BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

The British Columbia Federationist Jan 22, 1915

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcfed-1.0345085.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcfed-1.0345085.json
JSON-LD: bcfed-1.0345085-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcfed-1.0345085-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcfed-1.0345085-rdf.json
Turtle: bcfed-1.0345085-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcfed-1.0345085-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcfed-1.0345085-source.json
Full Text
bcfed-1.0345085-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcfed-1.0345085.ris

Full Text

Array THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
INDUSTRIAL U', J*. :  STRENGTH.
'';?:' ■■
SEVENTH/1EAR.   No! 4.
OFFICIAL PAPER: VANCOUVER TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL AND B. C. FEDERATION OF LABOR
Tancouver, b. c, Friday, January 22, i9isT
►POLITICAL UNITT: VIOTOBTI
(In Vanemver\
OUy, $1.00 )
$1.50 PER YEAR
,FIFT'> ANNUAL CONVENTION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATION OF LABOR WILL CONVENE AT NANAIMO ON MONDAY NEXT, JANUARY 25
WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION
AND THE FACTORIES ACTS
TO
BE LAID OVER TILL
NEXT SESSION
Anxiety to Shorten Present
Session Given as
Excuse
•To Be Used as Death-bed
Repentance Prior to
General Election
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA Federation of Labor, when it gathers at
Nanaimo next Monday for its
annual convention, will bo on the way
to the fifth anniversary of its first
convention, whloh was held in Vancouver, May 2, 1910. The various prelimi-
' nary steps, whieh led to the formation
of the Federation, were made during
the latter half of 1900. At that time
the industrial' aotivity of the province
was greater than it had ever beon before. Employment was plentiful, and
the membership of the unions was continually increasing, as the result of the
influx of new members and the coming of Athers from various parte of the
dominion ahd elsewhere. Among those
most interested in the constructive side
of trade union- activities, ihe idea had
been gradually growing that an effort
ahould be made to bring the various industrial organisations of workers into
closer, affiliation witn eacn other, for
the purpose of concentrating their combined effort on the work of securing
legislation in the interests of the working class.
Need of Unity Fait.
It had been felt for a long time that
the distance which separated1 the interior workers from those on the coast
had prevented that co-operation. In the
eastern part of the province were the
eoal miners, organised In the United
Mine Workers of America, and distributed among the metalliferous districts
were the quarts miners belonging to
Khe Western Federation of Miners,
loth these organisations were known to
be active and militant in their methods,
and it was felt that the effect of their
joining forces with coaat unions would
be a good thing—aa it eventually
proved to be.
Vancouver Took Initiative.
Thia opinio*, eventually crystallised
n definite aetion being taken by Vancouver Trades and Labor Council. After
i committee had gone carefully into the
natter, it was decided to circularise the
inions of the province and ascertain
vhether they were prepared to give
keir support to the plan of forming a
3. C. Federation of Labor. At the
aeetlng of the council held February
17th, 1910, It was reported that 27
inions had replied to the effect that
hey were prepared to suport the plan.
Inconsequence the committee waa initructed to issue a call for the convenient which gathered the following May
Tht Flrat Convention.
At that eonvention there were 27 accredited delegates, chiefly from anions
and trades councils of Vancouver, New
Westminster and Victoria. The two
miners' organisations came into the
Federation at a later date. The flrst
gathering waa chiefly occupied with
the formal work of drafting a constitution and arranging for the organising
work necessary to widening the scope
of the Federation.
The Second Convention at Victoria.
. Tke subsequent convention., held in
PBESJDBHT A. WATCHMAN
Who ws. eleoted st the New Wealmlniter eonvention lait January to ineceed Chrletlan
Slverti, snd wbo will preside st the Nsnslmo convention, whloh opens nut Monday.
Victoria the following January, waa
much larger. The organising effort
whloh had been made in the interim
showed in the fact that there were delegates there from as far north as Prince
Rupert, and) east as far as the Koote*
nays, Washington State Federation of
Labor sent its first fraternal delegate
that year, in the person of Charles Case,
its ex-president.
Steady Progress of Federation.
Since that time the Federation has
made steady progress In the work of
welding the unions of the province into
a composite.body for legislative upr*
poses. Like every other organisation
of lta kind it has had lta npa aad
downs, Its Internal squabbles, and suchlike transient troubles which are inevitable in a body of lta kind, where every
man is a thinking unit with ideaa of his
own. But it haa got past that, and
will always do so, for the very simple
reason that tho overwhelming economic
difficulties of the workers force them
into cooperation with each ther, and
eventually dwarf all secondary troubles
into insignificance.
Fifth Convention Next Monday.
This year'a convention will have a
tremendous taak before it to devise a
practical plan of dealing with the appalling working class conditions which
prevail all over the province. From
all that can be learned at this time of
writing the serious drain whioh haa
been made upon the financial resouces
of the unions during the paat year may.
result in some of them not being able
to send delegates. On the other hand,
while the gathering may be slightly less
numerically,, it will not be so from a
representative standpoint. Credentials
are already In from the coal minora of
the interior, alao from Bevelstoke and
other distant points, from tha Island
miners, from trades councils and numerous unions. It will probably be found
that during the year some unions have
either withdrawn or suspended their
affiliations for a time, owing to flnanclal Masons, while on the other hand
some have affiliated which have never
done so before, and lt ia likely that so
far as the number of unlona affiliated
(Continued on Page Four.)
OF
UBOR HOLDING
Executive Have Had Difficult Year Owing to
Unemployment
How to Remedy Conditions
and Plan for Future
of Federation
MISS GUTTERIDGE
AT WASHINGTON
STATE CONVENTION
MlssH. Outterldge, secretary-
treasurer of Vancouver Trades
and Labor conndl, left Vancouver
last Sunday morning for Olympia, Washington, to attend the
Wasnington State Federation of
Lahor, which met last Monday.
Miss Gutteridge went as the fraternal delegate from tha B. O.
Federation of Labor, aha being
tha unanimous selection of last
r year's convention of that body.
Interviewed by The Federatlonist just previous to leaving,
Miss Outterldge said she Intended'while in Washington, to learn
all ahe could regarding tha method! used by tha women of tha
state ln organising tha workers
of their aaz. Alio to see how tha
leglilatlon which haa been passed
thar* to protect woman workers
affects them.
The B. 0. Federation of Labor,
In lending Miss Outterldge, haa
not only chosen an exceptionally
well-informed ahd capable repre-
eentative, bnt haa reciprocated
tha aetion of the Washington
State Federation of Labor In
landing t, woman—Mrs. Ida Zeigler—aa Its fraternal delegate to
the laat convention of the B. 0.
Federation.
Mln Outterldge, although not a
delegate to the convention of the
B. o. Federation of Labor this
year, will TM over ln Nanalmo
about Tuesday next to speak
there, by arrangement with some
of tha local workera.
U.M.W.OF A.
Ll
Proposal to Purchase the
Holdings of United
States Company
JAMI8 0. WATTSB9
*ho wn elected th. flnt preildent of the B. C. Federation of Labor tn 1010, ahd re*
tired In 1911 to sooept th. presidency of the Trades and Labor congreu of Canada
at th. Calgary convention, an offlce whloh he atlll holdi.
Advance reports, received by the
Federationist thia week from Secretary*
Treasurer A. S. Wells of the B. C. Federation of Labor, Victoria, are much
more encouraging than' might reason*
ably be expected in view of general in.
dustrial conditions throughout the province. During the paat month two additional unions have affiliated with the
Federation In Victoria, while there
have been no withdrawals except the
Letter-carriers who had withdrawn juat
prior to the New Westminster convention last year. Victoria will probably
send at least a dosen delegatea to the
Nanalmo eonvention whioh opens next
Monday.
Another new affiliation ie that of the
Paper-makers' union of Powell Biver,
aa a result of the solicitation of the
manager of The Federatlonist, who
visited them a few weeks ago.
At least one delegate will be present
from Bevelstoke, from a local of only
nine members, and is as Secretary
Wells states, "the kind of spirit that
has made the working class movement.'"
Other delegates will be over from the
Interior, including two from the miners of the Crow's Nest valley coal
fields.
Secretary-treasurer Wells says: "A
splendid response has been made by the
locals in the matter of per capita tax,
for thla year, and In spite of the depression of trade there has been only
the best spirit shown to the Federation, and tne convention will be more
than a surprise to the antagonists of
the labor movement."
Vancouver, unfortunately, figures
most prominently lu the. matter of
withdrawals during the past year,
which, after all, is explainable to any
one who understands the colossal slump
which has taken place, especially In the
building trades.
Vancouver Trades and Labor council
will undoubtedly send a delegate, and
as many of tho local unions will be represented at Nanaimo next week aa
finances will permit.
There never was a time when the
Federation more urgently needed the
united support of organized labor, nor
was there ever a time when the Federation could do more for its affiliated
membership.
The present conditions cannot go on
forever. There must be a chango at no
distant date. The element of discontent rampant everywhere-must bo cashed in upon by organised labor. It is
the one factor which can bring order
out of sooial chaos. Suoh a responsibility must be faced with determination, bull-dog tenacity and confldenco
in too organized labor movement.
Let every union which can possibly
bo represented at the convention noxt
Monday send along its ablest men, mon
to whom losses mean simply that they
must begin anew,
Now, all togetherl
Every wago earner of a profit making, concern knows he is. earning moro
than he rooeives ln Wages.' His discontent in employment corresponds with
Us conception that he is resolving
short measure In wages,
To Be Sold Again at a
Profit or Operated
The United Mine Workers of America
may purchase the holdings of the
Baohe-Denman Coal company, In Hart*
ford Valley, They have offered $200,.
000 for the mines and their proposition, it is expected, will be accepted.
Under the terms of the offer, all ac*
tions growing out of the troubles between the coal company ahd miners are
to be dropped. This would Include the
dismissal of- the company's action for
$1,4110,000 damages against the United
Mine Workers of America, the local
unions in Arkansas, Oklahoma and
Texas, and the national officers, in connection with the destruction of four of
the company's surface plants at Prairie
Creek last July. It was understood
that creditors of the Bache-Denman
syndicate, ten of whose companies are
now in the hands of a federal receiver,
have approved the scheme.
It was asserted that the union intends operating the mines for the benefit of its members temporarily, and unleu they can be sold at a profit, will
continue working them on a co-operative basis.
Of the purchase price, $100,000 is to
be paid In cash, and of thia sum $60,*
000 in mortgages is to be taken care of.
in alx months and the balance in a
One-half of the remainder ia to be paid
year.
Miners' Convention Delegates.
It is expected that the following will
represent the coal miners of Vancouver
island at the B. C. Federation of Labor convention next Monday: From
Cumberland—J. Naylor, W. Smith.
District No. 28—B. Foster. Nanalmo—
J. Bobertson. Ladysmith—S. Outhrle.
South Wellington—W. Head. Jingle
Pot—J. Thompson.
CONVENTION AGENDA SHOWS
FEDERATION
ITS OWN
a. a. wells
Who waa elected secretary-treasurer of the B. C. Federation of Labor at Maw Weatmlna*
ter laat January, auoceedinx V. B. Hidgiey, and who will submit Ua aanuel report at
the Nanalmo eonvention nut Monday.
B. 0, Blectric Mu Killed
Jamea Beid, a foreman of the British
Columbia Bailway company, while
working with a gang repairing on Pender street, Vancouver, was run over
and killed by an automobile driven by
Charles 'Antensen, laet Wednesday
morning,
LETTEB-OABBDBS*   CONVENTION
THE TRADES COUNCIL
f
Small Minority of Builders'
Exchange Issued Bogus
Wage Scale
Trades and Labor Council
WiU Publish This Genuine List
FEDERATIONIST
WILL REPORT THE
CONVENTION
The Federatlonist next week
will contain a report of the convention of tha & 0. Federation
of Labor, which meets at Nasal-
mo next Monday. After tha 1913
convention, Tha Federationist
publlihed a full verbatim report
of the'dally proceedings in an 18-
page edition. Laat year the same
course waa adopted, only the edition was larger, It contained 32
pages. The reaaon thli was abbs
to be done was that lufflclent advertising was obtainable to pay
tha cost of production ud publication, This year inch a plan
la absolutely Impracticable, and
The Federatlonist will only have
lta ordinary four pages, For
that reason the report will perforce have to be mora summarised ud in the nature of "news"
report, This la to be regretted,
but overy endeavor will bo made
to report the moit Intonating
and Important of the proceedings.
With better times bigger things
could have been done, but with
the depression which prevails lt
Is absolutely impossible to do
things on tha scale of laat year
ud tho previous year.
Vancouver Builders' Exchange, a
few weeks ago, issued a scale of reduced wages for building tradesmen in
Vancouver and vicinity. The meeting
at which that action wu taken consisted of representatives of three or four
firms ana it took a week to get even
that number together. The whole thing
was really due to one firm, which-h doing C. P. B. work. They had been notified by the 0. P.'B. that the work
must be suspended. They promised the
C. P. B. that they would get all building
tradesmen's wagee reduced if the work
waa still carried on. So like the three
tailora of Tooley street, who called
themselves "we the. people of
land," this firm, and a rag-tag and
bob-tail element from one or two others, gathered together and issued a
scale of reduced wages as coming from
the Builders' Exchange.
At the last meeting of the Vancouver
Trades and Labor council a speolal committee waa appointed to compile and
tabulate a scale of recognized standard
union wages in the building trades, as
an answer to the attempt whioh had
been made to misrepresent tbat scale.
Following is the list which is to be
given the same publicity aa the list issued by the builders: Per hour.
Stonecutters   ..... $0.70
Bricklayers and masons., 76
Bricklayers' and masons' laborers 43%
Carponters and joiners      53%
.75
.50
.em
.56%
.62%
.56%
.62%
.62%
SPLENDID RESPONSE
FROM UNIONS OF
PROVINCE
Despite Adverse Conditions
Sec-Treas. Wells Reports]
Unions Should Strive to
Send Delegates to
. Convention
Eaat Proposes to Postpone Convention
ln Vucouver
Letter-carrier circles are agitated
over the proposal to postpone the biennial convention of their organization,
which should meet in Vancouver thie
year. At the laet convention, held in
Winnipeg in 1913, Vancouver waa selected as the next meeting place, However, since the war broke out, some of
the eastern locale state that they are
under financial obligations which would
make the sending of delegates to Vancouver difficult. They alao argue that,
as the federal parliament only proposes to deal with war matters as long
as the war lasts, It ia no use the letter-carriers going to the expense of
holding a convention to draft legislative proposals which the government
would not take -np.
The western locals take the view that
tha convention ihould be held as decided ui
fv-pHE AFFILIATED MEMBEBSHtP
I of the B. C. Federation of Labor
A throughout British Columbia will
be keenly disappointed to learn that
Attorney-general Bowser doee not intend to introduce his propoaed Workmen's Compensation act during tho
present session of the legislature at Vlotoria. At leaat, if introduced, it must
lay on the table until another session
takes place, which will be, by the way,
prior to the next general election. Thero
has been sufficient nubile agitation upon
thia   question to nave   warranted tho
government in placing the drafting of
the new bill in the handi
handa of a specialist.
Such a measure, to be satisfactory to
those who must work ud assume risks
under its operation, should have tht
"o. k." of tht exeouttve committee of
the B. C. Federation of Labor, and, inasmuch aa that organization haa had a
special committee working on tha meuure for tome months put, It la only
reasonable to assume that they will lie
consulted whan next tha executive
waits upon the provincial executive
council. Tho government may be trying to frame the very beet ut poeatbb.
It may not expect to please everybody.
But if it is honestly endeavoring te
meet the wishes of the workingmu ol
the province, including the loggers aal
timber workeri now barred from the
provisions of the present excuse for am
set, it will accept the practical experience and advice of B. C. F. of L.    *
>h. Theyiay that *to-do--uthem lur <-— ThrFaetortu tax." ~ " ' -****"
While on this subject of protection to
the life and limb of workingmen, it
might be just u well to mention that
there is much need for amendments to
the provisions of the Factories act.
While the inspectors are admittedly doing their duty, tbe limitations of tha
act and the powers accorded them aro
such that there is much room for improvement, Attorney-general Bowser
makes the plea that the present session
of the legislature must be a short one,
and urges that both the Workmen 'i
Compensation and the Factories acta be
laid over till next session, when he la
Srepared to go Into both of them fully,
[eantime what about tbe workers who
must do the work, run all the risks and
contribute to the long list of industrial
cuualties throughout Canada in the interim!
The Federationist, on behalf of,tht
membera of organized labor in B. 0,
realizes that Attorney-general Bowser
hu at present, a sufficient following is
the house to carry out any mandate ho
may choose to make, but surely theu
two meuures eould be given attention
at this session if there wu an honeit
desire to do so.   The preunt govern-
npol
would look like lying down just because
industrial affairs are rather dull. A
referendum vote of eaeh local Is being
taken on the question now. The vote
of each local counts as one vote be the
local large or small. Up to the present,
the only information as to how the vote
is going is, that Winnipeg bas voted to
postpone the convention. The local
letter-carriers will hold a concert February 10th to raise funds for entertaining the eonvention when it comes to
Vancouver.
TELEOBAPHEBS
Many Out of Work aad Prospects of
Still Another Out.
Local members of the Telegraphers'
union are having their own troubles.
Notwithstanding the fact that nine
members were already being cared for
by the union further reductions in the
force are in sight, and some of the boys
have about made up their minds to
"beat it." But u to a destination—
that ia the problem. Seems to be the
same everywhere. One at leut will hie
himself to a potato patch in Washington state. While the railway officials
explain that these trenchent steps .are
but "war measures" the members fear
that once a reduction is suffered there
will be some difficulty in again bringing
the old staff together, u they will necessarily scatter to the four wind! in
search of the elusive job.
ment hu conceded practically nothing,
in the way of legislation, to organized
labor for the put seven yeara, Why
then make a deathbed repentance of
legislation so admittedly essential to
the welfare of the workers of thia province*
Plasterers.
Plasterers'laborera	
Lathors	
Painters	
Plumbers and steamfitters..
Sheet-metal workers	
Structural iron workers... .
Electrical workers (inside),
Hoist engineers (according to 1
rig operated) (  .62%
Common laborers 37%
In all cases tho hours of labor are
eight per day and forty-four per week.
VOTES  OF  LABOB  CANDIDATES.
Although Not Elected a Fair Showing
Wu Made.
While tbe candidates who woro put
forward for municipal office by Vancouver Trades and Labor council did
not succeed in being elected they made
a very fair showing for a first attempt.
W. Dalron, the candidate in wnrd »ix,
polled 537 votes. Tbe numbers polled
by tho two elected candidates in that
ward were 1,278 and 1,206, In ward
four, B. B. Bailey, tho candidate of
the council, secured 327 votes. The
two elected candidates received 003 and
901 respectively.
In Point Orey, J. E. Wilton polled M
votes in ward one, ho being next to the
successful candidato in respect of votes
polled, the elected man getting 104.
"LnsTFrlday 's meeting of the Civic
Employees Vunion decided to again
place a business ngotit in the field to
further build up tho organization. For
the office, John Sully, wbo has done
such ofilclent work In that capacity in
the post, was choson, and took up his
duties last Monday morning.
0HBI8TIAK BIVEBTZ
Who wu eleoted preildent of the ». 0. Mention ol Ubor at Vlotoria In Jannarr. '11.
belnf ineoeeded hr Preildent Watohmau one rear a|o thla month. PAGE TWO
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
FBIDAT .JANUARY 22, If Iff '
MOLSONS
BANK
Capital uid Reserve.   -   18,800,000
85 Branchea la Canada
A general  banking  buBlnoBB  transacted
Savings Department
Interest  allowed at highest
Current Bate
EAST END BRANCH
160 Hastings Street Bait
A. W. Jarvli, Manager.
The Royal Bank
of Canada
INCORPORATED 1MI
. | 11,500,00
It-HOtM
Paid-up Capital
Rutrva	
Total Aueta • •
WE ALLOW INTEREST ON DEPOSITS IN OUR
SAVINGS
DEPARTMENT
Ont Dollar will, open
tht aoeount, and your
butlnau will bt wel-
oome bt It lirgt tr
amall
FOURTEEN BRANCHES IN
VANCOUVER
THE
INCORPORATED
1155
BANK OF
TORONTO
.   ....$11,000,000
Deposits.. .. ..$11,000,000
Joint
Savings
Accounts
A Savings Account In th* names ot
two or more individuals frequently
possesses element! of oonslderabl*
convenience. In an account o! tbla
nature funds mey lie deposited or
withdrawn at will by either party
to the account, on hli or her,Individ-
ttftl atfnature. lntereat li added to
balances half-yearly.
446 HABTINOS STBBBT WEST
and
Corner Hutlngi and OarraU Sta,
British Columbia
LAND
Spleudid opportunities In Uixed
Farming, Dairying, Stook and
Poultry. British Columbia
Oranta Pre-emptions of 160 acres
to Actual Settlers—
THE B. C. FEDERATIONIST
Published every Friday morning by tho
B. C. Federation Iat, Ltd.
R. Para Pettlplec Manager
J. W. Wilkinson Editor
Directors:   Jaa.    Campbell,    preeldent;    J.
H. MoVety,    secretary-treasurer;    H.
Gibb; G. J. Kelly; R. P. Pettipiece
Offlce: Room 217, Labor Templo
Tol. Exchange Sey. 7498.
Subscription: |1.50 per year; In Vancouver
City, |2.00; to unions subscribing
In a body, $1.00
'^^^'^^BpJSsOTATVEs" ~^ ~""S"
New Weatminiter.. .W. B. Maiden, Bos 984
Prince Rupert W. £. Denning, Box 581
Victoria A. S. Weils, Box 15S8
Affiliated with the Western Labor Preia
Association.
"Unity of Labor; the hope of the world.1
FRIDAY JANUARY 22, 1915
THE CONVENTION of the B. O.
Federation of Labor, which will
convene in Nanaimo next Monday, will have to deal with a more difficult problem than has confronted any
previous    annual
THE FIFTH
ANNUAL
CONVENTION.
Free
TERMS—Residence on the land
for at leaat three years; Improvements to tho extent of tt per
tore; bringing under cultivation
at leaat Ave acres.
For further Information apply to
DEPUTY IdRISTBE Of
LANDS, VIOTOBIA, B.O.
SEORBTART, BUBEAU OT
PROVINCIAL INFORMATION,
VIOTOBIA, B.O.
gathering of tbat
body. The gravity
of the working
class situation
throughout the province is without precedent. Unemployment has reduced thousands of the
workers to destitution and want,, and
to the point where every cent in the
family purse must be looked upon aa
the last desperate margin between them
and actual starvation. All those who
have been in tho labor movement any
.length of time know that suoh .conditions have an adverse effect upon tho
numerical strength of the membership.
It ciwiot be otherwise. And even
though it may not be pleasant to have
to swallow the fact, yet nothing is to be
gained by ignoring it. It means a reduction of finances, and of the resisting
power of the movement against the
economic iniquities which it is attempting to abolish.
• e e e
It has come at a particularly unsuitable time in British Columbia, for never
before was there more dire need of a
solidly organised labor movement with
ample funds to push forward its propaganda. Bight at thiB very moment,
some of the more important legislation
which the Federation has been striving
for during the past four years is in the
balance. And unless the working class
are alive to the position, that legislation may be pigeon-holed indefinitely by
politicians who know no law but the necessity of votes. The debates of the
convention will servo to make that
plain, and to emphasize, the serious necessity of making every effort to bring
the movement successfully through this
time of stress. The presence there, of
delegates from all parte, even though
they may be a little reduced in numbers
compared with previous years, will
shew that hard though times are, the
workers throughout the province are determined that, insofar as sacrifice and
sincerity can avail, they are prepared
to put forth their utmost effort to eon
tlnue thia work of the movement.
the way he walked into the social democrats in Cobalt, when they wrote protesting against a drill hall being erected in their midst for the purpose, as
they believed, of housing militia to protect strike-breaking miners,.   Part of
his letter, in reply, ran as follows:
"Sir: A copy of your manifesto,
attached to letter from you, haB
reached me.   There'is nothing new
in the manifesto.   It ia brimful of
the usual slop and the silly vapor*
ings of minds ill-formed   in   the
problem of human government. The
idea of an institution whose practices are .by many   regarded   aB
thoso of the thug the aasasBin, the
mid-night    murderer,    the   hedge
persecutor of innocent women and
children, the destroyer of   homes
and business industries talking of
'humanity' and 'progress' and deploring    'bloodshed'    would    bo
laughable, were it not so sSKous."
From all of which it would appear
that Sam is quite a sweet and amiable
youth when occasion requires,
e       •       •       •
If such an account of his official manner was an isolated one, it might be
reasonable to assume that just at the
particular time he was badly upset
about something. But there seems good
reason to believe that in hia official
dealings with those who differ from
him, he is consistently discourteous. In
the parliamentary report of J. 0.
Watters, president of tho Trades and
Labor Congress of Canada, appears the
following:
Throughout the session I have
had many courtesies extended to
me by both cabinet ministers and
private members. I have also been
the recipient of the most courteous
treatment from the officials of the
different departments when attending to the duties associated with
my position. In one instance, only,
tho common courtesy of a reply
to a letter was not extended to me,
but when it is known to whom I
am indebted for thia act, characteristic of an ill-bred, Ignorant person, or a person with a peculiarly
balanced mentality, the Minister
of Militia, there ia no occasion for
surprise.
Evidently, Sam is quite a Kaiser in
his way, and the thought arises as to
how much be would differ in hla methods from that militarist monomaniac,
if ho had things all his own way.
IN THE
AT LAST
THE WAB
LOBDOF
CANADA.
MAJOR-OEN. SAH HUGHES,
federal minister of Minister of
Militia, will likely be with us
by the time this appeara in print, or at
leaat sometime around then. We do
not know all he will
do when he geta
here, but we do
know one thing he
will do. He will
talk far more than
men who are proficient in his profession talk. Such men are noted the
world over for their alienee. But Sam
will talk. Ho cannot help it. He talked
at Winnipeg last Monday when he said
that the war was one for the liberty of
all the nations engaged—including the
Germans. Time waa when Sam spoke
differently of war, for like all politicians he has a chameleon-like aptitude
for changing himself to suit the circumstances of the moment. On one
occasion he blurted out the truth,
which must have surprised even himself. Speaking at Farnham, Quebec, in
1913, he said:
We all know that war is made by
capitalists, and by certain financiers   who   manipulate the atock
market.   War   is   engineered   by
them and the poor soldier has to
step in and do the work,
But that Uttle episode seems to have
been the flrst and last of its kind.
•       e       e       e
Ever since then Sam has been very
severe on anti-militarists and all their
works. We believe it was In the Federal parliament where he said that drill
halls were of far more value to the
youth of Canada, and the country ln
general, than technical schools. But
that was milk and honey compared to
THE IDEAL
LABOB
PAPER.
THE HIGHEST
SAFE INCOME
For the purpose of the great majority of Investors the best
investment is the safe investment with the highest Income.
Investors aeeking safety, together with an attractive interest yield should investigate the merits of B. O. Municipal
Bonds, which, yield from 6% to 7%, and the security is unquestioned.
Canadian Financiers Trust Company
HEM) OFFICE 839 HASTINGS ST. W.     VANCOUVER. B.C.
Patrick Donnelly- General Mana<er
THE BOY SCOUT movement never
had any illusions except for
those who were either too indifferent, or ill-equipped mentally, to be
able to see the real meaning which lay
beneath the official
description of the
movement's objects. Time after
time, In answer to
criticisms branding
it as a cunning plan to mold the minds
of boys to the military ideal, official
statements have been issued that no
such object was Bought. And on the
strength of thoso statements, many
parents who could not see through the
lie, allowed their boys to join the
movement for the sake of the benefit
to be derived from the physical and social aide of It.
.      t      .      •
Since the war commenced, all that
was ever said about the military intention of those who fathered the Boy
Scout movement, hen been justified.
Boy scouts in every ono of the countries at war, are now engaged by the
thousand in military duties of one kind
or another, and with the official recognition and approval of the various governments. The labor movement never
expected anything else and said ao, often and plainly, with results which are
too well-known to need recital. Tho
main thing, now that the real objects
of the Boy Scout idea are laid bare, is
to bring parents to realise that it is,
at the bottom, a plan to produce cannon
food for future wars.
with the recognized policy of the
labor movement.   That is no miracle that cannot be performed. But
no paper can exist that is not sup*
ported financially.   My ideal of a
labor paper a "dream," probably,
iB a publication so flnunced by our
movement that It does not need to
be dependent upon secular advertising for its support.   That may
be a long way in the future, but
right now we  can immensely increase the power unci influence of
our movement if we support as we
should     our    labor   publications.
"Men shall know the truth and
truth shall make men free."
Every word of that is solid truth, deserving the serious thought and attention of all members of organized labor.
Summed up In a phrase, It Is a reiteration of the well-known fact that If you
want a thing done the best way to get
it done is to do it yourself.   The best
and most effective labor paper is that
which does not have to seek sources of
finance outside the movement to whose
Interests it Is devoted.
THE LABOB PRESS, has a problem all its own, tbe problem of
paying printers' bills and other
expenses of production and publication. The finance to discharge these obligations can only
come from two possible sources. Either
the labor movement
must bear the entire cost, or it must
bo derived wholly or In part from advertising. That The Foderatlonist is
not the only labor paper to realize this
difficulty, is apparent from the report
of Presidont E. P. Marsh, of the Washington State Federation of Labor, and
made to that body at its convention
last Monday.   He says:
It la our solemn duty to make of
that press a great educational power by giving it our united support.
There ia no class of men ln the
labor movement who labor so tirelessly and devotedly for the betterment of mankind than the labor editors. The great majority of thom
barely make ends meet, due large*
ly to a lack of support from the
rank and flle ot labor. We do not
like the editor's views on politics
or his views on Industrial tactics
and ao we refuse to subscribe I We
pay six dollars a year for a dally
paper which never protends to give
expression to tbe economic views
of labor, but we grudge one dollar
a year to our own organ. We have
It In our power to shape the policy
of our labor press exactly as we
have it in our power to shape the
polloy of our labor movement. We
must pay more attention to building up our labor publications. The
policy of a labor publication becomes the province of a Board of
Control to work out In accordance
THEBE IS ONE newspaper, published in San Franolsco, whose
dally   comment   upon   current
and philosophlo issues we alwaya follow with keen interest.  It haa a vigor,
ous    and    healthy
BUSINESS <rlu,dor •" itf 0WB-
in a city where the
WAB AND prem j, not part,c,
NEUTRALITY      u-ariy     eonaplooua
for   its inclination
or capaoity to deal with serious matters
In a fundamental way.   We refer to
the Bulletin, which haa   a   knack of
pricking the bubble of humbug in s
way whioh, at times, muit be distinct
ly bad for the bubble.  Dealing recent*
ly with tho question of the neutrality
of non-belligerent, nations, it goea to
the very eon of the bualneaa thus:
"It ia not neutral to build  a
wholo ship for a belligerent nation,
unless tho ship is a submarine, in
which case there is some, but not
much, doubt In your favor.   It ia
not neutral to enlist soldiers in a
neutral nation for an attack upon
a belligerent.   But it ia quite neutral to manufacture for tho use of
belligerents anna, ammunition, explosives and othor war parapher-
' nalia whieh are worth more than
soldiers.   It is not neutral to discuss the Issues of the war in public, but it ia entirely neutral to do
all you oan, within those restrictions, to help the nation or natlona
which can pay you beat for your
help.   Tou mustn't stir ono hairbreadth off the dead line of neutrality, even if you think the whole
fate of the world is at stake, unless
you think you oan clean up some
dividends by doing so, and then it is
perfectly ethical'for you to go as
far aa you think is safe." .
That covers—or -perhaps it would! ba
more correct to say uncovers—the way
in which the lawa of neutrality have
been devised by tho commercial interests of the various-nations, while'they
were still at military peace with each
other. Men may be killed by the tens
of thousands, women and ohlldren made
widows and fatherless, starvation ruin
and destitution miy overwhelm tho
common people, but the profits of capital must not be disturbed.
A. A. BROOKHOUSE
Who is receiving the congratulations of hia
numerous friends upon his being returned
as School Trustee for the Municipality of
Burnaby last Saturday. He ran second in
a field of five aspirants, and was eleoted
for two years, Mr. Brookhouse is a mem-
her of the Typographical union and a
former delegate to the Vanoouver Trades
and Labor council.
Premier Slfton, of Alberta, has an*
nounced that his government will grant
(15,000 to the cities of Edmonton and
Calgary, and (0,000 to the cities of
Lethbrldge and Medicine Hat, for the
purpose of assisting the unemployed
during January, February and March.
At the coming session of the B. C. Leg*
Islature, Premier McBride will meet
the situation In this province by advising the starving and destitute to
"have courage and confidence," and
to "comfort themselves with calm
dignity."
'Mid the slaughter of thousands, and
the rampant raging ruin of the war,
tho armament business goes on as merrily as ever. The "Nation" compares
the price of'the shares of four representative firms when the war broke
out, with the price to-day, as follows:
Present
. July 30
i   s. d.
Birmingham    Small
Arms 2   2   0
J. Brown 16   6
Cammell, Laird.   ..4   0   0
Kynoehs 7 10   0
time
2 12
1   7
4 15
14   5
A news item says:
"The hills around Nazareth are
said   to   have been fortified and,
roads suitable for the transport of
heavy guns are being constructed
from Acra to Mount Carmel."
It appears the Turks are afraid the
Allies may attack Palestine.   In case
that course is decided upon, it would
seem entirely appropriate to form the
expeditionary foroe of militarist parsons.   It would be a good way of rid.
ding us of such an abomination, and
they   and   their Mohammedan prototypes could go at it to their hearts'
content, with, let ua hope, victory for
both sides.
"The Publlo" sees it this way:
The Tsar is said to have   ex-  '
pressed a determination "to sacrifice his last mujlk" in order   to
capture Berlin.  He. only draws the
line, apparently, at sacrificing himself and other membera of Bussla's
predatory classes.   But that is the
spirit of all who make war.   Europe would be at,peace to-day had
there been a requirement that in
case of war no peasant soldiers be
put on the firing line while the supply of Romanoffs, Hapsburgs and
Hohenzollerns held out.
But why not include armament manufacturers and those responsible for the
schemlngs of secret diplomacy in "the
first contingent!"
Victoria Times in a resume of labor
matters in that city during the part
year says: ;
The year haa paaaed without any
serious labor trouble here, and tho
general feeling la that the unlona
will assume a more normal condition now that thoir unnatural alao
haa been reduced to include only
those who have a stake in tho
community, and that they will not
hurry Into advanced courses without calculating the effects of their
actions.
In other words, now that hunger asd
destitution hang aa a threat over the
heads of Victoria workers, they an
foroed to swallow many things, which
self-respect would lose not a moment in
rejecting if it were not for the need
of dally bread which knows no answer
but bread.
Doctor—"I have to report, sir, that
you are the father of triplets."
Politician-"Imposslblel I'll demand
a recount."
The education department of the
Manitoba government has bought 2,500
copies of the government blue book
containing the official explanation of
the present war, so that a. copy can be
placed in every school throughout the
province. Teachers are to instruct the
children from tho book, It is to be
hoped that parents will be found to insist on withdrawing their children during the time such instruction is being
given, in the same way they would if
the Manitoba government started giving sectarian religious Instruction. The
blue book is one chapter of the dirty
story of European diplomatic scheming.
The similar publications of the other
nations are the other' chapters. The
children at least ought, to be given a
chance to redeem the present generation in the eyes of posterity. ,
PBOVINOIAL UNIONS
B. C. FEDERATION OP LABOR—
Meets ln annua] convention ln January. Executive officers, 1914-15: President, A, Watchman; vice-presidents, W.
F. Dunn, Jas. H. McVety. a. H. Fraser,
J. W. Grajr, H. Knudson, J. J. Taylor, B
Simmons. Secretary-treaaurer, A. S.
Wells, Box 1688, Victoria, B. cl
NtW WI8TMIN8TW, B.C.
NEW WESTMINSTER TRADES AND LABOR Council—Meets every seeond and
iourth Wednesday at 8 p. m. in Labor hall,
Preaident, H. Knudson; flnanolal seoretary,
R. A. Stoney: general secretary, W. E.
Maiden. P. O. Box 994. The public is in*
vlted to attend.   .
PLUMBERS AND STEAMFITTEBS' LOOAL
No. 495—Meets every aecond aad fourth
Friday of month in Labor hall. 7:90 p. m.
President,   D.  Webster:  seoretary,  A.  llo*
Laren.    P. O. Box 959, New Westmlnater,
VICTORIA, a. C.
VICTORIA TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL—Meets flrat and third Wednesday,
Labor hall, 781 Johnston atreet; at 9 p. m.
President A. S. Walls; saoretary, Thos. 9.
Mathlson, Box 909, Victoria, B, 0.
KIHBERLET MINERS' ONION, NO. 100J
Western Federation of Minera—Meeta
Sundsy evenlnga ln Union hall. President.
Alex. Wilson; aeeretary-treeaurer, 3. W.
Stewart, Klmberley, B, 0.
TRAD! UNION  DIRECTORY
Allied Printing Trades Council—R. H. Nee*
lands, Box 66.
Bakers—J.   Blaok,   Room   110,   Labor
Temple.
Barbers—S, H. Great, 589 Qsorgla etreet.
Bartenders—Oeo.   W.   Curnocn,   Koom
101, Labor Temple.
Blacksmiths — Malcolm    Porter,    View
Hill P. 0.
Bookbinders.
Boilermakers—A. Fraser, 1111 Howe Ht
Brewery   Workers—Frank   Graham,  Labor
Tempi"
BricklV
Temple.
. .hlayei
. 215, tabor Temple.
-William a. Dagnall, Room
At the outbreak of tha European war
it waa freely predicted that the cause
of true democracy would be set back
a full twenty years or more. It la now
said that the apostles of the civilization to come who were drafted into the
army are finding more willing listeners
in the trenches at the battle front than
they ever had before. The horrible re*
alities of war have converted aome of
the enlisted workingmen into eager
students of the varloua economic croeda
listed under the generic term of socialism. 'Twas over thua. Suffering and
sorrow are great educators. Tho aver
ago man is mentally too indolent to dig
beneath the surface for tho causes of
tho economlo ills which afflict us. It is
only when he geta down In the bread
line or near to it that he begina to see
the true inwardness of things.
CHILD'S VIEW OF THE WAB
The following essay on the war was
written by a girl of nine years in a
Cheshire elementary school:
"The war ia a terrible thing. The
Germans have sunk six of our Britlah
ships. My brother is a soldier and my
mamma cries every night about him
because she says he is her only son. I
wish I waB a man, I would go to the
Germans and aak them not to fight my
brother because my mamma' wants him
to come home again. My sister does
not like the war she is always saying
it la not an honest war, and my dada *
alwaya teasing her. She goes with
boy that is a Socialist, and my dada
says Socialist people are peace. I
think the war will soon be over, and
when Father Christmas comes I am going to ask him to bring me my brother
home, because I would rather have him
than any toys, I say a prayer every
night for the soldiers In the battle. I
saw a lot of Belgium soldiers yesterday
when I waa coming to achool. They
had their arms in a sling, and one had
only one foot. I don't know anything
else."
TBTST.
I am waiting here for you,
Every drop of blood
That pulses thru my heart
Is a flaming torch to light your way-
Lover lad, with- your Irish eyes,
How well I know'just what you'll do,
Still—I am waiting here for you.
■UIINIM AOINT  DIRECTORY
for labor Temple  'Phene Exehaais,
lojmear .7495   (unless otherwise stated).
Bartenders—Room 908; Oeo. W. Ounoek.
Bricklayers—Boom 915; Wm. 8. Dagnall.
Cooks,    Walters,    Waitresses—Room    908;
Andy Graham; phone Sey. 8414.
Electrical Workers (outside)—Room 907; I.
H. Morrison.
Electrical Workers (Inside)—Room 907; F.
L. Bstlaahaasea.
Engineers (steam)—Room 910; X. Praetor-
Longshoremen's Association —
Alexander street; F. Payne;
0959.
OBc,   145
phone   Sey.
Moving Picture Operators—0. R. Hamilton
room 100, Loo building    '       " " "*"
Musicians—H., 3. Braaflel
Lsbor Temple.
Street Railway Employeea—Fred. A. Hoover;
phone Bey. 609.
Tjjpographlcal—Roomi 911*19*14; R. H. Bee-
Bey. 9046'.
s 904*605,
Brotherhood of Carpentera District Council—F. L. Barratt, Boom 109, Labor Temple.
Hod Carriers, Builder* and Common Laborers—George Harrison, Boom 190, Labor Temple.
Cigarmakers—Care Hurts Cigar Faotory, 72
water Street.
Cooks. Waiters, Waltreaeea—Andy Graham,
Room 906, Labor Temple.
Electrical workers (outside)—!. H. Morrison, Room 107, Labor Temple.
Electrical Workers (inside)—Room<107; P.
L. Eatlnghausen.
Engineers—E. Prendergaat, Room 110, La*
bor Temple.
Granite Cutters—Edward Hurry, Columbia Hotel.
Garment Workers—Lsbor Temple.
Horseshoers — AC. MaeArthur, City
Heights, B.C.
Letterearrlera—Robt.  Wight,  District 11.
Lathers—Victor R. Mldgley, Leber Temple.
Locomotive Firemen and Engineers—0. Howard, 607 Davie street.
Loco. Engineer"—A, E. Bolloway, 1999
Pacific.   Tel. Sey. I671L.
Lonrshoremen—Geo. Thomaa, 149 Alexander Btreet    -
Machinists—J, H. MoVety, Room 211,
Labor Temple.
Musicians—H. J. Brasfleld, Rooms 604*905,
Labor Temple.
Marbleworkers—Freak Hall, Janes Road,
B. 0.
Molders.
Moving Ploture Operators—L. B. flood-
man,, Room 100, Loo Bulldlni
Palntera—J.   Train,   "*
Temple.
Plumbers—Room 208, Labor Temple.
Pressmen—P. D. Edward, Labor Temple.
Plasterers—John Jamee Cornleh, 1809
Eleventh Ave. Eaat
Pattern Makers—J. Campbell, 4)09 Argyle Street.
Quarry Workers—Jamea Hepburn, care
Columbia Hotel,
Railway Conductors—O. W. Hatch, 761
Beatty street
Railroad Trainmen—A.   B.
Box 248.    .
Railway Carmen—A Robb.
Street..
Seamen's Union.
Structural Iron Workers—Room 208, Labor
Temple.
Stonecutters—James . Rayburn, P. 0. Box
1047.
Sheet Metal Workers—M. C. Dougan, MO.
6, Fifteenth Ave. Weet.
Street Railway Employees—A. V. Lofting, 201) Trinity Btreet •
Stereotypers—W. Bayley, care Provinoe,
City.
Telegraphers—BJ. B. Peppln, Box 421
Tradee and Labor Counoll—Oeo. Bartley,
Room 210 Labor Temple,
Typographical—H. Neelanda, Box )).
Tailors—C. McDonald, Box 568.
Theatrical Stage Employees—Geo. W. Allln,
Box 711.
Tllelayers and Helpers—Evan Thomaa,
Labor Temple.
lii
Room   802,   Labor
MoCorvllle,
410  Nelson
T. B. OOTHBBRTSON is Oo.
Men's Hatters and Outfitters
Three Storei
VANCOUVER UNIONS
TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL —
Meeta flrst and third Thursdays. Exe- j
eutive board: Jas. H. MoVety, preaident; -
Frank Estlnghauser, vice-president; Geo.
Bartley, general seoretary, 210 Labor (
Temple; Miss H. Outterldge, treasurer;
Fred A. Hoover, statistician; sergeant- -
at-arrna, John Sully; O. Curnock, F.,
Knowles, W. R. Trotter, trustees, I
LABOR TEMPLE COMPANY, LTD.— ;
Directors: Fred. A, Hoover, J. VH.
McVety, James Brown, Edward Lothian,
James Campbell, J. W. Wilkinson, R. P. I
Pettlplece, Geo. Wllby, W. J. Nagle, F.J
Blumberg, H. H. Free. Managing Director,!
J. H. MoVety, Boom 211, '
ALLIED   PRINTING  TRADES    COUN-1
CIL.—Meets second Monday in tbe
month.    President,  Geo.   Mowat;  secretary, R. H. Neelanda, P. 0. Box 66.
BAKERS'
AND CONFECTIONERS' LOOAL:
No. 40—Meets second and
fourth Saturdaya at 7:80
p. m. Preaident, H. G. Leeworthy; corresponding l
retary, R. J. Adams; basi-1
BARTENDERS' LOCAL No. «7e.--OF-1
floe, Room SOS Labor Temple. Meeta
first Sunday of eaeh month. Preeldent. I
P. F. Lavlgne; flnanolal seoretary, Geo. I
W. Curnock, Room 80S, Labor Temple.
BRICKLAYERS' AND MASONS', NO. 1
—Meets every 1st and Srd Tuesday,
8 p.m., Room 307. President, Jamea
Haslett: corresponding aeoretary, W, 8.
Dagnall, Box 68; flnanolal secretary. F.
R.TJl*own- buslr    ~"   "
nail, Room 216.
BROTHERHOOD OF BOILER MAKERS
and Iron Sblp Builders snd Helpers
of America, Vancouver Lodge No. 101—
MeeU flret and third Mondays, • p. m.
Preeldent, t. Barclay, 868 Cordova East;
secretary, A. Fraier, 1161 Howe street,
COOKS, WAITERS AHD WAITRESSES
Union—Meete flret Friday in eaoh
month, 8:80 p. in., Labor Temple. A. Ore*
bam, buiineu representative, Offloe: Room1
S08, Labor Temple, Houra; 8:80 a. m. to
10; 3 and 6 p. m. to 8:80, Competent help
famished on short notice.   Phone Bey. 8414. J
DISTRICT COUNCIL OF CARPENTERS
meeta Jn room 809, Labor Temple, seeond and foorth Thursday ef eaeh month. I
p. m. President, 0. S. Hardy: secretary,
F. L. Barratt; treasurer, W. T. Taylor. Lo*
ea) No. 817 meets flnt and third Monday bf each month, and Loesl 8647 w
flret and third Tuesday of each month.
ELECTRICAL WORKERS, LOCAL NO. 811
—Meets room 801, Lsbor Temple, every
Monday, 8 p. m. Preeldent, Dave Flnkj
viee-pres ldent, M. Sander; recording see*
retary, Roy Elgar, Labor Temple; financial
eecretary and business agent, E. H. Morrison,
room 807, Labor Temple,
ELECTRICAL WORKERS,  LOCAL NO.
881 (Inside Men)—Meets flnt and
third Mondays of each month; Room 206,
I p. m. President, H. R, Van Sickle; recording aeoretary. J. M. Campbell; busl-
ness agent, F. L. Estinghausen, Room 107. |
HODOARRISRB, BUILDING AND COMMOn
Laborers' onion. No, 06—Meete flrst andl
third Friday of each i "■   " '     "
Oeorg-i
i month, Ubor Temple.]
i Gibson; -■—  **---— ■
president, Qeorge Gibson; secretary, Oeorge j
Harrison, room MO, Labor Temple. All lair J
orera Invited to meeting. i
MACHINISTS. NO. US—MEETS SKOONOJ
and fourth Frldya at 8 p. m,   President-!
A.   R,    Tovler;    recording    secreUry.    J.I
Brookes; financial secretary, J. H. McVety. |
MUSICIANS'    MUTUAL    PROTECTIVE
Union, Local No. 146, A. F. of M.-I
Meeta seoond Sunday   of   eaoh monthj
80S Lsbor Temple.^ Preeldent,  J.  Bev—*■
vice-president,
■field;    tn
Seymour 7406.
Engllshf'seeretary, KjJI
" -    ---•        ph0BJ
OPERATIVE PLASTERERS' INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION. No, 10 -
MeeU every flrat snd third Wedaaida]
In the month in room SOI, Labor Temple
Preaident, A. Horry; eoivespondlng aeoretary
F, Sumpter, 1880 Twenty-third avenae east]
lial secretary, D.Jaeott,  677 Rlebardi
secretary,
itreet; treasnrer.   L.
Scott, 677 Rtebardil
Tyson.	
PAINTERS',, PAPERHANGERS'. ANlfl
Decorators', Looal 188—Meets even!
Thursday, 7.80 p.m. President, H. Grand!
flnanclal aeoretary, J. Freckleton, 10!ff
Comox street; recording seoretary, f
Dowding, 6IS Howe street. BuslneL__
agent, Jamas Train, Room 803, Labofl
Temple.
PATTERN MAKERS* LEAGUE orf
NORTH AMERICA.—Vancouver anl
vicinity. Branoh meets 1st and 3rd Fri-l
days at Labor Tenfple, room S06. Roberfl
C. Sampson, Pres., 747 Dunlevy Ave.f
Jos. G. Lyon, flnanclal seoretary, l73i
Grant street; J. Campbell, according sec]
retary, 4S69 Argyle atreet.
SYNOPSIS  OP  COAL   MINING   RKQU-
LATIONS
Coal mining rlghta of the Dominion,
ln Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,
the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Territories and In a portion of the Provinoe
of British Columbia, may be leaaed for
a term of twenty-one yeara at an annual
rental of $1 an acre. Net more than
8,660 sores will be leaaed to one applicant.
Applications for lease must be made by
the applicant In person to the Agent or
Sub-Agent of the dlstriot In whloh the
rlghta applied for are situated.
n surveyed territory the land muat be
described by lections, or legal subdivisions of notions, and In unsurveyed territory the traot applied for shall be
staked by the applicant himself.
Eaoh application muat be accompanied
by a fee of IS, whloh will be refunded tf
the rlghta applied for are not available,
but not otherwise. A. royalty shall be
paid on the merchantable output of ths
mine at the rate of Ave cents per ton.
The person operating the mine shall
furnish tha Agent with sworn returns
accounting for the full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay the royalty thereon.. If the ooal mining rights
are not being operated, saeh returns
should be furnished at least once a year.
The lease will Include the coal mining
rlghta only, but the leasee may be permitted to purchase whatever available
surface rights may be considered necessary for the working of the mine at the
rate of 110 an acre.
For full Information application ahould
ba made to the Secretary of tha Department of ths Interior, Ottawa, or to any
Agent or Bub-Agent of Dominion Lands,
W. H. CORT,
Deputy Minister of the Interior,
N. B.-Unauthorlsed	
advertisement will not
publication of this
be paid for-SOSM.
STEREOTYPERS' AND ELECTROTYP-
era' Union, No. 18, of Vancouver i
Vlotoria—Meeta seoond Wednesday «
each month, 4 p. m„ Labor Temple. President, Chaa. Bayley; recording secretary!
A. Birnle, o.o, '*Ncws Advertiser." 1
STREET AND ELECTRIC RAILWAY KM
PLOYEES, Pioneer Division, No. 101-
MeeU Labor Temple flnt and third Wed
days at 8:80 and 8 p. m, Pretident, <...
Hubble; recording seoretary, Jas. E. Griffin
financial aeerstary and business agent,
A. Hoover, 3400 Clark Drive.
STEAM  ENGINEERS,   INTBRNATIOnI
al Local 897—Meeta every Wednesday
I p. m„ room S04, Labor Temple. Flnan-T
clal secretary, E. Prendergaat, room Sit, f
TAILORS'   INDUSTRIAL   UNION   (INJJ
ternatlonal). Local No. 178—Meetlni
held fljrst Tuesday ln each month, 8 p. n_
President, Miss H. Gutteridge; recording
seoretary, a MoDonald. Box NS;  tr
clal sec., ___ Paterson, P. O. Box 603.
THEATRICAL STAGE EMPLOYEES, LO-I
CAL No. 118—MeeU seeond Sunday ell
eaoh month at room 304, Labor Temple.1
President, H. Spears; recording secreUry,!
Geo. W. Allln, P. 0. Boa 711, Vancouver.
TYPOGRAPHICAL    UNION,    NO.    886-
MeeU last Bondsj tf eseh month st L_
S. m. President, R. P. Pettlplece f vlee-prsstdj
ent, W. S. Metsgeri sssrstary-treasarsr, B.I
H. Neelaads, P. 0. Bos OS. J
Taks that Watoh to Appleby, SOS
Vender Weat, Cor. Pender and
Richards, for ttlgh-daas watch,
olock and jewellery repairs. All
cleaning and mainsprings Joba
guaranteed for IS months.
J0p9____m__m
Union
MADE
Dew
Or America    _    ,
anam «w9i __i «u*m»io na \
ELECTRIC
HOUSEHOLD
APPLIANCES
CONVENIENT TO USE
are AND
CHEAP TO OPERATE
Cost ot Current for Mott Popular Appliances
COFFEE PERCOLATOR
1 Cent for sufficient eoltaa for an
ordinary family.
ELECTRIC TOASTER
1 to 2 Oenta provides toaat for
the family breakfast,
ELECTRIC GRILLS
1 to 2 Cents according to amount
of cooking.
ELECTRIC IRON
1 to 5 Oenta per hour.
Cost out of all proportion to convenience afforded.
ELECTRIC WASHER
8 Cents per hour.    Actual oost
varies according to amount of
washing.
.    CHAriNO DISS
I to 2 Cents covers oost for social evening calls.
Cstisll aad
Hsilinp Slnet
B.C. ELECTRIC
113S GiaavUl. Si.
Nssi Dsria BIDAT JANUARY 22, IMS
THE BRITISH OOLU.MKIA FEDERATIONIST.
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.  '
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
Stanfield's Underwear at
Reduced Prices at Spencer's
i Bine label—Heavy weight, cream ribbed.    Beg.  I1.7S
garment,    Sale..    11.29
Stanfield's Natural Wool—Light weight, elastic rib.   Reg. |1.26 a
garment.    Sals pries  95c
Combinations....    91.90
Stanfield's Natural Wool—Medium weight and soft finish.   Bsgalar
S1.60 s garment.   Sale pries        $1.10
ombinauons 98.30
Stanfield's Natural Wool—Heavy weight, double breasted.   Beg. 91.76
a garment for ,.  91.20
Combinations, a ault      $2.68
SUnflsld's Silk and Wool—Cream, medium weight, singls breasted.
Begular 92.00 a garment.   Sale pries  81.49
Combinations, a suit  92.99
SUnflsld's Cream Wool—Heavy eUsttc rib. double breasted.   Beg.
SS.00 a garment.   Sale price  92.20
omblnatlonc, a suit   9**0
All stanfield's llnss ln tbls sale cany the unshrinkable guarantee
anl are offend In all slsss from SI to 44.
David Spencer Limited
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
VANCOUVER
City Market
MAIN STREET
APPLES—Large variety of winter stock at $1.00
and $1.25 per Box.
POTATOES—At Market Prices; these are the lowest prices in Vancouver. Stock always fresh
and in best condition.
NEW LAID EGGS—Are now arriving in larger
quantities. You can always rely on Eggs which
are sold as new laid at the City Market
VEGETABLES—All   kinds  at most
prices; in quantities to suit all buyers.
AUCTION SALES are held every Tuesday and
Friday at 10 A. M. If you really wish to reduce
the cost of living, you can do so by attending the
AUCTION SALES.
VANCOUVER
City Market
MAIN STREET
BraTd's
Best
Coffee
„,.**"*• KHAII) h <-° ...
Did You Get Yours
This Morning?
BRAID'S
BEST
COFFEE
HOTEL REGENT gWJSTiS^SS
s ""       ""'"*
1.00 per day up.     Attractive'Rates to Permanent Quests.
lottmikam * Bwttr, Proprietors IM J—'
Local and Long-Dlstance
*   In Connection. Rates
HEALTH ti mora to Tb* desired ud li of mora vital Importance to th)
wtll-botng asd happiness of tbo Individual than gnat riches, Poor
tooth aoonor or later moan poor health. To he healthy wa mut have
the power to assimilate onr food. Before lt oan he assimilated, It mut
be thoroughly digested, before lt oan be digested lt mut bo thoroughly
mastiiated, and before It ean be maotlgatad joa mott havo good teeth
with which to maiUgate.
Owing to the stringency of the money market I am offering to do dental
work at very moderate prices
Silver filling  $100
Platinite filling  2 00
Gold Crowns or Porcelaine Crowns. 5 00
Bridge-work, per tooth  5 00
Plates  10 00
Dr. BRETT ANDERSON
Phono Seymour 3311 Offloe:  101 Bank of Ottawa Building
Named Shot! i
Union Factories-
no matter what
plain ud readable
All ahoea without the Union Stamp aril
alwaya Non-Union.
BOOT A SHOE WORKERS' UNION
IM Summer Street, Boston, Mass.
3. T. Tobla, Proa   0. L. Blaine, 8ee.*Treu.
"Nature Teeth" are not only LUXURIOUSbut-they
are NECESSARY for EFFICIENCY
BUILT
IN THB
MOUTH
Luxury
Necessity
Efficiency
Ins -few
lualari.Baak
Bldf.. Blehards
ud BssUnp
Second Ploor
1HEBE "Nstnr. T.*th''_of mine
(sntlrslr
ith) wlile)
different from
X    ordinary and nflr "Fail. Teeth) which are made to
match the ones that.crew In roar Jews—In sheps and slss
and exact tint—ttad to fit like the ones Nature save 700.
rflHESE "Niton Teeth" are truly luxurious beesose yon
X    oan bite, chew and emlle with them In perfect eonl-
dence_snd comfort.
UT they are also neoeosory to health and oSeleney. The
old "relse Teeth" are truly false, for they are but
makeshifts and do not perform the functions of Natnre'e own
mastication of the food—which Beans stomach health and
JM ATOM'S own teeth, then, or their worthy successors
_ .    —my "Nature Teeth"—are necessary to the proper
general efficiency—and to the luxurious senee of welf*being '
which makee fer tbat eflolenoy.
"tcvsD-rmaoMar- ooAsuranp
. i ui
I Phone ley.
I 4.0.7.1
,    ORN
I V___
I HEREBY GUARANTEE Hut all dental work
performed by me will be absolutely painless. If ihe
slightest twinge of pain Is eaperieneed br the patient no money need be paid to me. or If aay has
been paid It wUl be Instantly refunded by me.
f furter guarantee that all erown ar bridge work
or fllling will remain la flrst'Claes condition for a
icrlod of TEN TSARS.   If any of my work booemeo
lefeetlro dnrlnttkal     —'" '"""	
FREE OT OHARGE
s:
MeeUnJarinjQhat'tlme I will repUiee 11 abeoiutely
Dr. HALL, "The Modern Dentist"
B. F.
President of Washington State Federation of
Labor, who is presiding over the convention now in session at Olympia, Wash.
WHAT MIGHT BB
Lessons Which Organlied Labor Should
Learn from War
"There is a lesson to be learned today from the marching hosts in Europe.
In its precision, its discipline, its deadly effectiveness, the world never saw
such a spectacle as the hosts of war present. If men can so organise, millions
of men obeying the sharp toned orders
of their superiors along that 'far flung
battle line,' 'theirs but to do and die,'
dare we say we cannot so organize that
men, women and children may live!
Beside the stern necessities of war that
cause that wondrous military compactness, the difficult'es, trials and tribulations of our industrial problems are as
nothing. In that vaat European army
no man is master of his own destiny;
in eur country every man is master of
his destiny did he but realise it. In no
country in the world does opportunity
exist as in our country for democratic
control of industries and of government. The trade union movement is
the great school of democracy, and if
we have but entered the primary grades
the fault la ours. Tolerance, patienci
with the slower footed sympathy for al*
oppressed, the whole surmounted by
high ideals and aspirations, will make
of our movement the greatest . single
agenoy for the good of humanity the
World ever knew.''—President E. P.
Marsh at Washington State Federation
of Labor last Monday.
MOTORS AND STBBBT OABS
California   Companies  Do  Not  Like
"Jltnoyi."
Vancouver is not the only place
where the competition of automobiles
with street cars is causing concern to
the street railway company. The "jitney bus" has cut so seriously into the
profits of the street railway companies
in San Francisco, Los Angeles, San Diego and Oakland, that the companies
now have observers on the street corners to count the "jitneys" and estimate the passengers.
"If it gets much worse," says General Manager Black of the United railroad the other day, "we shall have to
go out of business. Certainly it will
prevent financing arfy extensions. And
it is worse in Oakland."
In Los Angeles, where the "jitneys"
flrst appeared. Black estimates that
they are taking $1,000,000 business a
year away from the Los Angeles street
railway.
* The Ways of Carpenters.
Frank Brown, a local carpenter, disappeared on Tuesday, the 12th inst., to
the great alarm of his family. Search
parties of friends were organized, and
every likely place in the city was visited by them. Mr. Joe Frew, another
carpenter, waB one of the searchers. He
scoured the hedges and ditches of South
Vancouver until 2:30 a. m. looking for
his lost friend. A day or bo after, he
received information that his sister,
Miss Frew, and Mr. Brown, were in
Victoria, whence they had gone to be
married and spend their honeymoon.
The joke was on Joe, and nobody appreciates it more than he does.
PAGE THREE
SEND CLOTHING
AND BOOTS TO
FEDERATIONIST
Havo you aay leftoff clothing
or boots which are still usable?
If so please forward them to The
Federationist office, 217 Labor
Templo. Miss H. Outterldge hu
received numerous appeals from
working folk on Vancouver ialand telling o'f stories of destitution and want which would seem
to be almost Incredible if lt wero
not already known that they aro
Only too true. For the benefit of
any doubter the following quotation is given from just one of tho
letters ln Tho Federationist offloe: "... My oldest daughter
Is sick ln bod with asthma and
we cannot get right Bupport for
her. Her father has not worked
now for two years and Ux
months, so wo are pretty hud np
agalnat lt. I would he glad If
yon could send me anything In
tha shape of bed clothes, as my
bods ara bare of everything, and
lt goes pretty hird with tho children this cold weather. I got a
box already from you, md I gave
thom out to tho neighbors, as I'
thought they woro needing moat,
ao I will ho glad If you can land
me anything, It does not matter
what, food or anything at all, for
wo are almost starving." All
parcels, large or small, will be
gladly received at The Federatlonist offlce, and handed over to
Miss Outterldge. .
MISS HELENA OOTTEEIDOE
Fraternal delegste from .the B. O. Federation
of Labor to the Washington State Feder.*
tlon of Labor, now ia session et Olympia,
Wesh.
Where Is "-Tack" Slattory?
Dr. Frederick F. Owens, Cherry
Creek, Nevada, writes The Federationist, asking for assistance in securing
the whereabouts of "Jack" Slattery
member of the Miners' union, and
last heard of, by his frienHs, in British
Columbia. Concludes Dr. Owens: "...
If you can help me in any way I would
be very thankful, and at the same time
you would earn the gratitude of his
brother." Any information should be
communicated directly to Dr. Owens.
Smeltennen'8 Irish Else.
Employees at the Oranby smelter re>
ceived a rise in wages January 1st, of
five per cent. When the smelter resumed operations recently, the men
went to work at a reduction of 25 per
cent.
"By the way," said Mrs. de Style.
"Test"
"Do you know of any poor persons
who would care for a discarded lorgnette*"
PRESIDENT
5U5PENDER
MADE IN CANADA
HARRON BROS.
FUNIRAL.  DIRECTORS AND
■MBALMKRS
Vancouver—Office and Chapel,
1084 Granville Bt., Phone Sey. 8486.
North Vancouver — Offloe and
Chapel, 128—Sixth St Weat, Phone
18*.
PkeaeSer. 221 BarerMiflrt
NuflD, Thomson & Clegg
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
aid EMBALMERS
SMUcbrfcft.        VucMVtr, I. C.
PAPER-MAKERS IN CANADA.
Local Union at Powell River, B. O.,
Subscribe* to "Ped." aa ft Body,
Tbe following, statement concerning
tbe paper-making industry In Canada
generally, and in Quebec particularly,
waa made last week by President
Carey:
"There is no denying tbe fact tbat
Canada has become a great paper producing country. Some of the largest
and fastest machines in the world are
being operated in Canada and under
conditions favorable to manufacturers
of paper in Canada, new mills have
been built and in some of the localities
members of the organization have
achieved many successes, so far as conditions of employment- and wages are
concerned, but this has only been
achieved by the activity of the members themselves with, the. co-operation
of the international organizations. As
to the statement that in the province
of Quebec the people speak French generally, we have not found that to be so,
as far as men employed at the.paper
trade are concerned. While it is true
there are some few men employed on
the paper machines who speak French
only, the great majority can speak both
languages."
One of the strongest locals of the
gaper-makers in Canada is at Powell
iver, British Columbia. The "Fed."
goes every week into the bands of each
member of the local there, the union
subscribing as a body.
J. J. TAYLOR
A vine-president of the B. O. Federation of
Ltbor, who wm one of the lmprlioned
miners at the time of lait convention, tnd
who wu elected by' acclamation. "Joe"
will not be preient thli year, bavins been
compelled to seek work In Washington
itftte after hla release last fall.
BARTENDERS' LEAGUE,
Sec-Treas Jere L. Sullivan Reports
Progress During Fast Tear.
"None of us but feel deeply over the
frightful carnage of our fellow workers
in Burope, brought about ae many of
us believe, by the greediness of rulers
for greater power and enlarged territory, causing unheard of suffering among the people of the nations involved
as well as inflicting on noncombatants
in all parts of the world greater burdens than they should be required to
carry, . . . Despite somewhat untoward
conditions it is decidely gratifying to
be able to inform you that our international union, thanks to the efforts of
co-workers in the field of organized labor, the organizers, officers and labor
editors, as well as the active members
of trades unions generally, has made
exceedingly fine headway and accumulated approximately an added membership of close to 4,000, and probably
would have gone considerably beyond
that figure if it had not been for a
rather severe setback caused by the
success of sumptuary legislation advocates. ..."
Sooner End Zt All Now.
For ourselves, we have an unshrlnk-.
able faith tbat the spirit of militarism
and the moral purpose of the world
are at war. If we believed, says the
Winnipeg Tribune, that the principles
of Bismarck, of Treitsehke. of Nietzsche, of Bernbardi, and of all the other
founders of Prussian militarism, were
destined to prevail, we would welcome
some cataclysm of nature which would
render the surface of our planet as barren of life as tbe crust of tbe moon. If
men were destined for ever to thrust
bayonets into eaoh other's vitals, if
trenches had for ever to be piled high
with human dead, if peaceful countries
had for ever to live under the shadow
of the sword, the fortress and the destroying horde, we would say let the
race grow senile and decay. But the
progress of the suns is not in the direction of militarism. The stars In their
courses are fighting against it.
CULINARY WORKERS
Meeting Requests License Commissioners to Replace Orientals In Hotels.
Cooks', Waiters' and Waitresses'
Vancouver local union, No. 28, wish to
extend to the delegates attending the
fifth annual convention of the B. 0.
Federation of Labor fraternal greetings and best wishes for a successful
convention. They wish to call tbe attention of all union men to the fact
that only those bouses displaying their
union card are union restaurants,
' Old and New Members.
Tbe most interesting meeting held by
the culinary crafts so far this year was
called to order at' 8:00 p. m., Friday
night, January 16th, in room 206, Labor Temple. It is encouraging to be
able to report that we have three applications for membership pending,
while four suspended members applied
for, and were granted, reinstatement.
Evidently some of our delinquent
brothers and sisters are beginning to realize the seriousness of the economic
situation.
Want Orientals Dismissed.
Under new business a resolution was
adopted instructing tho exec tive board
to write the board of license commissioners, drawing their attontion to the
large number of competent culinary
workers who are out of employment and
unable to find work and urging them to
relieve the situation a little by having
the hotels replace their Oriental help
with white labor. The disastrous fire
which gutted the Empire cafe, on Hast'
ings street, Saturday morning, compels
tbe union crew of tbat establishment to
swell the ranks of the unemployed, temporarily at least. Brother Frank Glaise,
formerly night ehef at the Vancouver
hotel, has re-opened the Waffle Emporium, on Pender street west (lately
Clow's Union Waffle Parlor). If you
are partial to the delights of the succulent waffle your patronage will be appreciated. JOHN CUMMINO,
Vice-president.
ONTARIO COMPENSATION AOT
Purtiier Proriilons To Be Asked for
by Labor
With the view to penalizing employers who seek to evade making returns
to the Workmen's Compensation Board
under the act, and thus deprive their
workmen of protection under the new
law, it Is understood that certain
amendments will be asked of the Ontario legislature at its next session. In
addition to increasing the penality of
$500 now provided for not making returns, the house will be asked to increase the penalty and ft method v
be devised of hunting down those who
try to escape the law. It is also proposed to make the employer found in
such circumstances personally liable for
any compensation awarded by the
board for an injury to a workman instead of being able to call upon other
members of the class in which he might
have been grouped.
Tbe Oost of a Rich Man.
At the smallest average for the making of a single rich' man we make a
thousand whose life is one long flood
of misery. The charnal houses of poverty are in the shadow of the palace, and
as one is splendid, ho is the other dark
poisonous, degraded. How can a man
grow rich except on tho spoils of
others' labor! His boasted prudence
and economy, what is it but the most
skillful availing himself of their necessities, most resolutely closing up his
heart against their cries to bim for
help.—Froude.
A Creditable Publication.
The Carpenters' Trade Journal, the
official organ of the New York State
council of the Brothorhood of Carpenters and Joiners is one of the best prepared publications whieh comes into
Tho Federationist office. Both from a
typographical and literary point of
view, it is far ahead of The Carpenter,
the monthly journal of the international.
W. Dodd Re-elected
Alderman W. Dodd, member of the
Street Railway Employees' union, and
of the New Westminster city council
for some years, was re-elected to the
council last week.
CENTER & HANNA, lid.
UNDERTAKERS
Refined Service
1041 GEORGIA  STRUT
One Block west of Court House,
Use of Modern  Chapel and
Funeral  Parlors  free  to all
Patrons
Dr. Brett Anderson, dentist,—Crown,
bridge and plate work a specialty;
painless methods. Bank of Ottawa
building, Vancouver, B. 0. ***
Phone: Fairmont 810
Patterson* Chandler
Manufacturers of
MONUMENTS
Vaults, Curbing, Etc
Office and Works:
Cor. 16th Ave. and Main St.
Branoh Offloe: 40th ft Fraser Aves.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Mh Union Man
Are you eating Union-made Bread, are you
helping to maintain the Union Standard of living by
using goods produced by Union Labor?
BREWER'S XL BREAD
has the Union Label on every loaf, and in quality
and flavor it is unexcelled.:
Phone Highland.573 and we will call at your
house.
BREWER'S XL BAKERY,
Corner 4th Avenue and Commercial Street.
TOU HAVE A CHANCE TO OUT
YOUB DOLLABB BACK
Wken jrou boj
British Columbia Made
Goodi
Ever, dollar sprat la Eastern or
Forslgn Ooods if (one forever
Ledde Boots are Made ln
Vancouver
—thtt on fottof them, and ytm got
honan -rain* tot yonr mono, aratj
Mays.
ILECKIE CO., Limited
Vancouver
MOUNT PLEASANT HEADQUARTERS
For Hardware, Stovti ud mtnsta
Everything for tha Kitchen
W. R. OWEN & MORRISON
Phone Frir. «47  8837 Hah Strait
PENDER HOI
en ami inn oran
rnaaSaMff
1 Bates OLIO jet Bar a—Va
1915 Diaries and Calendar Pads
TRANSFER BINDERS, FILES
LOOSE LEAF BINDERS AND SHEETS
Complete Lines of all Offlce Beqnlremsnta.
We do all kinds of OOMMEEOIAL PBINTINO
We an BLANK BOOS HAMDTAOTDinS
Thomson Stationery Co., Ltd.
HASTINOS STRUT WMT
■ltT IN THI WMT
VANOOUVU, ».C.
MTAILItHIP IM
WM. TURNER 2Srt£
-DEALER IN-
New and second-hand China, Crockery, Furniture,
Hardware and Stoves. Furniture moving and shipping. Telephone us when you have furniture for
sale. Highest prices paid.
TELEPHONE SEYMOUR 3745
Superior
Printing
AT MODERATE
PRICES
Telephone:
Sey. 7495
UBOR TEMPLE
The FEDERATIONIST
can supply all your Printing
needs. No Job too large or
too email. Firrt-clase workmanship, good ink and high-
grade ttock have given our
Printen a reputation (or
SUPERIOR PRINTING
Union Work a Specialty.
Our Prices are right and we
deliver when wanted.
When You Want a
First-Class Beer
-OHB THAI TOU CAN'T BEAT AT ART PRICE, » ANT
OOUNTBY, OET BEEB WITH THIB LABEL OH. PINTS, SEE   I
fob nrrr cents. "" '
BBEWED AND BOTTLED IN VANCOOVEB BT
VANCOUVER BREWERIES, Ltd.
J PAGE FOUR
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FBIDAY. JANUABY 22, 3
f
Our January
Sale is
On!
Everything
in the Store
is Reduced
Buyers
Now
Save
Hudson's Bay
Company
Granville and Georgia Streeta
BIDING TRADES
OF
Builders* Exchange Forced
the Fight and Are Being Worsted.
Pete Dowler Will Attend
Montana Federation of
Labor Convention
■KEEP YOUB MONEY IN B. 0.' *
BY USING
South Wellington Coal
as sappUsd by
The Main Supply
Company
1029 MAIN STREET
Best Lump, ton.. .$6.75
Washed Nut, ton. .$&00
DeliTered free within two mllee. ',
Phone Yonr Order Now.
SEYMOUR 8491
in B, 0. hy B. 0. Labor for
B. 0. People.
,-=== Heat is the only,
test of Fuel
Yon boy fuel to supply yon with
heal*
The eoal that supplies yon with
the most heat—to the dollar expended la tho cheapest
Blether genuine South Wellington Coal, haa been proven by
seientiio test to contain the
highest number of heat units to
the ton of all Pacific Coals.
Oat a trial ton and note carefully tha reeult.
_= 553
OqXV
AROSE!
'OGGOt
Labor Teapla
Bnildinr
Phone Sey. 4410
Printers of The Fun.
F. W. Dowler, international organ'
izor of the Brotherhood of Carpentera,
with headquarters at Seattle! is at present in Great Falls, Mont,, where the
Building Trades councU has locked
horns with the Builders' Exchange, and
the flght is a merry one. The County
Trades and Labor assembly is assisting
the building trades to good) purpose and
bo far the contest has been confined
chiefly to Great Falls, where the employers forced the issue upon organized
labor, and instead of disrupting their
forces only succeeded in solidifying the
labor movement, inasmuch as every union in the city is contributing financially, personally and collectively, to the
commissary of trades unionism.
Dowler as Fraternal Delegato
"Fete" will attend the annual convention of the Montana State Federation of Labor, which opens at Helena,
on February 1st, as the fraternal delegate from Washington State Federation
of Labor, and haB taken his oath on a
blood-stained putty knife that The Federationist shall be supplied with a synopsis of the proceedings. Inasmuch
as all the unions of the Pacific Northwest have . so many interests In common the result of all the conventions of
western .state federations of labor will
be anticipated with keen interest.
GOVEENMBNT  LABOB  OFFICIALS
Will Meet ln Annual Convention This
Year it Detroit
The Association of Government Labor Officials of the United StateB and
Canada, of which 0. B. Gordon, Vancouver, provincial factories inspector,
is seoond vice-president, is doing effective work. It has for one of Its slogans: "Armies and navies may be ne*
cessory, but the nation that provides
for her industrial soldiers is the
greatest nation." The association is a
consolidation of the former organization of "Officials of Bureaus of Labor/
Factory Inspectors and Industrial Commissions." Its object is to meet in annual convention (Detroit, 1015), interchange ideas and experiences and promote efficient administration of labor
laws. To co-operate in securing the
enactment of uniform industrial legislation. Another motto reads: "Conserve the greatest asset of any state or
nation, the life of those who create,
produce and build. Promote the comfort, health and safety of our toilers."
Labor PrtM Association Meeting
The Western Labor Press association
will hold its annual meeting in Olympia, Washington state, to-morrow. The
association is a voluntary one, consist-
ing of editors and managers of western
labor papers, for the purposes of co-operating in their work. The president
is B. V. Hoyt of the Taeoma Labor Advocate, with' E. B. Ault of the Seattle
Union Becord as secretary, and B.
Parm. Pettipiece of The B. 0. Federationist as vice-president. -
Carpenters' Mass Meeting.
A mass meeting of carpenters will be
held ih the large hall, Labor Temple,
Monday evening, February 1st, at 8
o'clock. One of the most important
matters to be dealt with at the meeting will be the recent action of the
Builders" Exchange in issuing a schedule of reduced wages for building
tradesmen.
WEST AUSTRALIA
J. WM. WILKINSON
Who succeeded J. 0. Wat ton, in 1911, an president of the
He retired at the Victoria convention ln January, 1918,
Federationist since April, 1914,
B. G. Federation of Labor.
Editorial   writer   on   The
SOCIALISTS CALL
FOR PEACE AND
DISARMAMENT
Delegates of Neutral Countries Hold Convention
at Copenhagen
sThree resolutions were passed unanimously at the closing session in Copenhagen, last Tuesday, of the conference
of socialists of neutral countries, which
opened on January 10th. The first resolution declares it to be the duty of
all socialists to work for a speedy declaration of peace, the terms of which
shall provide a basis for international
disarmament; it also calls upon the International Socialist Bureau at Berne
to convoke a meeting of all socialist
parties at the beginning of peace negotiations to take an advisory part therein. The second resolution proposes that
all socialist parties of neutral countries urge their respective governments to consider the possibility of offering mediation to the belligerents,
with the view of lasting peace. The
third protests against the arreBt of five
members of the Busslan Duma, who
met to draft a report from the present
conference. Denmark, Norway, Sweden and Holland have been represented
at this conference by four delegates
each, and Italy by one. No delegates
attended from the United Statea and
Switzerland. On Tuesday the conference adopted a resolution protesting
against Germany's "violation of Belgium's rights" and calling upon all
socialist parties to labor to bring the
war to a speedy end.,
BOTH MEASURES TO
BE LAID OVER TILL
THE NEXT SESSION
(Continued from page 1)
UNION MINER OF
FERNIE ELECTED
MAYOR OF CITY
Tom Uphill, the well-known organizing secretary of the Gladstone local
union of the United Mine Workers of
America, was elected mayor of Fernie,
B. C. last week by a majority of 61
vqtes over his opponent. The 'District
Ledger, tho weekly paper of the miners,
says:
"Tommy" has been a resident
of the town for some years and has
earned the respect and esteem not
only of his own class, which,is evidenced by his-repeated election to
the. position of-secretary, but that
of the bulk of the business men in
the city of Fernie. We wish him
every success in the responsible
office he has secured.
ElecUd Chairman of School Board
At the flrat meeting of the new
school trustees on Monday evening
last, Mr. Frank J. Russell was
unanimously elected chairman of the
Burnaby school board. He is an old*
time trades unionist, and was a long
time delegate to tho Trades and Labor council of this city. Ho 1a a good
man fer the position.
FHONB SBTMOUB MM
.-^tRES'/vef
WE INVITE
INQUIRY
by those contemplating making
changes, opening new accounts,
etc., and anything in our line
generally. Our business is conducted on sound conservative
commercial principles.
DOW FRASER TRUST CO.
122 Hastings St. West.
Vancouver, and McKay Station,
Burn.by, B. C.
Close at 1 o'clock Saturday.
PANTAGES
Unequalled Vaudsvllle  Mesns
PANTAQM  VAUDEVILLE
THRU »H0W8 DAILY
' «.«, '7.M, t.1S    Season's  Prlcssi
Matlnss, 1lo.| Evenings, 11c, ate.
goes there will not be any very notable
decrease.
Past Tear s Difficult One,
It ta not possible to forecast tho na*
ture of the officers' reports, but it is
safe to say that none of their predecessors have had such a difficult task
to meet the obligations of the Federation as President Watchman and Seoretary-treasurer Wells. With every
union in 'the provinoe having to care
for a large number of unemployed members it is pretty safe to guess that the
per capita tax receipts of the Federation have not been in excess of its bare
needs.
Convention Agenda.
As to the matters which will be the
subject of the most important debates
of the convention, doubtless the report
of the labor Commission, appointed by
Premier McBride, will be one. Of tho
numerous features of the report none
is more Important than that dealing
with workmen's compensation. Attorney-General Bowser has already announced that a new draft act will be
laid before the coming session of the
legislature, but that no action will bo
taken to pass it into law before next
year. How to make bim change his
mind will be one of the questions for
the convention to take up.
One thing is certain respecting this
question and all others dealing with the
passing of laws in the interests of the
working doss, and that is, that as long
as the workers are organised industrially and disorganised politically, neither McBride or Bowser will go far out
of their way to pass working class legislation. How to remedy this condition will also likely be oae ot the big
problems tackled by the convention.
"SAPBTT naSTI"
Powell Biver Paper Company Recognises Waste of Industrial Accident!
The prevention of accidents and in*
juries by every means possible is a personal duty which every man owes not
only to himself, but also to his fellowmen, says Safety and Health, a monthly publication issued! by the Powell
River Paper company. Safety Bhould
be your first thought. Accidents to
yourself or another are UBually somebody's fault; don't let them be your
fault. Finding the danger points about
your job first is the safest way; then
report your findings to the proper authority. Every time you prevent an accident to yourself or to another, you
become somebody's benefactor. Time
lost through an accident is waste, if the
accident could have been prevented.
Tour duty to yourself, your home and
society is to help prevent that waste
by being careful.
Poor Editor Again.
"Where's the editor!" bellowed the
caller at the offlce of the Fodunk Pabulum. "He's out," said the office devil.
"You see we had a home talent play
at the town hall tho other night and in
describing the scene botween Mr. and
Mrs. Hanks, who played the leading
parts, the editor wrote: 'He held her
tight as she struggled to get in,' but
when it got into the paper it redd: 'He
held her tights as she struggled to get
In.' Mr. Hanks called about it, and I
ain't sin neether of 'urn since."
DELEGATES ELEOTED
To Attend Nanaimo Convention of B. C
'... Federation of Labor.
Following unions have sent credentials of delegates to Secretary-treasurer
Wells. These organizations will be represented at the. Nanaimo convention
of the B. C. Federation of Labor,
which convenes on Monday: District
No. 28, U. M. W. of A.; Amalgamated
Carpenters, Nanaimo; Longshoremen,
Victoria; Pattern-makers, Vancouver;
Amalgamated Carpenters, Victoria;
Blacksmiths, Bevelstoke; United Mine
Workers, Nanaimo; Typographical union, Nanaimo; United Mine Workers,
South Wellington; Machinists, Vancouver; Painters, Victoria; United Mint
WorkerB, Ladysmith; Trades and Labor council. New Weatminster; United
Mine WorkerB, Jingle Pot local; United
Mine Workers, Cumberland; Barbers,
Victoria; Pattern-mwrars, Victoria;
United Mine Workers, ernie; Trades
and Labor council, Victoria.
In addition there will be a large
number of delegates from the Vancouver and New Westminster unions which
are meeting this week. ■
WANT UNION PATRONAGE.
Bnt Unwilling to Reciprocate by Demanding Union Label on Printing
A number of the officers of organized labor in Vancouver have been recipients of'circulars during the past
week, advertising a certain shoe store
in this city. The circulars do not bear
the union label and should be returned
together with a note informing the
management of the store' that the proper way to secure'the patronage of organised labor is to advertise in labor's
official paper—The B. C. Federatlonist.
LONGSHOREMEN
Secretary-treasurer Madsen Visits Vancouver—Union Holding Iti Own
3. A. Madsen, secretary-treasurer of
Pacific district No. 38, International
Longshoremen's association, Portland,
Ore., was an official visitor in Vancouver during the past week. No special
mission caused Mr. Madsen to - leave
headquarters, it being merely a part of
his regular rounds of affiliated locals.
Work is still slack among local mei
ben of the Longshoremen's union. One
of the questions at present being dls*
cussed by the union, is the adoption of
a sick benefit society. This for the
reason that no class of workmen in B,
C. are exposed to more risks of injury,
as ta amply shown by the number of accidents, many of them fatal, during the
past few months.
The  Chief  Features  and
Provisions of the Act,
Outlined
Compare New Act for British Columbia with This
and Others
Preparing tb* Way.
The capitalists are forced to concentrate and monopolize and organize industry. The capitalist who lags be
hind goes bankrupt. But the very process of organizing industry, when it is
completed, renders the capitalist unnecessary. He becomes simply a drawer
of unearned revenues and is ready to
be thrown off whenever the useful members of society so decide.—Maoriland
Worker.
B. 0. F. OF L. PREAMBLE.
The British Columbia Federation
of Labor is organlied for the purpose of voicing the needs and aspirations of labor, legislatively and
otherwise, and to provide a place
for the membera of its affiliated
unions to participate in th* discussion of those practical problems,
upon tb* solution of which depends
their welfare as workers, individually and collectively.
With th* introduction of th*
modern machinery of production
and the harnessing of the forces of
nature, lt Is only fitting that the
wealth producers should participate
in the benefits derived.
We, therefore, pledge ourselves
to unceasingly demand a universal
work-day of eight hours or less; so
long as labor power ta sold oa s
commodity.
We believe ther* is mora efficacy
ln electing working-class representatives to write the law than, by
supplicatory methods, and our efforts will be mora in that direction
in the future.
We are firmly convinced that the
future belongs to tht only useful
people in human soctaty—the working-class.
[In view of the prominence which
will be given to the subject of workmen's compensation ih British Columbia, during the next y*u, by reason of
th* ntw act promised by Attorney-General Bowser, Th* Federationist ta publishing summaries of compensation acts
of various states and countries which
ar* supposed to have had considerable
experience of legislation of this Und.
The various acta of Australia and Tasmania will be summarised, and appear
weekly. Following is a summary of the
Workmen's Compensation act of West-
em Australia.]
Western Australia Act
The Workmen's Compensation aot,
1012, includes as employers "any body
of persons, corporate or unincorporated'
Nature pf work to which the act applies.—Manual, clerical or otherwise.
Workers expressly excluded.—Per-
sons whose remuneration exceeds £300
a year. Casuals, police, outworkers,
members of employers' family.
Employer not liable to pay compensation.—For first week of injury if disabled for less than two weeks.
In the event of insolvency, maximum
amount of compensation admitted aa
first oharge on assets per individual —
£160.
Compensation in case of death.—If
dependents left—three years' earnings
or £300 whichever is larger. Maximum
£400. If no dependents, maximum
amount for medical attendance and
funeral expenses, £100.
Compensation in case of incapacity.—
Weekly payment—half-average weekly
earnings, maximum £2. Maximum total
liability £400.
Compensation to workers- over
years of age who have entered into
agreements.—Death (where there are
dependents), £100. Incapacity, minimum payment 10s. Maximum total liability, £100.
Compensation for Infirm worktrs who
have 'entered into an agreement.—On
death, minimum payment £50. Incapacity—weekly minimum payment 10s.
Maximum total liability, £100.
. Compensation for workers under 21
years of-age earning less than 20s. per
week. — Weekly payments — average
weekly earnings (no maximum).
Period after which lump sum can be
substituted for weekly payment.—Six
months.
Tribunal if claim not settled by
agreement.—Local court.
Regulation for injured worker leaving the state.—Weekly payments continue in the event of an injured worker leaving the state.
Burnaby Municipal Elections
The result of the polling whioh took
place on Saturday last wae as follows:
Reeve—Fraser (acclamation).
Councillors.—Ward One—Bevan, 90;
Young, 82; Stride, 54. Ward Two—Col-
dicott, 211; Allen, 125; Collins, 80.
Ward Three—Col. Ward, 42; Culley, 21.
Ward Four—Fan Vol, 46; Lumley, 26.
Ward Five—MacDonald, 235; Mufgrew,
177* Ward Six—Murray, 166; Silver,
111.
School trustees—Disney, 740; Brookhouse, 690; Murray, 562; Lumley, 455;
Mayne, 421.
"Jimmy" Simpson's 16,300 Votes
James Simpson, who was elected at
the top of the poll last year for the office of controller in Toronto, was this
year defeated by the narrow margin of
143 votes. This was due to a Utter
and well-financed campaign waged
against him by tho capitalist interests
of Toronto. In spite, oi that more than
16,300 votes were cast in his favor.
WOOD
BEST 16-inch Fir Oordwood at $3.00 per Wad. This ii an
exceptionally good lot, and just what you need this oold
weather.
Phone Seymour 1936 for trial load.
JINGLE POT COAL
will save you money. Quality guaranteed.
This is the only UNION BUNBD Ooal in British Columbia.
McNEILL, WELCH & WILSON, Limited
formerly
VANOOUVER OOAL OOMPANY
Phone Seymour 6408
JANUARY CLEARANCE SALE
GREAT REDUCTIONS on all our Mens' and Boys' SUITS AND OVEBOOATS, soma as low as HALF-PRICE.
AU Winter UNDERWEAR except Penmans' 95 at BARGAIN PRICES.
CLUBB   &  STEWART
309-315 Hastings St. West      Phone' Seymour 702
Farther the Boms Industry iionmsnt by havlai
this label appear on yonr printed matter.. II standi
for good workmanship, fool dtlseashlp, lecenl
wstss anl the up-bnUdiif °(tha dty.
aiued warnta teams
Oompoud of T-msnuatal Union, Web Fressnsa't Union. PrlaUu
Bookbinders7'Union, Photo-sairavors' 'ftnTon.'
Unlets
Fond Mother (j
think he looks *
roudly)—"Don't you
:e his father'"
Sympathetic Neighbor (cheerfully)—
"Never mind that, Mrs. Brown, so
as he's healthy."'
'n, to long
SAVING
MONEY
on the purchase of a piano II an Important Item—a real saving when
every quality that you require lh a
piano la part of your purchase. In
the  "
KOHLEY a\ CAMPBELL
PIANO
We offer an instrument of unusual
j value—a', piano that la favorably
known the world around, anil that la
In aotlve everyday uae throughout the
globe. You cannot. do better than
compare the Kohler ft Campbell with
other pianos you know, nee them
and you'll be convinced that they are
all that) we represent them. You'll be
surprised at our low prices. ' We always have a large stock of used
pianos ranging In prices from 1100.00
to $300.00. Oome In and get our
special prices and terms,
THE
KENT
PIANO CO. Ltd.
558 GRANVILLE ST.
26% OFF ALL TRUSSES THIS MONTH
RED STAR DRUG STORE.
I Cordova Street West Vancouver, B. O.
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
.Capital..-'........... .$16,000,000        Best.  113,600,000
Main Offlce:   Corner Hastings and Granville Streets, Vancouver
CITY BRANCHES . LOCATION
ALMA ROAD '..' Cor. Fourth Avenue snd Alms Road
COMMERCIAL DRIVE Cor. First Avenue snd Commercial Drive
EAST END. Cor. Fender snd Main Street!
FAIRVIEW Cor. Sixth Avenue and Oranvllle Street
HASTINOS sal CAMBIE Cor. Hsitinm snd Cambie Streets
KITSILANO Cor. Fourth Avenue and Yew Street
MOUNT PLEASANT Cor. Eichth Avenue anl Mala Stmt
POWELL STREET Cor. Victoria Drive and Powell Street
SOUTH HILL  Cor. Forty-fourth Avenue and Truer Road
Also North Vancouver Branch, Corner Lonsdale Av*nu* and Esplanade
n
Office Furniture
. Less Than Wholesale
Hastings Furniture Co., Ltd., 41 Hastings St. West
ly* an making a Clearance of
all pruent stock of Offlce Furniture.
Com* *aily and mak* yonr
choice.
Five Thousand Labor
Temple Shares at Par
The Vancouver Labor Temple Co., Ltd., is still on a paying
basis, despite the general unemployment and industrial depression.
During the past fiscal year its earnings have exceeded all
expenses by nearly $100 per month, placing it among the few
businesses in Vancouver which have a balance on uie credit
side of the ledger at this time.
With the completion of the Georgia-Harris' street viaduct
very shortly, another step towards this section becoming
"newspaper row," Labor Temple stores will soon be in demand, whioh should result in dividends at the olose of next
year.
Vancouver Labor Temple Co. shares are a good investment
—conservatively estimated the property is worth three times
the par value of the shares.
The executive board have authorized the sale of five thousand shares at the par value of $1.00 each.
Every union man in Vancouver should own at least ten of
them.
Call at Boom 211, Labor Temple, for particulars.
VANCOUVER LABOR TEMPLE CO., Ltd.
Nicholson's Gin
is perfectly pure and palatable
IT'S REFRESHING
AND INVIGORATING
TRY IT FOR YOUR STOMACH'S SAKE.,
WILL DO YOU GOOD.
ALL RELIABLE DEALERS SELL IT
A paid-up union card entlUes
you to all the privileges of the
Labor Temple Club.   Try It
LABOR TEMPLE CLUB, POOL
AND READINO ROOM OPEN
SEVEN DATS A WEEK.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcfed.1-0345085/manifest

Comment

Related Items