VOLUNTARY  ARBITRATION CONTRACT
OUB STAMP lagfUSl
   Oellecttve Bugaimag
forbids Bum SMhaa udUekeoej
DUtutoe Seem* by ArtltosMia
■toady Savloymeal eat SkUHd WoikmaasUf
Fnawt Dehvoruo te Deeafa ead Paens
Pmo. ead guuaae te Weeasn ead Employes*
Prosperity ef SkM atlHag Ocmmutttao
Aa loyal anise i
^to donuad shoee bearing   the   above
oa Stamp oa Sole, r    	
lerllalag.
BOOT AND SHOE WORKERS' UNION
2« SUMMER STBEET, BOSTON, MASS.
OolUs lovely. Quote! Pmldent.   Ohsilw L. Setae, Ooaanl Set-lime.
MASS MEETING
DOMINION HALL, NOVEMBER 22
At 8 p.m, Sharp, in Support of
M. B. Cotsworth
INDEPENDENT CANDIDATE
Who Will Speak on
THET PLUNDERERS   OP   B.   C,   THEIR
METHODS-AND OUR REMEDIES
Other Speakers
COL J. Wt McINTOBH, MBS. AMOBIL, BSV. A. E.
COOKE, 0.3. A8HWOBTH
He Standi Finn for-
1. Upholding
above thoss ol Property aad Honey:
whloh two latter muet be controlled
talo sight nae for the people of all
aeefnl clause Im British Columbia,
especially    for    EETTJUrED    SOL-
DX»S and their dependeata.
9. WOKS* UD OXXLDBSV
TIBS*.—Beeaaee their best development pxedvooe tha reel wolfere of
oa> Baee, they taut reoelvo onr foremost eeaaUsratloB la Xegtslatlve and
Government affairs; on saeh vital
Issasa aa the VreOfatal Oare of
atataara tevelopiag ehlldrea. Tree
■eternity Attendance aad Zoapltal
Treatment wherever reaaonably se-
QUlred, also ensuring adequate oup-
Slloa ef nutritive Teode eaeh ea una,
reed. Sugar, Maata, Tlah, ate, with
■uoh aeceultloe aa Ooal, Wood end
Olothing at economlo prices
3. upbuilding Contented TAJOLT
lot   nt   naiunn   b.   o.
BOMSfl—oocur. from tbo revogoo of
■eat Profiteers, entorttonato Lees
Companies, Best aetata exploiters
and unfair Vaiatlofe—A Court of
Equity te be eetabllahed (first operating aa a "Pair Beat Court") te
eradicate each ahnaw hy giving jnst
dselslona after full ooaalderatun af
the rlghta of all ooaoeraod.
4. PBOPOBTIOBAL BBTBISBB-
TAT10M needed to seonre due appor-
Uoament of Seats la. ths Legislature
—-oepeclally for Labour aad Women
members. WOMBB meat be given
BOUAL BIOBTB with D>.
I Abolition Of PABTT OAMPAIOJT
rtTOa, to bo replaced by ench OOL*
UOTlOBg u wlU be gethtrod from
Public Meetings, whore citlsens
dulre me to represent them oan
by eaoh help eeeure Independent Be-
preeentatlon,—freed from the debaa-
isff aad rnlnona aeont llnenelel lover*
age by whloh unaompuleue finanolors
have during many yean forced upon
Oovernments their nefarious eehemos
for graaplag nndne control of onr
Ooal, Timber, Pulp, Tlohlng aad other
Bceeuroes, alao uSated Oovernment
and Bailway Contraot Mooa by see-
ret Commissions, eto.
d. The DOTAOMBST ABD BZ-
PULSIOB   TBOM   TMB    LXOZSLA*
oonraglag production more effldat
and lu. .outly iiBasMw at Taaw
now dupUoeted by Womlnliie aad B.
a QovansuMe' saliera whose weak
oen be greaUy redneed by eattat oaa-
lection of laaoau aad ethaa TMea.
whloh aaa bo fairly d'vtdad between
the Qoveaamaaaj.
13. Moderate TAXATIO* of VW-
    proviso tkat to help¥oau-
makere, tkoee who beoome trace et»-
toaa by marrylag before eg* <•, ehalt
bo ropold tho total amonat of tkotr
pro-marriage Tales, on pruoaUag la
the Oov.nunent Agent oopy of thete
marriage certUcate, aid their original reeelpls tet tha Tana they la-
epeettvely MU.
14. UOBBn>0 af PBOPBSSIOB-
ALMBB^-Tke Tilceastag of Aoop—
aate,   Arohiteete,   Soetors,   Saw.
and other Profuslnaal Men aad '
men. for the proteotlsa af    "
    -'---   at  ~
Lawyua
and Wk-
ottlseaw
my 1
who <
TUBS of any member who hu been
proved guilty of participating In
such espioiuueaa, or oaptarlag also-
oapttirlaf E
lelvlng hie <
tlon by Trend, or deoelving
stltueata
7. The ABOUXIOB OT IBB 95
CBBTS PUB MXLB hitherto WBOBO-
LT atXWSt AS "MfLBAOB," On
addition to thetr tl.eoo Indemnity)
by Memben of the B. 0. Loglaletnre
fer Bailway Dietancu tkey navel to
and from tht Legislative heeolon—
while oaly paylag for Meals 'and
Beitha whloh an rightly ohargoaHe.
, Memben yearly
receive Tree Tranapertatlon naeu
from BaUway Companlw In B. 0.,
under Eoctlsa sts of tkt "BaUway*
Aot of 1911," whloh nada "The Com-
"piny shell furnish free traaaporta-
"tloa for Memben of the Legislative
"ef this Province, with tbelr beggage,
"aad alao fer the Mlnletor, with his
"bsggage end equipmont." Thonforo
tt eeems obviously wrong and Indeed
a legalised thlovage for Memben
end Mlnliten Inn eaeh Interior
Bldlage aa Veleon, Pernio end Cranbrook to take Iron the Provlnolal
Tveaanry oech Beulon about 1856,
WW, and 1391 rupeottvoly moro then
they pay oat for tnnsportatton.—
Prom those stuns they shonld bo en*
titled to two daye' eatra time Indent*
nlty, both coming and going, with
coet of meals and herthe, totalling
about IM.
While the saving would bs abont
16,000 por yur, my greater purpoie
ll to remove thet contaminating taint
from the Leglllatnre.
8. PBEESOM TOB MBMBEBS OP
SB    LEOISLATUBB    TO    SPEAK
ABD VOTE for what they know to
be right, and full liberty to oppose
whet tbey deem to be wrong—WITHOUT COEBOIOH BT PABTBAB
OBOAHIEATIOBS; whether the Lo*
glslatlon Is proposod by tho Govern*
most, or Opposition members.
b. BE-DUTBIBUTIOB' OP SEATS
aftor the 1M1 Consul, to give Greater
Tencouver the mon edoauete repre-
oontetlon to whloh It Is entitled,—
though sow deprived of mon by political trickery la Interior Eleotornl
Arue. Bodace the total number of
memben, to loeien cost end make
Legislation more efficient.
10. The ERAOTMBHT and PIBM
EBPOBOEHENT of well-considered
.Veto empowering the Oovernment to
Fi-rchnse, Import, nnd SELL ALCOHOLIC LIQUORS, nnd control their
use ln accordance with the mandeto
given by tho Eleotore on Ootober
30th.—Also to oaforce similar control ovor Drugs and Drug addicts.
11. ECOIfCMIC OETELOPMEBT
OP OUB AOBICULTUBAL, COAL,
OIL. TIMBER, PULP, MIHIHO,
I'lSHIHO, ETC., AREAS, with the
utilisation of WATER-POWERS, to
Increase Industries and ensure Permanent Prosperity by Leasing instesd
of selling Land, etc.—thereby eavlng
ovor-oapltallMtlon, debarring undue
exploitations, reducing the costs of
Produotlon, aud lowering the Cost of
Living.
19. IBCBEASE RBVEBUES by sn-
prlvllegos obtained through Charters
granted by the Leglslatnre.
Tor esantnle^ snob r-'~—-g wn
enable tke ■ovetaaunt to endone at
eanoel tht tlieaau of laellule«i
bribed or eatoMoante Aaeenntaala
(or Law-ren) eaeh aa tke onee who
dlegnsaMSp failed to aafegnard tke
Sharaholden aad Depositors la tk*
defunct Dominion Trust Oen
aad tht one who waa paid sit,
year (nearly twin tke aalanr pa
tke Premier)  by the Whalen Tali
Vane*
thalr Aeoonnte.
II. BrPEOTITB SUPBRtlSIOK of
COMPANIES aad TRADBBS In B. SL,
especially concerning thtlr ioeonat*
of Capital, Aeeets, asd Profits; else
alleged Lossee, to pnveat InSsMoss
of Capital, and caaaonlaged eoeoaata
still being lane*ed npon onr Hover*,
ments through distortion of thalr S-
nenclal statomeate designed to deplete payments rightly dae to tko
Publlo Treeanry.
Bnaet "BLUB SBT SAW" te protect lnveeton and advaaee Pnvtaolal
Oredit.
10. ABOUTIOB of PATBOHAOB
In Ooverameat Ooatraeta, Supplies
aad  unfair   ttvn  Servioe  appoint-
IT. BqultaUa BBSBAOIB» of tke
lira SBRTTOB. aad the woediag
oat of obsolete and esoeulvs aaa-
bars of ooetlr Oovernment Agenals*.
Beoorden, ate, now u»
    n She reunt BaUway provided diatribe aroaad WUaax, Pals-
vlew. Oraad Porke, Sreeawoed. Ottn-
Bloola. Prlncetoa, Roeelead. Troal
Bake, Tala, ete.
U. Beaaouable SUTBBABBUATXOB
Juetly apportteaed for long aad «M>
cleat eervtu bg Civil Servaate, **•
Uce aad others, to Improve asd eo*.
noalsa publlo aervice.
Provide B. O. AHETtflTiaS OS Ss-
mlnlen Terms e< pnrehaae, aad utulee
the puehaaera* oapital for tke Bev*
opment of the Province.
lt. BEOBOASIEB the PBOTfS.
dial POLIOS aad fre* than from
evtle of patronage, and tko IneBeleaey
oauaed hy ench political handlcog*
aa that Impoeed hy Mr. W. J. Bowses,
whs began aa Attotawr-Oeaerel h»
appointing partlaane, SO per emit, ti
whom wero proved by tht Begiedlng
Oommlaoloa to bave heen appointed
hy Mr. Bowaar' over the maximum
age, contrary to the Polloe BegnldF
tlons lt was hla duty to enforce.
10 More OOV-BBBtaBT ASSISf-
ABCE   to   MUBIdPALITIBS,   BOS'
pitals aad SCHOOLS to meet tko
changing conditions sf Tnslaalsl dovelopment.
91. Mon practice! BDUOATIOB,
with canal opportualtlee for every
chUd to develop ae beet that It la
capable of, to adveaee lta own aad
the publlo welfan.
99. Belli the Provincial Standard
of 3J5 per cent, butter-fat In MILS
to average itandard which tha
world's but aatheriUeo noommend
for tbe trout dovelopment of child
Ufe.
93. Abolition af costly and unjust
TAB SALSS, to bt nplaced by maniocs of the Lead to the Ooverameat
end Munlclpalltlee for permanent
Leasing, pnfenbly to Beturned Men
and widowe with ehlldns, after tw*
years have bun allowed aesoseed
ownen to redeem.
Thie would permanently eeonn tho
unearned increment of ruing valuu
to be appUed to tht publlo welfare.
94. Helping to eetabUth useful
work for UBEMPLOTED men and
women, under condlttone maintaining
eolf-rupeot end upholding brlghtu
future ln thie great Province—eo
richly endowed by i natural wealth
their work le needed to develop, end
from which they should derive a sa»
tlsfaotory living.   ■
25. Support and holp to Improve eO
useful Legislation regardless of tho
party or porson proposing lt—OppoM
whatover ls proved by faot aad experience to be wrong or Inadvisable—
always bearing ln mind tho thru
fundamental Factors of provlnolal
Wu: 1st, tbe Home with our women
end children; and, the Workon end
developers of Agricultural and Industrial progress; and last, bnt not least,
the luting debt we owe, ead must
honour, to the worthy eoldlen and
tbelr dependents, for the lavaluahl*
sacrifices tbey made to eeve B. 0.
and our Empire for fuUer life to ns
all.
Respectfully submitted to Taacon-
ver Electors by
MOSES B, COTSWORTH.
VIVt. PAGE EIGHT
TWELFTH TEAR.   No. 4T
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST    Vancouver, b. e.
...November It, \**9
CLAMAN'S STORE NEWS
BOYS' DEPT.—SECOND FLOOR
SALE
of
MEN'S and BOYS'APPARE
Offers Many Sensational Values for the
Week End.   We Mention a Few
Boys
Boys' Mackinaw Coats
Reduced to $6.95
Pure wool, soundly tailored Mack-
Iinsw Coats for boys—every mother
will immediately recognize this as an
exceptional value.   All sizes,
Boys' Suits
With Two Pair of Pants
Reduced to $13.90
Tou may select a smartly tailored
Suit—guaranteed pure wool fabrics
—with two pairs of pants, at this
very low price. Sizes 24 * | et aa
to 31. Sale, price .....$1 J.SJU
Children's Sweater Coats
Reduced to $3.85
Ther is sure to be quite a scramble
among the boys to secure one of
these Sweater Coats, so we would
advise early shopping. There
is no need to tell you that
it  is   reslly   a   wonderful
vslue. Priced       d»Q nr*
Arrow Collars
25c
Among the reductions in prices
that will meet with your approval
are theso well-known collars. All
styles and sizes.
Union-Made Overalls
Reduced to $2.50
You know what Union-made quality
is. With or without bib, in plain
black, plain blue and blue stripe.
Regular $3.50. Sale '
price	
$2.50
Men's Overcoats Reduced
to $15.00
A genuine reduction to half and less
than half price—as you will at once
recognize. Pure wool Overcoats.
Thick, soft and cozy. Cut with distinctive cozy, lines. Big collar,
former prices of $40 and $45. All
sizes.  Sale *| *
price ^ 1 J)
Young Men's Suits Reduced
to $11.85
Two for less than the former price of
one. How's that, young fellow?
Beautiful pure wool suits, specially
made for young men. Designed with
that suggestion of vigor which
young men like. It suits them, too.
All sizes. Begular $25
suits.  Sale price..
ite  uigui,  tuu.
$11.85
Copyright 1920 Hart Schaflner & Mm
Men's Suits Reduced
to $24.50
A surprising reduction on quality
Suits. Exclusive cut and distinctively tailored in all pure wool. Suits
with individual character. A splendid suit for business or semi-
informal wear. With all the outstanding style associated with their
former prices of $0 and $45. All
sizes.   Sale *tOA CA
price  ............ yfafi DU
Viking Underwear Reduced
to $7.50
The wonderful Viking Underwear,
line, soft, closely-knitted, heavy
weight wool. Unshrinkable. Form-
shaped. Conforms to every movement. Begular $10 the garment.
Sale price, the
'garment.	
$7.50
The Home of
Hart Schaffner & Marx Clothes
Boys' Overcoat*
Reduced to $15.95
Single and double-breasted
styles, tailored' just liko
Dsd's and made from fine,
pure-wool fabrics. Sizes 26
to 36.
CI
aman's
153 Hastings West
Canada's Largest Exclusive Store for Men nnd Boys
Holeproof Silk Hose
Reduced to 65c
A fine opportunty to renew
your supply of Hosiery. Genuine, Holeproof Silk Hosiery,
seamless and reinforced at
heel and toe. Begular $1.25.
All colors and sizes.
Sale price :;,'.	
65c
THE THOS. FOSTER & CO. Limited
SPECIAL SALE
is now in operation and hundreds of customers are availing themselves
of the opportunity to buy tbe best clothes made at substantial reductions.
Below are some of the specials we are offering:
Blue Irish Serge Suits, fast color; also
tweeds snd fancy mixtures. Begular
$50 and. 155,
now	
$38.50
Blue Serges and Cheviots, in all wool,
fast-colored cloths; many models to select from. Begular up to
$75, now	
$55.00
EXTRA SPECIAL—One hundred raincoats to be sold without any consideration
of the cost  Begular $25, $30, $32.50, rit | j- fart
W YOU NEED A BAINCOAT DO NOT PAIL TO SEE THESE
Kenneth Durward Overcoats, in three
weights: light, medium and heavy.
Begular $50, $65, $75 and $85, for—
$40, $50 and $65
Youths' Suits, a limited number of first
long trouser suits; worth
$25 and $30, for
$15.00
ONE STORE
ONLY
Shop of FASHION CRAFT
THOS. FOSTER & CO. Limited, 514 Granville St.
DANCING LESSONS
PRIVATE OK CLASS
W.'E. Fenn's School
COTILLION HALL
Phones:  Sey. 101—Sey. 30S8-O
Social Dances Monday,' Wednesday and Saturday.
Toronto Building Trades
Favor: New Wage
Agreement
(By the Federated Press)
Toronto, Ont.—Toronto bulding
trades of the American Federation
of Labor' will sign a blanket agreement covering all affiliated unions,
and making a uniform wage scale,
all the locals so far voting on tlie
proposal carrying "it tiy overfrHelm-
ing majorities i*.'; '/
"The .innovation will, be a popular one," John Cottam, secretary
of the Carpenters District Council,
said.'. ."And' it will "be tart-led by
large majorities in all the carpenters unlona," .;/,
The blanket form of agreement,
although used ln Qreat Britain and
Australia, has not been generally
adopted throughout Canada.
INDIA IN THE GRIPS OF
STRIKE   WAVE
(Continued from page 1)
the demands of the strikers being
for an lncrcace.of 60 per cent, in
their salaries... It is signlflcant to
note th$t In'this case only the skilled workei.s,:' occupying , high and
important .popitJonB, have struck.
Though the strikers are numerically small, they., have succeeded in
bringing, about a serious dislocation of}-work. ,< The output in the
■"-*m#n'tf/r»fPectfed Is about 15
per cent, normal.
At Mysore the government print.
ing workers have joined in .the general demand for wage increases. At
Bangalore there ls a strike among
the woollen mill workers. One of
the most serious situations Is In
the Assam tea districts, where
workers In eight gar'dens went on
strike. Reports indicate that
strikers were forced Into violent
demonstrations. Several constab-
es and the superintendent of police were injured in the riots, the
provocations for which have not
been made public by the India offlce in London.
The serious strike situation
which has touched every Industrial
centre in India may continue indefinitely to affect and paralyze the
commercial life of the country, to
an even greater extent than it.has
up to the present, since feelings of
resentment, discontent and Indignation are general among all
classes,, of people In India. The
political unrest as expressed In the
progress of the non-co-operation
with the British Indian government movement, Is but a larger aspect of the troublesome problem
which the British policy of economic exploitation and political oppression of India has engendered.
Patronize Fed Advertisers.
Buy at a union store.
YOUR sickness may be
traced to wrong and
improper eating.
Dr.W.Lee Holder
Specialist in Diet
Houra 1 to 6 and   by  appointment.
A  Teacher of  Drugless
Healing.
Sey. 8533
Bay. 40S3R.
FAIRFIELD BUILDING
ORANVILLE! AND PENDER
H,.. Walton
PHOFESSIONAL MA8SEUS
Specialist  In    Electrical    Treatment!,
Violet Kay and High Frequency for
RheuraatlKin,  Sciatica, Lumbago,  Ftr
AlyiU, Hair  and   Hcalp   Trratmenti,
Chronic Ailments.
310-811 OABTEEOOTTON BLDO.
Phont Stymour 2048
196 Utatiaga Stroot Wert.
LAKUEST MEN'S STORE IN THE WEST
Don't Fail
to See
THE STARTLING REDUCTIONS ON
CLOTHING AND FURNISHINGS IN
DICK'S BIG AD ON PAGE  5,
GREATEST PRICE-CUTTING EVENT IN
THE HISTORY OE VANCOUVER.
Wm. DICK
Limited
45-4749 Hastings St. East
SOCIALISTS   PLAOI   THB
ISSUE CLEARLY
(Continued from page 1)
bourgeois clau, who eventually
overthrew feudal society. In our
day, we also know something of
special privileges, and who enjoy
them. What has Liberalism to offer but to repeat the traditional
cries of the 16th, 17th and 18th
centuries? The SociaUst says that
this problem, which is thrust lh
the face of humanity, the ownership and control' of Us means of
life, can be solved In only one way
—by the social ownership of the
means of production—and not tlie
individual ownership t_( the Liberal. All the schemes of pscudo Liberals and reformers hnve left the
working class to this very day, In
all the fundamentals that are essential to freedom, practically enslaved.
Dcsplsos-Old Methods
J. Harrington, the next speaker,
opened his address by drawing attention to the fact that It was contrary to all political rules and regulations, according to the way
things are being run today, that
the previous speaker had failed to
slam the candidates of the old political parties. Th* methods of the
.old parties are not in our line. Thd
charges they make against one another are nothing. When the show
staged before the public is all over,
they are as 'thick as bed bugs in a
logging camp. The Socialist Party
attempts, lf not to Impart knowledge, to give an idea where that
knowledge can be obtained. The
old story of Hercules and the wagoner, who got stuck in the mud,
was an admirable illustration of
the methods of humanity, when it
got in a mess. The appeal to the
super-human to assist men In overcoming their difficulties has not entirely disappeared, notwithstanding the fact tnat this agency never
Intervened and never assisted men
In their endeavors. They have
called upon this agency for ages,
ahd have left an elaborate religious ritual showing to what extent
they would go in order to have assistance for problems which they
were unable to overcome. A vory
remarkable thing ln human character is that wc know perfectly
well none* of the deeds recorded of
gods ever took palce; it all took
place in the Imaginations of men,
and yet they appeared as vital persons and Interfering human agencies. In the old Grecian days, men
spoke personally with their gods,
and argued with them, and earlier
still Moses tried to get out of being the Labor delegate for the Jews
ln Egypt. The modern Individual
who Is inclined to call In this usp-
ernatural being, has a certain scientific basis for this practice. In
spite of the fact that he may never'
have heard of Darwin or Spencer
or the evolutionary theory, every
avenue of activity in which lte
finds himself are connected with
that evolutionary theory, because it
Is Incorporated Into thc life processes of men. If they do nol
know of these things at leaat these
things have a direct and Immediate bearing on them. Today no
man talks to'God. Here aud there
you will flnd earnest individuals
who tell you they speak to God, or
God speaks to them. If thoy get it
very bud, they nre liable to land In
some of the Institution of the government. Man Is addicted to calling, In cases of extrema dllfhuit/,
on a supernatural agency. These
cases are getting fewer, and so the
need for calling has almost entirely disappeared. So much so, that
the deliberation? of the Peace
Conference did not need to be sub'
mltted to any higher functionaries
than thoae we know of having sat
around that table. However, we
still have the desire to call
other forms. When our social
troubles become overwhelming, and
we can no longer' eliminate or over'
come them by the ordinary pro
cess, we immediately call upon politicians for help. If wc look up
their records, we will flnd their
efforts have been absolutely nil, so
far as benefitting us is concerned
We cannot deny they labor and
sweat, spinning out words and
phrases ln order that certain
measures might be wiped off or put
on the statute books. This is not
simply the conclusions of Socialist
philosophers,.but of their own historians, and thp idol of Liberal historians, Buckle, devotes about fifty
pages in his work to show conclusively that all the efforts of parlii
ment have been used to prevent
mankind from bettering his condition; and that practically ever
law that was of benefit has been
repealed and passed again, never
hy politicians, but through the Influence of an adverse opinion in a
particular country which forced Its
adoption In spite of them. Practically all reforms In the last 120
years came not from the Liberals,
but from the Conservatives, and
came because of a definite econo
mlc reason. The reforms granted
through the Conservatives were
for the means of maintaining that
party in their controi of power, by
playing off the industrial wage
slaves'* grievances against the employing class, who were represented by the Liberal Pnrty. It was to
the Interest of the lana owning
class that the workers in lnduitry
should have sufficient money to pay
for the products of the land The
votes of the wa«c earners were not
to be neglected. Their interest in
extending the franchise can readily
be perceived.
The idea that some one ts going
to lead the people out of the wilderness, even through politics, ls
a dream. Immediately any gang
of politicians have been elected to
a parliament men go about their
duties and they are forgotten, except for an occasional r'emlnder
when some squabble causes an uproar; The whole of the social
problem lies In the question of the
social knowledge and the desire of
mankind as a whole to get away
from placing any trust in a god or
any other power outside of themselves and to do as Hercules told
the wagoner,—to put his shoulder
to the wheel, dig hie heels In the
mud and get out of the hole.
Next Sunday the candidates will
again appear at the Empress Theatre.
The campaign ls now well under
way and support and enthusiasm
Is growing. The campaign tom-
mittee have eight further meetings
arranged. S
Social and dance on Saturday
night tn aid of campaign funds at
Socialist'HalL
SPECIAL
SALE
Men's Boots
Values to $10.00.  Sale
Price: .....
Values to $12.00.  Sale
Price 	
Values to $14.00.  Sale
Price..... „. 	
Values to $15.00.  Sale
Price : .	
$10.45
SEE OUR WINDOWS.  NJUPF SED     !
CORNETT BROS. & CLARKE
33 HASTINGS STREET EABT
*
10 Sub. Cards
Oood lot on* taw's sabiorlptlm te Tk*
B. O. redeMttonUt, wilt bo wdM to
toy addreu Id Ctntds for 113.80
(Oood snywhere outiide of Vmmitif
city.)  Order tta today. Remit whwMJfc
_ "WE!   GROW   WHILE  OTHERS   CROW"
GIVEN AWAY
FREE   *
Ladies' Skirts and Men's Overcoats
JUST FOR DOLLAR DAY
Every lady buying a Coat or Dress, value $40.00 or
over, we will give absolutely free a fashionable Dress
Skirt, value $7.60, or a Coat or Dress, value $60, entitles the purchaser to a smart Dress Skirt, value
$12.50.
Every man spending $60.00 or over on a Suit, we will
give a smart new Overooat in rubberized cloth or
tweed, value $30.00, absolutely free.
— EXTRA SPECIAL—i
For Dollar Day onl; wc will sell
ladles'   Fashionable   Fall   Coats,
TX*™-. $12.50
Terms:  $1,00 down, $1,00 weekly
143 Hastings St. West
WE   CLOTHE
THE
WHOLE
FAMILY
ON
TCREDIT
Sey. 1861
CREDIT  STORE  OPPOSITE  PROVINCE
I'ATRONIZE FEDERATIONIST ADVERTISERS
Dollar Day
Specials
Youths' Suits
Good quality hard-wearing tweeds, in
shades of brown, grey, etc., in single
and double-breasted models;, also belters.   Regular selling for $25—
Sale
Price
- $15
Men's Suits
About twenty-five or thirty odd suits in
good shades and standard models—extraordinary values.  Regular prices to
$35- ,,...^:
Sale
Price
- $20
Gabardine Coats
These are real coats, made in Britain;
. good heavy weight cloth well proofed;
will stand hard wear and look well;
Raglan with belt all round—
Price — Jplo./O
CD. BRUCE
LIMITED
Corner of Homer and Hastings Streets

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