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The British Columbia Federationist May 25, 1917

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IND     f[AL UNITY: STBENOTH
BRITISH  COLUMBIA  FEDERATIONIST
r    _———^ A    x\ •'   AVaVrnTAT. Pi Pirn,  vinrnrimriii) irainva ivn T.AAnn nrmufm    iimn n VRnnnirrTnv nn i •nn* —^     -.	
Eli
YEAR.  No. 21.
mm class
Ai I GREAT
Ignorance Being Wiped Out
in the Hard School of
Experience
The   Nations   Are   Going
Bankrupt in Present
World Struggle
ON EVERY subject from marriage to Shakespeare, from
religion to war, Mr. Bernard
Shaw claims to be, and generally
is, an authority. In a lecture re
cently deliverey at the National
Sporting club in London, he declared as follows: "Germany
made war because she could not
trust the rest of Europe, but
found it safer to slay her neighbors than to live with them. It is
impossible to indict Germany for
beginning the war, because once
you recognize war, you must recognize also the right to commence war. Treaties, moreover,
have always been broken, and
Great Britain herself has made
scraps of paper of international
agreements." It is quite possible
to agree with Mr. Shaw and at thc
same time condemn the violation of thc
neutrality of Belgium even though
done in the interests of "national evolution." But on the other hand, small
nations or bjffer states, with their
separate languages, institutions and
customs, are so many bars to progress.
Competition among nations, as among
corporations and individual^ is an unspeakable evil, which in the opinion of
Count Tolstoy, who made the statement in a lecture at the Hotel Vancouver, Vancouver, B. C, on May the
8th, should, along with autocracy, be
abolished.
A Necessary Calamity.
Since tbe occurrence of the flood, the
present war, unprecedented and un-
paralled, is the greatest calamity which
has befallen the human race, yet it
could not have been prevented, for if
so, it would have been. Still, strange
to say, the war is in the Hue of progress, for, JdBt as slavery wns necessary until the problem of production
wns solved, ami the sinking of the
"Titanic" required to awaken those
in authority to the necessity for adequate protection of lives and property on the sea, so was the war of the
nineteen governments necessary in order to demonstrate the futility and
the cost of wars and to hasten the arrival of permanent international peace.
This is a paradox, but the world is ns
full of them as the seas aro with fish.
Tbe Chief Industry.
During the earlier stages of the war,
thc slogan of Great Britain was "Business as usual," which was soon cluing
ness aB usual," which was soon
changod to "The war is our business
until victory'is achieved." It bas become the only industry and renched a
Btagc in which nlmost anything done to
bring it to a speedy termination is in
order. Everything else has become sub-
ordinnte to it and it is tho all-pervading subject of conversation. When
■jfivents follow one nnother in such rap-
*d succession, millions of persons daily
scan thc headlines of the papers to
learn the latest developments and peruse what the militnry censors are graciously disposed to allow to filter
through.
The literature on the wnr and its
various phases would stock several
Carnegie libraries, because there is
nothing else to write about. From
Maximilian Harden to Bernard Shaw.
Bernhardt to Lord Northcliffe, and
from Bobert W. Service to Luke North,
tho war is the one and only text.
Fashions Change.
Red Cross work has become as fashionable us formerly Were monkey dinners, the phrase "After the war," monotonous, "Somewhere in Frnnce," n
platitude, "Yoiir country needs you,"
as familinras Mary's little lamb, while
"Spring drives" come annually like
hnuHO-cIenning. Since nlmost the en-
tiro population of the world is engnged,
the term "slacker" hns become worn
out, nnd especially no In Cnnndn, where
it cnn no longer be employed with
consistency.
Preparing for Bankruptcy.
Momentous were tho events immediately prior to August Ut, 1914, when
thc assassination of tho grand duke by
the members of a secret society wns tho
spark which set alight the world-wide
conflagration, and far-roacbing indeed,
were, are and will be, their after effects.
A Btate unprepared for war wns like
n lamb among wolves and unless armed
to the teeth goea out of existence, but
peace with its costly armaments had
become very expensive. On the other
hand, war is more expensive, nnd if
persisted in for a little longer, itB logical sequence will be international
bankruptcy. When the interest on nntionnl debts can no longer be paid, tbe
system must be reconstructed or a new
one replace it.
On tho one hand, the wnr has produced many thousands of millionaires;
on the other, untold misery and privation, which is anothor pnrndox. But
since there ifl no evil without n little
(rood, tho war has its compensations,
for it has brought nbout state capitalism, the final stage of the capitalist
method of wealth production, and consequently hastened the coming of the
brotherhood of man and tho realization
of our dreams.
Obvious Falcts,
As clearly and concisely as the proof
if a proposition in Euclid, it hns been
iemonstrated that civilized wnrfnre is
in impossibility, a contradiction in
terms, that wars are fought by workers
*nd carried on by the wealth which
:hey produce, and'thnt nny modern nn-
i OFFICIAL PAPBE: VANCOUVEB TBADBS AND LABOB COUNCIL, AND B. C. FEDEBATION OF LABOB
POLITICAL UNITT:   VIOTOlt
T
VANCOUVER, B. C, FRIDAY, MAY 25,1917
(In Vaacwnr V
OUT. W.M   )
$1.50 PER YEAR
B. H. NEELANDS
Elected Wednesday by acclamation for
the eighth year as secretary-treasurer
and business ngent of Vancouver
Typographical Union, No. 22
Chairman of South Vancouver school
board.
AT PRESENT WEALTH
IS IN NO DANGER
Man Power the Only Sort of
Goods Considered Fit
for Confiscation
Canada's Democracy a Much
Mouthed Phrase Without Meaning
CONSCRIPTION! Meaning, of
course, conscription of men,
has been on the lips of every
man in the Labor world, organized
and unorganized alike, for the
past week. This because the fed
eral government is likely to attempt to railroad through some
edict or other of the kind, without
as much as consulting the electorate. Nor has there been as much
as mention made of any effort to
conscript the collectively-used
wealth of the country. Naturally
there are many misgivings and utter lack of confidence in a government that has no mandate from
the electors. Under such cireum*
stances if an attempt is made to
force conscription of man-power
alone upon the country, there is
going to bo a lively.timo—nnd it will
not be confined exclusively to the
workers.
A good deal has been said Bince the out*
brook of the war about fighting for democracy. It "has been more than suggested thnt Canada is a democracy. But
if the word has any meaning what-
ever, then the section of Premier Borden is most assuredly conclusive evidence that he holds contrary opinions.
Otherwise the edict of "selective conscription" would never hnve been pronounced.
It Is self evident that tho premier
hns listened to the'siren-voiced gentry
of Downing street, who, playing upon
his vanity, actuated him to ignore the
fact that Canada is presumably ut least
n self-governing unit, poBBessing a constitution. Hence the procedure ndopt*
ed would tend to the assumption thnt
Sir Robert Borden considers the timo
ripe to pull down the old sign of democ
racy from tho deliberative assemblies
and instal in its placo the discarded
escutcheon of Nicholas Romanoff.
In a domocrncy a question of such
vital Importance as compulBory enlistment should bo submitted to those who
aro factors in the struggle. Otherwise
the much-mouthed word is a misnomer,
void of any renl meaning.
If Premier Bordon decs not, nor will
not, givo thc elcctorule an opportunity
of saying whether it has nny confidence in Ills government or policies or
not, then perhnps tho Banner it Ih made
plain the better.
Organized labor will then know exactly jvhot to expect nnd whnt to do.
"ETERNAL VIGILANCE IS
THE PRICE OF LIBERTY"
___
AU the Reactionary Forces of the World Are Alive and Active in Filching From the
Common People All Rights and Privileges—The Opportunities Afforded by War
Are Being Seized Upon With Avidity By the Agents of the Ruling Class to
Nullify All that Labor Has Gained Through Centuries of Struggles—Canadian Tools of Capital Willingly Obey Their Masters—Time to Halt
 —i i
SINISTER INDEED are the moves being openly aud persistently made by the governmental functionaries of the ruling class in all countries of the earth. Under the cry of patriotism and for
the alleged purpose of rallying the fighting power of nations to the heroic task of safeguarding democracy and preserving the theoretical liberties of mankind, the most nefarious schemes are being
brazenly and insultingly foisted upon the usually decent, well-meaning and peace-loving wealth producers of the world. AU that has been won by organized labor ,as a result of a century of bitter struggle,
will be completely wiped out if a halt bc not called to the infamous proceedings of the power-drunken
political henchmen of capital who are now bent upon using their power for the undoing of democracy
and thc rape of human liberty. While the forces of organized labor have not in the past been utilized
along the line of invading and gaining control of the legislative and executive powers of government,
and thus placing Labor in a position to defend the principles of democracy and' buttress and bulwark
the liberties already gained, and push forward to new conquests, there is no excuse worthy of consideration tHat can be offered to warrant our lying down and' meekly submitting to the impudent nullification of all that has been so painfully won in the past,
Of the Moat Sinister Significance.   *"      L —
The moat sinister and deadly move
that can be made against democracy
and the cause' of human liberty if
military conscription. No more com
plete and sweeping denial of liberty
and democracy has yet been conjured
forth by the cunning brain of autocratic tyranny than that. And to pretend that it is inaugurated for the purpose of conserving and promoting liberty and democracy ia to indulge in the
moat abominable and disguBting hypocrisy and deceit. Compulsory military
aervice implies nothing short of the
complete abnegation of all liberty,
either theoretical or otherwise. It
means the absolute surrender of all
munhood and manly attributes to the
conscienceless mercies of military tyranny, the ultimate expression of all
that is vile and brutal in the. rule of
Blaves by their masters. It is the complete and ultimate antithesis of all lib'
erty. To submit to it is to return to
the very starting point of tbe human
race in itB age-long struggle to rid itself of that selfsame infamy and curse.
It is to begin again the long drawn out
and bloody struggle of the race to
lift itself from vulgar and debasing
slavery to a decent and free civilization. Liberty's cauBe does not call for
enforced service. Every man instinctively obeys ber mandate once he recognizes it to be ber own. If there be any
lack of volunteers to fight the battles
of the present war, it can only be due
to the fact that there is grave suspicion
that the call being now put forth in
the name of democracy and liberty is
but a mask and a pretense better calculated to cover designs of sinister significance to the enslaved wealth pro*
ducers, than to further liberty's causo.
Tbere is more than ample justification
for the suspicion to be found in the
stereotyped line of action followed by
all of the governments concerned, in
not only wiping out all of the advantages that have been gained by organized labor in the past, but by putting
the finishing touch upon all democratic
gains and aspirations, by resorting to
the permnnent military lariat, the
throttle of human liberty.
It Hears the Master's Voice.
The dominion government evidently
hears its master's voice. It is now taking steps to throw the lariat. Of
course it wob never elected to office
for any such purpose, thnt is, as far ns
the common herd waa privileged to
receive enlightenment upon the matter. There is one thing especially nice
about our boasted freedom and that is
that although wo do not elect "our
government" for tho purpose of handing us nny tough bunch of luck, it is
perfectly free to do'bo If it pleases
our industrinl overlords and they so order. That is what is now happening
to us, nnd as wc did not offer serious
objection to the election of tho present government, nnd have never manifested sufficient interest    in our own
tion cnn iilmlisli -poverty, which being
dono would cause all the other sores on
the body of human society to automatically disappear.
It has quo become obvious that no
individual or set of individuals cnn initiate a wnr, but their causes are inherent in the capitalist Bystem itself,
and that they will continue until that
system is abolished or until they are
found too expensive.
The Ignorance of the Workers.
If it is true that all great men had
great mothers, the converse contains
nn element of truth. Did not the
kaiBer's mother die insanef He, like
some nearer homo who might be mentioned, haa the storey above his chin
but scantily furnished; Although the
dividing line between genius und in-
snnlty has alwayB been thin, his brain
would at-best be an interesting study
for tho branch of biology known aa
psychology, and his helmet an excellent
souvenir for the British museum.
The really grent obstacle in tho way
of progress is not autocracy, but th'e
ignorance of the working (imas. Wars
and the capitalist system, ns already
pointed out, nro closely related, and
with thom both is associated the lack
of political intelligence among Ihe
Workers. Since tho world could do
without nil three, their disappearance
would be highly desirable.
The enomles of tho human race continue to be nakedness, hunger, nnd
cold, no let us all mobilize consciously
and correctly an international army to
mnke them ns extinct as the Pithecanthropus erect da, to overthrow the
forces of oppression, and to bring about
n world fit for tho habitation of man.
TYPOGRAPHICAL UNION'S
ELECTION OF OFFICERS
The Annual Election of Officers Took
Place on Wednesday Last.
A very good proportion of the members of the Vnncouver Typographical
union turned out on Wednesday, May
23, to vote ut the annual election of officers and committees for the ensuing
year, due to tho active interest tnken
by some of the candidates for ofllce in
marshalling their supporters. W, B.
Armstrong is now preaident-elect, having defented President H. 0. Benson
for that office. R. G. Marshall wns the
choice out of a ticket of four candidates
for vice-president. 11. H. Netdands was
again elected secretary-treasurer by ac
clamation. Tlie various committees and
delegntcs nre composed of the following,
viz.: Executive committee, R. Fleming,
W. H. Jordan, J. R. Melsom, E, Oro and
N. Williams; delegntes to Trndes and
Lnbor council, Geo. Bartley, H. C, Benson, H. L. Corey, W. H. Jordan and W.
R. Trotter; delegates to Allied Trades
council, Geo. Bartley, R, H. Neelands
and J. Rankin; delegates to Trades and
Labor Congress of Canada, W. C. Metzger and W. R. Trotter; delegates to
Northwestern Typographical conference, H, L. Corey and R. H. Neelands;
audit committee, M. B. Buchanan, W.
B. Currie and R. J. Lnkey; conciliation
committee, W. 8. Armstrong and H. C.
Benson; trustees, H. C. Benson, W. R,
Trotter nnd Geo.-,WiIby; reading clerk,
H. L, Corey; sergeant-at-arms, H, F.
Connell; Bick committee, W. S. Armstrong* F. W. Fowler, W. H. Jordan, W.
C. Merger and A. Pelkey, Geo. Hartley was elected delegate to the I. T. TJ.
convention which Ib to be held nt Colorado Springs, beginning August, 1617.
A substantial majority vote, was
given in favor of the proposed arbitration ngreement between the I, T. U. and
organization of job office empuloycrs
throughout thc jurisdiction.
■fg*qfflE5H«4'
"Holidays and Things."
With a "holiday" Bince Wednesday
noon The Fedorntionist appears aome-
whnt abbreviated this morning. But it
will be back to old-time form next
weok. Mny being a five-week month,
so far as the TradeB and Labor Council
is affected, there will be no session
next Thursday, May 31. The noxt
meeting will not take place until June
7.
HON. J. W. deB. FARRIS
Who haB this week been made attorney-
general, and the new minister of
Labor of the province, to succeed M.
A. Macdonald, and who will seek confirmation by his Vancouver electorate
on Saturday, June 9. Mr. Farris haB
been counsel for Vancouver • Trades
and Labor council for the paat nine
years.
welfare to butt into the governmental
game in order to conserve tbat welfare, it rather looks aB though we had
no legitimate kick coming. But another fact obtrudes itself upon us and
position looking to thia precious combination decreeing itself a longer lease
of life. Of courBe tbat is no abrogation of tbe rights of an enfranchised
democracy. It is no autocratic act.
Perish tho thrfjght, for are we not
fighting valorously for the overthrow
of autocracy and the freeing of tho
world, henceforth and forever, from
its banoful sway? Why, certainly
wo are. Everybody knows that. Under the political plnn now being hatched up at Ottawa, the country will be
absolved from thc bother nnd expense
WHO DICTATES PRICES OF
FOODSTUFFS IN, VANCOUVER?
Is Sugar Refining the Only Sinner In
Profiteering Vineyard?
VANCOUVER MILLING   &   GRAIN
COMPANY, LIMITED.
(J. E. Hall, Gen. Manager)
Vancouver, B. C, May 11; 1917.
Feed Jobbers:
Dear Sirs: Effective on receipt of
this letter, we shall be glad if you will
be guided by the following prices in
making sales of any of the commodities
listed hereunder. These prices represent fair market values, and you are
respectfully requested not to sell at
lower figures than those given below:
Por 100 lbs.
Bran  $2.25
Shorts      U.45
Feed flour     3.30
No. 1  wheat     4.85
No.  2  wheat       4.3fi
Whole corn *    8.76
Cracked corn     3.85
Feed comment     3-85
Whole oats    2.90
Crushed oats     8.00
Whole barley     B.20
Ground barley     8.80
Scratch food     4.26
Yours very truly,
VANCOUVER* MILLING   &   GRAIN
CO., LTD.
H. McKee, Sales Manager.
RMcKlB.
' 'that ia that the present government has
no further legal right to an exlat-
ence. An election ahould be held. We
understand an undertaking ia now on
between the government' and the op-
of an election, and the possibility of
the election of a government that
might not be altogether and unalterably opposed to democracy and the right
of a people to determine their own
governmental policies, be averted. And
then there will be nothing in the way
of this precious political gang at Ottawa atill further decreeing itself such
additional longer leases of life as subsequent occasions might call for. If
the schemers are allowed to call the
tune to which the working people of
the dominion are to be compelled to
dance, without any protest upon their
part, a great load will no doubt be
lifted from the loyal and patriotic
hearts of the political and industrial
overlords whom the providence of priv
ilege hath ordained to role over and
aweat them. If tbe workers take kindly to it, the pathway of the future will
be made easy for further adventures
along the same line, until all liberty
will have been lost and the heavenly
millenium of. class rule and class beatitude will have arrived.
Time for a Kick.
It ia time the organized workera, and
all others who would that democraty
should survive and human progress
continue, made a kick, and a most energetic one. A resounding demand
should be made that no arbitrary prolongation of the life of the present
government be nut through. That
election should be called at once. If
the result should be the return of
government with a distinct mandate
to inaugurate conscription, there would
be nothing-for the minority todo but
gracefully submit. But let the demand
be made, and with no uncertain ring,
that no conscription be attempted until
tho aame has been authorized by the
popular vote, and that the conscription
of wealth to cover the expense of war
shall precede the conscription of manpower. Let that be emphatically understood. And above all things,
see that no conscription be authorized
for a time extending beyond the ending of this war. We want no permnnent military establishment in Canada
under any circumstances that can now
be imagined. We are not yet ready to
bc converted into swashbuckling, goose
stepping, British Prussians, even for
the Bake of bringing great joy to the
profit-thirsty souls that now rulo over
and rob us, to their patriotic satisfaction and enrichment. We nre not quite
ready for thnt. We have enough in
the way of paternal uplift nnd solicitude for our immortal souls htinded to
us by our precious "upper classes"
now, to render us supremely satisfied
upon thnt score. But let ur register n
kick against being smothered with
any more of it.
LABOR TEMPLE
MEETINGS DURING
THE COMING WEEK
SUNDAY, May 27—Steam Engineers; Typographical Union.
MONDAY, May 28—Amalgamated Engineers; Pattern Makers;
Electrical Workers.
TUESDAY, Mny 2(1—
WEDNESDAY, May 30-
THUHSDAY, May 31— Sheet Me-
tal Workers.
FRIDAY, Juno 1—Railway Car-
men; Pile Drivers and Wooden
Bridge Builders; Civic Employees; Molders; Letter farriers.
SATURDAY, June 2—Bakers.
STREET RAILWAYMEN'S
TO HOLD MASS MEETING
Employees Will Hear Report of Special
Committee Elected to Seek
a War Bonue.
(V special midnight mass meeting ot
the members of Pioneer Division No.
101 of the Street Railway Employees'
union will be held in Oddfellows' hall,
Mount Pleasant, on Saturday nt 12.30
midnight, in order thnt employees of nil
shifts cnn be present, When the meeting assembles, the division executive
committee will submit a report bf tho
irk of the joint const tri-city special
cojiiniitlee, elected to npproticb the management of the 11. C. E. U. for a wnr
'onus, to meet the increased price of
oodsluffs, In response to represent!!'
ions inaile by the committee last Monday, the company has mado d counter
effort To all employee.'* earning #(10 or
less per month, if will concede a war
bonus of 15 per cent.; to those receiv-
ng between $(10 and $70 per month, 10
per cent.; these over $70 to receive 5
per cent.; these amounts to be paid by
separate cheque.
Prior to the mass meeting Saturday
night, the executive will hold a meeting
at 10 p.m.
BREWSTER GOVERNMENT
MAY AGAIN NEED WILLIAMS
May Be Necessary to Once More Call
Upon P. W. to Pull Chestnuts
From the Fire.
Sny« the Victoria correspondent of
the News-Advertiser: " * * *
There is every likelihood that Parker
Williams, who ran in Newcastle at the
last general elections and was elected,
ami later was given a position on the
[Workmen's Compensntion board, thus
leaving that riding without a representative, mny get back into politics again,
be selected ns the new minister of labor,
a department just created by thc government, and contest Newcastle, where
J, li. Hawthornthwnite, former socialist member in the legislature, is seeking
election, and in which, according to reports, his chances of success are excellent. In fact the likelihood of that
gentleman's victory nt the bye-election
there, whenever it "is held, is considered
so strong by the government that the
cull to Mr. Williams to enter the contest is stated to be due to that fact."
W. 8. ARMSTRONG
Elected president of Vancouver Typo,
union, No. 226, Wednesday, defeating President Benson by 17 votes'. His
running mate, "Bob" Marshall, was
also elected vice-president over
field of four.
HR TAX
Manifests Much Solicitude
for the Welfare of
Profiteers
Minister of Finance Avoids
Giving Information on
Their Swag
•yHE HOUSE OF COMMONS has
* spent considerable time lately in discussing the matter of raising additional
revenue by means of increased taxation.
Much valuable light hae-beea thrown
upon the attitude of the government in
its careful avoidance of pressing too
heavily upon the profit grabbing interests that nre making such tremendajs
gains out of the circumstances afforded
by this world war. During the discussion, Sir Wilfrid Laurier und others
made request for the production by the
minister of finance of figures showing
what the various companies in the Dominion had been gathering in the way
of profits since the outbreak of tbe war.
They claimed that it was most emphatically in the interest of the people of
the Dominion that these figures ahould
be made known, becauae they undoubtedly had a moat important bearing upon
the high cost 'of living. Sir Thomas
White, minister of finance, true to the
interests of the big profiteers, declined
to produce the figures upon his own responsibility, but said ho waB in the
hands of parliament. If an opposition
member would make a formal motion
for the production of the informntion
required, he would give it "sympathetic consideration.'' Presumably this
"sympathetic consideration" would be
forthcoming from tbe standpoint of tbe
profiteering interests, into the magnitude of whose loot tho liberal members
of the house were desirous of making
inquiry.
The Promise of the Future.
The information thus not being forthcoming the minister proceeded to defend the government's present taxation
schemes, which he asserted were ample
to provide for meeting existing conditions, He also stated that there would
be no further changes in the tariff this
year. He then proceeded to gloat over
the prospect of the shipbuilding interests being assured of a very profitable
period of business for a long (ime after
the war. The avoidance of any undue
interference with the gathering of rich
profits now, and the fostering of such
conditions as will assure the satisfactory continuation of the delightful pro*
cesses of plentiful loot III the future,
appears to be the chief function of the
prosont government of Canada. Still
there is nothing strange nbout that. All
governments nre thus constituted, nnd
it is Impossible for them to change their
nut ire and habits so long as they remain exclusively the executive agents
of loot nnd plunder. Bo long ns there is
no strong labor representation in the
governments of the world, the privileges of loot will be dealt with gently,
even in the face of wnr or other grent
alamity, but that less consequential
thing known ns man-power will bn lev-
' id upon without stint nnd fed to the
dogs of war without scruple and with-
ut mercy, Tlie minister of finance is
wise in refusing to uncover the magnitude of the loot that is gathered from
the crucible of war and the nation's
agony. If it were known in all its fulness it is more than likely that nnt
even the press gnng would bring forth
further food for cannon.
The best way to make a man fight
for "his" country would be to give
him a country to fight for.
Most of the politicnl novices af Victoria are only now discovering who
really runs the governments of Cnnndn.
Further "investigations" might dispose a whole lot of things worthy of
note to amatcirs.
When a government dare not take
the electorate into its confidence, thero
is something wrong. If Premier Bor-
and Sir Wilfred Laurier nre agreed as
to what the war policy should bo, then
what good excuse is there for postponing u general eleetion long overduet
Who snid something about democracy f
OFFICERS OF TRADES
cores it
Three Members of Executive
Appear to Be the
Whole Works
Autocracy Appears to Mwhf
Gains While Denocarcy
Loses Ground
THE TBADES AND LABOB
council has decided to hold' a
Congress of Canada executive
conference at Ottawa, commencing June 1. Or rather three members of the executive, President
Watters, Vice-president Simpson
and Secretary-treaaurer Draper,
have decided to hold a conference.
Vice-president Bigg, Winnipeg,
was, it iB said, unable to get away,
and so advised the other membera
of the executive. .The remaining
members then decided that the
services of Vice-president Watchman would be unnecessary. The
"conference" purports to be a
gathering of the executive members of the Congress and of the
various international union officials throughout Canada. But inasmuch us there will probably not bo
one representative of organlted labor
present from west of Winnipeg, it mar
be rather difficult for President Watters and others to convince the next
convention that the "conference" wu
designed to be representative of the
voice of Labor In Canada, Much could
be said. There certainly ie need for a
genuine heart-to-heart talk between officers of the trades union movement.
But the "conference" of which the
Labor press haa not even been advised,
will not tend to strengthen the confidence which should eiist between the
Congreaa executive council and the
membership generally. There are serious issues to be wrestled with. Bo serious that practically ivory wage-worker
In Canada is waiting for organlted
labor to indicate a definite line of action. If the Trades and Labor Congreu
-officials rite io (he occasion, it will bo
to their everlasting credit. If they fall,
then the crisis it practically • of their
own making. The weat ia watching and
waiting. >;,
President Watten' statement
To judge by Associated Press reports, President Watters has arrogated
to himself the duties of the entire executive council nnd, despite the pronouncements of Congross conventions,
leaves an impression thot probably the
eiecutive council will listen to tho
arguments of the visitors overseas before mnking a final decision. Usually it is necessary for lnbor officials to
impress their views upon others, in
order to secure concessions, but probably the Congress ollicers at Ottawa hnve
discovered some now mothod of registering protests and carrying out instructions from the membership,
through tho delegate conventions. At
any rate, here is the statoment nt-
tribjted to Presidont Wnttors:
"After giving full consideration
to tho statement tho prime minister made to the eiecutive of tho
Congress, the executive sees no renson to change its position on conscription. Thc eiecutive hns considered tho mattor carefully and
nothing has transpired to alter its
stand of n year ngo. The eiocu*
tivo will meet ngain on Monday,
nfter the debate on the measure,
and a full statement, going into the
dctnils  of its stand,  will
sued on Tuesdny."
be is-
NELSON OITT COUNCIL'S
METHODS OF FINANCING
Provide Funds for Employen' Banquet;
By Raising Tax on Dogi.
N'KLRON, May 21.-Wlicn it comes'
lo ii duration of liminec, the city council
of tins city can give most of the legls*
Intive butlies some pointers. Djring the
pnst week we hnd n convontion of what,
wns suiil to lie mining men, about fivo
per eent. of whom nuilil In* classed ns
practical  men   of  that   industry.    Of
nurse the city had to provide a banquet. Hut how to find tlie nccesotrV
monoy wus u problem, in those tlnys of
rigid thrift null economy, Tho feed' eost
OivO. After wrestling with tho question for sume time it was finally docid-
(1 to increase tlie dog tux from (2 to
*'J per yenr. A cnrefjl statistical com-
piifitii'n brought out the fnet that thero
were just nliuut L'Od dogs within tho
city's confines, which would just meot
tlie ease tu a nicety. Hu the dug tnx
increnso goes.
At the same meeting of the council,
howover, an nppeal for immedinte aid
for tho victims of the recent Fernie coal
mine disaster, wns promptly Iniil over.
The latter were only working people,
ond tbey could suffer nnd wnit.
SASKATOON UNIONISTS
TAKE HAND IN POLITICS
Will Contest a Riding ln Forthcoming
Saskatchewan Elections.
SASKATOON, Snsk., May ID.—Tlio
Saskatoon Trades and l.nbor council has
entered the politicnl uronn .and huve
chosen for their stnnilnrd-beurer A. M.
Eddy. Mr. Eddy is a member of the
Macnltilstd' union. An eleetion committee hns been formed ami the members arc right down to business. In
regnrd to tlio financing of the campaign
the unions arc responding magnificently nnd money is rolling in. The workers nre nwnre that a stiff fight is nticiiil
of them and they arc resolved that
they ore going to give the "old parties" a run for their money. The Liberals litive not yot announced their candidate, but Donald Maclean is the nominee of the Conservatives. The election
is for tho provincial house.     .1. O. 8. PAGE TWO
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
FRIDAY...
...May 85, 1917
THE
INCORPORATED
1858
BANK OF
TORONTO
  $73,000,000
Deposits  54,000,000
JOINT SAVINGS
ACCOUNTS
A JOINT Savings Account
may be opened at Thc
Bank of Toronto in the
names of two or more persons. In these accounts
either party may sign
cheques- or deposit money.
For the different members
of a family or a firm a joint
account is often a great convenience. Interest is paid
on balances.
Corner Hsstings and Gambia Sts.
J. Edward Sears    Offlce: Sey. 4116
SEARS &PATTON
Smitten, Solicitor!, Cosreyaaceri, Etc.
Victoria aad Vancouver
Vancouver Office; 616*7 Rogera Bldg.
VANCOUVEB, B. 0.
G. ROY LONG
Barrister, Solicitor, Notary
Public
Phons Sty. 3229        Birks BaUUif
VAHOOUVEB, B, 0.
T. B. CUTHBERTSON a 00.
Hen's Hatters and Outfitters
6S0 OruvUIt Stmt
lit Haitian Stmt Wert
OLELAND-DIBBLE ENGRAVING COMPANY
FHOTO  EHOEAVEBS,   OOMHEB-
OIAL ABUSES
Phoao Saimonr 716S
Third Floor, World Building,
VABOOUVBB. B. 0.
The only Union Shop In Vanconver.
Phon* Say. 6183  1396 Oranvilto
ROOTE Auto Top Co.
BEAT COVERS, AUTO UPHOLSTERING, TOPS RECOVERED
BLBOTBIO nZTUBBS AT OOST
la* as aal save matey.
Wt Jarvis Electric Co., Ud.
570 Rlcbards Strset
ASK TOUB OBOOEB FOB
PRIDE OF ALBERTA, and
MOTHERS' FAVORITE
FLOUR
UMIOK KILLED
J. TtaLLirt A 00., Afenta
 1 IMS 1221 Hamilton
SMITH'S BUTTON WORKS    .
Keautitebinr, buttons covered, seal*
lopplaf, button holea, plnklor, aponf-
lag aaa shrinking, lettering, pleot ett•
lag,   pliatlnf,   ruoblnv,   embroider]*.
•SS annus St.      ISIS Demiiaa St.
VABOOUVBB, B.O.  VIOIOBUTb.O.
nttt BtyToioi .    PtoMiise
CENTER & HANNA, Ltd.
UNDERTAKERS
Refined Servioe
1049 OEOROIA STREET
Ona Blook west of Conrt House.
Use of Modern Chapel and
Funeral Parlors free to aU
Patrons.
Telephone Sermour 2415
To mentors of anr union In Cantda a
•peclal rate for The Federatlonist of $1
aer year—If a club of 10 or more le sent
IB.C. Mil
Published every Friday morning by the B. 0.
Federatlonist, Limited
B. Farm. Pettlplece .Manager
Offlce: Boom 217, Labor Temple
TeL Exchange Sermour 7495
Subscription: $1.50 per year; in Vanconver
Oity, $2.00; to unions subscribing
In a body, $1.00.
REPRESENTATIVES
New Westminster W. Tates, Box 1021
Prince Rupert. S. D. Macdonald, Box 268
Victoria ~..... A. S. Wells, Box 1538
"Unity of Labor:   the Hope of the World'
FRIDAY Mny 25, 1917
THERE ARE patriots und patriots.
Soma of them blow thoir bugles so
loudly thnt none can mistake thoir
genuineness.'  When a mini noisily proclaims his patriotism,  from   thc  very
housetops as it were,
OLASS who among us would
PATRIOTISM have thc im'pertin-
COMING TO enco to doubt his .sin
THE SURFACE, cerity? If bc admits
it himself, there can
be no furthor room for doubt. There is
no further opportunity for objection or
argument. That settles it. Then again,
if he romain as silont as you please, bat
jumps to his feet every time he happens to hear some lugubrious national
anthem musically crucified by raucous
toned instruments, and stands ut attention as though his spine was of cast
iron and devoid of joints, there can be
Uttle doubt about his caso. If, however, there be added to his deportment
upon such nn occasion, a disposition to
frown menacingly and in a military
manner upon somo unlucky wight who
does not understand such jumpingjack
antics to be any part of a sane and
healthy patriotism, and, therefore, does
not enter into1 hearty participation in
such antics, the last vestige of all doubt
is forever removed. It is also supposed
to be very convincing evidence of patriotism upon the part of old "gazabos"
and other exempts from military service, impertinently bone others to offer
their lives upon their country's altar.
This is an eminently pleasing brand of
patriotism because it is so safe. In
fact that ia the most commendable fen*
ture of it.
* #      *
Through the columns of the daily
papers we learn that the members of
the house of commons at Ottawa have
been recently deluged with demands for
conscription in Canada. But we also
note that these demands came from
'' boards of trade," " chambers of
commerce" and "other public bodies.
No mention was mado of any coming
from wealth producers or organizations
of such/ They apparently all came from
those sections of the community that
are engaged in the ancient and honorable calling of separating the wealth
producers from that which they bring
forth. Now as there is nothing that we
know of to prevent the individual members of these "boards of trade, chambers of commerce and other public bodies "from volunteering and going forth
to nobly fight, bleed and die for their
country—and if it is not theirs whose is
itf—we are compelled to confess that
their demand for conscription looks exceedingly like unto an expression of
real patriotism of the undisputed commercial sort. ^They would patriotically
compel everybody else to offer themselves for sacrifice. There is no dis
count coming on that sort of patriotism. It is the real thing, that is according to the famous Dr. Johnson's
definition of that sort of goods.
* *       *
In the United States the real ruling
class patriotism is also coming rapidly
to the surface. No sooner was the war
policy of the government announced
than the sordid and baneful interests
that skulk behind, the governmental
protective skirts began to thrust forth
their dirty claws and proceed to take
bock whatever they wanted from the
workers and which thoy had been previously granted.    The first move was
The Royal Bank of Canada
INCORPORATED 1809
Capital paid-up _ * 12,9)1,000
llosurvo Funds      14,324,000
Total Assets   287,000,000
tho abrogation of the eight-hour dny in
government employ. This was granted
without a murmur by the ngonts of organized labor. The pretense was that
nothing -should be allowed to stand in
tho wny of the greatest prduetion possible while the nation waB engnged in
such a heroic struggle on behalf of liberty and democracy . (It is to snicker).
Now the demand is to be mnde on behalf of struggling industry, especially
of the south, that the child labor laws
shall be nullified during tho war. Also
that all restrictions upon the introduction of Asiatic labor shall bc removed,
in order that the agricultural interests
may bo able to obtain a plentiful supply of choap labor. Ono would think
thnt tho great republic was ulrcady
upon its last logs in consequence of tho
e.xhnustion of its man-power, nnd yot
thero Hns not yot beon a gun flrod or n
potard hoisted by thc "stnr spnnglcd"
gent. Tho patriotism of trade, commerce and proflt always rises to the occasion, without awaiting tho coming of
disaster'and sorious threat to the notion's life. It is alwaya "Johnny on
thc spot," without thc necessity of being conscripted. It is nothing but tho
spirit of reaction and tyranny thut finds
opportunity for a now lease of life out
of tho awful ciruumstancos of Mood
nnd slaughter and loaves no stone unturned to seize upon still further power
nnd, if possiblo, regain thnt which mny
have been previously lost to it. Thnt
sort of patriotism is tho patriotism of
ghouls. It is tho sort, howover, that
meets with tho noisiest kind of approval. Every country on oarth Ib cursed
with it, for evory country on earth is
cursed with class rule nnd class institutions. That brand of pntriotism goes
with it. It is a caae of thc "tail going
with the hide."
BEAD  OFFICE,   MONTREAL
 1
410 branches ln Canada, Newfoundland, West Indies, etc., of which 102
are west of Winnipeg.
SAVINGS DEPARTMENT
Open an account and make deposits regularly—say, every payday.  Interest credited half-yearly., No delay ln withdrawal.
tic, are doing all that lies in their
power at present to bring the working
class the requisite wisdom and under*
standing to do the job and do it well.
In the achool of bitter experience the
working class of the world is learning
its lesson. There is no other school.
All the knowledge possessed by the
human race has been gleaned in that
school. And the lesson now being
pressed ■ to the front is the imperative
necessity of totally repudiating human
slavery with all of its property humbug
and its hoax of investment, debt and
financial flimflam. If the working class
learns the lesson out of this war, riseB
to tho occasion and takes supreme control of tho material factors of civilization, and by that token becomes master
of itself and all that belongs to it, the
war will not have been fought in vain.
It will bo worth all that it hus cost in
human blood and humun suffering.
Who said Democracy!
GOAL NEEDS IMPERATIVE;
OOVERNMENT INACTIVE
Sits Idly By and Lets Profiteering Patriots Run the Show.
Unless something is done in regard
to the coal situation a grave crisis is
Hkely to arise next winter, says the
Voice. Most towns on the prairie land
depend largely for fuel supply on the
Alberta mines. These mines are not
working, as the miners feel that they
cannot afford to-dig for the remuneration offered by the mine operators.
The operators on the other hand declare
that they cannot pay any more. It is
certainly up to the Dominion government to take over the mines and operate them without delay if there is a
deadlock between the mon and the mine
operators. The Bafety and lives of
thousands of settlers on the prairies
cannot be trifled with. Enough coal to
supply essential needs must be dug out
of our mines even if the government
makes not a cont of profit by the
transaction.     The mine operators, ap-
"National Service!'
have somel
Well,    lot's
Hugo war profits and talk of conscription of man power do not seem
to go well together.
Word comes from Petrograd that
150,000,000 acres of land in Russia has
already boen seized by the peasants
and distributed among themselves.
They did not feel inclined to await the
slow procedure incidental to the breaking up of the great estates, as promised
by the Djma. So thny attended to the
matter themselves. This is really a war
economy, as it cut out an immense
amount of costly official rod tapo. Tho
policy is worthy of being recommended
to the workers of other lands, upon the
grounds thut if they want anything
done they hnd better go and do it
themselves.    .
—SAVE TOUR MONEY—
0. S. HARRISON, Manager,
Granville and Pender
START A BANK ACCOUNT IN
THE MERCHANTS
BANK OF CANADA
Don't stow away yoar spare
cash in any old corner where it is
in danger from burglars or fire.
The. Merchants Bank of Canada
offers you perfect safety for your
money, and will give you full
banking service, whether your ac*
count is large or small.
Interest allowed on savings do-
posits,
<*. N. BTAOET, Manager
Hastings and Oarrall
IT SEEMS to be a sort of chronic
weakness with the average man to
make the most noise and fuss over
matters  that  are  of the  least conse-
quenco, while those of the utmost importance are allowed
MUCH to   pass,   oftentimes
ADO ABOUT       unnoticed.    There is
NOTHING. more than one person
at the present time
who is greatly disturbed over the huge
national debts that are being accumulated by the various countries at war.
Much fear is expressed that these debts
will eithen never be paid, or that their
payment will entail a heavy burden
upon the future. And there are numerous well-intentioned ones who are exceedingly busy in trying to stir up the
popular mind (if there is such a thing)
to the point of repudiating thoae debts.
It has been noticed that the noisiest
authorities on matters of finance are usually to be found among those who
know the loast about the art of financial jugglery and legerdemain. It has
also been noted that the most persistent
and dogmatic of such authorities are to
be found among those whose sole con
nection with the financial world has
been limited to the handling of exceedingly small wages, with an occasional
dash into the realm of high finance
through the negotiation of a loan from
some pawnbroker upon due and suitable
collateral.
* * *
But our worthy friends who uro disturbed over the magnitude of the national debts now being piled up on account of this wnr, and who are obsessed
with alarm in regard to their over being paid off, or yet again those who
possess such an inherent hatred for the
tribe of bondholders and coupon clippers as to dosire that their' claims be
repudiated, need borrow no trouble
What they may say or do will have no
result, either one way or the other, in
that which tho future holds in store for
bondholders and their ilk. Thoso so-
called debts of thc world have never
been paid, and never can bo puid, for
the very simple reason that there is nothing, and can be nothing, with which
to make payment. The people of the
earth consume prnctically everything as*
rapidly as it is produced. There is next
to nothing carried over from one year
to another. All that there is to what is
commonly termed debt—which is but
another name for investment—is that
ho who holds it is enabled to eat, drink,
wenr and otherwise cmjoy the good
things of life, without cost to himself.
There is nothing to it beyond that,
Debt nnd investment, which are but two
names for tho sume thing, are without
significance oulsido of tho fact thut tho
holder of the debt, the investor, has a
legal right to spongo his living from
others who produce tho things requisite
therefor, by thoir labor and sweat.
♦ ■*  . ■ #
If tho individual holders of a national
dobt are paid off by the govornment of
thnt country, it does not mean that
their licence to plunder the producers
of wealth has been terminated. It
merely moans that the plunder shull
honceforth como to them through other
thnn governmental channels. Thoir investments, instead of being in the form
of government bonds, will now become
bonds, stocks, deeds, mortgages or other
paper evidences of ownership in industrial and financial enterprises. Their
revenue will come to them from tho
same source as bofore, and likewise
without cost to themselves. It will
como from the unpaid toil and sweat of
an enslaved and exploited working
class, It can come from no othor source
for the very simple roason that there is
no other. No one need worry over the
eventual repudiation of this age-long
nnd world-dospoiling debt and investment honx and swindle. It will come in
timo, but it cnn only como when the on-
slaved and robbed working class of the
world becomes sufficiently wise to itself
and the Infamy that has been for centuries perpetrated upon it, thnt it will
itBelf bring about that repudiation. Onr
precious ruling clnss BtateB, whether outright autocratic or pretended domocrn-
War as a palliative of insanity is a
theory unfamiliar to most people, but
we have no reaBon to doubt tho conclusions of Dr. Oswald, of Glasgow Lunatic asylum on the matter. One phase
of the subject is instructive and significant. This is "the removal of the powerful effect of poverty on the mind, and
itB replacement by tho higher standard
of living and remunerative employment." Poverty and unemployment are
thus by medical testimony more fertile
causes of insanity than war. That is a
lesson to be borne in mind when the
war is over.—London Globe.
This conclusively proves that the war
Bhould be made a permanent institution,
for that seems to be the only way to
deal with the problem of 'unemployment
and poverty. But still it does bear a
striking resemblance to the old-time
Chinese method of obtaining roast pig.
Moral reform and civic purity is nt
high tide in Vancouver at present. The
valiant crusade of the mayor against
the unlawful and immoral practice of
administering the soothing booze unto
thirsty patients of Vancouver hotels
during prohibited hours, by the deceitful teapot route, has proven eminently
successful. The humble and innocent-
appearing teapot is no longer requisitioned for such unholy purpose. Weak
mortals are no longer in danger of having their souls pickled with Scotch
whiskey while laboring under the delusion that they are drinking pink ten.
The mayor is nothing if not aggressive
in his warfare against sin. He has stopped the infamous and soul-deadening
practice of dice-shaking at cigar stands,
and the moral atmosphere is immeasurably purified thereby. There is no doubt
about it. Following tho mayor's splendid example in ferreting tfut the teapot
infamy of tho wicked hotels the police
department of the city has apprehended
and severely punished something like
half a dozen "fortune tellers,"'presumably for the sin of having infringed
upon the prerogatives of'priests, preachers, evangelists, metaphysical charlatans and professed magicians in general, who by long-established custom
and practice have been allowed to sepn-
rato silly gowkB from their silver tokens, under the pretence of seeing things
I'that were not and possessing knowledge
of the future thut was nothing better
than well-developed lack of scruple, and
a superabundance of gall. At any rate
Vancouver is becoming so morally purified that neithor "Lady Godiva" nor
''September Morn,'' though clad in
their historic habilaments, would bring
the glint of sinful suggesti'vencss to the
eye of the mayorified, policoified und
otherwise sanctified dwellers therein.
Glory be!
FOR THE
Mechanic
This store is stocked with Solid
Leather Shoes for Men,, who re-
quiro a good strong, everyday
shoe—and at tho same time a
comfortable and dressy shoe.
As far ns possible, we buy
union-mndo shoeB, and wo guarantee satisfaction*
Wo solicit your put nonage.
CLUFF SHOE CO.
649 Hastings Street Weit
GET YOUR MEALS
-AT-
McLeod's
Restaurant
ROGERS' BUILDING
478 Oran-fille Knit (downrtaln)
HOME COOKING
QUICK SERVICE
MODERATE
PRICES
GIVE US A TRIAL
W.  R. OWEN
I    Malleable   Bangei,   Shelf   and
Heavy Hardware;   screen doors
and windows.
2337 MAIN BI. Phone: Fair. 447
A pleasant surprise awaits you
if you go to the
Orpheum
CAFE
for your meals.   A joy to
travellers.
Ihe Pick of tha Market.
Charges Moderate
762 ORANVILLE STBEET
Opposite the Orpheum Theatre
-THE-
COAL
You Want Is
"Jingle Pot"
Has no equal for
HEAT AND LASTING
' Today's prices are:
Screened Lump $7.50
Washed Nut $6.50
Washed Pea $4.50
PHONE ORDERS TO
FAIBMONT 2800
McNeill,Welch &
Wilson Ltd.
1629 MAIN STREET
I eckle
^Jhoes
1__*kM>
Get them at
QBataWo     your Dealers
Good heavy work Boots for
thc logger, miner, farmer or
city workman.
The quality is always thc
parently, will not "operate" unless
there is a good profit accruing. They
will nJot pay any attention to the requests of the miners for more wages.
It ia the government's 'responsibility
and it is a responsibility that cannot
be shirked. The settlers on the plains
must have coal to put them through
the long, cold winter which ia coming. That coal ought to come from
our own Canadian mines.
THEATRICAL
COUNTBY STOBB
COLUMBIA
TONIGHT
Oome and have a good time, perhapi
take home ts side of bacon.
Hastlngi Stnet, near Abbott
PantageS
Unequalled Vaudeville Means
PAVTAOES VAUDEVILLE
IBBBB SHOWS DAILY
s:«», 7:10, 9:18     Souon'a Pricei:
Hetlaoo. 16c; BvMlaii, 16a, 86e
Colonial   Theatre
Programme changed every Monday and Thursday.
POPULAR PRICES
Most up-to-date photo- play
house,
VANCOUVER UNIONS
TBADES AHD LABOB OODNOIL—MEETI
«...   -*w   muua   wunviu—JUUKl'I
Int   ud  third  'rhur.d-.Ti,    ExentiTi
 d; Jamee H. UoVotr, pmldM     -   * *
Hoover,
board;
..m.      MH.      MM.U      .UUHOWB.        BXeOUUV,
I; Juiu B. UeYety, pnaldent; Fnd A
aw.tr. vioo-prealdent; Victor B. Mldilajr,
general itonttrr,' S10 Leber Temple; wm
tvoowle., Ireuurcr; W. H. Cotterill, itetUtl
du; lergeut-st'insj, Qeorge Harrbon: A
S. Crawford. Ju. Campbell, I*. Half*, bus
ALLIED PBINTINO TBADES COUNCIL-
Ueete  eecond Monday  in  tbe  montb
Preeldent, J. McKinnon;  eooretarr, B. H
Neelande, P. 0, Boi 08.
•..jrJ™.81"^1"" -f'mple. MeeU Iral
SSS!Ku?*-«*™h. mo"ttt fruident. Jam.,
MCnS aaoTSai _%_%
\__U__nf. W"' U°'""""' alobi
JOURNEYMEN BARBER a' 1NTERNAT10N
I        al Unloa of Amorica. Local No. 120—
Meeti 2nd aad 4th Teeidayi ln tbe month,
, Room 20S     Ubor Temple.   Preildent, L. B
Herrltt; socretsry, S. H. Grent, 1871 Alberni
| itreet.,
BRIOKLAtERS AND MASONS, NO. 1-
Meet 2nd and 4th Wednesdays, 6 p.m.(
Houn 807. .President, Chas. F. Smith; cor
responding secretary, W. ti. Dagnall, Box 63;
flnanolal aeeretary, W, J. Pipes.
BREWERY WORKERS, L. U. No. 201, I. U,
,        U. B. W. of A.—MeeU flrst and third
Wednesday of each month, Room 802, Laboi
I Temple, 8 p.m.    Preildent, A. Sylcei; leor*
tary-   Prank Graham, 2260 Twelfth aveuui
weet.
BROTHERHOOD OP BOILER MAKERS
aad Iron Ship Builders and Helpera ol
America. Vancouver Lodge No. 194—Meeti
first and third Mondays, S p.m. Preildent,
A. Campbell,• 78 tievtiuteenth avenue weet;
socretary, A. Fraier, 1151 Howe etreet.
How Much Alive
Are You?
One often hears the expression,
''walking around to save funeral
expenses," and while it is intended as a joke, it is a half
truth. You commence to die when
you commence to loose vitality.
More vital force is lost through
defective eyes than in any other
way. Allow our specialist to cor*
rect your eye defects by means of
lenses glasses, and commence to
live.
INTERNATIONAL UNION OF STEAM AND
OPERATING   ENGINEERS — Local   No.
u«0,     Meets  erery  Sunday,   3   p.m.,   Labor
Temple. President. William Walker; vice-
.prosidont,   J.  R.  Flynn:   secretary-treasurer,
w. A. Alexander, Room 21(1, Labor Temple.
I Phone Sey. 7406.
DEEP SEA FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THB
Pacific—Meets at 437 Gore avenue every
Tuesday,  7 p.m.   Russell Kearley, business
agent.
INTERNATIONAL LONGSHOREMEN'S Association, Local 88*62—Offlce and hall,
.104 Fender street east. Meets every Thursday 8 p.m.   Secretary-treasurer, F. Chapman;
1 business agent, J. Mahone.
Limited
8th Floor Birks Building
Seymonr 4565
ELECTRICAL WORKERS, LOOAL NO. 218
—Meeti in Room 206, Labor'Temple,
Avery Monday, 8 p.m. Preildent, D. W. MeDougall, 1162 Powell itreet; recording iecretary, John Murdock, Labor Temple; flaanelal
seoretary and business agent, E. H. Morrison,
Room 207, Labor Temple.
MACHINISTS, NO. 182—MEETS SECOND
i and fourth Thursdays at 8 p-m. Preildent, Wm. Small; recording aeeretary, J.
Brooke: financial iecretary, J. H. MoVety,
'all Labor Temple.   Seymoar 7496.
MOVING PICTURE MACHINE OPERA-
ton' Union, Local 848, I. A. T. 6. B. t\
M. P. M. 0.—MeeU firat Sunday of eaoh
I month, Room 904, Labor Temple.   Preaident,
J. R. Footer; business agent, Sam Haigh;
1 financial and corresponding aeeretary, 0. A.
Hansen, P. 0. Box 846.
PATTERN MAKERS' LEAGUE OP NORTH
America—Vancouver and vicinity.—
Bra.ich meets second and fourth Mondays,
Room 20S, Labor Temple. President, Ray
MeDougall, 601 Seventh avonue west; financial secretary, J. Campbell, 4609 Argyle
streot; recording secretary, E. Westmoreland,
IS 12 Yew street.   Phone Bayvlew 289BL.
BROTHERHOOD OP PAINTERS—Local No.
138—Meeti aecond an fourth Thursdays
of each month, room 808, Labor Temple.
President, John McNeil; financial seeretary,
Geo. H. Weston; recording seeretary, Ju.
Wilson, room 808, Labor Temple.
STREET AND ELECTRIC RAILWAY EM-
ployoes, Pioneer Division, No, 101—
Meets Labor Temple, second and fourth Wednesdays at 8 p.m. President, J. Hubble;
vice-president, E, S. Cleveland; recording see.
tary, A. V. Lofting,   2681   Trinity   atreet.
Shone Highland 168R; flaanelal secretary aad
niineii ageut, Fred A, Hoover, 3409 Clark
drive, office eorner Prior and Main streets.
Sou-Van Milk
Should ba ln the horn* of onrj
UNION
num.
IS IT OT YOTO87
fair. 2624
JOURNEYMEN TAILORS' UNION OF
America, Local No. 178—Meetinga held
first Monday in each month, 8 p.m. President, J. T. Ellsworth; vlce-preiident, Mill
H. Gutteridge; recording aeeretary, W. W.
Hocken, Box 508; financial secretary, T.
Wood, P. 0. Box 608.
SYNOPSIS OF OOAL MINING REGULATIONS.
pOAL mining rights of the Dominion, lu
^ Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta, the
Yukon Territory, tbe North-West Territories
and in a portion of the Province of British
Columbia, may be leased for a term of
twenty-one years renewal for a further term
nt 21 years at an annual rental of $1 au aere.
Not more than 2,560 aores will be leased to
one applicant.
Application for a lease must be made by
the applicant in person to the Agent or Sub-
Agent of the district ln which tbe rights applied for are situated.
In surveyed territory the land must be dos*
scribed by sections, or legal sub-divisions of
sections, and in unsurvoyed territory the
tract applied for shall be staked out by the
applicant himself.
Each application must be accompanied by
a fee of 85 which will be refunded if tht,
rights applied for are not available, but not
otherwise. A royalty shall be paid on the
merchantable output of the mine at the rate
of five oents per ton.
The person operating the mine ahall furnish the Agent with sworn returni accounting
for the full quantity of merchantable eoal
mined and pay the rqyalty thereon. If tbe
eoal mining rights are not being operated,
sueh returns ihould be furnished at least
onee a year.
The lease will Include the coal mining
rights only, rebuindod by Chap. 27 uf 4o
George V. assented to 12th June, 1914.
For full Information application should In-
made to the Seoretary of the Department of
tbe Interior, Ottawa, or to any Agent or Sub-
Agent of Dominion Lands.
W. W. CORY,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N.B.—Unauthorised publication of his advertisement will not be paid for.—'"675.
TYPOGRAPHICAL UNION, NO. 228—MeeM
last Sunday of each month at 2 p.m.
President, H. 0. Benson; vice-president,
W. R. Trotter; lecretary-treaiurer, R. H.
Neelandi, P. 0. Box 86.
PROVINCIAL UNIONS
B. 0. FEDERATION OF LABOR—Meiti la
annual eonvention ta January. Executive
oflcers, 1917-18: Pmldent, J. Naylor, Bos
416, Cumberland; vice-prsildeaU—Vancouver: Jas. H. McVity, V. R. Midgley, Ubor
Temple. Viotorla: J. Taylor, Box 1816. Vancouver Iiland: W. Head, South Wellington.
Prinoe Rupert: W. E. Thompson, Box 894.
.Vow Westminster: W. Yatei, 908 London
itreet. Kootenay District: A. Goodwin, Box
28, Trail. Crows Nest Valley: W. B. Phil-
lips, 176 McPherson avenue. Secretary-
treasurer: A. 8. Welle, Box 1688, Victoria,
B! Pi_
VIOTOBIA, B. 0.
VICTORIA TRADES AND LABOB COUNCIL—Meets flrst and third Wednesday,
Labor Hall, 1424 Government atreet, at 8
p.m. President, E. Christopher, Box 887;
vice-president. Christian Siverts, 1278 Den-
man street; secretary, B. Simmons, Box 301
Victoria, B. 0.	
INTERNATIONAL UNION OF STEAM AND
OPERATING ENGINEERS—Local 448.
Victoria, B. 0. P. 0. addreu Box 92. Local
union meet! flnt and third Sunday, 10 a.m.
Place of meeting, Labor Hall, DeCosmoa blk.
President. J. Johni, 829 Delias road; secretary, J. M. Amer, 1046 McClnre atreet; buiineu agent, 8. Cullum. phone 1101R,
NB# WBirMINSTBB, B. 0.
BARTENDERS' INTERNATIONAL LEAGUE
of America, local 784, New Westmlnater
Meata second Sunday of each month at 1-80
p.m.    Seeretary, P. W. Jameson, Box 496.
PRINCE RUPERT, B. 0.
PRINCE RUPERT TRADES AND LABOR
Couneil—Meet! second and fourth Tuesdays of eaoh month, in Carpenten' hall. Pre*
sldent, 8. D. Macdonald; secretary, J, J.
Anderson, Box 378, Prince Bupert, B. 0.
SOUTH WELLINGTON. V. I.
LOOAL UNION, NO. 872, U. M. W. OF A.-
Meets aecond and fourth Sunday of each
month, at 8.80 p.m., Richards Hall. President, Walter Head; vice-president, Wm. Iven;
recording aeeretary, Jaa. Bateman; financial
secretary, S, Portray; treasurer, J. H. Rich-
lardaon.
lifON
m
Ws * I/BCKIB
EL DORO
CIGARS
McLEOD, NOLAN & CO.
MAKERS
LONDON, ONT.
Made by the Highest
Skilled Union Labor and
under the most sanitary
conditions
Using only
the Highest Grades of
Tobacco grown.
Positively Hand-made.
For Sale Everywhere.
D. J. ELMER
Sales Manager for B. C.
and Yukon
3118 Alberta St., Vancourer, B, 0.
MAJESTIC CONCHAS
2 for 25c 3 for 25c
ACTUAL SIZES FBIDAY...
...May 25, 1917
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
PAGE THREE
DAVID SFENOBB, LTD.
DAVID SPBNOBR, LID.
Outing Shirts for the Men
Men will need them for the summer outing.   Don't neglect to get
them.   We have ....
White shirts in a hair cord oambric that are very satisfactory, Collar
attached.    Price  •■—;■■■••■ ••■■■■ ''te
AT $1.00—Choice of several kinds in fine oatmeal cloths, self cord
stripes, oxfords with black and fanoy colored stripes, madras shirts,
etc.; all with collar attached.
AT llJ15*--8hirtB in fancy vestings with colored stripes, white and colored grounds; also cool white Bhirts in open basket weaves.
SPORTS SHIRTS—Shirts with deep open collar in line stripe prints in
all colors at .;:—••••••; ~-~ j*J
.18.110
Floor
White cambric with colored stripe collar and cuffs at .
WHITE JAP    BILK BHIBTB with lounge collar; also pongee *W*
MEN'S BATHWO SUITS F,r8t Flc
Begulation stylo in navy at Mo andI 76c
Navy, trimmed with red   W.00
Blue cashmere bathing suits JL'Jj
Grey wool bathing suitB, trimmed with black J-***oO
Wool bathing suitB, in* all colors, with fancy trimmings I3.96
TROUSERS FOR SPORTS WEAR
White duck trousers, well mado, with four pockets, belt straps and
cuff bottoms :..:  »ll7B
MEN'S COTTONADE TROUSERS FOR $1.75
One of the moat durable trousers manufactured.   Comes,in a neat
grey with black stripe.   Cannot be beaten by any work trouser.   All
DAVID SPENCER LIMITED
DAVID BPENOEB, LTD.
DAVID BPENOEB, LTD.
A Proposal to Inaugurate a
Frequent Get-together
Day for Labor
"THE BEER WITHOUT A PEER"
So popular because it's ao good. Cascade is brewed of the
highest grade B. 0. hops, and selected Canadian barley-malt,
and Is aged for months in our cellars before being offered to
the publio.
WHEN YOU BUY CASCADE YOU
Oet a Beer that has knowledge and pure material baok of it,
TRY A DOZEN PINTS AND BE CONVINCED
BREWED AND BOTTLED AT THE BREWERY
- FOR SALE EVERYWHERE —
Vancouver Breweries Limited
Established 1891
John J. Banfield
Fire Insurance, Accident Insurance, Estates
Managed.
MONEY TO LOAN
327 Seymour St.
Phone Seymour IBS
Canadian Northern Railway
TRANSCONTINENTAL
THE LOWEST POSSIBLE
PASSENGER FARES |
TO
EASTERN DESTINATIONS
MODERN EQUIPMENT—COUBTEOUS ATTENDANTS—
TBAVEL COMFOBT
CONSULT OUB NEABE8T AGENT OB WBITE
DISTBIOT PASBENOBB AOENT, SOS HASTINOS W., VANCOUVEB
Telephone Seymour 8482
TBADES UNIONISTS-IS THE MTLK SUPPLIED TO TOUB HOME
DELIVBBED BT UNION LABOB?
. If lt U not call op tht
BeaconsfieldHygienicDairy
PHONE FAIBMONT 1697
or drop/a card to our offlee, 905 Twenty-fourth Avenue Bait.
WE EMPLOY UNION LABOB EXCLUSIVELY
WE OUABANTEE TO CHVE TOU SATISFACTION-GIVE UB A CALL
I
s
Action Taken to Determine
Average Wage of the
Contract Miner
[By Walter Head]
SOUTH WELLINGTON, B. C. May
21,—Our regular union meeting waB attended by Parker Williams in his official capacity of Workmen's Compensation Act commissioner. He wrote asking for a meeting to be arranged for
the purpose of getting the contract miners to discuss the question of fixing a
universal wage upon which to base any
claims that may arise under the Compensation Act. The board is of the
opinion that the adjustment of claims
would be simplified by this method, and
"t would also guarantee the miner a fair
compensation allowance, instead of
some getting a groat advantage due to
better places.
The meeting decided to let thc wage
be fixed by the average wage made by
the contract miner. I understand that
ii meeting was called at Cumberland for
the same purpose, but as usual, it was
packed with bosses, who wanted the
matter turned ovor to the hand-picked
grievnnce committee. But they didn't
quite make it, so the mattor is at present up in the air.
May Day Inventory.
Apart from the balance sheet presented by the May Day committee, there
was very little business done. The balance Bheet showed a favorable margin,
and it was decided to hold another good
day at some future date.
It would be a good thing if the workers would hold a get-together day at
regular intervals. We, as workers,
don't get together enough. The prevailing tendency amongst the workers is to
be at loggerheads and it is patent that
this tendency is fostered by the bosaes
at every opportunity. They alwayB try
to create jealousy by giving certnin men
favors. They very often attempt to
buy men who are active in the labor
movement, and by so doing bring dis
credit on the movement. The history
of the labor movement is replete with
men who havd been bought, but the intelligent worker will never be Bwerved
by auch tacticB. He doeen 't throw the
movement down because some individuals have allowed themselves to be
bought; because, in every cose, the rank
and file are to blame for adopting such
an apathetic attitude. I have always
maintained that there Ib no hope for the
workers until they rouse themselves
from their deadly apathy. We see evidences of this apathy on every hand.
The worker takes so little interest in
his economic condition that time and
time again the psychological moment
comes and goes and leaves him stuck in
the mud.
The Apathy of H. Dubb, Esq,
I was unable to attend one meeting,
and hear the discussion on the proposal
of the compensation board. I received
word two hours before the meeting requesting my presence at a mass meeting
at Ladysmith. The latter meeting was
very sparsely attended. The men at
the Extension mines are in full possession of that common property of the
Henry Dubb, the aforementioned apathy. They also seem to havo a pretty
healthy fear of the boss; because they
are paying their union dues, but not attending tho meetings as they Bhould. It
is a hard thing to Bay, hut the meeting
wns attended almost wholly by mon in
the prime of life, the younger men being conspicuous by their absence. The
same young men will finally learn to mi
fight for tbeir rights, when it iB too- *\T
late. A bloodthirsty maBter class will
drive them into the trenches and there
make them flght the battles of Baid ruling class. It behooves the young men
to take a tumble before it is too late.
I would like to say more, but I must
remember that I am living in a country
that is blessed with democracy and freedom,
Nanoose Bay Prospects.
On tho day following the meeting I
travelled to Nanoose bay, with two representatives of the U. M. W. of A., aB
the men there were holding a meeting
to select a committee to draw up a
wage scale. I distributed a bundle of
Fedorationists. The majority of the
men there are members of tho U. M. W.
of A. There are some 70 men working
nnd I hope, very shortly, to see a local
anion organized. The men at present
are attached to Ladysmith local, as it
is a new mine and they haven't got the
facilities for holding meetings. The
mine is going ahead and we Bhall see a
good local union built there shortly.
British Justice Bays ''Shoo."
We are going to give the newly-elected Department of Labor something to
do very shortly. • We have a bunch of
labor-hating kaisers on Vancouver Island, who have got to be placed where
they belong before there can be industrial peace. The trouble-makers at
Cumberland are looking for trouble,
and unfortunately they are aided and
abetted in their nefarious work by some
of  the   aforementioned   traitors,   who
were formerly fighting on our side, and
who have sold their birthright for a
mess of pottage. A new man upon
starting work is threatened with dire
penalties if he dares to become a member of that terrible organization, the U.
M. W. of A. A man doesn't nave to
take an active part in order to obtain
the order of the can. If they know
that he pays his dues his name is mud,
and if he is seen talking to oJe Naylor
he is excommunicated, crucified and
flred. They have one of those diabolical excresences with which oar beautiful social system is blessed—the "company town," where the justice of the
peaee, if you please, parades the approach to said town to "shoo", such
wild animals* as Joe Naylor away.
(What about the function of the Btate
nowf) A J. P. scabbing on the police.
National Service and Spuds.
I received the above information
from one of our members, who was
driven out of Cumberland because he
was a union man. The boBs had tbe
gall to give that as his reason, and
made no bones about it either. No wonder the powers that be have to foroe
men to fight tbeir wars. The workers
have enough enemieB nt home without
going to France. Let them rid the
country of the parasties and give us
back our country before tbey force ub
to leave to flght for said parasites.
We have had ono of th'e food-speculator brand of parasite perambulating
around this district.   He has cornered
ost of the potatoes by making a con
ract to buy at a certain price, paying
a deposit to make the deal a cinch. The
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
Capital   $15,000,000 Beat   $13,500,000
Main Offlce:  Oorner Hutlngi ud Granville Street), Vancouver
OITT BRAHOHE8 LOCATION
COMMERCIAL DRIVE Cor. Flrat ATenie aid Commercial Orife
EAdT END Cor. Pender and Mala Streeta
f AIRVIEW Cor. Sixth Atobm ud OranTllle Street
BASTINGS and CAMBIE Cor. Biatlnia and Cambie Street.
KITSILANO Cor. Konrth Arenae and Tew Street
MOUNT PLEASANT Cor. Elihtb Arenne ud Mais Stnet
POWELL STBEET Oor. Victoria Drlta ud Powell Stnet
BOOTH HILL Cor. Pottyelghtt and Fraier A.ee.
Alio North Vancouver Branch, Oorner Lonsdale Amine ind Bsplanado
Union Man's Favorite
CARHARTT'S OVERALLS
SOLD BY ALL GOOD DEALERS
THE NANAIMO
COAL
BEBT QUALITY BEBT PBIOE BEST BBBVIOB
Evans, Coleman & Evans, Limited
Wharf Offlce:
FOOT COLUMBIA AVENUE
Seymour 2088
Uptown Offlce:
407 OBANVILLE STBEET
Seymour 226
Pure Milk T Union Labor
HILLCREST DAIRY
131 FIFTEENTH AVENUE WEST PHONE FAIBMONT 1034
The milk supplied by thie
dairy is pure in every sense of
the word.*
All the bottles. and utensils
used by this dairy are thoroughly
sterilized.
Our milk supply eomes from
the Fraser Valley,
Our dairy equipment coven all
known appliances for the proper
treatment and sanitary handling
of milk.
GIVE US A TRIAL
Westminster Iron Works
JOHN BED), Proprietor
•   GENERAL MACHINISTS AND ENGINEERS
Manufacturers of
STRUCTURAL and ORNAMENTAL
IRONWORK
Office and Worki: Tntta Stntt
NBW WE8TMINBTEE, B. 0.
possibility is that many of those potatoes will rot before they are taken
away. If such tactics are being pur*
sued in this district it is likely so in
other districts, and if potatoes are being boarded why not other commodities 1 Such a state of affairs will always prevail as long aa we permit a
gang of pirates to own the means of
production. It is high timo the government took a hand in the high cost of
living proposition.
The Liberty wd Democracy pf Capital.
But when we come to think of it, the
workers have been fools enough to put
the representatives of the oforemen*
tioned gang of pirates in the halls of
legislatures; so the only course left
open Ib for the Henry Dubba to kick
the parasites overboard and take a
hand in the game themselves. It might
not be patriotic, but it would be extremely sensible, and it would be quite
a change to see the workers uae a little
sense for once, after letting someone
else think for them for so long. Tney
may start to wake up, now that their
masters are going to try to "force"
them td fight for liberty and democracy.
It seems to be a poor sort of liberty,
when men have to be forced to fight for
it. Of course, the capitalist papers all
say that everybody wants conscription.
Let them take a referendum and see if
everybody wants conscription. It may
be that all the ineligiblea want conscription, and It is very bad taste to
want somebody else to do some thing
that one cannot do oneself.
If the workers allow themselves to be
forced into a limited form of conscription, the masters will become bolder
and take away some more of the much*
advertised liberties of the Britisher,
and we Bhall become slaves of the very
identical Junkerism that we are sup*
posed to overthrow. But perhaps by
that time the German workers mar
have revolted and bounced Kaiser Bill
and hia satellites.
CONSCRIPTION
To the Workera of Canada:
Customs once .formed find a place in
the social structure, and long after the
conditions which called them into being have disappeared, they are continued.
The few privileges and petty liber"-
ties which we now possess, and which
have been gained by the strugglea of
those memberB of our class who have
gone before, are about to be taken
away. The necessity of our masters
demands that we be stripped of the
laat vestige of liberty that we possess
in order that we may be used in whatever capacity they aee fit for the furtherance of their intcresta and to the
detriment of ours.
Protesting against the Bystem, known
ns capitalism, in nil its forms, we take
particular exception to being forced
to take active pnrt in any war between
sections of tho master claas in which
we would be compelled to shoot down,
and be shot down by, othor members of
the international working claBB, nc
matter under what flag they may hap'
pen to bo living or to have been born.
Tht placing of a large proportion of
tho population under military control
meana tho annuling of alt those privileges which are generally considered
necessary to n peaceful development
Wo realize that whenever those privi
legoa become dangerous to the owners of
the giant moana of wealth production
they have power to curtail them. But
in bo doing they muat adhero to cortain
rules. In carrying out their policy, certain legal formalities must be observed,
and during this period the workers
have opportunity to successfully oppose
any attempted abridgement of their
privileges.
Wo object to being forced to rivet
still more firmly the chains of servitude about our limbs; to boing forced
to aid in the perpetuation of tho degradation under which we of the working clnss Buffer. And we hereby declare <Mr uncompromising opposition
to any attempt ef tho maBter class to
curtail any of tho liberties that we now
pOBBOBB. '
Workors of Canada, you havo but
one enemy—THE MASTER CLASS!
Your fight is not against your follow
workers, but against the syBtem of
exploitation undor which we suffer ond
from which alone springs war with
all its attendant horrors.
"Workers of the world, UNITE, you
have nothing to loose but your
CHAINS; you have a world to GAIN."
Local No. 1, Vancouver
Socialist Party of Canada.
EATING HIGHER UP
Bert Swor, famous delineator of darkey typos, hnils from Fort Worth, Tex.,
whoro he had exceptional opportunities
for stpdying tho characters which ho
now impersonates in a professional way.
Swor loves to tell about a certain
dusky swain who, when he found the
door closed against him, tried to cozen
hia sweetheart with soft promises,
After a long and unsuccessful coaxing
Henry tried a masterstroke.
"Better let me in, honey," he said,
"kaBe I'se got sumfln you all liko."
"What is it!" inquired Clarissa, suspiciously.
"Pig's feet."
With, a sniff of contempt Clarissa re
torted:
"Go on away wif youah piga feet; I
done got me a now beau an' now I am
ontin' higher up on re hawg."—Pitta-
burg Chronicle-Telegraph.
•i |       Selling
Astoria Boots
FOR MEN
Worth $7.00 and
$8.00 a Pair for
$5.75
—EFFECTING a saving of from |1.25 to $2.25 on every pair
bought—a saving worth while in these days of economy.
Everybody knows the Astoria Boot—it is a shoe that the best
of leathers and workmanship goes into before the brand goes
on—a shoe of style, fit and service. Made in styles for dress
or street wear,_with black and brown calf and,kid uppers-
medium round, high* and flat English mo'del toes, and guaranteed Goodyear welt soles. The men's shoe buying event
of the season. Regular $7.00 and $8.00 values aq mm
Sale price vO. 19
\^l{*  ,V imtmwmvsts  it't     muir t |Hiflww> iwHmwa "^   A_^^J
\
Granville and Georgia Streets
BRITISH COLUMBIA'S BEST
COAL
_$&50
For your kitchen, Wellington nut	
Kitchen, furnace and grate, Wellington lump 7.50
For Your Furnace
Comox Lump !  $7.50
Comox Nut ___________-_->______ 6-60
Comox Pea  '   4.50
(Ry onr Pea Ooal for your underfeed furnace)
JMJIILII:
macdonald-Marpole Co
Phone
Seumour^
ZIO
loot una mnt
The Art of Dentistry
is exemplified in the highest degree at this establishment.
The Charges
are as pleasing as the service given.       .,  ,.
Dr. Baker
Closes Saturday at 1 p.m
Open Tuesday and
Friday Evenings
407 Hastings bt. w.
Phono tor. 2939
"The Tomporato Man's Drink"
PHOENIX BEER
Brewed trom the (inert Halt and Hops, and, lnddontollr,
furnishes a living to aome forty odd Brewery workers.
MANUFACTURED BT THB
Victoria Phoenix Brewing
Compsny, Limited
On sale at all Liquor Stores Is
VANCOUVER AND  VICTORIA
The Street  Railway's
Problems are Your
Problems
The increased cost of operation, together
with unfair competition, are preventing
the street railway from making a fair return on its investment.
The tendency is to add expenses by means
of taxation and other restrictions upon a
public utility company.
There can be only one result of this—poorer
quality of service to the public
A street railway requires continually to be
repaired and renewed. Unless a fair return is assured, its ability to give service
will deteriorate.
OSC^iectdc n
PAGE POUR
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
FBIDAT. Mey 25, :
In buying anything, whether it be clothing or anything else, the price alone does not establish its
value.   ,
The good style and the good dependable quality
of our
$25.00 Suits
give our clothing the standing it has among men
who wish to be well dressed for a moderate sum.
SHOP OF
Thos. Foster & Co.
LIMITED
514 ORANVIUE STREET VANCOUVER, B. 0.
Broadway Theatre
MAIN AI BROADWAT
PHONE PAIR. 882
WEEK Or MAT 28th
Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday
FANNIE WARD
—IN—
"A SCHOOL FOR HUSBANDS"
Thursday, Friday and Saturday
Edith Storey and Earle Williams in Hall Caine's
"THE CHRISTIAN"
ADDED ATTRACTION, FRIDAT AND SATURDAT
Billie Burke in "GLORIA'S ROMANCE"
.This is the brand to ask for
DELICIOUS TEA cannot be made from an indifferent brand. Use
NABOB TEA and the success of your beverage ie assured. Because it is the flavor that counts in tbe cup and that's where NABOB
TEA leads.
PRINTING
COWAN ft BROOKHOUSE
Labor Temple Press    Soy. 4480
DO IT NOW
Oet Onty and have yonr old bicycle
made like new. We will enamel and
make yonr wheel look Uk. new from
15.60 np.   All klnde of repaln at
HASKINS ft ELLIOTT
Sis-sis Howe Hasttan 41S
The Sign USE
SHAMROCK Brand
Lard        Butter
Ham Eggs
Bacon       Sausage
P. BURNS
Of Quality & COMPANY, LTD.
Retail Stores in All Sections of the Province
Workingmen, don't
neglect your teeth-
There is no other class of men who should give moro attention to
their teeth than workingmen. •
Their work is of a character which demands substantial food and
good dlgostion. Unless those conditions nro mot, thoy nre unable
to do the work which fails to their lot.
Full enjoyment and proper digestion of food are impossible unless
tbe teeth are ln proper .order.
Defective tooth meun only partial mastication of food and this, in
turn, means only pnrtinl digestion. Thc natural result of such
conditions is tho weakening of the bodily powers and the inability
to do required work.
Have your defective teeth given attention and see what a marked
improvement lt will make ln yonr general health.
To meet the demands of workingmen from out-of-town, I will mnke
speciul efforts to hnve your work done ns promptly ns possible. Call at
my office or phono us soon ns you arrive in town and I will mnke nn
appointment. For thc benefit of Vnncouver workingmen, my offico will
bc open on Tuesdny nnd Friday evenings.
Phone
Seymour 3331
Examinations
by Appointment
Dr.Brett Apdereoi)
Crown and Bridge Specialist —
602Ha$tings St. West
Corner Seymour Street
!§P"
Prayer That Should Be Put
Up By Every Employer
on the Footstool
Especially Applicable to the
Case of Coughlan's
Shipyards
There is a strike on at the Cough-
Ian Shipyards in thiB city. Liko tho
employees of tho highly esteemed great
captain of industry, B. T. Bogers, of
sugar refinery fame, the men at Cough-
lun's fojnd it by no meiuis easy to
wrestle with the present patriotic
prices of foodstuffs and other necessary thingB, ut the equally patriotic low
wage and patriotically uncomfortable
long hours and other unseemly conditions prevailing in connection with the
Coughlan servitude. They, therefore,
decided to exercise their "God-given
and inalienable right to quit work,"
until their grievances were remedied,
and conditions of recompense and toil
were brought more in tune with thtir
actual requirements in order that they
might retain the .proud position, long
Bince won by their sturdy ancestors, as
worthy "sons of empire'' and "hearts
of oak." In fact, they wanted their
wuges and hours of labor brought "up
abreast of the wages and hours generally prevailing in tbe shipyards of this
eoast. The Coughlans were, of course,
aggrieved. In fnct, they were quite
shocked to think that workers Bhould
be so lacking in patriotism as to
strike, and thus interfere with the*
building of ships "for the empire," in
this, the hour of its need. The workers probably overlooked a bet right
thore. They undoubtedly thought they
were engaged in building ships for the
Coughlans in thia, the hour of their
(the Coughlan's) need for profit. They
probably never dreamed thdy were
building Bhips for the "Empire." It
is more than likely .that many of them
do not know it yet, even though the.
CoughlnnB have snid it. It is undoubtedly very unpatriotic, ungrateful and
extremely disloyal on the part of tho
workers in thus quitting the service of
the "Empire," because they were getting too small wages and too big work.
But it does not logically follow that the
Coughlans are likewise unpatriotic, 'ungrateful and disloyal, because they refuse to pay the men living wages nnd
grant them living conditions of labor.
If the Coughlans keep their plant shut
down "till the crack of doom," to use
a B. T. Rogerism, that would be strictly
patriotic nnd thoroughly loyal, especially when it was kept shut down for the
purpose of frustrating such nn unpatriotic and disloyal plot ns the obtaining
of higher wages and more comfortable
working conditions. Anybody can see
that.
. A New Day Dawns.
It is always the darkest just before
tho dawn. At least that is what is
claimed by those who profess to have
gained their knowledge through experience and observation. The Coughlans
may well take cheer from the good news
that now cometh unto us from the dear
old "motherland." The head of a big
Glasgow shipbuilding firm, recently
speaking at the opening of nn exhibition of women's war work in London,
took occasion to express the greatest of
satisfaction ovor the excellent results
that had been obtained in his line of
business, from the "dilution" wtth women labor. This "dilution," meaning
the introduction of woman labor into
tho shipbuilding industry, in the place
of the male labor that would otherwise
be required. So enthusiastic did he become on behalf of female labor that he
fairly bubbled over with it. "Given
two more years of war," he declared,
"I would undertake to build a battleship from keel to aerial, in nil itB com*
Elex detail, entirely with woman
ibor."   He finds that, "tho woman
Hotel Canada
518 Blebards Street
VANCOUVER
(Near Labor Tsmple)
Best Service
Lowest Rates
Try Us
Wines and Spirits of
the best quality
280 rooms, 100 with private baths
Phons Stymour 8880
HOTBL DUNSMUIR
Vancouver'a newest and most   .
oomplete Hotel
European Plan 11.00 per Day Vp
New electric auto bus meets all
boats and trains free
Oor. Dunsmuir and Richards Sts.
VANOOUVER, B. 0.
HOTEL ALCAZAR
Oppoiito Libor Timple
VANCOUVEB, B. 0.
Hcidqtftrtera for Labor men,    Ratt
75c md  |1.00  per  day.
$2.50 per week and np.
0»f* st BtawuMt Bates.
Special Values
In Middy Blouses
For Women
AT $1.00 — Middy in all
white and white with
navy or cadet collar, cuffs
and pocket.
AT $1.26—White Middy
Blouses, in Norfolk style,
with belt, pockets and
collar of smart stripes, also plain straight middies
made with two pockets in
skirt. There are twelve
different styles at $1.25
each,
AT $1.60—Coat Middy, in
all white drill, made with
long sleeves, wide sailor
collar and button cuffs.
AT $1.76—A great assortment of Middy Blouses at
this price, both in coat
and straight styles. Some
are in all white while
others have colored trimmings.
Store Open* at 8.30 a.m.
and closes at 6 p.m.
575 Granville Phone Sey. 3540
who has trained for a trapeze can lind
her vocation at the giddy heights of a
Scotch crane." It seems that all that
will be required is to first train a wo
man on the .trapeze and then she will
be amply equipped for crane work in a
shipyard. This opens up unlimited possibilities for the gentler sex, among
whieh is that of becoming the future
"rough necks" of the world. But why
speculate? It is quite enough to know
that woman is to come fully into her
own, nnd man, mere man, is to be liberated from tho slavery of the ages nnd
realize his sublime destiny as food for
ennnon nnd the roll of honor. But when
that happy duy comes wbat a delightful und deliglitod line-up of battered
and ancient war relics thero will be
down around the Coughlan shipyard,
"rubbernecking*' nt tho erstwhile Vsncouver damsel of tho French heel and
the drug store expression, as she coyly
rivets the Bhip's plates or imperiously
commands tho gantry crane. Let tho
prayers of all shipbuilders and similar
loyal and patriotic souls be fervently
offered up for at lenst "two more years
of war.'' The golden nge of the profit
lord will thon be bere. The awful tyranny of masculine labor will be forever broken. Female labor omnia vincit,
LEGAL NOTICE
PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given
that under and pursuant to the Statute
passed by the Legislature of the Province of British Columbia and being
Chapter 21 of the Statutes of 1017, the
Honourable William Alfred Galliher one
of the .Tustices of the Court of Appeal
of British Columbia, the Honourable
Denis Murphy and the Honourable William Alexander Maedonald two of the
Justices of the Supreme Court of British Columbia, have beon appointed
Commissioners to constitute a Commission to inquire into the matters referred
to in the preamble to the said Statute.
The purpose and scope of the inquiry to
be held by the said Commission is to inquire into all the facts and circumstances connected with a by-election to
fill a vacancy in the representation of
tho Vancouver City Electoral District
held on the 20th day of February, 1910,
and into the manner in which snid by-
election was conducted and whether any
{regularities or illegal practices took
place or were committed or attempted
to bo committed at such by-election, and
if so, the manner of the commission of
such irregularities or illegal practices
and attempts to commit illegal practices, nnd all such particulars in relation thereto as may bo necessary to
fully inform the Commissioners in regard fo such irregularities nnd illegal
practices and attempts to commit illegal
practices and of the person or persons
guilty thereof and concerned, aiding or
abetting therein, and of acts done or
committed in the commission of Buch irregularities and illegal practices or any
attempts to commit illegal practices,
whether before or after such by-election; AND FURTHER to investigate
and report on any facts and circumstances, occurring subsequent to said by-
election and connected in any manner
with the irregularities and illegal practices and attempts to commit the same
which ore believed to have occurred at
the said by-election, including therein
the movements of nny person or persons
who might have boen material witnesses
on any investigation into such irregularities and illegal practices and attempts to commit the snmo which was
hold or might have been held either by
the Legislature of the Province of British Columbin or any committee thereof,
or who might have been mnterial witnesses on any criminal prosecution instituted or which might hnve been instituted in British Columbin in respect of
Buch irregularities or illegal practices or
attempts to commit the same, or in respect of any offence or offences under
the "Provincinl Elections Act" nnd
amendments thereto, nnd as to whether
any such person or persons who might
have been material witnesses as aforesaid was or were permitted or assisted
or advised to leave the jurisdiction and
to remain thereout so ns to prevent the
evidence of such person or persons being available on any such investigation
or prosecution, and if ho, by whom and
under what circumstances and for whnt
consideration, financinl or otherwise,
and aB to any expenditures of money or
promises to pay money to cover up or
nttemnt to cover up such irregularities
nnd illegal practices and attempts to
commit the snme nnd by whom Buch expenditures of or promises to pny money
were made.
The first meeting of the snid Commis-
sionerB to proceed with the inquiry
above referred to will be held in the
Assize Court Boom at the Court House,
at the City of Vancouver, on Wednesday, the 6th day of Tune, 1017, nt the
hour of 11 o'clock in the forenoon of
all of which mntters all parties interest
ed are required to take notice and gov>
ern themselves accordingly.
Dated nt Vancouver. B. C, this 22nd
day of May, A. D. 1917.
BY ORDER OF THE COMMISSIONERS.
Social Democratic Forum.
O'Brien hnll, Supday 7. .10 p.m.
"ForceB Making for Social Democracy" ia the subject for May 27. Dr.
W. J. Curry principal speaker. Discussion and questions.
Kill at once every fly you can flnd
and burn his body.
Quality Dentistry
A PRINTER'S KISS
He printed on her lips a kiss,
And from'his'own confession,
He thinks he has the proof to show
A very good impression.
—Yonkers Statesman.
Tho maidon seemed to liko the type,
And heeding hU petition,
She said she thought tho time was ripe
To print a large edition.
—Youngstown Telegram.
"Oood Ood!" we heur the maiden cry,
"This is a glorious showing;
Wo hopo the men have steam enough
To keep the presses going."
—Yonkers Statesmnn.
The prcssos, we'vo no doubt, will go,
And for a lime surprising;
Most anything would go. you know,
With this much advertising,
—Houston Post.
Ho printod on her lips n kiss,
lb filled her with elation;
"Oh, boy!" the maiden cried,
"This helpB my circulation."
—Beaumont Enterprific.
Ho printed on her Hps n kiss,
It was a soul inspirer;
And by his "form" she knew that he
WaB no mere "stereotyper."
—Houston Labor Journal.
He printed on her lips a kiss,
It was some warm perspirer;
And by the "hotness" of its bliss
Proved him some linotyper.
—DallaB Toiler.
Ho printed on her lips a kiss,
Sans press, sans lock-up, type—light
face;
Such pi atonic osculation,
Completely pied his caso.
THE SPORTSMAN'S LAMENT
I 've lost my friend, my'dog, my wife,
Saved only horse and purse;
Yet when I think on human life,
Thank heaven it is no worao.
My friend wbb sickly, poor and old,
Was peevish, blind and crippled;
My wife was ugly and a scold,
I rather think she tippled.
My dog was faithful, fond and true,
In sporting gave me pleasure;
I shouldn't care for t'other two,
If I had saved this treasure.
Poultry Wanted
|     BEST PRICES
HARRY STEVENS
Phona  Seymonr 1007
910 OranviUe Bt.
Trades Unionists of
Greater Vancouver
We Want Tou to Do Your
Furniture Business With T7a
WE WILL MAKE TERMS TO
SUIT   YO0B   CONVENIENCE
Onr stock of Furniture la the beat
in lbe province. Whenever you want
anything in onr line, eai) in and look
it over.
41 Hustings Street Wtat
SHOP AT
SLATER'S
Sitter's Ayrshire Bacon, lh... SSe
Slater's Streaker Bacon, Ih. 26c
Slater's valuo Tea, lh, SSo
Slater's value Coffee, th SSo
We deliver to all ports.
1S1 Hastings St. East   Be,. 3362
830 Oranvllle St.     Sey. 866
3214 Mais Stnet.    Fair. 1683
WE OATEB TO UNION TRADE
Trade Unionists—
I N COMING TO MY OFFICE workingmen should under-
* stand that my charges ore based on the very lowest
terms which con be quoted for good materials and skilful
workmanship.
This fact should be carefully considered by you when you
or ony member of your family contemplates having dental
work done.
I am now prohibited by law from doing what I personally believe is your right—advertising my rates so that you
may be informed as to them before coming to my office.
I am, however, conforming strictly to the schedule of
rates advertised in previous Issues of The Federationist. Particulars will also be given on enquiry at phone Sey. 2716 or
application at my offico.
Call at my office whenever you desire to know anything
In connection with your teoth. Tou will he given A cordial
welcome and your enquiries given every attention.
In all my work I use the most approved methods known
to modern dentistry for the alleviation of pain.
DR. GRADY tesaus
Phona
Seymonr 871S
yF?£LS!!n?E QVAL1TT DHOTIS!
Df ATTENDANCE Haatin,. stmt Ooraar Seymour
202 BANK OF OTTAWA BUILDING
ICE
Will Reduce the
High Cost of Living
Phone
*"£ Price
AirTtytt
Simple ■
Practical
Efficient
MAIN
ICECHANBeA
/NSULATION
FOW CHAMBER
.00
$5
A.LAMIEL
South Wellington Coal
BOYS' DEPARTMENT
The kind of Suits the boyi Uke to wear are now on display.   Pinch
Baoks, Norfolks, and all the new and up-to-date styles are shown,
ENGLISH JERSEYS
A NEW SHIPMENT JUST RECEIVED
MEN'S SUITS
IN ALL THE NEW STYLES.
OVEBALLS-OARHARTT'S AND OTHER BRANDS-UNION LABEL
-WOBKINO SHIRTS, OLOVES, ETO, IN OBEAT VARIETY.
CLUBB & STEWART LIMITED
Tel. Sey. 70S 308 to 316 Hastings Street Weit
FREE HOMESTEADS
 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Along lino of P. Q. E. Bailway open park line lands.   The inest mixed
farming lands in the province.
.   Oood water, best of hunting and fishing.  The settlers who have gone
in there are all boosters, as they ore making good.
If you want to go back to the land, write
A. S. WILLIAMSON
LAND CRUISER
PAOmO GREAT EASTERN RAILWAY
Welton Block, Vancouver
Dependable Paints
-Fon—
Spring Painting
We solicit your paint orders for your
Spring Painting. Our stook of paints,
brushes, emanels, etc., is most completo,
and prices most reasonable,
HUNTER-HENDERSON PAINT CO.
642 ORANVILLE STREET
VIOTOBIA, B.C.: 618 View Street. Phone, 1269.  Greenhouses and Nursery, Esquimalt Boad.   Phone 212.
HAMMOND, B. C: Greenhouses and Nursery on C. P. B.   Phone Ham-
m6nd 17.
Brown Bros. & Co. Ltd.
FLORISTS, NURSERYMEN, SEEDSMEN
Fruit and Ornamental Trees and Shrubs, Pot Plants, Seeds,
Out Flowers and Funeral Emblems
Main Store and Registered Offlce: VANCOUVEB, B. C.
4S HaBtings Street East.   Phones, Seymour 988*672.
Branch Store, Vnncouver—728 Oranvllle Street,   Phone Seymour 9S13

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