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The British Columbia Federationist Mar 26, 1915

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Array INDU8TBIAL CNITT:  STRENGTH..
OiilblAi PAPEB: VAKCOOViSB TJADES ANP LjABIII. i^lNI'Il, AND B.O. FEDEBATION OP
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VANCOUVER; B, C;, FRIDAY, MARCH 26,1915;
General Matters Concerning
the Coming Campaign
Were Discussed
South Vancouver Candidate
Is Recommended  to
thie Council
The parliamentary committeo of
Vancouver Trades and Labor couneil
met in the Labor Temple on Wednesday
evening to discuss general matters can
nected with the forthcoming provincial
elections. Over thirty delegates were
present from more than twenty unions.
One of the main questions considered
was the proposal to run candidates in
South Vancouver and Point Grey. It
was decided to recommend tb the. council thai a candidate be nominated at
once for South Vancouver, and that the
matter of Point Grey be laid over for
one week; In connection with, ihe
South Vincouver nomination the names
of Mr. F. Welsh and Mr. B. H. Neelands were mentioned.
A general discussion took pl&ce regarding the Work of organizing the
canipaign and it was decided that a further meeting Bhould take place at the
close of the Trades and Labor council
convention. .,
- The outstanding feature of this meeting of the Parliamentary committee
was the general unanimity of opinion
which prevailed. Many of those who
had formerly opposed the proposal to
run independent candidates expressed
their determination to accept the decision of the council and to take their
share of the work of making the campaign a success.
Several nominations of candidates
were received -tfrom unions and referred
to the council last night. Some organisations, like the Locomotive Engineers
and Firemen, wrote to Bay that their
constitutions did not permit them to
take active part in political affairs officially, but that they would do everything in thoir power to assist tbe council in its efforts, as they believed the
proposal to be a step in the right direc*
. tion.
TBBATIEB AND WABS
Excellent Pamphlet Published by Brit
ish Labor Press
"Belgium and the Scrap of Paper'.'
ie the title qf a penny pamphlet by H.
N.'Biailsford, which haB just been published by the British Independent Labor party in their "Labor and War"
aeries of two-cent pamphlets.
Mr. Brnilsford deals .with the invasion -of Belgium by Germany, and refers-
to parallel incidents, by other nations.
• He describes the treaty of 1839 as a
historical curiosity, and quotes n speech
of Lord PalmorBton, the British slgna-
, tory to the,"Scrap of Paper," to show
that though he had signed the treaty
' he did not "attach very much importance to such engagements."
No war can establish the sonctity of
treaties, ia Mr. Brnilsford V contention,
"while nations heap up armaments and
form diplomatic combinations in order
to win colonies or spheres of influence."
For those who wish to study the
causes of the  war from  the  opposite
| angle to tbe official one this is one of
. the books that can be recommended. It
can be obtained for five cents, including postage from the National Labor
iss, limited, Blackfriars street,
Manchester, England.
WAB TIME MEASURE
Would Solve Many Problems for Workers In Timo of Peace
The new law which gives the government of Great Britain power to commandeer any factory or manufacturing
plant, no matter in what industry it
may be engaged, and transform it into
an establishment for the production of
munitions of war, is by general agreement the most revolutionary of all the
unprecedented pieces of legislation
which hnve been rushed through the
bewildered British parliament since the
beginning of the war. The bill brings
into being at a single stroke, although
tentatively and for a special purpose,
a condition which has been the dream
o'f socialism for the last 50 years. "It
would be much simpler," urged Sir
Frederick Banbury in the house of
commons, "if we merely gave the government a one-eluuse bill anying that
during the continuance of the war they |
I can do just as they like." I
LABOR CANDIDATES
Trades and Labor Council Candidates Chosen
Last Night to Contest Vancouver
City Electoral Riding
j. W. WlLklNsON, Carpenters
J. H. McVETY, Machinists
W. R. TROTTER, Printers
F. A; HOOVER, Street Railway Employees
J. fi. WILTON, Printers
F. WELSH, Plumbers
ALTERNATES
GEO. Hi HARDY, Carpenters
J. G.LYON, Pattern Makers
F. HAIGH, Street Railway Employees
^,.      CAMPAIGN MANAGER
BOSS itELEN GUTTERIDGE, Tiiil(*s
CANDIDATE FOR SOttH VANCOUVER
R. It. NEELANDS, Printers
THE IS
Spatial ih(|uiry by "Fed-V
Representative   Gives
Reliable Details
Condition* Vary—Valuable
Information for the
Likely Emigrant
Walter Orilble Married.
According to tho Industrial Banner,
Toronto: "Wilfrid dribble, a well-
known member of tho United Brother'
hood of Carpenters and Joiners, and socialist organizer, who is well known all
the way from British Columbia to the
Maritime provinces, recently married
a'ii 'estimable lady in St. John, N. B.
His friends sey, 'It's a long way from
Toronto.' "
REOISTEE VOTES NOW
All Workmen Bhould See About Being
on the LiBt
Those workingmen who have not registered their votes should take note of
the all-important fact that they must
do so before April 5th in order to have
their names on the new voters' list
Which will be issued and which may be
utilized for tho coming election. The
court of revision will be held on the
third Monday ln May and it is absolutely imperative that prompt action be
[taken by those who are not on the Hst
■or who may have doubts as to whether
Jtheir names appear there.
Labor men should call at the court
louse, Georgia and Howo streets, where
ivery facility will be afforded them to
fcjjister.
. This SjJdtial cbrivfention of VantJouvei- Trades and
Labor council) for the purpose of nominating candidates for the coming provincial election, was held in Labor Temple last night. At the outset, the parliamentary
committefe recommended that a candidate should be
nominated by the convention for South Vancouver—as
well as candidates for Vancouver city—and that the
question of putting a candidate in the field for Point
Grey be laid over for a week. This course was decided
on, as also was that of nominating for South Vancouver
first. Delegate Sully moved that a record of the union represented in the convention be taken. The motion was
ruled out of order, and the meeting proceeded to make
nominations.
South Vancouver Nominations
^When the chair called for nominations for a candidate to contest South Vancouver the following were submitted: R. H. Neelands, secretary of Vancouver Typographical union; J. A. Key, Carpenters, and F. Welsh,
Plumbers. The ballot resulted as follows: R. H. Neelands, 20; J. A. Key, 3; F. Welsh, 16. None of the nominees having secured a clear majority, J. A. Key dropped
out, and a second ballot was taken, R. H. Neelands polling 24 votes, and F. Welsh id. R. H. Neelands was declared elected, and on motion of F. Welsh, seconded by
J; A. Key, the candidature of Mr. Neelands was made
unanimous.
Vancouver City Nominations
For the choice of six candidates to contest the city
of Vancouver, the following were nominated: W. R.
Trotter, Typographical union; J. W. Wilkinson, Carpenters; J. H. McVety, Machinists; G. H. Hardy, Carpenters; J. E. Wilton, Typographical; F. A. Hoover, Street
Railway Employees; A. Bunting, Street Railway Employees; F. Haigh, Street Railway Employees; J. G.
Lybh, Pattern-makers; F.Welsh, Plumbers.
The Successful Candidates
The voting on the foregoing nominations resulted as
follows: W. R. Trotter, 25; J. W- Wilkinson, 36; J. H.
McVety, 28; J. E. Wilton, 23; F. A. Hoover, 26; F. Welsh,
21; G. H. Hardy, 16; A. Bunting, 7; F. Haigh, 10; J. G.
Lyon, 15. The first six mentioned, having obtained a majority of the votes cast, were declared the official candidates to contest Vancouver city electoral district at the
coming elections.
Alternate Candidates Elected
G. H. Hardy, F. Haigh and J. G. Lyon were elected
to be alternate candidates. Mr. Neelands, who was engaged elsewhere on union business at the time of his
election, was present in the convention at this time and
thanked the delegates for the support given to his nomination.
Miss H. Gutteridge Chosen Campaign Manager
At the close of the convention, the elected candidates
and a number of the delegates, held a meeting for the
purpose of discussing preliminary plans for organization work and for the general furtherance 6f the campaign. The question of selecting a campaign manager
was among the more important matters taken up, and
at the unanimous request of all present Miss H. Gutteridge, the secretary-treasurer of the council, agreed to
act as campaign manager.
Candidates Will Meet Next Wednesday
After lengthy discussion as to the best ways and
means of pushing forward the work of the campaign,
it was decided to hold a meeting of the candidates next
Wednesday evening at 7 o'clock, in 210 Labor Temple,
for the purpose of suggesting plans to the parliamentary
committee at its meeting later in the evening. It is now
more than ever important that all members of that committee should be present at the regular meeting of the
committee next Wednesday. Now that the decision to go
ahead has been made, there will be work for all who are
willing to do it in an effort to secure the election of the
candidates.
[Note.—Mur members bf organlied
labor In British Columbia have gone to
New Zealand or Australia sinco tho industrial slump struck this province.
Tho outbreak of war did sot mako aay
noticeable difference ln thla tide of
emigration to tho Antipodes. Tho Fed-
orationist is continually being asked if
lt is possible t« obtain absolutely reliant* itiformatibn aa to tho condition of
the labor market In Australia, by work-
era who aro thinking of going over
thero. For thit reason we wrote our
special correspondent, Mr. W. Francis
Ahem, Sydiey, Niw South Wales, asking him to make (fecial effort to secure
for na this information, and wo have
received reply- as below.—Editor B. 0.
Federatlonist.]
(Special Australian Correspondence.]
STDfcfe***, N, S W., Feb*. 18.—I have
been hard at work during the last few
weeks to. try and estimate what the
number of men out or work really is.
It is very difficult to get at, mainly because the majority of the unions do not
keep a proper system of unemployment
statistics; But after interviewing several individual .unions I am able to
gauge the position as under:
Pointers ind Carpenters Ont
Painters, paperhangers and decorators report that they* are slack, mainly because of the end of the building
boom. Of late many have been employed in painting transports, but there
is a slackening in this work now. There
are about 300 out of work, and many
on half time. The prospects are not
bright at present.
Carpenters and joiners say that there
are 250 men out of work out of a union
register of 2,500 men. Of late, ninny
men have bad casual work on transports.
Flour Millers All Busy
Progressive carpenters nnd joiners,
2,000 strong, sny that about 200 of
their men hnve had no work or part
time only since last November. Only
half their body nre making full time
all the time.
Trolley and. draymen say that work
is good, -They9 tinve 3,600 men in their
union. There nre nt present very
few unemployed. Mnny of the men
who wero out of work have gone to the
war with army medical corps, as drivers, etc.
Bricklayers union of 3,000 men say
that about 350 of their men are«out of
work at present.
Flour millers, 750 strong, are all at
work, but future is not too bright.
Metal Miners Hard Hit
Federated Mine Employees have had
» very bad timo. War has hit them
very hord'. In ordinary times, there are
4,0p0 on tho union register. To-day but
1,300 are on the roll; 2,700 are out of
work, becnuse of the fact thnt export
of silver and copper by-products, and
other metals is stopped, Germany being
only the sole buyer of this material.
There is no prospect for these men till
the war ends. This of course does not
apply to eonl miners, which is dealt
with elsewhere.
United Laborers of over 7,000 men
do not think things too bad. They have
at all times a few out of work, and this
is no worse thnn at any othor time.
Transports and metal quarries have
taken much of their surplus lnbor.
POUTIOAL ONITT: VICTOBT j
(Nfffrsr) H^lriAi
A      Attn He. on— . hat?
A number.of prominent workers in labor and socialist clrcfei
on both aides p' the Atlantic are urging, ao long ao anil-amenta
are considered necessary, Uiat the governmental ahall directly
control all auch work and that private profits In this conneotlon
shall cease.
Sown 'mid an orgy of crystallized hate-
WHO will reap-^when the reaping we tee?
WHO will rejoice when the fields have been gleaned
And what indeed, will the Harvest be?
Will the song which heralds the Harvest home
Echo of time and of lives welt spent?   .
Will the chofus, rising to Heaven's blue dome.
Be one by ho ugly discords rent?
"Be ready for war" to have lasting peace—
So runs the lying and time-worn screed;
WUl ii still survive when the conflict cease
fo perpetuate unholy greed?
Can a man gather figs from thistles sown;
Or a tree be untrue to its kind?
Achieve the Millenium by hope alone
And cast war with its horrors behind?
Reaping will bring tb the storehouse of Fate
Whatsoever the nations have sown;
And the major part of that crop bis Hate-
Misdirected, perhaps, but lull-blown.
The anharheht ghouls will rub their hattds
And mutter and peep in hellish glee;
For Hate is an asset in all these lands',     ,
And THEY know what tht harvest will bt!
they reap not alone what others havt sowh,
. For these fields thty have carefully tilled;
And what care they though the nations' may groan-
Private Profit is not 'rnohg the killed.
(He is in the thick of each deadly fight,
, In the pack of both sides he's the deuce.
If absent at all it's surely "not right"—
Like the days df the one "Christmas" truck)
Will the workers reap when reaping ttae comes—     ,
Will they garner a crop of sound sense?
Or return content to impoverished homes
With "Thank you, boys," as a recompense?
Will they hold a court-martial of their own
On the curse-sowing devil, employed;
The nations his harvest of Hate disown
When Private Profit has been destroyed?
-W. R, Trotter.
Vancouver, Canada/*.
-JDDMJDE
KILLS FFTY
Unorganized Victims Ha)
Nd Chaw* to Protwt
or Escape
Labor Minister Asks Ted>
to Extend Sympathy
to Survivors
Iron and Culinary Workers
Hotel, .Restaurant and Caterers' union reports little unemployment, At
present time this union ia having trouble over a wage reduction. Otherwise
nil is well.
Other small unions report, much the
same ns above—not a great deal of inconvenience or unemployment through
war.
Federated Ironworkers of 2,000 mon
has about 400 out of work, though not
badly off. War has made no difference
to this union, as what was lost in one
way is taken up by extra defence
works. This union hopes to be in better position soon.
Miners and Longshoremen
Miners Federation of 10,000 men on
all fields, say thnt apart from men on
strike at the live collieries in Newcastle district, things nre fairly good. Men
on strike nre suffering no hnrdships,
owing to their getting strike pay every
week.
Wharf laborers and sen front men
have about same numbers at work as at
corresponding period last year. There is
not so much unemployment owing to
the fact thnt over 500 have enlisted for
front.
Bailway Employment Better
Railway Workors and General Laborers' Association report thnt war bus
helped them. Their membership was at
12,000 at first month of the war, now it
is over 18,000 strong. This union consists of men engnged on railway works.
They are all getting, four and half
days per week, and there is, on account
of this arrangement of work, no unemployment. Large increase is due to the
fact thnt the government has opened
new works to absorb men from other
walks of life, nnd these men to number of 6,000 have joined this.union.
Public Works Staff Retained
Public Works Department of N, 8.
Wales, which goes through about £10,-
000,000 worth of work yearly, has not
decreased stuffs of men, any shortage
of work is being met by men working
one day per week less and so saving unemployment.
Hay Invite E, V. Debs
MOBE "COMPENSATION"
Another Victim of Industrial Accident
Forced into Expensive Litigation
Before Mr. Justice Morrison, in the
supreme court, this week, the action of
Pearson vs. the Pacific Dredging Company was commenced, the suit being
for damages for Injuries aufitairfed by
plaintiff while working for the company on the bank of the Fraser River,
Defendants were the contractors for
clearing the bed and banks of the river
at Hell's Gate Canyon, and plaintiff
on June 20 last was engaged in drilling
holes in small boulders for the purpose
of allowing the dog hooks to grip them
in order that they might be taken
acrosB the river on a cable line. Defendants had men engaged nt a height
above plaintiff removing rockB, and it
Ih alleged that by reason of the negligence of defendants rooks were allowed
to fall down to the place where plaintiff was working, he being struck aad
as a result sustaining a broken arm, together with^, severe lacerations, which
had caused him to lose the use of his
left arm completely. Plaintiff is claiming $13,000 damages under common
law, or in the alternative $2,800 under'
tho Workmen's Compensation Act. Mr.
S, 8. Taylor, K. O.) is appenring for the
plaintiff, Mr. B. L. Reid, K. C, representing defendants.
RECLAMATION SCHEME
Harbfa Commissioners to Develop
Forty Acres ln False Creek
Word was received on Tuesday .from
Ottawa that an order-in-council had
been passed granting '42 acres of tide-
Hats in False Creek to the Vancouver
haroSf -c^imfniflsHmV*-The mtamrttton
of this large area, which extends on
both sides of Granville street bridge,
haH been under consideration .by tbe
commission for u considerable time, but
a crown grant had to be secured from      ,.„„ „„D UBlH, w Uu mo ovu
tho dominion government,  before   the j]fnff of a few industrial tyrants.
, General regret and sorrow will be felt
by every trade unionist in i"-—*   --"-
OIVIO EMPLOYEES MEET
Labor
Mass Meeting Last Friday in
Temple Was a Success
A well attended open mass meeting
was held by Vancouver Civic Employees union in Labor Temple last Friday evening. The purpose was to discuss organization and the coming provincial elections.
The meeting was addressed by Messrs. Bartley, Pettipiece*, Kilpatrick, McVety, Hardy and the chnirman, Mr. E.
C. Appleby. In addition to speeches,
there was music, singing and recitations, all of which contributed to make
it one of the most enjoyable and successful gatherings ever held by the
union.
BROTHEBHOOD OF OABPENTEB8
i-ichemo could be proceeded with. Commissioner McClay states that steps will
be taken at an early date to proceed
with the work. The general details of
the project have been mapped out. It is
the intention of the commission to develop the tract for industrial and warehouse sites, and it wns hoped by this
moans to provide Vancouver with something which it hns lacked hitherto, industrial sites in a. central locality on a
moderate rental basis. Incidentally, it
may mean the provision of a few jobs
for the unemployed of Vancouver.
BUILDING TBADES
Very Little Activity at Present, and
the Prospects are Very Uncertain
The building trades in Vancouver
have u gloomy outlook. The permits
being issued at the city hai) have beon
decreasing eaeh week, until now they
nro practicnlly nil. Quite a large number of building tradesmon have left the
city, while otfaerH have resorted to unskilled work of various kinds, from
sewer digging to farming. No new
cards are being received. Very little
organization work is being done at present, but it is said that the Brotherhood international intends to place a
man on the job next month.
PRINTEBS* MEETING
Regular Meeting of Local 226,1. T. 0.,
WlU Be Held Sunday at 2 P. M.
The typos, will   hold   their   regular
monthly meeting in  Labor Temple on
Sunday next, at 2 p. m. sharp.   Every
ihe victims of the disastrous snowali
at Britannia mines, Howe Sound,
Sunday night last, where a itopeado
snow and landslide swept to their deal
about SO human beings and injured ,
ethers. With what is eharaeteriau
by the few survivors as an almost if
describable aound, chiefly resembliq
the noise made by a colosaal explodtt
—the effect 61 a volume of air suddei
tcompressed and forced forward at -
terrific pace by a huge solid mass—hui
dreds of thousands of tons of earth ati
5' now ahd rocks and trees slid, withon
rawing, from their foundation, hid
up near the top of the mountain, anj
descended upon bunkhouse, eookhouee,
Vockhouie, tramway terminal and dwellings, completely wrecking and burying
them and killing the human beings who
ttceuplecV them.
No British Columbia landslide sine*
ihe Rogers Pass disaster, which occurred some five years ago, has equalled m
horror or destructiveness this eetaatn*
bhe which has occurred within twenty
miles of Vancouver, and none ha*
served better to illustrate the faot that
the miner, whether he works above or
below jffroilridy and whatever precaution n may be taken, lakes hli life M
his hands.
While it Ib true that all of the employees were non-union the sympathy
of every member of organised labor
goes out to them and especially thli
wives and children who were also included in the death roll.    .
It will,be remembered that a year
ago last February the union crew walk;
ed out and eventually the mine war
filled with representatives of nearlj
every nationality on the globe. Th|
company refused to abide by the deci
sion of a federal arbitration board
which had decided that the demands 4
the union were reasonable, and if nw
in words, in effect, told the governmental authorities to mind their own
business. The employees, being unorganized, were afraid to ask for anything that would make for safety. Ift
fact, to be known as ever having been
a union man was sufficient cause for instant dismissal. And with every Inch
of ground thereabouts company property, tue union was unable to regain
a foothold. The present employees are
truly slaves and have been cowed and
driven like cattle to do th'e every bidding of a few industrial tyrants. Mori
than fifty of the poor unfortunates have
had to pay the price at one fell swoop,
not to mention the dozens who havo
been maimed and injured from time tH
time since the strike, mostly due to incompetence.
It is to be hoped that a rigid investigation will follow, and that, in addition to placing the responsibility for*
the present disaster, some effort will be*
made to expose the whole rotten ayetem in vogue under the present management at Britannia, mines. ■ .. ...
Expression of Sympathy.
On Tuesday morning The Federation
1st received the following message o|
sympathy from Hon. T. W. Crothers;
federal minister of labor:
Ottawa, Ont., March 23,1015.
B. C. Federationist,
Labor Temple, Vancouver, B. O*
I have heard with deep regret of
the great calamity   at   Britannia,
mines.  I should be grateful to you
if you would kindly convey to the
survivors and to   bereaved   relatives an expression of my sincere
sympathy with them ln their distress.
T. W. CROTHERS,
Minister of Labor.
jritombcr in the city should be present.
International Advises Local 617 ThatiSevernl committee reports of interest
Orflganlaer Will Be Forthcoming
A good turnout was tho order of thi
day nt tbo regular meeting of Brother
hood of Carpenters, Local 017, on Mon
day night. Considerable discussion
took place on the relief expected from
hendquarters for organizing purposes,
nn organizer being promised. Action
wns taken on the nominations for lnbor candidates in the forthcoming provincial election, and the following were
nominated: Brothers Wilkinson, Hardy,
Trotter, Key, Kingsley, McVety. Bro.
Wilkinson was elected us delegate to
the parliamentary convention.
ti) the union will bo presented. Chair
men of chapels should also remember
that the next meeting of those officers
will be held on Saturday afternoon.
April 10th. The oxecutive committee
will go into session to-morrow nftei
noon at .t.'.'JO o'clock.
CONGRESS COMMITTEE
STRUCTURAL IRON WORKERS.
Despite Industrial Collapse Membership k
is Being Maintained Locally. '
"The membership of thi   	
Iron Workers is being maintained at
close to the eighty mark," Bald an ac
tive member to The Federationist yes
terday. "Quite truo a number of our
members nre working outside the city,
but their membership is being maintained here. There is a good deal of
bridge work going on and up till now
wc hnve no particular complaint to
make. Our memberhip is larger than
that of Seattle and Portland combined.
We have no kick coming."
To Meet at 7:30 P. M. on Wednesday,
March 31 st,
TJhe Trades and Lahor congress of
Canada convention committee, will
meet at room 217, Labor Temple, on
Wednesday, Mnreh lilst, at 71*80 p. m.,
prior to the regular meeting of the central lnbor body parliamentary committee, The members of the committeo to
date nre: Messrs. Pettipiece (chair-
Structural I mnn), Estinghausen, Sully, Brooks,
Hartley, Graham, Curnock and Knowles.
Mr. Klngsley's Position,
It is stated that Mr E. T. Kingsley,
the well-known  exponent of tho platform of the 'Socialist Party of Canndn,
A proposal is on foot to invite Eu-lwill not be a candidate of that body at
gene V. Debs to come to Winnipeg and |the coming elections, but that ho will
speak next Labor Day under the aus-1 support th:e political platform and pro-
pices of the Trades and Labor council, jpoanls of Mr. J. H. Hawthornthwalte.
Street Railwayman Dies Suddenly.
Denth's call cmne very suddenly on
Tuesduy morning to Benjamin Levin-
rion, a well-known member of the
Street Railway Employees' onion. He
expired near the corner of Broadway
and Main street while being helped up
tb I)r, Brric's office. Hemorrhage of the
brain is ascribed as the cause of his
sudden demise. Tho deceased was ap*
pnrently in good health 1n tlie morning,
and went nut on the early run. He
complained of feeling ill about 0 o'clock
and securing a relief man to take his
place, wns on his way to his home in
Mount Pleasant on a Fnirview car when
he almost collapsed as tho car reached
the corner of Main street and Broadway. Mr. McDermont, a friend of the
deceased, helped him out of the car
and they were on Jheir way up to Dr.
Bine's office when Levinson expired.
The deceased leaves a widow, and has
been in the employ of the B. C. B. B-
for some time.
California Typo. Conference
Twenty unionB affiliated with the California State Printers' Conference havo
adopted a resolution favoring n six-
hour work-day during the winter
months to relieve unemployment. They
also went on record as in favor of but
one union in the building trades industries,
McCarthy for Mayor.
It is definitely nnnouncod that, at tbe
coming municipal elections in San
Francisco, P. H. McCarthy will be the
enndidnte endorsed by the labor unionists for mayor. Mr. McCarthy has already served ono term as mayor of San
Francisco.
G. T. R. Men Want Raise
Representatives of the Grand Trunlt
Railway engineers and firemen have
presented tho company with a new
wngo nnd time schedule to replace iho
ono under which tho men hnve operated
for several years past and which terminates on April 1st. No details of the
new schedule havo boen given out 'for
publication, but it is said Tt requests an
increase in wnges of about 5 per cent.
nnd sets tho maximum number of hours
to be worked continuously at fourteen.
U. M. W. A. District 18 Agreement
For the past few weeks representatives of the minora nnd the coal operators of the Crow's Nest Valley nave
been in conference at Calghry with the
object of drafting a new agreement to
replace the one which Ib about to ex*
pire. Advices received this week 'state
thnt a possible basis of settlement haa
been arrived at, and that it will be
submitted to referendum of the men
March 20th. PAGE TWO
s.
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA^EDERATIONIST.
FBIDAT.
MABCH 26, 1615
INOOEPOBTED 1855
THB
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Bank
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♦8,800,000
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A general banking business transacted.   Circular letters of credit
Bank money orders.
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Interest allowed at highest
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The Royal Bank
of Canada
INCORPORATED 1Mt
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Total Assets - -
* I 11,100,09
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. ltt)
WE ALLOW INTEREST ON DEPOSIT* IN OUR
SAVINGS
DEPARTMENT
One Dollar will open
the account, and your
business will be welcome be It large or
email
THIRTEEN BBAN0HB8 IN
VANOOUVER
THE B. C. FEDERATIONIST
Published every Friday morning by the
B. C. Federationlit, Ltd.
B. Perm Pettlpleee Manager
J. W. Wilkinson ..Editor
Office: Room 217, Labor Tomple
Tel. exchange Soy. 7406.
Subscription: $1.60 per year; In Vancouver
City, 12.00; to unions subscribing
In a body, fl.00
~~ REPRB8ENTATVE?
Now Weitminiter., .W. E. Maiden, Box 914
1'rlnce Kupert W. E. Denning, Box 681
Vlotoria A. S. Weill, Box 1538
JS!
Affiliated wltb ths Weitern Ubor Preu
.  ,     Aiioclatlon.
'Unity of Labor; tho hope of the world."
FRIDAY  MABCH 26, 1915
B"
BRITANNIA
RULES THE
SLAVES
THE
INCOUORATED
1SSS
BANK OF
TORONTO
Asset*.
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..I41.0M.00O
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The Bank of Toronto offers to
all business people the advantage
of Us moot complete and modern
banking service. Msny yeara of
experience In Canadian Banking,
large resources, ample banking
facilities, carefully chosen connections, and tke service of efficient and accurate officers are
some of tke advantages gained
by transacting your banking affairs with this Institution.
Paid-up Capital $6,000,000
Reserved Funds.. .. ..16,307,272
MS HASTINOS STBBBT WEST
Doner Hastings and Carrall Sts.
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I   LAND
Splendid opportonltlei In Mixed
Fuming, Dairying, Stock tnd
-Tonltry. BrltUh Columbia
Granti Pre-emptions of 100 aeree
Co Aetual Settlers—
TBBMS—Residence on the Und
for nt leut three years; improve*
ments to tho extent of $5 per
aero; bringing under cultivation
at leut (We urea.
For further Information apply to
DEPUTY MINISTER OF
LANDS, VICTORIA, B.O.
SEORETARY, BUREAU OF
PROVINCIAL INFORMATION,
VICTORIA, B.O.
RITANNIA BEACH, where a disaster occured lut Sunday night
whioh killed fifty or more people
and injured half as many others, has an
ill-favored and notorious reputation
from a union standpoint. The property
is owned by an
American group of
capitalists, with a
"dummy" board of
directors in British Columbia, for the
purpose of formally complying with the
law. The company exercises on its property, absolute right of admission or
exclusion.
*        §        e        •
Persons going up there to look for a
job, <step on to the company 'a wharf
and are met by the company's policeman, who, on behalf of tlie company,
asks the new arrival what his business
with the company Ib. If any of the
human moles which the company employs are needed that day, he is permitted to go .up to the office and be
looked over. If not, ne is not allowed
to proceed farther, and the policeman
sees him back on the boat. Everyone
up there is free—to do aB he is told.
a .      ■ a a a
It is a notoriously non-union camp,
and in the early months of 1913 was the
scene of a strike of the Western Federation of Miners against the dictatorial methods of the company. As far
back as the summer of 1912 there was
trouble between the miners and officials,
owing to the latter refusing to allow
the men to hold union meetings in their
own time, and be visited toy tbeir secretary. A board of inquiry waB appointed by the dominion Department of
Labor under the provisions of the Industrial Disputes Investigation aot. The
findings of the board were in favor of
the men, but the company refused to accept them.
•        •        •        «
The men lay low for awhile, trying
to figure out just how they could overcome their difficulty. Finally at 4
o'clock on the morning or Christmas
day, 1912, they held a mass meeting
secretly and elected officers. However,
the company soon learned of their ac-
tion and trouble started again. It culminated on February 16, 1913, in the
company telling the miners to either
disband their union or they would be
discharged. The men replied by again
trying to eome to reasonable terms
with the company, but failing to do so,
400 of the men went on strike.
t       •       •       •
That wu the end of Britannia u a
union, or even semi-union camp. Some
union men have worked up there from
time to time since, but the company
did not know it, for erery man who arrived at the beach with a union card,
if the company knew it, was unceremoniously bundled back aboard the
boat. The camp wu filled up with nonunion workmen of overy nationality on
tho face of the earth—u a perusal of
the names in the list of killed and injured will shew. No union could have
have stopped the side of the mountain
falling on these men. But the incident
recalls the ugly history of the mines at
Britannia, beach.
and Labor council appeared before
theBe gentlemen with the suggestion
that, for the sake of all concerned it
would be well if they tempered their
methods with more commonsense and
cossackry. The reception the committee met with was, the bullheaded
obstinacy of vulgar tyrants vested with
a little brief authority which their intelligence was not equal to handling
properly.
#■«#*«
Mr. J. H. Hawthornthwalte, who at
that time was a member of the provincial parliament, went along with the
delegation. He had expressed his opinion of the whole miserable business in
very plain terms from a public platform
the previous night, by saying that Mr.
James Findlay as a mayor, "had not
enough brains to make his head ache;"
This was remembered the following
morning and brought the proceedings to
the place where it looked for a minute
or two as though Mr. Hnwthornthwaite
and Williamson would "mix." Prudence prevailed however, and the deputation got out without violence. But
one of the main things it lenrned whilst
it was there was, that Mr. Walter Leek
the conservative nominee, had no use
for trade unionism, and that should be
remembered by evory working roan
when he goes to the polls at the coming
provincial election.
CONSCRIPTION
AGAIN TO
THE FRONT
MR. WALTER LEEK, u one of
the new conservative ticket for
Vancouver olty, should get par
ticular attention from union men. As
the employer of non-union steamfltters,
and the pronounced-
opponent of union
labor he is well-
known. At • the
time of the free
speech riots on
Powell street park, Mr. Leek was one
of the city police commtBBtoners along
with Mr. Williamson and Mr. James
Findlay, ono of tbe most tactless men
who over occupied a mayoral chair.
LEEK HAS
NO USE FOR
UNIONISM
THE MOVE MADE at last week's
meeting of   Vancouver   Trades
and Labor council, to have that
body withdraw its endoreation from the
B. C. Federationiet, wu so.crude   and
transparent that no
A WORD one   waB    °'eco-'ved
from   the   start   a*
AB0UT to   what   the. out-
OURSELVES Come would be. It
was a clumsy Liberal frame-up and smelt badly of its
origin. The ostensible reason given by
those supporting the resolution to have
the council withdraw its endorsatlon
was, that we had published advertise
ments from firms or persons unfavorable to organized labor. That ground
has been gone over many times before,
and no one wishes more than we do
that the paper could be financed without advertisements. It could. But it
is not.
#        »        *
The real reason, aB the delegates
could see, was that The Federationist
does not believe the Liberal party is
any more use to the workers than the
Conservative party, and that we have
said so in very definite language. We
propose to continue saying so. The
vote in the council has served to
strengthen us in our conviction that we
are right. Conservative and Liberal
alike are, in our opinion, only two
names for the same thing. They represent two groups with similar commercial interests, struggling with each
other to control the power of the state,
but both drawing their sustenance
from the same source—the exploitation
of the labor power of the workers,
*      •      •      •
Our experience hu been that when
the workers combine to secure more
political power, Liberalism and Conservatism alike become what they really
are—mere names for the same thing—
and both parties join forces to crush
the aspirations of the working class for
a larger share in the good things of
life. Some of those who disagree with
us are doubtless honest and sincere in
their opposition. Some of them are not.
The former we hope to convince of
their error. The later we will fight and
expose overy time the occasion offers.
\
CONSCftlPTKMlJT BRITAIN, according to 'pr&iB.b-eports, is again
being proposed. It is stated that
the steady flow of recruits to the army
has fallen off so much as to make the
military authorities
consider the practicability of some
form of compulsory
service. In this
they are evidently
acting in concert with that portion of
the press which is willing to advocate
conscription. We are told that many
of those who formerly opposed it are
now more favorably disposed towards
the idea.
* a*        a
As an example, the Daily Mail, the
foremost (next to the Times) in the
powerful group of jingo journals controlled by the Harmsworth interests, of
which Lord Northcllffe is the heady
says:
"Immense-losses will have to be
endured," it Bays, "and grievous
gaps to our lines must be Ailed.
There is only one means by which
the steady flow of reinforcements
may be secured, and large numbers
maintained in the field—by compulsory service. That service is fairer, and large numbers maintained
in the field—by compulsory service.
That service is fairer to the individual than voluntary service, aB it
prevents shirking. It is democratic, treating all alike. It is automatic, keeping up the supply of
men without effort. It is necessary. ''
Such language in such a paper means
that it is inspired by the authorities as
a means of feeling out public sentiment
with regard to the proposal.
* •      «      •
For our part, we are of the opinion
that if the day comes wnen recruiting
for the army cannot be maintained except by openly forcing men to join, it
will be a sure sign that the mass of people are tired of the war. Thousands of
them who accepted it with favor at the
start, are even now beginning to feel
that ab working men and women the
war will not make one iota of improvement in their material condition
when it is over. It is that growing
feeling which is partly responsible for
the falling off in recruits.
* •       t       •
We believe that if a man joins the
army entirely of his own free will, because he believes it to be right, it is
his privilege to exercise his choice with'
out interference. On the other hand,
we certainly believe that no man should
be forced to join either by legal enactment, or by other forms of pressure designed to drive him into a course of action which his Bincerest convictions revolt against. There haa already been a
kind of indirect conscription, u the result of employers discharging their eligible men and placing them in the position where their only choice lay between starvation and enlistment.
•        •        •        t
That kind of thing has left a nasty
taate behind it which haB not been forgotten. As to conscription being democratic; well, it may suit tne hired
scribes of the Dally Mail to call it
that. But we have been too used to
hearing the same people citing the voluntary system as the most democratic,
to be taken in by their sudden change
of front. Such tactics deceive nobody.
If the authorities are convinced that
conscription is needed to keep up tho
supply of recruits, it will be just as well
for them to say so in plain terms. And
if they do, we strongly suspect that the
working classes of Britain will give
them an answer which will be as surprising aB it will be unwelcome.
dress, a process in which they are
assisted by the government making no
move to prevent them unless the agitation of organized labor compels it
for political reasons to do so.
Hepburn's "ad." said that he would '
give "the working man all that he is
entitled to." That's about the only\
way he could be humorous—without j
knowing it.
CIVIC
EMPLOYEES
13 PER DAT.
 „   union oard  entitles
i all the privileges of the
bor Temple Club.   Try It
A   paid-up
IS6-"
The morning after the memorable
Sunday when, in obedience to the orders of these stalwart champions of
British free speech, the police had ridden down and clubbed all and sundry
within three quarters of a mile of the
park, a deputation from   the   Trades
BOND BUYING
TIME
Yonr spring dividends can now bs placed at an exceptional advantage.
As Fiscal Agentsire offer City of Alberni nineteen year
$100 debentures at a price to yield 7 per cent, net, Interest
payable bait yearly.   Circular on request.
Canadian Financiers Trust Company
HEAD OFFICE 839 HASTINGS ST. W.     VANCOUVER. B.C.
Patrick Donnelly-GenwtJ M6?\a|en
IVIC   EMPLOYEES WAGES in
Vancouver are nominally 43 per
day of eight hours, but the actual conditions under which many of
them are working make it a very different matter.   Under the  Bcheme of
civic    retrenchment
they get two weeks
on and two weeks
off.    Some    months
ago, they were told that if they liked
to accept $2.50 per day, they might be
put on full time.   A few of them believed tho story, but moat of them did
not.   The latter felt it was only a plan
to break down the 43 rate, and then
put them on half timo just the same.
»        •        «        •
Sinco that time, if our information is
correct, some of those who were formerly  nmong the strongest  advocates   of
iticking to the $3 figuro, have experienced a change of heart in favor of offering to uccept a rate of $2,50 or $2.40
providing city officials  will  agree  to
putting the men on full time.   It is for
the civic employees to decide for them-
But we prophecy   that   even
though they may ht given a sort of
promise that they will be put on*full
time if they drop their wages, yet once
they have done so, the amount of relief
work which is now being done by the
city will be brought forward as an excuse for keeping the civic employees on
half time.   It looks as though someone
is trying to  persuade   the  civic  employees to cut their own throats.
Bowser was tendered an unanimous
nomination at the conservative convention. This course was adopted to avoid
the secret ballot whieh was felt to be
too dangerous a route.
A member of the Canadian contingent at the front writes home to say
that he has seen far more antagonism
displayed in a football match than
seems to exist between the men facing
each other in the trenches at that part
where he is.   Ever since the famous
Christmas truce" statements of this
kind have been filtering through. The
puzzling part of it is how men- Uke
that can be persuaded to go forth the
next hour or day and kill each other.
It is a noticeable thing that bread
dropped back to 5 cents a loaf in Chicago last Monday. Patriotic wheat
speculators and shipping interests who
were willing to see bread prices mountain high in the United States, as long
as they could make big profits by selling food to the combatants in Europe,
will be the only disappointed ones.
They are the only element which really
had any concern about the naval block-
Ask for labec Templo 'Pheae Exchange,
Seymour .T4W   (oalsss otherwise stated).
Bartendors—Oeo. W. Curnook, Room 808.
Brlcklayen—Wm. 8. Dagnall, Room 215.
Cooks,    Walton,    Waltroioeo—Room    203;
Andy Graham; phono Ber. 8414.
Electrical Workeri  (outiide)—E. H. Iforrl-
■on, Room 207.
Electrics) Workors  (Inilde)—F. L. Ettlnghauien, Room 207,
Engineer! (ettam)—Room 216; B. Prouder-
tut
Laborers—John Bully, Room 220.
Loniiboremen'a   Aaioclatlon —  Offloe,   148
Alexander itnot; F, Payne;  phono  Bar.
0880.
Muilelana—H. J, Brat-told, Booms 104-108,
Labor Tomplo.
Stnet Railway Employees -Fred. A. Hoover;
phone Sey. 808.
-lographlcal—R. H. Neelanda, Rooms 212-
8-1-4.
ABOUT "CANADA'S COPT."
Women's Paper Says Potatoes Sent to
Britain Were Sold.
The Woman's Dreadnought, the paper of the East London, England^ suffragettes, says: "The British dominions
overseas have each sent gifts of their
produce to relieve the poor people of
this country, during this time of Euro
pean war. A part of Canada's gift consisted of a large quantity of potatoes.
One hundred and seventy-five sacks of
these potatoes were sent to the Boyal
Ophthalmic hospital. A salesman ih the
borough. market bought the rest. He
was allowed to pick out the better potatoes. The quantity that he has bought
is 100 tons, and men are now busily
engaged emptying the potatoes from
the sacks on which ' Canada's Gift'
marked tc     private sacks.''
In New South Wales
The government of New South
Wales, through the miners' agitation,
have been forced to Introduce a new
Arbitration bill. Wages boards aro to
be retained, power given to boards to
lay down general principles as to oost
of living and wages, also to have power to appoint royal commissions to intervene in any large dispute.
Strikes are not to be prohibited—
the men are to get the right to strike
when occasion demands it. Owners
and men, under this new bill will be
compelled to come together and discuss
matters, with view of settlements, but
men not to penalized for striking.
This is duo to the influence the miners hove brought to bear on the government by threatening to appoint men
of their own to parliament, in case parliament did not frame a bill to their
liking.
Westminster Trust Co.
HEAD OFFICE NEW WESTMINSTER, B.C.
J. J. JONES, Man. Director. J. A. RENNIE, Sec-Trew.
ACTS AS ASSIGNEES, LIQUIDATORS AND RECEIVERS
INSURANCE IN ALL ITS BRANCHES
HOUSES, BUNGALOWS, STORES AND MODERN SUITES FOR RENT
at a Big Reduction
Safety Deposit Boxes for Rent at $2.60 up
Wills Drawn Free of Charge
Deposits Accepted and Interest at Four Par Cant. Allowed
on Daily Balances.
■uaiNtaa agent directory
Tj?s°.f
TRADE UNION   DIRECTORY
Allied Printing Trades Council—R. H, Neelands, Box 60.
Barbert—0, H. Grant, SIS Georgia street.
Bartenders—Geo. W, Curnocn, Hoom
SOS, Labor Temple.
Blacksmiths — Malcolm Porter, View
Hill P. O.
Bookbinders—W. H. Oowderoy, 1886 Thirty-
fourth avenue eaat.
Boilermaker*—a. Fraaer. nil Howe St.
Brewery Worken—frank Grahan, Labor
Temple.
Bricklayers—William 6. Dagnall, Room
216, Labor Temple.
Brotherhood of .Carpenters District Couneil—P. h. Barratt, Boom SOO, Lahor Temple.
Cliarntakeri—Gare Kurti Cigar Factory, 73
Water Street.
Cooki, Walten, Waltrenee—Andy Graham,
Room 200, tabor Temple.
Electrical Worken {ontilde)—B. H. Morriion, Boom SOT, Labor Temple.
Electrical Worken (Inilde)—Room 807; P.
L. Eitlnghanien.
Eaglneeri—E. Prendergut, Room SIS, Labor Temple.
Granite cutters—Edward Hurry, Columbia Hotel.
Garment Worken—Labor Templo,
Honoihoen—Labor Temple.
Lettercarrien—Robt. Wight, District SS.
Laboren—George Harriion, Room 320, Labor Temple.
Lathen—Victor B. Midgley. Labor Temple.
Locomotive Firemen and Engineert—C Howard, 807 Davie street.
Loco. Englneera—A. E. Solloway, 1091
Pacific.    Tel. Sev. 8071L.
Longihowmen—F. Payne. 10 Powell street.
Machinists—J. H. McVety, Room ill,
Labor Temple.
Mnilciani—H. J. Braiflold, Rooms 104-106,
Labor Templo.
Marbleworken—Frank Ball, Janes Bead,
B. O.
Holden.
Moving Picture Operators—L. B. Good
man, Labor Templo.
Painters—J,   Train,
Temple.
Room   SOS,   Labor
Love, politics, and religion, play bell
with things—and people.
There are more things in heaven and
earth than are dreamt of in Bowser's
philosophy—and he is likely to learn a
few of them before many moons are
passed.
Bowser's proposed Workmen's Compensation act may turn out to be an
ante-mortem deposition. It ought to
and will do if the workers know their
business.
Some people seem to think the affairs
of the working class can be adjusted
with u pair of compasses, a square and
a spirit level. They ought to spend
about five yours in executive office ini
the labor movement.
A Patriot
Employer of unskilled labor: "Owing to the labor market being overcrowded your wages will be reduced 50
per cent., and as it is but just tbat we
should all bear our share of the burden
I have deducted 10 per cent, on account
of the war taxes. Knowing also how
anxious you are to contribute to the
support of the dependents of our brave
soldiers, a further 10 per cent, will be
stopped for that purpose. In conclusion
I should like to warn you against the
evils of extravagance during these unhappy times. We will now sing in
chorus: 'Britons never shall be
slaves.' "
Miners Dead—Profits Go On
Despite Iosbcb consequent on the explosion in the Hillcrest mine early last
summer, the company came through the
year in fair shape. The net operating
profits were only about 25 per cent.
less than for 1913. The following from
the Montreal Star gives the details of
the company's flnanclal position at the
end of 1914.:
Net profits of the Hillcrest Collieries
Limited, for the year ending December
31 Inst, show net operating profits, after providing for all expenses, amounting to $92,704, a decrease of $32,316.
War is hell, and politics are not so
very much different.
Mr. Asquith admits that bread and
sugar are both 72 per cent, higher in
price In Britain now than they were
tbls time last year, but says it is no
more than can be expected and refuses
to take government action to control
food speculators. Again we see the
same government which denounces
working class effort to raise wages, and
which takes complete charge of the
manufacture of the means of death,
declining to exercise the same power
over the means of life.
It is said that the reasen the Liberals
adjourned their convention waB that
they wished to bo fully assured that
tho Rev. Dr. Mackay really is the representative of heaven above, aB it is
felt by them that nothing short of assistance from thnt quarter can bring
success in the coming election.
The conservative ticket is composed,
as we expected it would be, of five rubber stamps and the' big boss bully
Bowser. They can be relied upon to
Btep lively when he cracks his whip.
We have no preferences particularly,
among thom. But we don't forget
Wnlter Leek, the some-time co-partner
of James Findlnykovsky, the Cossack
chief.
Calgary Trades and Labor council
is having just the same kind of trouble
over the fair wages clause on government work as othor councils are. Contractors on the new grain elevator there
are paying carpenters lower than the
rate provided in the fair wage scale
which is included in the contract, and
a government inquiry is now being
made concerning it. What is being
done in Calgary is being done elsewhere. Contractors are taking advantage of conditions to force men to take
lower wages, and placing every obstacle
I in the way of workmen securing re
Plumbers—Room 300 1-S, Labor Temple.
"        --------     ^
          jim   Cornli
Eleventh Ave. Eaat.
s*»*>m     Ualr.H T      t
Pressmen—P. D. Edward, Labor _
Plasterers—John _James   Cornish,
impla,
fir
lips
Campbell,  4869 Ar-
VANCOUVER UNIONS [j
- "       "' N
TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL -
Meets flrat and third Thursdays. Exe- ,
cutlve board: Jaa. H. MoVety. president; '
F.   L,    Estlnghauien,    vlee-preildent j   Geo.
Bartley,   general   aeeretary,   S10   Labor
Temple; Mis- "   «."*----«-
Fretf
ansa h.
 ry,   8
, .. —. Outterldge,  dMunn
Fre tf A.  Hoover,  statistician;  sergeant- ,
at-aroii, John Sully; A. J. Crawford, Fred.
Knowles, W. R. Trotter, trustees.
ALLIED   PRINTING  TRADES    COUN- \
OIL.—Meets second Monday in the
moath. Preildent, H. J. Bothel; iecretary,
R. H. Neelanda, P. O, Box 00.
BARTENDERS' LOCAL No. 67I.-OP-
floe, Room SOS Labor Temple. Meeta
first Sunday of each month. President,
F. P. Lavlgne; financial secretary, Geo.
W. Curnook, Room SOS, Labor Temnle.
i Labor Temple.
BRICKLAYERS' AND MAHONS', NO.  1
—MeeU every Ut and Srd Tueaday,
p.m.,   Room  307.    President.   -fam
Jamea .
W, &. '
Haslett; corresponding secretary, ... _
Dagnall, Box 63; flnanclal aeoretary, F.
K. Brown; business agent. W. S. Dagnall, Room 216.
BROTHERHOOD   OF    BOILER	
and Iron Ship Bailden and Helpers
of America, Vancouver Lodge No; 101—
""*-  *—   -'    third   Mondaya,   I
Meets flrat  and
Preildent, F. Ba.H„„   „„.   „„...
iecretary, A. Fraier,.Wa-fffgL.
Ste^ja^r.isnas;. uj
COOKS.    WAITERS    AND    WAITRESSES
Union—-Meets   flrst   Friday- ln   eaoh
month, 8:80 p. m., Labor Temple.   A. Graham, builneia representative.   Ofllce:   Rood
300, Labor Temple.   Hoars:    6:80*. m. to
10; 2 to 6 p. m.   Competent help furnished
on_ ihort notice.   Phone Seymour 8^4./.
DISTRICT    COUNCIL   OF   CARPENTERS
meets ln room 309, Labor Temple, see*
ond and fourth Thureday of eaeh month, • ■
p. m.    President, O. H. Hardy; secretary,
F. L. Barratt; treaiurer, W. T, Taylor.   Lo- 1
eal No. 917 meeta   flnt   and   third   Mob* ,
day of eaeh month, and Looal 1047 amte
flnt and third Tnndty of etch month. _
ELECTRICAL WORKERS, LOCAL NO. 318
—Meeti room 801, Labor Temple, every
Monday, 8 p. m.    President, Sam   "■»1'--
557  Temple ton  Drive;  recording
; flnantfal eecretary
H. Morriioa, Room
and business agent,
207, Labor Temple.	
ELECTRICAL WORKERS, LOCAL NO.
6S1 (Inside Men)—Meets flnt and
third Mondaya of each month. Room SOS,
8 p. m. President, H. R. Van Sickle; recording secretary, J, M. Campbell; busl-
ness agent, F. L. JBatlnghausen, Room 307.
HOD0ARRIERS, BUILDING) AND COMMON |
Laborera* anion. No. 05—Meets flrat nnd J
third Friday of eaoh month. Labor Temple. 1
Preildent, E. C. Appleby, 1410 Pendrill St.;
iecretary, Oeorge Harriion; builneia agent
John Sully, room 230, Labor Temple.    All
laborera Invited to meeting.
MACHINISTS. NO.  183—MEETS 8ECONP i
and fourth Fridays at 8 p. m. Pretident, 'J
J. Mclvor; recording aeeretary, J, Brookes; 1
financial iecretary, J. H. MeVety.   '  f
MUSICIANS'    MUTUAL   PROTECTIVE
Union, Local No. 146, A. P. of M.- J
Meeta aeoond Sunday   of   each month,
803 Labor Temple.   President,  9, "  ~
vlea'prealdent, P. ftr"*""- "
Brasfleld;    treasurer,
XT*
8.ymour'T4»V.~
W.  "fowler." S—ii
Pattern Makers—J.
Kyle Btreet
Quarry  Workers—James Hepburn, ean
Columbia Hotel. I
Railroad Trainmen—A.   B.    MeCorvllle,
Box 241.
Railway Carmen—A. Robb. 410 Nelson
Street.
Seamen's Union,
Structural Iron Worker,—Room 901, Labor
Temple.
Stonecutter.—Jamee   Rsybsm,   P.   O.   Box
1047.
Sheet Metal Worken.
Street Railway Employees   Jamee 1. QrlRa,
100 Twenty-fifth arenue eoat.
Stereotypers—W. Bayley. care Provlnee,
City.
Telegraphers—E. B. Peppln, Box 413.
Trades and Labor Council—Oeo. Bartley,
Room HO Labor Temple.
Typographical—H. Neelands, Box II.
Tallors-C. McDonald, Box SOI.
Theatrical State Employee,—Oeo. W. Wis,
Bos Til.
Tllelayers   and   Helpers—Bran Thomas,
Labor Temple.
MENTION TRE B. O. FEDERATIONIST
Phone:   S.ymour silo
Supplies ud Repslre at AU Kinds
m. aoovn-L
BIOTOLES
Hutey-Da-rideen Motorcycle,
1018 Pender Strsst Wast
VSMOWSt, B. O.	
WILLOW HOSPITAL
ros
SICK CHILDREN
Corner Broadway and Willow
Phone Palnnont 8108
Hln Hall aad Mlae Weitley,
graduate Nunc,
PLASTERERS' OPERATIVE INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION, No. 69 —
Meeti every flnt and third Wednesday ln the
month In room 801, Laber Temple. Preildent, A, Harry; vlocpreoldeat, A. Berent.cn;
eornepondlnt eecretary, Joe Corniih, 1800
Eleventh arena, eeet; flnanclal eeentary, I
Qeorse Montgomery; treeionr, Harold Reld. J
PAINTBRS',.   PAPERHANOERS'.   AND
 ^™r»«.<-!*s*.   t«ll  lM-MMts  eyJS
_   —,  >«vn.  138—Meete  every
Thursday, 7.10 p.m. Preeldent, H. Grand
lal aeoretary,   *   ™ 	
flnanclL.  	
Comox  atreet,
Dowding,   IM
sgant, Ji
Temple.
-.   J.   Freckleton,   10281
recording   eecretary, R. 1
i.        J?0?*   atreet.     Business 1
fcmss Train,  Room 808,  Ubor |
PATTERN MAKERS' LEAGUE OF
NORTH AMERICA.—Vancouver and
vicinity. Branch meeta let and Srd Fridays at Labor Temple, room 205. Robert
C. Sampson, Pies., 747 Dunlevy Ave.;
Jos. 0. Lyon, flnanolal eecretary, 1711
Grant street; J, Campbell, secordlng aeo-
retary, 4111 Argyle street.
STEREOTTPERB' AND ELBCTROTTP- |
sis' Union, No. II, of Vancouver and '
Vlotoria—Meata   aeoond   Wednesdsy of 1
saeh month, 4 p. m., Labor Temple. Preeldent Chas. Bayley; recording aeoretary.
A. Birnle, Co. ''Newa Advertiser."
STREET AND ELECTRIC RAILWAY (M-
PLOYKES, Pioneer Blvlilon, No, 101— ■
Meete Labor Temple, eecond snd fourth Wed* '
neidere at 3:80 snd 8 p. m. Pmldent, Jos.
Hubble; neordlng eeentary, Jae. E. Orlfla;
180, Twenty-fifth avenue eut; flnenclel aee*
ntery and buiineu agent, Fred. A. Hoover,
3409 Clerk Drive.
STEAM  ENGINEERS,   INTERNATION-
al Local IK—Meeta every Wednesday
• p. m., nop Ml, Labor Temple. Flnan-
dtl aeerstary. B. Prsndsrgsst, room 111.
TAILORS' INDUSTRIAL UNION (IN-
ternatlonal). Local No. 171—Meetings
held first Tueeday In each month, 8 p. m.
Preeldent, Miss H. Gutteridge; recording
Moratory, O. McDonald, Box 803; flnen*
clal sec. K. Paterson, P. O. Box 803.
PANTAQES
Unequalled Vaudeville  Mesns
PANTAOH  VAUDIVILLI
THRU SHOW* DAILV
Ml, 7.80, 9.18    Sssson's  Prlcee:
Mstlnse, 1lo.| Ivsnlngs, 11c, Ms.
TYPOGRAPHICAL UNION, NO. IM —
Meete lsst Sunday et eeeh month st I
p. m. Preeldent, R. P. Pettlpleoe; vlerpnol*
dent, W. S. Metegev: oecntorytnooarer, R.
H. Neeleade, P. 0. Bos 08.
A devastating fits MAT DESTROY your hoot at any mo-
mspt.   Nons -ara exempt.
Are You Insured Against
Fire?
Wl miu Fin Insurance in
Good Board Companies.
DOW FRASER TRUST CO.
Netery Public
122 Haatinga St. West
Vaneouvar, and MoKsy Itstlon,
Burnsby, I. C.
Class st 1 o'clock Saturday.
(VNOMIt  OF  COAL   MINING!   NICU*
LATIONS
Coal mining lights of ths Dominion,
In Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,
the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Tor-
rltorles and In a portion of the Provlnee
of British Columbia, may bs tossed for
a term of twenty-one years at an annual
rental of 11 an acre. Net mon than
1,880 acres will ba leaaed ta one applicant.
Applications for lease must bs msds by
the applicant In person to tho Agent or
Sub-Agent of .the dlstriot In whloh the
rights applied for are situated.
In surveyed territory the lend must be
described by eeotions, or legal subdivisions of sections, and In unsurvayod territory the tract applied for shsll be
staked by the applicant himself.
Eaoh application must be accompanied
by a fee of IE, whloh will be refunded If
the rights applied for ara not available,
but not otherwise. A royalty ahall be
paid on the merchantable output of th.
mine at the rate of Ave centa per ton.
The pereon operating the mine si
furnish the Agent with sworn return,
accounting for tha full quantity of mar
ohantabla eoal mined and pay tha royal.
If the ooal mining rights
" operated, such rsturne
ed at least ones a
ty thereon,
are not  b	
should be furnl
but tSi Tsssay'may^bs'.psP
are  not  being -operated,
wuld ba furnished at least ones a year.
Ths lesss will Include the ooal mining
rights only, but ths leases may be permitted to purchase whatever available
eurface rlghta may be considered necessary for the warklng of tho mine at the
rata of 111 an acre.
For full Information application ahould
be mads to ths Saoretary of the Department of the Interior, Ottawa, or to any
Agent or Sub-Agant of Dominion Lands.
W  H  CORY
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N. B.—Unauthorised publication of this
advertleemeni will not bs paid for-JMH
PBOVnrOIAL UNIONS
B. O. FEDERATION OF LABOR—MeeU
In annual convention In January. Executive offlcen, 1015.10: Preildent, A. Watchman; vice-presidents—Vancouver, W. F.
Dunn, J, H. McVety; Victoria, B. Slmmom;
New Westmlmter, W. Tate*; Prince Rupert,
VV. E. Denning; Revelitoke, J. Lyon; Dlitrlet 38, U, M. W. of A. (Vancouver iiland),
8. Outhrle; Dlitrlet 18, V. M. W. of A.
(Orow'a Neit Valley), A. J. Carter; aeeretary treaiurer, A. S. Weill, P. O. box 1888, .
Vlotoria, B. 0.
KIMBERLET MINERS' ONION. NO. 100,
Weitern Federation of Minera—MeeU
Sunday evening! In Union kail. Priildint,
Alex. Wilion; aeflretary'treunrer, J. W.
Stewart, Klmberley, B, 0.
N1W WISTMINtTIR. B. C.
NEW WESTMINSTER TRADEB AND LA-
BOR Oounell—Meeta every aecond and
fourth Wednetday tt 8 p. tn. in Lnbor hall.
Preildent,  0.   Cropley;   financial   aeeretar]
R. A. Stoney; general   aeeretary,   W.
Maiden.   P.O. Bor"*    — —
vlted to attend.
Boi (84,   The public Is In*
PLUMBERS AND STRAHFITTERS' LOOAL
No. 488—Meete every eeoond end fourth l
Prldsr of month In Laser hell, TtIO p. n. I
President, D. sVebiteri eeentary, A. Me- I
Uren. P. 0. Bos 188, Mew Wntnieeler, J
B. 0. 1
VICTORIA, ». 0,
VICTORIA TRADES AMD LABOR COOK*
OIL— II..U Snt end third W.4oMder. ,
Leber hell,  1484 Oovernment etreet, et 11
6 m.   President, A. 8. Well.; uontery, P.
oldrldge, Boi 808, Victoria, B. 0.
OROA1IIZRD LABOR OOMPAMQS.
MEXTIOR TBI B. 0. PIDIRATIOMIST
LABOR  TEMPLE  COMPANY, LIMITED—I
Directors: Joe. ~ --.--■
Pettlpleoe, vlce-p
Jetaee Campbell, „. „. n„.luBVU, u«0, „„.-
bv, W. J. Negle, P. Blumberf, H. H. Pr.e.1
Msnsgtng director snd eeeretsry-treeiurer, J.I
H. MeVety, room 911, Labor Temple.
run   vuuram,  UIUL11.U— |
: Jes. Brown, preeldMiti R- P.I
e-presldenti Edward Lothian,!
II, J. W. Wllklnmn, 0.0. Wll-I
B, 0. FEDERATIONIST, LIMITED—Motel
at cell of preaident, Labor Temple, Van-1
oeaver, B, 0. Directors: Jamee Cempb.11,1
president; J. H. McVety, eeerelarr-lreuarerif
A. Wetehmen, A. 8. Well,. R. Pern. Pettl-1
piece, menegar, 117 Laber Temple. Tele-|
pheae:   Seymour T4SI. OfflOIAL    PAPER     VAIOOUVBR
TRADES   ARD   LABOB   OOUHOn,
COLUMBIA
SEVENTH YEAR.   No. 13.
Our Display of Summer
Wash Goods is the Talk
of the City
Wa never had snch a showing as this season.. lha vartsty
Is almost unlimited and tha prices are enticing and tempting.
Wise shoppers are purchasing now, while the stock is complete, instead of waiting till later, when many lines will naturally he broken., These several lines ara specially worthy
of notice.   Bead
WHITE VOILES—I inches at, par yard. Me. to SSe.
ORIMPLED.WHITE CREPES Yard 20c.
WHITE OOTTON MAEQUISETTES at  «c.
and Sic.
WHITE SPOTTED SWISS MUSLINB-Per Yard 30c.
WHITE OOTTON RATINES-Yard..... 86c.
WHITE POPLINS—10 inches wide, Yard 80c.
WHITE PIQUE CORDS At 50c. and 85c.
SWISS EMBEOIDERED VOILES 11.00
to $1.50
MATTING WHITE SHIRTINOS — Par Yard 25c. and 36c.
WHITE OOTTON OBEPE—Yard .60c.
WHITE CASHMERE DUCK—Yard 26c.
MQhrfiudson'sBauCompam •
_ .   J _M___a_t   \ata      nwjwt s kwhT itsjm* ___v___ 1
GRANVILLE AND GEORGIA STREETS
VANCOUVER, B. ti, FRIDAY; MARCH 26.1915.
SIX PAGES.
B. C. Workmen's Cotnpmsotion Ad
[Continued from Last Week.]       .In Case of Shortness of Service or Its1
SCALE   OF  COMPENSATION* Casual Nature.
Compensation ln Oaae of Death. (2.) Where, owing to the shortness
: 33.' (1.) Where death results from »<*'«"> _*. *■** which the workman
injury, the amount of the compensation!™.•» tke employment of hts employer
."ii i* ■* nr rtta no aim I   -nafnm  nr  hla Amnlnvmant
MAKE THE HOTEL LOTUS TOUR
HEADQUARTERS
VANCOUVER,    B.C.
Line Oom-
nodlousLonngt
Boons and
Parlors
Tariff:
Without Bath
Sl.00 up
With Bath
♦1.60 up
Abaolutely Fire-Proof
HOTEL LOTUS
Howard J. Sheebin, Mimger
WRITE NOW FOB YOUR RESERVATIONS
High Class Dental Services at
very Moderate Prices
OOLD AND PORCELAIN CROWNS, Each 8 5.00
BRIDGE WORK, per Tooth.      5.00
PERFECT FITTING PLATES     10.00
AMALGAM FILLINOS      1.60
ENAMEL FILLINOS      2.00
Diseases of the gums, including Pyorrhea, successfully treated.
All work guaranteed.
Dr. BRETT ANDERSON
Phont Snnwur 8381 Offlee:   101 Bank of Ottawa Building
602 Hastings Street West
(a.) The necessary expenses, of the
burial of the workman, not exceeding
aeventy-five dollars:
(b.) Where the widow or an invalid
widower is the sole dependent, a monthly sum of twenty dollars:
(c.) Where the dependents are . a
widow or an invalid widower and one
or more children, a monthly payment of
twenty dollars, with an additional
monthly payment of five dollars for
each child under the age of sixteen
years, not exceeding in the whole forty
dollars: f
(d.) Where the dependents are children, a monthly payment of ten dollars
to each child under the age of sixteen
years, not exceeding in the whole forty
dollars:
(e.) Where the workman was under
tho age of twenty-one years, and the
dependents are his parents or one of
them, a monthly payment of''twenty
dollars, ceasing when tne workman
would have attained the age of twenty-
one years or at such later period .as the
Board may deem just:
(f.) Where the sole dependents are
persons other than those mentioned in
the foregoing clauses, a sum reasonable
and proportionate to the pecuniary loss
to such dependents occasioned by the
death, to be determined by the Board,
but not exceeding in the whole forty
dollars per month.
Duration of Payments Under Clause (f)
of Subsection (1).
(2.) In the case provided for by
clause (f) of subsection (1), the payments shall continue only so long as in
the opinion of the Board it might reasonably have been expected, had the
workman lived, he would have continued to contribute to the support of
the dependents.
Compensation to Dependents.
(3.) Where there are both total and
partial dependents, the compensation
may be alloted partly to the total and
partly to the partial dependents.
Board May Apply Payment for Benefit
of Children,
^4.) Where the Board is of opinion
that for any reason it Ib necessary or
desirable that a payment in reapect of
a child should not be made directly to
its parent,' the Board may direct that
the payment be made to auch person or
be applied in such manner as the Board
may deem most for the advantage of
the child.
Compensation Not to Exceed Percentage' of Wages in Certain Oases.
(5.) The compensation payable as
provided by subsection (1) shall not in
any case exceed fifty-five per cent of
the average monthly earnings of the
workman mentioned in section 37, and
if the compensation payable under that
subsection would in any case exceed
that percentage it shall be reduced as-
cordingly, and where several persons
are entitled to montbiy payments the
payments shallbe reduced proportionately.
Marriage of Widow.
34. (1.) If a dependent widow marries, the monthly payments to her shall
cease, but she shall be entitled in lieu
of them to a lump sum equal to the
monthly payment for two years, and
or the casual nature of his employment
or the terms of it, it is impracticable
to compute the rate of remuneration as
of the date of the accident, regard may
be had to the average weekly or monthly amount which during the twelve
months previous to the accident was
being earned by a person in the same
grade employed at tbe same work by
the same employer, or if there is no
fierson so employed, then by a person
n the same grade employed in the same
class of employment and in the same
locality.
Where Two or More Employers.
(3.) Where the workman has entered
into concurrent contracts of ' service
with two or more employers under
which he worked at pne time for one of
them and at another time for another
of them, his average earnings shall be
computed -pn the basis of what he
would probably have been earning if
he had been employed solely in the employment of the employer for whom he
was working at the time of the accident.
Meaning of Employment by Same Employer Concurrently.
(4.) Employment by the same employer shall mean employment-by the
same employer in the grade in which
the workman was employed at the time
such lump sum shall be payable within men's Compensation    Board,"    which
sittings shall be held there, except
where it is expedient to hold sittings
elsewhere, and in that ease sittings nay
be held in any part of British Columbia.
Proceedings of Bo«rd. ,    .
53. The Commissioner shall sit at
such times and conduct his proceedings
in such manner as he may deem most
convenient for the proper discharge and
speedy dispatch of business.
Appointment of Secretary and Offleen.
54. '(1.) Subject to the approval of
the Lieutenant-Governor in Couneil, the
Board shall appoint a Seoretary and a
Chief Medical Officer, and may appoint
such auditors, actuaries, accountants,
inspectors, medical referees, officers,
clerks, and servants as the Board may
deem necessary for carrying out the
provisions of this Part, and may prescribe their duties and fix their salar
ies.
Tenure of Offlee.
(2.) Every person so appointed shall
hold office during the pleasure of the
Board, but the Board shall not remove
any such person from office except with
the approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council. % ,
Jurisdiction of Board
55. (1.) The Board shall have exclusive jurisdiction to examine into,
hear, and determine all matters and
questions arising under this Part and
as to any matter or thing in respect to.
which any power, authority, or discretion is conferred upon the Board, and
—   -— —-x—„-_ the action or decision of the Board
of the accident uninterrupted by ab- thereon shall be final, ana conclusive
sence from work due to illness or any > and shall not be open to question or re-
other unavoidable oause. I view in any Court, and no proceedings
Special Expenses Not to he Included, by or before the Board shall be re-
(5.) Where the employer was acous-(strained by injunction, prohibition, or
tomed to pay the workman a sum to .other process or proceeding in any
cover any special expenses entailed on n—-■*- -- *-- - •' "
him by the nature of his employment,
that sum Bhall not be reckoned as part
of his earnings,
Matters to be Considered in Fixing
Payments.
42. (1.) In fixing the amount of
weekly or monthly payment, regard
shall be had to any payment, allowance
or benefit whieh the workman may receive from his employer during the
period of his disability, including any
pension, gratuity, or other allowance
provided wholly at tbe expense of the
employer,
(2.) Where the compensation is payable out of the Accident Fund, any sum
deducted from the compensation under
subsection (1) may be paid to the employer out of the Accident Fund.
Provision for Fortnightly or Monthly
Payments.
43. Where the compensation is payable out of the Accident Fund, the
Board may, wherever it is deemed advisable, provide that the payments of
compensation may be fortnightly
monthly instead of weekly.
Payments ln Case of Infant.
44. Where a workman or a dependent
is an infant under the age of twenty-
one years or under nny other legal disability, the compensation to which he
iB entitled may be paid to such person
or be applied in such manner as the
Board may deem most for his advantage.
The Workmen's Compensation Board.
How Constituted.
45. There is hereby constituted a
Commission for the administration of
this Part, to bo called* "The   Work-
CcSTwgf)   H.60 PER YEAB
Great
Sacrifices are being nude to clear all inp-srflaoui Stock
at tht Store of
Wm. TURNER
A visit to oar store will easily convince you we are doing this.
PBIOES never were so Low and we can supply Anything
or Everything for the home in the way of Household.   ■'
III   FURNITURE
Event
„..-    ~TTnAT-D 906GRANVILLE
Particularly sot. thst Pries st. Lower thsn srsr.
Tour opportunity U NOW I   Sit. your doUsrs.
Every article guaranteed ss represented.
Phone:   SET. 3745
Grow Your Own
Vegetables, and cut down household expenses. In all onr experience we
never had hotter vegetable growing stock. Decide now—the ideal time
to sst; climate conditions are favorable.
SEED
POTATOES
Parsnips, Carrots,
Lettuce, Radish,
Rhubarb, Beans.
All the Best for
Early Setting
At All Our Branches.   Catalogue and Information Free.
ONION
Extra Oood
2 lbs. for 35c.
SETS
BrownBros.&Co.Ltd
PLOBISTS, SEEDSMEN AND
NURSERYMEN.
Office Furniture
Less Than Wholesale
Hastings Furniture Co., Ltd., 41 Hastings St. West
We are making a Clearance of
aU present stock of Offlce Furniture.
Oome early and make your
choice.
one month after    the ^day    of    her
marriage,
Exception.
(2.) Subsection (1) shall not apply
to payments to a widow in respect of a
child.
When Payments to Ohild Cease.
35. A monthly payment in respect of
a child shall cease when the child attains tho age of sixteen years or dies.
Expense of Medical Attendance Where
No Dependents.
Whoro a workman leaves no dependents, such sum as. the Board may
deem reasonable for the expenses of
hia medical attendance nnd other care
during his disability, and of his burial,
shall be pnid to the persons to whom
such expenses are due.
Compensation in Case of Permanent Total Disability.
37. Where permanent total disability
results from tho injury, the amount of
the compensation shall be a weekly'
payment during the life of tho workman equal to flfty-flv« per cent, of his
average weekly earnings during the previous twelve months if he has boen so
long employed, but if not, thon for any
less period during which he has been
in tho omploymont of his employer.
Permanent Partial Disability.
. (1.) Whore permanent partial disability results from the injury, tho compensation Bhall bo a weekly payment of
fifty-five per cent, of tho difference between tho average weokly earnings of
tho workman before tho accident and
tho nvornge amount which he is earning or is able to enrn in some suitable
omploymont or business after the accident, and the compensation shall be
payable during the lifetime of tho
workman.
Payment of Lump Sum.
(2.) Whore tho impairment    of   the
Bhall, until otherwise determined by
Act of the Legislature,. consist of one
member to be appointed by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council, and shall
be a body corporate.
Tenure of Office of OommlBsioner.
40. (1.) Such commissioner shall hold
office for the term of ton years following his appointment, but shall be removable by the Lieutenant-Governor on
the address of the Legislative' Assembly.
in subsection
hold offii
pointed,
Appointment
Subject to removal as provided ! JJESif8 re'
lection (1), a Commissioner shall      (i\ The
Rico until hia successor   is   ap* fl,„ ;„„„•,»„
Court or be removable by certiorari
or othrrwlse into any Court.
(2.) Without thereby limiting the
generality of the provisions of sub-section (1), it is declared that such exclusive jurisdiction shall extend to determining-—
(a.) Whether any industry or any
part, branch, or department of
any industry falls within any
of the classes for the time be
ing included in Schedule 1;
and, if bo, which of them:
. (b.) Whether any industry or any
part, branch, or department of
any industry falls within any
of the claBses for the time being included in Schedule 2;
and, if so, which of them:
(c.) Whether any part of any such
industry constitutes a, part,
branch, or department of an
industry within the meaning
of Part I.
Power to consider
(3.) Nothing in subsection (1) shall
prevent the Board from reconsidering
any matter which has been dealt with
by it or from rescinding, altering, or
amending any decision or order previously made, all of which the Board
shall have authority to do.
Power of Board as to awarding compensation for expenses,
56. The Board may award such sum
aB it may deem reasonable to the successful party to a contested claim for
compenaation or to any other contested
matter aa compenaation for the expenses he has been put to by reason
of or incidental to the contest, and an
order of the Board for the payment
by an employer or by a workman of any
sum so awarded, when filed in tho manner provided by section 58, shall become a judgment of the Coprt in which
it is filed and may be enforced accordingly.
Board may Act on Beport of Officers.
57. (1.) The Board may act upon the
report of any of its officers, and any inquiry which it shall be deemed necessary to make may be made by the Commissioner or by nn officer of the Board
or some other person appointed to make
the inquiry, and tho Board may act
"""" t!" "iport as to the result of the
appro
of   Commissioner
Tempore.
47. In case of the death, illness or absence from British Columbia    of   the
Commissioner or his inability   to act
from any cause, the Lieutenant-Governor in Council may appoint some person
to net pro tempore in his Btend,   and
the person so nppointed shnll have   all
the powers and perform all the duties
of the Commissioner.
Commissioner to Give Whole Time to
Duties.
41*. Tho  Commissioner  shall
person appointed to make
tho inquiry ahall for the purpose of the
inquiry have all the powers conferred
upon the Board by Bubsection (1) of
section 50.
Enforcement of Orders of Board
58. An order of the Board for tho
payment of compensation by an employer who is individually liable to pay
the compensation or any othor order of
the Board for the payment of money
mnde under tho authority of this Part,
or a copy of any such ordor certified
by the Secretary to be n true copy,
may be filed with nny District Registrar of tho Supreme Court, or with tho
devote [Registrar or Deputy Registrar of any
Salary.
40. The salary of the Commissioner
shall be sovon thousand dollars per
annum, and shall be paid by the Board.
Powers of Board.
50. (1.) The Board ahall have the
like powers as tho Supreme Court for
compelling tho attendance of witnesses
and of examining them under oath, and
compelling tho production of books, papers, documents, and things.
(2.) The Board may cause depositions of witnesses residing within or
without the Province to be takon before any person appointed by the Board
earning capacity of tlie workman doos in a similar manner to that prescribed
the wholo of his time to the perform-j County Court, nnd when so filed shall
dice of hia duties under this Part.        | become   an   order  of  thnt  Court   and
26% OFF ALL TRUSSES THIS MONTH
RED STAR DRUG STORE.
63 Cordova Street WeBt Vancouver, B. O.
HrtTCI Rt'RPNT Abaolutely Fireproof.   Ltfoal Mid Long-Ulslunot*
I1UJ.JCi.Li KEiU-bPU   phone In Every Boora.Cafe ln Connection. Rates
11.00 per dsy up.    Attractive Rstes to Permanent Quests.
leMaitan * Bssttr, Proprietor.  lot HaiMags itrsat lsst
I
PENDER HOTEL
811 P1HD1I STREET Will
Ms*,  Modern,  rin-VUu
Sleun Heated, Eleetrle Liable.
Telephone Seymour 1888
Rstes 111.80 per Dsy snd Up
MOUNT PLEASANT HEADQUARTERS
For Hardware, Btovei and Banget—
Everything* for the Kitohen
W. R. OWEN & MORRISON
Phone Fair.  2337 Main Btreet
not exceed ton per cent, of his earning
capacity, instead of such weekly payment tho Board sdmll, unless in the
opinion of the Board it would not be
to tho advantage of tho workman to do
so, direct that such lump sum aa may
be deemed to be the equvalent of it
shall be paid to the workman.
Temporary Total Disability,
39. Where temporary total disability
results from the injury, the compensation shall be tho same as that prescribed by section 37, but Bhall bo payable only So long as the disability liiHts.
Temporary Partial Disability.
40. Where temporary partial disability results frpm the injury, tho compensation shall be the same as that prescribed by section 38, but shall be payable only so long as the disability lasts,
and sub-section (2) of that section
shall apply. •
How Average Earnings  to  be   Computed.
41. (1.) Averago earnings shall be
computed in such a manner as iB best
calculated to give the rate per weok or
month at which the workman was remunerated, but not so as in any case
to exceed the rate of two thousand dollars per annum.
by the Rules of the .Supreme Court for
tho taking of like depositions in thnt
Court before a Commissioner.
Commissioner to be Disqualified ln Certain Casss,
51. (1.) The Commissioner shall not,
directly or indirectly,—
(a.) Havo, purchase, take, or become
interested in any industry to which
this Pnrt applies, or any bond, debenture, or other security or tho person
owning or carrying it on:
(b.) Be tho holder of shares, bonds,
dobonturos, or other securities of any
company which carries on the business
of employers' liability or accident insurance:
(o.) Havo any interest in any device,
machino, appliance, patented process,
or article which may be required or
UBed for tho prevention of accidents.
(2.) If any such industry, or interest
therein, or any such Bhare, bond, debenture, security, or thing comes to or bo*
comoB veBted in tho Commissioner by
will or by operation of law, and ho
doos not within three months thereafter sell nnd nbBolutoly disposo of it,
he Bhall censo to hold office.
Offices pf Board ud Sittings.
52. The offices of the Board Bhall be
situated ib the City of Victoria, and its
mny be enforced as a judgment of the
Court.
Regulations.
Power to Lieut-Governor to Disallow.
5H. (I.) Tho Board mny make such
regulations aB may bo doomed expedient
for carrying out tho provisions of this
Pnrt and to meet cnsoB not specially
provided for by this Part, and n certified copy of every regulation bo made
Bhall bo transmitted forthwith to the
Provincial Socretnry, and nny regulation mny, within ono month nftor it hns
been received by tho Provincial Secretary, bo disallowed by tho Lieutenant-
Governor in Council.
Publication.
(2.) Evory regulation which is approved by tho Lieutenant-Governor in
Council shall immediately after approval or on tho day named by him for thnt
purposo become effective, nnd nftor the
period for disallowance has expired
every othor regulation which has not
been disallowed shall become effective,
and evory regulation which has bocome
effective shall be forthwith published in
the Gazette.
Penalty.
(3.) Evory person who contravenes
nny such regulation after it has become
effective, or any rule of an association
formed as provided by section 05 which
haa been approved and ratified as provided by that section, shall for every
contravention incur a penalty not exceeding fifty dollars.
Determination of Workman's Bight to
Bring Action.
(4.) Whore an action in respect of
an Injury iB brought ngnlnst an employer by a workman or a dependent,
tho Board shall have jurisdiction npon
tho application of tho omployer to determine whothor tho workman or dependent iB entitled to maintain tho action or only to compensation under
Pnrt l.m and if tho Board determines
(Continued on Page Four.)
OAVID SPENCER, LTD.
DAVIO SPENCER, LTD.
Wire Fencing for
Lawn and Garden
Beet   Quality   annulled,
and WlU Rot But
30 ins. wide—Per ft.. .140
36 lu. wide—Per ft., .lie
We have a large assortment of garden gates to
match the above fencing,
In any slse. Prices from
♦4.00 upwards, according to
*Ue. ' . -
FLOWEB   OUABD  — A
very neat bordering for
(lower beds; can be set up
in one minute; needs no
support and is a protection
from cats and dogs.
12 in, price, per ft....8c
18 in., price, per ft....9c
English Made
Poultry Netting
We carry all sites in
stock and sell it only in
rolls of 80 yards. The quality is the best possible to
obtain and our price,   de*
llvered, will be found equal
to wholesale.
MflCH MESH—
12 ins. wide, per roll 11.80
18 ins. wide, per roll W.75
24 ins. wide, per roll 88.18
30 ins. wide, per roll 88.78
36 ins. wide, per roll 88*86
48 ins. wide, per roll 88*86
60 ins wide, per roll 84*80
72 ins. wide, per roll 88.90
Pittsburg
Field Fencing
Every crosspiece is electrically welded; strands are
made of 11 and 14 gauge
wire; ia perfectly galvanised; cannot possibly sag,
and without a doubt the
most perfect field fence on
the market today. This
fencing is sold in 10-rod
rolls only, 165 feet in roll.
30 Ins. high, per roll 84.50
46 ins. high, per roll 8840
58 ins. high,, per roll 86.00
David Spencer Limited
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
DAVID SPENCER! LTD.
BOYS' CLOTHING DEPARTMENT
Spring Clothes, Economically Priced
„    AB lines
> years te
?£___-___* "' —» •*"•*■ *- *&* «<
___u. aeet.lt, Soorta,  dsaadlu
Worsteds an representee In all (rates.
CLUBB & STEWART, Limited
388-816 HASTDTOS STRUT WIST
Sheet termor TM
No More Tooth Trouble
leutteTyim  *"*" """ **"'" tm','," *° m*' ,m *"* W°"T *° ■°" *» «
NATURE TEETH
WHEN I have fitted yoa frith my NATURE TEETHA-after thoronrhlr »».
FREE
Make an appointment tet P8EE examination.   Phons er call.
Dr. HALL
THB MODERN DENTIST
STANDARD BANK BUILDING
 <• BOOM 218	
PB0NE SEY. 4S79
OPEN EVENINGS. 7 te 8
S^^Xten bUAL IrtcttoUt (j|JOT ""s^S^?"'
Ws hsvs an sapls supply ef this coal, all lUtSMnts tt the
contrary notwithstanding
DELIVERED PRICES
Screened Lump—We reaereen It here 80.50 ner net ton
NM, No 1-Oood tor tht range       . Js.60 J." J,   lo°
Pes-No better value ever given »,.oo £r net Z
Hr,£*ft: 88.60 bed delivered
inilde  Fir 88 00  load  delivered
Thorough}, Dr, Cordwood, M-ln. and 16-ln 88.76 load delivered
Thoroughly Dry Cordwood, t-lt. long 81.00 eerd delivered
Thoroughly Dry Cordwood, lain, and 18ln 86.60 cord del vered
Short Slat* and Edging. 8200 loud delivered
$»X"t J.Hanbury & Co., Ltd SSTStm
LABOR TEMPLE CLUB, POOL
AND READINO ROOM OPEN
SEVEN DATS A WEEK.
SPEND TOUR SPARE TIME IN
THE LABOR TEMPLE FREE
HEADING ROOM.
The Cost of Operating Electric Household Appliances
is Merely Nominal
STUDY THIS TABLE OF HOURLY COSTS
FOR OPERATING A NUMBER OF THE MOST
POPULAR APPLIANCES AND REMEMBER
THE COMFORT AND CONVENIENCE ENJOYED, ESPECIALLY DURING THE SUMMER
MONTHS, BECAUSE OF THEIR USE.
ELECTRIC IRON
4 to 5 Cents per Hour
Total cost varies according to frequency
and duration of use.
COFFEE
PERCOLATOR
31-2 Cents per Hour
Generally used from 15
to 20 minutes for one
operation
ELECTRIC GRILL
4 to 51-2 Cts. per Hour
From 15 to 20 minutes'
use prepares an ordinary light meal.
ELECTRIC TOASTER
5 Cents per Hour
Gives very intense heat,
but is operated for only
a very short time.
ELECTRIC WASHER, 3 CENTS PER HOUR
Total cost depends upon amount of washing
to be done
ANY OF THESE APPLIANCES WILL BE
DEMONSTRATED FOR YOU AT
OUR SALESROOMS
B.C. ELECTRIC
Carrall and Hastings Sts.
1138 Granville St.
Near Davie PAGE FOUR
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
TBXWrt..,.,;.;.;; HJMJ0H to, IM
Leckie
Shoes
"BUILT   FOR   WEAR
STYLE AND COMFORT"
Made in British Columbia
Step into a LECKIE SHOE at your dealers today. Note the ease and comfort—the practical shoe.
LECKIE SHOES are made for men and boys who
require something better in shoes; There are no
"paper" soles or convict labor in tfcCKlE SHOES,
They are built—honestly built—in British Columbia
by British Columbians for British Columbians.
Demand LECKIE at leading dealers
SMOKE
D U X
TOBACCO      -
CIGARETTES
2 Ozs. 25c.
10 for 10c.
AN EGG SUBSTITUTE FOR
ALL BAKING PURPOSES
Use it Instead of
Expensive Eggs.
PURE AND WHOLESOME
60c. Tins contain the equivalent
of 8 dos. eggs.
25c. Tins contain tlie equivalent
of 2'/2. dos. eggs.
SPECIAL LAHOE TINS FOB
BAKER'S USE
See Our Demonstration
in the Grocery Department of David Spencer
Limited.
Crown Broom Works, Ltd.
332 FRONT STREET EAST
VANCOUVER, B. C.
PHONE:   FAIRMONT 1148
Manufacturers of the
Mother Goose, Duchess, King, Janitor Special,
Peerless, Princess, Province, Ladies' Carpet Perfection, Favorite, Ceiling
Broom, Warehouse Brooms
SUPPORT HOME INDUSTRY
SAUSAGE
81S
Dunsmuir
Sey. 3759
Hourly
Deliveries
HOME INDUSTRIES
KEEP YOUR MONEY IN CIRCULATION AT HOME
THE MEMBERS OF ORGANIZED LABOR IN GREATER VANOOUVER AEE SPENDING $20,000 PER DAT. FEDERATIONIST ADVERTISERS ARE ENTITLED TO THE PATRONAGE OF TRADE UNIONISTS AND
THEIR FRIENDS AND SYMPATHIZERS.   LOOK OVER THE LIST ON,-THIS PAGE:
B.C. WORKMEN'S
COMPENSATION ACT
(Continued from. Page Three.)
PURVEYORS TO ALL THE LEADING HOTELS
AND CLUBS,   OFFICERS'   MESSES, ETC., ETO
GENUINE   OLD   COUNTRY GRAIN-FED1
Pork Sausage, Poloneys,
Saveloys, Collard Heads,
Jellied Hocks and Pure Leaf Lard
that tho only right of tho workman or
dependent ia to such compensation the
action shall be for over stayed.
Audit of Accounts.
60. Tho accounts of the Board Bhall
be audited by the Auditor-General or
by an auditor appointed by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council for that
purpose, and the salary or remuneration of the lust-mentioned auditor shall
be paid by tho Board.
Report to Lieut-Governor.
61. (1.) The Board shalloon or before
the fifteenth day of January in each
year, make a report to the Lieutenant-
Governor of its transactions during the
next preceding calendar year, and such
report shall contain such particulars as
the Lieutenant-Governor in Council
may prescribe.
Beport to be Laid Before Assembly.
(2.) Every such' report shall be forthwith laid before the Legislature if the
Legislature is then in session, and if it
is not then in session, within fifteen
days after the opening of the next
session.
Sufficiency of Accident Fund to be Examined Into Yearly.
2. Once in each year, and oftener if
so required by the Lieutenant-Governor
in Council, a person named by him for
that purpose shall examine into the
affairs and business of the Board for
the purpose of determining as to the
sufficiency of the Accident Fund^ and
shall report thereon to the Lieutenant-
Governor in Council. The salary or remuneration of such person shall be paid
by the Board.
Contribution by the Province.
Provincial Orant Towards Costs of Administration.
\, To assist in defraying the    expenses incurred in the administration
of thia Part there shall be paid to the
Board out of the Consolidated Revenue
Fund such annual sum not exceeding
fifty thousand dollars as the Lieutenant-
Governor in Council may direct.
Accident Fund.
How Accident Fund to be Provided.
Compensation Payable Out of Accident
Fund in Certain Oases.
64. (1.) An Accident Fund shall be
provided by contributions, to bo made
in the manner hereinafter provided, by
the employers in the classes or groups
of industries for the timo being included in .Schedule 1, and compensation
payable in respect of accidents which
happen in any industry included in any
such classes or groups shall be payable
and shall be paid out of the Accident
Fund.
Industries ln Schedule 2 Not to Contribute.
(2.) .Notwithstanding the generality
of the description of the classes for the
time being included in Schedule 1, none
of the industries included in Schedule
2 shall form part of or be deemed to be
included in any of "vch classes, unless
it is added to Schedule 1 by the Board
under the authority conferred by this
Part.
Payment of Compensation Out of Reserves or Consolidated Revenue Fund.
65. Where at any time there is not
money available for payment of the
compensation which has become due
without resorting to the reserves, the
Board may pay such compensation out
of the reserves, and Bhall make   good
■ the amount withdrawn from the re-
; serves by making a special assessment
j upon the employers liable to provide the
I compensation or by including it in a
subsequent annual assessment; or where
it is for any reason deemed inexpedient
to withdraw the amount required from
the reserves, tho Lieutenant-Governor
in Council may direct that the same be
advanced out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund, and in that caBC the amount
advanced shall be collected by special
assessment, and when collected shall be
paid over to the Provincial Treasurer.
Sufficiency of Accident Fund   to   be
Maintained.
66. It shall be the duty of the Board
nt all times to maintain the Accident
Fund so that with the reserves, exclu
sive of the special -eservo, it shall bo
sufficient to meet all the payments to
be made out'of tho fund in respoct of
compensation as they Dccomo pnyublo,
and so as not to unduly or unfairly
to burden the employers in any clasB
in future years with payments which
are to bo made in those years in respect
of accidents which have previously
happened.
Reserve Funds.
67. (1.) Subject to section 86, it shall
not be obligatory upon the Board to
provide and maintain a reserve fund
which shall at all times be equal to the
capitalized value of tne payments of
compensation which will become due in
future years, unless tho Board shall be
of opinion that it is necessary to do bo
in order to comply with tho provisions
of section 66,
(2.) It shall not be nocossary that
the reaerve fund shall be uniform as to
alt classes, but, subject to sections 66
and 86, it shall be discretionary with
the Board to provide for a larger re-
Berve fund in ono or more of the classes
than in another or others of them.
Industries Not Specifically Included ln
Classes,
68. If any trade or business connected with the industries of—
Lumbering,mining,quarrying, fishing,
manufacturing, building, construction,
engineering, transportation, operation
of electric-power line, waterworks and
other public utilities, navigation, operation of boats, ships, tugs, and dredgeB,
operation of groin elevators and warehouses; teaming, scavenging, and streot-
cleaninfj; painting, decorating, and renovating, dyeing and cleaning; or any
occupation incidental thereto or immediately connected therewith, not included, in Schedule 2, is not ipcluded in
any of the classes mentioned in Sche
dule 1, the Board shall assign it to an
appropriate class or form an additional
class or classes embracing the trades or
businesses not so included, and until
that is done, except in so far as it may
be otherwise provided by the regulations, such trades und businesses shall
together constitute a separate group or
class and shall be deemed to be .included
in Schedule 1,
Juridlction of Board.
9. (1.) The Board shall have jurisdiction and authority to—
As to Rearrangement of Classes.
(a.) Rearrange any of tho classes for
the timo being included in'Schedule 1,
and yearly thereafter on or before such
date as shall be prescribed by the
Board, prepare and transmit to the
Board a statement of the amount of
the wagos earned by all his employees
during tho year then last past and an
estimate of the amount which will be
expended for wages during the theu
current year, and such additional information aB the Board may require, both
verified by the statutory declaration of
the employer or the manager of the
business, or where the employer is a
corporation, by an. officer of the corporation having a personal knowledge
of the matters to wMc-n the declaration
relates.
and withdraw' from uny class any   industry included in it and transfer it Separate Statements as   to Branches,
wholly or partly to any other class   or j Etc.
form it into a separate class, or exclude      (2() Where tho bu8ine88 of the em.
it from the operation of Part I.: pioyer embraces more than one branch
Establishing Other Glasses. |0f business or class of industry,   the
(b.) Establish  other  classes,  includ- Board may require separate statements
ing any of tne industries which are for
the time being included in Schedule 2,
or are not included in any of the classes
in Schedule 1:
Adding to Classes.
(c.) Add to any of the classes for
the time being included in Schedule 1
any industry which is not included ih
any of such classes.
Apportionment of   Burden   of Assessment According to Haiard of
Business, Etc.
(2.) Where in the opinion    of    the
to be made as to eaoh branch or class
of industry, and such statements shall
be made, verified, and transmitted as
provided by subsection (1).
(3.) If any employer does not make
and transmit to the Board the prescribed statement within the prescribed
time, the Board may base any assessment or supplementary assessment
thereafter made upon him on such sum
as in its opinion is the probable amount
of the pay-roll of the employer, and the
employer shall be bound thereby; but
if it is afterwards ascertained that suoh
Board the hazard to workmen in any of j amount is less than the actual amount
the industries embraced in a class is' of the pay-roll, the employer shall be
less than that in another or others of | liable to pay to the Board the differ-
such industries, or where for any other I ence between the amount for which he
reason it is deemed proper to do so, the iwns assessed and the amount for which
Board may subdivide the class into sub-1 he would havo been assessed    on the
classes, and if that is done the Board	
shall fix the percentages or proportions
of the contributions to the   Accident
Fund which are to be payable by the
employers in each sub-class.
Separate Accounts to be Kept for Each
Class and Sub-Class.
basis of his pay-roll,
Penalty.
(4.) If an employer does not comply
with the provisions of subsection (1)
or subsection (2), or if any statement
made in pursuance of their provisions
is not a true and accurate statement of
, ,) Separate accounts shall be keptany 0_ $_e mattors required to be set
of the amounts collected and expended fortn ;n ^ the employer for evory such
in respect ot every class and sub-class, non-compliance and for every such
but for the purpose of paying compen-! statement shall incur a penalty not ex-
sntion the Accident Fund shall, never- ceeding five hundred dollars.
theleBs, be deemed one and indivisible. I ,    ;.       .-._ _       m- __•'.
Varying Amounts   of   Assessments in! Examination of Accounts and Books of
Certain Oases. \ Employer.
Additional Percentage. 74- O0 The Board and any member
(4.) Where . greater nn.nber.of ac.1* fejft-J «J ^ggtmmft*
t^^S^J^TL'f^Z the 4' to examineVo books and ae-
than in the opinion of the Board ought
to have happened if proper precautions had been taken for the prevention of accidents in it, or where in the
opinion of,the Board the ways, works,
machinery,' or appliances in any industry are defective,, inadequate or insuffi-
counts of the employer and to mako
such other inquiry as the Board may
deem necessary for the purpose of ascertaining whether any statement furnished by tho Board under the provisions of section 73 is nn accurate
statement of the matters which .are re-
curat, the Board may, so long as such *red t0 b|J stated there* or o{ M.
condition in its opinion continues to icort,lnlllg the omount of the pay.roll
exist, add to the amount of any eontn- of _$„}„, and for the purpose
bution to the Accident Fund for which Lf J ,-& ''exominati(ra nnd \n^ity
an employer is liable in respect of such the Board ftnd the „ M appointed
industry such a percentage thereof as jghall have „„ fte *vm vhif.h_&y te
tho Board m* deem just, and may ooiferrtd on a Commissioner appointed
assess and levy the same upon such under the ,.FMic Inq„iriea AJ£..
employer, pr the Board may   excludo '
such industry from the class in which
it is included; and if it IB so excluded
the employer    shall    ue    individually
Penalty for Obstruction.
(2.) An employer and  every    other
porson who  obstructs or hinders    the
liable to pay the compensation to which j making of the examination and inquiry
any of his workman or their dependents I mentioned in subsection (1), or refuses
may therenf ter become entitled, and j to permit it to be made, shnll incur a
such industry shall be included in Sehc-! penalty not exceeding live hundred
dule 2. {dollars.
Collection and   Application   of Addi- 'Assessment May be Made to Correspond
tional Percentage. j witll pay.BoUs.
(5.) Any additional percentage levied i Penalty,
and collected under the next preceding | 75 (1 j If a Blntcracnt is £ourid to llc
subsection shnll be added to the Acci- innccurat0 tlle nBSCssmont Bhall be made
dent rund or applied in reduction of on tll0 tru0 nm01mt of jh„ pay.roii „s
the nssessment upon the other employ* OR,,ortnjnea  by  such  examination  and
ers in the class or sub-class to which
the employer from whom it is collected
belongs, as the Board may determine.
Withdrawing Small Industries From
Classes.
70. (1.) The Board may, in the oxer-
inquiry, or if an assessment has been
made against the employer on the basis
of his pay-roll being ns shown by tho
statement the employer shall pay to the
Board \ the difference between the
.amount for which he waa assessed and
cise of tho powers confei-red by the ftho amount for which he would have
next preceding section, withdraw or ex- j boon assessed if the amount of the pay-
elude from a class industries in which |'f had been truly stated and by way
not more than a stated number of work- \ot V^^Y a sum equal to such differ-
men are usually employed,   and    mayjenee*
afterwards add them to the class or Board May Believe Prom Penalty.
classes from which they have been j (2,) The Board, if satisfied that the
withdrawn, and any industry so with- (inaccuracy of the statement was not indrawn or excluded ahall not thereafter Jtentionnl nnd that the employor honest-
bo deemed to be included in Schedule 1 jly desired to furnish nn accurate statement, may relieve him from the pay-
jment of the penalty provided for by
subsection (1) or any part of it.
Board to Have Bight to Inspect Pre-
or Schedule 2.
Employers in Industries withdrawn under Subsection (1) may elect to
become Members of Class
(2.) Where industries are -withdrawn
or excluded from a class undor the authority of subsection (1), an employer
in nny of them may, nevertheless, elect
mlses of Employer.
70. (1.) The Board and any member
of it, and any officer or porson authorized by it for that purpose, Bhall havo
to become a member of tho class to the right ut all reasonable hours to
whieh but for the withdrawal or ex- enter into the establishment of any
elusion ho would hnve belonged, and if-employer who .is liable to contribute to
he so elects he shall be a member ofi the Accident Fund and tho premises
that clnsl and as such liable to contri- connected   with  it  and  overy part  of
butc to the Accident Fund, nnd his
industry shall be deemed to be embraced in Schedule 1.
Notice of Election.
(.1.) Notice of tho election shall be
given to the Secretary of the Board,
and the election' shnll be deemed to
have been made when the notice is received by him.
Powers may be Exercised as Occasion
Requires
71. The powers conferred by the next
preceding two sections may be exercised from time to time and as often
as in the opinion of the Board occasion
may require.
When Regulations become Effective.'
Publication.
72. A regulation or order made by the
Board under the authority of clause (a)
or clause (b) of subsection (1) of section 69 shall not have any force or effect unless approved by the Lieutennnt-
Govornor in Council, and when so approved it shall be published in the Gazette and shall take effect on the expiration of one month from the first publication of it in the Gazette,
Statements to be Furnished by
Employers,
73. (1.) Subject to the regulations,
every employer shall, not later than
three months before the date named by
Proclamation as mentioned in section 3,
thom for the purpose of ascertaining
whether tho ways, works, machinery, or
npplianues therein aro safo, adequate,
and sufficient, and whether all proper
precautions are taken for the prevention of accidents to the workmen employed in or about the establishment or
premises, and whether the safety ap-
plianceBor safeguards prescribed by law
are used and employed therein, or for
any other purpose which the Board may
deem necossary for the purpose of determining the proportion in which such
employer should contribute to the Accident Fund.
Penalty for Obstruction.
(2.) An employer and every other
person who obstructs or hinders the
making of any inspection made under
the authority of subsection (1), or refuses to permit it to be made, shall incur a penalty not exceeding five hundred dollars.
Information Obtained Not to be Divulged.
77. (1.) No officer of the Board and
no persbn authorized to make an in*
quiry under this Part shall divulge or
allow to be divulged, except in tho performance of his duties or undor the
authority of the Board, any information
obtained by him or which has come to
his knowledge in making or in connection with an inspection or inquiry under
this Part.
(To be Continued.)
B.G.
Distillery
Co.. Ltd.
Established 1903
B. C. Special
RYE
Nine Years in Wood
UNSURPASSED
IN QUALITY
AND FLAVOR
ASK FOR SAMPLE
BOTTLE AT ANY
LIQUOR STORE
B.C. Whisky
Is a
HOME PRODUCT
Ask for "B. CSpecial"
"Satisfaction—or Money Back, at Any Oncer's."
ESTABLISHED 1804.
B.C. VINEGAR WORKS
■    Manufacturers of
Vinegar - Cider - Sauerkraut
BRANDS:
"Sunset" Malt and White Wine Vinegar, "Special" Malt and
White Wine Vinegar, "Mackensie's" Malt and White Wine Vinegar, >
Okanagan Older Vinegar, Okanagan Sweet Cider, Boiled Older, B. O.
Sauerkraut.
Manufactured in Bond under Inland Rovonuo Supervision.
factory:   1365 POWELL ST., VANCOUVER, B. 0. .
CAPACITY 16,000 OALLONS PER MONTH
Manager:  James H. Falconer Phone:  Highland 885
What Constitutes QUALITY in Beer
Healthfulness, combined with good flavor and taste, means real quality in
Beer. These are impossible without the
very best material and the highest order of treating.  In
PREMIER BEEfe
we provide the public with a good palatable and wholesome Beer of the highest quality.
Order a case from your own dealer.
New Westminster Brewery
PREMIER
Pancake and Waffle Flour
Best Ever - Agreeable To All Sense
MADE IN VANCOUVER
How Can I Make a Success
Of the Poultry Business?
EASILY    ANSWERED
Use an Essex Model Hot
Air or Jubilee Hot Water Incubator, and an International Sanitary Hover.
SUCCESS WILL
FOLLOW
We specialise is all
kinds of Poultry Supplies.  -
MARK DUMOND
Hardware and MeOonnlek Farm Machinery I
1048 MAIN STREET Write for Catalogue and Prices I fBIDAY...  MABCH 86, 1815
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA PEDERATlONllST.
Ask for   "NAB 0 B" Products
TEA SPICES
COFFEE IOINOS
JELLY POWDER PUDDINOS
FLAVORINO EXTRACTS BAKING POWDER
AT YOUK GROCER
Get and use "NABOB" everytime
10c.
APkt.
I, A^t    THE BEST YET
RED ARROW
BISCUIT
W^hen its Biscuits say "RED ARROW"
Manufactured by the
National Biscuit Co., Ltd.
Manufacturers of Red Arrow and National Biscuits
Haida Confections
VANCOUVER       -       -       B.C.
9pRNs-
USE ONLY
SHAMROCK
LEAF
PURE LARD
P. Burns & Co., Ltd
VANCOUVER
CALGARY
EDMONTON
Don't Procrastinate—Plant Soon
The British Columbia applea, In a world competition, captured the Gold Medal
Priie
This means that the B. 0. orchards will lead the world, A word to the wise Is
sufficient.
- v\Ve are offering choice varieties of our one-year-old apple tree atock at Ten Dollars per 100; two and three-year-old stock reduced accordingly. Our other fruit
tree stock and general nursery stock we give 30 per cent, off catalogue price allowed tn additional stock    Cash to accompany order.
In our stock of over 1100,000 we have everything you want to make your orchards
greater and your gardens more bautlful.   Catalogues mailed free oa application.
Patronise home growers, and build up a home pay roll.
ROYAL NURSERIES, Limited
B«d OMos:   no Dominion Bail-Uni, S07 Haitiafa attest West
Telephone:   flaj-aonr S56S
Store:   2410 OranvUla Stmt. Minis*
telephone:   Bayvlsw 1910
Nonaries aad Oreeahonsss st Boys! ea Bbnns Uae B. 0. Blsotrlc
,  Islsphont:   Bbnns M
Bsiilsacs: MSI Blreh Stmt.
Fhoas:   Bants* 1»0»B
Oflcs:    tot Bitks BnUdiaf
Phons:   Beymoor 7070
Vancoavsr, B. 0.
DR. A. McKAY JORDAN
80 Years a Specialist
Eyes Examined     —    Glasses Fitted
Personal consultation Friday and Saturday
Blf&tra thousand patients In B. 0.. thong*
audi of whom praviouily raffand from
chronic Stomach and Haart troubles, Baok
and Headache, ln ignorance of tho cum.
Don't Tall Ua Tour Troubles.  I'll Hat
thom.
Reference:   Manager of thla paper.
HOTEL ST. REGIS
H. TOUFORD FITZSIMMONS, Manager
Greater Vancouver's
Newest Hotel
European Plan
RATES:
$1.00 per Day and Up
Seymour & Dunsmuir Sts. Vancouver
One Block from Labor Temple
When You Want a
First-Class Beer
-OKE THAT YOU CAN'T BEAT AT ANT PMOB, IN ANT
OOTOTET, OUT BBSS WITH THIB LABEL ON. PINTS, HX
roB nrrr obots, ""
BBBWBD AND BOTTLBD IN VANOOOTBB 87
VANCOUVER BREWERIES, Ltd.
PAOEFTVE
E
Had No Time to Gather Its
Forces and Resist
Prejudices
Despite War the Ideal of
Solidarity is Not Less
Beautiful
[By John D. Barry.]
Just now it seems almost like a
ghastly joke to speak of solidarity
among the workers of the world. In
Europe, for the past few weeks, the
workers have been tragically showing
their lack of solidarity. . There has
been an arrayal, not of class. against
class, but of muss against mass, the
masses including millions »f those industrial laborers whose interests are
essentially identical. Never before has
labor so bitterly disappointed the hopes
of its brothers and sisters across the
seas. Never before did it have such
a chance to show its might,. The best
that can be said for it is that, taken
unawares, it had no time to gather its
forces, to assert its principles, and to
resist the, conventions and the prejudices and the patriotic enthusiasm sustained for many generations.
Labor Bobbed of Victory
If, by means of solidarity, labor bed
resisted the war,. it would have won
universal applause. Many -of its bitterest ' foes would have thrown up their
hats. No triumph on the battlefield
could have compared with this triumph. 6f all the victories of peace in
history this victory would have been
the greatest. Above the inhumanity of
kings the humanity of labor would have
shone like a star.      •
A Wesson for the Future
However, the war makes the ideal of
solidarity not less beautiful but even
more appealing. Its failure in this
crisis must give it a stronger hold on
the workers in the crisis yet to eome.
At any rate, the next time they are
not likely to be taken by surprise. Now
they cannot fail to see that internationalism must be something more than
a mere name if It is to sustain the
mighty structure of labor that is built
of the spirit and the energy of all the
laborers the world over, without reference to sex, creed or color.
Greater Than All Else
By comparison solidarity makes all
the other aspirations of labor seem
transient and insignificant. It iB as big
as all humanity. It reaches to the laborers in the depths and it gives them
the promise of standing side by side
with their brothers on the heights. It
sweeps aside the wretched prejudices
tnat so long have caused estrangement
among mankind. Its eager acceptance
as a faith by multitudes the world over
during the past few years show how
superficial those prejudices were and
how misleading. What it needs now Is
to find the way to teach mankind how
to put the faith into practice. Theories
can be sanctified only by deeds. The
task is mighty. But the rewards are
proportionate. To ask men in one
generation to break the bonds that have
separated the nations of the past and
to become broad enough in spirit to
include all the nations in their practical consideration as well as in   their
see, not foes, but allies. Eaeh year
they see the truth growing more plain
that the weakness of labor in one part
of the world weakens labor in all parts
of the world,, that labor is one great
organism, the blood of each laborer
contributing to the life of the whole.
Barrier! to Break '
Even while the barrier of language
ersists, other barriers can be thrown
own. They include the pride that
makes people rejoice in the advantage
of their own country wrung from the
advantage of another country. ' Shall
the laborers of one nation rejoice because their fellow laborers across a
purely imaginary line have been subjected to a crushing taxf When the
situation is seen in its reality such re*
joicing becomes impossible through being inhuman.
ly solidarity the workers of the
world have nothing to lose and everything to gain. Their way, out lies in
their own minds. All they have to do
is to make themselves > big enough in
thought to compass their emancipation
and their emancipation means the winning of the world for all who are willing to work. It means universal cooperation on terms of Christianity, the
realization, not in theory alone, but in
practice of universal brotherhood1.
i"
M ON THE
IE
Canadian Federation of Labor Almost Out of
Existence
Despite Bad Conditions of
Late, International
Unions Increase
Canadian tradeB unionsism, favored
by employers, is on the decline, while
international trades unionism is on the
increase, is the story told in figures
just issued by the Dominion government.
Statistics just to hand clearly demonstrate that, deBpite the keen industrial depression of the last two years
international unionism in Canada continues to make steady headway.
During 1913 and 1914 the net gain
in membership was 42,679.
It is distinctly discouraging to note
that it is only the international unions
that are making progress, for while
the period enumerated the nationalist,
or purely Canadian movement, had 26
less lesB locals than they possessed two
years ago. In 1911 there were 133,132
trade unionists in Canada; the following year this number had increased to
160,120, and for the year ending March,
1914, it had amounted up to 175,799.
Out of this number 149,577 were enrolled in the membership of the international organizations, and all non-international unions combined, including
purely independent bodies, could only
muster up 26,222. Of theBe the Canadian Federated Letter Camera are affiliated with the Trades and Labor Con
THE PRISON SYSTEM
Siing Sing Officer Says State
Prison Makes the
Criminals
More  Humane  Treatment
Brings Better Results
Than Old Method
"Our present prison system is a complete failure. Two thirds of the prisoners in the New Tork Btate insttutions
are second and third termers. Men
come back again and again because of
the lack of proper education/' says
Thomas Mott Osborne, warden of Sing
Sing prison, N. 7., discussing the question of prison reform, before an audience of 4,000 people recently. The meeting was held under the auspices of the
Men's League of the Peoples Presbyterian chureh.
"There is no confirmed criminal except what the'state makes. Putting
men in an unnatural environment we
make an unnatural criminal," asserted
Osborne-
"One man I know was a finished
product of the system. He began at
the age of seven months, in ah orphan
asylum, passing through the Catholic
Protectory, House of Reform, Elmira,
seven penitentiaries, and three state
priBons, He still has to visit the in
sane asylum.
"There are no criminal types. Lorn*
broso has been entirely disproven, while
Havlock Ellis' stuff on criminality is
rubbish. Men are simply the products
of heredity, environment and training.
Those of ub outride of prison are simply lucky in not being caught, that's
all."
Warden Osborne condemned severely
the old system at Sing Sing.
"The cells in Auburn prison, which,
by the way, is 100 years old this year,
are 7 feet high, 7% feet long and 4 feet
wide. In Sing Sing, built in 1826, they
are 6% feet high, 6 feet long and 3
feet 4 inches wide. Try to imagine
the stench in a July day emanating
from 1,600 cells in the cell block. On
damp days with the palm of your hand
you ean scrape the dampness off the
walls. Think what it means when 300
men are doubled up for lack of room,
sometimes three in a cell. Consider the
terrible- degeneration, physically, mentally and morally. And for their labor,
the prisoners are paid the munificent
sum of 1% cents a dayi
"I still owe the Btate 41 cents, having spent 14 hours in the cooler, receiving only a piece of hard bread and
a gill (six tablespoonsful) of water,
he added sarcastically.
Osborne told of some of the reforms
that have been instituted recently in
Sing Sing.
"In the olden days, men were absolutely forbidden to talk.   The   constant watching by tho 'screws' drove
many prisoners insane.   We have been
trying to do away altogether with the
espionage and tale-carrying.   We have
gress of Canada and are given recog-jput the men on their honor.   A freer
nition and assistance by the interna-'intercourse is allowed with the result
tional   movement.   Other independent I that 60 per cent, more work is turned
out in the workshops.    The prisoners
RENNfES SEEDS
OUR 1915 CATALOGUE IS FREE
Writ*, Call ot Thoae for a Copy T0-9AT
Wm. MINNIE GO, Ltd
1138 Homer St Phone Sey 8550. Vancouver, B. C.
Alio at Toronto, Montreal ui Winnipeg
WHITE STAR ~SfRVICT lABGKHiloTCMDA
PORTLAND, MAINE - HALIFAX - LIVERPOOL
vnttt uu Bittuk rut
"SOUTHLAHD"
88. "NORTHLAND"
(Twin 8e»w, 19,000 Tou) 88."
OeMn ud Third Oltu Onljr
Portland U th. nearest Canadian service wlnUr port.   Trsln praseeds to doe*.
Luifigt chocked through to itcim.tr.   No. transfer- bo tronbl. with niton...
AMERICAN LINE
jLarge tut American tUaneri.   Operated under the American fl»g.   -Wtcfclr
Express Sorrice.   New York*Liverpool,   Cabin ud Third CUui Only.
88. "St. PmI" March 37th 88. "New Tork." April Ird    -'    '
SS. "Philadelphia,". April 10th SB. "BixUais," April IV
Company's Offloei;
619 sboovd Avnrua, uactlb, wv.
sympathies Ib to impose a task beyond
the average human power. Before solidarity can be reached there must be
hard 'and persistent effort along a way
that presents many difficulties,
The Babel of Tongues
First of all there is the difficulty of
language. If the nations could only
speak freely to one another they would
realize much more clearly their essential likeness. To hear the talk going
on now about the Russians, for example,
one might imagine that the Slav peoples were profoundly different from
ourselves. Similarly, some of the nations of the world look with antipathy
on our own nation. They regard us as
infinitely inferior to themselves in refinement and culture. The Americanization of the world they would consider a calamity. But if they knew ub
better they would be likely to get a
pleasant surprise.
World Blindness
All people who think at nil nowadays
are becoming aware of the world-blind-
nesa that has kept humanity from acknowledging and liivng by its unity.
They are trying to roach tho light. It
is significant that the strongest effort
in this direction should come from the
people at the buae of society, those assumed to bo the least enlightened. They
are stirred by an urge greater than
mere sentiment.   In one another they
CENTER &HANNA, Ltd.
UNDERTAKERS
Refined Service
1049 GEORGIA  STRUT
One  Block  weit of Court House,
Uh of Modern  Chapel  and
Funeral  Parlors  free  to al)
Patrons
Telephone Seymour 8425
PhteoSoy. 221 Day er Ni|kt
Nunn, Thomson & Clegg
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
ud EMBALMERS
SMIktai**.        Vaecom, I. C.
__JPL	
bodies are also friendly to tho internationalists, so that the number of organizations looked upon as purely Canadian bodies are insignificant in number.
In fact, tbe so-called Canadian Federation of Labor failed to hold its convention last year, and is practically out
of existence.
In Canada, all told, there are 1,792
local trades organizations, of which
740 are locatod in Ontario, British Columbia coming next with 240, the balance being divided between the other
provinces,
These figures make good reading to
the friends of international trades
unionism, but they must be distinctively disappointing to those who would
like to see' Canada divorced from the
labor movement of the American continent, and split up into weak national
organizations that havo alwayB been
found wanting in the hour of trial. Apparently the Canadian workerB know
what they want and are determined it
ahull be internationolism for thorn-
OULINABY ORAFTB."""™"
Will Hold Special Meeting to DIkum
International Jurisdiction Matters,
Vice-Premdent J. Cummlngs presided
over a meagre attendance of members
at tbe weekly meeting of Local No. 28,
CookB, WniterH' and WaitreBEis' union,
held on Friday night, March 10, in
Room 200, Labor Temple. After various items of routine business had been
disposed of the question of segregating
the bartenders and the culinary workers into two separate international
unions, was brought up and laid over
to be dealt with at u special meeting to
be held two weeks hence, when It is
hoped that a sufficiently large and representative gathering of cooks, waiters and waitresses will be on band to
voice their sentiments on this important
matter.
Reporting on behalf of a committee
appointed to attend a special meeting
of .the craft held in New Westminster
last week, and of which he was a member, Business Agent Graham stated
that the lessee of the Strand Hotel cafe
was not living up to his agreement in
the matter of wages. Suitable action
will be taken in this matter in the
course of a few days should this gentleman decline to listen to reason.
One candidate was initiated at the
meeting.
Under new business a full ticket was
nominated for the forthcoming provincial elections, to be submitted to the
special meeting of the Trades and Labor couneil.
have their own mutual relief society,
and, although there has been aome condemnation from the newspapers, we are
holding classes nnd give moving picture
lectures. Beat of all there is no "dope"
or drug to be found in the entire
prison.
"We are trying to teach men to govern themselves,'" concluded Osborne,
'' We are placing responsibility where
it belongs and with application of the
golden rule are proving that there is
liberty only whore men are fit for
liberty."
TORONTO UNIONISTS
Getting Ready for the Next Municipal
Elections
One of the most important matters to
receivo consideration at tho last meeting of Toronto District Labor couneil,
says the Banner, was the nppointment
of a committoe of ten to arrange for
the holding of a representative meeting
of delegatos from all the labor unions
in Toronto for the purpose of taking
steps to inaugurate tho next municipal
campaign, and to consider what action
should be tnken in regard to nil future
provincial nnd federal elections. One
delegate, who questioned advisability
of thecouncil taking such a stand, was
informed by the chair that at a previous meeting it had been decided that
such a step was necessary und the question was not open for debate. The following wero elected to arrange for the
big meeting at as early a date as possible: Jas. SirapBon, J. Jones, L. O'Con-
_. C, Cribben, J. RichnrdB, C. F.
We Unhesitatingly Recommend
ROYAL CROWN
SOAP
m________a_——_——\ /-*;
as Mng tbe best SOAP on the market for general bowehold yuipooee.
Positively the largest sale of any Soap in Western Canada.
There is a Reason    Try it and See
Mr. UNION &AN
Do yon beUeve ln Brittii ColktnMa*
&ET na ataal taiMhar .
HAMILTON 0ABHABTT
TIM world'! lufwt O-rtnll Mnn*
factum.
VANOO07EB, B. O.
Toronto, Detroit, Liverpool, Dallas, Atlanta
My long yeara ot exoerittat iije
made Carhartt'■ overall* perfection.
I hare opened a faotory ia Vancouver
to tupply Brltlih Columbia trada.
THB WOBK II DOHB SMUT
HEBE BT UNION LABOB.
MB. UNION MAN, if yonr laatar
won't supply you Caraartt'a nimft
tend mo a postal with yoar waiat aid
leg meaaure, and I will aee that you
get them.
Write me anyhow for a weekly time
book, engineer'a time book, or farmer'a account book. Theee ara free to
you*
Named Show are frequeitly made iaNo-n-
Unioo Factories-Do Not Bay Any Shoo
no matter what lta name, unleaa lt bean a
plain and readable Impraaalon or thla atamp
All ahoea without tha Union Stamp ara
alwaya Non-Union.
BOOT A SHOE WORKER*' UNION
IM Summer Btreet, Boaton, Maaa.
3. T. Tobln, Proa.   O. L. Blaine, Seo.-Traae
JINGLE POT COAL
UNION MINED AT NANAIMO
MORE HEAT-LASTS LONGER
THIS COAL WILL SAVE YOU MONBY-TRY A TON
Lump, $7.00; Nut $5 SO; Pea, $4.00; Slack, $4.00; Briquettes. $6.00
WOOD, Choicest Dry Fir, f 3.00 par load
McNEILL, WELCH & WILSON, Limited
formerly
VANOOUVER OOAL OOMPANY
TELEPHONES :  SEYMOUR 5408 and HOT
Holl, W. Russell,
A. Miller.
A. Tipper, J. Word,
Having nothing to aay doean't keep
aome people from talking,
Phona:   Fairmont B10
Patterson* Chandler
Manufacturer! of
MONUMENTS
Vaults, Curbing, Etc.
Office and Worka:
Cor. 16th Ave. and Main St.
Branch Office: 40th a Fraaer Avea.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
HARRON BROS.
FUNERAL   DIRECTORS  AND
EMBALMERS
Vancouver— office    and    Chanel,
1IM Oranvllle St.. Phone Bey. 3111.
North   Vancouver — Offloe  and
Chapel, IIS—Sixth SL Weat, Phone
-> VANCOUVER -:-
City Market
MAIN STREET
A Uf! T T O N £r.e,held every Tue«i»y and
AUbllUll Friday at 10 A. M  If you
Q A T FQ reany wish to 'educe the
02i.JL.Ld cost of living, y
_, you can do so
by attending the AUCTION
SALES
Potatoes
At Market Prices; these are
the lowest prices in Vancouver. Stock always fresh
and in best condition
All kinds at most reasonable
prices; in quantities to suit
all buyers.
Vegetables
Apples- ■ ■
Vow    1 q.A Are now arrivin* in large
llCn*"UaiU quantities.  You can always
TjTT- C re'y on Eff&8 which are sold
JCjUUO as new laid
AT THE CITY MARKET
Large variety winter stock
at $1.00 and $1.25 per Box
ALL RED LINE, LIMITED
S.S. Selma-S.S. Santa-Maria
Leaves Johnson's wharf 0.80 s.m.. Mon.,
Wed. sod Friday, (or Wlson Crssk. Bsebslt,
Hslf Moon Bar, Bedruofe'i, Welcome Pass,
Hardy Island, Nslsoa Islsnd, Pender Harbor,
Sllllwster, Myrtle Point and Powell Blvsr:
reluming ths following days.
mart  aermear <II0
Printers and
Publishers
Ubor Team*
hmMmt
Fheao Sep. 4410
Hants of Therm, ?AfiE;SlX.
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FBIDAT..;...; MABCH «,. id
Thli coinittn,.along with.otker-rejiuUnra^viei-dafikif,isj^rtiejburp«M«»
of directing the purchasing power of organized labor among
those concerns who appreciate the support and patronage
of workini&ra arid their families.
BUYERS' GUIDEIVICTORIA
LABOR
P
LACE your order to-day with your Grocer for
TETLETC TEAS
War:Hjne» 1
Clange int
Hake Hard Tlmei, bit ln Bplta of Wa There la no
,  ttSKlceor   •    ■
Tetley's  40 C  TEA—better value than ever-is obtainable lit all gro-
eera for 40c. per pound, NOT 46c PEE POUND ,
Thole Who Ara Not Already TETLEY Drinkers ihotdd take thla opportunity to make a permanent change to any of the linos of theae world-f amona
Taaa aa aold at 40c., 60c. and 60c. per pound.    "BUSINESS AS USUAL."
A
all union Men
SHOULD HAVE THEIR WIVES ORDER
60NG SOUPS 5™X
Made In SU VarWttee Six Tablet! for 26c.
TOMATO, MULLIGATAWNY, OX TAIL
4 PEA, MOCKTURTLE, SCOTCH BROTH
Each Tablet is sufficient for three portions
CORNEILLE DAVID & CO.    Tor.ato,DMont»i.",Bwfflw, Etc.
T
"Canada's Best Flour"
SHOULD BE IN THE HOME Off
EVERY UNION MAN IN ftRITBH COLUMBIA
Telephone yonr Grocer an order to-day "QVAXJT7 THE BEST"
H%{ . ■ '   VJ'-\'________W______UM
Mills Compaiiy, Limited
RDER Your Coal to-day
f b Main Supply Co.
■nnH Main Street
Are Selling the Famous MIDDLESBORO COAL
MINED IN MEBBITT, B.O.
LUMP $6.75
Phona SETHOUB 8491
NUT $5.50 TON
A LITTLE BUBNB LONG
N
I
Qeeds
u
From Burpee's and other reliable grower's.
Bedding Planta. Phone Seymour 539
Kcw Gardens
THAT GROW  503 Pender W. near Richards
UNION SHOP
Just a whisper off Granville, 704 Robson Street
W  The Delmonico
VANCOUVER'S LEADING CAFE
Harry Reckner Ervin Switrer       Phone Bey. 8345    VANCOUVEB, B.O.
S
Capital City Labor Bureau
Comes in for Considerable Criticism
Routine Matters Occupy Attention of Delegates at
Last Meeting
VICTORIA, B. G," March 17.—Regular meeting of Trades and Labor council held this evening. President Wells
in the chair. ,
Credentials were received from the
Carpenters, Stage Employees and Steam
Engineers.
Report of finance committee was received, and recommendation tbat hall
committee get busy and attend outside
locals, requesting that they make use
of the Labor rooms to hold their
meetings, and that union men should
join together to meet in the hall. Recommendation handed over to hall committee.
Legislative committee recommended
that protest be made to labor representatives in Australia, South Africa and
other British colonies against the letting of contracts to Canada for lumber
while .Oriental labor is used in the mills,
there being no scarcity of white labor,
and to point out to the respective labor
representatives there that unless some
steps be. taken to check this menace, by
preventing the letting of contracts that
aret contemplated, the, standard of
white workers will be lowered to that
of Orientals to enable the white workers to exist.
This matter was -taken up by the several delegates, and after careful consideration, it was duly handed Over to the
executive with instructions that the
committee's report be received and acted lippn.
A further motion was put that the
general president, of the, Timber Workers' association be written to, asking
for an organizer to be sent to deal with
the question.
Delegates Watchman and Simmons
reported on the action of the Saanich
council, condemning the action of the
reeve and couneil on the question of reducing the wages of the workers. The
delegates were instructed to keep busy
in Saanich.
Tbat Labor Bureau
Report was received from Delegates
Wells and Day on the actions of Dr.
Miller and the labor bureau, Delegate
Wells informing the council that Dr.
Miller's reports were misleading and
credit that waB not due was being
taken by thiB gentleman, that if the
figures were properly nnnylized and
the numbers taken out of men employed by the city and on the government work, the number employed by
and through Dr. Miller would be very
small, and thnt a stated figure was paid
by the city and government, but the
men in many caBes sent out by Dr.
Miller were being paid leas than Orientals, cases being cited where men. were
employed as low as 35 cents per day,
and in some cases suggestions were
made that they should work for food.
Delegates wore instructed to attend
all meetings of this labor bureau and
use every effort to top all such actions
that would tend to lower the workers.
A communication from Dr. Miller
was read, asking for names to be submitted to him of men who required
work. Letter was ordered filed, and
Dr. Miller informed that such a request
was refused, that the council would not
agren to any system which would tend
to degrade the workers of this province
lower than they were already degraded.
Communication was received from
the secretary of the TradeB and Labor
congress on the sume question, namely,
labor bureaux, repudiating the remarks
made by Miss Wellman, and requesting
the council not to deal with this question as yet, the matter was being dealt
with by that body and they would' advise the Victoria body later.
Communications were received from
the minister of lands and provincial
secretary in answer to resolutions sent
from the council as follows:
"8th March, 1915,
"Secretary    of   Victoria   Trades   and
Labor Council, Victoria, B. C:
"Sir,—I beg to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 4th inst,
with enclosure of a resolution passed
by your council in reference to the expenditure of the amount which has
been set aside for the development of
the timber industry in this province,
and to say in reply that the matter will
be brought to the attention of the executive council at the first opportunity.
"I am, sir,
"Your obedient servant,
"H. E. YOUNG,
"Provincial Secretary."
"March 11, 1915.
Secretary Victoria Trades and Lnbor
.Council, Victoria, B. C:
"Dear Sir,—The resolution of your
organization addressed to the provincial
secretary, under date of March 4th,
hus been forwarded to me, inasmuch as
the expenditure involved will rest with
this department. In reply I would sny
that the representation is carefully
noted, but at the same time wish to explain to you that it is not intended
thnt the money involved, or any part
of it, should be utilized as a bonus to
any of the raillB of tbe province, but is
to be devoted towards the investigation and building up of the lumber
trade generally in foreign markets, so
that the same may be placed upon a
permanent footing, in that way insuring
to the benefit of labor aB well as capital.
Yours truly
"W. R. ROSS,
nd plumbers were, locked   out,  „they
laving refused to accept reduction.
Delegate from Musicians' pulon*requested thjat thie council reconsider their
action with reference to tbe stage employees and the unfair theatres, -ind
that the executive of the councU ubo its
efforts still to bring about some settlement.   . ' .....
Delegate Watchman stated that the
stage employees and the musicians had
acted in a foolish manner,,. and * the
TradeB and Labor council -bad been
more foolish in their method of dealing
with it.
Delegate Day stated that the request
was being made at too late , a date.
This action should have been taken in
the first instance Had tlie two locals
involved done this and brought some definite plan the council would not be as I
it. was at present, numciy, that the
council bad acted foolishly,..
. .After discussion the, mutter was
placed in tbe hands of the executive to
work.in conjunction with the stage employees and musicians. ■ .
Delegate Day (plumbers) requested
Delegate Peal of the musicians' local
to take some action agaihst a plumber
who was working against the plumbers'
local who were on a lucnou:, this plumber being a member of the musicians'
local,
Delegate Peal promised to deal with
same and report.
HUMANITY AND WAR
A
'Minister of Lands,
,1
Communication waB received from a
number of local teamsters and transfer
men, complaining thnt the Stage Em*
ployces were employing a rig to parage
the streets with reference to theatres
being unfair to union labor, and that an
injury was being done by not payingthe
regular price and so reducing tho price
of lnbor.
-Motion thnt the letter be handed
oyer to the Stage Employees' delegates,
and they be instructed to deal with it
meted t
to Ihe
couneil.   Car*
innd report back
ried.
Beport of Locals
Trade generally bad with few exceptions.   Longshoremen   reported   strike,
Compilation of Lies of Literature Would include
War
best Service of This War ia
to Make the Workers
Reflect
"Safety Fifst'
Hints tb Employers of Labor
The responsibility of an employer
for the accidental pergonal injury, of
employees arises from negligence and
wrongful gets and omissions—particularly omissions; and. if the following
"Dont's" are carefully observed many
accidents for .which the employer would
be held responsible can ana will be
avoided.
DON'T neglect to inform younelf ae
to your legal duty to your servants.
Make younelf familiar with. tbe local
labor and factory laws regarding the
employment of children, the guarding of
elevators, shafting and machinery, etc.,
and see that your foremen are observing same.
DON'T neglect to furnish all employees, all the time, with the safest
and best ways, works, machinery and
appliances with which to do their work.
Equip your machinery with all the
standard safety contrivances whether
required by law or not.
DON'T neglect to furnish .proper and
frequent inspections, and keep all ways,
works, machinery and appliances in
repair. ,
DON'T neglect to employ experienced
and careful managers, superintendents
and foremen. Such employees, for
whose acts yoa are held responsible,
Bhould be engaged only upon written
application indicating their qualifications previous experience and general
fitness to direct your operations.
DON'T neglect to furnish a sufficient
number of careful and -competent employees to safely perform any operation
assigned to them.
DON'T neglect having all employees
carefully instructed in a language they
understand as to the proper and com-
paritively safe way to perform their
duties.
DON'T neglect to establish reasonable and safe rules and regulations regarding the operation of your business.
DON'T neglect t.o insist upon a strict
observance of the rules and regulations
prescribed, the transgression of which
should be severely penalized.
DON'T neglect to have all employees
on being hired, or immediately afterwards, expressly admit in writing in
the presence of witnesses, a knowledge
and appreciation of the ordinary, obvious and necessary hazards of the occupation they are to engage in.
DON'T neglect to warn all employees
by word of mouth and by printed notices against the dangers which are
not apparent except to the experienced
and intelligent man, and instruct them
how inueh dangen may be avoided.
CHILDREN IN AMERICA
Impressive Object Lesson at  'Frisco
Exhibition
In the exhibit of the Children's Bureau, nt the San FranBciBco Exposition,
there is a revolving globe whose total
area represents-all the causes from
which babies die in this country.
Thirty-nine per cent, of the surface of
this globe—a great red segment—represents deaths from remediable circumstances in the environment in which the
child is born.  '
In another part of this exhibit, says
Snn Franacisco Bulletin, the facts of
child labor are set forth on. charts, so
that the mind of the person who looks
ut them attentively will never quite
get rid of what they show. So many
children between ten and thirteen;
many between thirteen and sixteen;
many in cotton mills, bo many in silk
mills, so muny in agriculture, so many
in coal minos; nearly two million child
worker*, in all; more than eighteen per
cent of the childhood of that age, or
more than one child in every six.
This is but a small exhibit. Round
it are acres of ground covered with
bindings, erected to the good deeds of
civilization; flowers and plants here,
wonderful machinery there, miles, almost, of paintings, in which the soul of
the race Iiub striven to write itself
down; and there are great stately col
orful courts that would wring a tribute
of admiration from a savage.
The crowds go back and forth among
theso buildings. They look at the exhibit of the Children's Bureau, and
when they have seen that tbey go on
to look nt flowers or locomotives or statues, or to wander, pigmy-like, down the
glowing colonnades.
There are some pictures in the exhibit of tho Children's Bureau, pictures
showing children at work, and faces of
children marred by hard work. It
would not be conceivable to us, if we
did not live in the midst of the most
sudden and awful contradictions, that
these pictures should belong in tbe same
world with those majestic palaces,
those enchanting, sun-filled vistas, those
monuments to the strength and delicacy of man's spirit. But both go to
make the world we know.
Of course, the Court of .the Universe
is just as true as the charts and statistics of the Children's Bureau. . Mankind at times grovels in the slime, and
at times stands erect and looks'up at
the sky; the same man, and tbe same
civilization can do both things.
But, if we are to have any faith at
all, we must believe tbat all civilization will eventually be as beautiful as,
with infinite pains and labor, we have
made this one small spot of ground,
and that no mothers will then mourn
tor babies needlessly lost, and that no
nation will then depend for any proportion of its material ...prosperity on the
weary labor of children "between the
ages of ten and sixteen years."
[By John D. Barry.]
In looking back on the history of
ar, one circumstance is noticeable;
The leaders are rarely sacrificed. Many
bf those who spent a large part of their
lives in fighting came through unscathed. It might seem as if they received some special protection. So they
did. It oame from their own concern
for themselves and from the concern
on their behalf of their associates. Napoleon seems to have led a charmed
life; but the truth is that extraordinary measures were taken to give him
protection. Just now it is safe to assume that the Kaiser is strongly guard'
ed every Instant, not only from danger
twin the foe; but from the mischance
of disloyalty among his own men.1
Among the millions of fighters there
must be many who nurse bitterness in
their hearts and who would eagerly
seize a chance to get back at those
representing authority. Tbe stories of
tbe brutality shown by officers to their
men may be exaggerated; but they un-
Questionably have some, foundation in
act. The -truth to human, nature in
them relates itself to similar stories
coniin'g from other wars where men,'
wildly rebeling at being made food for
bullets, have tried to escape and have
found themselves confronted' with the
threats of immediate ana disgraceful
death.
Literature Lies About War
If a list were to be compiled of the
lies of literature it would include many
references to _ war. It has been the
shameful office of literature, in spite
of its pictures of war's horrors, to sustain the popular conceptions, largely
false, of War's glory. Stephen Crane
ought to be honored among American
writers for his effort to tell -the truth
about war in his novel, "The Red
Badge of Courage.'* So often in literature only the picturesque aspects of
war are revealed. Very little is said
about the internal dissensions in armies,
the rivalries and jealousies, of officers,
the petty competing for credit, the
biassed reports and the favoritsm. The
common soldiers who think at all must
be very noble if without indignation,
tney can .compare the lot of the favored ones with their own miseries.
Well-to-do Favorites
A good deal has been said of late
about princes and commoners, poor and
rich,, fighting side by. side in the ranks.
it must often make those people smile
who know of tbe direct and indirect
graft that goes on in an army. But
we cannot blame fond mothers and fathers with influence for asking special
care for their sons front officers they
are able to reach. There must be many
frantic appeals of this Kind and1 if they
are backed up with bribes they are
none the less pathetic. Parents of
wealth are so used to securing favor
for their children in civil life that they
can hardly be blamed for expecting
similar favor among the perils of war.
Perhaps one of the best services this
war can do for ub is to make us reflect
on the silent warfare that goes
throughout the world, none the less real
for being continuous, abounding in favoritism.
Internationalism Not Dead
Disappointing as the European radicals have been, reports that have lately been coming show that they were
not all false to their ideals. Rather
than go but and kill their comrades
many of them killed themselveB. And
among those that yielded to the pressure of circumstance and to the spirit
of nationalism, thero went something
of the spirit of internationalism which,
once felt, could never wholly perish.
If the war lasts for many months it
will be sure to manifest itself. It may
even be a factor in bringing about an
end of hostilities.
Ab to Atrocities
The stories of atrocities alleged to
have been committed by both aides
show that beneath the veneer of civilization many men are savages at heart,
Stir up their bitter feelings, inflame
them with the mob spirit and they revert to the barbarism that is like a
kind of madness. In such a reversion
there is nothing peculiarly French or
English or German. But there is something distinctly and profoundly human.
In a debauch of blood human beings
can go to lengths that, from the detached point of view, seem inhuman.
Thousands of miles awny it is easy for
ub to regard them with horror and
loathing. But, perhaps they have not
really been to blame; they are victims
of the conditions that drive them to
madness. The distinctions in butchery
advocated by the believers in war are
like over-refinements. In war, as In all
evil, is the first step that counts. Once
admit that war is defensible and you
throw open the doors to every conceivable infamy.
In the city of Melbourne, Australia,
exclusive of unemployed \ wharf laborers, there are 3,000 unemployed. The
lord mayor 'says no part of the patriotic
fund can be devoted for tho relief of
distress caused by unemployment.
Phones:   Seymour 8298 and 8259
THE
Hose & Brooks Co., Ltd.
Wines, Liquors and Cigars
501 Main Street, Vancouver, B.C.
pass
(jy mm fes
;MADE
n®j Of America rGbr
WW»imT.«»ADI HMHSgHTHW I.Ol
Hotel Irving Grill Room
101 Hastings Street East
ARE YOU ONE OF THE PLEASED PATRONS^
OF THE FINEST GRILL IN  VANCOUVER?
FRENCH CHEF. MUSIC 5 TO 12 P. M.
The Finest of Wines, Liquors and Cigars sold at
buffet, with courteous Union mixologists to served
you.
JOHN L. SULLIVAN, Proprietor.
Phone: Seymour 3380.
EVERYMAN'S LIBRARY
Th. moit Importut, tbl Hen wond.rtal ul Oi nut popular Hint} m
luntd.   On* huadnd TolamH to select from.
.   IBRD (OB IM*
THOMSON STATIONERY CO., LIMITED
Outoll Book k stationer? Co., Ltd. f
su Htittnii street w.it        w-rti Onumq, stmt
UNION ** OFFICES
This Official List Of Allied Printing Offices
OAN SUPPLY YOB WITH IBB ALLIED PMNTWO TBADBS UNION LABEL
BAGLEY I SONS, HI Haitian Sti*.»t......................... .-SefWonr 019
BRAND £ PERRY, 629 Pender Street, Weit ..................Sentonr 2578
BURRARD PUBLISHING  CO.,  711  Seymour Street   .....Seymour 8580,,
CHINOOK PR1NTIN8 CO., 4801 M.in Strut .......r»lrmont 1874 V
CLARKE 4, STUART, 820 Seymour Street  ...'....■ ..........Seymour 8 ]
COMMERCIAL PRINTINO A PUBLISHING CO, ..World Bulldtar Sey. 4(88*87  I
COWAN A BROOKHOUSE, Libor Temple Bulldlot............... Seymour 4480
DUNSMUIR PRINTING CO., 487 DuMmuIr Street.. ...... ......Seymour 1101 ll
BVANS t HASTINGS, Art. «nd Croft. Bldt, Seymour St.........Soyinour 56B0 F
ORANDVIEW PRINTERS. 1443 Comm.rctll BllUlod 741L *
JEWELL, M. L„ 041 Pender St '-. .Soymour 1444
KERSHAW, J. A.. 539 Howe St  Seymour (874
LATTA, R P, 383 Gore Ave '..'.' '. .Seymour 1089
MAIN PRINTING CO., 8851 Main St.......  .....' Fairmont 1988 '
MoLEAN A SHOEMAKER, North Vancouver...... ',  .....N. Von, 53,
MOORE PRINTING CO., Cor. Granville and Robson Sta..... .'. .... Seymour 4543 ■
NEWS-ADVERTISER, 301 Pender St.....  ..  ....  ....  ..  ....Stymott 1018.41
NORTH SHOBE PRESS, North Vancouver.  .'.i;;.N VoOj (0 I
PACIFIC PRINTERS, World BnlMinf..'.. ...... ...; ....  ..... Seymour 9602  ■
PEABCE * HODGSON, 518 Hamilton Street.. goTttoir 3(38
ROEDDE, G. A, 616 Homer Street %. Soymour 9(4 !
SCANDINAVIAN PUBLISHING CO., 817 Cambie Bt      Seymour 8509 1
TERMINAL CITY PRESS, 3408 Wutmlniter Road Fairmont 1140
THOMSON STATIONERY, 835 Haatlnp W.. Soymour 3590 I
TIMMS, A. H, 330 Fourteenth Ave. E Fairmont 031R 1
WESTERN PRESS, 838 Cordova W.     ..Seymour 7666 f
WESTERN SPECIALTY CO., 891 Dunamuir St  ........Seymour (538 L
WHITE* BIHDON. 157159 Cordova St.......       ... .Seymour 1315 Q
Wrlto "Union Labal" oa Tou Copy whan Ton Bind It to tha Printer
START NOW!
__ PITMAN'S ,h,|
oldest and best buslneas college^
In BrltlBh Columbia
Up-to-date business methods
Individual tuition.  Success guar J
anteed.   No charge for hookey
Established 1898 1
bor. Hastings and Bichards Sts. 'M
Vancouver, B. O. m
TOO MUCH
EMPHASIS
cannot be placed on the statement that the
Edison Diamond Disc
Phonograph
excels because it is the product
of a mastermind in the science
of acoustics.
It was not given to the public
until it had reached a degree
of perfection to satisfy the ugh
ideals of the inventor, Thomas
A. Edison, who said: "If music
ia worth anything—and in my
opinion it is worth much—it is
worth recording and reproducing
properly.''
Mr. Edison spent 37 years perfecting his New Phonograph.
Will you give 16 minutes of your
time to near his latest? Come
today.
THE
Kent Piano
COMPANY LIMITED
S58 GRANVILLE STREET
Closes March 13/151
AU changes Names, Addresses, Advertising, etc., must |
be in by that date.
B.C. Telephone Co., Ltd.)
Take that Watch to|
APPLEBY
who will toll you what is thel
matter, cost snd guarantee all]
Repairs.   438 Bichards Straet
tfe!
IwWeoTi^baccoJ
Nicholson's Gin
is perfectly pure and palatable
IT'S REFRESHING
AND INVIGORATING
TRY IT FOI$ YOUR STOMACH'S SAKE.
WILL DO YOU GOOD.
ALL RELIABLE DEALERS SELL IT

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