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The British Columbia Federationist Aug 29, 1919

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 THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
WJUSTBIAI. UNITY:  STRENGTH.
OFFICIAL f-APBBt   VANCOUVER TB-DSS AND LABOR COUNCIL, AND B. C. FEDERATION OF LABOR
POLITICAL UNITY:  VICTOR*
ELEVENTH YEAR.   No. 35 EIGHT PAGES
VANCOUVER, B. G, FRIDAY MORNING, AUGUST 29,1919
(y-tSSrSm) *1.50 PER YEARf
"HE PURPOSE OF LABOR'S
PRESS IS TO EDUCATE
the Federationist Will Pursue This Policy—But
Workers Must Assist—Labor Slowly Realizes
the International Nature of the
Working Class
LABOR. DAY EDITION
3?
THE DAWN OF LABORS' DAY
ABOB DAT will be celebratedf'
• on this continent   on   Monday
'- next. Why the fall of tho year
aid have been chosen for thie hoi-
lay ia not exactly plain, unless it
due to the fear of the ruling
s, that it would not be wise to
|ave Labor Day in Hay, when Euro-
ean workers hold their celebrations,
(ring to the growing international
ature of labor's ideas. "No international boundary line and no national
loliday can, however, keep the workers from realising their blood broth-
jirhood, and while labor has little to
lelebrate about on yet, the future is
|iright with the promise of a bet-
world in the making, and the
Freeing of humanity for ever from
(rage slavery. No grander ideal has
Iver inspired any class in socioty,
lhan the ideal of the workers, which
i to usher in the co-operative commonwealth, and banish poverty and
isery for ever from the lives of the
*ple.  Let it. be  understood that
" >r, to be true to itself, and to its
liseion, must understand the forces
hat are at work in socioty conform
b the changes that are taking placo,
M the outgoing of capitalism, and
lie birth of the new order.   This is
jae of the missions of   the   labor
To ineite, and to precipitate
ah moves is not good policy, but
i point the trend of events as they
ppear as judged from the science
t modern Socialism, is the real pur-
«se of a labor paper, and this is
fce object of the B. C. -Federationist.
j Oar Labor Day edition this year
i aot as large as last year's, duo to
way reasons, the main reason being
hat there is an active boycott of
-he paper by some of the merchants
of the city. This would not be (JP*0*-
bad, as the purchasing power of tbt. J*
workers can and is being organized,
but there appears to be individuals
in the ranks of labor who are assisting tho big business,interests. Another reason that we have had to
curtail tho number of pages Is the
fact that the merchants, naturally,
felt the effects of the strike. If the
workers are not earning wages,
they have nothing to spend, and the
merchants must suffer in consequence. In spite of all difficulties,
however, the B. 0. Federationist is
still pre-eminently the largest circulated Labor Paper in this eountry.
Its influence bas been felt in all
parts of the country, and no matter
wbat may be said about it by tho
ruling class, in the eyes of the workers it is the best and: taost influential labor paper on the continent. In
this issue will be found the advertisements of many or our regular advertisers, somo who have boen with
us for many years. Thoy aro seeking your support, and aro supporting
this paper by their' advertisements.
The least the workers can do is to
soo that this support is recognized,
and this can only bo done by patronizing those that advertise in tho
Federationist. To those who havo
come forward and advertised in this
issue, we would suggest tbat they
continuo their support—it will pay
them—for the workers are realizing
at last that the only way to secure
support is to go out and get it.
This they arc doing by organizing
their purchasing power, and their
dollars will follow tho Federationist
moro than ever in the future.
Electrical Workers Are
Indignant at Action of
International
The charter of the International
Brotherhood ot Eleotrleal Workers
Local 113 waa taken away by International  Viee-President  S.   Ingles
hat Monday. The reaaon for thla action ia became the membership of
the onion voted on tho question sent
out hy the British Colombia Federate of Labor dealing with the sii-
l hour day and Industrial   Unionism.
Loeal officers report that Ur. Ingles
has beon -in the eity for some time
in connection with this matter and
two weeks ago an attempt woe teadf
by him to organise a separate tele-
fhone local. This proposal was turned down by a big majority of the
telephone worhers.    kt a meeting
told in the Labor Temple on Wed
Msday, Organizer Ingles  proposed
that a new local of the international
ba formed. This proposal wis roundly condemned by the electrical work*
I and it aeemed to be the con-
i-his of opinion that the charter
is taken away with the purpose
eheating the local, with its 600
nembors, out of a vote at the international eonvention which is to
>e held in New Orleans shortly. It
raa pointed out that the whole of
he organisation of the Pacific coast
ere np ia arms against the interna-
ional for -what thoy claim to be the
scent  Paeide  eoaat  strike.    The
'tarter of the  Seattle local,   the
irgest on'the coast, was recently
then away, thus depriving that un-
n of a voice in the convention, and
e Vancouver membership express*
I their indignation very forcibly,
Wednesday night'a meeting when
lese facts were pointed out.  The
acting broke up without any dealt* aetion boing taken but a meet-
g will be held in the Labor Temple
>is (Friday)) evening for the pur-
>se of taking up the subject again.
Butchers Union Meeting
The Heat Cutters and Butcher
Workmen, union in getting back into
ita old form now that the high tension generated by the reeent* labor
troubles has cooled off. At its regular-meeting, next Tuesday evening
the subject of a new wage scale win
in all probability, be placed beforc
the membership.
Jlosed Shop, Ninety Cents
per Hour and Double
Time for Overtime
The agreement between the Plum-
•rs Union and the employers haa
ien settled to the uatisfaction of
th partiei reports organizer J. W.
"nee. An inerease in wages of
.20 per day with double time for
ertime has been obtained. The
osed shop, whieh waa lost to the
lion during the recent strike, has
so been agreod to by the employ's. These improvements will give
'e plumbers of Vancouver a wage of
'.20 for an eight-hour day and a
osed shop with doublo time for
•ertime.
Shipyard Laboren
IThe above local held its regular
leetiog in the Labor Templo on
riday last. The secretary was intruded to write to the Minister of
ustico endorsing the resolution of
he Trades and Labor Council re the
lembers of organized labor held
,'lthout bail in Winnipeg. It was
■lso deeidod to sond the businoss
gent over to Seattle to attend the
Mstrict Executive meeting on Snt-
irday. It ie understood that the
Mstriet Council in conjunction with
.he Metal Trades Councils on the
?acite Coast bas been able to secure
in all-round increase in wages to
late from Ootobor 1 in the Aneri-
ta yards.
LONGSHOREMEN
GET INCREASE
Agreement Covering the
Workers on Coast Is
Entered Into
Providing a uniform scale for
Washington, Oregon and Britiah Columbia ports for the first time in
northwest history and granting increases up to 15 cents un .hour on
straight time work and 30 cents an
hour on overtime work, a now agreement was signed late Saturday night
by representatives of the Northwest
Waterfront Employers' Union and
the Pacific Coast District Council of
the International Longshoremen's
Association. Tho ngreoment is retroactive to 8 o'clock the morning of
August 12. This is the first time a
uniform agreement 'ever has been
signed by waterfront and* longshore-
ing interests covering the leading
northwest ports, the Hst including
Seattle, Taeoma, Portland, Astoria,
Victoria and Vancouver, B. C. The
agreement is to continue indefinitely,
or until cancellation on thirty days'
notioe given by either side.
The new scalo is as follows: Longshoremen on coastwise und deep sea
work, 90 cents an hour straight timo
and (1.39 an hour overtime. Truckers, 80 cents an hour straight timo
and (1.20 an hour overtime. Lumber handlers, 95 cents an hour
straight timo and (1.40 an hour
overtime.
The new agreement recognizes tho
principlo of collective bargaining
and gives union Bhop conditions. On
tho other hand, tho employers arc
insured against strikes or stoppages
of work. Local griovanco committees will investigate all grievances
and, if they can not agree, arbitration will bo resorted to and the ar
bitrators' decision shall be final,
Milk Drivers and Dairy Employeea
One of tho best meetings ever
held by this local was held
last Friday, several new men
joining up. Two delegates were
appointed* to attend the meet*
■ings of tho Provision Trades Council with the object of getting closer
co-operation amongst the eating
houses. When the report of the
Trades CouncU delegates was being
given, the report of Del. McKenzie
with regard to the way the Bungalow Cafe was treating its girl employees, was given, anil It was pointed out that they were getting their
milk from an unfair firm, Steves'
dairy, and this firm is still on the
unfnir list. The following firms have
signed up a closed-shop agreement
with tho union Turners'Dairy, Valley Dairy, and the Fraser Valley
Dairy (this is the new name for the
old Standard Dairy), Members
should remember that the next
meoting will be held Friday, September 12, and as the question of fining
members for non-attendance will
como up, all should attend, or else
pay thoir fine without a kick,
Teamsten ul Warehousemen
The Teamsters, Chauffeurs and
Warehousemen's 0. B. U. has moved
from the Labor Temple to the Knox
Church, which is tho home of the
Boilermakers, Blacksmiths and Machinists' 0. B. U.
The manufacturers of B, 0. are op*
josed to the (14 minimum. They
say that it will penalise production,
bnt never a word about human Wa
and happiness. Lot'i abolish tt*
profit systom,
AT
IMPRESS
W. W. Lefeaux Has Not
Yet Returned From
Winnipeg
Last Sunday it was hoped that W.
W. Lofoaux would be back from
Winnipeg with some nows of just
what has happened there during the
last few weeks. Tho gutter press
has had its say; it is about time we
heard tho truth of the mattor.
Tho offorts of tho "1000 best
people," however, have had the result of detaining him in that centre
of bourgeois reaction and .thero is
littlo hope that lie will bo back hero
for another week, or until the matter of bail for W. A. Pritchard and
tho others hns been settled one wny
or the other.
Comrade Harrington will thereforo be tho speaker at tho Empress
meeting on Sunday night. Jack
Harrington needs no further intro*
duetion. Thc meeting starts at 8
o 'clock.   Doors open at 7.30.
Labor at Last Gets Some
Recognition from the
Government
There, is a new and gigantic power arising in Great Britain. The
government haa bowed to it. It is
the Triple Alliance. After many
attempts had been made in variola
ways to get the government to withdraw ita troops from Baesia, abolish conscription, abandon the policy
of using troops as scabs an-d to release conscientious objectors from
prison, with no avail, the Triple Alliance decided to take a strike referendum to enforce these demand*
The ballot papers were prepared and
were aboat to be aent eut when the
government surrendered and promised every demnnd. The Triple Alliance is composed of tho Bailroad
Workers, Transport Workers and
Miners of Oreat Britain, Governments ans not in the habit of sticking to itl promises, hut there is little
doubt but that thia time the promise will be attended to in all its
solemnity. If it doea not, then the
workers wiH have a batter reaaou
for direct action.
When through with  thii pier-
it m
Subscribing Whose
Names Were Published
Are Discharged
Tho B. C. Defense committee is
Btill in need of funds for the carrying on.of the defense of the men
arrested during the Winnipeg strike.
It had been the intention of the
committee to publish the names of
every individual subscribing to this
fund but it has been learned that
some of the individuals subscribing
and whose names have been published have been discharged for supporting thcir felloe/ workers. This
is tho rankest kind of discrimiua-.
tion and intimidation, and the committee has decided that for the pros,
ent it would be unwiso to submit
subscribers to this kind of cmploy-
ing-class spleen. Receipts to dnte
have been (3,085.93, and expenditures (2,054.75. The great bulk of
the expense is yet to come, as only
the preliminary expenses have yet
boen met, and the wives and families of the men facing trial have
to be cared for. All money should
be sent to A. S. Wells, 405 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver, B. C, who
will send receipt for same.
Whilst profiteers in Canada are
boing knighted, over in England a
shop keoper has just been fined (75
for overcharging a customer one eent
on a pound of ground rice.*
Teamsters, Warehousemen and Anto
Mechanics Unit of
O.B.U.
Meets every
WEDNESDAY
-AT-.
152 CORDOVA ST. E.
COME AND JOIN
UP
tllltMl
______ I I I I I ' I H
Membership of the Boilermakers  Is  Now
1,200
.Boilermakers and Iron Shipbuilders mid Helpers' Union, Local 194,
is very busy taking in new members
these days in order to supply Coughlan V shipyard with men on tho second and third shifts which the firm
hai started up uguin. Sixty new
members were taken in during the
past tew -day?, most of them being
returned soldiers. The .membership
of the union is gradually increasing,
apd today it stands at about 1200
friotiibcrs. Both Coughlan's and
Wallace's seem to bc preparing for
new contracts, and if these firms
are able to obtain them there wilt
be a good many months' work in
sight for the shipbuilders of the
city.
Cut out thc list of advertisers,
patronize them, and tell them why.
E.T.
Wells   Goes   to   Prince
Rupert—Richardson
to Victoria
The Federated Labor Party meet-
Im at tho Columbia on Sunday
evening next will be addressed by
Comrade Kingsley. As this is what
ia generally known as "Labor .Sunday," specinl meetings are boing
hud at other points in the province.
Comrade A. 8. Wolls left on Thursday's boat for Prince Rupert, where
he .will speak at tho Wcstholmo
Theatre, and Comrade Richardson
will speak for the Victoria branch
at the Columbia Theatre in that
eity on Sunday evening and at a
''Brotherhood'*' meeting on the Sunday afternoon.
On Sunday, September U, Comrade Tom Richardson will address
the Labor Party at Prince Rupert,
going cast from there to Edmonton.
On Monday, September 1 (Labor
Day), membors of the Vancouver
branch have arranged a basket picnic to Whitecliffe (Horseshoe Bay).
They intend to leave by the nine
o'clock ferry from Vancouver and
travel by the 9.25 train from North
Vancouver. Members wearing badges
wiU oe on hand to give information
and tea, sugar and milk wiU be supplied at ihfi "Bay."
Trades and Labor Council
Urges Action for Release of Victims
Too Many Small Units in
Organization, Reports
Secretary
The Vancouver Trades and Labor
Council held a well attended meeting in the Labor Temple last night.
The aeeretary reported that, accompanied by Del. Kavanagh, he hud
attended several meetings; of the
unite and unions and they had ar-.
rived at the conclusion that there
were too many small units being organized and tbat it would be far
better for these units to throw all
their strength into a larger unit.
Tho secrotary has found plenty of
encourage in cut amongst those who
were already in the organization and
also among those who wero still on
tho outside. The counoil was now
on* the upgrade and the receipt of
several applications to form' units
indicated to him that the sooner tho
council hired some stonecutters to
got busy on a tombstone for the
A. F. of L. the better.
In the reports of unions, Del.
Alexaudor of the Steam and Oporating Engineers reported the amalgamation of the millmen With his
organization. Engineers and mill-
men of POrt Moody wore join hi" the
unit and an organization meeting
would be held thore Friday. Or-
ganitation work was also being done
in New Westminster with good results, and the unit hoped soon to
have a membership that would equal
tho loggers.
Laundry Worken Make Progreee
The Laundry Workers reported
holding a very-good mooting,' with
85 per cent, ot ita membership in attendance. Tho organization had decided to accept factory workers into
the union, and a meeting would bo
held in tho Labor Templo next Wednesday evening for that purpose.
The Painters reported the defeat
of.a motion to withdraw from tho
council, and a talk from one of their
international officers was simply of
a neutral nature ami simply left it
to the membership to tako whatever
action tbey deemed best. This could
be accounted for, the delegato said,
by the fact that an election of officers would be held this year.
The Loggers reported considerable
activity in the camps and a vast
improvement in conditions of a
sanitary nature.
Credentials were received from
the Teamsters, Chauffeurs and Warehousemen's Unit, Auto Mechanics
and'Loggers.
The first reading of the bylaws
took place and with very few
changes were adopted.
There being a vacancy in the
office of vice-president, nominations
were called for, and Dels. Knvanugb,
House and Winch wero nominated.
Dels. Kavanagh and House declined
and Del. Winch was elected by acclamation.
Nominations were called for to
611 the office of secretary-treasurer.
Del. Pritchard of the Boilermakers
was nominated; Dol. Shaw, Teamsters, and Del. Petrie, Engineers.
Del. Petrie was not present. Del.
Pritchard's organization had not
paid its per capita tnx so could not
stand for office. Del. -Shaw was
elected by acclamation.
The School Board committoe reported not having received any reply from tho School Board.
Del. Midgley informed the council
that he had not hnd any reply from
the Minister of Justice in reply to
his second wire asking for a reply
as to the legality of the 0. B. U.
It was pointed out that the minister
had in all probability thought that
tho 0. B. U. might die vory soon and
would not need a reply, but now
tbat the organization was getting on
its feet again a reply might soon
be expected from the Minister of
Justice.
Del. Kavanagh brought to the attention of the delegates the subject
of bail being refused the men on
trial in Winnipeg, ami suggested
that organized labor should flood the
office of the Minister of Justice with
letters asking wby these men are
being refused bail and why the law
is being interpreted -in sueh a way
in tho case of these particular victims of democrucy. Tbe delegates
were instructed to take this matter
back to their respective unions for
action along tho proponed lines.
Tho letter of J. W. Wilkinson,
lublishcd in Inst Saturday's Prov-
nee, brought forth somo criticism,
but it was pointed out thai as most
of orgnnized labor in the city know
the calibre of J. W. Wilkinson that
it was useless taking up the timo
of tbe council with the matter,
Under the heading of good and
welfare Del, Alexander pointed out
the action of thc international officer in taking away the charter of
tho Elcctrlcai Workers.
Del. Midgley informed tho dele-
fates tbat the Typographini Union
lad voted five to one to lay the mater of affiliation witb the A. F. ot L.
Trades Council over for one month,
and that the Shipwrights had voted
two to three against tho affiliation
also.
LOGGERS CAMP CONDITIONS
ABE GREATLY IMPROVED
Organization Gets Results—Capilano, Duncan Bay
and Jackson Bay Strikes Still On—Men Sticking
Fast—Workers Are Getting "On the Job"-* **
Pay Dues and Play the Game
CAMP CONDITIONS are improv
ing in nearly all camps witfi
very little trouble. In a few
of them it ia necessary to take the
extreme action of calling a atrike
bofore the boas cornea to a realization of tke faet that -the organized
logger of 1919 ia a different kind of
animal to what he previously 'exploited and abused to the limit.
Capilano camp ia atill shut down.
A meeting with the management is
to be held on Friday morning. The
boys are sticking tight.
At Merrill, Ring and Moore's
camp, Duncan Bay, the pickets are
having the timo of thcir lives. In
fact it will be a harder job for Mr,
Moore to get them back on the job
now than it was at tho time the
strike was first called.
Jackson Bay strike at Kinman's
'camps of the Lapan Logging Company's is still on. The boys at the
Nimpkiah campa, 1 and 3, Alert Bay,
are on atriko to enforce the camp
conditions.
More orders for men* are coming
through to the union. Whet has
your camp done in tke mattert Have
you put it up to the. boss?
Camp delegates, should not lose
sight of tho fact that it is a part
of their duty to look up the books
of all members in camp and see if
their dues sre paid up to date. If
not, why notf ,
■ Aro you receiving your mall regularly! It is sent from headquarters.
Members in camp here have up to
tho present contributed $662.25 to
the Beilingham atriko fund. Details
will be published in tho Worker.
Further contributions of $100 have
'also come in to the Winnipeg defense fund. This will also be acknowledged through the Worker.
An outstanding feature of the reports coming in from camps is that
ln many easea they are having regular weekly meetings to diacuaa camp
questions and also those of general
working clasa interest. Camp committees are also being elected to
look after various camp interests of
the members and to, if necessary, assist tho delegato. To a greator extent than ever before the men are
getting down to organization and
"on .the job." That is the only
way in which a real live, solid organization will be built up—one
that will stand against all assault*
which may be made upon it, whether
from without or within- A member
who knows what his interests are,
what an organization ahould be if
it ia to function on his bohalf, ean-
not be fooled by bosses or their
tools. Neither can he bernisled by
would-be misleuders—within the organization. Oh the job is where
the organization is—and as the understanding, aim and object of the
men on the job, so will the organisation be.
It is necessary to draw to tb
attention of delegates and membera
that when a member is in arrears hie
cannot get into good standing by
ignoring the arrears and joining np
afresh. He must pay all tke *■«•
wblch he owes, otherwise he . la
cheating the organization whieh Ihu
nil 'the timo been securing him im**
proved conditions. Play the game
with the organization and your fellow members in the same wuy thtt
you want them to play it with you.
Blacksmittu* Union
The old Blacksmith's Union is
getting on its feet again. The
membership who turned in their
local union charter .and joined the
0. B. U. are now getting back into
tbo fold. Bro. Bussell iB acting as
secretary and the local iB meeting
in the Labor Temple on the aecond
and fourth Friday in the month.
We welcome tho British Columbin
Federationist to our exchange list.
A bright, woll-cdited ablo labor paler. — Tho Eastern Federationist,
Sew Glasgow, N, &
IN CHEN11
Oppose Tactics of Moore
aiid Draper—Govern*
ment Condemned
Sydney, N. S.—-Bepresentatives of
I
ARE OWING
Engineers and Mill Work-
ers Making Progress—
Russell Expelled
Considerable progreu la boing
made with organization work among
the mill workers. Arrangements
have been made- to hold business
meetings every month at Port
Moody, Mai Hard ville and Hew
Westminster. It is eipeeted to have
sufficient mombers organized around
Eburne shortly to warrant holding
business meotings in that locality.
If the members who are already
the United Mino  Workers  Tuesday |°'*"DjMd.   *!"    J_'v    S°„ t thrtr
turned their halt dries on Hon.
Gideon Bobertson, Minister of
Labor; Tom Mooro, president of the
Trades and Labor Congress, and P.
M. Draper. After a discussion that
lasted for two hours, the. convention
finally went on record as opposed to
the methods carried out by Messrs.
Robertson, Moore and Draper in selecting tho delegates to the Ottawa
Industrial conference on September
16.
The convention gave a sort of
semi-en dorsat ion of the Ono Big
Union, According to Secretary-
Treasurer MacLachlan; tho Mine
Workers ot Nova Scotia do not
recognize the One Big Union in a
way, but they do favor the recognition of every workmnn in Canada
and believe tbat these workmen, irrespective of their affiliations,
should havo been invited to attend
the Ottawa conference.
Tho session on Tuesday was perhaps tho stormiest of the convention
to dnte. The government was hampered right and left, while Tom
Moore and P. M. Draper were
buffeted from pillar to post.
Teamsters * Chauffeurs Local 656
The familiar button of tho Teamsters again made its appearance
this week, aftor an absence of some
60 days, during the reconstruction
period, and readers can insist on
having their goods delivered by a
man with a button, only international members are wearing this button.
Tho union is now back at thc old
stand, 587 Homer (Street, ond members who have not yet got their buttons can get them by applying
there, also any details they mny wish
to lind out. The meeting nights arc
the second and fourth Wednesday, in
thc Labor Temple.
When ordering your winter supply
of coat insist on having it delivered
by white men as several firms are
using Oriental labor to deliver coal
and thus gouge more profits for
themselves.
shoulders to tho wheel and help out
with the organization work it will
only bo a short time until the work*.
ers in the lumber industry in thii
province are 100 per cent, organized.
Andrew Bussell, a member of tho
abovo unit, was expelled for the following reasons: When a member of
International Local 030 he signed a
statement declaring himself opposed
to eraft unionism and desiring that
his account with tho international
be transferred to the 0. B. U.,
which statemont is in tho hands of
Secretary-Treasurer W. A. Alexander. He also swore allegiance to the
principals of the 0. B. U., and was
initiated into membership on July
21, and within two weeks after being initiated accepted the position
as organizer for the International
Union of Steam Engineers.
Thero were 47 members of former
Local 620 who voted against weeding from the A. F. of L. and Buri-
ncsn Agent W. A. Alexander states
that he has reliable information
tbat up to date not one-half of that
number have joined up with the new
international local that A. Russell
is attempting to organize.
'The Lighted Road," a Finnish
SociaUst publication, has been prohibited from coming into Canada*
Tho logging enmps of Higgins A
Co, have been closed down because
the firm refuses lo provido devent
beds und bath houses for tho lumberjacks. Mr. Higgins is of the opinion
that tbe men ought to be satisfied
with tho same conditions as existed
when he was a logger 25 years ngo.
Typos Defer Action
The Typographical Union nt its
laet meeting laid tho question of
affiliating with the new Trndes
CouncU over for ono _tont_»
Labor Making Big Gains
While Coalition Party
Loses Hold
Tho coalition government el
Great Britain is losing ground day
by day. Iu six by-elections held
sinco Parliament began its career it
has lost four seats. And labor ia
forging ahead.    In   the  by-election
rnment 's majority was reduced
from 4130 to 1092, 'and at the Bath-
well election a smashing blow was
dealt to the government by turning
a coalition majority of 332 into a
labor majority of 7108. In si* by-
elections 39,657 votea wore cast for
the government and 50,945 against
it.
Jewelry Workers.
Jewelry Workers Local 42 held a j just held in Hast Swansea* the gov~
well attended meeting last Friday ernment'a majority was reduced
at wliich several new members were
initiated. Thc wage agreement came
up for discussion und it was decided
to make some improvements in thc
old one and also a twenty per cent,
wcrease in wages. The report of the
delegate to the fourth annua! convention at Chicago, Dan Snell, was
given and lie reported a great ad*
van re in organization of the Jewelry workers in the United States and
that there was a bright future for
the workers in the jewelry tradu.
Labor Day Danco and Whist Drive
0. B. U. units aro intending to
celcbrato on Monday, September 1,
by holding a whist drivo, social and
danco in Room 403 Lnbor Temple,
and any member of organized lnbor
who desires to put in a pleasant
ovening should make arrangements
to be present.
Tickets may bo procured at the
office of tho Eugiiieors and Mill
Workers Room 210 Labor Temple,
or at tno door the night of tho
dance.
Gent's tickets aro 50 conts and
ladies' 25 cents. Light rcfreshnioatf
will bo served.
Patronize Fed. advertiser* .-
!
PAGE TWO
eleventh teab. No. k    THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST    vancouveb, b. c.
FBIDAT. .Aognet 29, 18;
School
Shoes!
THEY'RE SEEN AT
THEIR BEST HERE
Shoes for growing boys and girls that are made
to fit the feet correctly .
CHOICE STURDY LEATHERS
Good looking shoes that show quality and
class. A right size and shape for every foot.
$2.50 to $6.00
Goodwin Shoe Co.
119 HASTINOS ST. XAST
Phone Seymour 2692
s
F. M. Slowin
TAILOR
404-5 DOMINION BUILDING
207 Hastings Street W,
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Victory!   Ruin!
SLATER'S
QUALITY      SERVICE      FREE DELIVERY
OBOOttT  SBPABTKBHT
M.bob Tea, lb  Ke
Hl.lar'i tea Ub.1 Tm, lb. 45c
Buttoroup Milk. 3 for . 360
Fairy Soup, 3 for _   300
Sisters Salt lOo
UU    SPECIAL
Fliuit KIKfcn Sell tta cmMw oi
11 lbs. fop  w"
PBOVISZOK    DEPABTMEOT
Sloter'o   Siloed   Streak--  Bacon,   per
lb   560
Sletor'l Hatst Streaky   Bacon,   per
lb   soe
Slater's  Fineat   Sliced  Baek   Bacon,
lb.  ....  _ .....600
Slater'a Sliced Bonelesi Roll, lb 45c
Kannay'i Sodaa  Ue
Small WHto Bf.ni. 4 Ibo. for. Ke
Small Carnation Milk, 3 fcr 35a
New Spodi, 11 lba. for  Ue
BUTTEB—BUTTEB—BUTTEB
Fineat Albert* Creamery, No.  1:
ret. 800 lb., Saturdar only, from
8 a.m. to 13 noon, 56*£
Mmi'i'ViS,     ~~
nOUS SFSOIAl
300 «*lb. caoka of Boyal Home*
hold,  Fivo   Roaaa   and   Purity.
Floor,  aliffhtly damaged.    Bor.
33 tb     Saturday. «2 45
only    ~
Finaat Beef Drlppini,  lb.. 3(0
B. C. Freah F,gge, doien  75C
Alberta Freah Rfvs, doien - 60o
Fineat Alborta Freah Eggi, doi.-....65e
B. A K. Breakfaot Food, lack 46o
Por BlieuiU, lb 15c .
Chrlstie'a Arrowroot Bilenita  200
Vinegar, gallon jara
OOkPOUBD LABD SFEOIAL
Burni'    Fineat    Carnation    Compound.    Reg. 38c lb.,  Saturday
only,-from 8 a.m. to 11 _t*_j,
p.m., speolal, lb    "***
Limit 4 lba.	
Vinegar, large bottlea  _ 16c
Molasses  Snaps,  lb,  .  SOc
LOOK
We deliver yonr ordera, large or
email, froo, all oror the eity—
Vancouver HeighU, Haatinga
Towailte, South Vancourer,
Point Grey.
Finest Canadian Cheese. Ib 38c
FRESH MEAT  DEPARTMENT
Local Lamb,  Shoulder, lb 26V_0
Loeal Lamb, Lolna, lb — ,27l/,e
Local Lamb, Logo, lb  36c
Round Bonclcia Roaata. lb 360
Boiling Beef, from, lb. l2'/,e
No. 1 Pot Roast, from, lb. 17c
No. 1 Oven Roaet, from, lb 17c
Finest Beef Fat, Ib.  18c
Flnoit Oxford Sausage, lb.  35c
THREE BIG STORES
IS* HAITMOS STIKBT EAST
BIO OBAMYXLLS IIEBET >
SU0 MAW 8T1EBT     •     -     -
PhoM-Sty. 3262
fhOM toy. 80*
Pb«w Fair. 18t3
[By Geo. F. Stirling]
1' Victory. Ruin!'' saya Lloyd
Oeorge. Not in tho same breath,
however, but io two breaths with
due interval for celebrations.
What doos he meant Is ho a
groat statesman, or is he the greatest quack and politician of modern
times, a Cagliostro and Machiavelli
rolled into onef
A little while ugo he mndo a great
speech. We have gained a glorious
victory. Some sny wo did it. Some
say tho United States did it. Some
say I did it myself (tremendous applause). Anyway, the enemy is vanquished. Beatty and Haig havo received their Earldoms, with a littlo
pocket money to boot, and for tho
bravo soldiers of the Imperial
Forces, 250 miles of ribbon—two
inches apiece. Why Beatty and'
Haig should not also have beon con-
teat with this signal mark of honor
wo do not know. Anyway, 'tis done.
the bells have pealed forth, and
thanksgiving has been dinned into
the cars of tbe Almighty from tho
four corners of the earth.
And now, Lloyd Goorge makes
another speech, thia time with no
flourishes, but a straight, simple,
heart-to-heart talk. In tlie former
speech the keynote waa "Victory."
This timo thc kcynoto, is "limn."
Tho war has cost us forty billion
pounds. Tho national debt has in*
ureascd thirteen times. Pensions
are costing tho governmont a hundred millions pounds yearly. Our
adverse trade balanco is eight hundred million pounds. "Wo must
bridge that chasm, or at the bottom
of it is ruin." And then comes the
solution, "produco more and consume'loss."
When Joshua smote tho Amnlo-
kites hip and thigh in the glorious
•daya of old the victors did not have
to consume less ns a result of the
victory; on the contrary thore waa
a general inerease of prosperity, and
a greater consumption per head.
Why is it then, that after tho great-
cat war in history, the victors nre
told by thcir leaders that unless
they consume less thun they did before the glorious victory, they nre
faced with mint Is it possible that
after all wc havo not won a glorious victory!
Thero are three ways by which wo
can estimate a victory. First, there
is the question of loss of human life.
When we tnko this viewpoint we
And that the Allies had a greater
loss in taen killed than the Central
fP,
'owers. It is obvious, thereftrtL'that
wo have not gained much \k ft victory that way.
Second, there is the financial cost
of the war. The Central Powers are
facing ruin, apparently so are wo,
and if we consider that faot that
the war cost the Allies moro 'than
it did the Central Powers we. cannot
boast of much pf a victory there.
Thirdly, and this is the greatest
test of victory, there is the moral
side of the question. Which side has
gained tho greatest moral advantage, which side has made the greatest progress towards tho liberty, democracy, ami freedom of the people.
On the side of the Allies, Bussia
has overthrown the tyranny of tho
Czar and established a people's government. To some, people this is a
dubious advance, but to those of us
who belong to the working class it
is a tremendous victory. Against
this thero is on the side of the-Central Powers, the overthrow of the
tyranny of the Kaiser and establishment of a people's government
in Germany, also the. overthrow of
tho Hapsburgs ia Austro-Hungary
nnd the establishment of republics
thero, which equals, if it does not
outweigh the advantage in Bussia.
Moreover, whilst militarism has
been crushed in the Central Powers,
we find amongst the Allies that it
has taken a firmor hold. In England, and tho Unitod States compulsory military training sooms to have.
como to Btay. In Canada we are to
have a standing army. Admiral JoP
Hco is making a tour of the Empire
boosting the navy, and if wo mistake not we shall seo Httl6 navies
starting'up in Canada, Australia,
South Africa, etc., as a result of his
propaganda. Sb that on the/wholo
thero' Is some reason to doubt
whother thero really has been'a victory.
But lot us assume that wc havo
won. Why, then, are we.now asked
to produce more;, and consume lesst
Tho answor is simplo, Wo,aw not a
unit. When thc Israelites.gained a
victory over tho AninloKitcs, all. the
Israelites gained tho victory. Ono
section of tho Israelites didn't lend
money to tho othor soction to carry
on the war, and thon raked ia their
interest freo of taxation. There was
no question of disputo between capital and labor in the tribe In those.
days. True they were a bunch pf
savages, nnd robbers, but thoy were
all on the* same footing. Now> wo
have tho savages and robbers on' the
same footing it is true, but those is
Deals With Recent Commission in Great
Britain
Tom Bichardson was again tho
speaker at the Columbia on Sunday,
and his address dealt with "Thc
British Miners and tho Government." Mrs. H. Q. Taylor wai
chairman.
Mr. Bichardson statod that he
was born in a minor's cottage, and
wont to work in a mine before he
was eleven yoars old. Among his
later activities he had taken part in
the Durham Miners' Association,
and as a member ot Parliament he
had had further opportunity of
making himself familiar with, the
situation from the insido. He hoped
he might be able to aay something
to counteract tho designs of scheming politicians, newspaper... writers,
and big vested interests in England
and elsewhere.
Alluding, to the recent Boyal Com-,
mission in Britain, which he held
was t)f interest also to Canada, ho
pointed to the recognition of! the
miners as the back-bone of the country, the bedrock foundation upon
which the whole superstructure of
commerce was erected. In view of
C. H. Jones & Son
LIMITI-i "_
-MANUFACTURERS- ^'^
TENTS, AWNINGS AND CANVAS GOODS
OF ALL KINDS
28-30 Water Street
fc-Ki-l
no Ul
Phone Seymour 20
Perry & Mack, Ltd.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
305 Pender Street West Vancouver, B. C.
Clubb & Stewart
Established 89 Years IIMITeU
 UNION    STORE	
315 HASTINGS STREET WEST PHONE SEY. 702
I BOYS' DEPARTMENT I
New Fall Clothing."
School boys are already being outfitted for September,
and we call attention.to the quality and excellent workmanship of the new Suits shown in good tweeds and all-
wool serges; Norfolk and other styles.
fl
Bf
OVERCOATS,  GOLF  HOSE,  HATS  AND
CAPS, UNDERWEAR, PYJAMAS,     .
NIGHTGOWNS, ETC.
! <
SMALL BOYS'WASH SUITS
AR priece greatly reduced ta make room for new stock.
COTTON AMD STBAW HATS, up to ♦UB, RKp
BATHING SUITS
Oood nayy, trimmed orange, white and cardinal;
ull sizes to 32, at ™	
85c
another   footing  upon   which   the
working people have to stand.
In an editorial the other day, the
editor of the Province gave us a
fow platitudes about production and
consumption. It will perhaps broaden his horizon a little if wo give him
somo more.
1. It is impossible for all countries in tho world to export .more
than they import. <
2. Prosperity for all is -therefore
also impossible, under tho. present
system of production and consumption.   .
3. All the advantage of foreign
trado lies in the imports.
4. If a govornmont gives somo of
its citizens $5 for $4, it increases
the power of consumption of thoee
citizens at tho. expense of the other
citizens.
5. A war carried on by some citizens doiug the fighting and some
citizens lending money at intorest,
means that the fighters, after doing the fighting, will have to roturn
home'and do the paying of tho said
interest.
G. To give one's life is a grenter
sacrifice, than to give ono's money.
Hence, any capitalist, country will
give .the fighters a piece of ribbon,
and the capitalists interest for all
time which must bo paid by the
" jhters.
7. No capitalist country will
strike a. medal for tho money lenders with .-this inscription "Ho paid
the Bill."
. As tho working cluss generally speaking spends its monoy on
necessities, thc appeal to curtail consumption ia an appeal to the workers to lower their standard of. living,
and an appeal to the wealthy not
I o buy so many diamonds.
9. The curtailment of consumption on tho pnrt of the wealthy
menns for thom cutting out caviar,
ox tail soup, nnd champagne, thus
increasing thoir genernl health, to
thc workorii it means donylng themselves of necessnry food nnd clothing and increasing their ill health.
Wo could give him somo more but
maybe that is enough to lot Wm
and thc capitalisfs whom he stands
for set a better insight into the
working class standpoint.
Instead of all this foolishness
about getting wealthy by shipping
out moro wealth than we ship in,
wo would suggest doing away with
the tariff on imports nnd -putting a
high tariff on exports. If foreigners
Ihen flood the country with food,
clothing and other useful things
they eould be divided up between
tho population so that we would not
have to work at all. When they
slopped flooding tts we could dig in
und do a littlo work ourselves.
AVhnt we want is not work, bnt a
living. Work is a curse (see Holy
Writ) nnd the less we hnve to do
the better. If wo need a little exercise to keep tho body fit wo can play
golf, climb mountains, and go fishing. By aU meahs let tho foreigner
flood us. I wish Germany or some
other country would export to me all
Ihe clothes, food, implements nnd
comforts that I need, I wouldn't
give a toss about my trnde balance.
They would have to do the worrying
about that. Whnt tho nation needs is
a little moro unemployment for the
masses, and a good deal less of this
foolishness of shipping out the stuff
wo produco when wo are employed.
The writer, however, is not against
foreign exchange. The underlying
principle of all foreign exchange is
ihe saving of labor. If it costs us
100 hours labor to produce a quantity of wine that can be producod
in Franco for 10 hours' labor, we
will have the French wine, thank
you, and the unemployment, even if
wn have to give Fruuce 20 hours7
labor in our lumber eamps and mines
in return for it. We aro not so stuck
ou work that we would recommend
putting a 90-hour tarriff on French
wine so that wo could put in the
full 100 hours.
But apart from foreign exchange,
whioh saves us labor, any self-respecting people would parcel up all
these capitalistic homilies about increasing our foreign trade and put
thom up the flue.
LABOR DEMANDS AND INSISTS THAT AS A RESULT OF
THE WAB, THE STANDARD OF
LIVING OF THOSE WHO TOIL
SHALL BE RAISED, AND THE
STANDARD OF LIVING OF
THOSE WHO TOIL NOT SHALL
BE BROUGHT LOW.
It may be revolution. It may be
against law and order. It may be
anarchy, Bolshevism, O. B. U.ism, or
whatover else you like to call it.
But the world is in revolt against
the folly tbat caused the European
war.. We have our solution of the
riddle, and if our capitalistic rulers
cannot off-V a botter solution of this
riddle of the Sphinx, then thoy must
allow themselves to bo swallowod
like gentlemen with as good a grace
as possible.
If our standard of living has to bo
reduced; if wo do not get a greater
measure of freedom; if we do not
curtain the insidious campaign of
the jingoes for armies and navies,
wo have lost the war evon if we
sing hymns of thanksgiving until tho
dav of judaiuoat.
the criticisms levelled against them
he pointed out that, within aeven
days of the declaration of war, they
hud sent a delegation to Asquith,
undertaking not to ask for any increase of wages bo long as the war
lasted, provided the government on
thcir part would tako over the essential public utilities and thns protect the public against the profiteering that was otherwise to be expected.  (Applause.)
The governmont, however, did not
accept their offer, which waB, in fact,
a negation of the contemplated exploitation of civilians at homo and
soldiers and sailors abroad. The
power of the vested interests, the
designs of the capitalists prevailed;
otherwise tho country would not now
be confronted with the problom of
tlio nationalization of tho mines,
with the inflnted prices brought
about by gambling, etc., during tho
war.
The subsequent demands of the
mon for a 30 per cont. raise, and a
shortening of hours, led to the Royal
Commission, "appointed by the wily
Lloyd-George," the miners having
throe representatives out of a total
of thirteen. The miners' executive
mado the preliminary demand that
the' 'commission should report within a specified time ahd that the government should bo pledged to accept its findings; As to tlio mode of
procedure, when it was intended
practically to put the miners on trial,
thoy rof Used to proceed unless the
positions were revised; and so, for
tho first timo in history, tho mine
owners were placed in the dock and
provod guilty, not only in rolation
to the miners, but to the general
public as well. President Smilie was
deluged with letters congratulating
the commission on the way thoy had
demonstrated the evil of private
ownership of the mines.  (Applause.)
An interim report of the commission, signed by ten members out of
the thirteen, condemned tho present
system of ownership and operation
nnd demanded national ownership
and joint* control. The government,
in tho porson of Bonar Law, accepted the report and promised to give
effect to it in spirit and in lotter.
They were astute; they studied the
psychology of peoples, movements,
and events, the speaker remarked:
"I sometimes wish that working
men* had a little of the sagacity* of
employers, financiers and politicians;
wc would not then be so simple-
minded as wo sometimes arc." (Ap-
plause.)
Aftor further sitting, tho commission again reported for nationalization. This timo Lloyd-George gives
out that ho is "not going to do it."
(Laughter.) On the other hand, literature is distributed from ono end
of. tho. .country to tho other, making
tho miners responsible for a rise of
six shillings per ton in the price of
coal and dwelling on the "vicious
industrial eyele" which was involved in" the. demand for nationalization, adversely affecting tho whole
country's trade, and the well-being
of the miners in particular.
With this picturo of the mine-
owners and thcir solicitors "pathet*.
ically pleading tho cause of the miner's wife and the miner's child,"
the speaker contrasted the government's refusal of a demand for better inspection of the mines, on the
ground that the finances of tho country would not permit of another
150,000 pounds a year being devoted
to that purpose, evon in order that,
when the miner left his home in
tho morning to go to work, there
might by a reasonable probability of
his return.
The proposal of the government
now was not to nationalize tho
mines, but tho minerals, by buying
out tho royalty owners. But the
speaker thought. that, "notwithstanding the duplicity of Lloyd-
George, there is in Great Britain a
public sentiment that will compel
this governmont, or a now government that will bo elected shortly, to
nationalize the mines of Great Britain."
In concluding his address, Mr.
Richardson warned his hearers
ngainst tho serious tendency In Canndn to become parochial in outlook
and have little interest in world happenings. He urged that they should
make themselves familiar with the
"upward and onward" spirit that
was abroad. In the Old Country the
miners did not stand by themselves
as an industrial cluss; there was a
wide-spread solidarity of mind and
spirit that compelled attention. Tet
capitalism was so audacious, private
ownership so strong, that notwithstanding tho pledge of thc prime
minister and tho promise of parliament, it challenged organized democracy.
As to local conditions here, he
said, "Tou ought to rally round the
trade unionists of this town and resist a tyranny that, in any well-organized system of socioty, was banished thirty years ago." In the Old
Country, a mine owner dared not
talk to a fifteen-yenr-old pit-boy as
a local manager of this district talked to working men.
The mineral wealth of B. C. was
still national property; it had not
yot come under the control of vested interests as was the case else-
whero, and they would avoid that
state of things evor happening in
B. C.
Mention tho Federationist when
you make a purchase at a store.
Edwin J. Galloway
The Old Book Store
940 OBANVILLE BT.
Vancouver, B. O.
Established 1890
rhew Seymour 6851
All Unas of Books, News,
papers anl Stationery kept in
stock.
Rob Roy
Hotel
H0d.rB~E.0r7  Convonienee
Hot mil Cold W.lcr In Everf
Boom
FIRST-CLASS  BAR
ST  OOBDOVA  STREET WEST
Fropriotreu:     MUS.   WRIGHT
Ute  of Iho Victor Hotol
Month End Sale
Vancouver ladies were never before offered such bargains as may be secured at the Famous for the next few
days.
Serge and Poplin Suits-
Regular values tk *«.50...
Beautiful Serge Dresses—
Begular values to $35.00.....
$18.50
$18.50
Ooats—Throe-quarter and full longth— £Q t\f\
Regular valuo to *20  «Ptf-»UU
Extraordinary bargains in Wash Suits and Dresses-—
Whito Wash Skirts—Tartan Plaid Skirts and other
lines.
623
HASTINGS ST. W.
Near Oranvillo
PBOTEOT YOTJB FAMILY
PBOTEOT YOUBSELP
Our business is saving
money for your family and
for yon.-.
Crown Life Ins. Co.
Phono Sey.* 710
421-26 ROGERS BLDO.
BBENTON S. BBOWN,
Prov. Managor.
The
EMPIRE
CAFE
76 Hastings St  E.
Vancouver's Best
Where shall we go?
Let's go to the Empire, the most delightful cafe in town.
GET THE HABIT
—LET THB—
NODELAY
SHOE CO.
1047 Granville Street
DO YOUB BBPAIBINQ
-Anlythe   .
Rest
w ITnion
U   Oak
Solo leather osod. Show made
to order.    Union  shop with
Union principles.
Nodelay Shoe Co.
1047 OEANVILLB
Phono Bey. 1479
COAL
Lump (sacked), per
ton „ $11.00
Washed Nut, per ton,
at $10.50
KIRK'S   Celebrated   DonWt
Screened
NANAIMO-WELLINGTON
OOAL
Il Alwaya Dependable
Aak tho woman who burni Ik
Kirk&Co.
LIMITED
929 Main Street
Phonos Soymonr 1441 and 408
Tou can depend* on tht
Hillcrest
Dairy
A. FISH, Prop,
to niruiah you Pure Hill
Housewives should insist o
sll delivery men showin
their union cards.
rotate: Ity. 77j»o-o. ser, «Htt
O. a. LETS, Proprietor
LASOI TEMPLI
-TAXI-
SOFT DRINK PARLO
oiOAia. aioARims torn ion
DBIKf ^
«0* DUHSHUia BTRIMF
Greateit Stock of
Furniture
in Greater Vancouver
Replete in every detail
HastingsFarritveCaLhL
BB SUBB YOU OET
VAN BROS.
WHUT TOU ASK FOB
-CIDER-
■M Nonalcoholic wines of at
UNION   MEN'S   ATTENTIOI
—THB—
TROCADERd
CAFE
For Union Km
IM tit-—ttt— STBEET WBf
Phono Seymoar SSS
THE BEST PLAOE TO EAT t
VAHOOUVEB — UNION CAB
CENTER ft HANNA, Lt|
UNDERTAKERS
Rsflned Serrtoo
104* OEOBOIA STBBBT
Ono Blook Wost of CourthooJ
Uso of Modem Chapel ani
Funeral Parlors freo to all]
Patrons
Telephone Seymour am i
Our advertisers support the
eratloniat.   It ia np to you to J
port them.
THE HOLIDAY SEASON IS APPBOACHINO-Are yon going ttl
mako good your advantago of
living in British Columbia, by
spending a couple of weeks
out in the open. We offer yon
a splendid selection of Fishing Taekle. Hides, Cartridges,
Clothing, togothor with tha
usual Camping Requirements.
TISDALL'S LIMITED
The Completo Sporting Ooods
Storo
618-620 Hastlnga Street West,
VANCOUVEB, B. O.
°_:
N0THINO IS MOKE HIALTHFUL
After a day's labor
than a
Bottle of
^^Ask for it 'I
It's Union-Made
For Sale at all stands}
Westminster Brewery Oo. OmOllX    PAP1E    VAHOODVBE
1B4BBS   AHD   LABOB   COOHOU,
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
iLEVENTH YEAR.   No. 36 EIGHT PAGES VANCOUVER, B. C, FRIDAY MORNING, AUGUST 2971919'
omciAx fapxb _omm an,
omu nouanoa or uaos
Quality Footwear
Reasonably Priced
Dress Shoes for men; black and tan; new Fall
models; Goodyear welted soles, recede and
round-toe styles.
Astoria,  Gresham  and  Strider  makes;   all
arade-   „ $8.00 to $12.00
"STEELITE"  BOOTS
Solid leather right through, and "there's double
wear in every pair."
$5.45
Men's Work Boots for„	
Boys' School Boots for	
Misses' School Boots, in 11 to _.
Girls' School Boots, 8 to W/_ —
.$4.25
$3.45
$2.75
The Reason of Reason
We offer a superior
dental service
—The Best That Money Can Buy
We are able to do this because of oar staff organization of
specialists in every field of dental work—the mawelously complete equipment of our offico—and the fact that we operate our
own laboratory.
Our Prices Are Seasonable—Call and Oet Onr Estimate
Drs. Brett Anderson and
Douglas Casselman
Dental X-Bay sad Crown and Bridge Specialists
602 HASTINGS STREET WEST, CORNER SEYMOUR
Office open Tuesday and Friday Evenings
Phone Seymonr 3331—Examinations made on pbone appointments
LABOR DAY
Monday, September 1st
We offer congratulations to the Union Workingman.
We irish to return our thanks to Union Workingmen
for the liberal patronage extended to us the past year.
We trust that the coming year will add to the Workingman's opportunities and his welfare.
The Ingledew Shoe Co.
"Preah Out Flowers, Funeral Designs, Wedding Bouquets, Pot Plants
Ornamental and Shade Trees, 8eed>, Bulbs, Florists' Sundrios
Brown Bros. & Co. Ltd.
FLOBISTS AND NOBSEBYMEK
^2— STOBES-2
SB Hastings Stroet Bast 728 Granville Street
Sermonr 988-672 Seymonr 9513
Men's Fine Shoes
Union Made
Men's Velour Calf Bluchers,
high toe
Men's Velour Calf,
recede toe 	
Men's Mahogany Calf,
recede toe. '.	
$7.00
$6.50
$6.00
Men's Work Shoes,
from  _._.
$5.00 up
MEN'S  CLOTHING  AND  UNDERWEAR,
HATS AND CAPS-AT LESS
W. B. Brummitt
18-20 CORDOVA STREET WEST AND
444  MAIN  STREET
Tastiness!
Wholesomeness
Perfection
YOU'D nover think so
touch goodness eould
be put into a loaf of bread,
But then—we don't make
one loaf at a time. We
make them by the thousands and ean afford to
put tho bost that monoy
can buy into each loaf we
sell our customers,
AT TOOB OBOCEBS
SHELLY BROS., LTD.
Pood License No. M061
Pair. __
J
[By Nemesis]
It is marvellous how many miracles on working unnoticed around
ub each minute of our time—unnoticed in spite of the fact that there
is nothing which more strongly appeals to the human mind than that
which flavors of the wonderful or of
the miraculous.
An abnormally sized potato Will
set the tongues of a whole rural
community wagging for months, and
calls forth many sago theories and
exclamations of astonishment and
wonder.
A dozen murders will pass with
little comment, while one with mysterious settings will excite the whole
community for weeks.
The two most wonderful of all
miracles we accept without comment
and almost without recognition. I
refer to the life miracle and the
! functioning of brain.
1 So far as human research has gone
the veil of mystery, impenetrable
and forbidding, still envelops them,
but who knows what this twentieth
century may accomplish when our
present social system, a disgrace to
man even in hiB present state of
somi-development, has boen abolished and replaced by a sane one under
whieh and through whieh mental
progression can take place.
Let us examine this brain fnnc-
tion. Wo possess certain organs by
which, the forces operating in the
cosmos are transmitted to the brain,
! whose function it is to convert them
into sensations, vis:—seeing, feeling, hearing, tasting and smelling.
Light waves or vibrations passing
through the lens of the eye aro
focused upon tho retina and a
picture of the outside world Impressed thereon. This is a marvellous contrivance but man by means
of his camera can obtain a similar
result.
In the dark brain thc miracle is
performed by which that picture on
the retina is %nadc visible and that
is thc insolvablo mystery.
Those ethereal light vibrations are
by thc functioning of brain converted into vision. The marvel and
the mystery of itl
Tbis is the existence of the outside world revealed to us. This is
the beauty of living things and in*
animate nature made possible for us
by tho function of brain.
Great God! what mightier miracle
hast Thou performed than thatf
The towering mountains, the green
j earth, the rolling oceans, the rushing
winds, ayl and the whole ef the inanimate cosmos with its unnumbered
millions of suns and their satellites,
all products of the working of Thy
laws through countless aeons, dwindle into insignificance beforc thnt
last miracle—that climax of all. Thy
works, tho functioning of brain, a
little speck of cellular tissue enclosed in its dark reccpthcle.
Ethereal light waves according to
thcir variations are converted into
all the numberless shades of color
and mode visiblo; the green of the
leaf, the glowing tint of tbe petal,
the azuro of the ocean and the sky
—all color—made known to us
through the functioning of brain.
Ethereal heat waves borne
through the trembling ether from
their source nearly a hundred million
miles away, impinging on our body,
are converted into a comforting sensation of warmtf by the functioning of brain. Vibrations of thc air,
collected and transmitted by the organs of hearing nre by that same
functioning transmuted into sound-
something that we hear—into melody and harmony; into the rustling
of the breczs, tho roaring of the
ocean, tho song of the bird, the hum
of insect's wing and—most precious
of all—'the thrill of the human
voice.
Thc perfume of the flower, the
feel of a loved one's hand aro both
made possible by the functioning of
brain.
Great God! the mystery, tbe marvel; the love and the promise of it
alll
Feel it in our soul we may, ex-
| press it in words we cannot. When
we try we do but realize the narrow
limitations of language nnd its inability to adequately express the
effects of those unseen realities
which work so silently and so effectively in their hiding places.
And functioning from this miracle
of consciousness, but a thing apart
from it, is the faculty of reason, the
power which man possesses of deducing unseen truths from the known
facts or premises supplied by his j
senses, and which if properly exercised should insure for him without undue effort, the maximum
amount of security, perfect health,
and an abundance of creature com
forts, during his short earthly jour
ney on Life's road to eternity.
Why was the faculty of reasoning
given to man as a supplement to
that marvellous consciousness and
self-consciousness f
I say "given" as that word implies a giver; for if anyone can complacently believe, as the dull materialists profess to do, that that
marvellous functioning of brain
arose from the working of blind
chance or blind laws; that a few elements by chemical attraction at a
'favoring temperature, combined and
formed living matter and self-conscious matter, that could perform
[the miracles of seeing and bearing
and all that self-consciousness implies, then surely his quality- of
credulity must be unduly developed.
Before we answer our question directly, let ub first answer it negatively.
It is quito evident that this faculty of reason was not given to us
merely as a means of supporting
life, or as it is familiarly called
getting a living," for organisms
possessing only life and consciousness can perform that duty with
greater facility than man under the
handicap of our present social systom.
Therefore the fact remains for
consideration that man possesses
self consciousness and a reasoning
faculty which arc not necessary for
tho mere supporting of life. Without them he could obtain all tho necessary comforts to support a healthy
physical aud mental state of being,
as far as mentality can exist without
self-consciousness.
They were certainly not givon to
j to obtain luxuries which produce
'only deterioration in all qualities,as
'witness the moral and physical
wreckage presented in our ruling
classes today.
Considering these facts wo are
forced to the conclusion tbat they
were given to us that we might devolop morally to a state of absolute
perfection by a process accelerated
in exact proportion to the amount of
that reasoning faculty brought to in
fluenco it.
Without self-consciousness, moral
consciousness could not exist and it
needs'the aid of reaion for its full
development.
Then according to this showing
these super-qualities were bestowed
upon man that he might destroy the
bestiality in aim, inherited from his
jungle ancestry, «nd develop into
that being who has boen faintly pictured in the inspirations of all true
poets.
It is quit* evident that this regeneration of man must he accomplished through tbe agency of tbe
working classes, as their present
masters are absolutely without
vision, or moral conscience or desire
in any form to progress: indeed
without any ambition higher than
profit-mongering.
Now the great barrier, and indeed
the only barrier to the accomplishment of this regeneration, lies in the
present social system which has
arisen by a gradual and illogical
growth on the foundation of jungle
conditions and morals.
A social system founded on the
I survival of the fittest, whose natural
| operating grounds aro the jungle,
the forest and the slime of thc
swamp, cannot much longer be tolerated in the operations of men, all
of whom, above that ruling but morally lower stratnm of profit-mongers,
are feeling out for better, more ennobling and more sO-1-satisfying
conditions under which their self
consciousness and reason can function in accord with the intention of
their Donor and perform thcir defined work of regeneration.
When the present slaves of the
[earth are intelligently nnd determinedly united that work will be
un easy one.
Tho earth was created - for man
and must be owned by man as a
'whole. When that is accomplished
the rest will be simple enough.
The greatest task that lies before
them will be the overcoming of that
jungle ferocity which animates its
presont owners and indeed is their
chief characteristic, and as long as
there aro reactionaries in'their own
more enlightened rnnks, who with
dog-souls and for dog's wages are
willing and eager to operate thcir
terrible and hell-inspired engines of
'slaghter ngainst their own brothers,
tho task in deed will be impossiblo.
When tho great day dawns on
which they lay down their arms
and refuse to slay their brothers,
then will dawn the promised millenium the joy of which will be
shared by thcir present rulers if
their greed-eaten and power-puffed,
little souls were only capable of
recognizing the fact.
There can be no real joy and happiness in this world for anyone as
long as there are want and diseaso
and misery stalking rampant everywhere, and the true functions of
self-consciousness and reason operating under tho withering handicap of
tho present, evil, social system.
Pass The Federationist along and
help got new subscribers.
(In Oreiter
Vancouver,   |2.00
•'■«-U. ill
WORLD WIDE NEWS
w,v( NOEWAT
Kristiania.—Tho question of the
socialization of industries is being
takes up with great forco by the
Norwegian Labor Party. One branch,
"Nord Hydro," at Ejukan, the
greatest electrical power centre in
the country, having a number of
factories, iB ready to put into active
operation its plans for the socialization of the electric power industries.
Some form for the socialization of
the fisheries is also to be found.
JAPAN
Tokio—A big mass meeting of
the newly-organized Associated
Labor Union, called to discuss improvement in labor conditions, which
was addressed by Major Tagiri of
Tokio and others, was brokon up
violently when Sakae Osugi, a prominent Socialist, tried to address thej
audience.
Tho police interfered and stopped
tho meeting. After the trouble four
Socialists were arrested, but were
released later.
FINLAND
To War on Russian Soviets
London—Griffin Barry, correspondent of the London Daily Herald,
has cabled his paper as follows from
Paris regarding events in Finland:
"Thc Council of Five haB sent instructions to tho French, British,
Italian, and American military attaches at Holsingfors to urge the
Finns to accept Kolchak'b request
for a combined offensive against thc
Soviet city (Moscow), promising, of
course, more munitions and more
militnry advice.
In addition to this action, for the
first time an open and official request, signed by all the five representatives, includes a guarantee that
Finland will suffer no penalty under the League of Nations rules regarding .unsanctioned war against a
foreign country if the request is
complied with.
Los Angeles has been cut off from
the rest of the world during the past
three dayB on account of a strike of
switchmen on three railroads—the
Southern Pacific, Santa Fe and the
Salt Lake. Car inspectors and shopmen are out in sympathy.
) $1.50 PER YEA*
DRUGS
AT SPBOUL OUI KATES
"FBIDAY   ANO    SATSBDAT
too Held*. Fruit Saline SSe
85o Outoria    24c
. 60e Hind*. Cream  _'..~tlt
NJOO Horllck*. Halted Milk „ 76c
76. Scott*. Em.liloa   63c
16© 8terao Alcohol    . ISC
20o Star Bud Clon.r   loc
«6c Jed   S.1U      51c
60c Brook*. B.by  Bar].?  SSe
«Oo Forh.n'i Tootli Put.  SSe
Cambie Street
- Tailors -
303 CAMBIE ST.
If you want to buy a suit
or sell a suit,
If you want a suit repaired,
cleaned or pressed.
Come to us.
Satisfaction Guaranteed
303 CAMBIE ST.
FRANCE
A Tolling Headline
Paris—Thc "Journal du Peuple,"
for July 3, carries tho following
motto on its front page: "Those
who were most eager to cry 'Death
to the Bodies' will not be the last
to* re-establish commercial relations
witb the Germans.' "
AMERICA
One of tho most successful co-operative enterprises in  this country
is thc Purity Co-operative   Baking
""Jfc*'y, in Paterson, N. J.,  which
, Jen supplying its members with
chreaner and better brend in tho
city ..'for close on to fourteen years.
During tho war, while the prico of
bread was being regulated by thc
Federal Food Control Board, the
Purity Bakery, while all tho private
tfrif{*» were sending in telegrams
protesting against the high prices
fixed by the govornment, sent in a
statement to Washington that it was
making a bigger profit than was allowed by tho bylaws of tho society.
Five Canadian soldiers alleged to
have played a prominent part in thc
Epsom barrack riots in England
havo been sentenced to onc year imprisonment each.
60c Liquid Veneer
 38C |
75c Dorln'i  Brunette Rouge  SOc
26c Mennen's Ttlcum   14c
60c Velnor Shampoo ...  .24c
26c Bftby'i Own Tsbleti „ 18c
60e Chun's Nerw Food  SSe
80c Murine  ~_....™...30«
60c Mennen's Kor KonU  33c
Sl.00 Chue'i Liver Cur* 67c
60e Zambuk  29c
25c Witch Huel  Shiving Stick....l4e
SOc Emubifled  Corount  Oil 24c
12.00 Cuihion H»ir Broth  »1,1»
Sl-OO Gem Bator
...fte
S2.00 Hater Strop $1.24
60c Doan's  Pills   33c
Sl.00 Reld't Syrujp of Hypophoi-
pWt«    : 48c
Wu Tu Extra When Be«ulrtd
Sttttoatiy U SptcUl Pricei
Vancouver Drag Co.
X-nOTED
TBE OMOII.AL CITRATE
BBUOOISTS OF VAHOOUVEB
—Six 8tore&—
406 Hutlngi  St. W Sey.    1966
7 Hutingi  SI.  W Sty.    8632
418 Main   8t 8.J.    8082
782 Granville   St  Sey.    7018
1700 Comro.rei.1 Dr..- High.    283
Oranvlll. .nd Bn»Sway....B»y.   2814
A UNION STORE
THERE IS A HIGHER ART
in the spending of money tktn in tne earning sf it.
' Many and raety a nun haa earned big all hii working career to flnd himself broke at the end, while
his more edncated and scientific friend earning leaa In-
ishes up on "Easy Street." .Let us educate you to save
by purchasing here, and let us explain that we give you
all that anyone else can give ypu with every item, material, work and style, of better quality and with moro
innate, honest goodness, because we are all workers ourselves, taking a pride and a pleasure in our trade, and
seeking to maintain the prestige our house has earned
over a successful ten years making flne, customed-tailored
B. C. SUITS to the individual measure' of flu, big-
hearted B. O. men and women.
T.lephon. S.y. 4S41
Sails, Tents and Awnings
Tuastm- asd Garrotters'
APEONS,   BtJBBEK  BOOTS  and
OIL   CXOIHINO
Estimates glvan on canvas work
41 WATEB STBEET,
VAHOOUVEB, B. O.
Registered In accordance with tit.
Copyright Act.
POWER
Motorists and mechanical engineers aro heen to notice any
diminishing of power in their
engine. The fault may He in
some essential part of tho machinery, and a trifling adjustment may bc all thut is ncces-
■-■■ sary to restore it to its full
-nffini-ni-y. But until all tho unitn
sre working Jmnminiously the en-
cine Ik lacking in power. So it
in with the human machine, which
frequently receives less attention
ond anxious care as to Hi operation than a machine of metal. Full
mentnl- and physical efficiency it
not possible, for instance, with the
treth—highly essential parts—falling to perform tin ir true function
in tho operation of the human
machine. If yoa would be 100
per cent, efficient you must hat*
perfect teeth.
Maintain power by keeping your
teoth sound and efficient. Gain
power by having me restore them
to full efficiency. Uy fees ara
moderate.
Dr. Lowe
Fine Dentistry
HASTINGS   AND   ABBOTT
Phone  Soy.  MU
Opposite Woodward's
The Arnold & Quigley
Upstairs Clothes Shop
Saves You Money
THERE are many substantial and convincing reasons WHY THIS
UPSTAIRS CLOTHES SHOP SAVES YOU MONEY-many
reasons why we can give you better values than the average ground-
. floor clothing store.
Expenses here are cut to a minimum—we buy ior cash—we sell
for cash—we carry no charge accounts—we have the lowest rent of
any Clothing Store in Vancouver—we occupy the entire second floor
(2500 square feet) of this building—every inch is crowded with suits,
overcoats and raincoats.
Our tremendous turnover enables us to sell you high-grade hand-
tailored clothes at the lowest margin of profit.
REASON WITH YOURSELF AND THEN COME UPSTAIRS AND SAVE
MONEY ON YOUR NEXT SUIT OR OVERCOAT
The August Clean-up <
PRESENTS REMARKABLE VALUES AT.    '
Regular values up to $37.50 ^^^^^^
A drastic clean-up of all odd and single suits in fine all-wool worsteds, tweeds,
cassimeres and serges—standard two and three-button models — smart dark
browns, greys and fancy mixtures. Regular values d*oe A A
up to $37.50 in the August cleanup at - - «p-«*«J.UU
25
-THE-
SPROTT-SHAW
SCHOOL
336 HASTINGS ! ITREET WEST
has just completed arrangements for tlie opening of a
STRONC1 UP-TO-DATE
ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT
in whieh intensive instruction -will be given in all matriculation and high achool subjects.
We have already four teachers engaged, each a university graduate, and each a specialist.
SUCCESS IB ASSURED
DAT AMD EVENING CLASSES
—Snd for particular! toll. J. SPROTT, B. A., or Phono Seymour 1810
Prepare for Rainy Weather
Vulcanized Rubber Raincoats
—take advantage of old low prices on these splendid heavy-weight vulcanized rubber-lined English Tweed Raincoats — handsome green, grey and
brown mixtures, plaids and plain colors—every coat fully guaranteed.
|       $25   -  $30  -  $35
SHIRTS $1.39
30 dozen Men's Fine Englbih Cnmbrie Shirts in neat
fancy stripes; good qualities, $1.75 £l   QQ
| aad $2-00 values *  «Pl«Ot/
$2.50 and $3.00 W. O. & K. Hcg.il and Arrow soft cuff
English Percale, Zephyr and Madras 4*1   AP
Shirts in smart fancy stripes; Saturday.... -tPl-tt/3
Clearing up to $4.00 Bcavy Silk Front and Woven
Madras Shirts in d»0 AC
$1.23
OVERALLS $1.75
$_!.25 heavy striped Denim Overalls,
made large and roomy; Saturday	
ji:miuiui qualities 	
Iil.75 fancy striped; collar attached
I Outing Shirts ...a	
CHAMBRAY WORK SHIRTS $1.15
(1.50 .itra quality plain bluo d_ |    IP
Chauibra-f Work Shirta, .11 sizos «J> 1 • I O
SATURDAY SOCK VALUES
100 dozen rogular 60c Mon'a Plain Black Knglish Cash*
moro Finish Socks, in good qualities;        A |   t\f\
3 pair  -  V1 a\t\J
75c Puro Wool Cashmore Socks— t_ *|   g\f\
|_ pair   «J>I.UU
76c Penman'a Silk L,islo Socks in black, -while, tan,
rSr'r $1.45
Puro Silk Socks in blank, white,  tan,  grey, sni-nke,
champagne, navy, d» |   AA
cordovan, etc  -ipltUv
^^^^      $1.75
SUMMER UNDERWEAR 39c
39c
89c
50c
$1.45
$1.95
$1.45
100 dozen regular 05c white and natural Bal
briggtm Underwear; to clear Saturday..—_...
$1.25 medium weight natural
Cashmcro Underwear	
$1.00 Summer Knitted Athletic
Cotton Combinations	
$1.75 and $2.00 Bulbrigguu
Combination for  ■.	
$3.00 Natural Rpringlex
Spriuguecdlo Combinations 	
Del pnrk Athletic Nuincheek Summer
Combinations, values to $2.00 	
UNION-ALLS $3.95
$3.95
$5.00 heavy Denim One-piece Overall
Suits in black or blue stripes; Saturday.
WASH TIES 29c
50 dozon Fancy Hiik Striped Wash Neckwear In many
dninty doatgnft; OQ_f«
regular SOe velucs; Saturday ....* „. m«/C
TRADE UPSTAIRS AND SAVE YOUR DOLLAPS
ARNOLD&QUIGLEVi
"iTiie Store thuts always busy'. •' I
546GranvilleSr.546J
rnmSS UPSTAIRS CLOTHES SHOP ■"■
■■■a
BI
■I
PAGE POUR
eleventh YEAB. No. 35    THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST      VANOotmnt, b a
THE B. C. FEDERATIONIS
Publishod every Friday morning by The B. 0.
Foderationist, Limited
A.   S.  WELLS Manager
Office:    Labor   Temple,   405   Dunsmuir   Street
Telephone Exchange, Seymour 7495
Alter 6 p.m., Soy. 7497K
Subscription Bates: United States and Foreign,
$2.00 per-year; Canada, J1.50 per year; in
Vancouver City, $2.00 per year* to Unions subscribing in a body, $1.25 per member per year.
Unity of Labor: The Hope of the World
I'RIUAT	
..August   29, 1919
MONDAY next will be '-'Labor Day."
So designated by the employing
class aa the result of a demand made by
organized labor, that one day be set aside
on which the  workers could celebrate.
Like every other privi-
EVERT lege—if this can be call-
GROUND ed •   privilege—Labor
FOR HOPE.       day was handed to the
workers by the ruling
class. The usual parados and other methods of displaying their ignorance will be
indulged in by the workers on this' continent, and it cannot be said that much
. has been accomplished during the past
year. It is true that nationalization of
railroads, and other futile methods of bettering the conditions of the workers have
been put forth, but there is little evidence that the workers, at least so far m
this continent is concerned, have made
much progress. Peace may have been declared with the late enemy countries, but
. war is still rampant, and more are in the
making. While Labor Day is being celebrated the new democracy in Russia is
fighting for its existence. So far as its
enemies within are concerned the Soviet
government has little to fear, but thc
forces of reaction from every country in
the world are being directed to the defeat
of the new order in Russia. British statesmen have said that the British troops
would be withdrawn, and while this statement was being made~~ih order to stem
thc tide of protest against the action of
the Allied governments in supporting the
reactionary groups in Russia, plana and
schemes were being formed for the purpose of carrying on the campaign against
thc Soviet government, and while the
troops were being withdrawn, the same
actjon was taken by means of naval
forces, and by means of the blockade,
and the policy of anti Soviet intervention
still is being carried on without let or
hinderance on the part of the working
class.
•        •       •
Insofar as Canada is concerned, the
workera do not seem to know just what
they want or how to get it. The organized
labor mevement has reversed itself in a
few months, and still smarting from a
sense of defeat in the recent struggles tho
workers are more apathetic than ever.
While democracy was the war slogan,
_ members of the working class are in gaol
'for advocating exactly the same things
that they have done for years, and democracy seems to be a thing of the past,
and the few remaining liberties of the peo-
i pie arc threatened by the powera of coercion and intimidation. Yet, in spite of
all the set-backs, the future appears bright
for the working class. Beaten the workers
may be for a time, but the very forces
who have beaten them are slowly but
surely preparing the way for the future
freedom of tbe working class. The Canadian labor movement will never take
a big part in world events, yet the workers of this country must advance aa the
working class of the larger countries
progress. The last efforts of capitalism to
save the system are now being made, but
nothing can stop the wheels of progress
from revolving and bringing to an end a
system that has outlived its usefulness.
Born of necessity, not because of man's
will, but ont of material conditions, capitalism must give way to a new order in
thc near future, or the workers will perish in thcir millions. Aa chattel slavery
and feudalism came to an end when those
systems could no longer feed the slaves,
so must capitalism give way to a system
that will give to the people the necessities
of life. Hero worship has been one of the
bnnes of society for ages, big men have
l)i*i*ii looked for so that changes might be
mnde, thc workers have fallen into the
same errors as have thcir masters. Thc
ruling class has, by  arresting  leaders,
' thought that movements could bc crushed,
many foolish workers still think that by
removing individuals their conditions can
be improved. In both canes the idea is
anarchistic. In both cases the idea is born
of ignorance. Thc ruling class may attempt to stifle thc Russian democracy. It
may try to stamp out advanced ideas in
the minds of the workerB by repressive
measures. The workers may, in thcir
frenzy, use anarchistic methods, but all
of these methods will fail. Progress cannot be impeded. The removal of individuals will neither retard the advance of
ideas or improve tho conditions of the
workers. The individual is but thc pawn
of circumstances and a product of.mod-
• cm. society. Neither the ruling class or
the workers can accomplish their ends by
these means. Thc ruling class can never,
• by any means, stop thc development of
modern society or the birth of a new
order. Thc mission of thc workers is to
conform to the evolution of society and
to aid thc new order at Its birth. Every
foroe in society is working towards the
• bringing into being of a new order. As
the* present system develops, so'docs the
end of capitalism become nearer. Thc
workers have much that will cheer them
if they only would endeavor to understand
the present system. For Lalior Day is in
sight, thc day when thc worker shall not
br a slave, but the master of his own destiny.
flings at British policy in India, Egypt
and other places under control of the
British Empire. Later we shall have the
British exposures of American atrocities
in Mexico, or some other place. Thc more
they fall out, however, the more of the
truth we learn.
How  the   Allies   love   one  mother I
United States senators are daily taking
WE HAVE REPEATEDLY pointed
out the utter nonsense of the statements appearing in the press during the
Winnipeg strike, as to thc strike being a
revolution and an attempt to establish a
soviet government in
•M this  country.   If thero
IMPARTIAL      were no issue at stake
VIEW. except   the   statements
made by the press, it
would be a waste of time to deal with
them but, to a great extent, the liberty
of the men arrested during the strike
hinges on whether the general publie accepts as truth these statements. A correspondent has sent us a letter which was
written by a member of the Canadian Bar,
and which appeared in the "New Statesman," London. The part of his letter dealing with his impressions of the strike, and
the press statements referred to are as
follows:
My purpose in writing you was to
give you my views and impressions
regarding the experience through
which wc have just passed, In a large
way I think the strike was a contest
between the oppressed workers and
the powerful financial interests—just
another battle in the age-long conflict between the haves and the have-
nots. The committee of 1,000 raised
a fund in excess of a million dollars
to fight thc strike. Of course, it is not
necessary to argue the point that the
financial interests and the profiteers
were ready to pour out their dollars
to fight the strike. Thc newspapers
got a big slice of this_money for carrying the slanderous and anonymous
advertisements of thc Committee of
1,000. Then thc money was used to
pay for "volunteer" workers in tlie
various public utilities and to "compensate" other "volunteer" workers
for the difference between .their pay
from their regular employers and
that allowed them by the city or temporary employers.
Thc charge that tho strike was the
prelude to a general revolutionary
movement was sheer unadulterated
moonshine. The committee of 1,000 *
who evolved this theory, did not believe it for a moment; the press, after-
two or three days' campaign, commenced to lag in their propagation of
the "revolution" scare. It was too
absurd. Then somebody remembered
the old saying about the effects of
repetition and reiteration, and thoy*
went at it again with renewed vigor
and kept at it. The "Telegram" always referred to the "revolution,"
never to tho strike, with the result
that a large number of our real estate
and grain exchange magnates, and
most of the lawyers in the city, regardless of age, sprang to arms and
spent their whole time in barracks acquiring proficiency in the use of the
rifle and bayonet for thc purpose of
shooting down the strikers and ripping them open with^ bayonets. This
is the ono thing that the workers can
never forget. To mc it has been the
most regrettable thing in connection
with the whole strike. It was known
that the strikers were unarmed; they
had no supplies of ammunition, no
machine-guns or howitzers; they were
conducting the most peaceable strike
in the history of Winnipeg, or Canada, for that matter. Yet the business
and professional men of Winnipeg—
everyone, in fact, owning a motor-
armed themselves to kill their fellow-
citizens, who were demanding the recognition of the principle of collective
bargaining. It was damnable.
The idea that the strike leaders contemplated a revolution by force is
really too grotesque for utterance, let
alone for refutation, but some facts
may be indicated. Canada has relatively a small industrial population,
located in widely separated centres.
Where the workers are most numerous they arc heavily outnumbered by
the rest of thc population. The idea
of "pulling off" a revolution in Ontario and Quebec, where even the
working population is conservative
to the hilt, is about the limit of absurdity. And whon it is remembered
that Canada, as a whole, i- an agricultural country, whose rural population is innately opposed lo thc labor
movement, and intensely antagonistic to the socialistic philosophy and
its political aims and policies, it is
asking too much to believe that men
who have, the capacity to get
themselves elected as leaders of the
workers' movement could delude
themselves into the belief that a revolution by force was possible in Canada.
It was most unfortunate that Senator Gideon Robertson (minister of labor) ever interfered in thc striko.
Ostensibly he came as a representative of thc Dominion government. Actually he was a partizan of the {astern wing of labor, between whom and
the Western labor men a war l)as been
waging for the past year or two. Robertson had only one policy from the
day he landed in Winnipeg—to smash
the Btrike. This, too, was the policy
of thc Committoe of 1,000, and together they imposed their will and
their views upon the governments,
civic, provincial and federal, and upon
what is known as thc general public.
Well, they have smashed the strike,
and also thc unions, but thc fallacy
of thcir position lies in the assump-
I tion that thoy have onoc and for all
j settled tho question of industrial un-
I   rest.
While not agreeing in all particulars
with thc writer of thc letter, yet he very
ably sets out just what wc have repeated
ly stated, namely, that the whole of the
responsibility for the Winnipeg riots rests
on the Committee of 1,000 and that the
charges of "seditious conspiracy," laid
against the arrested mon who are nbw
facing trial, wks the deliberate attempt of
the employing class to break the growing
power of tho unions, and in ihis,,jwork
the big interests were ably aided by i the
press. The men now facing trial'-'have
been tried and condemned by this agenoy.
They are not yet out on bail, whileitheir
trial does not take place until Octobor.
Something more than press evidence Mid
inferences will have to be produced' to
convict these men, or the workers will be
compelled to come to the conclusion tW
no member of the working class is safe
if the big interests, aided by thc press,
can convict and send workers to the penitentiary by this kind of propaganda.
THE STATEMENTS of any international union official, or any labor
man of note, if it could be twisted to the
detriment of the strikers in thc recent
strike in Winnipeg, or against thc men
arrested during that
?o ?RE strike, h*ve De0ft wide-y
•* A circulated.    The  state-
REASON ments of such men
Hayes and Barratt of
the Typographical Union, arid other men
from ovor the line, havo been reproduced
in every paper in the country. Needless
to say, the statements wore not in accord
with tho facts. Tho Federationist • endeavors to give credit where credit is
due, and as we have just received a copy
of a statcriient made by President Moore
of tho Dominion Trados Congress at the
time tho mon were arrested, we can only
wonder that thc statement was not given
the same prominence that was given to
the statements of Hayes and others. From
what wc can gather, Moore's statement
appeared in an early edition of thc
Ottawa Journal, but not in the late editions, and so far as wc know it did not
appear in any paper on the coast.
Moore's statoment is as follows:
"Whon the Winnipeg strike was
called without reference to constituted labor, we gave the labor men
in Winnipeg a clear field—thc matter was uot in our hands.
"The men arrested have not communicated with mc; they have not
wired—perhaps they have not' been
given an opportunity. They may
have thought it advisable.to write,
and until I receive information front
them, I do not know the exact circumstance surrounding tho arrests.
a *      *    *   .        *     '
Questioned as to the attitude of orgm*
ized labor authorities in thc event of the
arrested men being charged with sodit lln,
Mr. Moore said:
"Labor does not  recognize  sod •
tion, inasmuch as for years prcvioi i
to thc war it was never heard of as ti
crime, and the distribution of propi*
ganda pamphlets, making latitude; loi
advanced thought, is not sedition.  i
"The  degree  of  sedition  whici
would  place  the  Winnipeg  strike
leaders outside the ban of the const i-,
tuted labor movement; would have to - •
include the plotting of danger to thc
state, conspiracy to do bodily injury,
usurping thc authority of the state,
and   absolute   suppression   of   the
people.   Labor recognizes   that   the ;
authority of thc state must  be  supreme."
Mr. Mooro, when asked what the attitude of organized labor would, be if
it were shown in evidence that the Winnipeg leaders were plotting Bolshevism,
said:
"I do not want to be linked up
with Bolshevism yet; on the other
hand reasonable latitude must be
made for advanced thought, and
Bolshevism comes under that head."
* *        *       -
Mr. Moore reiterated that, unless the
government proved conclusively that the
arrested Winnipog strike leaders were
dangerous to the safety of the state in
thc fullest sense of the word, the trados
and labor movement of Canada would
hold the government strictly to account.
Any organization would hold the government to account undor like circumstances," Mr. Moore concluded.
* *;■■■■ i
The coming convention of Congross
will ho doubt take a stand on thc entire
situation, and if thc president stands behind his statoment as above, there will bc
some action taken to sec that thc proof
is forthcoming, or the men arrested relieved from the charge that is hanging
over thom.
Social and financial conditions arc
growing worse. And the ruling class,
blind b% Socialism, has no solution cxgjpt
words and threats.
We hBve no inside information onthe
real roason for the idea of turning Kitsilano bathing beach into docks, but-Hhat
there is a nigger in the woodpile -Ibmo-
wherc there is no doubt. Our distinguished representative, H. H. Stevens, tad a
deal to do witli the filling in of False
Creek, which should havo been dredged
and turned into dockage facilities, which
wonld have made it possible for sliUMj-to
unload right in thc heart of the wty.
Perhaps Harry can tell us who will reap
thc profit in this case.
Great Britain is spending, along wilh
hor Allies, muoh energy in establishing
"stable conditions" in Russia, Persia,
Egypt, and a few other places. They say
charity begins at homo. How would it be
if Lloyd George started to bring about
stable conditions in tho British Isles, or
ovon in tho currency, and; let the other
places tackle their own problems! Perhaps Labor will show him how to do it in
the next fow years, and bring about real
stability, by abolishing the oause of the
present chaos.
Mason & Risch
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eleventh TBAn. »,. is    THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
VANCOTJVBB, & a
Marxism in Hungary
[By Colonel Wedgwood, M.P., In twonder that tho flrat set of tke Com*
Glasgow Forward.]
Colonel Wedgwood bu just returned
from a visit io Hungary. BU im*
pressiena, while not perhaps altogether agreeable roading to some
of ua who have been inclined to
idealize aU the stages in a class
revolution, are at anyrato tint-
hand and honestly framed.
THE  PIONEER  OP   UNION  LABELS
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The fact is I do not like Hungary
it ia, and I do not know what to
advise about it. First, let me say
that there is perfect ordor in the
whole country—little oriiuo, no going to law, for there are no law
courts, and, officially, no private proporty to defend or take. Outsido
the capital, Buda Peeth, private property continues to exist on snffcranco
at present. The rovolution lms not
been carried through outsido; peo*
pie are waiting nervously, in complcto ignoranoe of what tho future
has in store.
The previous Socinlist government
(Karolyis1, which wc ought to have
hclpivl) had taken stops to expropriate the great landlords, paying pro-
wnr prices for lho land, perhaps onc.
eighth of the present value in depreciated crowns. This lend they
had intended to give to tho landless
peasants. But undor tho Marxian
Communists all land is to bc state-
owned and state-worked, and the
peasants fear that what lands thoy
hud will be takon from them. Listen d of tho great estates boing
broken up among tho peasants thoy
nre now boing workod by the state.
Often, ns in tho factories, tho previous owners havo boen loft as managers! »nd there the laborers havo
highor pay nominally. But whero
tho great ostatcs were let to tenants, these tenants now pay rent to
the state instead of to thc landlords
—and they had hoped to got their
land free. Those peasants who owned less than 200 acres have boon
left in possession of their Inudj but
they aro afraid that it will bo taken
from thom by the state. They liavo
new mastors from Buda Pesth whom
they like less thon tho old. For them
the revolution is only a change of
masters; and I doubt if B por cent,
of tho country population is in favor of thc Communist government.
In Bussia tho revolution haa given
the land to tho peasants. Every
peasant has a vested interest in tho
prriiintiance of tho Russian revolution. In Hungnry tho revolution
threatens to tako the land from tho
peasants, and on such lines It cannot stand. I refer later to modifications in prospect;
Tho revolution wos made io and
exists in Buda Pesth. Boforo the war
this capital (tho only town in Hungary with over 60,000 inhabitants)
had a population of 1,000,000—ono
quarter Jows. During the war munition factories spraag up and refugees from devastated Galicia and
Poland drifted in to work. The pop.
nlatlon, so they say, roso to 2,000,000
nnd of the newcomers three-quarters
were refugeo Jews. One quarter of
the wholo population of Hungary is
in Buda Pesth, without enough work
to do, and very hungry. It is little
muniat government wu to solve tho
housing problem by dividing house"
room equally, finding quarters for
the proletariat in the mansions of
the rich. But'this vast population
must be fed, Wt tt produces at present practically nothing. Bela Kun'»
Communist government extracts food
from the peasants and supplies it to
the town workmen. The distribution
is by ticket and state stores, aad
all private shops are shut up. There
is no work or place for the lower
middle clasa. This is the Communism
of bankruptcy, coupled with robbory
by decree. All wrongi But * how
many * readers could- suggest
measures to meet the easel And
tbe same problem is met with in Vienna; only Mr. Hoover is feeding
Vienna, and, now the blockade is
off, Vienna oan get coal and iron.
It wtll be good pructico for readers
to play the gamo "If I wero Bela
Kunf"*'
Hore are the factors for the game.
A peasantry very rich, with excellent crops. They have paid off all
their mortgages; moro cuttle aro
said to be in Hungary now than boforo the war, much moro food ie
being produced than would feed the
whole people. On the othor side 2,-
000,000 starving proletariat with no
goods to offer in exchange—only bad
pjlicr monoy that the peasants will
not touch. Of course, if the Mock-
ado wore taken off they niight get
credit, ond they niight buy coal and
iron, and they might mako goods
that tho peasant wants. But—but—
remember humnn nature. Why work,
whon your government cnu tako by
force? Boia Kun's solution is the
dictatorship of thc proletariat.
It is true thot they told mo much
of the comuni-'al production that
they arc starting in B_da Pesth. But
there is not much work, and—they
spread it. I do not think tho managers of the works, thc old mnsters,
aro far wrong when they say that
-It takes six men paid each at four
timos*the old rate to produce what
onc man produced in wartime. Under
guild Socialism the employees at
each factory get tho profits; thoro
is somo incentive to work, Under
Marxian Socialism there is no incentive, only thc instinct to taako the
job go as far as possible. Communal
production ot a loss con. never compete with capitalist production nt a
proflt in thc surrounding country.
Even if they could' get coal aad iron
I doubt if communism at Buda
•Pesth could buy food from tho peasants in competition with the peoplo
of tho surrounding countries supplying cheaper gooda.
It is obvious that the strength of
the revolution liea> in Hilda Perth.
Yet, even in thc capital, all thoso
who have had their property taken;
—shopkeepers, insurance agents,
middlo men of overy sort, all who1
still have anything left to lose (and
most have buried at loast crockery
or clothes); all vho do a full day'a
work and cannot lose it, such as rail.
way workers and Home other necessary tradeamen; all these are against
the revolution, tho communism of extreme .poverty.
Hence the government must rulo
by forco ond terror, even in Buda
RUSSIA
,'       More Secret Treaties
Moscow—More documents have
Bleu unearthed from the secret archives of the Caarlst-Biusian government, showing what diplomacy
did. NOT dp to prevent this war.
.The documents play a very good
'aecond to the Secret Treaties that
the revolution gave to the world.
They bave heen appeariag in the
Pravada, a Soviet organ in  Petro-
Posth That it is which strikes 'a
Westerner as most uttorly intolerable. Throughout the country so
nowspapers may be printed whloh
are not communist; no books sold
which are not Marxian; no meetings
may be held save those where Marx
la expounded. No one may travol
without a permit; letters muat all be
posted open and are scrutinized;
spies or"political directors" are at
oach man's elbow. I'felt like living
under the Csar.
Tho terror la maintained, not by
fear of death (for there have been
few executions in spite of several
attempts at counter-revolution and
tho railwaymen'a strike) but by
other fears. Each mon fears to be
denounced lost he should bo forced
into the army, lost he should lose the
job ho has got under government,
lost his houso should be visited and
his clothes, rooms or furniture
tuken, since he has no legal right to
anything. People dare not speak to
a stronger. Once a ticket-collector
spoko to mo. Ho sotf from my luggage label that 1 was English. Ho
spoke hastily, looking over his shout
der ofton, ending, "It in vory dan*
gerous, but I thought it wus my
duty." Tho poor wretch was almost
crying with urgoney.
Aftor five days' wandering in the
westorc parts, I got tn Buda Pcsth
and the dictators. AVhat they answered me, and how modifications
mnv conic I leavo to the next article.
My last recollection before I readied thc capital was a midnight talk
in the streets of Bnab. Wo wero all
talking, and a "political director"
moved into the group. The rest
edged away and I found myself
alone with tho director. I said,
"You hnvo destroyed liberty," and
ho answered, "We have established
order." I sold, "I prefer rebels
to cabbages." Ho said, "You aro
a follower of Bakunin; I follow
Karl Marx." And thero for thc
present, on tho old rock that split
the First International, I will leave
the problem of tho rcvoltuion.
grad, under the editorship of the
Soviet Commissary ot Financa, Pi"*-
rovaky.
Tto London Daily Herald gan a
Yeauma of the documents seme time
ago, aa did alao tho Swedish papera.
Briefly, the atory ia aa follows:
As far back as 1909 Bussia and
Italy "settled" in a "mutually
benevolent attitude" the Bussian interests in the Straits and the Italian
interests la Tripoli and Cyrenaica.
When tha Tripoli war broke out
in 1011, Isvolsky, Human Ambassador in Paris, wrote that Italy, in
pressing her Claims to Tripoli, should
be reminded te "keep ker word" regarding the question of the Straits.
Isvolsky's faithful aervice to hia
country necessitated making sure,
not alone ef Italy, but of France,
alao. And ae, ln October, 1011, he
makes a touching statemont. about
being "deprived of a moat important iuatrument, sinco all my aa-
siduoua entreaties to be provided
with funds for the praaa have produced no result." And whyt Becauso, he aays, "if we , are really
concerned to take up the queatlon
of the Straits, then it il of the highost importance to soe to it -that we
bave a good press here."
He goea on to prove "how useful
-it is to have money to offer the
press," that the result of the Tripoli
affair, "now manifest to all," waa
brought about by Tittoni (the Italian Ambassador tto Paria), who
"worked up the leading French papera most thoroughly and with tho
most open hand."
In 1912, Poincare said to Isvolsky
that Franco "will not lose a minute
in fulfilling her pledges to Bussia
if a (Russian) conflict with Austria
snould involve Germany's armed intervention.
Then we have Sir Edward Grey
(thn unsuccessful peacemaker of the
early war duys) promising "without
hesitation" that "Bnglund would
do everything to inflict tho heaviest
blow on Gemma power" by koep*
Ing thc German fleet off tho Keltic
enast of Russia, whilo Franco kept
tho Austrian licet out of thc Blnck
Sea.
And then, in April, 1914—mark
the date—whilo Sir Kdwawl Grey
and King George wero iu Paris having conversations with Isvolsky,
Groy said "thero could only be a
quostion of naval convention between lis and England and not a
continental convention because tho
disposition of England's land forces
was already arranged, and they
could not operate alongside tho Bussian land forces."
UQMWfM
EDISON  HALL
-THE-
Kfent Piano Co., Ltd
,  , _ Steinway and Nordheimer Pianos
Fourteen Phonograph Parlors
558-560 Granville
Opp. DryadaVs
Where is your union button?
CANADIAN
NATIONAL
RAILWAYS
The  Line  of  Transportation
ithat Belongs to All the Nation
CANADIAN
NATIONAL
RAILWAYS
IT FATS TO USE IT
Bound Trip Summer Tourist Ratea
$50.50 EDMONTON-CALGARY $50.50
Return Limit October Slat .
AU Year Tourist Tickets 9 months return limit on Ml* ta
Eastern Canada, Central and KasUrn States.
Passing; through the Rookies
I, WKEBE KATTJSB  SPEAKS IEOM  SHOW OSOWVSD PEAKS
, Trains leave Vancouver Union Station
9:00 A.m.—Snndar, Tuesday and Friday—9:00 a.ai.
For Rates and Information apply- to
ASSISTANT OEUEBAL PASSENOEE AGENT
60S Haitian St West VANCOUVEB, B. C. Phons San-Mr 2412
AOKKT FOR ALL ATLANTIC STEAMSHIP LINKS
PHONE BEY. 2114
J. F. Burns
LEATHER GOODS STORE
LADIES HAND BAGS A SPECIALTY.
ALL KINDS OF HIGH-GRADE TRAVEL.
LING GOODS.
519 Granville St Vancouver, B. C.
HIGH GRADE
Mechanics' Tools
OF EVERY DESCRIPTION
J. A. Flett, Limited
338 HASTINGS STREET WEST "~ '*-
We buy and sell second-hand GUNS
FELLOW UNIONISTS
Be consistent ud demand the Union Stamp oa rem boote Ml
■hon. lha following local Onus an fait to Organised Labor aal
an worthy of yonr patronage and snpport:
J. Leckie Co., Ltd., 820 Camhto Street.
Harvey Boot Shop, SI Cordova St. W.—Custom Halting and la.
pairs. - ,
W. J. Heads, 20 Water Street—Custom Making aad Repairs.
H. Voa * Son, 63 Cordova Street Wost—Custom Making aad Bepairs.
Dunsmuir Boot Bhop, 531 Dunsmuir Street—Custom ItakUg aai
Bepain.
union rar Aim aeon
"Nodelay" Shoe Bepalr Company, 10*7 Granville Street
Standard Shoe Bepair Shop, 618 Bobaon Street
M. B. Thorns, 258 Kingswajr. ,
Woods Ltd. "K» Boot Shop, Cordova and Hutingi St. W.
H. C. Spaulding, 5971 Fraser Street, South Vaneouvar.
Ba progieaalve, Hr. Shoe Bapainr, and gat la taact witk I
Uty Tom Cory, __6 Vernon Drln.
OUR LIFE LINE OF
REMOVES YOUR LINES OF WORRY, PULLS YOU ABOVE THE EMBARRASSMENT OF BEING ABLE TO, BUY ONLY WHEN YOU HAVE THE CASH
**• -THE LATCHSTRING IS OUT FOR YOU-COME IN AND SEE HOW MUCH AT HOME YOU FEEL AMONGST OUR GENEROUS TERMS AND
ECONOMY PRICES.
RIGHT N0W-0UR RE-ORGANIZATION SALE IS IN FULL SWING-BUT YOUU HAVE TO HURRY IF YOU
WANT TO GET A SHARE OF THE BARGAINS, AS WE WIND UP THE SALE NEXT WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 3t AT 1 P.M.
-IT WILL BE YOUR LAST CHANCE TO BUY HIGH-GRADE CLOTHING AT SUCH A MARVELOUS REDUCTION IN PRICE.
—ALL YOU NEED TO PAY IS A FEW DOLLARS DOWN AND A LITTLE PAYMENT EACH WEEK OR MONTH AS DESIRED.
Grasp Your Opportunity—It Will Put You On Easy Street As Far As Clothes Are Concerned
IF YOU HAVE NEVER DONE BUSINESS THIS WAY BEFORE JUST TRY IT ONCE AND YOUR WORRIES WILL VANISH IMMEDIATELY.
LADIES' COATS-In assort-.
ed materials and various styles
Regular $20. A
big snap at	
$12.50
LADIES' FALL COATS-
Mostly travellers' samples.
Regular$30,to'  $IQ£Q
WASHABLE SUITS-These
are  a  rare  snap.   Regular
$14.50, going
for.	
$8.50
LADIES' SUITS-Assorted
patterns and styles. Regular
mM s*l_ $22.50
pnce_
SILK SUITS—In various silks and styles.
Reg. $40 to $75, for.  _	
$25 to $40
Men's Suits
Only 25 to clear; suitable for dress or business wear. Very stylish;
assorted patterns. Reg.
, $25. Sale price
i   $17.50
SILK SWEATERS-In sever-
al shades. Regular $39.50, to
£L___.... .$20.00
SILK DRESSES-A very
choice selection. Regular $40.
Clearing
at  	
$20.00
■»*■•     aveguuu
$20.00
SERGE DRESSES-Several
styles and shades.   Regular
$35.00, to
clear for.	
DRESS SKIRTS-Silk poplin,
in all colors. Regular $12.50,
to be cleared . d» o C ft
MEN'S SUITS-Made by Canada's leading tailors in nifty styles,
suitable for men of all ages. Exceptional wearingfroi TA
materials. Reg. $30 to $62. Sale prices from       o}C,L.d*J lip
SALE CLOSES ON
WED., SEPT. 3rd
COME EARLY AND
PROFIT
"DRUM WELL" OH BAIT TEEMS AT THB
New York Outfitting Co., Ltd.
143 HASTINGS STREET WEST
Opposite Province Office phone Seymour 1361
PUT YOUR NAME
ON OUR BOOKS-
IT WILL PUT TOU IN A
HAPPIER FRAME Or HIND
AND IN THB FRONT BANES
AB A GOOD DRESSER. ■——■——
PAGE SIX
eleventh yeah. Ne. -    THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST    vancouveb, b. o.
FRIDAY...
..August 29, 1919
There's a Big Difference
in Prices Now!
Before the CAL-VAN MABKET arrived on tlie job,
you were forced to pay from twenty to fifty per cent,
more for what you eat than what you need pay today.
The old methods of merchandizing wero slow and costly. Instead of supplying your food direct from the
producer, it was compelled to pass through a series of
middlemen's hands. Like the proverbial snowball, the
priee kept growing in size an it rolled.
TRE CAL-VAN MARKET effected t saving of middlemen's
protts, high rentali, delivery colli, bookkeeping charges and
otber frills incidental to th* maual atore—which you bave to
pay for—nnd ean't eat.
Tbe net savi-ag amounts from oue-quarter to -sne-ifth on your
usual monthly expenditarea. That is what tbe CAL-VAN
MARKET has done for yon. Came in and see tbe display of
freab, eatable fond-tuffs of Irat quality only, and tbe reduced
prices ln plain figures.
Cal-Van Market
Hasting! Wert
Opp. Fanta-get
Vancouver Unions
TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL—Ex-
scative committee: President, E.
Winch; viee-presld-ntt, «J. Kavanagh;
ftmaanr, F. Knowles; aerieaut-at-arms,
W. A. Alexander; trustees. W. A. Prit-
eb-ar-4, W. H. Cottrell, P. McDonnell, H.
■Sattwidga; aecreUry, V. B. Midgley,
m—m 210 Labor Templo.	
ALLIED   PRINTING   TRADEB   COUN-
oil—Maata    second    Monday    in    the
month.    President, J. F. McConnell; sec-
wtary, R, H- Neelands. P. 0. Box tf«.
JOURNBTMBN BARBERS' INTERNA-
tional Union of America, Local No. 120
—Meets second and fourth Tuesdays in
the month, Room 305 Labor Temple. President, C. JE. Herritt; secretory, R. A.
Webb,  134 Hastings street west.
BRIDGE STRUCTURAL ORNAMENTAL
and Reinforced Ironworkers, Local 01
—MeeU aecond and fonrtb Mondays.
Pretident Ju. Hastings; finanoial secretory and treasurer, Roy Masseur, 1640
12th Ave. Bast.	
BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS,
Local No. 617—Meets every second
and fonrth Monday evening, 8 o'clock,
Labor Temple. President, J. Reld; Eeentary, B. J. Temoin, 1223 Georgia Kaat;
bnsiness agent and financial secretary,
0. C. Thom, Room 208 Labor Temple.
Phone Sey. 7405.	
BLBCTRICAL WORKERS, LOCAL No.
218—MeeU at 440 Pander Streot
Weat, every Monday, fi p.m. President, H. H. Woodside, 440 Pender W.;
rooordlnf aeeretary, W. Foulkes, 440 Pender Street West; financial aeeretary and
business agent, E. H. Morrison, 440
Pender Street Weat; assistant aeeretary,
F. R. Barrows.   	
HOTEL AND RESTAURANT EM-
ployete, Loeal 28—MeeU overy flrst
Wodnesday In the month at 2:30 p.m.
and every third Wednesday tn tho month
•t t:30 p.m. Preaident, Harry Wood;
aeeretary and businsss agent, W. Mae-
heaalo, oftee aad meeting hall. 814 Pender Bt. W. Phone Bey. 1681. Often
hoan:  11 to 12 noon; ________
SHIPWRIGHTS LOCAL 1803, U. B.
Carpenters—Meets Hoom 307 every
2nd and 4th Tuesday in each month.
President, J. W. Wilkinson; recording
secretary, W. J. Johnston, 73—24th Ave.
W.; financial secretary, H. A. Macdonald,
Room 212 Labor Temple.
JOURNEYMEN TAILORS' ONION OF
America, Local No. 178—Meetings held
flrst Monday In each montb, 8 p.m. President, J, T. Elsworth; vice-president, A.
R. Gatenby; recording seeretary, C. McDonald, P. 0. Box 503, Phone Seymour
8281L; financial secreary, Robt. McNeish,
P. 0. Box 503.
GENERAL TEAMSTERS, CHAUFFEURS
A WAREHOUSEMEN, Vancouver Unit
of 0. B. U.—Meets overy Wednesday, 8
p. m. President H. Mills; business
agent, F. Haslett, 125 Fifteenth Avenuo
East; secretary-treasurer, J. Hartley, 687
Homer street. Office, 587 Homer street.
Phone, 8ey. 4117. ' 	
TYPOGRAPHICAL UNION No. 226—
Meets last Sunday of each month at
2 p.m. Preaident, W. H. Jordan; vice-
president, W. H. Youhill; secretary-
treasurer, R. H. Neelands, Box 66.
Provincial Unions
B. 0. FEDERATION OF LABOR—Meets
In annual convention in January. Excutlve officers, 1918-19: President, J.
Kavanagh, Labor Temple, Vancouver;
vice-presidents—Vancouver Island: Cumberland, J. Naylor; Victoria, J. Taylor;
Prince Rupert, Geo. Casey; Vancouver,
W. H. Cottrell, P. McDonnell; New Westminster, Geo. McMurphy; West Kootenay, Silverton, T. B. Roberts; Crow's
Nest Pass, W. B. Phillips, Fernle, W. A.
Sherman. Secretary-treasurer, A. 8.
Wells, Labor Temple, 405 Dunsmuir St.,
Vancouver, B. 0.
VICTORIA, B. 0.
INTERNATIONAL JEWELRY WORK-
•ra' Union—Meets 2nd aad 4th Fridays, 205 Labor Temple. President, W.
Wilson, 2239 GranvUle Street; secreUry
treasurer, P. J. Bnell, 916 Dunsmuir Bt.
VICTORIA AND DISTRICT TRADES
and Labor Council—Meets first and
third Wedneadaya, Knights of Pythias
Hall, North Park Street, at 8 p.m. Pnsldent, E. S, Woodsworth; vice-president,
A. C. Pike; secretary-treasurer, Christian
Wverti, P. O. Box 302, Victoria, B. 0.
MORTH VANCOUVER'
<&&&&£;&-
MRMIONIST
Bditor B. C. Federationist;   The* 'us who come frota tho   old   land
LUMBER WORKERS' INDUSTRIAL
Union of the Oae Big Union—Affiliated
with B. 0. Federation of Labor and
Vancouver Tradea and Labor Council—
Aa industrial union of all worken in
legging and construction camps. Head-
taarten, 01 Cordova Stnet weat. Van-
ecover, B, 0. Phona Sey. 7960. E.
Whieh, secre tary-treasurer; legal advis-
•rs, Messrs. Bird. Maedonald -ft Co., Van-
•aaver, B, C; auditors, Measn. Butter
ft Chiene, Vanconver, B. C,
U. B. OF CARPENTERS ASD J01N-
en, Local 1777—Meets first and third
Mondaya la I. O. 0. F. Hall, Lower Kieth
Road East, at 6 p.m. President, W.
Cummlngs, 10th Street East, North Vancouver; finanoial aecreUry, Arthur Roe,
210—13th St. W-, North Vancouver,
INTERNATIONAL LONGSHOREMEN'S
Association, Local 3852—Office and
halt, 804 Pendor Street Weat. Meeta
fint and third Fridays, 8 p.m. Secretary-treasurer, F. Chapman; bnaineai
agent. P. Sinclair.
-AMALGAMATED MEAT CUTTERS AND
Bnteher Workmen's Union No. 843—
Meeti fint and third Tuesdays of eaeh
month, Labor Temple, 8 p.m. Presidont,
W. V. Yamley, 1838 Powell St.; recording seeretsry. William Gibbs, Station B.
P. 0. Vancouver; financial secretary and
bnsiness agent, T. W. Anderson, 687
Homer St. . 	
PATTERN MAKERS' LEAGUE OF
North America (Vaneonver and vicinity)—Branch meets second and fourth
Mondays, Room 204 Labor Temple. Pnaldent, Wm. Hunter, 818 Tenth Ave. North
Vancouver; financial secreUry, E. God-
dard, 856 Richards Btreet; recording secreUry, J. D. Russell, 028 Commercial
Drive.    Phone High. 2304R.
6HIPYAHD LABORERS, RIGGERS AND
Fasteners, I.L.A., Local Union 38A,
lories 5—MeeU the 2nd and 4th Fridays
of the month, Labor Temple, 8 p.m.
Pmldent, John Solly; financial seoreUry, M. A. Phelps; business agent and
corresponding secretnry, W. Leo. Oftee,
Room 219-220 Ubor Temple.
dNE BIG UNION UNIT of Steam and
Operating Engineers — MeeU every
Monday, 7:30 p.m., Labor Temple. Prealdeat, F. L. Hunt; vice-president, Percy
Chapman; aeeretary-treasurer and business agent, W. A. Alexander. Room 216,
Labor Temple.    Phone Seymour 7495.
BTREET AND ELECTRIC RAILWAY
Employeea, Pioneer Division, No. 101
--Meets A. 0. F. Hall, Mount Pleasant,
ltt and 3rd Mondays at 8 p.m. President, W. H. Cottrell; recording secretary, A. V. Lof'ing, 3239 St. Catherine*
Street; treasurer, E. S. Clovcland;
flaanelal aeeretary and business agent,
Fred A. Hoover, 2409 Clark Drive; office
corner Prior and Main streeta.
I
PRINCE BUPERT, B, 0.
PRINCE RUPERT TRADES AND LA-
bor, Connell—Meots second and fourth
Tuesdays of eaeh montb, in Carpenters'
Hall. Pnaldent, W. E. Thompson: secreUry, Goo. Rudderham, Box 278, Prince
Rupert, B, C.
Where is your union button t
T.B. CUTHBERTSON A Co.
Men'i Hatters and Outfitters
630 Oranvllle Street
610 Hutings street West
CUTS
And Commercial Art
for u.b in
Newspapers,   Catalogues,   Souvenir
Booklet!!, Ete.
518 HASTINOS ST. W.
The Royal Bank
of Canada
Triple Alliance, composed of the government, coal operators and the representatives of the international ex-
ecutive board of tne U. M. W. of A.,
has declared that no member of the
0. B. U. can in future work in or
around the mines in District 18 and
every man who was on strike in this
district must renounce the 0. B. U.
by signing the U. M. W. of A. checkoff.
After he has signed this checkoff
by which he renounces his allegiance
to the 0. B. U., he is provided with
a card which entitles him to ask for
a job in the mines, this is, in fact,
a rustling card pure and simple, as
every man formerly on striko is informed very definitely that he must
present this card at the mine.office
before he can secure work.
Our old-time friends and former
international board members for this
district, Davo Bees and Bob Livott,
are thc men selected by the international commission to go through the
Crows Nest Pass nnd sign up tho
men and make them a present of
thoir ruBtling cards, needless to say
they arc making a host of friends
since, they undertook this renumer-
ative occupation.
Tho ex-district -otficers are informed that boforo they can secure a
rustling card they must appeal to
tho international executive board,
who will pass judgment upon them,
and they may secure the card entitling them to hunt a job, but not
until after the district has been reorganized and a new election has
been held, they are evidently afraid
that the men might re-elect theso
men and aro taking no chances that
they, in their wisdom, can eliminate.
Thc ineinbcrs of tho district bourd
and policy committee are nlso refused rustling cards, as arc ulso some
of the former officials of tho local
union; this in fact holds good in
case of every English speaking man
who has been at ull active in the
G. B. U. movement.
It must bo a matter of extreme
satisfaction to our friends Bees and
Livctt to be tho instruments used
to introduce tho rustling card system in this district, and their activity in this matter will no doubt be
greatly appreciated by thcir many*
friends, especially the Western Coal
Oporators Association, and if thoir
efforts prove successful there should
be a soft seat provided for them
by either tho operators or tho government, it would bo altogether too
bnd if thoy should be forgotten by
their masters for whom they arc at
present putting up Buch a desperate
fight.
Whether tho men of thc district
will peacefully submit to the Bystem
now being introduced or whether
they will kick over the traces is a
matter of mero conjecture nt present, but judging from whnt one hoars
there is lots of flght loft in the men
of the district who have now been
on strike for threo month/ entirely
on their own resources, and after
work is again resumed Rees and
Livett may find that they havo undertaken a man's sizo job nnd ono
which they cannot measure up to
even though they havo tho bncking
of every interest opposod to that of
thc worker.
PICK MINER
INCORPORATED 1869
Capital Authorized : $ 25,060,000
Capital Paid-up $ 15,000,000
Reserve and Undivided Profits. *- $ 16,000,000
Total Assets.  - $430,000,000
666 branchei in Canada, Newfoundland and Britiih
Weit Indiei.
Alio branchei in London, England; New Tork City and
Barcelona, Spain.
Twelve branchei in Vancouver:
Main Office—Corner Hastings and .Homer Street!.
Cor'ncr Main and Hastings Streets.
Corner Granville and Hobson Streets.
Corner Bridge Street and Broadway West
Corner Cordova and Carrall Streets.
Corner Granville and Davie Streets.
Corner Granville and Seventh Ave. WeBt.
1050 Commercial Drive.
Corner Seventeenth Ave and Main Street.
2016 Yew Street.
Corner Eighth Avenue and Main Street.
Hudson Street, Marpole.
Also—North Vancouver, New Westminster and 28 other
points in British Columbia.
SPECIAL ATTENTION 18 GIVEN TO SAVINGS ACCOUNTS
Ono dollar opens an account oa which intorest is paid half-yearly
at current rates.
THOS. PEACOCK, CI W. FBAZEE, Vancouver,
Manager Vancouvtr Branch Supervisor for & 0.
Editor B. C. Federationist: Sir—
I have just received u copy of tho
Vancouvor Citizon, dated Juno 24.
I hnd heard a lot of talk nbout
this wonderful Bcrap of paper, but
when I como to read tho thing for
myself it filled mo with indignation
and disgust. It is renlly a hymn of
hate. One feature is to try and
raise friction between tho Canadian
workors and those of Old Country
birth. One of tho statements made
is that Canadian-horn workers do
no need to rebel as they nre well
fed, and being so, they cannot bc let!
astray by Blum-bred agitators. Well,
in tho first placo, the said workors
woro not all well fed in 1014; thjoy
felt the pinch of hunger just tho
samo as the Old Country born, and
besides, they have not yet got tho
right to live. In that respect they
arc like the workers of all othc.v
countries, controlled by a cIbbs who
lots them live only if it concerns tho
interests of thnt class nnd they, likewise, die for the same purposo. I
would just like to mention that i!1
there were no mansion-bred parasites there would bo no slums, and
after all thc peoplo in the slums
hnve tho most right to talk—they
give the most and get tho least.
There is also a statement mnde that
ovoryono knows; thero are sweatshops and millions of starving
people in the British Isles. Has tho
editor of tho Citizen been arrested
for sedition! Because for onco he
has stated the truth, our labor men
are arrested for telling the truth
nbout conditions us tbey really nre,
not us they are given out to bo. The
citizens' committee ought to make
nn earnest study of conditions us
they exist, and they will find that
all empires arc built on sweat shops
and starving millions; those are the
Iiiji-Hoiiled principles nnd Ideals we
heur our clergy talk so much about,
but talk is chcup, and if anyone
tnkcB high-souled action, ho finds
himself behind prison bars. Tho
statement is made that it is covet-
ousness that is the matter with tho
workers today, and wc havo the
commandments quoted for our benefit. They arc all right if strictly adhered to, but we know tbnt when tho
ruling class interests uro at stake
the ten are blown to thc four winds
of heaven. Thou shnlt not steal, and
still this present civilization is built
on thc robbery of thc workers.
Thou shnlt not kill, and yet if any-
ono refuses to kill, or refuses to believe in killing, they arc imprisoned,
Thou shnlt not covet, tlie Citizen
says. Mr. Editor, wo went into this
wur for principlo alone, wc were
told, und yet wc huve managed to
take over a million nnd a half of
territory. Wc muwt have cast a covetous eye on somo one's acreage.
Thou shalt not commit adultery, nud
yet wc huve had it os a war mensure. Thy shalt not bear false witness against thy neighbor. What
nbout our vile capitalist press, the
Citizen included, and their lies about
thc recent strike and thc workerB
doings in general! Lies nnd abuBe
are our reward for our sacrifice and
suffering in this war, nnd for defending a country that denied us
bread. Let tho citizens' committee
think twico beforo thoy quote thc
commandments to tho workers,
working class aro tho only pooplo
who keep tho moral laws.   Thoso ot
know capitalism In all its horrors,
and we see the thing getting a hold
this fair land, and in a short
space we will have tho oxtrjeme
poverty and extreme wealth of the
old land.
Thero is talk of deporting Old-
Country born because thoy agitate
too much. Well, we did not corte
here by choice. We wore starved
and hunted out of our homeland by
the present accursed system as were
the workers of all other countries,
and becauso we refused to bo
drugged under.\I would like to inform thc citizens1 committee that
people may be compelled to live in
slums and still refuse to bc degraded. I know because I have soon
tho poople of my class die by inches
rather than bo dragged under. Oh,
no; they did not get shot and put
out of thoir misery quick. They
took years to die. Tho finest and
tho best of people, the intelligent
workers from thc old land, gave that
land the best that was in thom.
They aro giving thcir adoptod land
their best, aud that best is to put
first things first, and first things in
our opinion aro the welfaro of men,
women and childron; aid to strive
for equality for all. Trado and foreign markets are not our ideul.
Labor's mission is to do away with
sweat shops.and starving millions,
and to issue a new order of society
whero men and women will have thc
opportunity to dovelop tho best that
is in thom. We are advised by this
paper to take an example from thc
G.W.V.A.. They aro real patriotic
Englishmen. Well, wc have nothing
nguiiist thc rank and file of that
body, but we do not admire the particular brand of patriotism that
looks out for cushie jobs for itBclf,
und thinks that the proceeds of
raffled automobiles, soup kitchens
and tag days are good enough for
their comrades. And we ennnot forget thc fnct that the so-called labor
agitators stood by the soldiers'
women folk and defended them from
the insults and injustice that was
being handed out to them from another such committee as was abusing tho workers. The timo of the
strike labor stood by the women
when the G.W.V.A. turned them
down. Of course the Veterans'
executive had thcir cushie jobs to
think about, but labor ulwuys fightB
for a principle.
In Arthur Runsome's lettor to
America he makes mention of_ the
mean little minds in our country
and mine. Well, the mean Utile
minds in this country arc tOJ m
found in tho people who Btyle th-cfo
nelves the loyal citizens' committed.
I roiuain yours r£]<
AN EX-SOLDIER'S WIFH.I *
August 26, 1919. iCf ,
 ■ ,      iui 1 j J
Taeoma, Wash.—Tho chattel-1' bf
the Taeoma Central Labor Comtifl
will be revoked by the excctttiU
committeo of the State Fod-nntiofe
of Labor, according to Wm. Sft-ok
president of tho stato federatwrf.
TiB action follows the vote ofiutlfc
Taeoma council last week to defy
tho state and national federations
of labor and carry on a referendum
on the Ono Big Union,
Cairo.—Contrary to expectations,
the strikes of tramway employees
nnd waiters nre still in full swing
nnd 12,000 cignrette makers a>BO
walked out. Outwardly, there is
nothing political in these strikes as
yot, but revolutionary propaganda
is boosting of thc coming triumph
of thc proletariat und Bolshevism.
A New Kind of Strike
Reprinted from "Liberator"    '
(From a Correspondent.)
It may throw some light on the
present revolutionary disturbances
in Italy if I tell you of a strike
which happened in* Bergamo last
March. The employees of the automobile works of Franki and Greg-
orini, 2,000 strong, organised a soviet and presented their demands.
Theso -demands included a forty,
four-hour weok and a committee of
workers to share in tho management.
Some of their minor demands wore
granted, but the major demands
were refused and so they went on
striko.
But it was a new kind of strike-
so far as I am aware the first strike
of tho kind in the history of any
capitalist country. They simply remained at work and put their demands into effect, working harder
than ever I
I was ablo to secure a copy of
the resolutions passed by the soviet,
which I have translated as follows:
'' We, the employees of the Franki
ft Grrgorini Company, after hearing
the report of our committee, hereby
resolve to' begin work for ourselves
in order to show our real intentions,
and also beeause we wish to act not
only for our own interests', but for
the greater interests of Italian industry and tho masses of the Italian
people.
Wc ask the authorities to givo
thoughtful consideration to this decision, which is justifiable in view
of the alternative offered by tho employers—tho closing of the works
without cause.
"We, the workmen, promise to remain at work, and to protect tbe
machinery and whatever else may
be taken into our charge, so ns to
prove our readiness to work and live
honestly; but we disclaim any responsibility for what may happen if
we arc denied thc exercise of our
most snered right—the right to work.
' "We will accept the supervision
of any public authority, or of the
ownors, and we set one woek as the
term of this demonstration, unless in
the meantime something should occur to modify our planB."
The strike lasted two days, and
then troops were sent to dislodge
tho workers from tho factory. They
offered no resistance and evacuated
the place without disorder. I understand that thc workers demands
wero then granted in fnll by the employers,
I mention this only as a dramatic
instance of the readiness and preparedness of Italian workingmen to
take up the management of industry
themselves in the event of a breakdown of the economic Bystem—wliich
is due if it haB not already arrived.
J. Q. A.
WARNINGI
TO MVESTOES:
Don't buy oil Mocks or royalty units until you have flnt hud information of
TEXAS OIL FIELDS
Ott tbe TRUTH about TEXAB OIL PRODUCTION and DIVIDEND psyt-r*. We
will tarnish ABSOLUTELY FREE an official State Government report made by
aU producing Oil Companies with a
SWOBN STATEMENT
ahowing their production for the second
quarter of 1919, an required by atate
special income tax law. These report!
are now compiled. We will forward to
you the complete list ABSOLUTELY
FREE. We publish a FREE OIL MARKET LETTER DIGEST. Tw ahonld
hive this INFORMATION if you Intend
to invest safely fn TEXAS OIL.
Inquiries Promptly Answered.
PUBLIC  INFORMATION BUREAU
120-121-122 OU Operators Building
FORT WORTH, TEXAB
CLELAKD - DIBBLE   ENGBAV-
ING COMPANY
PHOTO  ENGRAVERS
COMMERCIAL ARTISTS
Phona Seymoar 7109
Third   Floor,   World   Balldinf,   Vancouver, B. 0.
Phone Bayview 2660L
BEMEMBER MT SHOP CLOSED ALL THROUGH THE STRIKE
B. C. Manuel
CARPENTER and GENERAL CONTRACTOR
Jobbing; Alterations and Repairs
433 Dunsmuir Street Vancouver, B. C.
Buy nt a union store.
John Green
205 OARBALL ST.
8-ettndinavian Literature and
Badical Papers and Periodicals in nil languages.
Thc working man's information bureau.
206 OABBALL BT.
UNION MEN ARE
MADE WELCOME
—AT THE-
Bank
Buffet
Soft Drinks and
Fresh  Cool Beer.
The right treatment
and best service.
If you want the best-
quick lunch in the*"
city give us a trial,  c;
Ex-Sergt. Forestell
Corner Hastings andip.
Homer
3mm labor. The Coupons
with <Mch package ara a
Value in tf_e_a_elv__»
Pumps & Power, Ltd.
ANYTHING IN PUMPS AND DRIVING
POWER
LARGEST STOCK IN B. C.
216-224 Abbott Street
Announcement
OWING to the fact that the dyes, hatters' fur and all
other materials that go into the construction of Men's
Hats has tremendously increased in price, we are compelled to slightly advance thc price of our hats. We could
continue to sell our hats at the old price in spite of tbe
increased cost of materials but it would mean that we
would have to offer an article of inferior quality.
We feel that we would be beBt serving, and better satisfying, our many customers by keeping up the well
known Black and White standard of quality. To enable
us to do this, we have increased our price 5O<0 per hat,
which will become effective September* 1st.
Between now and September 1st we offer you onr hats
at our price of $3.5©—this is an excellent opportunity
to outfit yourself with headgear for Fall ahd Winter.
The Black and White Hat Store
doner Hastings and Abbott Streets
PATRONIZE FEDERATIONIST ADVERTISERS
Highest Grade Mechanic's Tools
FOR ALL TRADES
Martin, Finlay son & Mather Ltd.
46 Hastings St W.      ::      Vancouver, B. C.
School Books
and - - -
School Supplies
Make our store your headquarters
for School Books, Reeve's Paints, Pastels, Paint Brushes, Compasses, School
Bags, Loose Leaf Note Books, etc.
THE VANCOUVER STATIONERS, LTD.
STATIONERS AND PRINTERS
683 Granville St Phone Seymour 5119
10 dozen boys' combinations in a   good   two-
thread balbriggan. Zimmerknit mako.
Beg. $1 for....
127 Boys' Tweed and Worsted Suits; Regular
$12.50 and $13.75 for $7.95
Bolter and waistline models, neat patterns In dark groy and
brown fanoy checks and mixtures. Sizes 24 to 34. d_*7 QC
Beg. $12.60 and (13.76 for  «P / eVD
125 English Tweed Suits; Reg. $16.50 for $11.95
Handsome grey and dark tweoda, seat overchecks, new shades of
brown and mixed green effects, ete. Every suit is smartly tailored and backed by the Spencer guarantee of satisfaction. AH
sizes, 84 to 35.   Begular (15.00 and (16.50 411   €_*_
tor
_)<_
High Grade Wool Suits in New Styles; Worth in
the Regular Way $18.75 and $20, for $14.95
Fine'homespuns and wool tweed suits, tailored to perfection, and
cut in up-to-date models; all the extras that a boy likes are present in these suits, A flne selection of patterns to choose from.
Sizes 24 to 85.   Begular $18.76 and (20.00 tlj. Q***!
Irish  Serge Reefers With Brass  Buttons;
.     Regular $12.75 Value for $8.95
Fino qunlity Irish serge reofer, with or without belt; plain or
velvet collar, straight or slash pockets; al) nicoly . (j*Q QC
trimmed.    Begular (12.75 for tpOet/O
Boys' Tweed Hats in New Fall Style; Regular
$1.50 and $1.75, Sale Price 98c
20 dozon fall bats for boys in smart shades of brown, grey, green
and mixed effects—nifty cord hats in navy, brown and copen.
Black and brown plush hats of high-grade quality. All now fall
■tock just arrived.   Sizes 6 1*6 to 7 1*8, Q ft_»
Eogular (1.50 and (1.75, special __-... J/OC
Sale of Boys' Suits Starts
Tomorrow for School Wear
in Four Groups Furnish the Solution of the
Outfitting Problem-$5.95, $7.95, $11.95, $14.95
He wore his old suits to shreds during the holiday and
it was good enough for him, but he will need to make
a better appearance now that school is starting. This
sale is the way out—the solution of the boys' olothing
problem for parents. Such prices as we quote will
Btrike everyone as very reasonable indeed and sure to
arouse further enquiry. Don't wait. We expeot to be
busy, but we will have time, with the extra assistance
wc have engaged, to give you proper attention. Every
suit in every group iB big value for the money, some
are better than others, and are calculated by our
clothing experts to provide an incentive to early buying.
Boys' Suits; Reg. $8.75 and $10.50, $5.95
40 only good hard wearing school suits, in dark groy tweed, made
with full bolt and buckle.   Sizes 25 to 31. <fcC QC
Begular (8.75 and (10.50 for tyOoeJO
Boys' Tweed Bloomers; Reg. $3.75 for $2.65
Bloomers mado of English tweeds, neat patterns in brown and
grey, tine stripes; also a navy Irish serge; all made with Governor fasteners and lots of pockets; sizes 25 to 33. tkek /JC
Begular (3.75, special *4>__!»00
Boys' School Jerseys; Reg. $1.50 for 98c
Bibbed jerseys for school wear, in navy, brown and saxe blue.
Made in button-on-shoulder and pull-over styles. Sizes QO—
22 to 32. . Begular (1.50.   Special _ 90C
, 15 Dozen Boys'Shirtwaists to Clear, 49c
In neat stripes and plain whito with fancy  collars,  plain  blue '
chambray.   All neatly made; military and sport collars,    ^Q —
Begular 80e and (1.00 for  1S7C
•    Boys' Dress Shirts, with Separate Soft
Collar, $1.50
Made of fine percale, in all tho now stripes, double cuffs and
separate soft eollar,   Sizes ]1V_ to 14. d>|   CA
Special
Boys' Caps, Special 85c
Tweod caps in a dozen different pattorns; a flne cap for OB.
school wear.   Special  OOC
29 Boys' Junior Suits to Sell at $5.50
All taiado in tho Junior style with belt and flash pockets. Carefully chosen for the littlo fellows. Ages 2 to 8 years. * £ g/\
Begular (7.75 for %*tOtO\l
DAVID SPENCER, LIMITED fBIDAT...
..August 2S, Ml*
eleventh tba». No. m    THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST    vancouveb, b. a
PAGE SEVEN
Boys!
We Need Cans
We can pay for used cans as follows:
20c for 4-gallon gasoline or coal oil
tins.
15c for 4-gallon cans used for other
oils.
10c for 1-gallon varnish cans.
Dig up the cans, boys, and bring them in
Hunter-Henderson
Paint Co.
642-GRANVILLE STREET-642
Expert Motorcycle and Bicycle Repairing
W. H. Morrison
Indian
Motorcycle
FuU stock ot Bicycles
and supplies always on
hand.
Agent for Massey Harris and Indian Bicycles.
108 Hastings St. E.
Vancouver, B. 0.
PATRONIZE FEDERATIONIST ADVERTISERS
-^f$ '•5*x^—*■*, Named Shoes are frequently made
SWORKtRS UNION/ in Non-union factories
DO NOT BUY ANT SHO? *,
No matter what its name, unless
it bears a plain and readable impression of this UNION STAMP.
All Shoes without tho UNION STAMP an always Non-union
Do not accept any excuse (or Ataonca of tho Union Stamp
BOOT AND SHOE WORKERS' UNION
246 SUMMER STBEET, BOSTON, MASS.
COLTS LOVELY, General PruUeat—DBAS. L. BAINK, Genernl Sec-Tress.
BRITISH COLUMBIA'S BEST
COAL
For your kitchen—Wellington Nut
Kitchen, furnace and grate—Wellington Lump
For Your Furnace
Comox Lump—Comox Nut—Comox Pea
(Try our Foa Cool for your underfeed furnace)
COAL
macdonAld-marpole CO.
LIMITED
1001 MAIN STBBBT Phone Sty. 310
PATRONIZE FEDERATIONIST ADVERTISERS
ONE OF THE FINEST TONICS
Good for Health Improves the Appetite
CHEAP PRODUCTION
Everyone know^ tjiat cheap goods can only be procured
by using cheap materials and employing cheap labor,
CASCADE BEER
is produced from the highest grade materials procurable
—Cascade is a UNION prodaee from start to finish.
VANCOUVER BREWERIES LIMITED
The Russian Scandal
The following trenchant criticism*on our western front out of thoae
of the British policy in regard to
-Russian affairs appeared in-the editorial columns of the Manchester
Guardian for July 86. Furthor com-
mont ib unnecessary:
The time haB come for some
plainer speaking about the mad
gamble with brave Englishmen's
lives which is still going on in the
North of Bussia. The Great War ie
finally over,, and any idea of our
having to keep men on Bussian soil
to fight Russiun friends of Oer*
many is out of date. Tho naked
truth that British officers and men
are boing thrown away because some
of our politicians want to back one
side in a Russian civil war against
tho other can no Ipnger be hidden.
It Ib not a British national quarrel.
It is purely the business of Bussians
whother they prefer to be governed
by Lenin and Trotsky or by Koltchak. To most Englishmen they all
alike seem highly undesirable rulers,
stained in -degrees not easy to distinguish with tyranny or savagery.
Whethor Bussians are to choose as
dictator one or the other is wholly
Russia's affair. It Ib a quarrel
which we in Western Europe and in
America should keep out of with
particular care, not only because it
is not our business, but also be*
cause we cannot touch it without dividing ourselves.
Tho working class—which is alio
the private soldier class—in all
white countries now knows that,
whatever else may divide the two
parties to.the Bussian civil war, all
Bussian capitalists are on the Koltchak side, and that Benin's side is
profoundly anti-capitalistic. The
working class also believe—unfortunately wjthr some reason—that,
until some impartial American and
English visitors to Bussia began to
spread the facts, we were all fed on
falsehoods about the Bolshevik
movement—assertions that it enjoined, or even enforced, sexual promiscuity, that it had no voluntary
popular support, that it was impotent for purpose of organized government or of war, that it >vas a
mere chaotic weltor of terrorism,
rapine, and .corruption. And the
working class ovidently believe,
further, that this dishonest propaganda had the object of divorting
attention from the fact that the real
flght in Russia was between an extremely backward form of capitalism and an extremely advanced form
of Socialism. What aro you to think
of the political sanity of mon who
cry out; as some of our anti-popular
journalists are doing, for England to
plunge into another groat war i* order to give the victory in tho Bussian civil war to the anti-popular
despot Koltchak against tho Bolshevik dospot Lenin f Of course our
Labor Party is furious, and the
"Triple Alliance" is talking of a
strike against the waste of English
blood on sueh an anti-democratic intrusion into a foreign eountry's heme
affairs. We are already, to a small
extent, entangled as combatants in
the mess, and every fresh account
from Archangel shows it to be
equally disastrous and inglorious.
Our command at Archangel has evidently acted in ignoranco of the
state of public feeling in Russia,
with particularly tragic results for
five British officers. It seems to
have beon imagined that prisoners
taken from the Bolsheviks 'could be
treated like Pathans formerly in
arms againat us on the Indian frontier—enlisted in our service and
used, with British officers over
them, as British troops. It was as
if we had formed battalions to fight
German prisoner! who on their capture had come in cursing the Kaisei*
and the Prussian war party. Of -,
course there waa -****• mutiny, and the1
officers who. had been asked to placj
this insane confidence in the prison-***
era, and had gallantly tried to carry
it through, were murdered. According to a Times correspondent on the'
spot, whose facta are as eloquent
as his comments are queer, it seem*
to have been assumed that the civil
population must wish for our success so much that our socrots would
not be earned by it to the Bolshevik
forces—with the result that while
the Bolshevik commander
aeroplanes and we have many, "be
knows as much about onr lines as
we know about his." It looks as If
our staff on the spot had made the
error of treating our own propaganda as serious information, and had
assumed that every Bussian was at
heart opposed to the Bolshevik Government, and would gladly help foreigners to overthrow it
Of course, our miniature invasion
of Bussia has had the effect of every
foreign invasion. It has had exactly the effect which a Bussian invasion on.behalf of one of two political parties in- England would
have. It has enormously strengthened the party whieh the invaders
oppose. It has given Bolsheviks the
right to call Koltehakists the "pro*
Englishers," and the "friends of the
foreigner,"* and* "tlw anti*
Russians." A German landing at
Belfast in support of Sir Edward
Carson in .1913 would have set
against Sir. Edward . Carson every
Englishman and Irishman who,
whatever he thought about Home
Bule, had a sensitive British patriotism. So onr Archangel expedition
has raised the patriotic instinct of
Bussians against Koltchak, as the
man who brings foreigners, in to
shed Bussian blood. While there, is
not the slightest hope, or rather fear,
that public opinion here would per?,
mit an invasion of Bussia on a scale
that could seriously help Koltchak
to become a dictator, our present
small and futile intervention is making . him morally impossible and is
giving Bolshevism the prestige of
nationalism, although it is far
enough itself from being nationalist. ItB continuance can only make
the. government which finally prevails in Russia more and more venomously anti-British. Some perception of. these things seems to hav-fj
reached the mind of the Times eorri
respondent, He records the local be,
lief at Archangel that when w\
now withdraw, as we have promised!
our troops, tho present Koltchakistj,
forces on the spot—whom he oddly,
calls the "loyal" troops, as if tho
Tsardom were back already—will at
ontfo join the other side. He reportB,
no doubt correctly, that we' are not
seriously expected to remain, and,
as we have said, he. indicates that;
the inhabitants are- not heartily with.
us. Of course, we cannot, either in
honor or in common sense, remain*
We cannot break faith with our own,
troops and their countrymen, whoj,
were assured that our reinforce*
Uients woro simply sent out in order
to secure the safe withdrawn! of
their predecrssors. And we cannot
in vita* military mutiny and civil war
in our own country by trying to use
its young men, perhaps by tho million, to put down an anti-capitalist
govornmont in Bussia. All sorts of
false points of honor are being
raised in support of the proposed
gamble. Even the "women arid
children" flourish, somewhnt depre
ciatcd in value since its cold-blooded
[By Maxim Gorky] '<
Yesterday was the day   ef   the
reat Falsehood—the last day of its
jpwer.
.For ages, man hu spider-like,
thread by thread, diligently woven
the strong cobweb of a eautious
philistine life, impregnating it mere
and more with falsehood and greed.
Wan has to feed on the flesh and
blood of his fellow men aad the
means of production, the weapons In
the struggle with nature, are .merely
a means to oppress men,—this cynical falsehood was looked upon aa
immutable truth.
And yesterday this road brought
mankind to the madness of the all-
European war. The red glow of
this nightmare threw a light on all
the ugly nakedness of the ancient
entrenched falsehood, and now we
see the old world shaken to its
foundations, shattered to pieces; its
obscure secrets exposed, and today
even these who were blind have
opened their eyes .and see the utter
ugliness of the past.      .
Today is the day of reckoning tot
the falsehood which reigned yesterday.
The violent explosion of ths people's patience has destroyed the out
worn order of life, and it cannot
again be re-established in its eld
forms. Not all of the outworn past
is annihilated, but it will be—tomorrow.
Today there is a great deal ef horror, but it is all natural and comprehensible. Is it not natural that people infected by the strong poisons ot
the old order—alcohol arid syphilis-
should not tbo generous! Is it not
natural for people to steal,—if theft
was the fundamental law of yesterday! Is it not natural, that ten*,
hundreds, thousands of men should
bo killed, after we had been accustomed for four years to kill them
by thd taillionsf The seed of yesterday brings fruit today; the prosont day is brutal, but its brutality
is not the offspring of today. Malice
ft* createtd by the power of men;
everything comeB into existence
through men. Among the ruins of
the past is clearly visible every force
that held ft together, and everything
that lay hidden in the heart of tho
oppressed is today impelling them
to oppression.
It is easy to find fault with man
as ho is today,—man,is facing the
mirror of history, naked as a beast,
burning with tho fire of belated,
useless revenge.
But we should remember that the
Vancouver
FAIR
SEPT. 8-13,1919
Races and Horse Show
— Every Afterncon
Big Fireworks Spectacle
"SOMEWHERE  IN FRANCE"
Every Evening
Auto Races SATURDAY
YESTERDAY an/TODAY
Wtji n,buae in tho rigging of the Js.meson
Baid, has boen brought out and
•tgied. But the case is too plain.
oddly, -Withdrawal from Northern Russia
is more necessary, for military reasons, than waa withdrawal from the
Dardanelles. But it is also necessary
because good faith to our troops
thore demauds it, and beeause a
broach of our promise to them
Mould destroy our hopes of restored
9«aee among ua at home. It ia for
-tbe government to decido the de-
Jails and the terms, if any are needed, of our'withdrawal. But any
failure on its part to carry out its
promises is unthinkable.
day is too bright, and tkat is why
the shadows are ao heavy. We
should understand that in the midst
of the dust and mud, of the chaos
of destruction, of today, hai already
began the great work, of liberating
mankind from the strong, iron cobweb of the past, a work which is as
painful and difficult as the pangs of
a new birth; we should'feel that we
ara witnessing the death of the evil
of yesterday, which is going through
ita last hours together with the man
of yesterday.
It has ao happened that the peoples marching to the decisive battle
for the triumph of justice are led by
the leut experienced and weakest
fighters,—by the Russians, a people
of a country which is backward economically and culturally, a people
worn out by its past more than any
other people. Only yesterday tho
whole world looked upon them as
semi-barbarians, and today, -almost
dying from hunger, they are marching toward victory or -death with
tho ardor and courage of old, tired
fighters.
' Everyone who sincerely believes
that the irresistible aspiration of
mankind toward freedom, beauty,
and a sensible life is not a vain
dream, that it is a real force which
alone ean create new forms of life:
that this force is a lever which can
turn the world,—every honest man
must recognise the universal significance of the activity which is carried on by the earnest revolutionists
of Bussia.
The activity which is now going
on in Russia should be interpreted
as a gigantic attempt to incorporate
in life, to turn into actuality the
great ideas and watchwords whieh
were created aud enunciated by the
teachers of mankind, by the sages
of Europe. Yesterday the Socialist
thought of Europe pointed the way
to the Bussian people, today the
Russian workor is striving for the
triumph of European thought.
, And if the honest Russian revolutionists, few in numbers, surrounded by onemies and worn out by star*
vation, will be conquered, the con-
sequences of this terrible calamity
will fall heavily on the shoulders of
all the European revolutionists, of
thc whole working claas of Europe,
Should this catastrophe ocoi^r, all
those who do not feel, who do not
comprehend the terrible struggle
which is waged by the wishers of
Russia day after day, wilT have to
pay for it with their blood and
lives.
The honest heart does not waver,
the honest thought knows of no
temptation to compromise, the honest hand will not cease working
while the hoart is still beating. The
Bussian worker is confident that his
brothers in spirit will not permit the
strangling of the revolution in Russia, that they will not permit the
resuscitation of the old, which has
roeeived a deadly blow and is expiring, disappearing, and whieh will
disappear,—if the revolutionary
thought of Europe will comprehend
the great tasks of today.
At the Pantages
Topping the new bill of vaudeville
at the Pantages, opening with the
matinee performance Monday, will
bo "The Kromlin at Moscow," a
big organization of native Russian
singers, dancers and musicians. The
latter will play the bnlaika, the
Russian national instrument. Maurice Golden, a dancer, is tho featured member of tho cast.
For tlie special added attraction
of tlie week Manager Pantages has
arranged for the first appearance
hero of the Lo Grohs, European pan-
tomimists, in what is said to be a
sensational novelty.
Marie Fitsgibbons, "tho great
big story tellor," who has a special
talent for talcs in dialect, is expected to prove a drawing card.
Dorsch and Bussell have a spectacular scenic novelty in which they
extract music from various kinds of
railroad equipment.
Chisholm and Breen, man nnd
pretty maid, will be seen in their
latest comedy success, "Her Cave
Man," which is, declared to bo filled with amusing situations.
The Panama Trio, composed of
colored girl singero, wilt offer a
rcpertoiro of plantation melodies
and jazz tunes.
Telephone Operators on the Pacific
Coast are voting with big majorities
favor of a new walkout. The
strike was settled by the international oflico with the phono companies nnd the workers claimed they
were sold out by the international.
St.nd your old address with your
new ono when making a change.
Eastern News
Those of oar nadcrs wbo trt In-
twtad in Eastern Ctn*dUn n«wi
tnd world-wide event* should
tnlHicrihe to Tht Miw Democracy,
301 I.inter Bldg., Hamilton. Ont.
tiubtcrlptton rates |1.5Q per jt-mt.
Our Circulation Maiuger will
bt> pleiBod to receive nnd forward
subscription...
Thi Mew Draoerscr u a Ht*
working-sImi paper and should be
road br all workers intereited in
Canadian and world-wide events.
McLeod-Nolan and Co.
havs    manufactured    nothing   bu-b
Union Made Cigars
(i for 20 Years  9 ..
El Doro
u
El Siaelo
"I n c ome
Cigars of Quality
ECONOMY
MARKETS
BEST
MEATS
-AT-
Lowest
Prices
Union Store
for a
Union Men
400 Suits being sacrificed at cost,
$9.00 to $25.00. Do you want to
save money. If so, buy two or
three of them.
In Furnishings, we have 12 pairs
Sox for $2.00.
Reg. $1.75, $2.00 and $2.50 Negligee Shirts for $1.50; sizes 14 to 20.
We fit all cornel's, big or small.
We are a Union Store. We support a Union Labor paper. We
expect our proportion of Union
trade. We are not getting our
share of Labor Union customers.
We support your paper—you'toust
support us. ..;....•
The Jonah-Prat Co.
401 Hastings Street West
patronize Federationist advertisers
•_____
Loggers and Camp Workers
~-jon* THB-
LUMBER WORKERS INDUSTRIAL UNION
OF THE ONE BIG UNION
which embrace! all workers in the camp* and mill* of the
Lumber Industry—also all construction workera.
EMPLOYERS
Hire your men through the Union. Over 10,000 memben
to draw from.
—LOOK FOE THS-
BIG 3 TAILORS
If you want to buy uncalled for or left off suits at lowest prices.
Wc also buy cast-off clothing.
CLEANING AND REPAIRING A SPECIALTY
332-334 OAERALL STRUT
Phone Seymonr 3483
Branch Offlce: 311 Main St Vancouver, B. O.
Vancouver Land District
District of Cout, Bulge 1
TAKE NOTICE that I, Mary
Alieo Clarke of Vaneauver, B. C, !
kougowife, intond to apply for por*J
mission iu purcbaeo the following,
described lands:
Commencing  at   a   post   planted
about forty chains North    to    tbo
.South boundary of Lot 542; thence
West Sixty chains;    {hence    .South
about twenty chnins to   the   North
boundary of Lot 1004; thonco East
forty chains; thence South  twenty \
chains;  thence  Num  twenty chains!
to tho point of commencement, con- j
tuining 160 acres, more or loss.
MABY ALICE CI.ABKE.
Dated 31st July liilii.
Vancouver Land District
District of Coast, Range 1
TAKE NOTICE tkat I, Edwin
Clark Appleby of Vancouver,
B. C, Jeweller, intend tt apply for
permission to purchase tko following
lands:
Commencing at a poet planted
about fifty chains Southwest of thr
Southeast corner of Lot 482; thence
about twenty chains North to the
South boundury of Lot 4*28; thence
Easterly about forty chains to the
West boundary of Ut 489 (old I'.K.
603); thenoe Sonth about sixty chains
to shoreline; thenco Westerly and
Northerly along thc shoreline to
point of commencement, and containing 200 .acres more or less.
EDWIN CLARK APPLEBY.
Dated at Vuneouver, 31st July, 1918.
EMPLOYERS
THE EMPLOYMENT SERVICE OF CANADA
has been created to grade the various
classes of workers—trained and untrained—and to place the best in the
country at your disposal, through a
system of Employment offices from
Coast to Coast.
THE PROFESSIONAL AND BUSINESS SECTION
exists to place you in touch with
Professional, Business and Technical
workers.
THE INFORMATION AND SERVICE BRANCH
DEPARTMENT OF SOLDIERS' OVIL RE ESTABLISHMENT
has a representative in each of these
offices to render whatever special
services may be required in the
employment of the
RETURNED SOLDIER
Cranbroohl
remit,
Kamloo-pc
Nanaiiua,
Nelson,
New Weehntoeter,
Penticton,
Prince Rupert*
Revelstoke,
Vancouver,
Vancouver,
Victoria.
Vernon,
10 Baker Street
16J Vlotoria Aw.
246 Victoria St.
Windsor Block
Royal Bank Bid*., Baker Sb
Board of Trade BH-j.
Shatford Block, Main Street
P. O. Drawer 1674
Firat St. W.
140 Cordova Street
Alcasor Hotel, Dunsmuir St
Langley and Broughton Ste.
835 Barnard Ave. B.
Td.N-t,
SO
ISA
oat
iat
ita
in
151
SSI
N
a. tan
C.S4M
SSO ■^■-^
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**********
Mi
*>
PAGE EIGHT
ELEVENTH YEAB.    No. .15
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST     Vancouver, b. a
WUDAY..
 August. M, lSt9
Money Saved Is
Money Earned
WOODWARD'S  GROCERIES   SAVE  THE
MONEY
Special for Week Com. Friday, Aug. 29th
Silver Bar Seeded Raisins,
lion, pkt 18c
Crisco, 1-lb. tins  40c
Boyal City Tomato Catsup,
large tin   10c
Libby's Bed   Salmon,  tall
tin 31c
Quaker   Strawberry   Jam,
4s 11.06
St. Charles Milk,   Ull   tin
for 12'/-*c
Sifto Stilt, in cartons ...10c
Boyal Crown Soap, 5s ...,26c
...6C
Toilet Paper	
Holbrook's Vinegar 29c
Helm Vinegar - Sic
Nootka or Primrose Pilchards,
tall tins ...17c
B. ft K. Boiled Oats, 7s .49c
Pride   of   Vancouver Boiled
Oats, 7s  A...47C
Iris Boiled Oats, 6s 37c
Robin Hood Flour, 7s 49c
B. ft E. Oatmeal, 10s _ 03c
Purity Whestlets, 5s ..........39c
Matches, 300s      —...... 8C
Bamsay's Family Sodas ...23c
Ormond's Biscuits  .;.:.. 9c
Evaporated Pears ......29c
Evaporated Apricots ..........36c
Evaporated Apples .........L..30C
Boyal Purple Currants ...:.20c
Shredded Cocoanut _............32c
Holbrook's Ground Bice ..He
White Gloss Starch ...'..'.. He
Silver Gloss SUreh  _8'/»c
Benson's Corn Starch. 13c
Empress Baking Powdor ....17c
Malkin's Beat   Baking   Powder   S3«
Snap .... i „......:....17c
Bon Ami  lie
Boyal Crown   Washing   Powder    9Vic
Pels-Napth* ......10c
Lux lie
Lilac, Bose,  Glycerino   Soap,
for 12e
Ivory Soap .*....* for 26c
Old Dutch  9c
Pearlino  -7c
B. C. Icing Sugar, lb 14c
Nabob Icing Sugur pkt... !Sc
Whito Star Icing Sugar, pkt.
for  lie
Bed Kidney Beans, 4 lbs 16c
Sngo, 2 lbs SOC
Siam Bice, 2 lbs 23c
Jap Bice, 2 lbs, 31c
Boman Meal, pkt. ;.30c
Cream of Wheat  .23c
Krumblcs .: lO'/ie
Corn Flakes H'/jc
Grape Nuts 13c
Tilson's Scotch Health Bran
for .'. 13c
Braid's Best Coffee .....60c
Seal Brand Coffee .....66c
Empress Tea   64c
Woodward's Choice Tea ....39c
Woodward's Extra Choice Tea
for 43c
Woodward's Better Tea 64c
Maybloom Tea 52c
Nabob Tea 59c
Fry's Cocoa, half lb _6>/ac
Beaver Sterilized Milk, large
' tins 8c
You serve yourself and carry your groceries,
thus eliminating heavy expense.
YOU GET ALL THE SAVING
GET  IT  AT  WOODWARD'S
BATE TOOK SUIT
CLEANED ud PRESSED
*     ,     -BY—
CULL
fhe Tailor
790 NELSON STBBBT
Suits called for and doliref-
td.   Work guaranteed.
Phone tty. SSO*
Hicks & Lovick Piano Oo.,
LIMITED
1117 aRAKVOLE ST.
PIANO la W.l.ol   _|164
Lovely Second Piano   6175
Flat Now Piano, Mahogany 9310
Hen-tome  Parlor Organ    666
Pine OHOAN In Walnut    ISO
aew Pianos tf Naweomb. Plane Oe.
at lew prices.   Ttnni.
Hicks A Lovick Piano Co.,
1117 OJAKVim- ST. (Hear Sane)
QUALITY SHOES
I AM NOW LOCATED in my new storo and extend to you a
eordial invitation to come and inspect the class of shoes that
I am offering—Shoes for the whole family, and every pair that
you buy here is guaranteed abaolutely solid.
I do not profess to sell cheap shoes. Quality, Comfort ond Style
tre the great features in a shoe nnd it has always been my aim
to turn out sueh shoes without sacrificing any one of these features
nnd sell them at a reasonable price.   My success is the proof.
I am offering exceptional values in School Shoes. These shoes
an all Mill—have double toe-caps, leather counters and leather
insoles.
My Making Department is fully equipped and can turn out any
particular style of shoo made to your own measure.
Tomorrow only I will pat an a pair of Babber Heels, any
style or color, on any pair of shoes, 0"_g.
for
Take Advantage ef * This Special Offer
OOOD FOB TOHOBBOW (SATURDAY) ONLY
I have the largest Boot Repairing Plant in the West. Bring
yonr repairs bere and got real satisfaction. All work ii guaranteed.
P. PARIS
BOOT AND SHOE MANUFACTURER
51  HASTINGS  STREET WEST
Opposite Columbia Theatre .. *
TAKE   NOTE   Or   THE   NBW   ADDRESS
We Give Credit
—where you are usually require*} to pay
cash.
D EADY-TO-WBAR clothing for men and women—
" quality, style and value the equal of that offered
elsewhere—offered on
Weekly or Monthly Payments
We number among our regular patrons hundreds of
workers—men and women who appreciate thc service we
render—the satisfaction we give.
CALL AND SEE OUR DISPLAY
SPECIAL-TO CLEAR
SO All Wool Velour Coats—Excoptio-ual Value—      &<_>Q  t*f\
Special  <4>£t/.OU
45 Cash Deposit and *2 per week,
B. C. OUTFITTING CO.
342 HASTINGS STREET WEST
'   Near Homer
Government by Orders-in-Council
'"•
In the order-in-council, tlie Dominion Government has for nearly two
years found an unfailing panacea,
tho Oppoeition food for variable criticism, tho constitutional lawyer a
parliamentary puzzle. Of frequent
uae, the order-in-council hns quietly
couraed through the governmental
activities of the country, attracting
little notice until, in its growth in
Canada, it added to itself one function after another and, full-bloomed
in 1918, was hardly recognizable by
constitutional lawyers, critic and
even legislator.
Unlike other legislative and executive machinery, we find the order-in-
council greatest, when we first know
it, in English constitutional history.
As timo went on, it began to be bettor understood. Its limitation were
added to—and, of* all methods of
quasi-legislation, we find it to bo in
Englnnd, the most antemic, tho least
loved. War-time Canadian legislation and Union Government breathed
into it a warmth and life that it was
never meant to have, and whose
weak constitution was unablo to
stand the grafting, leaving it an object of pity and more than over
bare.
Older Than Parliament
Tho ordcr-in-council is much older
than purliamout and, like everything
in the British Constitution, the result of evolution. Despite its method of growth, it is clearly discernible at every stage of development,
and in England seldom taken or used
for aught else than it is. The earliest modes of legislation, within the
post-absolutist period, wero by char?
ters emanating from the crown, by
royal proclamations and ordinances.
All three have their legal justiflca-
in the royal prerogative and, with
the period we are now discussing,
legislative power was with the crown
in its limited sense only.
The beginning of the thirteenth
century emphasized the principle in
England that the prerogative of the
crown was not given for the personal
advantage, of the King, but allowed
to exist because it is beneficial for
the public weal and is, for thnt.rea;
son, to be closely guarded. Thc
King's prerogative is therefore at
first liberally interpreted and acts
for the benefit of the aggrieved, for
tho redress of the wronged by order
or by exclusion; for tho making and
the enforcement of laws that will
benefit the subjoct. Extraordinary
remedies and special writs nre still
known as prerogative writs—a slight
remnant of what was once a generality. The charter emanating from
the crown was in the nature of a
unilateral law. Although legislative,
it was the gift of the king to his
subjects, and, at best, and well, into
the beginning of tho parliamentary
era, was the answer to the petition
of the estates of the realm—not unlike that of the Estates-General of
pre-revolutionary France. Tho charter was meant to confer privileges,
to redress grievances, to declare and
to affirm tho Common Law. The nobles, the clergy and lator thc commoners presented evils and needs
that needed legislative attention.
The king granted tho prayer—the
members of his council drew a charier, and the first modern legislation
was produced. Thus, Magna Charta
was a charter, and, as wo shall see
later, almost an order-in-council.
Struggle Between Xing ud
Parliament
The royal proclamation was the
jsual mothod by which the king signified his.commands and enforced
his authority. By it, the crown could
declare the existence of a law, proclaim the method of its enforcement
and devise means for its execution—
by penalties or otherwise. The
crown could not not by it enact .pr
alter the law. In practice it differed
then littlo from the ordinance. With
the increase of strength by parliament, this conception was more and
more clearly insisted on; but, during
the period of struggle botween the
upholders of the prerogative and thc
champions of the popular cause, the
principlo often suffered, and thc proclamation and ordinance frequently
and powerfully were vested with
legislative character. Tho history
of this struggle is tho history of parliament. The king's power grew
rupidly in tho timo of Henry Vp.
Tho preamble to 31, Henry VIII, C.
8, speaks of the "contempt and disobedience of the king's proclamations by some who do not consider
what tho king by his royal power
niight do,", and enacts that "considering that many occasions might
require spe$dy remedies and that delaying these until parliament mot
might occasion great prejudices to
the nation, ordains that the king for
the timo being, with the advice of
his council, might wt forth proclamations with pains and prntilties in
them, to which obedience .should be
given as il thoy hnd been made by
Act of Parliament."
The Petition of Grievances
Utvrler Kliz.i_j-.-tli, there was claimed for the sovereign, by means of
the proclamation, a sort of supple*
mentary right of legislation to perfect and'Carry out existing laws.
The petition ot* grevaiiccs, presented
to JamcH I, iu HMO, refers to illegal
proclamations, in these terms:
11 Proclamations have been of late
years, much more frequent than heretofore and thoy nro extended not
only, to the liberty, but also to the
goeds, inheritance and livelihood of
nieri—some of tbem tending to alter
points of law and make them new J
others made shortly after a session
of Parliament for mattors directly
rejected at the sumo session; others
appointing punishments to be inflicted before lawful trial and conviction
—by reason whereof, there is a genernl fear conceived and spread
among our people that proclamations
will by degrees grow up and increaso
to the strength and nature of laws.
What the order-in-council means
in England today, wc shall see later.
The intervening period is of interest
only to the historian of constitution
al dovelopment.
, Differs from tho Statute
What is an order-in-council, and
how does it -differ from the statute?
Is it a legislative or eiecutive men-
miref Whother tho king redrcwes n
grievance by statute or ordinance, he
acts ns a legislator. Though, in one
ense, he acts wilh the advice of the
council and consent of the Estates
of the Realm; and, in the othor, with
tho advice of the council only; thc
enacting power iu both eases is bis.
The ordaining power lies for thc latter only,   Evety staiuia la a* o-N-Un.
'ance, but the ordinance is not a
atatute. It lacks the assent of th*
Commons. That is the earmark of
the ordinance, and subsequent ratification does not change its fundamental nature. Hakewell has defined
the ordinance as next in degree of
strength to the statute; but the chas*
actor of the statute, (that is law),
remains. Anson states that tho statute is primarily a legislative aet;
the ordinance, primarily, an executive one—and that the statute stands
for the ordinance in the same relation as the law of the Twelve Tables
to the Prstor's Edict, One is loath
to disagree with Anson; yet, when
it is remembered that every ordinance, though decreed as a measure
of the executive, has borne a distinct
legislative character from the time
of John to this day and has added
to the body of the law—although
that part of the law which has more
moreto do than the exception, than
tho substantive body of it,, the most
charitable view one can adopt is
that the order-in-council ii at least
quasi-legislative in character. That
part of tho section of the Criminal
Code which statos the penalty, is as
much substantive law as is the definition of the crime; so is that part
of the Criminal Code which deals
with criminal procedure. If that is
substantive law and, therefore, legislation, why is the order-in-council,
defining the punishment of defaulters under the Military Service Act,
an executive act!
Limited Powers of the Executive
It is conceded that the executive
must have certain powers, to aet in
emergencies whore there is no legislation to meet the occasion. Where
fhe-crowncan so act, it can only be
>y a deputed, aad not by a prerog*-
Early Shoppers
Get the Pick of
these Bargains
PEACHES—The finest Crawford
freestone, for preserving, Special priee, <fc 1 C C
crate Vie DO
AUSTRALIAN JAMS—Assorted;
very special n r_
_ tins ...._ OOC
HONEY—Local, absolutely pure;
extra special *a g
per jnr  OOC
ECONOMY AND SCHRAM
TOPS— At___
Per dozon 4UC*
SWEET ORANGE MARMA-i
LADE—Extra Ot%aa
speeial, tin  -__V/C
B. k K. ROLLED OATS—Extra*
cream; 7-lb. C|*i_»
sack for OUC-*
B. k. K. OATMEAL—Fine, Medium or coarse* CtS.
101b. Back for   OOC'
FINEST ALBERTA CREAM-*
ERY   BUTTER—Very  choice,.
for..'. $1,751
GRAPE-NUTS—Spc-        | o
eial, per pkt.  IOC*
PAROWAX—For seal-    IA
ers, per pkt    1HC*
S.T.Wallace's
Marketaria
lit HASTINGS ST. WEBT
Fall Styles
Are Here
COME IN AND
LOOK THEM OVER.
Jtaljum
Hxzft
Pure Wool
Guarantee
Quality
Clothes
10 Per Cent. Discount
to all Returned Men
Thos. Foster
& Co., Limited
514 Granville St.
tive power. The order-in council
must be either purely one within tho
realm of the executive, or must rely
on deputed power dearly defined by
legislation, and not baaed en inference. The erecutive has a limited
power of legislation by order-in-
council, bnt only where the exercise
of such power has been authorized or
sanctioned by Parliament. It is a
fundamental law of the English Constitution that the Crown can neither
alter, add to, nor dispense with, any
existing law of the realm.
Orders Under Statutory Powers
Orders-in-council, under statutory
powers, are plentiful. They are
used mainly in the transaction of departmental business, in governing
crown colonics, protectorates or newly settled countrios. Several of the
king's councillors meet—three at
least aro required—a resolution is
proposed and carried, the law officers
of the crown couch it and are responsible for its legality, and it is an
ordcr-in-eouueil. The powers usually so exercised in England, are:
1. Powers of laying down rules,
e. g., as those of tbe Home Secretary
to issue orders as to the discipline
of policemon, those of the loeal government board as to the government
of workhouses.
2. Poweri to issue particular
covenants, e. g., loeal government
board will order the placing of a
sewer pipe, which the sanitary board
has neglected and will compel payment by. it of the cost
3. Power to grant licenses of an
extraordinary nature, e. g., to permit
a Jesuit to remain in Englnnd.
4. Powers to remit penalties.
5. Powers to inspect factories,
mines, etc.      #
6. Powers of inquisition, e. g., enquiries as to railway accidents; the
Sankey Commission, etc.
Judgments of Privy Council
The judgments of the Privy Council are orders-in-council. The Privy
Council is a court of law, but administrative forms are still retained. Its
judgment is an advice to the king
and, by. order-in-council, His Majesty reverses, or confirms, the judgment of the eolonial court. This is
a curious reminder of the times when
judicial ahd governmental functions
were blended, and the same council
advised as to both. These examples
are not limitative. They serve rather
to show what class and character of
matters are dealt with by orders-in-
eouncil passed by our Parliament,
what cannot bo passed.
The order-in-council, admittedly,
is subordinate legislation, and, like
all legislation, is based on well-defined authority and may bo intra
vires or ultra vires. The critical
tests of an order-in-council are:
1. Is the subject matter such
that, although of legislative charactor, it does not fundamentally affect
nny substantive lawf
3. Does it fall within the powers
conferred by any deputed lawf
It is not my purpose here, nor can
I within the limits of a short article,
express an opinion as to the constitutionality of the orders-in-council
passed by the Dominion Government
for thc past two years. Each order-
in-council must be examined by itself and tho tests mentioned, applied. I cannot enterjain thc general
theory that tho War Measures Act
has deputed, sufficient power to thc
govornment to -pass, by ordcr-in-
council, many of the measures passed
by it. The general opinion held by
laymen that many of tho Orders-in-
council so passed went too far and
wcro passod without sufficient nuthority, will safely be adopted by
constitutional lawyers who have not
resigned themselves to the supreme
court judgment in the Lewis caae.—
Louis Fitch in the Statesman.
New York,—Striking actors aro
not scared at tho managers' threat
to closo every theatre, since the
stago employees and musicians have
joined in the strike. Commenting on
Ihis move by the managers, Frank
Oilmbro, executive secretary of the
Actors' Equity   Association,   said:
If the theatres are closed to us,
we Bhall organize companies to tour
the country, just as Mrs. Fiske and
Mme. Bernhardt did when a powerful trust .discriminated against
them." Twenty-throe theatres ure
closed down.
PARIS, France. — Farm laborers
aro up in arms over the refusal of
tho French parliament to include
them in the recently-enacted oight-
hour law. These workers charge* that
the government listened to the organized farm owners, who insist that
an eight-hour day is "impracticable"
Du Sncll of the Jewerly 'Workers
union and formerly manager of the
Biggar Jewelry Store is now In business for himself in the Burns Block,
18 Hastinga Street West. Dan has
over 20 yoars experience as a watchmaker and jeweler and the Federationist and his many friends wish
him luck in his new venture.
Ottawn, Ont.—The cost of living
commissioner's report concerning
the stocks of food in storage iu
Canada, shows an increaso of approximately 1,250,000 more pounds
of butter on August 1 thnn on the
same date one year ago.
COWAN t BROOKHOUSE
PRIHTEBS,     PUBLISHERS,     STE*
BliOTTPEES   ANO   BOOSBINDEBS
Union Oftclsli, write for prleM.   W«
■Iv. SATISFACTION
Phone Hey. 821      Day or Night
Nunn, Thomson & Olegg
/FUNERAL DIRECTORS
531 Homer St.   Vanconver, B. O.
H. P.Nelson
Stationer
Bookseller
Canadian and Americnn
tnuRnzincs, Engliah Newspaper* and Mi.gu*-i»c8.
1071 ORANVILLE BT.
Phono Seymour 2757
If LIMITED
Novelty Silk and Satin Linings
Very Fashionable
Large assortments are shown
here in Silk Poplins, Messa-
lines and Pussy Willow
weaves, in attractive Oriental
and floral effects, in all the new
colorings. Note the following:
NOVELTY SUBSBNE SILK, 36 ins.
wide. Special 91.75 per yard.
Shown in attractive floral effects in
saxe, grey, tan and Copenhagen.
NOVELTY SILK POPLINS, 36 ins.
wide, f2.50 per yard. Shown in
dainty floral designs and Oriental
patterns, in dove grey, champagne,
mid grey, brown, Copenhagen and
tan.
NOVELTY PUSSY WILLOWS, 36
ins., 92.85 per yard. Shown in
grey and fawn shades in conventional patterns.
NOVELTY SATINS, 36 ins., 92.95
per yard. These come in attractive
designs in a splendid range of costume colors.
NOVELTY SILK DAMMAS, 36 ins.
wide, 93.95 per yard. A beautiful
heavy quality and soft texture; a
high-grade silk lining from every
standpoint.
NOVELTY MESSALINE.    Special
93.95.   This is one of the most
beautiful silks shown in Oriental     v'
patterns and conventional designs,
in magnificent colorings.
575 Granville Street
■''#*-*. -'5?*7*5.<
Phone Sey. 3540
Salmon fishers on Deserted Island
received five cents per fish for salmon weighiag from 10 to 16 pounds.
The fish were brought to Vancouver (a five hourB* journey) and sold
for 30 cents per pound.  Nuff said.
Don't
forget
OUB advertisers.
Tim* tnd money »re ntemary for
•11, but If yen wut correct time,
bring yonr w-itch to
Dan Snell
WATCHUAXEI AMD JIWZI&H
Md b. will UT. yoa money.
II HASTINOS SI. Will.
On. door wit of Pant-la. Theatre
Rooms 11 .ni 12 Phone Sty. S833
Mail order* receive prompt attention.
(Ovor 20 rear, eiperience). (For
marly witk Binm.)
Furniated room io rent at #2.50
per weet.   1028 Howe Stroot.
Buy onl*r from ■ union atore.
For Books, Stationery
and British Periodicals
-HBMRMBER-
W. Galloway's
Book Store
135 Hastings East
OUB Simmer Prieei nre now
on; remodelling fnra, expert tuning and dyeing et
rcaionable ratea* Urgent manufacturer, ia Britiak Colia-
-FTOS FOB BALE-
New York Fur
Company
Kt ud 66. OEOBOIA ST.
Opposite Hodjon'i Bay
Beymour M78
Real
Young
Men's Styles
TOP notchers—in Value as
well as Style. Complete
suit assurance with a range of
patterns and styles that truly
make the Dick Stores headquarters for young men's
clothes.
You'll find models that are
different—you'll find patterns
that are exclusive—with value
as a supreme feature—giving
absolute suit-satisfaction.
At Dick prices these suit
values for the young men are
unusual. You'll say so when
you make your selection and a
try-on. Take our advice and
make your selection with the
early birds — models and
values like ours are not often
seen nowadays—
$35 to $75
guaranteed as usual-
Money's Worth or
Money Back."
"Your
Your
10%-Off to AU SoIdiers-10%
WM. DICK, LIMITED
33-45-47-49 Hastings St. East

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