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The British Columbia Federationist Apr 20, 1917

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Array "'II ""111
TI1E BRITISH  COLUMBIA  FEDERATIONIST
INDU6TBIA! fl.NITT: STRENGTH
EIGHTH i,SAR.   No. 16
OFFICIAL PAPEB: VANCOUVER TBADES AND LABOR COUNCIL, AND B. C. FEDERATION OF LABOB
"VANCOUVER, B. C, FRIDAY, APRIL 20, 1917"
POLITICAL UNITT:   VIOTOBI
AT
CITY IL
1 From a Viewpoint Not Represented By the
Daily Press
| Chinese Have Nothing on
Peculiarities of Vancouver Aldermen
THE CONTROVERSY between
the city council and the B, C.
Electric   Railway   company,
■concerning certain new clauses
[ which the former desires to have
I incorporated in the city charter, is
I of more material importance to
[the working class ratepayers of
I the eity than most of the business
ltransactedl for many moonB by the
licity fathers. The fight has been
|.marked by some window-dressing,
land not a little brass band work.
■Round about an inner principle of
[the utmost importance to the labor
■movement, numerous activities
■have been going on unseen except
Dy the few who for one or another
Jreason, were unable to divine what
■was really transpiring. Some of
Ithcr; things are rather amusing,
■Others, in the light of civic developments which may not be a hun-
■dred years ahead, are possibly
■worthy of note and record for future reference.
Just to refresh the reader's mc-
inory, let the facts of the case be
T'c-stated.   Under the city charter
La it now ronds, tho city ennnot itcquiro
■water powers for tho purposo of genor-
Titing electric current for snlo to its
l-itizens. It is seeking sueh powors from
tho lcgislntMTc now, through tho me-
Jjium of amendments to thc city charter.
(That is what all tho trouble is nbout.
How It AU Started.
It aroso in this way. Just aftor
Jjhristmas, tho city council invoke to
|lie fact that tho frnnchiso of tho B. C.
K., covering car lines in tho eity,
ipires in February, 1919. It nlso occurred to tho uldermou that possibly tbo
dty might not wnnt to renow the franchise nt that timo, but would prefor to
turclinso tho system und opornte it on a
nunicipal basis.
Thero being no record available of a
uccessful electric street car system bc-
ng operated without eloctric current,
;he question of what the city would do
frith tho enrs if it got them, but had no
mrront to drive them, began to mildly
gitate tho cerebral cavities of the elo-
rant eight to whoso divorse mentality
he fortunes of this fnir city aro lnrgo-
jr entrusted.
Not nil of thom, by nny means, wore
ortain how to go nbout solving the
iftlculty. On tho othor hnnd, it is said
hero is good renson for thoso whoso
ars nnd eyes hnvo boon alert during
he past three months, to presume that
bero were sundry of tbo wiso ones
mong the city solons to whom the situ-
tion wns no dilemma.
Sparring for Openings.
This docs not mean that all the en-
fghtcmed onos woro what might be
ailed desperato to put tho others
'wise." Indeed, subsequent events, in
ho opinion of somo who woro watching
losely, nre snid to hnve given ground
or the impression thnt certain of the
rise ones were not unwilling—to put it
n tho vcrnnculur of the west—to "pull
he wool" ovor tho eyes of the rest.
Now, "to got on with tho action,"
,s tho publishers of the "best sellers"
ay. Tho wholo quostion wns referred
o tho city solicitor, to draft proposed
mondmonts to tho city chnrter, so ns
o give tho city tho right to acquire
vater powers for tho gonoration of elec-
ric current.
Up to this stngo nono of the alder-
nen seemed to notico tho fly in tho mo-
asses. In other words, it was not
iointcd out that nuthority to ncquiro
■vntcr powor for tho gonoration of elec-
ric current wns ono thing, and that au-
hority to sell that current to tho citi-
ens was nnother. Tbo formor condi-
ion, without tho lntter, would hnvo
nndo tho wholo proposition that fami-
inr constituent in much of modern leg-
illation known ns a "joker." How-
ver, tho matter was handed over to
ho city solicitor as it stood, and ho hnd
o authority but to net according to in-
(ructions, nnd roport bnck to a specinl
looting of thc council.
Things Began to Happen.
It was ubout this time thnt things be-
(Oontin'ued on page 8)
But Neither Sugar or Flour
Trusts Increase Employees9 Wages
Having Stranglehold Upon
Consumers, Sharks Put
on the Squeeze
THE MEMORY of most British Columbians can ensily reach back to
the timo whon an 18-lb, sack of granulated sugar could be bought in. Vancouver for 90 cents. Even thon it was
rumored that B. T. Eogors, tho great
mogul of the B. C. Sugar refinery was
getting along in a financial way to give
assurance that he would bo able to pull
through a fairly severe winter. Sinco
that timo sugar has advanced in price.
It now requires $1.65 to purchnso an 18-
lb. sack, and on next Monday the price,
it is said, will be advanced to $2.25.
No ono around here has yet hoard that
tho slaves of Rogers', cither the whito
ones hero or tho indentured Asiatics on
his island plantations, havo suffered
any incroase in wages at all commensur-
nte with this advance in 'the price of
sugar. So it is safe to presume that
Rogers will bo able to worry through
another severe winter or two on the
very narrow margin now left to him on
sugar. And presumably tho snmo will
bo tho caso with the other snechnrine
capitalists that constitute what is commonly termed tho Sugar Trust.
A 49-lb. sack of flour now rctnils in
Vancouver nt $3.00. On Monday noxt
the prico, it is snid, will be ndvnncod
to $3.50. It doos not cost any moro to
produce cithor sugar or flour now than
it did before tho war, but all of theso
prico increases and other uncomfortable
market idiosyncrncies arc but legitimate
phonomenn incidental to a civilization
that provides profits for masters and
wages for slaves. No wonder tho heel
of Labor becomes bruisod with travelling nn "easy stroet" paved with such
cobble stones.
OPERATING ENGINEERS
VISITED BY VICE-PRESIDENT
Looking Over the Field With View to
Taking Up General Organization.
Wm. Mackenzie second vicc-presi-
dont of tbe International Union of
Stenm nnd Operating Engineers, with
hondqunrters ut Portlnnd, Oro., is in the
city this woek, looking over tho field,
nt tho request of Vuncduver local, with
a viow to determining whether it would
bo advisable or not to place a permanent organizer at work. Vice-president
Mackenzie wus surprised to seo Buch a
fine structure in tho Lnbor Tomplo, nnd
expressed the wish thnt tbo members of
orgnuized labor horo would bo able to
finance it through at thc closo of tho
war. Ho also complimented the locnl
officers of his organization upon tho
splondid work they havo been doing for
tbo pust fow months. Whilo horo, ho
will interview officials of certain shipbuilding industries relntivo to securing
nil eloctrical operating work for the
jurisdiction of his membership. With a
membership of over 90, and three now
members to be initiated at next meeting, the engineers nro now nenring the
100 mnrk. All aro fairly well employed
and wago working conditions hnve been
vory much improved sinco tho organization took on a new leaso of life some
fow months ago.
AMALGAMATED CARPENTERS
MET TUESDAY EVENING
New Wage Rate of 60 Cents per Hous
Partially in Effect.
Tuesday night's meeting of the Amalgamated Carpenters, was well attended.
Ftfur new members wero initiated. Reports showed thnt tbe membership was
fully employed, and a number of contractors nro already paying tho 1917
wago rate of 50 cents por hour. A mass
mooting of carpenters is to bo held at
the Labor Tomplo on Wednesday, April
25, for tho purposo of further discussing the forthcoming wago increase
Tho drawing for n kit of tools, in aid
of tbe widow of tbo late F. Ovendon,
took place, C. Atkinson holding tho
lucky numbor, 154. Tho sum of $73.30
was realized. A numbor of tho members aro going to subscribo for The Fedorationist, and nt n futuro meeting the
question of re-affiliating with tbo B, C.
F. of L. will bo decided.
Wireless Operators' Inquiry.
Tho federal board of inquiry, into the
dispute between the Marconi wireless
operators of the Pacific coast and tho
compnny, bas held two sessions this
week, and will sit again on Monduy.
PROGRESS BEING MADE UNDER
THE PRESSURE OF WORLD WAR
V7AR CONDITIONS are seriously accentuating the industrial un-
y\ rest in both England and Prance. The British government has
assumed control of all coal mines, because production was deceasing. The workers manifested their discontent over low wages,
hile the owners were making large profits, by frequently abstaining
;om work to such an extent that the government was compelled to
:izc the mines and advance the wages of the men. Work in muni-
on factories has been found to produce impairment of eyesight, and
any serious accidents have occurred due to uncorrected errors of reaction, flying particles of metal and other causes. Governmental
easures are being taken to remedy these conditions. France is
loptiug measures for governmental control of food supplies and
rices. The British government has established a new department
encourage industrial and scientific research. All of which goes
' show that encouraging progress is being made in spite of thc tcr-
(ic strain of war, even if it is not actually accelerated because of it.
ie continually increasing economic pressure upon the workers will
pice them to acquire a more pronounced participation in the activi-
2S of government for thc purpose of still further curtailing tlio pro-
rgrabbing privileges oi* property and lightening-the burden upon
emsclves.   This will come immediately upon the heels of this war.
(In V.ncouvor \
our 18,00 )
$1.50 PER YEAR
IS ORGANIZED LABOR AWAKE
IN THE DOMINION OF CANADA ?
Press, Pulpit and Platform Boost for Conscription While Labor Sleeps Without Even
Snoring—The Forces of Reaction Lay Their Wires While the Workers Remain Supine and Apathetic—Evidently Nothing Will Awaken Them
IS THERE AN active and virile Labor movement in Canada? If so, where is it located, and of what iB
it composed? What is it doing to demonstrate its right to be considered a living factor in the economic and political life of the Dominion? In the face of world events of far greater significance to
the workers of all lands than were ever before crowded into the short space of three years, there seems
to have never been such an utter lack of interest among the workers in passing events, and their bearing
upon the future welfare of labor, as now. If there is any distinguishing characteristic peculiar to the
average worker of these days, it is that of complete indifference to what is happening and the possumlike disposition to lay down and curl up in the face of whatever assault may be made upon his few remaining privileges and liberties. He appears more like a dull clod in the hands of fate and fully prepared to accept whatever that may deal out to him, than a living virile being, intellectually and morally equipped to cope with world problems and clear from his pathway, and that of his class, those obstacles that evil purpose has placed therein, so tHat he and his shall remain clods and not become men.
Is Not An Easy Task,
Assentees Will Be Chosen
By Vote of the Entire
Membership
It is perhaps a more plonsnnt task to
flatter than to condemn. Flattery is
far more palatable to the average person
than the cold blunt truth, that por-
chance rends tho mask of dull complacency which covers and hides his mental laziness and spineless indifference to
the hoaxes and humbugs that aro perpetrated upon him by tlie ennning
rogues of human society, who thus use
him for tho furtherance of their ulterior schemes and purposes. But it is up
to the enemies of the organized labor
movement to flatter and cajole, if by so
doing they can swerve that movemont
from its purpose, and thus farther their
own sordid ends. It is up to thoso
who have the true welfare of the workers at heart to spnre no criticism that
may be deservod nor lenvo a stono unturned in tho effort to spur thom on to
n realization of tho task that lies beforo thom if they and their class nro
ever to bo raised abovo the status of
exploited and tortured slnves of capital.
And slavos these workors are, and will
so remain until they hnvo forced their
way into the politicnl life of their respective countries nnd becomo tho dominant factor in the administration of its
industrinl nffnira. That tho prosent unsatisfactory condition of labor is due
entirely to tho absenco of working class
control of the means of industry nnd
lifo, is a fact so pnlpably apparent thnt
it seems almost nn impertinence to mention it. And that this condition m!iist
continue so long as tlio workers, as a
class, remain outside of tho activo politicnl life of nations, and consequently
outside of any and all control of industry and the menus whereby thoy live,
if they live nt all, is nnother fnct equally apparont.
Wliat Are We Dolng7
Are tho workers tuking nny pnrt in
the political life of Canada, or manifesting any pronounced disposition to
do. so ut any. time in the. future? Tho
politicnl life of tho Dominion is peculiarly mnrked by nil but complete nb-
senco of lnbor within its councils1. ,And
by virtuo of this, there is no labor
movement ronlly worthy of the name.
EVERY WOMAN IN
B.C. SHOULD GET
ON THE VOTERS'LIST
Inasmuch ns the women of British Columbia kre now entitled to
the franchise, it is essential that
those of the working class shall
register without delay. Especially should wives and mothers of
soldiers, returned or otherwise,
see that their names aro recorded.
With the deletion of the ranks of
organized labor, consequent upon
the war, it becomes the duty of
their woman friends to assume
the responsibilities hitherto borne
by the men fdlk. When election
day comes, if the women do their
duty by registering now nnd lining up with working class candidates on that occasion, many of
tho present problems pressing for
solution will bv ably mot. Evory
woman in British Columboia
should register at the earliest opportunity.
For we know full well that the future
welfnre of humUnity, the bringing
nbout of conditions that will make
peace and docency possiblo in civilization, depends solely upon a labor movement that will politically and industrially conquer the earth and free tho enslaved toilers from their chnins. Wo
all know that, that is if we know anything, or are sufficiently capable of applying the test of reason to the bread
and butter problems of life. But aro
wo doing anything worth mentioning
here in Canada to,further such a labor
movement and punh it forward to tho
day of its triumply Candor compels us
to admit thnt wo nro, indeed, doing little if anything nlong thia line. Not for
two deendes has tho so-called Lnbor
movement been more indifferent nnd
apathetic politically than at present.
And for that reason it hns never been
nearer dead than now. For dispute it
aB we muy, the struggle of labor, if it
is to be a struggle above the level of
blind rebellion, must be a political
struggle, a struggle upon the part of
Labor to seize that point of vantage
from which all operations upon the field
of industry aro controlled and the fruits
of industry disposed of. That point of
vantnge is the governing power of nations. Without that political aspiration the labor movement is without the
breath of lifo. Without that it can
have no goal for which to struggle. It
becomes a meaningless abstraction.
Tbe Grand Opportunity.
Never did history record such a
splendid opportunity for tho entrance
of tho labor world into the political lifo
of nations, as has been afforded by this
war. Novor was such an opportunity
offered for the organized forces of labor
to successfully command recognition and
voice in the administration of tho political and industrinl life of tho groat nations of tho earth. And it iB doubtful
if a more complete and abject failure to
seize an opportunity and profit by it,
ever occurred. Instead of boldly soiz-
ing tho opportunity to gain a commanding position nt tho council boards of the
nations, and thereby becoming an influential factor in the conduct of this
brutal ruling class war, nnd the solving
of tho problems thnt will immediately
follow m its wake, tho entire Labor
movement sacrificed everything it, possessed, including its dignity, tho lenst
of its possessions, upon the nltnr of alleged patriotism, and now bids fair to
como out of this struggle entirely shorn
of oven the puny political aspirations
that it oace had. And the patriotism to
whose appeal this surrender wns made
was entirely of the ruling class brand,
which is but another way of saying it
meant only tho abject nnd servile surrender of everything the lnbor movement may havo gained in the past, to
tho forces of military reaction nnd tyranny, thoso baneful influences that
hnvo nlwnyB risen to tho occasion whenever tho opportunity wns offered to i-"
(Continued on page 3)
Full loud above the cannons roar, above the machine guns rattle,
O'er all the din and tumult, rising from the field of battle;
Will our patriotic noise be heard throughout the danger zone,
As we cheer "our country's heroes" on, by long distance telephone.
GENTLEMEN,.-
THERE'S A SH|P
READY ANO iAILS
fOR THE OTHER 5IDE,
WILL ANY OF YOU
ENLIST TO GO TO
"SAFETY FIRST" DEVOTEES FEARLESSLY "DOING THEIR BIT!'
[FROM SOMEWHERE IN CANADA]
-Courtesy Aiifltralinn Ulrar Call.
DMBIWUD
IDLE AS RESULT
OF LOCKOUT
Routine Business Occupies
the Attention of Last
Night's Meeting:
OIXTT-THEEE dolegates attended
—* last night's meoting of Vancouver
Trades and Labor council. Quito a number of questions nffocting the interests
of the membership wero discussed and
acted upon. Consideration of the new
bylaws and constitution of tho council
occupied a considerable portion of tho
evening, resulting in a curtailment of
other things usually dealt with under
tho heading of "new business."
Labor Candidates.
In conformity with the action of the
council some weeks ago, asking for the
nomination of .thoir choico as Labor
candidates at tho forthcoming bye-elec
tion, eighteen unions responded. Of
these fifteen made nominations, and
three declined to participate. The nom-
ineoB are: McVoty, 12; Trottor, 7;
Kingsley, 2, and Messrs. Cleveland,
Midgley, Miss Gutteridge, Pottipiece,
Welsh and Hoover, ono each. Upon
motion all tho nominees will bo notified
by tho socrotary of thoir selection, and
asking for cither acceptance or declination. The list will thon bo re-submitted
to the entire membership for a referendum vote, returnable upon a dntl) to be
fixed by tho executivo committee. In
this way it is hoped that the choico of
orgnnized labor in Vnncouvor will bo
sufficiently acceptable to all wngo-work-
ors to ensuro tho candidates' election.
Engineer Bucking New Wage Seals,
Presidont McVety's report emphasiz*
ed tho necessity of keeping nn eyo on
the city council if thc recently-adopted
union scalo of wngos for skilled mechanics wns to bo onforcod. Tho city
engineer, cithor himsolf or at tho instance of certain aldermen, was opposing the proposod revised wngo schedule.
Tho suggestion will bo noted 'upon.
New Parliamentary Committee.
The following wore named as tho now
parliamentary committee: B. Wight,
chairman; Bruce, McFnrlnnc, Haig, Mc-
Donald, Miss Uuttoridge, Hawthorne.
Graham, Pipes, Cory.
Attendance Boll.
Shoe workers, T. Cory; longshoremen,
Bon Hughes, G. Thomas, J. Kavanagh,
G. Kolly, 8. Enrp, A. Troo; stroot railway employeos, 1*'. Haigh, P. Hoover, B
E. Bigby, J. Hubble, B. Davios, E. G.
Knowles, A. Mclnnes; machinists, A. B.
Towlor, J. McVety, J. Brooks, W. M.
Hawthorn; letter carriers, F. Knowles,
.1. Cass, J. Dodd, B. Wight, N. Burlow;
civic employees, V. B. Midgley, G. W.
McFarlane, G. Hurrison; tailors, It. Gutteridgo, B. E. Gutonby, 0. S. Gren, J.
T. Ellsworth; deop sea fishermen, B.
Kearley; eloctrical workers, A. H.
Woodsido; cooks nnd waiters, A. Graham; carpenters, No. 017, J. Campbell,
A. McDonald, E. McCormnck, J. Smith,
J. H. Copping, J. G. Thom; shoet motol
workers, A. .1. Crawford; plujnbcrs, P.
W. Wolsh; typos., W. E. Trottor, G.
Bartley; moving picture operators, E.
B. Stenn, A. 0. Hanson; bricklayers, W.
.1. Pipes, W. Dagnall; brewery workers,
A. SykoB; sailors, W. S. Burns; pressmen, J. Scott, E. B. Stephenson; molders, A. H. Donnldson; I. B. steam shovel
(iredgormen, A. W. Cochran; bakors, S.
H. Grant, J. P. Fern; plasterers, G.
Bush; cigarmakers, A. Kocholl, H. G.
Kurbitz; painters, D. Lemon; garmont
workers, J. McMustcr, B. Burnett; ro*
tail clorks, lt. Bruce; bartenders, J. A.
Smith, McAffory.
Want An All-round Wage Increase,
Nearly all branches of orgunized
labor in tho Winnipeg district aro seeking very material increases in rates of
pay, suys The Voice. All schedules
which expire with the end of April uro
withdrawn as a basis of negotiation.
Tins is not strange on account of pre-
vailing price conditions, but it hns boen
noted with some degree of wonder this
year that organized labor is but following tho load of unorganized men in this
quest for moro wages.
WHAT WILL RETURNED
SOLDIERS DO WITH OS?
" *. * * A good many people seem to be worrying about wbat
tbey are going to do with the returned soldier at the close of the
war. It seems to me that the teal
causo for anxiety should be based
on what tbe returned soldier Is going to do with ns when he returns.''
—W. E. Trotter, at Monday night's
mass meeting ln Labor Temple.
Consolidated  Co.  Counter
Demands of Men for 50
Cent Increase
District Executive Has Unanimous Backing of
Membership
ROSSLAND, B. C, April 17.-
(Special to The Federationist.)—The Consolidated company in an effort to intimidate its employees, has closed
down its mines here, and looked
out over 500 men. And this in violation of the federal Industrial
Disputes Act. The men, however,
are standing firm, and will insist'
upon a little participation in the
immense profits of the mining
companies, as a result of war-time
prices, so that the higher cost of
living may be met.
Last week your Trail correspondent gave a review of conditions
in and around the Smelter City,
situated on the Columbia river
some six miles below this city, announced that a strike vote had
been taken, and warned1 wage-
workers to steer clear of the interior until more settled conditions prevailed.
It may be further stated that
this action was taken simultaneously at Rossland, Nelson, Trail,
Kimberley, Greenwood and Sandon, by the locals of tho International
Union of Mino, Mill and Smelter Workors (W. F. of M.) Ont of the total district voto cast by tho membership, only
70 mon voted ngninst a striko to on-
forco tho domnnds of tho mon involved.
As Boon as the rosult of tho voto was
mado known, tho Consolidated Co. hore
immediately closed down its Eossland
mines, throwing over 500 mon out of
employment.
District Executive ln Oharge.
The district executive bonrd is now
negotiating with tho Consolidated Co.
Tho management has given out n statoment, not to tho publie press, however,
as all wage-workors in British Columbin will havo noted, in reply to tho presentation of tho men's demnnds, thut
they will have an unswer ready for tho
mon todny, but at this writing, no decision hns beon forthcoming.
Want EO-cent a Day Increase.
The outstanding demand of tho mon
is for nn increnso of 00 cents per day,
nlong with the chock-ell' system fur tho
collection of 'union dues.
Will ndviso Tho Fedorationist as
othor developments tnko place, but in
tho meantime it will bo good policy for
all workers seeking employment to stay
away from Eossland, as the mines hero
aro idle and conditions in other minea
of tho Consolidated aro unsettled, especially at Kimberley, Ainsworth, and
tho Emma mino at Greenwood. The
situation at tho Trail smelter, too, is
vory unsettled.
Tho workers of tho interior aro now
beginning to appreciate the valuo of
having such a paper as Tho Fedorationist in whieh to stato their ease, if necessity arises. Not a word of this hugo
lockout hus appeared in any of tho British Columbia papers to dale, other than
The Fedorationist.
CITY SHOULD BE
MODEL EMPLOYER
Too Much Shuffling and Side-stopping
and Not Sufficient Action.
The demand for a now shuffloiin tho
mattor of wages is becoming general
around tho city hall thoso duyB. Tho
old bunk about war conditions nnd tho
practice of thrift and economy is worn
threadbare, especially ia view ef tho
way the patriotic employer! of the na*
lion nre practising tho new dogma. It
is about timo tho city council mndo up
its mind to denl with thc whole question
of decent treatment of civic employees.
Thoro has been altogether too much'sen-
timentnl slush peddled, at a timo whon
the aldermen themselves increased their
own stipends, nnd not enough renl action. With prices of foodstuffs soaring
ench dny to heights out of reach of tho
average wago being paid, somo deiinito
policy should bo adopted. Tho city
ought to bo a model employer. If (ho
wage-worker electors of the city wero
to uso thoir frnnchiso properly on election dny, it would be.
WHAT IS THE MATTER WITH THE
LOGGERS ALONG THE PACIFIC COAST?
IT IS DUENED FUNNY, when you consider the part the average
logger plays in this world. Ho risks his life and limb every day he
works, to create wealth for his employer, and when the government calls for troops to wage a war—that concerns him not tho least
—he is off to thc front witli a gun on his shoulder, says the Timber
Worker. But when it comes to standing up on his hind legs, along
with his fellow loggers, to ask for wages and* conditions suitable for
such a hazardous calling, he is as timid and shy as a young maid. I
would like to sec tho inside of his head. I'll bet there arc at least
three wheels missing. I have worked a good many years in the
woods, nnd 1 have reached this conclusion after careful consideration:
From his shoulders down, a logger is as good a man as walks this old
earth, but from his shoulders up, he is away shy. But, I have always
hoped that some day he will wake up and realize his importance to
the industrial life of tlio nation, and by combining with his fellow-
loggers, compel the dollar chasers, who employ him, to furnish
accommodations in camp suitable for a human being. Will somo
wise man tell me why such a skookum bunch of men, as arc the loggers of this coast, continue from year to year to live in hovels
like a lot of hogs! PAGE TWO
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
THE
INCORPORATED
1865
BANK OF
TORONTO
 $73,000,000
Deposits  64,000,000
Household Banking
Accounts
in The Bunk of Toronto have been
found by many to be a great convenience. The nccounts may be
opened in tho names of husband
And wifo, and either may deposit
or withdraw money. Interest is
paid on these accounts twice a
year.
Paid-up Capital 85,000,000
Beserve Fund 6,600,000
Comer Hastings and Cambie Sts.
W. R. OWEN
Malleable Ranges, Shelf and
Heavy Hardware; screen doors
and windows.
2337 MAIN ST. Phone: Fair. 447
THE GOLDEN RULE OF
TELEPHONING
When you telephone, you like to
hear plainly and distinctly!
So doeB the other person. Why impose the hardship of unnecessary
strain on your listener, when it is
such an easy matter to transmit your
voice distinctly, by placing your lips
close to tho telephone t
Speak Into the telephone, as you
would have others speak into the telephone unto you.
B. O. TELEPHONE CO., LTD.
Out-of'town Union Men who visit
Vancouver should pay a visit to
Perry & Dolk
The Labor Temple
Union Tailors
Pick out a spring suit and get it
properly made, union-made, combined with right treatment.
Trades Unionists of
Greater Vancouver
We Want Tou to Do Tour
'  Furniture Business Wltb Us
WE WILL MAKE TEBMS TO
SUIT   TOUR   CONVENIENCE
Oar stock of Furniture U the best
in the province. Whenever yon want
anything In onr line, call in and look
It over.
Hastings Furniture Co. Ltd.
41 Hastings Stroet West
Sou-Van Milk
Should be ln the home of every
UNION
man.
IB IT IN 70UBS7
Fair. 2621
THEATRICAL
PHONE BtV. 318      TWICE
DAILY
2,30
THlfWUKt        aiMNvn.li *t.    8,20
"THS HIT Of VMIDIHLU"—— —
Matinee Prices: Evenings
10c, 15c, 26c, 60c.      10c, 26c, SSo. 76c.
PantageS
Unequalled Vaudefilli Muni
PANTAOES VAUDEVILLE
THBEE SHOWS DAILY
3:46, 7:20, 9:16      Seaion's Priwi:
Matinee. 16c; Ewningi, 16c, 96c
Published every Friday morning hy tbe B. O.
Federationist, Limited
B. Parm. Pettipiece .Manager
Office: Boom 217, Labor Tetaple
TeL Exchange Seymour 7495
Subscription:  $1.50 pur year; In Vancouver
City, $2.00; to unions subscribing
in a body, $1.00.
kkKsi^atives      "~~
Now Weatminster W. Yatos,.Box 1021
Princo Ruport S. 1). Macdonald, Box 268
Victoria A. S. Wolls, Box 1538
'Unity of Labor:   the Hope of the World'
FRIDAY April 20, 1911
NOW THAT tlio United States lias
joined tho Entente Allies in the
struggle to remove tho menace of
ii belated feudalism from ihe pathway
of civilization, all of tlie patriotic upstarts   and   blatant
NATIONAL charity      schemers
SERVICE and    boosters    are
AGAIN. getting b-jsy in the
land of the "Stars
and Stripes," in foisting their noisy
and vulgar schemes upon a patient and
semi-stupid publie. Patriotic funds, tobacco funds, sock knitting enterprises,
aud a multitudo of similar charity
schemes not unknown to the people of
other lauds, and accompaniod by all of
tho sinister and cunning enlistment-enforcing persecutions and impertinences
common to the tribe of old women of
both sexes, whoso chief mission in lifo
is to point out to others the path of
patriotic rectitude that leads to the cannon 'a mouth, while discreetly avoiding
tho danger zone themselves, are becoming as common in that country as
"skeeters" in New Jersey or schemes
and practices of like import in this
greatest empire that the world ever
saw. Drunken squabbles over differences of opinion regarding patriotism,
and the patriotic duty of thoso thus afflicted, differences that are usually attributable to the varying effects of the
fumes of booze upon certain brands of
intellect, are magnified and scare-headed into spontaneous outbursts of patriotic fervor, and emphatic popular disapproval of sedition and disloyalty. Dis
plays of hoodlumism upon the part of
uniformed irresponsiblos against those
who perchance consider true patriotism
as something other than blatant lip-
scrvico and the ostentatious, ridiculous
and continuous obeisance to commercial
trade marks and territorial emblems
that passes muster as the real thing iir
patriotic display during tjus brilliant
epoch are heralded to all the world as
magnificent expressions r>f the popular
will in favor of this most righteous war.
♦ *       *
Now all of this is no doubt very nice
and, perhaps as it Bhould be. At any
rate it is all that is to be reasonably
expected at this stage of the journoy of
tho human race from tho primitive savagery of thousands of centuries ago to
whatever may lie before it in the dim
and distant future. That all of this
phonomona occurs is all of the proof requisite to establish the fact that'it is
tho vory best that the human raco is
capable of at this stage of the groat
process of tho evolution of human society. True it is not much to brag
about, but still it is tho very best that
can be done under the circumstances,
and with the material at hand. But
ufter all is said and done, no person,
oither sane or otherwise, can truthfully
assert that there is any legitimate and
logical reason why '' Uncle Sam''
should tolerate any of theso ridiculous
and vulgar charity schemes and ruffianly practices, unless it bo from a desire
to escape the responsibilities that
should properly be assumed by the government of that great country. And we
uae the term great, advisedly. That
greatness will be demonstrated only by
that government and that country assuming all of the responsibilities incidental to participating in this world
war and thereby safeguarding all of its
patriotic sons and daughters against the
ignominy of being compelled to accept
charity, and thus become the victims
of the degrading and humiliating
schemes of a slobbering philanthropy
that can have no other excuse for its
cxistenco than that of affording a hypocritical mask for governmental ineptitude and the disposition to shirk a
manifest duty, evon as charity mongers
nnd other "slackers' 'oftentimes shirk
their manifest duty by not going to tho
front, and "doing thoir bit."
* *       *
The excuse cannot bo offorod that
"Uncle Sam" needs financial assistance
to carry on the war and, therefore,
theso charity schemes are justifiable It
has boon discovered that this foxy old
chap is possessed of moro wealth than
Groat Britain, France, Gormuny, Russia, Italy and Japan combined, and that
he owes practically nothing. Perchance
it may have been noted with what ease
and grace the Congress recently passed
-SAVE TOUR MONEY—
a. 8. HARRISON, Manager,
ariDTllle and Pender
START A BANK ACCOUNT IN
THE MERCHANTS
BANK OF CANADA
Don't stow away your spare
cash In any old corner where it is
in danger from burglars or fire.
The Merchants Bank of Canada
offers you perfect, safety for your
money, and will give you full
banking service, whether your account Is large or small.
Interest allowed on savings de*
posits.
0. N. STAGEY, Manager
Hastings and Oarrall
the bill appropriating $7,000,000,000 for
war purposes. It was done with loss
fuss and bother than would have ordinarily occurred with the average business concern upon the occasion of making nn expenditure or outlay of two
dollars and six bits. And that was only
a starter, although it affords an illuminating suggestion as to what may be
expected later on when the spending!
becomes good and lively. Such a huge |
volume of wealth was never yet possessed by any nation on earth, as that of
the United States. As far as wealth is
concerned, probably no nation ever engaged in war was even one-half as well
equipped. It is a low-down and contemptible insult to the very manhood
of the American people, if they have
any, that any charity scheme should for
a moment be tolerated in that country,
either for tho purposo of carrying on
war or for the purposes of pence. What
this paper has said about this same matter here in Canada and the British Empire, is doubly true of the United States,
becauso of tho immensely greater volume of wealth at the command of that
country.
*       *       *
Now, as to the raising of sufficient
forces to push the war to a successful
conclusion. There is talk of conscription. That, of course, comes from those
interests in the country that would
place tho shackles of militarism upon
tho limbs of Labor, not only for purposes of wur, but for industrial purposes as well. Let it not be forgotten
that overy country on earth, no matter
how far advanced along democratic
lines, contains within itself as bloodthirsty and ruthless a class of pirates
as that worthy gang that has so successfully steered the Gorman peoplo to
their complete undoing, and to their
eventual extermination, if they do not
get rid of that gang and its military
expression. The only difference is that
the military pirates of Germany are on
top in that land. The would-be military
pirates would like to got on top in the
United States, and all othor countrioa.
No matter how many aoldiers may bo
required by the United States in order
to bring the war to a successful end,
thoy can be obtained without any resort to compulsion. Make the pay of
the soldier commensurate with the
wages in industry, and all the men required will be obtained. Lot the soldiers pay bo placed at $60 per month
at least, and the problem will be solved.
This would enable the soldier to leave
his dependents with the assurance that
they will at least be enabled to escape
starvation while he is in his country's
servico. If this bo followed up by proper pension provisions in case of his
death or disablement, thore can be little
quostiou as to the response to the country's call for volunteers by those upon
whose shoulders must fall the task of
fighting her battles, if thoy are to be
fought. But above everything else thc
workers of all countries where conscription has not yot been foisted upon thom
should leave no stone unturned to see
that they are not forced into that position of intensified slavory that is tho lot
of thoso who dwoll in conscript countries. Where it has already been forced
upon them, they should leave no stone
turned to effect the repeal of all conscript measures. Conscription and freedom cannot oxiat together. The one is
the completo donial of tho other. Keep
that in mind.
ered to be a perfectly legitimate institution in this province, or perhaps it
might be more correct to term it a well-
established and time-honored custom.
At any rate, it is no politicnl sin.
Widespread concern is being manifested as to what wo are going to do
with the returned soldiers, once tho war
is over. The Federationist begs to suggest that time spent in worrying over
that problem is time wasted. Just what
the returned soldiers are going to do
with, or to us when they have returned
from tho war, and have awakened to a
realization of the cheerful prospect that
thoir beloved country, for which they
have bo nobly fought and bled, has in
store for them, is the most serious problem with us. It is moro than probable that something more than a patch
of semi-worthless prairie land or totally
worthless British Columbia landscape
letting on edge, will be required to reconcile them to the fate that awaits
them in the overstocked slave market
and industrial shambles of the future.
What will they do. to us once they learn
how our valiant "patriotic fund" man-
'-"latorB have dealt with some of their
TYP'
FRIDAY. April 20, 1917
ipula
wives and families. That is the
too, and the good Lord knows, we deserve it, too.
Wilson's "selective draft" bill bids
fnir to meet with vigorous opposition in
the United States Congress. It is about
time this usurped authority by the president to coerce the legislative department of the government into obeying
his will, was stripped from him, and ho
wns relegated to his proper function of
nn executive only. That is all tho
power the constitution ever placed in
the office of president. But from the
day of the republic's birth to tho present time, tbe presidential history of
the States has been that of a continual
encroachment of tho oxecutive upon the
legislative powerB of government. This
usurpation of power, if allowed to continue unchecked, will culminate in a
despotism that cannot be gotten rid of
except at heavy cost, no mater whether
the despot is snmo military brigand or
a boneheaded college professor. It is high
time that parliaments called a halt to
all interferences at tho hands of the executive machinery of governments. And
the preaent president of the United
States affords an excellent subject for
demonstration purposes nlong this line.
A new champion of the poor nnd lowly has entered the ring on behalf of the
down-trodden, and the "high cost of
living" is destined to fall soon, if not
sooner, and receive the solar plexus
death swat that will exorcise this holy
terror from the haunted dreams of
those who nre foredoomed to live by
thoir sweat. The Pennsylvania Rnilrond
company has decided to allow its employees to raiso spuds and other vegetable gems upon its right-of-way, thereby
working after hours, that is if the
compnny has left any juice in Mb bones,
the employeo will be able to obtain for
nothing that which would otherwise
cost him much money in tho market
plnco. This will be quite equivalent to
an increase of his wages, as any one
may readily see. And what is still more
to the point, the speculator in spuds,
onions, carrota, turnips and similar soul-
satisfying and labor power producing
edibles will find his nefarious occupation gone, without injury to the gosh-
dinged employee or the gol darned railway company, either. All hail to the
Pennsylvania Railway company. As a
champion of the down-trodden and oppressed, and tho dendly enemy of the n.
c. of 1. it has all other modern Don
Quixotes and surface-aKlmming connubi-
ators left at the post. And, come to
think of it, this simple solution of the
problem of the high cost of living will
not cost the Pennsylvania a cent. Or
any ono else for that matter. At least
that is the way it looks.
It is confidently asserted that the explosion which occurred at Edling's
brewery in the city of New York last
week, waB not the result of a German
plot.
It may not be possible for somo of
the old-party political pimples in tho
trades union movement to discover
where campaign funds sometimes come
from; but developments at Victoria are
at least making it possible to know
where some of thc money does not go.
The Morning Sun, probably in view
of political developments at Victoria]
is now running a series of "fly-swatting" front-page cartoon flare-head
stories. If the recalcitrant Liberal
members for Vancouver keep going it
is not 'unlikely that Eeditor Fred. C.
Wade may treat us to somo of Mr. Carter-Cotton's old-time editorials on "The
Ancient Discovery of Tin," with perhaps its modern application.
If there is a member of the trades
union movoment in this province who
cnn see any difference, other than the
personnel, in the "two groat parties'•*
at Victoria, he ahould consult a surgeon
immediately. And yet there are miserable little souls in the organized labor
movoment who are wilUng to let that
sort of politics answor the purpose. If
ever thoro waB a time when the wage-
workers of British Columbia should
jump in and do something on their own
account, that time is now. Tho electorate of both soxes must bo about fed up
with tho prosent clrcuB at Victoria.
Tho inquiry into P. G. E. railway
financing and construction affairs has
gono just far enough at Victoria to
completely convince both the government and tho opposition that it will not
be either safe, or for tho good of the
country to go any further with the
mutter, because of thc danger of dis.
closing just how much P. G. E. money
was actually "benevolently assimilated" into the campaign funds of both
the Conservative and Liberal parties.
Enough has already been uncovered to
show that it wub some swag and as
groedily grabbed by the purified and
sanctified Liberals as by the polluted
and damned Conservatives. The pot
and the kettle appear to be of the same
color. ■ *
Tho result of tho prohibition referendum appears to be that a majority has
been given for the "wets." The'
"drys" have appoalcd to the Liberal
governmont of tho provinco to declare
the prohibition, measure carried, upon
tho grounds that it was defeated by
the "wets" only by "plugging" at
the polls. It is not to be expected, however, thnt this Liberal govornment will
prove unkind to tho "wets" merely
because they indulged In a little "plug*
ging," for it is well-known that the
successful practice of this peculiarly
British Columbia art is eminently calculated to appeal to the Liberal heart and
conscience.   And besides, it is consid
And now it has been discovered that
Oxman, tho "star" liar for the proso-
cution in the Mooney trial, and whose
testimony wns chiefly responsible for
Mooney's conviction, is also guilty of
acting as a "go-between" for the prosecuting attorney, and his equally dirty
associates who engineered the "frame-
up" against Mooney nnd his comrades.
Correspondence through which Oxman
attempted to induce others to become
perjurors like himself in order to
strengthen the case of the prosecution,
has been brought to light. This correspondence has been published by the
San Francisco Bulletin, and ia nlso boing widely spread by the Defense
league. The more light thoro is thrown
upon this "framo-up" tho more clearly
it becomes that it is the most reckless
and ferocious attempt ever yet made by
the unscrupulous tools of capital, to
murder those who have aroused its ire
because of their offorts on behalf of the
exploited workers. If this attempt to
m'order thoae whoso solo crime consists
of their legitimate activity on behalf of
labor, can be carried to a successful
conclusion, in the face of the complete
and widely heralded ex*posuro of the entire damnable '* frame-up'' scheme,
there must be something lacking in the
spirit of organized lnbor that renders it
worse than useless. If there is nny virtue at all in tho strike, and the workers
of the United States, we believe, still
posses the right to uso that means of
enforcing their will, it would seem that
there could be no more worthy purpose
for which to invoke its use than that of
preventing the murder or further imprisonment of Mooney nnd his comrades, who are boing made tho victims
of the brutal passions of San Francisco's capitalists.
MRS. A. McMORDIE DIES
AS RESULT OF ACCIDENT
»OS. TO ELECT OFFICERS
ON WEDNESDAY, MAY 23
Nominations at Next Regular Meeting
—Chapel Chatter.
Nominations of officers for the ensuing
year will be tho outstanding ordor of
business at the next regular meeting of
Vancouver Typographical union, on
Sunday afternoon, April 20, at 2 o'clock
sharp. Tho election will take place on
the fourth Wednesday of next mouth,
May 23. The polling will take placo at
tho office of Secretary Neelands, room
206, Labor Temple. So far there seems
ta be no particular interest in the election, but it is admitted in at leaat ono
or two of the locnl nowapapcr chapels
that President Benson will hnve opposition for re-election.
Newspaper work hns been rather
slack for this season of the year, with
the rosult that subs, are plentiful. Tho
job side continues very dull with more
mon available than jobs. Reports from
tho prairie centres Indicate openings for
a few machino men.
The Daily Provinco chapel is still
working under advorso conditions, resulting from many alterations being
made in the newly-acquired premises,
and additions to an already modorn
plant.
A cable hns been received by Mrs. J.
W. Ross stating that her husband has
been wounded during the recent fighting at Vimy Ridge. Pto. Ross is a member of Vancouver Typographical union,
and was employed by the World ns a
compositor for over ten years nnd went
overseas with the 47th battalion nearly
a year ago.
It's $1 in Vancouver.
A rebate of 75 cents will in future bo
allowed for attendance nt Calgary Typo,
meetings, instead of 50 cents as formerly,
"^Brewery Workers' Editor Dead.
Gustav Mostler, editor of the Brewery Workers' Journal, published by the
International United of United Brewery
Workera, at Cincinnati, Ohio, died on
April 8, after a ahort illneas. His death
will be a distinct loss to the trades
union movement.
Vancouver Machinists' lodge, No.
182, hns increased its representation on
Tho Federationist's mailing list from
45 to 101, exclusive of the Princo Ruport list, which must now look nfter its
own muttons as the result of having
taken out a charter of its own.
Toronto Veteran Labor Official Loses
Wife and Helpmeet of Many Years.
Mrs. Alexandor McMordio, wife of
Socretary-troasuror McMprdie of the
Federated Association of Letter Carriers, Toronto, died on the 10th inBt, as
a result of falling from a street car on
Queen street. MrB. McMordio was born
in Ireland 50 years ago. In addition to
her husband, she leavos seven children,
fivo boys and two girls.
Secrotary Wight of the local branch
of the F. A. of L. C. says: Alexander
McMordie wob our flrst arid only secretary-treasurer, having hold that position for tho last twenty years, and an
active Labor man. He represented the
Foderation at the Toronto Trados and
Labor Congress last year.
Alberta Typos. Oet in Line,
Calgary Typographical union last
woek re-affiliated with the Alborta Fedoration of Labor. Only one of the
Typo, unions of Alberta now remains
outside the fold.
The organized workers want decent
pay, not bonuses. Thoy want what they
are entitled to, not charity. They want
a chance to tako caro of themselves and
thoir families, and not the opportunity
of seeing philanthropists doing it for
them.
LABOR TEMPLE
MEETINGS DURING
THE COMING WEEK
SUNDAY, April 22—Stoam Engi-
neers; Moving Picture Operators.
MONDAY, April 23—Amal. Engineers; Pattern Makers; Electrical Workers; V. B. Carpenters,
No. 817; Street Hnilwnymen's
Executive.
TUESDAY, April 24—Bnrbors;
Brothorhood Locomotivo Engi-
WEDNESDAY, April 25—Street
Railwaymen; Press Feeders'
Committee; District Council of
Carpenters.
THURSDAY, April 26—Maohin-
is'ts; Milk 'Wagon Drivers;
Shipwrights nnd Cuulkers.
PBIDAY, April 27—Pile Drivors
CLELAND-DIBBLE ENGRAVING OOMPANY
Limited
PHOTO   ENGRAVERS.   COMMERCIAL ARTISTS
Phone Seymour 7169
Third  Floor.  World  Building,
VANCOUVER, B. O.
Tlie only Union   Hliop in Vanconvor.
COUNTRY STORE
COLUMBIA
TONIORT
Como and have a good timo. perhaps
tako homo a sido of bacon.
Hastings Street, near Abbott
SMITH'S BUTTON WORKS
Hemstitching, buttons covered, seal-
lopping, button holes, pinking, * sponging and shrinking, lettering, picot edging, pleating, niching, embroidery,
hemming.
663 oranvllle St. 1310 Douglal St.
VANCOUVER, B.O. VIOTOBIA, B.O.
Phone Sey, 3191 Phone 1160
Phone Bey. 6183   1296 Oranvllle
ROOTE Auto Top Co.
SEAT COVERS, AUTO UPHOLSTERING, TOPS RECOVERED
ELEOTM0 FIXTURES AT OOST
FBIOES
See ui and save money.
The Janrii Electric Co., Ltd.
670 Richards Street
DO IT NOW
Oet busy and have yonr old bicycle
made like now. We will enamel and
make your whoel look Uke new from
(6.60 up.   AU kind! ot repair! it
HASKINS S ELLIOTT
616-619 Howe Halting! 411
Poultry Wanted
BEST PRICES
HARRY STEVENS
Pbone Seymour 1097
 910 Oranvllle St.
"United   we   stand,   divided   we
crawl,"
MAIL CONTRACT
SEALED TKNDEBH. addressod to the
PoNtmaBtnr Goneral, will be reeelvod at Ottawa until noon, on Friday, tho llth Mar,
1017, for the conveyance of HU Majesty's
malls, on a proposed contract for four yoars,
six times por woek each way, ovor
VANCOUVEB BUBAL BOUTE NO. 1
from the 1st,of July next,        *
Printed notices containing furthor Information as to conditions of proposed contract
may bo seen and blank forms of tender may
he obtained at the Post Offices of VANCOUVEB, MABPOLE and BBUBNE, and at the
ofllce of the Post Officii Inspector.
Post Office Inspector's Office,
J. P. MURRAY,
Post Offloe Inspector.
Vanoouver, B. 0., April 14th, 1917.
J. Edward Sears     Office: Say. 4146
SEARS & PATTON
Barristers, Solicitors-, Conveyancers, Etc.
Victoria and Vancouver
Vancouver Office: 516-7 Rogers Bldg.
VANCOUVEB, B. O.
G. ROY LONG
Barrister, Solicitor, Notary
Public
Phone Sey. 3229 Birks Building
VANCOUVEB, B. O.
T. B. CUTHBERTSON Ss 00.
Men's Hatters and Outfitters
630 Oranvllle street
619 Halting! Street West
ASK TOUB OROOER FOB
PRIDE OF ALBERTA, and
MOTHERS' FAVORITE
FLOUR
UNION MILLED
J. PHILLIPS * OO., Agent!
Ptone 6116 1226 Hamilton
Jobbing Work a Specialty
E. A. BAILEY
PLUMBING AND STEAMFITT1NO
Phono Soy. 136 and Boo. Bay. 77
1033 OBANVILLE ST., Vancouver
Vancouver  Pickle  Co.
ask for
B. O. ROME BRAND PICKLES,
KETCHUP, SAUCE
Highland 21   Factory 801 Powell
How Alive
Are You?
One often hears tho expression,
"walking around to save funeral
expenses," nnd while it is intended as a joke, it is a half
truth. You commence to die when
you commence to loose vitality.
More vital force is lost through
defoctive eyes than in any other
way. Allow our specialist to correct your eye dofects by means of
lenses glasses, and commence to
live.
Limited
8th Floor Birks Building
Seymour 4665
PRINTING
COWAN tl BROOKHOUSE
Lahor Temple Press    Sey, 4490
"QUALITY DENTISTRY"
T WANT the public to know the High Standard of Dental Work which
***-  is done in my offlce.
I nm justly proud of tho character of the work as overy patient is
given my personal attention.
To afford tho residents of Vancouver and vicinity an opportunity of
becoming ucquuinted with the clnss of work dono at my office, I will
FOR THIS WEEK ONLY
make a special offer on all work arranged during tho wook or
A REBATE OF $1.00 ON EVERY $5.00 OF YOUR BILL
HERE ARE MY REGULAR PRICES:
Upper or Lower plato $10.00    Oold Fillings
Gold Crowns, 22 karat $5.00
Porcelain Crowns  $5.00
Bridgework, per tooth $5.00
...$2.00
Porcoluin Fillings  -.$1.60
Silver Fillings  $1.50
Painless Extraction     50c
Ne charge made for extraction when in preparation for
Plates or Bridgework.
My offer covers not only work actually done during tho weok, but alBO
nil work for which arrangements nre mado bofore Saturday night noxt.
My usual 10-yonr written guarantee goes with all plates, crowns nnd*
bridgework. I nlso uso tho Anocain Infiltration method ondorsod by the
highest dental authorities for the alleviation of puin.
REMEMBER MY PERSONAL ATTENTION GIVEN EVERY PATIENT
Dental nurse ln attendance
DR.  GRADY
QUALITY DENTIST
PHONE SEYMOUR 2716 Offlce Hours: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Open Evenings Tuesday and Saturday 7 to 9
202 BANK OF OTTAWA BUILDING
Good for one year's subscription to Tbo B.
*\ g\    p     1 f% I       O. Fodorationist, will bo mailed to any ad*
III    \||K       I   QfflC   dr08B in c&,mdft ,or $10-    (G(,,lli o»y«hore
outside of Vancouvor olty.)
day.   Remit whon sold.
REDUCE
THE HIGH COST OF LIVING BY USING
WAFFLE BRAND SYRUP
Instead of puro maplo.   It is just as. good, and eosts considerably less.
Made from pure Sugars, nnd guaranteed to contain no foreign flavoring.
Watoh for demonstrations at the leading grocery stores.
ONOE TRIED—ALWAYS USED
Packed in bottles, quarter, half nnd ono gallon tins.
Order a tin today and be convinced.
KELLY CONFECTION CO., LTD.
1106 MAINLAND STREET VANCOUVER, B. O.
Carhartt's
Made a new pants for you last week. It's reinforced
seat and knees, double CARHARTT value in wear
to you. Ask your dealer for Union Goods, made
here.
Ask for
CASCADE
BOCK BEER
POSITIVELY THE BEST BOOK BREWED
For sale, bottled, at all Liquor Stores; for sale, on draught,
AT ALL HOTELS.    Rich, Creamy and Malty.   Health and
vigor in every drop.
BREWED IN VANOOUVER BT
Vancouver Breweries Limited
WiZTtfC":-::. FRIDAY..
...April 20, 1917
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
PAGE THREE
DAVID BPENOEB, LTD.
DAVID BPENOEB, LTD.
The Man Who Wants
Work Trousers
—will ilnd at Spencer's easily the largest stook and best variety in the
eity. What is more, wo have a stook at low prices, starring at $2.00, for
u dark brown tweod.
AT $2.25 thoro nre three patterns, including plain brown and diagonal
grey tweeds that are exceptional values.
AT $2.75 thoro are plenty of patterns in brownB, greys and mixtures.
AT $3.50 we hnve the famous Halifax tweod and an English whipcord in
grey, both Vory popular trousers with men who want wear.
AND AT $3.00 an English hairline in dark grey, also a most durable garment.
AMONG THE DRESSIER TROUSERS
such aa a man often wants to eke out a coat and vest that are capable
of furthor service, wo have a fine range of stripe worsteds—there are
particularly good to wear with a navy serge or any dark coat.   Prices
are $4.60, $5.00, $6.50, $6.00 and $6.50.
NAVY SERGE TROUSERS, of excellent quality are here in all sizes at
$3.00 and $5.50.
DAVID SPENCER LIMITED
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
HaboB
^■^^aaWfi
WlNGPOVf1
BAKING
NABOB POWDER
Your best offorts at oake making
and cake baking will fall far
short of success if your baking
powder is not up to Btandard.
Uso Nabob Baking Powder and
be Bare of your results.
YOUB GROCER SELLS
NABOB PUBE FOODS.
VICTORIA, B.C.: 618 View Stroet. Phono, 1269. Greenhouses and Nursery, Esquimalt Road.   Phono 219.
HAMMOND, B. C: Greenhouses and Nursery on C. P. R. Phone Hammond 17.
Brown Bros. & Co. Ltd.
SUK FLORISTS, NURSERYMEN, SEEDSMEN
Fruit and Ornamental Trees and Shrubs, Pot Plants, Seeds,
Out Flowers and Funeral Emblems
Main Storo nnd Rogistorod Office: VANCOUVER, B. C.
4S Hastings Stroet Eost.   Phonos, Seymour 988*672.
Branch Store, Vancouver—728 Granville Streot.   Phono Seymour 9513
FREE HOMESTEADS
.   BRITISH COLUMBIA
Along lino of P. G. E. Railway open park line lands. The finest mixed
farming lands in the province.
Good wator, best of hunting nnd fishing. The settlers who hnve gono
in thore aro all boosters, us they aro making good.
If you want to go back to tho land, write
A. S. WILLIAMSON
LAND CRUISER
PACIFIC OBEAT EASTERN BAILWAY
Welton Block, Vancouver
Pure Milk T Union Labor
HILLCREST DAIRY
131 FIFTEENTH AVENUE WEST PHONE FAIBMONT 1934
The milk supplied by this
dairy is puro in every Bense of
the word.
All the bottles and utensils
used by this dairy are thoroughly
sterilized.
Our milk supply comes from
the Fraser Valley.
Our dairy equipment covers all
known appliances for the proper
treatment and sanitary handling
of milk.
GIVE US A TRIAL
Great Northern Transfer Co., Ltd.
Cartage Agents, Furniture and Piano Removers, Packers and
Shippers
Baggage delivered to outgoing trains and boats for 25c oents
per piece.
Phone day and night
Sey. 604-405
80 PENDER STREET EAST
THE NANAIMO
COAL
BEBT QUALITY BEST PRICE BEBT SERVIOE
Evans, Coleman & Evans, Limited
Wharf Offlce
FOOT COLUMBIA AVENUE
Seymoar 2988
Uptown Offlee:
407 OBANVILLE STBEET
Seymonr 226
Hare Decided to Organize
and Seek Co-operation
of Friends
PATRIOTIC FUND IS
S
Soldiers' Wives and Dependents Want Fund as
Wages Not Cftarity
"Resolved, that this meeting of
soldiers' wives and dependents protest against the form of administration of the Canadian Patriotic fund
and we believe that ln future the
money should he paid direct from
Ottawa In the form of wages,"
' 'Resolved, that in the opinion of
this meeting the $17.50 which had
heen promised to each of the soldiers' wives and dependents, should
he repaid In full, wherever the same
has heen cutoff."
BY UNANIMOUS vote of a mass-
mooting of soldiers' wives and dependents, held in Labor Tomple Monday
evening, the above resolutions were enthusiastically ondorsed. The meeting
was called by a provisional organization, brought into being during the past
weok by a fow soldiers' wiveB who are
thoroughly disgusted with the professional "charity" methods of tho Canadian Patriotic fund committee. It was
woll attended, and will probably roBult
in a permanent organization to be
known aa the Soldiors' Wives and Dependents' Protective league, or it is
possible that a decision may bo made to
work with some ono of the existing organizations, or through an auxiliary affiliation with the Returned Soldiers' as-
prudence.
Whole System Wrong.
Rov. Dr. Chas. Camoron presided. It
was his opinion that the donors of monies to tho patriotic fund did not intend
that it should bo appraised as charity;
it wbb given ns a part recompense for
the grent sacrifices mado by those who
bad gono leaving loved onos bohind.
The system of administration of the
fund was wrong. Why should women
havo to line up like convicts and be
asked questions that no ono has a right
to know? The systom in vogue almost
prohibited any woman from practicing
prdudence.
Urged Women to Organize.
R. P. Pettipiece, the first speaker of
tho ovening, urged the women to thoroughly organize into a body of working
womon "to fight for their rightd." The
whole principle involving tho treatment
of soldiers, ho said, had been wrong
from tho first. Tho men woro not paid
a sufficient wnge to mako possible the
proper enro of their dependents. If he
were to put a sign on Hastings streot
advertising a wngo of $3 or $3.50 per
day, ho could raise an army of 20,000
men in a very short timo. Munitions
workers, ho added, were pnid good
wages, whilo soldiers, doing just ns important work, wero paid bnt $1.10 por
day. Tho wnr problem wns boing sottled in Europo now. It wns the after-
war probloms which the womon would
hnve to look after, and especially since
they now had tho franchise. Tho speaker insisted that the conscription of manpower should carry with it the con-
conscription of wenlth. He criticized
tho federnl govornment for turning over
tho manufacture of munitions, with its
resultant profits, to private contractors
who wero becoming immensely wealthy
at a time whon thrift nnd economy was
being preached—for others. Tho patriotic fund, as far ns lnbor wns concerned, was not voluntary, he declnred. Ho
instanced the cases of tho Britannia
Minos, where men wore forced to con-
tribute or quit. And this corporation
i by no menus nn exception to tho
rulo. Mr. Pettipiece closed by urging
the women to orgnnizo themselves and
look nftor tlieir own interests.
A Mistake from Its Inception.
W. R. Trottor, tho noxt spenkor, said
that, the Canadian Patriotic fund wns a
mistake from its inception, Tho fund
was regarded as charily by tho people
who woro in chargo ot its disbursement,
and it should not be on that basis. "No
porson should havo tho right to probo
into the iifTnirs of nny soldier's family
ns is boing dono nt the prosont timo."
ho nddod. Owing to personal experience ns a soldier, he could appreciate
tho foollngs of tho womon who wero
prosont. lie considered it an nnti-pati'i-
otic fund, as tho experiences of a IttTgfl
number of the soldiers' wives woro not
such as to induce ait excess of patriotism, cither on thoir part nr on that of
the men at tho front whoa thoy found
out hnw their dependents wore being
treated.
"Wo speak of pitting tho soldiers on
the Innd, when they come homo," snid
Mr. Trotter, "and in other ways aro
considering what  wo are going to, do
with them. It seems to me that the
question is, what are they going to do
with ua when they come home? What
right has any business man to tell a soldier's wife that sho should not send her
children to a picture Bhow or what she
shnll buy with her patriotic fund money
ob ia being done? It is nobody'a business what you do with your money after
you receive it. Your men went to the
front believing that you would be well
looked after."
Mr. Trotter urged that the fund should
be pat on a national basis and a direct
tax be placed upon all inhabitants according to income, including the Asiatic population, of whom thore were over
35,000 in the province. Like Mr. Pettipiece, he criticized the fedoral government for its method of handling the
manufacture of munitions, a syatem
which allowed the manufacturers to
mnke enormous profits, only 25 per cent,
of which was returned to tho Dominion
treasury.
Women Speak for Themselves.
Following the addresses, several women in the audience told of instances
where they declared they were shown
discourtesy and insult at the patriotic
office. They vigorously protested
against being compelled to accept charity, and declared they were ready for
ony line of action that would result in
remedying the present unsatisfactory
methods of making good on the promises mado by thoae who were left behind at .the time their husbands and
bread-winners enlisted.
CIVIC SIDELIGHTS AS
GENERATED AT OITY HALL
(Continued from page 1)
SHINGLEWEAVERS
ORGANIZE IN I
[
gan to happen, which changed the whole
face of tho proposition. Many of tho
moves made by certain members of the
council about this time, nre yot rather
puzzling' to some peoplo who were
watching, and who have not since been
over-impressed by the actions of some
who havo lately been in the vanguard
of tho city's champions in its fight
ngninst the company.
At the meeting where the solicitor re-
coived hia instructions, Aid. Gale announced that he had to leave the city
in connection with organizing the big
Rotary conference, which waa held hero
in February. He also requested that
the meeting at which the charter
amendments were to be considered,
should not be held until his return, and
received the asaurance that hia wishes
would be met.
Thnt was ns far as he got with hia
request. While he was away, on Feb.
14 and 15, special meetings of thecoun-
cil were held, and the charter amendments diaposed of. Theso included the
clauses giving the city authority to acquire water power for tho generation of
oloctric current. No provision was made
for authorizing the city to Bell tho current.
Mayor McBeath was in the chair at
thnt meeting, nnd although he has Bince
become an ardent champion of the
city's clnim to become a seller of electric power, he did not make nny objection to tho adoption of the ".-joker,"
Enter Aid. Gale. '
At tho first meeting of the couneil
aftor hia return, Aid. Gale enquired
why tho mntter, contrary to the pro-
miso made, had boon disposed of in his
absence. Ho wns informed in by no
menns sympathetic tones by tho mayor
that the council hnd bo decided.
Technically thnt was true. But it
Boon became obvious that all the aldermen did not realize what they had let
the city in for. This was true of the
majority who, if they had acted with
hnsty judgment nnd little legal knowledge of tho situntion, did not wish to
lenvo tho city in n fool's paradiso,
whero it. would bo helpless to meet the
company.
This wns proved by the support thoy
gave Aid. Gale whon on March 12, he
moved for a reconsideration of tho
whole question. This resulted on Mnrch
10 in tho principle of tho redrafted
clauses as redrafted by George H. Mc-
Crossnn and City Solicitor Jones being
adopted by thc council on Mnrch 22.
This plncod tho city in the position
where it could npply to the legislature
for authority not only to acquiro wnter
power to generate electric current, but
also power to sell that current to the
itizens for lighting and power purposes.
Whnt is finally done with thc city's
application now depends on the legislature. The point, so far as the local aspect of tho question is concerned is,
taht had it nnt been for the timely action of Aid. Gfllo, the city would 'have
gone to the legislature asking for a
"joker," instead nf for something
which would eventunlly onnble the city
to own n municipal eloctric lighting and
power plant, and possibly a municipal
street rnilwny system.
In the menntime, thoro ia nn interesting story connected with tho fortunes
of these nmendmonts, which commence
with the dnto of their loaving Vnncoii'
ver nn their way to tho privato bills
committee nt Victoria. "Inside" informntion, plus somo fairly well informed outside observation, aro snid to
hnve furnished tho mntorlnl for a story
which does not glbo with the reputation
for civic virtue which Bundry of tho
city fathers are snid to be so painfully
striving nfter. Thnt, however, ns Kip-
ting would sny, is nnother story. It
cnn snfely wait n whilo without losing
nny of its flavor.
City Council Restores $3 Per
8-hour Day for Civic
Employees
Street Railwaymen Put on
Social Event of Season
in Labor Circles
NEW WESTMINSTER, April 19.—
The organization committee of the
Royal City Trades und Labor council
haB been working for somo time trying
to get the shingle woavers in the district organized. Thoir efforts were rewarded on Sunday last, when tho organization waa completed at a meeting held
in Labor Templo. The meeting waa attended by about 30 men engaged in the
induatry, and the international president, Mr. Brown, Seattle, addreaBed the
meeting; alao several local speakers,
after which the charter was opened and
every man present made application for
membership. Tho new local will bo
known as Local No. 7, International
Shingle Wenvera of America, and will
hold meetings on Sunday afternoon of
each week in Labor Temple. The president is W. E. Ivison, 914 Pender street
west, Vnncouver, and tho secretary is C.
Donohugh, room 6, Arcade building,
New Westminster,,
Hold Whist Drive and Dance.
The B. C. E. R. Employees' Sick Benefit association hold a most successful
whiat drive and dance last night in St,
Patrick's hall, there being 220 visitors
present. Music for the dance was furnished by Messrs. Meekness, Ostromj
Biladou, Filgani and Innea. Mr. Alex.
Wnllaee sang a few well-rendered Bongs,
The first prize in whiat was won by
Mrs. C. Harria, and tho gents' first prize
waa won by Mr. Brandon. The prizes
were merchandise orders on Chamber-
lin 's jewelry store, and Eugene
Brown's clothing storo. ■* Consolation
prizes were won by MrB. W. H. Elson
and Mr. Patterson. A large hand-painted vase, donated by Mrs. McRae, was
drawn for and won by Mr. V. P. Clark
with ticket No. 334. The hammock
drawn for was won by Mr. H. R. Green,
ticket No. 21; the sofa cushion was won
by Miss Gladys Gosso, ticket No. 19,5;
the pair of doylies waa won by Mtb. T.
Furness, ticket No. 34. Refreshments
were served by the ladies in the large
dining room and dancing started immediately after the whist drive was over,
lasting till 2 a.m.
$3 for 8 Hours in Royal City.
Tho Civic Employees' association has
won n reputation for itself by the
methods adopted to get a necessary
wage increase. They invited the mayor
and all the aldermen to attend one of
their meetings, after they had made
several requests for increases without
results, and when the members of tbe
council heard the viewpoints of the
workers on the cost-of-living question,
they paid some attention, especially
when they saw that ■ the men were
organized in such shape that it was a
different problom than the old way of
dealing with ench individual. Result,
minimum wage for all employees of $3
per day. Thia rato was decided on at
the meeting of tho city council last
night, all the council voting in favor
excepting Aids. McAdam and Goulet,
the latter being a member of a trade
union, but apparently not a trade
unionist.
Plenty of Men Where Wages Warrant.
Tho general state of the labor market
in the city ia bettor than it haa been for
some years, but there has been no difficulty yot in Bccuring enough men to fill
all calls, except in tho mnchinist trado
which has n few vacancies. ' Some of
tho sawmills have a hard time to keop
a full staff, which is accounted for by
tho low rate of wages whicli they are
willing to pay.
Hotel Canada
618 Richards Street
VANCOUVER
(Near Labor Tsmple)
Best Service
Lowest Rates
Try Us
Wines and Spirits of
the best quality
IS ORGANIZED LABOR AWAKE
IN THE DOMINION OF CANADA?
(Continued from page 1)
end of it. Undor no circumstnnccs
should labor stand for conscription.
With the pay of the soldier based upon
the wage of labor in industry, the problem of recruiting the necessnry forces
to carry on war would bo solved. Compulsory servico would he unnecessary.
Not only should no previously gained
concessions bo surrendered by the workers because of war, but everything requisite to the betterment of labor conditions should be as energetically pushed forward thon as nt any other time.
A Labor movement or a notion that allows itself to be uncivilized just becnuso it has been forced into war, isn't
much good anyhow. But then these aro
merely suggestions. , It is not nt alt
likely thnt thoro will be any Labor
movement in Cannda for some time to
come, that will bo sufficiently wide-
awake to concern itself with anything
■0 serious than jobs and petty little
squabbles relating thereto. So wo will
let ib go at that.   But ia there a Labor
vement in Canada anyhow?
ARGUE!
tfell
W neon oobacea
reoso   tho   stranglehold   upon   human
liberty,
A Suggosted Lahor Programme.
It is not yot too lato to suggest a
Labor programme that might be profitably adopted by the labor forces of this
Don) ini mi, und uf other lands involved
in this or future wars, FirBt, tho cost
of all wars should full solely upon tho
property interests of the country involved. That is, the cost in material
things. The human cost shmild bo borne
by those who are not required for the
actual operation of noceasary industry,
utterly regnrdlesM of whether such possess property or not. The soldior
should rOCOlVO pay equivalent at least
to the average wnge in the fiold of in,-
dustry. This would onnble him to leave
his dependents al least as well provided
for as In times of pence. In ense of
death or disablement, tho pension provisions should bo also bused upon tho
nverage wnge scale. No distinction
should be mnde between officers mid
mon, either in pay or pensions. No
patriotic funds nnd other begging,
blackmailing nnd vulgar charltv
schemes should be tolerated. All such
are not only vulgar, debusing and un*
warranted In any country worth fighting for, but they afford a nesting and
roosting plnco for a joblot of nose-poking nuisances that might bo bettor cm-
ployed eithor fighting at the front or
doing nocossnry janitor work at home
Lnbor should not only hnvo a voice in
tho administration of war, but should
havo complcto control of the industrinl
250 rooms, 100 with private baths
Phone Seymour 8880
HOTEL DUNSMUIR
Vancouver's newest and most
complete Tiotet
European Plan $1,00 per Day Up
New electric auto bus meets all
boats and trains freo
Oor. Dunsmuir and Richards Sts,
VANCOUVER, B. O.
HOTEL ALCAZAR
Opposite Labor Templo
VANCOUVER, B. O.
Hcnilfjuiirtcrn for Labor men.    Hat.
75c and   $1.00  por day.
(2.50 per weok and ap.
Osfe at .Reasonable Rates.
CENTER & HANNA, Ltd.
UNDERTAKERS
Refined Service
1049 OEOBOIA STBEET
One Block wost of Court House.
Uso of Modern Cbapel end
Funeral Parlors free to all
Patrons.
Telephone Seymour 2426
Painters and House Decor-
atorsl-A Great Varnish Sale
At Below Manufacturer's Prices
,Take advantage of the saving prices—buy liberally. You
know how varnish prices are advancing, and this is a chance
for you to stock up at a price you'll be able to make money on.
We got it from an Eastern manufacturer who needed cash—a
carload of it—high-grade qualities, guaranteed to stand up as
well as goods sold under our own label—and suitable for floors
and linoleums. It will sell readily—for these prices are tempting, very:
Gallons, regular $5.00, for. ;. .$2.60
Half gallons, regular $2.50, fpr. „ .$1.36
Quarts, regular $1.25, for.    64c
SI OhrBudsonsBauiTonipanij. fig
^ .   V ...   imwjuth   >tta     mwiH t attaaJaa. ttoatt a____m* .     \ ^sUr
Granville and Georgia Streets
BOYS' DEPARTMENT
The kind of Suits the boys like to wear are now on display.   Pinch
Backs, Norfolks, and all the new and up-to-date styles are shown.
ENGLISH JERSEYS
A NEW SHIPMENT JUST EEOEIVED
MEN'S SUITS
IN ALL THE NEW STYLES.
OVERALLS—OARHAETT'S AND OTHER BRANDS—UNION LABEL
—WORKING SHIRTS, GLOVES, ETO., IN GREAT VARIETY.
CLUBB & STEWART LIMITED
TeL Sey. 702 309 to 315 Hastings Stnet Wart
TRADES UNIONISTS—IS THE MILK SUPPLIED TO YOUB HOME
DELIVERED BY UNION LABOR?
' If lt is not call np the
BeaconsfieldHygienicDairy
PHONE FAIRMONT 1697
or drop a card to our office, 905 Twenty-fourth Avenue East.'
WE EMPLOY UNION LABOR EXCLUSIVELY
WE GUARANTEE TO GIVE YOU SATISI1 ACTION-GIVE US A CALL
Established 1891
John J. Banfield
Fire Insurance, Accident Insurance, Estates
Managed.
MONET TO LOAN
327 Seymonr St Phone Seymonr 153
"The Temperate Man's Drink"
PHOENIX BEER
Brewed from the finest Malt and Hops, and, incidentally,
furnishes a living to some forty odd brewery workers.
MANUFACTURED BY THE
Victoria Phoenix Brewing
Company. Limited
On sale at all Liquor Stores ln
VANOOUVER AND  VICTORIA
The Answer
to the charge that the protective clauses in
the city charter were "hog-rolled" into the
Legislature in 1900:
In 1900, the city of Vancouver applied to
the Legislature for a revision and consolidation of its charter, and asked the legislature to free the city from the protective
clauses given in 1895. The matter was fully
discussed before the private bills committee,
who instructed the city and the company to
arrange a compromise. A meeting took
place and a compromise thoroughly satisfactory to both parties was eventually effected and confirmed on the floor of the
House by every member of the legislature,
with but one exception.
Why did the city agree to this compromise, and why was it almost unanimously
endorsed by the legislature? Because the
company, on the strength of the protective
clauses, undertook the heavy tramway,
light and power extension required by a
young but rapidly-growing community,
which was exactly what the city was most
anxious to secure, as not only was the development of the city's terirtory thereby
assured, but it also enabled the city to utilize its own resources in other necessary
civic improvements.
Phone Seymour
Carrall and Hastings 5000 PAGE FOUR
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
FRIDAY...
No Reason Why We
Should Not Get
Your Trade Mr.
Union Man
1st—Onr goods are of the highest quality.
2nd—Our Suits are cut, fit and made by only expert union help in our
own premises.
3rd—We are the only Union Tailors in British Columbia that can make
your suit at the prices mentioned below.
4th—If yon doubt our promises of perfect fit and making, keep this as a
receipt, and we will cheerfully refund you money if we fall to
please you.
6th—Tho reasons why we can make your suit at that price are: We buy
the goods in large quantities, and pay spot cash, and our turnovers
are large.
SUITS MADE TO YOUR MEASURE PROM $25.00 to $40.00
B. C. Tailoring Co.
128 HASTINGS STREET EAST
Estableshed 1910 Near Pantages
Broadway Theatre
MAIN AT BROADWAY
PHONE PAIR. 882
Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, april 23,24 and 26
FANNIE WARD
—IN—
"THE YEARS OF THE LOCUST"
A Drama of Hearts and Diamonds
THURSDAY, FRIDAY and SATURDAY, APRIL 26, 27 and 28
MARGUERITE   CLARK
—IN—
"MISS GEORGE WASHINGTON"
THE STORY OP A GIRL WHO COULD NOT TELL THE TRUTH
Stylish Suits
—at a—
Reasonable Price
Stop a minute and look at the new body-
defining Coats which are shown in Semi-
ready Tailored Suits.
In all the years of a wide experience, nothing has ever been seen with such superior
characteristics.
Our windows will give you a slight idea
of the values we offer in Serges and
Worsteds and in beautifully Woven Tweeds
at $25.00 and thereabouts.
* *    *
Some less—some more—the price in the
pocket signifies the quality of the wool.
* *    «
SUITS AND OVERCOATS, $15 to $35
THOMAS & McBAIN
655 Granville Street
AT
Miners Will Take the Day
Off to Discuss Many
Questions
Organized Effort Made to
Put a Number of Annoyances Right
SOUTH WELLINGTON, V. I,, April
18.—Wo hold our union meoting Inst
Sunday, and I am moro than pleased to
record that things industrially arc
booming. Our membership is in a promising condition. Wo havo inaugurated a working button system, and every
ono is falling over themselves to pay
their dues and secure a button.
A communication was received from
the International Workers' league enclosing copies of the pamphlet "The
Frame-up System." Tho local decided
to sond for 100 copies.
Tho ways and means of subscribing
to The Federationist was then taken up
and tho local left the matter in the
hands of the executive to draw up a
mailing list and work out the details.
Some time ago we decided to hold
only one meoting a month, but the meeting decided to rescind that motion, and
hold meetings in future on tho Sunday
after payday, and the last Sunday in
tho month.
Will Celebrate May Day.
It was decided to celebrate Labor's
international holiday on tho 1st of May.
A strong committee was picked, and we
hope to have a good time. The timo is
too short to have anything elaborate,
but the mere fnct that Labor can flhut
down on industry and hold a celebration on their own day, is sufficient to
demonstrate that Labor is a factor to
be reckoned with. E. T. Kingsley, of
The Federationist editorial staff,. has
been invited to address the May Day
meeting of tho miners.
A Legislative Committee.
We now have a legislative committee.
This committee was appointed for the
purpose of dealing with any political
matters. This committee has been instructed to make a protest to the government ngninst tho enactment of bill
No. 19, which is nn attempt to deal
with nftor-tho-war problems, by shouldering the responsibilities of the state on
to tho individual. We have written to
tho attorney-general, whose bill it iB,
entering a vigorous protest, and it behooves all organizations of labor to do
likewise
Women on the Voters' List.
The Liberals in this district are vory
active in placing tho wives, of tho elect
on tho voters' list, so wo havo written
for registration forms, and wo aro going
to hustle around and endeavor to place
overy woman on the list.
Wo were also instructed to write to
the Workmen's Compensation board and
suggest to them the advisability of placing a representative in this district, io
accordance with the powers conferred
upon thom by Sec. 63 of tho Act. We
think that this district, with its large
number of mining and other industries
shduld hnve a representative, and we
have written to the board to that effect.
Thero is a continual dispute ovor the
weight of coal mined by thc miner, so
the miners have decided to put on a
check weighman, and we are asking the
inspector of weights and measures to
come up and inspect the scales in the
presence of tho check weighman, and
by so doing may minimize some of the
defects of the cursed contract system.
The "Back-hand System.
Another system that has been.inaugurated, i. e., tho back-hand system,
camo in for a great deal of abuse. Now,
tho back-hand system is a system by
which an experienced miner takes an
inexperienced man in with him, the
company paying tho back-hand a daily
wage and deducting it from the miner's
pny. By this system, a miner can exploit his fellow-man, although many of
them share up with their bnck-hand.
Another glaring fault of tho system is
this: A mnn with a miner's certificate
GET YOUR MEALS
—AT—
McLeod's
Restaurant
ROGERS'  BUILDING
476 Oranvllle Street (downstairs)
HOME COOKING
QUICK SERVICE
MODERATE
PRICES
GIVE US ATRIAL
Women's Silk
pose fust
Received
Black or white Silk Hose,
made with flne lisle and
double garter tops, reinforced toes and heels; all
sizes. Special value, $1.00
a pair.
Women's Silk Hose, with
clox, in black with white,
and white with black.
These come in a splendid
quality, with thc double
garter top; all sizes. $1.25
per pair.
Women's White Silk Hose
with black vertical lines,
double toes and heels and
with deep garter top; all
sizes.   $1,25.
Women's Novelty Silk
Hose, with fancy stripes,
in all leading shades, including sky, pink, palm
beach, battleship, canary,
silver, black and white;
all sizes.  $1.75.
Direct
oire
Knickers
FOR PRESENT WEAR
Women's     Directoire
Knickers, of fine balbriggan,  in  sky,  pink  and
black, at 75c per pair.
White at 60c per pair.
Women's Fine Mercerized
Lisle Directoire Knickers,
in white only; comes in all
sizes and out size, at $1.25.
Store. Opens at 8.30 a.m.
and closes at 6 p.m.
575 Granville "Phone Sey. 3540
PRES. HOOP REINSTATED,
BUT WILL NOT GO BAOK
Pressure of Organised Labor Compels
Government to Recede.
What some regard as tho closing incident in regard to the operations of the
Anti-registration committee, which gave
rise to such commotion at the beginning
of tho year, camo before the last meeting of the Winnipeg Trades nnd Labor
council, when tho announcement was
made that tho two suspended Letter
Carriers had been reinstated and representatives of the association thanked
tho council for the manner iu whieh it
had sustained thom. Del. W. H. Hoop
informed the council that so far as he
was concerned, the reinstatement would
not be availed of as ho wished to further enjoy the BonBo of freedom which
he had experienced during tho period of
suspension.
may be driving or doing any othor job
round the mine. Tho boss will refuse
to put him in pnrtnors with another
minor, but will hiro an inexperienced
man, who works at the face 'until ho
gotB his certificate, and thon gets a
place to himsolf. That is a system that
will have to be eliminated beforo long.
Bi-monthly Payday Wanted.
Another question that wns tnkon up
was tho bi-weekly pny. We nre asking
the management to grant this demand,
and if something is not done vory
shortly, tho men nre going to raise Cain.
They don't want any joke semi-monthly, liko Extension and Nanaimo hnve
got. Thoro is a strong suspicion, in my
mind, that it is n case of shirking on
the part of tho government, becauso one
of thoir government heelers is .a member of the men's committeo at Extension, and thore mny be somo on the
committee at Nanaimo, because the
Daily Horald, tho mouthpiece of the
Western Fuel company, eulogized Mr.
Sloan for tho fnct of tho Nanaimo mon
getting the semi-monthly pay. So if
enough island companies grant a payday that looks something like a fortnightly pay, tho government will use
that as nn oxcuso to forget. So bring
in a fortnightly pay bill.
Tho men here nre stnnding by the demands made by tho representatives of
organized labor, who interviewed tho
government some six weeks past, viz.,
payment in currency every two weoks,
with not more thnn six daya in hand,
and no fako two nnd throe-week pays.
In future, I will try to givo a report
of any happenings of interest to Labor,
and I hope to sec at least 100 Federa-
tionists coming into this camp in the
near futuro. A news lettor from here
will perhaps serve the purpose of creating an intorest in the Labor movement
■up in this part of the island.
Rossland Teamsters' Union Active.
Ono of the livest of tho smnllor unions
nt RoBBlnml is thc Teamsters' local.
Thoir meetings are well attended and,
with the assistance of tho Minors'
union, it will soon bo a 100 por cont.
organization. h
FACTS ABOUT
SHOES
Whon yu buy foreign footwear
you pay nearly 40 por cont. of tho
prico to tho customs for duty.
What's the use?
Whon you can got equally as
good, made in Canada by union
workmen. Terfoct in overy respect; fully guaranteed and savo
$2.00 to $3.00 per pair.
CLUFF SHOE CO.
649 Bastings Street West
LECKIE
SHOES
Good stout all-leather shoes.
All LECKIE SHOES are thc
same as far as quality is concerned.
There is tho neat, stylish
Shoe for tho man about
town, and tho heavy working boot for the logger, miner, farmer or city workman,
but wc never change the
quality.     *
Look for thc name LECKIE
on every pair.
AT YOUR DEALER
Made in British Columbia
mn
Aoes'
ito* * IvBCKLB
..April 20, 19
METAL TRADES ORGANIZE
Afflliated Unions Busy Drafting Blanket Agreement for Presentation.
Matters affecting tho interests of the
newly-formed Metal Trades council
wero discussed at a lengthy session
Wednesday ovening in the Labor Temple. Delegates from tho various crafts
affiliated woro presont, and the drafting
of an agreement, jointly covering nil
the affiliated unions, was drawn up for
presentation to the employers of foundries, factories, shipyards and contract
shops, all of whom will be in possession
of the agreement by Monday next. This
fedoration of interests on tho part of
the metal trades workers marks a notable advance in tho strength of the
Beparnte unions involved.
Following nre tho ollicers elected:
Prosidont, J. Donaldson, molders1; vice-
president, J. Bromfield, shipwrights; financial secretary, A. J. Crawford, sheet
metal workers; recording secretary, F.
W. Welsh, plumbers; cxec-utive commit-,
tee, J. Goodlet, shipbuilders; J. Mill-'
man, blacksmiths; E. Simpson, molders;
A, Fisher, shoot metal workers; G.
Scott, boilermnkers; F. W. Welsh, plum-
bors; J. R. Flynn, steam and oporating
engineers; machinists, to bo elected;
sergeant-at-arms, J; Strnchan, blacksmiths.
Another meeting will be held next
Wodnesday evening to complete arrangements for the enforcement of the
new schedule.
INVESTIGATION BOARD WILL
SIT MONDAY EVENING
Civic Employees' Union to Seek Restoration of Pre-war Conditions.
The-first sitting of the board of investigation, nnmed under the provisions
of tho federal Industrinl Disputes Act,
askod for by the Civic Employeos'
union, will take place Monday ovening
at 8 o'clock. Tho sessions will bo hold
nt thc court houso evenings, so that as
littlo working time will bo lost as possible. Victor R. Midgley will represent
the civic employees. Chas. Reid has
been retained to look after the city's
intorests, and Mr. Justice Murphy has
been mutually agreed upon as chnirmnn
of the board. Jns. H. McVety will
present  the  enso for  tho  Civic  Em-
Sloyees' union, assisted by Vicc-prosi-
ont Macfarlano and Secretary Harrison. Tho mon nro seeking a restoration
of pro-war working conditions, namely,
$8 for nn eight-hour dny; thoy nllego
discrimination by civic departments
against union men, nnd they want tho
principle of promotion by seniority,
other conditions being equal, adopted.
Much interest is being manifested in
the proceedings. Tho sessions are open
to tho public, nnd as thoy will be held
in the evening, it is likoly quito a numbor of local unionists will nvnil themselves of tho opportunity of witnessing
tbo proceedings.
A 10 per cent, increnso in the wages
of all workmen hns been conceded to
the Port Arthur (Ont.) Shipbuilding
company.
J. E. Wilton will spenk on "Industrinl Democrncy in Australia and New
Zealand/' at the Open Forum meeting,
Sunday, at 2.30 p.m., in O'Brien hall.
Friends of The Federationist should
go after every returned Boldier they
can locate. See that they recoivo Tbo
Federationist regularly. There IS a
reason.
SHOP AT
SLATER'S
Slater's Ayrshire Bacon, lb... 25c
Slater's Streakey Bacon, lb. 25c
Slater's value Tea, lb. 26c
Slater's value Coffee, lb 26c
We deliver to all parts.
131 Hastings St. East   Sey. 3262
830 Granville St,     Sey. 866
3214 Main Street.    Fair. 1683
WE CATER TO UNION TRADE
Kiaawjarsaigg
SHOSMHHNSa.
Morning,
Noon or
Night
you will find it a pleasure to take your meals
at the Orpheum Cafe.
A particular place for
particular people.
WE KNOW HOW
THE
Orpheum Cafe
OPEN ALL NIGHT
Opposite the Orpheum Theatre
762 ORANVILLE STREET
mmmmmmmmaammm-
"GOODWIN'S
GOOD
THE STANDARD OF VALUE AND QUALITY
Whorevor a pair of "Goodwill's Good Shoes" you will find a contented
wearer, and tlio chances lire that wherever you find a wearer of "Goodwin's Good Shoes" you will flnd a porson of good taste and good judgment—men who oan afford the better things of lifo, but insist upon an
adequate return for every dollar invested.
And—after all is Baid and done—no amount of money can buy more
than COMPLETE satisfaction.
GOODWIN SHOE CO.
HEN'S AND BOYS' ONLY
123 Hastings Street East Opp. Pantages Theatre
Paint Up
and Clean Up
Noo> we will all be as busy as humming birds wilh our painting changing and fixing.
SEE OUR SUPPLIES FOR YOUR SPRINO PAINTINO
HUNTER-HENDERSON PAINT CO.
QUALITY FIRST PAINTS
642 OranviUe Street
BRITISH COLUMBIA'S BEST
COAL
For your kitchen, Wellington nut $6.50
Kitchen, furnace and grate, Wellington lump 7.50
For Your Furnace
Comox Lump  . $7.50
Comox Nut , 6.50
Comox Pea  , 4.50
(Try our Pea Coal for your underfeed furnace)
MACB0NALO-I1ARPOLE Co.
Phone
Seymour'
ZIO
Phone
iSeumour
210
1001 MAIN STBEET
The Sign USE
SHAMROCKfBrand
Lard Butter
Ham Eggs
Bacon       Sausage
P. BURNS
Of Quality & COMPANY, LTD.
Retail Stores in All Sections of the Province
Westminster Iron Works
JOHN REID, Proprietor
GENERAL MACHINISTS AND ENGINEERS
Manufacturers of
STRUCTURAL and ORNAMENTAL
IRONWORK
Offlce and Works: Tenth Street        NEW WESTMINSTER, B. O.
Owho£ Uyovm/
JX°a"^'    (_)ord>!

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