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British Columbia Federationist Jun 15, 1923

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Array BRITISH COLUMBIA F
INDUSTRIAL
unity: strength __».        Official Of gan Vancouver Trades and Labor Council (International)      -m-* political unity, vtotoit
■FIFTEENTH YEAR.  No. 24
POUR PAGES
VANCOUVER, B. C, FRIDAY MORNING, JUNE 15,1923
$2.50 PER YEAR
[Trades Council Queen Contest Starts Off with a Bang
MALCOLNL BRUCE OIY ID DO
|Labor Editor Is Acquitted
on Seditious Utterance
Charge
■all
ISeven Witnesses of Crown
Give Evidence in Favor
of Accused
Malcolm Bruce, accused of seditious utterances at Glace Bay, has
been acquitted. While speaking to the
miners in this place, he was supposed
to have made a statement which was
not in accord with British ideals, but
after giving the ruling claas a little
trouble locating him, he gave himself
p and was duly tried and as stated
above, acquitted.
The Maritime Labor Herald, in reporting the preliminary hearing, gave
put the following facts:
The court room at Glace Bay was
crowded with miners on Thursday
morning when the preliminary hearing of Malcolm Bruce, charged with
seditious utterances at a meeting in
Glace Bay on May 6th, took place.
H_After all the screaming of the caplt-
,11st press during the past few weeks,
and the reports that the Crown Prose-
utor waa investigating the case and
going to press the prosecution to the
limit, all that the Crown could pro*
Jrduce was seven witnesses who refused
to declare that Malcolm Bruce had
Rhrnde the statement charged against
foim.
The flrst witness called, George
'Koblett of Glace Bay, admitted that
'he was at the meeting In the Savoy
and was of the opinion that he had
heard Bruce speak. He heard no
mention of any flag at all. Asked If
had spoken with Mr. Ralph about
(the meeting he admitted that he had
•but denied having told him that Malcolm Bruce had made the statement
barged againBt him. The defense
lawyer, Col. Harrington, asked the
witness if Ralph had visited him for
[the purpose of working up a case.
The prosecutor objected to this. The
Witness admitted that he had never
seen Ralph around Glace Bay before.
Wm. McKlnley, grocer, was present
the meeting at the Savoy and had
heard a speaker tell of the housing
situation among the workers In Saskatchewan. He was quite positive
that he hnd heard no references to the
[flag whert asked by the prosecution.
He also declared that he had not told
^nyone that he had heard references
'hade to the flag.
•■Jsames Hayes, a miner, stated that
,ie knew Malcolm Bruce by seeing
im around town. He had been nt
he meeting ln the Savoy but had not
leard him make the statement read
H,>y the prosecution attributed to him.
he speech he had heard Bruce make
vas a labor speech, but he had made
to reference to the flag.
Edward  Corbett,  reporter  for the
lydney Record,  was at the meeting
'ind denied that there had been any
ef erenee to the flag made.   He stated that he had taken notes of the
Ineetlng and had sent a report of the
meeting to  the Sydney Record,  but
toe statement which had apeared in
he paper had not been Bent by him.
^^ ressed  upon  his  point  he  insisted
^Vint he had sent his version of thc
leeting to Bruce Jefferson, news ed'
lor of the Record, but the statement
harged against Bruce had not been
mt in by him.
After adjournment the prosecution
illed  Jack  MacDonald,  reporter of
_ ie    Sydney    Post.    His    statement
(.greed with the rest of the witnesses
or the prosecution that Bruce had
ot made the Btatement attributed to
im.   He had taken notes of the meet'
^ng and had heard the speech made
^g>y Malcolm Bruce at the meeting, but
statement  charged  against  him
ad not ben made.
; Bruce has ben an active worker in
he working class movement In this
ountry for many years.   At one time
>ie was a resident of Regina, where
ie gave many young men their first
nsight into modern capitalism.    He
now a resident of Toronto, and a
ndidate for the  Provincial House,
the coming election.    In addition
being an all-round rebel and agi<
ator,  he  is also the  editor of the
Worker,  the    official   organ of   the
orkers' Party of Canada.
Labor Alderman Shows the
Board of Works How
It Can Be Done
Some three months ago when a proposal was made in the city council to
have the hauling for the city done by
contract, Alderman Pettipiece, the
only Labor alderman in the city council, objected, and suggested that this
work could be done by the city if
trucks were secured.
After three months of delay, and
with the assistance of a Labor alderman and two mechanical experts, Alderman Pettlplece's contentions have
been proven to have been correct, and
the Board of Works convinced that
the city will save by purchasing its
own trucks and doing its own work.
This matter, as far as the Board of
Works was concerned, was decided
on at a meeting held in the City Hall
on Tuesday afteronon, when Alderman Pettipiece won out on every point
and the stand he had taken vindicated,
the committee accepting a sugestion
made by the Labor alderman, that
with extra trucks, all city work could
be cared for by the employees of the
city, and at the same time 'accepting
the report of the experts as to the
make of truck which should be purchased.
There may not appear to be much
in the proposition so far as the workers are concerned, but the Civic Employees may flnd that they are bene'
fitted by the actions of a Labor alderman, and his efforts to secure control
of the work of the city by an elective
body, instead of a contractor, and
the union rate of wagea and decent
working conditions maintained.
M
I
1 Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Pease, of Dallas,
! Megan, have lost all Ave of their own
hlldren. They found some solace for
his overwhelming loss In the adop
lon of a child in the John Reed home
n Samara.
Why Lot Georgo Do.It
.. you do not attend your  union
leetlngs and the other fellow does,
kick!    He Is doing the beat Ke
Why complain becauae George
it.    Why not do lt yourself?
If
ff
• does
START DRIVE TO
E
Hotel and Restauant Employees Seek Aid of
Other Workers
The Hotel and Restaurant Employ
ees elected the officers for the second
half of the yei\r on Wednesday, June
6th; the officers and delegates elect'
ed are us follows:
President, Wm. Colmar; vice-
president, T. Parkinson; business
agent, Andy Graham; press agent,
Win. Colmar; Inspector, Philip Howard; Inside guard, Walter Allen;
recording secretary, W. J. Wilson,
executive board, W. J. Allen, H. Storey,
T. Parkinson, C. Davies,' Gus Pallas.
T. and L. Council T. Parkinson, W.
Colmar, W. MacKenzie, A. Graham,
J. Oullette, D. Ross. Local Joint
Board, W. Colmar, H. Storey, T. Edwards.
The attention of members of organized labor is called to the fact
that there are a number of union
houses in the city which should be
supported. They are advertised In
another column, and the Hotel and
Restaurant Employees seek the support of the workers ln their efforts
to unionize as mnny restaurants as
possible during their organizing campaign. Demand the union card and
help the Hotel and Restaurant Employees, is the slogan.
Ti
CHOOSE YOUR QIEEN All VOTE AID WORK FOR HER
VIOLET WELLS
Queen Candidato, nominated by Cowan
BrookhouGo Ltd., lor Trades and Labor
Council Society Circus nnd Mid-Summer
Carnival.
EDITH EDMONSON
Queen candidate, nominated by tbe C. P.
H. Social and Athletic Cltib, for Trades
and Lalior Council Circus and Mid-Summer Carnival.
A
Hastings Street Job of B. C.
Electric Railway Co.
Under Fire
Uniforms of Firemen to Be
Made By Union
Men
On the question o .the awarding of
the contracts for firemen's uniforms
In South Vancouver municipal coun*
ctl, a division was called, owing to the
fact that the secretary of the Tailors
Union had protested in the Trades
Council that the contract was being
let to a non-union Arm.
The matter was referred to a committee of the South Vancouver Municipal Council, composed of Councillors
Masters and the reeve to bring In a
report and recommendation at the
meeting following the discussion of
the contract. The recommendation
of the committee was to the effect,
thut the contract be awarded to Mr.
Farrington, providing that union labor
was employed.
Councillor Hardy, recognizing the
wide application of the term "union
labor," moved an amendment to the
recommendation, calling for the union
label of the customs tailors to be affixed 4o every garment. After a long debate, this amendment carried, and the
council waa divided aa follows:  For
Fifty Cents Per Hour WiU
Be Minimum of the
New Local
The meeting of the General Laborers Union, held on Monday, was
well attended, and a start made with
further organization work.
Secretary Bengough, of the Trades
and Labor Council, was present, and
reported that he had received a number of due books, and that the charter was expected daily. He also gave
a flnanclal statement, showing that
the money paid in had been used to
pay charter fees, and incidental expenses, with a small balance on hand,
which was handed over to the secretary.
Brother Floyd reported as ro the
Hastings Street Job being done tor the
B. C. Electric Railway Company. He
stated that tho Street Railway Employees' representative had been interviewed, nnd that it was learned
that the rate of pay for this class of
work was 49 cents per hour for men
who had been employed less than
three months, and that the rate of
pay after this period of employment
was 54Va cents per hour, but as the
job had been let as a contract, there
was nothing that the Street Railway-
men could do, but that the employees of the B, C, Electric Railway
would do all in their power to organize the laborers working on the
job.
Secretnry Bengough suggested that
when the charter arrived, a rate of
pay for laborers could be settled on,
and the same forwarded to the fair-
wage officers of the Province and
Dominion. He also suggested that
this rate should not be less than 50
cents per hour.
The meeting then decided that the
secretary of the Trades Council be
empowered to put in the minimum
wage for laborers aB being 50 cents
per hour.
It wns suggested by Secretary Ben
gough, that a monthly button be se
cured, aa a means of Identifying
union laborers, as well as a means of
organizing the unskilled workers.
The Circus and Summer Carnival
of the Trades Council was next
brought to the attention of the members, the proceeds of which will go to
the building fund of the Trades Council, and that the local union selling
the most tickets would secure a caah
prize of $75.00.
A motion to supprt the carnival ln
every way was then adopted. The
next meeting of the local will be held
on Monday, the 18th, at 319 Pender
Street West, and as the charter haB
now arrived, permanent officers and
delegates will be elected.
Support the Carnival
If you wnnt to see orgnnized labor
In a home of its own, then support
the Circus and Carnival, which  will
be held from June 30 to July 7.
the amendment, Councillors Cornett,
Hall, Coltart, Hardy and McPherson.
Against: Councillors Masters and
Bucklngton.
The secretary of the Tailors Union
reports that as a result of Councillor
Hardy'a amendment, the shop of Mr.
Farrington haa been signed up and all
tailora working in the establishment
have Joined the union.
UNA  HARRIS
Queen candidato, nominated by tbe Civil
Service   Dept.,   for  Trades   and   Labor
Council Society Circus and Mid-Summer
Carnival.
JEAN DUNCAN
Queen candidate,  nominated  by Arctic
Ice, Cream Co.,, for Trades and Labor
Council Circus and Mid-Suminer Carnival
rpHE Queen contest of tho Van-
J- couver Trades and Labor
Council, In connection with the
Circus and Carnival to be held
from June 30 to July 7, Is well
on the way, four contestants being ln Uie field. They are: Jean
Duncan, nominee of the Arctic
Ice Cream Company; Una Unr-
ris, nominated hy tlie Civil Service; Edith Edmondson, nominee or the C I*. It. Social Club,
and Violet Wells, nominated by
Cowan Brookhouse Ltd.
Considerable competition Is
already ln evidence, and each
contestant ls seeming the active
aid or their many friends. Those
who support their candidate.*
ror the position or "Miss Vancouver," in addition to securing
twenty-flve votes ror their favorites when purchasing a Queen
contest ticket, also hnve a
chance on a trip to Lob Angeles
or Alaska, nith return fare paid.
Tickets are also on Bale for
tlie circus and carnival, the price
being SO cents per ticket, whicli
ls good for admission to the circus and carnival every night of
tlie week. This admission ticket
also gives the punftiaser a
chance for a trip to Los Angeles
or Alaska. All prizes will be
given away on the night or July
7 on the grounds.
. Get ln the drive for the building fund of tlie Trades and Labor Council and assist your organisation In securing a home
for your local. If tlie employers
are against you In nay move you
make, you can be assured that
.when you take an opposite stand
that you are correct. Boost for
the Queens entered In tlie Labor
contest, and the Circus and Carnival of the Trades and Labor
Council.
SHOP STEWARDS
E
Capital City Workers Seek
Higher  Wages  and
Better Conditions
The Steam and Operating Engineers of Victoria called a strike on the
new drydock Job. Every member of
the organization has quit in this struggle for better conditions and higher
wages.
The Vancouver Trades and Labor
Council and the local union here has
been officially notified to this effect
by the Victoria Trades and Labor
Council and the local union.
On Wednesday, Secretary Green of
the Vancouver local, notified all members of the strike, and wired to the
Victoria local, stating that the Vancouver local was in full accord with
th   step taken.
The demands being made are an increase of wages to bring them to the
same level as Vancouver, and certain
conditions which have been the cause
of trouble, are being contested.
The strikers are receiving the full
suport of the Victoria Trades and
Labor Council, and it is expected
that the strike will be of short dura
tlon. All employment agencies have
been notified of the trouble, and engineers are warned to STAY AWAY
FROM VICTORIA.
LARKIN APPEALS TO
Maginf-cent Reception Tendered to Labor Leader
on Return Home
Wallace Drydock Job Wages
Is Subject of
Debate
GET A NEW SUBSCRIBER
Tbe greace-t awdstance that tbe
readers of 1__e Foderationist oan render ua at thla time, la by secnrlnc a
new subscriber. By doing eo yon
spread the newa of the working clan
movement and assist us.
LABOR HALL
MEETINGS
June  Ittli «> June 22
FRIDAY, June 15—Moldera,
Granite CutterB.
MONDAY, Juno 18—Electrical
Workers, No. 3in, Federal
Labor Union, Structural Iron
Workers,  Boilermakers.
TUESDAY, June 19—Trades &
Labor Council.
WEDNESDAY, Juno 20—Lithographers.
THURSDAY, Juno 21—Steam &
Operating Engineers No. 844,
Tailors' Executive. Machinists
No. 182, Plasterers Laborers.
New Officers to Be Elected
on Monday, June
25th
Local 452 of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners, held
a successful and interesting meeting
on Monday last,
Twelve new members were admitted, and a large amount of business
transacted.
A proposal for the appointment of
shop stewards was endorsed, and lt ls
expected that every Job In the city
will be canvassed for new members,
and all members are requested to aid
the stewards ln their work.
The Wallace dry dock job caused
considerable discussion, and the executive was instructed to endeavor to
secure the prevailing rates on this
work, and the delegates to the Trades
Council were instructed to secure the
aid of that body in the attempt to establish the minimum rate of wages as
laid down, and recognized by the local
unions affiliated with that body.
Nominations for officers showed
that there was considerable interest
In the personnel of the officers for the
coming term, there being many nominations for almost every office, a healthy sign in any Labor union. Nominations will be opened at thc next
meeting, which will be held on June
25 in the Manufacturers building,
Granville Street, when the elections
Will take place.
The nominees to date arc as follows: Business agent, Dunn, Page and
Thom; president, M. McKenzle and
Dunn; recording secretary, Page and
Hardy; financial secretary, Nixon,
Hardy, Page and Smith; treasurer,
Page; conductor, Dickinson, Thom and
Page; warden, Welts and Pnge; delegates to Trades and Labor Council,
Dodson. Tough, Wells, Hardy, Page,
Hatley, Thom and Dunn; sick committee, Ferret t, Edmonds, Page,
Wells and' Hardy.
All members are urged to attend
the Joint meeting tonight (Friday) In
the Manufacturers building at 8 p.m.,
at which meeting there wil lbe a full
report made as to the negotiations
with the employers.
Who Shall lie Mlw Vancouver?
The members of organized labor
are challenged. Thc employers associations are opposed to the efforts being made to the drive to provide a
home for organized labor, but each
member of the trade union movement
can support this project, by voting
and buying a ticket for the Trades
Council Queen  of Vancouver.
Soviet Ceremonial in 17. S, A.
The Red Flng of the Soviet was
ceremonially hoisted over the United
American finer Reliance at Now York,
when 35 American miners and tbelr
families left to work the Russian
minen.
A  Union  Ih What You Mnke  It
Some men Imagine that a union
comes out of the sky, and that it is
made to order. This is a fallacy
which only active participation In
union affairs can destroy. Why not
be an active member, Instead of a
knocker.
UREN CALL
Local Friends of Soviet Russia Join in the
Campaign
The call of the children in thc orphan homes of .Soviet Russia, and
those unable to secure refuge In such
homes, is being sent out throughout
the world, by the Friends of Soviet
Russia.
There are thousands who are unable to be cared for at tbe present
time, and this organization is seeking
to secure funds, so that these help'
less victims of capitalistic counter
revolutionists and famine, may be
cared  for.
The local bianoh of the Friends '.1
Soviet Russia, in an endeavor to sc*
cure money for this worthy object
lias decided to hold a concert nnd
dance in tbe Workers Party Hull, 303
Pender Streot West, on Friday, Juno
29.
Valuable prizes will bo given away
and a good time Is assured to ill who
attend. Tickets arc now on sale, the
price being 25 cents.
You may wish to help Thc Federatlonist. You can do so by renewing
your subscription promptly and send,
ing In the subscription of your friend
or neighbor.
UNITED STATES
Free Speech Fights and Arrests of Workers Show
Tendencies
The two civil liberties union of the
United States issues most prominent
in thc reports for the month, are the
criminal syndicalism cases and nffi
clal Interference with mcetingH. In
California the fight of thc Industrial
Workers of thc World to gnin recognition of thcir rights is culminating
in such conflicting actions as thc arrest of hundreds of members in the
San Pedro strike, and the successful
holding or Civil Liberties mass
meetings by Upton Sinclair, the decision confirming the conviction of the
ten Casdorf-Flrey trial witnesses, and
the acquittal of live men in Kureka
by a Jury which held the I. .W. W. a
legal organization.
Thc right to speak in any language
except English, has been refused In
Buffalo, N. Y.. In connection with
clothing workers strike, nnd In Columbus, Ohio, hall owners, by order of
the American Legion nnd the Chamber
of Commerce, boycotted the committee arranging a Debs' meeting. At
| Dtinmore,   Pa.,   a   meeting   was   pre-
New Tactics Urged by Irish
Labor Leader in
Dublin
[By Fintan LalorJ
(Special to The Federatlonist)
Dublin, May 12—If there was any
doubt in the minds of any Irishman
or Irishwoman as to who was the dominating figure in the industrial and
political life of the Irish working
class, that doubt was removed at the
celebration of the anniversary of the
execution of the late James Connolly,
held here today. Although away from
Ireland for over eight years, 20,000
men and women, amidst the pouring
rain, roared their approval of the return of Jim Larkin, At the same
time, roaring their disapproval of the
cowardly silence of the Irish Labor
Party in allowing the executions of
the last few months to pass without
protest on their part.
Lurk In speaks
Jim Larkin addressed his remarks
chiefly to those who favor the Republicans. Hs spoke to them of the
necessity of revising their tactics and
exhibiting a clearer understanding,
and coming to grips with the realities
of the situation. He urged them to
lay down their arms nnd enter the Dall
(Irish parliament). "They were going
to be a free nation," he said. "Because
they had got a setback, was that
any reason why they should not go forward to the dawn?" he asked.
Many Republicans fenred that the
appeal of Jim Larkin, asking them to
lay down their arms, was an appeal
based upon the idea that they should
be left helpless nnd conduct their
fight in a paciflst manner; but Jim
removed their fears when he declared:
"Olve up their arms—yes!" Ireland's
.sacrificed dead," he went on to declare, "gave up their arms many a
time, and waited until the hour arrived and seized these nrms again,
and went out and died that the nation
might live." The crowd sensed the
point that Jim was making, and tumultuous cheers greeted his remarks.
Many saw that Jim was asking them
to be sane men und women, as .sane
as they bad bcen brave. They were
being asked only.to revise their methods, and not to change their principles. _j
No Disgrace to (Wive I p Arms
"It is not disgrace to give up your
arms," declared Larkin, "when the
forces opposed lo you are overwhelming. If Connolly were here he would
say to them to have peace by understanding) and then reform the line
and march forward to victory."
Referring to (he muny who were
dying upon the hillsides and those
who had gone before, victims of the
brutal conduot of the government,
and the cowardly silence of the alleged representatives of the people.
Jim Larkin asked the assembled thousands, "Were they going to waste the
seed of this nation, and were they no-
Ing to sacrifice tho men In the goals
for one personality or a dozen personalities?" The crowd answered
No!"
Cming to thc vexed question of the
oath to the King of England, Jim
Larkin declared that no mnn living
could make them pay allegiance to a
king, He urged the crowd, whether
they were Free Staters or Republicans, to Join together and make an
appeal to the men on the hillsides to
come Into the nation. "Let them not
mind the words about giving tip guns,"
he said, "so long as they do not give
up the principles of a United Ireland,
one and indivisible."
He urged the crowd to seriously
study the question of pence. Let them
come out into the open and fight for
tbelr principles, was the advice tendered by Larkin. "Let the Free State
govornment declare n vacancy," he
said, "and he would flght the best man
they could produce on the question of
peace by understanding."
(Continued on page t)
vented by the mayor when Alexander
Howat attempted to address tho miners, while permitN to speak In Old
Forge, Pa., were granted to Howat,
and refused to representatives of thc
Italian Socialist Federation.
The indictment of severnl men in
connection with the University of
Missouri lynching, the action of the
Texas legislature against conspiracy,
the New York antl-masking bill nnd
the offer of a large reward for information In the 'Harrison, Arkansas,
lynching look to wnrd an open Interest
in the mob evil. PAGE TWO
fifteenth year, wo. 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIBT Vancouver, b.c.
FRIDAY. June 15,  1.
BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
**T-M_-h_d erery Friday morning by The B. C. FedefatlonUt
Buelness Office:   1188 Howe Street
Editorial  Offloe:    Room   306—lit  Pender  Street  West
HdRarlal Board:  P. R. Bongough, R. H. Neelands, J. M.
Clark, George Bartley.      .
Bubecrlption Rate: United Statea and Foreign, J3.00 per
year; Canada, |,_.B0 per year, 11.50 for six months; to
Unions subscribing in a body, 16c per member per
month.  ,
Unity of Labor: The Hope of the World
FRIDAY '. , June  15,   1828
Protection of Forests and Profits
A MODERN WAGE SLAVE would not feel at
home if he did not have a government to govern
him, and to make him produce profits, for those
who control the government. Under chattel slavery, the slaves used to run away from their masters, but under oapitalism they- seek their masters
and vote for their henchmen, so that they can be
properly governed and kept in that place which a
divine providence has placed them.
* *        »
But while a divine providence has decided that
workers shall be slaves, that same providence has
provided for thc wants of man by the provision of
natural resources, such as minerals, forests and all
those things which go to make up the natural
wealth of a country.
* *       -*.
If, however, a country was filled with all nf those
things wliich are described as "natural resources,"
and .there were no workers, there would be little
capitalistic wealth produced. In fact, if it were
not for the workers-of Canada, it would be possible
to buy the Canadian Pacific Bailway for a niekle,
and the recipient of this sum of money would
think himself lucky to have found a sucker.
When slaves are hungry, and there is little work
to be found in the land, the employing class is parsimonious. , It does not recognize the necessity of
humanity, but only thc needs for conserving its
wealth in the shape of dollars and cents. But
when the other natural resources are threatened,
such as forests, that is a different story.
* *.        *
British Columbia has a government—it is Liberal
by name—and capitalistic by nature. Its main
function is to keep slaves in subjection, and conserve the interests of the ruling class. Htfiv this is
done ean be seen in any capitalistic newspaper.
One instance of its capitalistic nature can be found
in a recent order in council, in which it is declared
that His Majesty's advisers have found it necessary
to preserve the forests of this Province, at the rate
of twenty-five cents an hour.
The government of British Columbia, wishing to
preserve the timber in the Province has in its
wisdom, decided that men, when called out to fight
fires in timber areas, shall bc remunerated at the
rate of twenty-five cents per hour for preserving
thir masters' property. It has also decided that if
the worker docs not do as he is told, that he will
be fined a sum not less than $25 and not more than
$300.
Whilo this "necessary" provision as to the workers' part in conserving of property has been made,
the department of lands has allowed thc natural
watershed from which Vancouver secures its water
supply, to bc denuded of trees by an American company, whose only object is the securing of profits.
Professor Davison, a man versed in thc science of
botany, claims that the removal of trees from the
hills will menace the water supply of the City of
Vancouver and surrounding municipalities. But
the trees arc being removed in the name of profit
and interest on invested capital. A truly laudable
objective in capitalistic society.
. But we also learn that while the watersheds are
being denuded of timber, so that capital can secure
its returns, that the employing class who reaps the
benefit of thc natural resources and the labor of
slaves, will not plant trees where there has'been
lumbering operations, because campers and smokers arc careless and cause the fires in the districts
where lumber is plentiful. Is this not too bad?
If a mine is blown up, a dead Chinaman who can
not talk back, is blamed. If a forest is burnt, then
it is the campers who are the culprits, and if capitalistic property has to be saved from fire, ninny
times started by the operation of capitalistic concerns sueh as logging outfits, it must be saved at
thc rate of twenty-five cents per hour.
Of course, the worker in bis wisdom, votes for
his master, lie returns Liberal members to thc
Legislature, and gets Liberalism to the extent referred to. In fact, he imagines that it would bc
folly to vote I'or a working man, as working men
arc not capable of conducting a government. Now,
wc do not imagine for onc moment that the eleetion of working class representatives will bring
about a social revolution, hut wc do suggest that if
the workers would only sec tbe necessity of voting
for working class representatives, it would be possible to get more than twenty-five cents per hour
for preserving their masters' property, and if that
were not possible to show what a bunch of cheap
skates the ruling class is composed of, even when
they desire to preserve not only the natural resources, but the slaves which convert them into
commodities for a world market, and who starve in
the midst of plenty when they have produced moro
than can bc disposed of. It might at least bc worth
trying to elect men who realizo where all wealth
comes from, that will, at least, be a start in tho
struggle which thc working class is waging for the
preservation of human life and thc natural re
sources of the country.
The Brass Band and the Working
Class Movement
■THERE NEVER WAS a crowd whieh did not like
1 music. If there is a band playing jazz, or the
worst kind of music, there are lots of people who
will stop and listen. One has only to stand at a
street corner and watch a Salvation Army band,
and the crowd which will wait to hear the strains
of "Nearer My God to Thee," or some other strain,
to realize this fact.
In fact, music of the military forces has been the
greatest force in recruiting the men who have, on
occasions, innumerable, acted as cannon fodder for
the mister class. But the music of the working
class militants has been so far in advance, that the
crowd has not been able to hear it.
That music has been the propaganda of the class-
conscious members of the working class. The band,
in other words, the men who understood the working class position, has gone so far in advance of the
masses, that their utterances could not be heard by
the members of the working class who were. engaged in the every day struggle to secure a living.
The result has been the Labor movement has not
been stirred, as it should have been by the music
of the revolutionary proletariat, which would have
inspired the Labor movement, and brought recruits
in thousands and in fact millions,
A change has, however, taken place. The band
has recognized that its only function is to play so
that others than the players may hear the music.
Thc militant section of the working elass has at
last realized that a band at the head of the parade
is much better than one about a mile in front
where thc crowd can not hear it. The result is
that the militant workers have come down from
the clouds, and realized that the workers can only
be kept in step and on tho way to working elass
emancipation, when they can hear the music played
by the band of the proletarian class-conscious workers. In the meantime, the intellectuals are content to play their little tunes in their own little
halls and listen to thcir own performances, being
content to let thc crowd bc starved and restrained
from the music of the revolutionary struggle, and
by that starvation, condemned to further misery
and degradation under the present wage system.
The workers can take their choice—follow the
music of the new militant Labor movement, or stay
in the rut and search for the inspiration which they
so much need by listening to the dreary utterances
of thet self-satisfied members of the working class
whose only interest in life is their own conception
of their own knowledge.
Jim Larkin Appeals to
Irish Workers to Organize
(Continued from Page 1)
In one of the most dramatic appeals
ever uttered in the streets of Dublin,
he asked those assembled who were ln
favor of peace to raise their arms.
There was a unanimous response. It
was significant to note that men in
uniform expressed their approval of
Larkin's appeal for peace.
So ended the flrst meeting since the
Free State government came into
power where the men and women of
Ireland had the pleasure of hearing a
speaker stand up, regardless of the
blatant display of power and declare
to the world that the Republic would
win, Dublin turned out in its thousands and felt itself more than ^warded for standing ln the pouring rain by
the tremendous appeal uttered by
Jim Larkin.
Ireland ls going to have peace—let
there be no mistake as* to that. It
will not be the peace of the lamb lying down before the brute strength of
the lion. It will be that of men and
women realizing the futility of continuing the struggle, at present,
against overwhelming odds. It will
be a peace that will allow the militant elements in Ireland to' reform
themselves and pursue new tactics.
Dublin today clearly demonstrates,
as much as we regret it, that the
forces of reaction stand temporarily,
triumphant. The populace looks kindly, for the time being, on the forces of
the Free State. Free State soldiers
march up and down the streets, with
loaded rifles, reinforced by armored
cars. Free State officers boldly swagger forth, reminding one of the prewar days in Prussia. But it is all of
temporary duration. We mention it in
order to counteract the criminally
foolish statements of fanatical Irish
Republican speakers in America.
Irish labor in parliament due to its
silence on the executions and other
matters, has fallen into disrepute.
When its representative Cathal 0'-
Shannon rose to addresB the crowd,
prior to the speech of Jim Larkin, he
was met with howlings and derisive
cries. Finally, realizing that it was
useless to continue, O'Shannon had to
sit down and allow Jim Larkin to take
charge of the meeting. Down among
the crowd, afraid to be seen, was
Thomas Johnson, chairman of the
Irish Labor Party. Irish Labor has
failed miserably in the political arena.
It even lacked the ordinary courtesy
of attending the welcome accorded to
Jim Larkin by the Dublin masses. It
now finds itself in a position where lt
can not obtain a public hearing without the aid of Jim Larkin. Upon the
industrial field the workers have, due
to the union established by Jim Larkin—the Irish-Transport and General
Workers Union—maintained a higher
standard of living than that obtaining
ln Britain. It now prepares to cement
its forces and forge ahead not resting
until lt has secured a republic, the
only republic that counts—a Workers
Republic.
Hand The Federationist to your
shopmate when you are through with
It.
OOBPOBATIOH  Or  POINT   OREY
NOTICE
1923 Tax Statements bave beea -mailed.
Taxes are doe on or before June SOth, 1928
If you have not received' roar statement,
phone Kerrlsdale 91. Unregistered parties
please note.
f V7. A. 8flB?PARD,
Collector.
"Jim" Woodsworth^ Work in
Parliament
COEPOEATION OF POINT OREY
TENDERS
THB  COUNCIL   is  prepared  to  consider
tenders on tho following:
(1) AsphaJtle concrete pavement, concrete
curbs and sidewalks on Eighteenth Ave*
nae between Colllngwood and Waterloo
Streets. Tenders to reach the undersigned by 5 p-m. of Monday, June 18
Inst.
(2) Concrete sidewalks on various streets,
the list of whloh may he obtained from
the Engineer; tenders to reach tha nn*
derslgned by 5 p.m. of Monday, Jane 18
inst.
(3) Sewers of various sizes In Stratheona,
Magee and West Point Griry Dlstricts.
Tenders to reach the undersigned by 5
p.m, of Monday, Jane 25 Inst.
Specifications, forms of tender and full
particulars may be obtained on application to
the Municipal Engineer.
A deposit, equal to ten (10) per cent, of
the amount of tbe tender In each case, will
be required as security that accepted tender*
era will enter Into their contracts and pro*
vide bonds for iho due performance of the
same.
Should an accepted tenderer fall to enter
into the contraot and provide the required
bond his deposit wiU be forfeited to the Corporation.
Tenders mnst be In sealed envelopes endorsed on the outside, "Tonder for. "
and reach the undersigned by the times above
mentioned at the Municipal Hall, 5811 West
Boulevard, Vancouver, B, C>
The lowest or any tender not necessarily
accepted.
HENRY FLOYD, 0. M. C.
Municipal Hall, 5851 West Boulevard,
Vancouver, B. C
You Can't Help Saving
Every purchBse at tbo "Famous" mart save'
you money, because we make our own garments ond sell direct to our customers, thus
cutting out all jobbors' and dealers' profits.
The "Famous" prices for   .
Stilts—Coata—Capes—Dresses
are unquestionably the lowest in town, and
the quality and general make up are of tho
very best.
Famous
623 HASTINOS STEEET WEST
CLOAK and
SUIT CO.
Bird, Macdonald & Co.
BABBISTEBS, lOLIOROM, BN.
401-408 Metropolitan Building
8J7 Huti-gl St. W. VASOOUVEB, B. 0.
TiUphonH: Seymou 0000 ant 8007
Store Opens at I a.m. and
Closes at 6 p.m.
The Best
Bathing Togs
For Women, Misses and Children
Women's Pure Wool Bathing Suits at 83.75 to
$6.75.
Children's and Misses' Pure Wool Bathing Suits for
ages 6 to 14 years at $3,75 to $4.25.
Bathing Suits for little tots of 2 to 5 years at $1.75
Women's Bathing Caps at 25«. to $2.50.   Children's Bathing Caps at 25«£ to $1.50.
Children's Bathing Shoes at 50*"> to 0&*p.
—Drysdale's Sports Shop, Third Floor, and Junior Shop,
Second Floor.
575 OranviUe Street
Phone Seymour 8540
What about your neighbor's subscription ?
WRITING HISTORY is supposed to be the work
" of an historian. But men who live, and in their
lives do things, provide the material for historians
to write about, and in the history of Canada, as it
will be written in days to eome, one man willstand
out as the most compotcnt representative of the
working class in Canada in the year 1923, and that
man will bc J. S. Woodsworth, Labor M. P. for
Centre Winnipeg.
"Jim," thc man who had courage enough to refuse to load munitions to be used against Soviet
Russia in the City of Vancouver, has proven his
worth to the working class movement in the Dominion House. He may not bc as red as some people wish, but at least ho has courage and has shown
to the workers of this country the Value of a
working class representative in the legislative halls
of the country.
Hansard, the official record of the doings of the
Dominion House, teems with instances of his activities,, and of thc information he has compelled the
government to produce wilh respect to the position
of the working class. We have no intention to
make Jim Woodsworth into a hero, but the least
thai cun bc done is to give credit where credit is
due, and it is coming to the member for' Centre
Winnipeg.
Speaking on the question of free trade, the member for Centre Winnipeg took a stand that is in
lino with the working class movemont. He quoted
the following opinion, expressed by the Montreal
unemployed, which may not havo been appreciated
by the ruling class members of the House, but
which should bc of interest to the slaves of this
country.   It reads as follows:
We note that almost half of the budget when
applied in payment for past wars and in preparations for future wars and it would appear to us that something could have bcen expected from the government for thc preservation of life and thc building up of a higher
grade of citizens. While the government, evidently, has no regard for the welfare of the
workers of this country, we noto thcir great
interest in cattle and farm stock. To such an
extent are they interested in thc latter, that
nearly three millions of dollars is voted to
wipe out disease and in improving thc type of
stock. Wc ean not bc blamed if we come to
thc conclusion that wc as human beings in the
working class arc considered of less value than
cows, horses and pigs.
It may not bc nice to realize that pigs and cows
arc considered more valuable than human beings,
but it has bcen proven in the Dominion House that
thc government of this country has that opinion,
and if thc slaves of the modern system will only
realize this faet, that will elect moro working class
representatives of the Woodsworth type to expose
the present system and tho governments which
operate it,
The 15th and 16th of June
Are $1.00 Days
For the day we offer the following:
Stanfleld's Rod Label Underwear:
Suit  »5.00
Less $1.P0
$4.00
Men's Black-white Striped Shirts,
ror $1.00.
Men's Blue Cliumhiiiy Shirts, for
$1.00.
Men's  Military  Grey  Shirts,   for
$1.00.
Men's Stockcltit Shirts, blue and
khaki, for $1.00.
Men's Kluikl shirts, for $1.00.
Men's Blue and While Shirts, detached collar, l_'/2 only, $1.00
Men's WhlteKegllgee Shirts, $1,00.
Men's Straw Hats, rustic patterns,
$1.00.
Men's Ribbed Underwear, $1,00
garment.
Any Men's shoes In stock by mentioning this ad., $1.00 less.
Eight this 2 In 1 or Nugget, for
$1.00.
Tno Neckties for $1.00,
Three pairs Blnck Sox, fast colors, for $1,00.
Three pairs Working Sox, for
$1.00.
Tlio only agent Headlight Overalls in Vaneonver.
W.B. Brummitt
18 and 20 CORDOVA STREET WEST   VANCOUVER, B. C.
AND 444 MAIN STREET
The secret of
good beer lies
in purity—
That's why Cascade Beer has for 35 years
been British Columbia's favorite health
beverage. No expense has been spared to
ensure purity. It has eost a million dollars to build a plant to accomplish this.
But after testing Cascade Beer, yon agree
that it has been worth it.
Insist Upon
Cascade
Why Not Shop in the
Low Rent District?
Men's Box Kip'Blucher, in black
only; .6 to 10.   Special $4.00
Men's Tan Canvas Boots,  with
leather sole and heel $2.85
Mon's Tan  Elk  Blucher Work
Boot,  6 to 10 $4.50
Men's Wash Vests, to clear $1.00
Atlantic   Underwear—Saturday,
per suit   $1.95
Men's   Striped   Canvas   Gloves,
knit wrist, per pair 25
Men's Black Bib Overall, 32 to
44 at  $1.85
Arthur Frith & Co.
Men's and Boys' Furnishings, Hats, Boots and Shoes
2313 MAIN STREET
(Bttwnn 711 ud Btl Avenue!)
Phone, Fairmont 4859
Ring np Phone Seymour MM
for appointment
Dr. W. J. Curry
DENTIST
Suit*   301   Dominion   Bnlldlaf
VANCOUVBR, B. C.
Drugless Healing
I HAVE proved to hundreds of iat*
isficd patients thit la Rheumatism, Sciatica, Lumbago, Lobs of Manhood, General Debility and many
other diseases, my methods hare got
permanent resuJts where all other
methods have failed. Our treatment
Is absolutely PAINLB8S; having
had many yoars of PRACTICAL experience, we have the knowledge that
only PRACTICAL experience can give.
WE   ASK TOU TO   INVESTIGATE
Downie Sanitarium
314 Standard Bank Bldg.
Sey. 603, High. 21341.
We represent the American University
of Sanipractlc, Seattle, Wash.
FIRST CHURCH OF
CHRIST SCIENTIST
1180 Oaorfla Strfct
Bonds/ eervieei, 11 ..m. uid 7:80 p_n.
Sunday ichool immediately following
morning lerviee. Wedneaday teatlmonlal
meoting, 8 p.m. Tree readini room.
801-80-  Blrki Bide.
>. r. Hirrtioa 8. A. Betty
MOUNT PLEASANT
UNDERTAKING CO., LTD.
AMBULANCE SERVICE
831 BOSK-SWAY      VA-TOOOVM, B.O.
Phona ralrmona 88
BE SURE YOU OET
VAN BROS.
WHEN YOU ASK FOR
-CIDER-
Order Gallon Jar for your parties and dances.
UNION MEN'S ATTENTION
Phone. Highland 80.
Mainland
Cigar Store*1
MO OAltr.AIili STREET
THE PLACE FOR PIPES
Summer Courses
In tho Principles of
VOICE   FREEDOM
Based on Relaxation
COMMENTING NOW
Arthur J. Foxall
L.L.O.M., Ent.
STUDIO:   881 PENDEB ST. WEST
Iff. 62-7
WHEN IN TOWN STOP AT
The Oliver Rooms
48 Y,   CORDOVA STREET  EAST
Everything Modern
Rates Reasonable
EMPIRE CAFE
AND GRILL
"A Good Place to Eat"
HASTINGS   AND   COLUMBIA   ST
THB  INOREASINQ  VALUE  OP TOTO
TELEPHONE
YOUR telephone la of greator raise ai
eaoh month goea hy. With a stead*
inerease In the number of new telephone!
you are constantly able to talk with I
larger number of people, Thla eppllci
*o different parts of the province.
It meana to the business man that ht
la In olose touch with more people, Aa
every telephone la a long distance tale'
phone, anyone on tha Lower Mainland or
Vaneoaver Island mar be reached at a
moment's notice. The conversation It
direct, the reply instant.
Don't overlook the cheaper night
rates. Between 7 p.m. and 8 a.m. /or
get three times the day period at tht
aame price.
B. 0. TBItBPgQWB COMPACT.
=-"LAID OFF"*
Uro SHort WonW, BrldUnc the flail BrtwM
COMFORT ud POVERTY
J-Val-aaT&iVF-^
taa "EMIT BAT."
W. WKWOLT ■lOOUHlKD ,o_ » .Urt •••_ _» Maout AT 0101,
•I oa. af aw Otf BraaakM.
I taa. I. Baa-Ma. Maun.
_____ aa< IM An. MU* eat BraUnr
VIIU TOU WX___ JUMUUIl PBOMPT ABB OOVinOUl AV!1E__0_F
Union Bank of Canada
FA—If rot ara littaf ll ■ __a_aultr wl yrttMU vM Baaklnf faaUIIlM, _»•'_
drama _r-__-,_-4w. w__WiMM|ri!»raa_Bi«rMtto "B_a___i ky Matt." fclDAT...
..June IS, Hit
FIFTEENTH TEAR.     No. 24
BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST vanoouver, b.c.
Are your teeth
in proper
OB. BBBf X ABDBBSOH
Formerly member of the Faculty
of the College of Dentistry, University of Southern California;
Lecturer on Crown and Bridge*
work; Demonstrator in Platework
and Operative Dentistry; Local
and Oeneral Anaesthesia.
17 Yeara Practice In Vancouver
Make sure!   Call at my offloe.  I am ready to give you expert advice—as to whether they are in condition—as to
what should be done if they are not in proper shape.
EXTBAOTION OF TEETH
My Extraction Room Is equipped with
the most modem methods of extraction without the leaat inconvenience
to you. The methods I use for eliminating pain are a revnlationl
EXPBESSION PLATES
Moulded by unusually precise methods
to your individual mouth—made 'and
adjusted with painstaking care—they
are real triumphs in the art of den*
tlstry. Call and see the models at my
office.
Hygienic Grown and Brldsowork—Pyorrhoea Treatments—Dental
X-Ray Films and Diagnosis, Fillings, etc.
Fifteen-Year Written Guarantee Given.
Most modern methods (or elimination of pain used in all my work.
Dr. Brett Anderson
602 HASTINGS STREET WEST
Corner Seymonr
Phone, Seymour 3881
Offlce Open Tuesday and Friday Evenings
Vancouver Unions
I ANCOUVER TBADES AMD LABOB
Council — President, R. H. Neelanda, U.
A.; general secretary, Percy R. Bengough.
Aeo: 80S, 319 Pender St. Wait. Phone Bay.
LBS. Meeta in Labor Hall at 8 p.m. on
a flrst and third Tueadaya ln month.
IlUED PRINTINO TRADES COUNCIL—
I Meeta second Monday in the month. Pre-
Ident, J. R. White; aeeretary, R, H. Noel-
>ds. P. 0. Box 66.	
Offloe
LsDERATEB LABOR PARTY, 148 OOK-
Idova Street West—Builneia meetinga
tery Wednesday evening. A. Maclnnis,
lialrman; E. H. Morrison, aec-treas.; Geo.
I Harrison, 1885 Woodland Drive, Vancou-
sr, B. C., corresponding aeoretary.
Any diatrict In British Columbia desiring
formation re securing speakers or the for-
lation of local branches, Undly communicate
lth provincial Secretary J. Lyle Telford,
14 Birks Bldg., Vancouver, B. 0. Tele*
*ona Seymour 1888, or Fairmont 4938.
AKRBY SALESMEN, LOCAL 871—Meets
seoond Thursday every month,.319 Pender
treet West. President, J. Brightwell;
tanclal aooretary, H- A- Bowron, 929—llth
ve. East.
5uRNBYMe5 BARBERS' INTERNATION-
■ AL Union of America—Local 120, Van-
buver, B, C, meeta aecond and fourth Todays in each mouth In Room 813—819 Pen-
ir Streot West. Preildent, C. E. Herrett,
|L Hastings Street East; aeeretary, A. R.
anl, 880 Catnblo Street. Shop phoue, Sey.
>'02. Residence phone, Dong. 217IR.
INTERNATIONAL BROTHERHOOD OF
1 Boilermakers. Iron Shipbuilders and Help'
,s of America, Local 194—Meetings firat
nd third Mondaya in eaeh month, Preii-
mt, P. Willis; secretary, A. Fraser. OBce:
oom 303—819 Peader Street West. "'"
iots, 9 to 11 a.m. and 8 to 5 p.m.
U0KLATKH8 AMD MASONS—If you~need
brieklayera or masons for boiler works,
Jjc, or marble setters, phone  Bricklayers'
Baton, Labor Temple.  .
INITED BROTHERHOOD OF OARPEN-
T TERS and Joiners, Local 452—President.
Dunn; recording secretary, W. Page;
■nainesa agent, Geo. H. Hardy. Offloe:
loom 304—819 Peader Street Weat Meeti
ucond and fourth Mondaya, 8 p.m., Room fi,
119 Pender Street West.	
UVIO EMPLOYEES UNION—Meata flrat
fad third Fridaya in eaoh month, at UR Cor-
ova Street Wost. President, David Cuthlll,
itt 12 Albert Street; secretary-treasurer, Goo.
garrison, 1385 Woodland Drive.	
RNG1NEERS — INTERNATIONAL UNION
1 Steam and Operating, Looal 844—Meots
■very Thuraday at 8 p.m., Room SOT Labor
Temple. Secretary-treasurer, N. Green, 958
Hornby Street. Phone Sey'. 7043R, Record*
[ng secretary, J. R. Campbell, 803 First
[itreet, North Vanconver.	
f.ITY   FIREFIGHTERS   UNION   NO.   18—
President, Nell MacDonald, Na. 1 Firehall
ecreiary, 0. A. Watson, No. 8 Firehall.
IOTEL    AND    RESTAURANT    Employeea
L Union,   Local   28—441   Seymour   Street.
Meeta flrst and third Wednesdays at 2:80
Second  and  fourth   Wednesdays   at
p.m.    Executive   board  meets   every
I'aesday at 3 p.m.   President, W. A. Colmar'
Tualnesa agent, A. Graham.   Phone Seymour
tm-
I UMBER WORKERS INDUSTRIAL UNION
OF CANADA—An industrial union of all
orkers in logging and conatructlon camps.
east District and General Headquarters, 61
ordova Btreet West, Vanoouver, B. 0.
hone Seymour 7850. J. M. Clarke, general
uirytary-treasuror; legal advisers, Messrs.
ird, Macdonald A Co., Vancouver, B. 0.;
tditora, Messrs. Buttar ft Chiene, Vancou*
, B. C.
IACHINISTS LOCAL 182—President, Les
George; seoretary, J. G, Keofe; business
tent,  P.  R.   Bengongh.     Office:   309,   319
| ender Street' West.    Moets in Room 318—
19 Pendor Stroot West, on flrst and third
Thursdays iu month.
AOHINI8TS LOOAL 692—President, Ed.
Dawson; secretory, R. Hirst; business
•ent, P. R. Bongough. Offlce: 309—B19
onder Stroet West. Meets in Room 3—
.19 Pendor Street WeBt, on second and 4th
'liesdays in month.	
EUSICIANS MUTUAL PROTECTIVE
UNION, Local 146, A. F. of M.—Meets at
■msn Hall, Homor Street, second Sunday,
j 10 a.m. President, Ernest 0. Miller, 991
■elson Streot; secretary, Edward Jamleson,
1)1 Nelson Street; finanoial secretary, W. E.
I'illlams, 991 Neltton Street; organiser, F.
Petchar, 991 Nelson Street,
1 MOTHERHOOD OF PAINTFWH. DECORA-
■TORS and Paperhangers of America, Local
IB, Vancouver—Meots 2nd and 4th Thura-
_ys at 148 Cordova Stroet Wost.    Phone,
. 3510.    Business agent, R. A. Baker,
IILE   DRIVERS,   BRIDGE,   WHARF   AND
Dock Builders, Looal No. 2404—Meets at
2 Hastings Street West every Friday, at 8
Jns. Thompson, finanoial necretary.
AILOR8-   UNION OP THU  PACIFIC,  185
[Cordova St. West, P. 0. Box 571.   Phone
. 8708.   Meetinga every Monday at 7:30
,   J. Pearson, business agent.	
■EDERATED SEAFARERS' UNION OF B.
J 0.—Meeting nights, flrst Tuesday and Srd
Iriday of eaoh month at headquarters, 818
■ordova Street West. President, D. Oilles-
Pta; vice-president, John Johnson; secretary*
IjesMircr, Wm. Donaldson, address 818 Cor
|W Street West. Branch agent's address:
I'm. Francis, 1424 Government Street, Vio-
Aria, B. 0.	
Itreet and electric railway em-
ployees. Pioneer Division, No. 101—Meets
I.. P. Hall, Eighth and Kingsway, 1st and
rd Mondays at 10:15 a.m. and 7 p.m. Pre*
Ident, F. A. Hoover, 2409 Clarke Drive;
ecordlng socretary, A. V. Lofting; treasurer,
L. F. Andrew; financial* aeeretary and hostess agent, W. H. Cottrell, 166—17th Ave.
rest. Offlee, corner Prior and Main Streets,
hone, Fairmont 4S04Y.
foURNEYMKN TAILORS' UNION OF
I America, Local No. 178—Meetings held
[rat Monday In each month, 8 p.m. Presl*
lent, A, R. Gatenby; vice-president, Mrs.
If oik; reeordlng secretary, 0. MoDonald, P.
. Bex 803; flnanolal secretary, P, McNelsh,
r. 0. Box SM,	
IOOIETY  FOR TECHNICAL AID TO   SO*
I viet Russia—Vancouver braneh meets first
nd third Sundays each month, 2 p.m., at 81
ordova Street weat.   Fer Information write
, branch seoretary, 8. T. A. S. R„ 61 Oet*
jva Straet West, Vaneonver, B. 0.
YPOORfcPHIOAL UNION, No. 22«_Presl*
denl, R. P. Pettlplece'.   vice-president   J.
Jt, Bryan;   aeoretary-treasurer, R. H. Nee*
J-.nds, P. 0. Box 68.    Meets last Sunday of
■■ich month at 2 p.m. in Labor Hall, 319
fender Street West.	
HE VANCOUVER THEATRICAL FEDER*
ATION—Meets at 091 Nehin Street, at 11
J.m. en tha Tueaday preceding the 1st Sun-
Bay ef the month. President, E. A, Jamie*
fen, 891 Nelson St.; Secretary. C. H. Williams,  911 Nelson  Bt J   Business  Agont,   F.
teller, 991 Nelson St.       	
IpMHCE RUPERT TYPOGRAPHICAL
JVQttON, No. 413—President. S. D. Mac
■4, aald, aaeratary-trewarar, J. M. Campbell,
If. 0. Box 689. Moeta laat Thursday of each
law*.
Slater's
Week-end
Specials
FREE DELIVERY
123 Hastings St. E Soy. 3262
830 Granville Street—.Sey. 888
1191 Granville St. — Sey. 8149
3280 Main Street Fair. 1883
Butter Special
On sale Friday and Saturday,
Alberta Creamery Butter,
at 3 111 a.
at	
$1.15
B. C. Fresh Eggs, 3 dot-n tor 90c
Slater's Red Label Tea,  lb 66c
Ham Special
On sale Friday and Saturday, Slater'a Famed Smoked
Picnic Hams (average 5 to
8   lbs.)t
per lb	
Nothing finer for boiling or
frying.
151c
Bacon,
.30c
Sliced   Sugar-cured   Ayrshire
per lb	
Sliced  Sugar-cured Smoked Roll Becon, per lb -..S16c
Siloed    Sugar-cured    Streaky   Bacon,
per lh 40C
FRESH MEAT '-
Choice Pot Roasts, from,  lb 10c
Clibico Oven Roasts, from,  lb 10c
Choico Boiling Beof, from,  lb  8c
Choice Boneless Stew Beef, per tb 10c
Boof Blum kg, nil tho meat on;  tb " 6c
Slater's Famed Pork Shoulders—Average weight-4 to 8
lbs. Unequalled for your
week-end roasts. •% Cl_f»
Special,.per lb....      lOlv
PRIMS MILK-FED VEAL
Prime Shoulders of Veal, from, tb 22c
frlme Stew Veal, per Pt 16c
Lard Special
Finest Pure Lard, on  CCa
•I sale, 3 lbs     UUV
We have a nice selection of Primo
Local Killed Lamb arid Mutton at
competitive prlcea.
Choice Middle Cuts of Pork;
practically no bone AA.
Special, per lb  afiyV
GROCERY DEPARTMENT
Sardines,  4  tins  for 26c
Crosse «  Blackwell's Potted Tongue,
glass  Jnrs   - *26c
Crosse &  Blackwell's  Potted Ham-
glass jars   «6c
Libby's Devilled Tongue, 3 tlns....26c
Red Salmon. 2 for 80c
Brown    nnd    White    Vinegar—Largo
bottlos, 2  for 36c
Nabob Vinegar  26c
0.  &  B. Vinegar 40c
Orange Marmalade—No. 2 tins in 36c
Pek Naptha Sonp,  3  fur 26c
Blnck,   White   and   Brown    Boot
Polish, 2 for  25c
Jelly  Powders,  3  for 26c
Del    Monte    Pork    and    Beans—
Three for 25c
Clark s Pork und Beans, 3 for 30c
Tomatoes, 2 tins for 26o
Sweet Pickles, per bottle ._S0c_
Pickle Speciul
Uowat's Old Country Pickles,
put up in Glasgow, Scotland;
large quart Jars, AtLie
only    WV
At Slater's Stores
LUMBER WORKERS9
NEWS AND VIEWS
PAGE THREE
Fighting Fires and Low Wages
That tribe of chin-whiskered farm-fold days he Bpoke about laBt session
ers, pettyfogglng lawyers and other
.birds of a like nature, who compose
the executive council of the Provincial government at Victoria, have recommended to the Lieutenant-Gover-
nor-in -Council that the wages to be
paid to men fighting forest fires this
year shall be 26 cents per hour for
(Ire fighters, and 80 cents per hour for
straw bosses. In accordance with the
recommendation of the executive
council, the Lieutenant-Go vernor-in-
Councll has issued his edict, and the
proclamation is now posted up In the
logging camps on the Coast, setting-)
forth that the above will be the wage
scale—aud that refusal to work' for
this wago ls punishable with a fine of
from $25 to 9300. Such ls the treatment handed out to the workers ln
British Columbia by a bunch of half-
baked politicians who have got themselves elected to office In the hopes
that by having bestowed upon them
such titles as premier or minister of
thiB and that, they will be able to
shine In the reflected glory which is
supposed to emanate from such an
offlce. However, even the dignity df
such a position is inadequate to instil
a knowledge of society and the needs
of mankind into the brains of men
whose ideaology does not rise above
aklnning workers out of 25 cents per
hour. It will truly be a difficult feat
to make statesmen from such material.
Probably Honest John, our farmer
premier, who should by rights be back
on a farm where he belongs, was
thinking of getting back to the good
Patronize FederationiBt advertisers.
COFFEE
"In the flavor Sealing Tin"
of the House when he told how he had
worked for 15 cents per hour. It Is a
safe bet that he was overpaid, if his
abilities as a farmer Is on a par with
his ability to administer the affairs of
a province.
Twenty-five cents an hour and board
is what the men who work ln the
woods are going to be paid for protecting the forest wealth of BrltlBh
Columbia, and if they don't like It,
they will be fined from $25 to $300.
Such ls the deal handed out to the
men who keep the basic industry of
British Columbia on the map, by a
tribe of politicians who could not extinguish the flre in a cook stove except someone was standing over them
showing them how.
During the year 1922, the Provincial government received a total revenue from the forests of B. C. of
over three and a half million dollars; in 1921, they received almost two
million, and in 1920 they received
over three and a half millions. During the five years from 1917 to 1922,
they received a grand total of $17,-
816,921.31. That seventeen odd million dollars came from the same
source that all .wealth comeB from—
out of the hides of the workers, and
to protect this gold mine, the workers
are rewarded With two bits an hour
and their board. Why the forests of
British Columbia produce as much revenue as the booze business does.
This then is the new role that the
Liberal government is playing—that
of wage reducers, but with the difference that the ordinary employer who
tries to reduce the wages of his workers may have a strike'on his hands,
but if the loggers of B. C. attempt to
do that, they will probably land in the
"can." It means that the men working in the logging -camps—they are
about the only ones who will be compelled to flght bush fires—are having
their wages reduced about 50 per cent.,
and if they object being.put in the
category of criminals. .
There Ib no doubt but that the
Lumbermen's Association will welcome this, as it helps to show that
wages may be reduced another notch,
If the men can be compelled to stand
for It. It is actual open, undisguised
slavery, without any frills. It Is the
outcome of an idea that could only be
conceived ln the brains of men who
possess all the ideaotopy of wage
slashers, union busters and slave drivers who have grown so ruthless ln
gTOVES AND RANGES, both malleable and steel,
McClary's, Fawcettjs, Canada's Pride, installed
free by experts; satisfaction guaranteed.   Cash or
$2.00 per week.
Canada Pride Range Company Ltd.
346 Hastings Street East
Sey. 2399
A TRAIN EVERY HOUR
Is being operated to and from Whyteeliff
On Sundays and Holidays for
Horseshoe Bay
—BY   THE—
PACIFIC GREAT EASTERN RAILWAY
(Via North Vuneouver City Ferries) •
At tbis popular Howe Sound Resort there are two hotels, an open
air dancing pnvilion, boats for hire and every convenience for bathing. The extensive park, with seats and tables to ac-iommodate 400
people, sports ground, swings for children and hot and cold water,
are all available to the public without charge.
Return Fare from Vancouver to Whyteeliff
for Horseshoe Bay
Adults 70c, Children 40c (good day of issue only)
Special reduced rates fot excursion  parties.
The train nchedule fnr Sundiyn and Holidays In as follows:
Leave North Vancouver for all points to Whyteeliff for Horseshoe Bay, 8:40
a.m., and then 30 minutes past each tour till 8:30 p.m.   Leave Whyteeliff foi
all points to North Vancouver 25 minutes past each hour from 9:s_6 a.m. till
«:25 p.m.
A convenient train service is operated on wuejedays,
Purchase tickets at   122 Hastings Street  West,  or Ferry Wharf,  foot  nf
Columbia  Avenue.
Time TsliIeH and Information may be obtained at Passenger Dcpnriniont, 122
Hastings Street West. Seymour 0331, and P. G. E. Depot, Nortli Vancouver.
Phone Nortli Van, 300.
their calling thftt they have lost all
sense of even oommon hypocrloy.
While lt Ib true that we have but
Uttle faith ln the advantage of substituting one gang of capitalist-owned
politicians for another, yet Just the
same, even If tt waa only for spite,
this bunch of wage-slashers ahould
be kicked out of offlce at the earliest
opportunity. At the next election, when
they come with their -periodical promises to the working class of what
they will do In the future, If only they
are re-elected, they should be confronted with their deeds of the past,
of which the above is an example, and
be exposed ln their true colors wherever they attempt to speak.
Now That the Hot Weather Is Here
There It Nothing More Refreshing
Than a Bottle off
PALE
BEER
Get "Rainier
Off the lee—
Orders In quantities of two doaen or over
placed with the Government Vendor are
delivered the same day direct from our
plant "toy cold" to your hone.. Oor motto,
"Quality and Senrtae/'
This advertisement ia not published or displayed by the Liquor
Control Board or by the Government of British Columbia.
[The opinions and Ideas expressed
by correspondents are not necessarily
endorsed by The Federatlonist, and
no responsibility for tho views expressed ls accepted by the management.]
A Correction
Editor B. C. Federatlonist—Sir: In
your issue of June 8, Christian Science
is spoken of as being "a method where
suggestion operates." I am sure you
will allow me to correct this statement.
Christian Science does not use or
practice suggestion In any form, either
in healing or teaching. The method
of suggestion may change bodily
symptom, but this does not necessarily benefit the patient, or give him a
proper sense of health. Christian
Science overcomes' the errors of sin
and disease by knowing the truth
about God and man, and thus becoming obedient to spiritual law. It is
impossible to impart an understanding
of truth by suggestion. A teacher
might suggest the correct answer to a
sum, his pupil might accept the suggestion, write it down, and even gain
a good mark for having the right figures on his paper, but the boy would
not have acquired any proper knowledge of arithmetic by the process of
suggestion. He must acquaint himself intelligently with the rule, and
apply lt to his sum if he ls ta avail
himself of the science of numbers.
Otherwise, he will be liable, owing to
hia ignorance, to accept an erroneous
suggestion with the same readiness,
when occasion offers. In the same
way, Christian Science can not be
practised or learned through suggestion.    Yours,
KATHERINE ENGLISH,
Christian Science Committee on Publication for'Britlsh Columbia.
4450 Angus Avenue,
Vancouver, B. C.
June 11, 1923.
Who Shall Bo Miss Vancouver?
The members of organized labor
are challenged. The employers associations are opposed to the efforts being made to the drive to provido e
home for organized labor, but each
member of the trade union movoment
can support this project, by voting
and buying a ticket for the Trades
Council Queen of Vancouver.
You may wish to help The Federationist. You can do so by renewing
your subscription promptly and sending ln the subscription of your friend
or neighbor.
Dr. E. Gallant
CHIROPRACTOR
Announces   change   of    <.___■_«   from
Carter-Cotton Bldg.  to ntw building
Cor. Granvillo nnd Hobson Sts.
(Entrance 712 Bobson St.)
Seymour 8790
Brunch  Offices:
Jubilee   Station,   Coll.   187L3;     Colllngwood  Wost,   Coll.   178X3
(Ruport  nnd  Wellington)
CAMP AND PORCH
A SPECIAL display of new stock for summer use
including Camp Cots and Mattresses, Seagrass
Chairs, Folding Chairs and Tables—and swings-
get ready now for the holiday season. Our values
are the best procurable.
FOLDING CAMP STOOLS :  .76c
FOLDING STOOL WITH BACK .$1.86
FOLDING HARDWOOD CHAIRS $2.75
FOLDING HARDWOOD TABLES $6.60
FOLDING HARDWOOD
DECK CHAIRS. $8.76
LARGE   SEAGRASS
CHAIRS  $8.60
LARGE   SEAGRASS
ROCKERS  $9.00
RATTAN DECK CHAIRl
with head rest $10.00
HARDWOOD LAWN SWING-Suitable for four people; set
up on your lawn i $19.60
FOLDING WOVEN WIRE CAMP COT $ 8.98
FOLDING METAL COT WITH LINK SPRING. $ 5.75
FOLDING METAL COT WITH COIL SPRING. $12.50
LEGS and CASTORS fitted on any wood frame spring $ 2.00
CHILDREN'S SEAGRASS CHAIRS $ 2.95
FLAT UPHOLSTERED COUCHES $12.50
OLD HICKORY CHAIRS $7.00 to $11.50
SPECIAL BEDS, SPRINGS AND MATTRESSES.
Hudson's Bay Company
VANOOUVER, B. 0.
Put a one-cent atamp on thia paper     Alwaya look up The Fed. advartUera
and mall It to a friend. before making purcboaea.
1 NM \0N^
THREE SAILINGS
EACH WEEK
VANCOUVER
—TO—    .
PRINCE RUPERT
Monday
Wednesday 1200
Saturday Midni«ht
Fon
POWELL RIVER
Mon., Sat.
OCEAN FALLS
Mon., Wed., Sat.
SWANSON BAY
Wed., Sat.
STEWART
Wed.
ANYOX
Mon.
QUEEN
CHARLOTTE ILS.
Wed.., June 6th, 8:00 p.m.
nnd Fortnightly tlirn'iiflrr.
Tourist and Travel Bureau
627 iGranvillc Strwt
To All Members of
Organized Labor
TAKE NOTICE the undersigned houses employ
Union help, and are entitled to your patronage
Roy's Lunch
Martinique Cafe
Jim's Lunch
Acme Cafe
Avalon Oafe
Love's Oafe
OranviUe Lunch
New Delmonico Oafe
Vancouver Hotel Waiters
Orpheum Oafe
Standard Oafe
Lodge Cafe
Morris Lunch
Oood Eats
Pender Oafe
Oourley Waffle House
Moonlight Oafe
Oaks Oafe
Palace Oafe
Busy Bee
Kings Oafe
Wonder Lunch
Oyster House
The Only Oyster House
Empire Cafe
Broadway Cafe
Golden Gate Oafe
Victoria Cafe
Eastern Cafe
Marine Cafe
P. S.—All others are unfriendly with organized labor.
HOTEL & RESTAURANT EMPLOYEES UNION
441 Seymour Street.  Phone Seymour 1681.
PREVENT FOREST FIRES
The fires that start each summer might have
come from YOUR cigarette-stub.
The forest charred and burned might have
been the result of YOUR camp-fire.
The wooded hillsides might have been blackened by YOUR lighted matches.
The burned farms might be the wages paid by
YOUR thoughtlessness.
Idle logging camps might be the result of
YOUR momentary carelessness.
If forest fires annually destroy our natural
wealth, if money is to be spent in fighting
fires instead of building up the Province,
then the loss is YOURS and that of the
generations to come.   Be careful.
IT PAYS nnir-rfiiM#liwi,iiiBii
PAGE FOUR
fifteenth year.   _... 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST Vancouver, ag
Odd
Pants
Values to $5
A REMARKABLE range of Odd Pants
■fl awaits your selection very specially
priced, during our great Manufacturers
Outlet Sale. These are tailored from flne
pure wool tweed suitings, ln all colors,
and finished with five pockets, belt loop*
and either cuff or plain bottoms. Your
choice now at only—
WILLIAM DICK UMITED
45-49 Hastings St., East
10 DUAL
Secession Looked Upon As
Unfavorable to Labor
Movement
Patronize Federatloniat advertisers     Pass 'The Federatlonist along and
and tell them why you do so.         help get new subscribers.
Fresh Cut Flowers, Funeral Designs, Wedding Bouquets, Pot Plants,
Ornamental and Shade Trees, Seeds, Bulbs, Florists' Sundries
Brown Brothers & Co. Ltd.
FLORISTS AND NURSERYMEN
48 Hastings Street Sast        2—STORES—2 655 GranvUle Street
Sey. 988-672 "SAY IT WITH FLOWERS" Sey. 9513-1391
Militants Urged to Stay on
the Job in Existing
Unions
At a recent convention of the Progressive miners in the United Mine
Workers of America, held in Pittsburgh, the following resolutions on
dual unionism and the twelve-hour
day ln the steel Industry, were passed. These resolutions indicate the
trend of the. trade union movement in
WILLIAM TEH
CIGARS
UNION-MADE
BEST on the MARKET
WESTMINSTER BREWERY LIS
THE LABEL STANDS FOR PURITY
Stop! Look! Listen!
S - Society Circus
T - Trades Council
O - One Week Carnival
P - Plenty of Fun
L - Labors Offering
0 - One Season Ticket
0 - One Half Dollar
K - Keen Amusement
L - Labor Bodies
1 - Invite You
S - So Be There
T - Think It Over
E - Enjoy Yourselves
N - Now Is the Time
Stop! Look! Listen!
the United States.   They read as follows:
Resolution Against Dual Unionism
Whereas, the preservation of unity
In the ranks of all coal miners is the
first essential to the success of our
movement, and
Whereas, dual unionism and secession are fatal to this necessary unity,
therefore, be it
Resolved, that the Progressive Miners' conference condemns ail union
attempts, whether these are brought
about by the Lewis administration, or
whether they come from mistaken
zealots who believe that the way to
strengthen the Labor movement is by
destroying the old trade unions and
starting the whole movement all over
again on a new basis, and be it further
Resolved, that the Progressive miners pledge anew their loyalty to the
United Mine Workers of America, and
reaffirm our determination to build up
and regenerate our organization and
make lt a great and effective instrument to defend our interests.
Resolution Against 13-Hour Day
Whereas, our brothers, the steel
workers, are being driven in their labor at the Inhuman rate of twelve
hours a day, and
Whereas, the U. S. Steel Corporation has definitely decided not to abolish the twelve-hour day at a time when
workers in all other industries are receiving concessions from their employers, and
Whereas, the coal mining industry
has become an Important adjunct to
the steel industry, many thousands of
miners being employed by subsidiaries
of the big steel companies.
Therefore, be it resolved, by the
Progressive Miners Conference, as>
sembled in Pittsburgh, that all dele
gates be instructed to bring to the at
tention of their respective units of the
U. M. W. of A. the pressing importance of securing the nbolition of the
12-hour day in the steel industry, and
that an organization campaign of the
steel industry, which has just been endorsed by the State convention of the
Pennsylvania Federation of Labor, be
immediately launched by the American Federation of Labor, and be it
further
Resolved, that tlie present campaign of publicity being carried on by
The Worker of New York City, the
militant weekly organ of the working class, be supported In every possible manner.
FRIDAY ."...:. June   15,   lj
Patronize Federationist advertisers.
Dollar Day
Special
50
SUITS
Odd and broken lines in
Men's and Young Hen's
models, tweeds, worsteds,
serges. There are some wonderful values in this lot, the
regular prices running up to
$29.50.
$ DAY PRICES
$14.95  $16.95
.$19.75
BUY DAD A TIE
Cut Silks and Knitted
Ties; splendid value, 2
for$l.
CD. BRUCE
LIMITED
Oor. Homer and Hastings
Less Money—More for Iti
AT PARIS'muM m
LADIES'   WHITE   CANVAS            FINER GRADE WHITE WOMEN'S   PATENT   ONl|
STRAP SUPPERS                                 OXFORDS STRAP SHOES
Smart well made Shoes of A long wearing fabric tbat Welted sole Slipper, with p|
nice quality canvae, leather cleans splendidly; soles are .-„, v.m_ ... _,_„ 011.rt.l
soles and heels; one Instep light, good quality oak tan- nt vamp ana grey quartej
strap.   Our Bpeclal for dollar ned leather.     Smart shoe at medium height Cuban heel
day at,                 d»|   QC a low price;        *0  PA Saturday special, d»g f|jl
per pair    VAttfO per pair    «P__uOU per pair    VO.V*!
BOYS' DOUBLE SOLE TENNIS SHOES j*,
Por Saturday selling—Double soled boys' brown canvas Rubber fchoes. with rein- IL  _^_\ j
forced toe and good strong duck upper.   All £ <|   i\i\ • fD    jH -1
sizes, 4-10, 11, 13, 1, 5; per pair  <Pl>vU ^     ■ J
Girls' high top white canvas Sport Shoes,   with rubber soles; all H I
size, to 2;  also mi-scs'  one-strap white sandal,  with  rubber H 1
soles.   For dollar day selling our price ls.                  £*j   £___ I I
.               per pair Vl.Uti ******a
V      >>V.*?NV MEN'S SNUG GRIP BROWN PARIS BLACK CALF OXFOIUifl
~y    ,r$V OXFORDS Th,- „ne ,H made gpeclliny ,_ g]J
J-*y.'-'i*_. °"c Bay Only, Saturday unusual sorvice.   The upper is iirij
\ Our regular  57.60 quality of  (nil black calfskin with suede nee! 11:1
j solid leather brown calf Oxfords) tng.   The soles are ful] 10-in guagl
' with  new  French   toe.    A  good- oak tan.   A reliable shoe at a log
looking young man's    d»E AA price; *>p   nn
shoe ot, per pair  wOwV per pair     *J>0.0*
DARIS hand-made arch support Shoes positively build up weak feet. Your corns are sore becausl
tho shoes you wear do not carry the weight of your body properly. The cunstant friction oj
tender corns is due to the up and down motion of your foot, and can only bo obviated by having f
shoe that supports the arch properly and reduces the pressure on the front of the shoe. Our arc!
support shoe fits snugly from the heel to the toes and holds the bones of the foot in place.
In stock or made to your measure.   FIT GUARANTEED.
PIERRE PARIS
51 HASTINGI
STREET WEST!
A Vnlom Is What Vou Make lt
Some men Imagine that a union
comes out of the sky, and that it Is
made to order. Thta Is a fallacy
which only active participation in
union affairs can destroy. Why not
be an active member, instead of a
knocker.
Support the Carnival
If you want to see organized labor
In a home of its own. then support
the Circus and Carnival, which will
be held from June 30 to July 7.
Patronize Federatloniat advertisers.
Best $2.50
GLASSES ON EARTH
OOMPLETE WITH
OUE SCIENTIFIC
EXAMINATIONS
Glasses not prescribed unless absolutely  necessary.    Examinations
made by graduate Eyesight Specialists.    Satisfaction  guaranteed.
We grind ou own lenses. Leuies
duplicated by mall.
Brown Optical
• House
Be   sure   of   the   address—Above
Woolworth's Store, near
Granville.
Salt* 36, Davis Chambers,
616 HASTINGS STBEET WEST
Phone Sey. 1071
Why Let George Do It
If you do not attend your union
meetings and the other fellow does,
why kick. He is doing the bent he
can. Why complain because George
does it.    Why not do it yourself?
dancing!
EniT Hoa., Wed. eat Sat Br____n
THE NEW ALEXANDRA
DANOWa PAVILION
80- HOBNBT SI. Opp. Mlt B«
T
A
I
L
O
R
S
TO PARTICULAR MEN -
STORRY & McPHERSON
Upstairs at 663 OBANVILLE STEEET
T
A
I
L
O
R
S
Refrigerator Cabinets
Those combined Refrigerators and
Kitchen Cabinets are left on oar hands
and will be cleared at a great sacrifice.
They combine tho advantages of Kftrh'-n
Cabinet and Ice Box, and have the following conveniences: Metal Hour hin, metal-
lined bread drawer, utensil and cutlery
drawers, sliding curtain doors, white porcelain enamel baking board 48 in. by 27
in., large centre ice compartment and (wo
food compartments.
Housewives and those Intending to
build should see these Cabinets, as tkey
will be cleared at little moro than the
price of an ordinary kitchen cabinet.
These Cabinets are equipped with rustless hardware and glass drawer and door
knobs.
Robertson & Hackett
Sash and Door Co.
Limited
North End Granville Street Brldicc
"Lest We Forget"
Vote "NO"
-ON THE-
Saving
PLEBISCITE
POLL SATURDAY, JUNE 16 VOTE EARLY
ANTI-DAYLIGHT SAVING LEAGUE
134 Hastings Street West
(Next Door to  Province Office)
Campaign Hfftulquarterg Open 10:80 a.m. to 9:30 pan.   Phone Seymonr 2480
VANCOUVER'S FIRE HAZARD CAN BE
REDUCED IF YOU
VOTE for the RREBOAT BYLAW
It will only cost you 8 cents per thousand dollars
The following would be the loss to the Oity of Vancouver if any,
one or all of its waterfront industries were destroyed by fire jt.
Canadian Pacific Railway, wages and supplies $ 9,332,000.00
Harbor Commissioners, expenditures, Mar. 31,1923 5,017,269.00
Four C. P. B. Empress boats, wages aud supplies.. 2,600,000.00
Four C. P. B. Empress boats, Tourist travel  400,000.00
Canadian Govt. Mer. Marine, wages and supplies 1,750,000.00
Hastings Mill, wages and supplies  1,750,000.00
Canadian Fish, wages and supplies  1,443,000.00,
B. C. Sugar Ecfining Co., wages and supplies  1,500,000.00
Evans, Coleman &*Evans, wages and supplies  1,340,000.00 i
Union S. S. Company, wages and supplies  1,250,000.00 j
V. & V. Stevedoring Co., wages only  1,000,000.00 j
Empiro Stevedoring Co., wages only  761,000.00
Canadian Aus. S. S. Co., supplies and tourists  850,000.00
B. W. Greer & Sons Ltd., wages and supplies  432,000.00
P. Burns & Co., wages only  400,000.00
B. C. Marine Limited, wages and supplies  350,000.00
Hastings Shingle Mill, wages and supplies  382,000.00
Canadian Customs, wages only  272,000.00
B. W. B. Tow Boat Company, wages and supplies 250,006.00
Brooks Bidlake & Co., wages and supplies  240,000.00
Admiral Line, wages and supplies  220,000.00
Dingwall Cotts & Co., (shipping agents)  193,000.00
Coyle Tow Boats Co., wages and supplies  192,000.00
Empire Shipping Co., wages and supplies  163,000.00
Canadian Robert Dollar Co., wages and supplies.... 150,000.00
Balfour Guthrie, wages and supplies  154,000.00
Harbor Navigation Co., wages and supplies  100,000.00
Boyal Mail S. S. Packet, wages and supplies  100,000.00
Canadian Shingle Co., wages and supplies  158,000.00
Vancouver Shipyards, wages and supplies  90,000.00
Miscellaneous (not itemized)   3,500,000.00 ]
Wholesalers and firms not wishing their figures
made known)	
Taxes collected from waterfront by city (not included in above)  308,000.00 ]
Total $36,647,269,001
 j
A few items of supplies brought in by the Coastwise S. S. Co.'s: -
From the logging camps $16,000,000.00
From the canneries  17,000,000.00
Granby Consolidated Mining Co    3,750,000.00
Pacific Mills     1,750,000.00
Powell River    1,750,000.00
Whalen Pulp & Paper...'.    1,200,000.00
Britannia Mines .-.    1,000,000.00
Other miscellaneous revenue of small cities and
towns, coal and other mining companies, estimated conservatively at    3,000,000.001
$45,450,000.00 I
Grand total„: $82,097,269.0

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