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The British Columbia Federationist Jun 25, 1915

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Array II     ., ' ■'•'■■  " '1211 lm-
I       JUN 2 8 7„r^V
THE BRITISH  COLUMBIA FEDER
INDUSTBIAL TJ'BTI:  STBBNOTH.
SEVENTs/iSAR.   No. 26.
OFFICIAL PAPER: VANCOUVEB TBADES AND LABOB COUNCIL AND B. C. FEDEBATION OF LABOB
NIST
► POLITICAL UNITY: VfCTOBTI
VANCOUVER, B. C, FRIDAY, JUlfE 25,1915.
inii food
CHF#ENED BY
\ Shows Comparative Prices
Conservative and
Labor
in
[West Australia Controls a
Wide and Varied Range
of Industries
[Special Australian Correspondence.]
SYDNEY, N. S. W., June *.—If anybody required to be convinced of what
a labor Btate can do in the way of fixing prices to defeat some of the profits
of the capitalist, that convincing conclusion is covered by a set of statistics
just issued by the Australian Commonwealth—a copy of which has been sent
me for use in this journal.
Investigations made with 46 articles
of food in daily use, in 30 of the principal towns of Australia, give the per
centage of increase since war com'
menced as follows:
Labor states: New South Wales, 8.6
per cent., and West Australia, 10.3 per
cent'.
Conservative states: Queensland, 21.3
per cent., and Victoria, 16.3 per cent.
Figurei for Tasmania.
The, ugures for Tasmania, where the
Labor party has only a majority of one,
are 14.1, and for South Australia, where
Labor has ganed its last victory (and
where the figures were taken while the
Tory government was yet in power),
the figure is 14.5.
It will be seen, however, where Labor
has a good working majority, the prices
are much lower than in the other states.
In New South Wales, where the most
drastic measures have been taken
against the trusts controlling the food
supplies, the prices are lowest of all.
Bow N. 8. W. Helps Tanners.
Since the war, and drought in New
South Wales, the Labor government has
advanced to   the   farmers   in   need
. (4,000) over 640,000 bushels of   seed
'wheat for next season. Sixteen thousands two hundred and sixty-two tons
of chaff have been advanced to 2,500
farmers in need of feed for stock. Thi
represents an advance of $1,750,000 to
the farmers, and in addition (175,000
have been been advanced to allow them
to clear land for next crops, and an additional $100,000 to keep them on their
> farms. In addition much money has been
remitted in the way of rentals, so that
l It can be said that New South Wales is
seeing that the man on the land Ib get
ting a fair deal during the hard times
at'present'withTis In this country.
State Industry in West Australia.
During the lost year there has been
turned out at   the   West    Australian
State Implement workB some $350,000
worth of goods.   After allowing for all
1 losses, such as depreciation of tho plant,
interest on moneys, sinking funds, etc.,
the net loss to the Btate is just on $8,-
000. The Tories profess to make much
out of thiB, but it must be borne in
mind that these worka have only been
in working order for a little over a
year, and it is not to be expected that
a works of such magnitude could conduct its business with a profit on the
first year. On the other hand the fact
that there in only a loss of $8,000   on
| the first year's work is a splendid result, and, after all, the loss is more in
the nature of a nominal loss rather
than an actual loss.
Full Up With Orders.
The beBt testimony that the state
has, is the fact that its order books are
always full, and it cannot turn out im-
i plementa fast enough for the demand.
Over 600 hands are employed, and the
wnrres paid to them is higher than that
paid by the Implement trust.
Runs Its Own Brickworks.
Like New South Wales, this Labor
state has its own brickworks, but they
1 are not yet as fsr as advanced as in the
eastern state. The works are held up
temporarily owing to maehinerv being
required to enlarge works. A kiln has
been built of 1,200,000 bricks made by
the government with appliances at
hnnd, at a price much lower than thnt
of the brick ring. The new kiln just
completed hns a capacity of 220.000
bricks a week, and bricks for trading
will be turned out early in July.
Lumber Trust sad State MlHfs.
The state sawmills show a profit of
#12,500 for tho Inst yenr'B working.
This profit would have been considerably increased but for the Bpecially vindictive action of the Conservative government, while in powor in tho federal
parliament, in cancelling the contract
for the Bupplv of 1,500,000 powelllfled
sleepers for tho great East-West rail-
Way.
That contract waB let to the West
Australian state government by the
previous Labor government while in
power, and its receipt caused the state
government to spend largo sums of
money in the enlargement of the millB,
trnmway construction, roads and so on.
But ns the contract was up against
the timber ring, the plute government,
when it got control of the federal
bouse, cancelled it, an*! gave the order
to the timber trust.
Happily it did not remain in office,
and was thrown out by the people at
the earliest opportunity, and the state
has the contract back again.
Tbe Opposite of B. O.
A brighter picture is presented this
year, for we find that,for the six months
just ending of the present' year, the
state mills have already made a profit
of $80,000. The mills employ over 1,300
men, and the state has been wise
enough to retain thousands of acreB of
the state forests containing millions of
feet oft good timber, while the timber
trust has practically no good timber
country and will, in the near future,
have to buy their timber from the Btate
or import it. In this particular busi-
, ness tne West Australian government
f has made n groat future for itself.
Operating Steamship Line)*.
A big undertaking like   a   lino  of
[ steamships cannot be expected to pay'
MR. 6. N. BARNES SEEKS
MECHANICS FOR BRITAIN
"We waat all the skilled mechanics, i. e., boilermakers, machinists and shipwrights, we can get, but none other will be of any
use to us." This was the definite statement of Hr. Barnes, who waB
ill Vancouver this week, along with Mr. W. Windham, the other
member of the commission from the Old Country, here for the purpose of securing available men for this class of work, to The-Federationist representative on Tuesday last.
Who b Mr. Barnes?
Mr. Barnes, a eanny Scotchman of course, is a typical type of
the Old Country trades unionist and1 practical politician. He was,
from 1896 to 1906, general secretary of the Amalgamated Society
of Engineers (machinists), but upon election as the Labor member,
for Blaokfriars division, Glasgow, he resigned, having been thus
transferred as a trades union business agent to the pay roll of the
government, and still stands true to the interests which elected him.
* Mr. Barnes is also editor of the official journal of his organization
and a director in a co-operative printing association which employs
some 600 printers in the various crafts.
Hay Addreu Central Labor Body.
President McVety of Vancouver Trades and Labor council, J.
T. Brooks, financial secretary of the local lodge of Machinists, and
B. P. Pettipiece met Mr. Barnes by appointment at Hotel Vancouver on Tuesday, to discuss the general conditions surrounding the
.engagement of mechanics, and also to extend an invitation to address a meeting of the local central labor body. The request will
be acceded to provided Mr. Barnes can arrange his itineary to suit.
Making Ready for Transports.
Messrs. Barnes and Windham left for Victoria on Wednesday
and there they will remain until the examining committee, composed of three practical men—foremen from the Boyal Arsenal and
Dockyards at Woolwich—reaoh Vancouver. Meantime the commissioners will deal with a voluminous amount of correspondence,
arrange for transportation for the 'munitions makers and work out
suoh other details as may arise. Out of more than 10,000 applications throughout Canada Mr. Barnes figures that probably some
3,000 will meet the requirements, and at the earliest possible moment theBe will be despatched to Ottawa, the base, and from there
sent to the Old Country. Trade union wages will be paid on the
job; transportation will be furnished and $2 a day traveling expenses allowed save for the transatlantic portion of the trip.
No Authorized Agent in Vancouver.
Mr. Barnes was emphatic in his denial that a Mr. Young or
anyone else was commissioned to act for them in the matter of recruiting mechanics. As arranged at Ottawa the commissioners will
be assisted by the mayors of the respective localities, and the cooperation of the central labor bodies has been asked for and generally received, After the preliminary eliminations, which will be
made by Messrs. Barnes and Windham, the list of applicants will
be turned1 over to'the examining board now en route west and
after acceptance by the latter there will be no delay in engagemnt.
Manufacturers and Employers Objecting,
In some cases, Mr. Barnes admits, employers have objected to
taking mechanics away from Canada. They, naturally, would like
to see the men employed here and the products shipped instead,
whioh would thus ensure as profit the difference between the wages
\4 paid to employees and'the amount received for the finished product
—in a word, business. The C. P. R. has refused, in some cases, to
give their employees any guarantee of work upon their return,
and in Vancouver representatives of the Manufacturers' association were fearful lest the supply of wage-workers of the particular
brand mentioned above would be sufficiently lessened to warrant
the remaining ones seeking decent working conditions and wages.
But nothing has been permitted to interfere with the plans of the
'munition commissioners. They know what they came to Canada
for and before they leave next month they will have accomplished
their mission, whether it be good, bad or indifferent. Britain wants
'munitions.   Nothing else matters.
i iiir
Parker Williams, M. L A.,
Says Mines Department
is to Blame
McBride Ignorant of Mines,
and is Cursed With
Hook-Worm Too
from the beginning, especially when it
is up against a powerful and merciless
combine such as the shipping combine
is here in Australia.
There have been, then, losses in the
steamship business. The loss for the
first year was 110,000 dollars, and for
the second year 30,000 dollars. These
Bums include interest, sinking funds,
and depreciation. The official estimate
Is that the loss will be further reduced
this year by 30.000 dollars—in fact progress to date fully justifies this. It is
snid. however, that bnt for the unsuit-
abllity for the trade of one of the vessels, the steamship service .-would have
been a direct success by now.
Gives Cheaper Service.
But with all this, the enterprise can
lay claim to having compensated West
Australia to a greater extent thnn its
losses amount to, and is thus, indirectly,
n paying concern to the Btate.
This claim is based on several reasons such as the following; Since the
beginning of tho service, the freight on
stock from the north ports to the south
ports has been reduced from $20 to $12
per head, and the provisions of the
state boats, by which stock can bo
landed in a better condition for Bole,
has increased the value of the stock by
$2 per head. As an average shipment'
is 750 head of stock, it will be seen that
on each shipment a sum of $7,500 dollars is saved to the shipper. It must
also be remembered that fares and
freights generally have been reduced.
Then again, owingtothe state steamship
services ensuring a regular service,
much land has been taken up, as will
be seen by the following comparison.
Effect oft Land Settlement.
Prior to the state ships, an area of
21,323,980 acres was taken up in three
years—1909, 1910, 1911. During the
three years since the service commenced, 31,401,183 acrea have been
taken up—an increase of juBt on 10,-
500,000 acres. This represents a land
revenue of $26,150, to say nothing of
other increases in the way of stock,
etc.   r
Added to this, must be noticed the
fact that the state ships operating have
compelled the price of meat to bo kept
down to a minimum, so that, despite,
the losses in the shipping businoss,'
West Australia can congratulate itself
in being able to carry out a snipping
service that is of good generally to the
state, if not in a direct way, then in nn
indirect' manner, I
W. FRANCIS AHERN.    '
BY-LAW VOTE MONDAY NEXT.
Mass Meeting Last Night to Urge Passage of Money By-Laws.
The mass meeting, under the auspices
of Vancouver Trades and Labor council, last night in Labor Temple, to urge
the passage of civic by-laws, to be submitted on Monday next, was well attended. Miss Helena Gutteridge, executive member of the central labor
body, presided, and Mayor Taylor, Aid
McBeath, chairman of the finance committee, J. H. McVety and R. P. Pettipiece were the speakers. It is expected
that every union property owner and
wage worker qualified to vote will turn
out to vote on Monday. They will have
to if the by-laws are to be sanctioned,
as the ratepayers are not very enthusiastic about providing payrolls or anything else for any body, where their
pocketbooks are touched.
Shame to Spoil a Good Story.
Some of Phil Obermeyer's friends
hnve suggested his name as international representative from the I. T, U.
to the Vancouver session of the TradeB
and Labor Congress of Canada, which
meets in the western city in September.
The I. T. U. is entitled to a delegate,
and usually Bends one of its Canadian
members. Last year, R. P. Pettipiece,
of Vancouver, represented it at St.
John, N. B.—Labor News, Hamilton,
Ont. 	
Phil Obermeyer is not a candidate
for I. T. U. representative for Canada
at the Vancouver convention of the
Trades and Labor Congress of Canada.
R. P. Pettipiece never represented the
I. T, U. at nny Congress convention
and was not present at the St. John
convention in. any capacity. Ouside of
that t..o above' Btory is a good story, as
told in Samuel L. Lander's very own
inimitable fashion.
B. C. E. R. ASKS BOARD
The latest Information concerning the
relations between the British Columbia
Electric Railway company and the local
union of Street Railway Men is that
the company has requested the Federal
Department of Labor to appoint a
board of Investigation under the Industrial Disputes Investigation act to
go into the matters in dispute between
the company and Its employees.
[By Parser Williams, M. L. A.]
Without for a moment questioning
the sincerity of the various demanding
and resoluting individuals and organizations, I would urge that the present
attack on Chief Inspector Graham and
Inspector Newton is of more value to
the department of mines and the government than it is to the miners of
British Columbia.
Minister of Mines Responsible.
Removing inspectors when they become impossible, ana selecting others to
place in a ' '" '
ble, is mere],
thought will
conception of function and duty —
the part of the minister of mines that
is necessary.
Originally the mine owner, devoting
his attention to profits, and with little
regard for the life; of the miner, the
death rate became so great that the
state decided to interfere.
Underground Policemen.
Laws were written, outlining how
work should be carried oo, so as to secure greater safety. It was quickly
learned that' legal obligations were no
more binding on the mine owners than
the previous moral obligations had
•been. .
It was decided to appoint—policemen—inspectors, whose duty it wae to
compel obedience underground, just as
the other policeman perfomed the same
duty above ground.
Premier Is Ignorant of Mines.
Follow in detail the organization of
the British Columbia mines department.
It will be seen that it is hopeless to
look to our officials to carry out the
simple purpose above outlined. The
head of the mines department, Sir
Richard McBride, knows absolutely
nothing about mines or mining. He is
a lawyer. By some process, known only
to himself, he discovered his fitness for
the position. He does not fh any sense
place himself nor consider himself responsible to the mining communities.
The gentleman, while insisting upon
acting as minister of mines, prefers to
place Mb political ljfe in the hands of
a commercial constituency—I use the
word "insist" because notwithstanding
the skulduggery incidental to a B. O.
election the vote of every coal mining
town in B. C. has for twelve years been
a repudiation and condemnation of Sir
Richard McBride.
McBride Has Learned Nothing.
In the thirteen years tnat Sir Richard
has occupied the position an energetic
person would have picked up a Uttle
knowledge, but Sir Richard has learned
nothing, for his physical laziness is
only exceeded by his mental laziness.
Deputy Minister Is as Bad.
The deputy minister of mines knows I
as little aB his chief does of mining
and its problems. His duties are very
hard to define.
If I am correct bo far, then the quality of the mines department, to whatever extent it is beneficial to the mine-
worker, is wholly dependent on the
mine inspectors. The moment we learn
how the inspector is selected, our last'
excuse for expecting anything from the
mines department vanishes.
How Inspectors Are Selected.
How are the mine inspectors selected f The writer has sat in the legislature for a mining district thirteen
years. During that time many inspectors have been appointed. But in no
instance has the writer been consulted.
From personal knowledge I can say
that at no time during a much longer
period have the mlneworkers of Vancouver Island been consulted in such
matters. Eliminating then, as we must,
the miner, and the representative of
tho mining district, the only other
party who has interest in the matter or
knowledge on the subject' is the mine
owners.
McBride Cursed With Hook-Worm.
With a minister technically ignorant
and cursed with hook-worm, and inspectors nominated by the mining corporations, we have no right to look for
efficient mine regulations. As a matter
of fact the B. C. mines department has
degenerated into a mining brokers'
agency. Its publications devote fnr
more space to the wonderful wealth
"we" hnve in the undeveloped Ground
Hog coal field than it does to mine
safety. And who is "wef" The Harriman railyway system, Mackenzie &
Mann nnd other plunderers of the same
type, while the inspectors would seem
to consider that' their duties had something to do with assisting the corporations to solve the various questions of
economical production.
Mines Act iB Made Farcical.
The B, C. Mines Regulation act is
largely modeled after that of Great Britain, but Its enforcement hns been and
is a farce of the most shameless type.
When the inspector found one of Mackenzie ft Mann's mines with less than
the minimum amount of air required by
the law, there was no prosecution. The
sworn evidence at coroner's inquiry disclosed an abBoluto disregard for tho
law, but there was no prosecution. But
a miner was fined for chewing a brand
of dope which the inspector decided
wns smoking tobacco. Infractions of
the aet at its most vital points by the
mine owners go unpunished, whilo
frivolous chnrges are pushed against
the miners. This is the use that is made
of the act, which a brazen pack of political hnrlots advertise ns "the best
mining act In the world."
Inspectors Are Brazen.
I am well aware that the Inspectors
in question have placed themselveB   in
V^rSHS)    -11.50 PER YEAR
INQUEST ON VICTIMS
OF NANAIMO DISASTER
Robert Foster, international organizer of the United Mine
Workers of America in this district, haa been over in Vancouver
this week, and during a visit to The Federationist, expressed himself as follows concerning the inquest held in Nanaimo last week on
the victims of the recent explosion in the Reserve mine over there.
Satisfied With Verdiot of tile Jury.
He said he was satisfied that from the evidence submitted, the
jury could not have brought in a verdict different from that which
they did. It was not so much the verdict of the jury which the
union miners are concerned about, as the revalations which were
brought forth; and which, in hia opinion, throroughly substantiated
many of the criticisms which he and his colleagues have voiced during the past three years.
Goal Mines Regulation Aet Violated.
The evidence of some of the witnesses proved conclusively that
the Coal Mines Regulation act had been violated in suoh flagrant
fashion, that those responsible for it could not possibly plead) they
did not realize what they were doing. As an instance, the evidence
showed that men were working in places where the "brattice" was
aB far back from the ooal face as twenty feet, instead of as the act
says, not more than twelve feet. This "brattice" is a kind offence
temporarily erected in a "working place" to direct the current of
air sent into the-mine by the ventilators, round the spot where the
miners are actually digging coal, and thus prevent an accumulation
of gas.
Reeerve Mine Had No Gas Committee.
It was also divulged that the Reserve mine had no committee
to inspect the mine for gas before the men were allowed to go in to
work. According to the aot, if the men do not select a committee
themselves from their numbers, then it is the duty of the mine inspectors to appoint two miners for that duty. No suoh committee
had been either selected or appointed. Mr. Foster said he was convinced that the men had not selected a committee, because they
were afraid that if they did and that commitee reported gas in the
mine, the committeemen would be discharged. This has happened!
very many times before, both at Nanaimo and at other places on the
Island. It was one of the main causes of the late strike. Summed
up in a sentence it means that the miners would sooner risk their
lives than their jobs.
Collusion Between Inspector! and Managers.
This neglect, in the opinion of Mr. Foster, furnishes further evidence in favor of the miners' contention that the way the mine inspectors carry out their duties, proves that between them and the
managers of the mines there is continual collusion to ignore the
law; an arrangement whioh is a constant danger to the lives of the
men working in the mines. The evidence also proved that the element of danger in the mines which work three eight-hour shifts
consecutively, as the Reserve mine was doing, are more dangerous
than those which only work two shifts running.
OFFICERS 11 BE
Result of Union Selection;
of Election Candidates
is Expected
AD Delegates Should be Present at Half Yearly
Meeting
What Mr. Farris Said at South Wellington.
At the inquiry into the South Wellington disaster, Mr. J. W.
deB. Faris, who acted as counsel for the union miners, said that one
of the chief impressions which the evidence had created in his mind
was, that there was a sympathetic understanding between the inspectors and the mine managers. Mr. Foster said the same about
the Nanaimo inquest.
-•■    Oompany Circulating Petition.   	
He also said that at this time there is a petition being circulated by the Western Fuel company, among its employees, expressing the satisfaction of the miners at the way the inspectors carry
out their duties. The signatures of the men are easily obtained because they know enough to realize that unless they do as the company wishes in the matter, they must expect to be discharged on
some excuse or other. Mr. Foster said it was characteristic of the
company that, when trouble came along, it should show such a
touching desire to consult the men with respect to the mine inspectors and their methods.
Men Should Elect the Inspectors.
He concluded by pointing out that the evils surrounding the inspection of mines would never be removed until such time as the
miners were allowed by law to elect the inspectors. This was
something they had been fighting for for many years, and until it
was achieved, the present disgraceful condition of things would go
on causing, every so often, additions to the list of casualties which
has made the coal mines of British Columbia to rank among the
most deathly in the world. 	
Typos. Meet Next Sunday.
The June nieeting of Vancouver
Typo, union, No. 226, will convene at 2
p. m. Hharp on Sunday next. Every
member ia urged to attend. The session
will probably not last more than an
hour.
Pres. Watters in Winnipeg.
President J, O. Watters of the Tradea
and Labor Congress of Canada was in
Winnipeg last Tuesday and addressed
a public meeting in the Labor Temple
on the subject of "The Necessity of
Organization, and Its Relation to Labor
Legislation," particularly as applying
to the federal parliament.
The war has given a new and grim
application of the cry "Back to tho
land, young man."
position. But the gentlo-
men who failed to discover grounds for
a prosocution of tho company from tho
evidenco at tho coroner's inquiry on
tho death of MclntoBh and Munroe, aro
not cursed with very delicato feelings.
From tho standpoint of tho mino-
worker ho may as well have theBO two
gentlemen brazen if out aB to havo
Messrs. Lockhnrt, Tonkin and Stockett
select from among their officials two
other mon for tho positions.
New Department is Required.
Mino safety in British Columbia requires not new inspectors, but ln the
first instance, a new mines department
The first essential is to porsundo the
ministor of mines that tho first duty of
hia department' is to safeguard the life
and limb of tho worker—not sell mines
or brenk strikes. Either a constitutional amendment requiring the minister to bo elected by the mineworkors
throughout the province, or legislation
enabling the minoworker to olect tho
inspectors would end the present state
of nffnirs.
Suspend Inspectors and Managers.
The duty of tho inspector being to
maintain tho minim in a snfe condition,
the moment, to any mensurable degree,
ho fnlls to do so—when such disasters
as that of South Wellington or the Reserve shaft occurs—both manager nnd
inspector's certificate should be suspended until a rigid inquiry, with tlieso
two partes ns tho accused, located tho
responsibility. It is changes nlong this
line, rather than new inspectors, thnt
will bring safety to tho mineworkers of
British Columbia.
EVERY UNION SHOULD
BE REPRESENTED AT BIO
CONGRESS CONVENTION
Every union in Western Canada,
especially throughout British Columbia, should make some provision
to be represented at the Vancouver
convention of the Trades and Labor Congress of Canada, which
meets on Monday, September 20.
Present Indications point to a rather slim attendance from the eastern section of Canada, so that lt is
up to the west to bring up the
average. The official "call" win
be Issued by Secretary-Treasurer
Draper during the flrst week in
July. .President J. C. Watters Is
now en route west, visiting all the
Industrial centres of note. Naturally the Congress la feeling the
pinch of war times, in common with
others, and organised labor will
have to be alert if it Intends to
keep pace with the responsibilities
being thrust upon it.
Vancouver Trades and Labor couneil
wiU meet on Friday evening, June I,
the regular meeting night falling on
Dominion Day Inasmuch aa nomination of officers for the ensuing six
months will take place every delegate
should be present. Many local union
delegates have been lax of late In attending central labor body meetings.
These should either come along or ft*
sign and make room for live ones. Nominations will remain open till the July
15 meeting, when further nominations
will be received and election take place.
Result of Referendum Vote.
As the referendum vote, for the purpose of selecting six candidates to represent Vancouver Trades and Labor
council in the forthcoming provincial
elections, in. Vancouver City electoral
district, and also one candidate »
South Vancouver-Burnaby riding and
lone in Richmond (Point Orey) riding,
I closes on July 2nd, It is more tban probable that the campaign manager, Hiss
Helena Outterldge, will be able to announce the final result.
.there are sixteen nominations in aU,
thirteen for Vancouver city, two for
South Vancouver-Burnaby, and one for
Richmond. These are: Vancouver eity
—W. B. Trotter, J. W. Wilkinson and
H. C. Benson of the Typographical
union; F. A. Hoover, H.Schofleld and F.
Haigh of the Street Railway Employees; J. H. McVety of the Machinists: Geo. H. Hardy, J. C. Smith aad
J. A. Hey of the Carpenters; Francis
Williams of the Tailora; F. ManaeU of
the Bookbinders, and J. 0. Lyon of tie
Pattern Makers.   Richmond riding—*J.
E. Wilton of the Typographical union.
South Vancouver-Burnaby—R. H. Neelands of the Typographical union, and
F. W. Welsh of the Plumbers.
Reports of several committees will be
heard end these should prove of special
interest to the membership. Certain it
ia the central labor body needs the best
from its affiliated unions during these
trying times, when every effort aid
every factor of old capitalism seems to
tend towards battering down the wages
and working conditions ao dearly
sought and gained by organized labor
during past years. All things considered Vancouver unionists are doing
marvellously well, and unless the bet-
otm of the social fabric drops out completely it will be found very much on
the map for the finals. Visitors are always welcome. Come along to Labor's ,
parliament next Friday evening,
NELSON MECHANICS AVAILABLE.
Mr. Notman of Trades and Labor Council Confers With Mr. Barnes.
"Trade conditions are simply awful," said Mr. J. Notman, financial
secretary of Nelson, B. C, Trades and
Labor council, to The Federationist yesterday. "Unless there is some kind of
a change shortly I don't know where it
is all going to end." Sec. Notman is
here as the representative of the city
council and the Southern Kootenay central labor body, to confer with Mr.
Barnes with regard to the possible en*
listment of unemployed mechanics for
the Old Country from Nelson, to thus
alleviate in some measure the dreadful
condition of the unemployed. He met
Mr. Barnes on Wednesday evening and
has arranged for the commissioners to
visit Nelson en route east, in the course
of "a couple of weeks. Mr. Notman
crossed the gulf to Victoria yesterday
and will return home via Vancouver tomorrow.
BRITISH  UNIONS  FUSE.
Amalgamation Marks Forward Step in
Olothing Trades.
After four years of negotiating nnd
balloting tho idenlB of thoso who have
heen endeavoring to bring the clothing
tradeB in Britain into closer communication havo been to a great extont rea-
lizod.
The societies definitely deciding to
pool their interests and form the United
Garment Workers' Trade Union are tho
Amalgamated Clothiers' Operatives,tho
ClothierB' Cutters, tho London Society
of Tailors, the Waterproof Garment
Workers, and the London Society of
Jewish Tflilrs.
Two other societies, the Leeds Tailors
and the Scottish Operative Tnilors' Society, are expected to come into the
amalgamating aB soon as certain formalities havo been completed. Places
have been left for each of these organizations on tho executive board of the
new amalgamation.
The culminating stops were taken nt
Leeds nt conferences held oa tho 29th
and 30th of May.
Thero arc something like 300,000
workers in the United Kingdom on-
gagod in the clothing industry; at' the
present moment less thnn 40,000 bolong
to any trado union organization, but
the new union hopes within a very few
yoarH to havo remedied this stnto of
things.
BUTTE MINERS' BUSTUP.
Pres. Moyer Says the Real Union Men
WUl Oome Back Into Fold.
Charles H. Moyer, president of the
Western Federation of Miners, Denver,
Colo., when informed thnt tho Butfo
Miners' union had adopted resolutions
withdrawing from the Federation said
that no attempt would be made to resist
the separation. "Any local may withdraw from the Federation," ho explained, "but tho charter prohibits tho
local taking nny union proporty with it
when it leaveB. This clause of the
ehnrter wns upheld in tho recent decision of Judgo John B. McClcrnnn, in
which if was held that tho Federation
was entitled to all the property and
funds of tho Butte union. As a matter
of fnct, tho Butte Miners' union now
consists of a mero handful of men—
probably about 35. Thore are some
6,000 men working in tho Butte district
who withdrew from the Federation on
nccount of the locnl disagreement in the
Butte union nnd who have signified
thoir willingness to come back Into the
organization as soon ns tho Western
Federation secures tho charter nnd
other papers of tho Butte locnl and perfects a reorganization in Butte,"
Smoke Local Made Cigars,
Boys! Wnko up to your own inter-'
osts. Surely you can sea that by
smoking local union made cigars you
nro helping out in this financinl stringency by keoping your money at home.
Hero they nro, boys: Kurtz'b "PIo-
ncor," Kurtz's "Royal Honor." "Terminus," "Booth's Bouquet," "P. &
R," and "Lovolla."
Longshoremen Coming Back.
Tho Longshoremen of Vnncouver at
their meeting last Wednesday night do*
cided to Rook renfTilintion with the
Trades and Labor council, with which
they hove not boon connected for some
timo. 'mo meeting, at the request of
tho Longshoromon, was addressed by J.
W. Wilkinson on tho subjoct of the
Trades ntul Labor council putting a
ticket into tho field nt tho forthcoming
provincial elections, PAGE TWO
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FBIDAT JUNE as, imJ
jj .	
INCOEPOETED 1866
1KB
MOLSONS
Bank
CAPITAL and *BSEEVB
18,800,000
93 BrucbM in Canada
A general banking business transacted. Circular letters of credit.
Bank money orden.
Savings Department
Interett allowed at highest
current rate
The Royal Bank
of Canada
INCORPORATED 1MI
Paid-up Capital ■ • • t 11.M0.00
Reeerve      1M0M80
Total Aeeete 180400*000
WE ALLOW INTEREST ON DE-
P08IT8 IN OUR
SAVINGS
DEPARTMENT
One Dollar will open
the account, and your
bualneaa will be welcome be It large or
amall
THIRTEEN BRANCHES IN
VANCOUVEB
THE
INCORPORATED
1SSS
BANK OF
TORONTO
Auttt.
,   ..180,000,000
.141,000,000
Out of Every
Wage
•ome portion should lie banked
regularly, either ae security
against the proverbial rainy day
or as a foundation to future prosperity. 81-00 will open an account in The Bank of Toronto,
and interest is added half-yearly
to the balances on deposit.
i ..86,000,000
..80,307,872
Paid-up Capital..
Reserved Fundi..
Comer Hastings and Cambie Sts.
and
Corner Heatings and Carrall Sta.
British Columbia
LAND ,
Splendid opportunities in Uixod
Farming, Dairying, Stock and
roultry. British Columbia
Grants Pre-emptions of 180 acres
to Actual Settlers---
Free
TERMS—Residence oa the land
for at least three years; improvements to the extent of 86 per
acre; bringing under cultivation
at least Ive aeree.*-
For further information apply to
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LANDS, VIOTOBIA, B.O.
SEOBETAET, BUBBAU OF
PBOVINOIAL INPOBMATION,
VIOTOBIA, B.O.
ib. cm
Published every Friday morning by the
B. C. Ftderetlonlet, Ltd.
B. Pun Pettlplee* Mealier
^^-y""""''-* •■•-••'•, "•-LEJit<>r
Office: Room 217. Labor Templt
Tej.  Exchange Sey. 7495.
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Subscription: |1.69 per year; In Vancouver
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in a body, $1.00	
*""* REPRESENTATVBB
New Weatmlnater.. .W. _. Maiden, Box tii
Prince Rupert W. E. Denning, Box 691
Victoria A. S. Welle, Box 1686
Afflliated with tbe Weitern Labor Preie
Association.
'Unity of Labor; tht hopt of the world.'
FRIDAY   JUNE 25, 1915
THB
AMAZING
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FERNIE AND HILLCHEBT  mlnen
have attracted a good deal of it-
tention lately, and by their action
given rise to considerable   comment.   The cauae of it seems to be the
same in each place—the miners of British nationality, acting   on  their   own
initiative, refused to
work    any   longer
PBOLETABIAT    i„ the -mines   with
minera   of   German
or Austrian nationality.   Fernle made
the first move. Then Hillcrest followed.
Both these camps being in the Crow's
Nest Valley, in the eastern part of British Oolumbia, it would seem that the
feeling, once having been raised,
came contagious.
• «        •       •
When it is remembered that bota
these camps are well organized under
the constitution of the United Mine
Workers of America, we have to confess that the action of the minera appeared to us surprising, to pnt it mild'
ly. Some few points must be made plain
by anyone who claims the right to criticise. And before going further, we
Will state as plainly as we can the basis
upon which our criticism is founded—
for we intend to criticise.
* •        *       •
The main points are that' this country
is at war with Germany and Austria.
In the coal campa of Fernie and Hillcrest are many miners of German or
Austrian nationality. In the eyes of
the state they are "alien enemies.-''
They are alao members of the United
Mine Workers of America, and international labor unionists, like the miners
of British nationality. The demand for
their exclusion from the mines, came
from the miners of British nationality.
It did not come from either the federal
or the provincial governments, or the
mine owners. So that it amounta to
thia—membera of the United Mine
Workers of America, who can claim
British citizenship, sought to deprive of
their employment other membera of the
United Mine Workers of America who
are of German or Austrian nationality.
a       a       a       a       a
That seems to us to define that part
of the situation as clearly as it can be
done. Now let us say a word as to the
conduct which we feel theae "alien
enemies'' will be wise to observe. We
consider that any German or Austrian
workman, who has no more sense in his
head than to exult or express pleasure
at such times as his country seems to
have secured some passing advantage in
the war, is a fool. Moreover, if he expresses sentiments unfavorable to the
Allies, or commits any deed whieh a
grain of common sense should tell him
can be construed as likely to interfere
with the plans of the Allies, he is a fool
for that also. He should remember he
is in an enemy country. He Bhould keep
his tongue still, and set a careful guard
upon his actions. If he has not enough
sense to do these things—in view of the
situation in which he finds himself—
then he is an ass, and not worth the
consideration or sympathy of those
who are trying to preserve some sense
of proportion in face of a' condition
which is marked by very high feeling.
a        a        a       a
The number of aliens who have been
interned at Fernie and Hillcrest, is altogether about 500. If they had been
guilty of any of the indiscretions enumerated above, their present plight
would have caused no adverse comment
from us. But apparently they have not
been guilty. We assume this from the
fact thst the government did not take
the step wblch resulted in their incarceration. For that reason we cannot see
why they are not entitled to be treated
according to the terms of the Order-in-
Council issued by the Federal government on August 15th last. It says in
part:
Now, know ye that by and with
the advice of Our Privy Council for
Canada, we do by these presents
proclaim and direct as follows:
1. That all persons in Canada
of Gorman or Austria-Hungarian
nationality, so long as they quietly
pursue their ordinary avocations
be allowed to continue to enjoy the
protection of the law and be accorded the respect and consideration due to peaceful and lawubid-
ing citizens; and that they be not
arrested, detained or interfered
with, unless there is reasonable
ground to believe that they are engaged in espionage, or engaging or
attempting to engage in acts of a
hostile nature, or are giving information to the enemy, or unless
they otherwise contravene any law,
order-in-council or proclamation.
This proclamation was given the
widest publicity, and aliens were made
fully aware of its contents, so that they
could conduct themselves accordingly.
for many years. At the last Supreme
Court session, held in Fernie a week or
two ago, the presiding judge was presented with a pair of white gloves, to
signify that there was nothing for him
to do, because no one had been unlawful enough to be haled before-him. So
evidently the "alien enemies" took the
advice of the Order-in-Council to heart.
And as no Order rescinding this one,, United States, and will do so for many arti to be gone over with a much __eT
"    ':~    !*   T   " v""~ '""" ~"      " yfla" y^ before *l»t country assumes reCruiting comb.   Insofar as Canada is
definite nationality as such.   At present concerned  the  future was    hinted at
or superceding it, has been issued, we
fail to see what particular reason there
was for interning theBe miners—except
that their fellow union men practically
forced the authorities to do so.
ved in the present conflict, the coun- "White Feather'
try might be rent with internecine methods of unofficial semi-compulsion,
strife, and civil disturbance, from • *« . .
end to end. CitzenBhip in any The terrible slaughter of men which
state is not consummated by the this war has entailed, has astounded
mere issuance of naturalization papers. eveil tfcoae who hld practical knowledge
It takes generations to assimilate ot the devastating possibilities of mo-
varied nationalities into a new nation. dern munition8 of war, and it is becom-
That process is still   going   on in the ing apparent that the British colonies
it is a very loosely woven affair as nations go. And the German military authorities know it.
K'
LISTEN
BWAINS
If the situation is as we see it—and
we have carefully searched for fjitemi-
ftting circumstances—then it constitutes a travesty on labor unionism even
in the narrowest sense of that twin.
Et is not by actions of this quality that
the powerful United Mine Workers of
America, with its polyglot membership,
hus been built up. Besides that, there
is another aspect to the question which •AOT MAIDENS
makes it all the more puzzling. Both
Fernie and Hillcrest have for a long
time low had the reputation of being
politically very advanced. The philosophy of the Socialist Party of Canada-
according ot report—has found eager
acceptance there for some years. Indeed, Hillcrest is part of the constituency which returned a member of the
party to the Alberta provincial legislature at the general election next previous to the last one.
We looked eagerly to the District
Ledger, the newspaper belonging to the
miners, for some explanation of the
situation. But the only light it seems
to offer, is to say:
This action has been taken by
individuals and not by the   local
union of the U, M. W. of A. as a
body.
Pray who are these " individuals" if
they are not members of the union! In
those camps every miner is a member
of the union, which fact makes it possible for them to have a working agreement with a very powerful group of
operators. And to talk of "individuals" in a way whieh might give
these who did not know better to think
they were not union miners, ia bordering near the pitiful.
We have to confess the episode is
amazing to us—especially in view of
the claims which have been put forward
for the miners of that district, aB compared with other working class groups
in the province. If this is all there is
in it, then it is pretty plain proof that
glib aptitude for using the terminology of scientific economics, is no sign
of international working class consciousness, or working class solidarity. The
miners of Fernie and Hillcrest have
done a thing which we believe is unique
in the history of an organization which
has a record of having fought aome of
the greatest struggles for international
working class progress which the world
haB ever seen. Discrimination and victimization have been two of the most
monstrous enemies they have bad to
face. But from all appearances it looks
as though the union minera of Fernie
and Hillcrest were going in strong for
both on their own account.
IS8ING   IS   DEADLY.    Not all
kinds of kissing, of course. Hissing the Blarney Stone   for instance; that's alright.   But that oscu-
latory salutation which has been   the
source   of incalculable   and   delirious
delight since   Papa
Adam took his first
nibble of that infernal    apple — well,
that kind of kissing is dangerous.   The
Pan-American Medical congress decided
the matter at San Francisco last Monday, although, just why ft was necessary to tell such a thing to anybody-
even thoae of the most limited experience—it is not quite plain. That learned
body of bifurcated   sawbones   would
have been just as usefully occupied in
telling the world that the sun rises in
the east.
MHJTABY
BERVIOEIN
THE V. S. A.
Since that time, criminal acts and
general offenses against the law, have
been fewer in the upper country  than
THE DICE LAW in   the   United
States, plus the polyglot population of that country, should produce a situation containing intensely
interesting phases in case the   United
States Ib eventually
dragged    into    the
European war. Very
few American citizens     know    they
are liable    to compulsory military service.   But they are.
If you are an able bodied male citizen
of the United States, between the ages
of 18 and 45, you are a member of the
"Reserve Militia" and as such may
be called to arms by the President.
•      •      •      •      •
If you are a member of a religious
body previously publicly known to be
conscientiously opposed to the use of
armed force, you may be excused.
Otherwise not; and if you refuse to
come along when called, you can be
fetched and shot after trial by a mill-
tary court. Now supposing the United
States became involved in the present
war, and all able bodied citizens were
called upon. How would it work out in
view of the mixture of other nationalities wich go to make up the American
nation f If a correct answer could be
given to this query, it might go a long
way toward explaining why the Kaiser
figuratively put his fingers to hia nose
In response to the American protests
against the Lusitania disaster.
. Of course kissing is dangerous.
Everybody knows it. That 'a why
it is so popular. It is alao the reason
why ordinary human folk will keep on
a' doin' of it. They like it beeause
they like it. Incidentally, it is one of
the most important of the charming
preliminaries with which wily Nature
has paved the way to the perpetuation
of the human race. And not all the
ponderous old pedagogues which ever
were, or are, or will be, can do much
in respect to altering Nature's chief
ways of doing business. But really it
Ib the season which is to blame. The
dog days are almost upon us, and we
should have felt genuinely disappointed
if this evil of kissing had not b
mentioned; just the same as we shall
if some hoary old liar of a fishing boat
captain does not drift into port, with
a stock of ultrn-Munchausen stories
about sea-sepentB being more numerous
and fearsome than ever before. We
would even refuse to accept the war aa
sufficient excuse for depriving ua of the
perennial midsummer amenities.
pretty strongly by Hon. Arthur Mei-
ghen, speaking at Orillia, Ontario, last
Wednesday, when he said:
The call has gone out for 36,000
more men. It is a challenge to the
native born. I am not an alarmiBt
. . . but I believe it may come
to this—that every physically fit
Canadian will have to join in the
fight for the existence of the British Empire and the continuance of
civilization.
Ab the Solicitor-General in the Federal government it cannot be ignored
that he most likely expresses the government view of the situation.    The
Canadian Militia act, clause 10, says
AU the male inhabitants of Canada, of the age of 18 years and
upwards, and under 60, not exempt
or disqualified by law, and being
British subjects, ahall be liable to
service in the militia, provided that
the governor-general may require all
the male inhabitants of Canada capable of bearing arms, to serve in
the ease of a levee en masse.
If anything in the act should   not
seem to give the authorities sufficiently
wide powers, a special session of the
Federal parliament could just as soon
give those powers to the government as
it could give money for war purposes.
The day when this may be done ia not,
in our opinion, so far away as some people who do not closely watch the trend
of affairs may think.
IT IS RUMORED that when the Fed
eral government applied1 the   war
tax which requires stamps to the
value of two cents to be put on   bank
checks, the Western Fuel company   at
Nanaimo     changed
WESTERN it8 methoa» rf-W
FUEL COMPANY form_ fi k „tated
PATRIOTISM i that now, instead of
getting a bank
check, the employes get an order from
the company on pay day; and the company is thereby enabled to elude payment of thiB particular war tax. We
are not able to vouch for the truth of
the rumor, but it might very well be
worth the attention of the federal authorities. If the rumor is true, surely
the company might try to defray its
share of the war tax out of the profits
it made by supplying Nanaimo coal to
the German cruiser Lelpsic at San
Francisco last August.
According to Professor Albert B.
Faust of Cornell University, who has
made a special study of the subject,
the country contained in 1910 32,243,382
people of foreign birth, or 35~ per cent,
of the entire white population. Of
this number 13,345,545 were foreign
born, 12,916,311 had been born in America of foreign-born parents and 5,981,120
had one such parent. According to tho
statistics a larger proportion of the foreign-born population, or at least those
of foreign birth, are of German origin.
There are 8,282,618 Germans and some
4,604,360 of Irish descent, and 8,231,952
classified aB English, Scotch and Welsh.
Canada contributed 2,754,615 to the so-
called foreign population; Austria-Hungary, 2,701,886; Russia, 2,541,649; Italy,
"" 18,360, and the Scandinavian group,
including Sweden, Norway and Denmark, 1,743,378, all the other countries
totalling 1,177,092.
Looking over these figures carefully,
and remembering how the fact of war
arouses the keenest sense of nationalism in the mass of men, It la evident
that if the United States became invol-
CHRISTIAN DE WET, Boer   farmer, and will-o'-the-wisp warrior
in the late South African war,
has been sentenced to six years   imprisonment and to pay a flne, as the
result     of    having
DBWBT bf?   *Td   8"il'5r
of high tretuon by
"" leading   an   armed'
AND HOLLAND revolt against the
, British crown at the
outset of the European war. Some people thought he might get more severe
punishment than thia. Many ho^ed he
would be thot, whieh is the maximum
penalty for the oSenee of whieh he was
found guilty. But there are wheels
within wheels. And it may be that the
apparent leniency meted out to De Wet,
is for a definite purpose.
.        •■      .        .
In Holland he is still regarded as a
hero of the South African war and of
the Dutch race. He is looked upon
there as the leading representative of
the old Boer families who trekked to
Southwest Africa in 1900 and 1001, to
avoid coming under British rule. Now
it Is continually being rumored in the
press that the British government
would very much appreciate the favor
if Holland would declare war on the
side of the Allies, and thus give pas
sage to troops across its territory, and
bases for naval operations in its ports,
This is a feasible enough idea, and it
may bo that De Wet haa got the. benefit
of a vory strong desire which the British government' feels at the present
tine not to offend the Dutch people.
Host people think what they like to
think.   It saves them thinking.
Most people would rather follow the
line of least resistance, and believe
what they want to believe, than
exercise the mental energy to find out
what is worth believing because it is
true.
Bichard, our very own Lion Heart,
is home again from the crusade—of trying to find a softer spot to alight on
than British Columbia looks like being
for him if he has to stay in politics
here.
Atorney-General Bowser took the
Austrian and German strlke-breakera
out of the Nanalmo mines and interned
them. Union minera of Fernie and Hillcrest caused the union Germanwand1 Austrian miners to be interned. We think
Bowser's action the more creditable of
the two.
Bead the following from a Vancouver
morning paper:
The usual fee charged to the mothers who leave their   babies   in
charge of the civic   creche   while
they go out to work will be foregone for the present on the part of
those really unable to pay, according to a resolution submitted to the
city council Inst Monday night.
Then remember that the Salvation
Army is still advertising in Britain for
women and girls to come out to work
in Canada as domestic servants.
Westminster Trust Co.
HEAD OFFICE
3. 3. JONES. Man. Director.
NEW WESTMINSTER, B.C.
J. A. RENNIE, Sec-Tint.
A0T8 AS ASSIGNEES, LIQUIDATOB8 AND EEOEIVEBS
INSURANCE IN ALL ITS BRANCHES
HOUSES, BUNGALOWS, STORES AND MODERN SUITES FOR BENT
at a Big Reduction
Safety Deposit Boxes for Rest at 12.60 up
Willi Drawn Free of Charge
Deposits Accepted aad Interest at Four Fer Cent Allowed
oa Dally Balances.
TRAD! UNION DIRECTORY VANCOUVEB    UNIONS
Allied Printing Trades Council—R. H. Neelands, Box 68.
I*?"!-8' I- £r■"!,• •„*• *-"- street.
Barteader.*—H. Dsvll, Box «24.
Bl.ck.mlth. — Malcolm    Porter,    View
Hill p. o. "' w
Bookbinders—W. H. Cowderoy, 1811 Thirty
fourth nuu tut.
Boilermaker*.—A. Fraier, till Howe St.
Brewery   Workors—frank'. Oraaan,  Leber
Temple.
Bri;fu,y*E"—William 8. Dagnall, Room
216, Labor Temple.
Brotherhood of Carpenten Dlstriot Coun-
•11—r. L. Barratt, Boom lot, Laber Tern*
pie.
Olnrnekere—Oare Kurts Olisr Factor,, W
Cook., Welters, Waitresses—Andy Graham,
Boon) 808, Labor Tomple.
Electrical Workon (outsidt)—I. H. Morriion, Boom SOT, Labor Tuple.
Electrical Werkon  (inilde)—Room J07; F.
L, Ettlagbausen.
EmImjm—B. Pread.rga.1, Beam 111, Labor Temple.
Granite Cutters—Edward Hurry, Columbia Hotel.
Oennent Worker*—Lsbor Temple.
Hora.iho.ri—Labor Temple.
L.tUreerrl.rs—Bobt. Wight, Dlitrlet li.
LebonrtrrQeorgo Harrison, Boom 310, La*
bor Temple,
itters—Viet..
Locomotive Fin
Latters—Vletoi R. Mldgley, Ubor Tempi..
Meomotlve Firemen and Engineers—O. Hon*
trd, 607 Darle atreet.
Loco Engineer.—L. T. Solloway, 1157 Her-
wood.   Tel. Sey. 1848R.
Longshoremen—J. Q Kelly, 10 Powell Street
Maclilnlsw—J. a McVtty,    Boom   JU,
Labor Temple.
MuelcUne—H. J. Brtcttld, Boom 104*105,
Labor Temple.
Marbleworkere—Frank   Ball,   Jane.   Bod,
B. O.
Holders.
Moving Picture Operators—L.  B.  Goodman, Labor Temple.
Pointers—Room 809, Labor Tempi.
Plumbers—Boom 100 1*9, Laber Temple.
Pressmen—P, D. Edward, Labor Temple.
Plasterers—John   Jamee   Cornleh,   lltll
Eleventh Ave. Eaat
Pattern Makers—J.  Campbell,  4188 Ar-
gyle Street
Quarry Workeri—Jamee Hepburn, oare
Columbia Hotel.
Railroad Trainmen—A.   E.    McCorvllle,
Box 141.
Railway Carmen—A. Robb,  420 Nelion
Street
Seamen's Unloa.
Structural Iron Worker.—Boom 308, Labor
Tomple.
Stonecutters—Jamea   Rayburn,   P.   O.   Boi
1047.
Shot Metal Workers.
Btreet Railway Employeea—Jamas I. OrlOn,
166 Twenty-flfth avenue east.
Stereotypers—w. Bayley, care Province.
City..
Telegraphers—E. B. Peppln, Box 48!.
Tradee and Labor Council—Geo. Bartley,
Room 210 Labor Temple.
Typographical—H. Neelands, Box II.
Tallon—C. MoDonald, Box 508.
Theatrlcfl Stage Employeea—Oeo. W. Allln,
Boa Til.
Tllelayers   and   Helpers—Evan Thomaa,
Labor Temple.
TKAJLIES   AND   LABOR   COUNCIL -
"SSe* tS£_ SSffiK'ft. m —**
le-vA/fA    iV     ™*  «utt8rluiie, ireuurar-
cu? ££jrtugu ,j'8am.s coun:
BARTENDERS'
laf^m\S%^lf!^_^M
____ __?• ■**•»<.TTfcaS*
BROTHEBHOOTT"
m'4°'» ins -X^'-.oK
itUe"      """"* *• t—wt, 1161 Hewe
en abort nolle.   Pbon. aomouraeiT
DISTRICT
COUNCIL   OF   CABPENTlU
meets to room 208, UborTomilo.
and fourth TIuhjI. -« ...V1??'8*.
P. m. Preeldont, O. It Herd,? SL
J* L. Bemtti treasurer, •/T^e#?^£
cal No. 117 meets   6rit   and   ihlrf   vi£
oad_aadtifo»rth Tkaradu ef eaeVmeaV
"• Hardyi oeerotei
Jr. W. T. tarloi
diy of-.«h S.-nti. Ki' __i SSS _:
trst aad third TaeTda. efjgh month
ELECTRICAL WOUKEB8, LOOAL NO."lie
—MeeU room 801, Ubor Temple*.™.
m°t *£!£!**• J-WyiNO AND COMMON
.•.i_.«SPB J"'*"1* N»* ••—Meets «r.t nni
JwdJl'!-'*/ ?,' Hi ?-""••• Ub?r Tempi,
■eoreUry, George
John Sally, room
Uhorml^ltVd To 5&i5^,~ "Sfi*:
.    >7.   „..
■USINItt  AOINT   DIRECTORY
Earl Manvera, one of the "hupper
suckles," speaking at Nottingham,England, .Tune 2, advised the establishment
of martial law at any place where a
strike occurred, and made the suggestion that ringleaders should be shot.
There is no doubt—as many eminent
publicists have pointed out lately—
that this war is having the effect of
bringing about a muoh more sympathetic feeling between the working class
and the divinely inspired ruling nucleus
in Britain. The gallant earl should be
congratulated for having succeeded -in
reaching such a high pitch of stupidity
in a class where the competition is so
keen.
RE
OF THE
TIMES
ECRUITING IN CANADA is go-
ing to bo conducted from   now
on in a much more   thorough
and vigorous fashion than it has been
up to the present.   In Vancouver at
any rate, the  signs
8IGN8 °' ^n0TeBBe^ "c™it*
ing activity are al*
ready noticeable in
the shape of cloth
banners stretched in
the streets, and striking posters die*
played in varioui prominent places
where it is expected they will catch the
eye of thoBe eligible to enlist. These
signs are pregnant of more to follow,
and it is well within the possibilities of
the next few monthi thst we shall iee
ladies of the "better elass" organising
Mr. J. Hunter Watts, addressing retail employees in England laat week,
put it very clearly, if a trifle brutally,
when he told them, "When the instinct
of national self-preservation forces the
state to flout the axiom of industrial
feudalism that ' all commodities must
enter the realm of exchange before they
can enter the field of consumption,' and
compels it to organize a Bystem of production for use which will eliminate
'buying and selling,' thousands of you
will find your occupation gone." Buoh
talk, illustrated by the eminently practical illustrations which Britain affords
to-day, should make Clarence of the
"woollens" think some.
Olothtnr that beam thla label Is
made la lanltuv work ■hops, and
under rood worHnf oondlUoni.
This label le a protection guar-
- you.   If lt does not bear
this label your clothing may be
made ln sweat shops amid unsanitary conditions, and you may contract disease by wearing It.
Aik for Labor Tomplo   'Phont Exchange,
Soymour .7496   (onlois  otfcenrtse  sUtod).
Brlckloyera—Wm.  8. Dignoll,  Room  816.
Cooki, Walton, Wsltreuoi—Room 203;
Andy Grofatm;  phono Soy.  8414.
Electrical Workera (outside)—E. H. Morrison, Room 207.
Englneera (ateom)—Room 816; E. Prendergut.
Lodnhoromon't Asaoolotlon — Offloe, 145
Alexander itreet; G. J. Kelly; phono Sejr.
MuBlclano—H. J. Brasfleld, Boons 804-805,
Labor Templo,
Btreet Railway Employees—Prod. A, Hoorer;
phono Sey. 508.
Typographical—R. H. Neelanda, Rooms 812-
The literary boarder fastened his eyes
upon the hash. "Kindly pass the Review of Reviews," he said.
Every time you boost the Uion Label
you are helping some Union man to
hold a job.
J. W. Ca'rruthers
HIGH CLASS TAILOR
232 Broadway Eaat
T.B. CUTHBERTSON & Co.
Men's Hatters and Outfitters
Three Stores
SYNOPSIS OP COAL MININQ RIOU
LATIONS
Coal mlnins rights ot tht Dominion,
In Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,
tht Yukon Ttrrltory, tht Northwest Territories and In a portion of tht Province
of British Columbia, may bt Itated for
a term of twenty-one yeara at an annual
rental of II an aort. Not men than
I.UO aent will hi leaaed te one applicant.
Applications for lease must be made by
tht applicant In person to tht Aftnt or
Sub-Agent of the dlstriot In whloh tht
rights applied for are situated.
In surveyed territory the land must bt
described by sections, or legal subdlvls*
Ions of seotlons, and In unsurvayod territory the tract applied for shall be
staked by the applicant himself.
Each application must be accompanied
by a fee of li, whloh will be refunded 11
the rights applied for are not available,
but not .otherwise. A royalty shall be
paid on the merchantable output of tbe
mine at the rate of Ave cents per ton.
The person operating the mine shall
furnish the Agent with sworn returns
accounting for the full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay the royalty thereon. If the coal mining rlghu
are not being operated, such return,
should be furnished at least once a year.
The lease will Include the coal mining
rights only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available
surface rights may be considered necessary for the working of the mint at the
rate of 110 an acre.
For full Information application ahould
be made to the Secretary pf tht Department of the Interior, Ottawa, or to any
Agent or Sub-Agent of Dominion Lands.
W. H. CORY,
 Deputy Minister of tha latertor.
N. B.—Unauthorised publication of thl.
advertisement will not bt paid for—UIH
Ask you favorite mixologist for "B,
O. Special." Government inspected and
absolutely pure. •••
HARRON BROS.
FUNERAL   DIRECTORS  AND
EMBALMERS
Vancouver-omce   and    Chattl,
10S4 Qranvllle St., Phone Sty. MM.
North   Vanoouver — Offloe  and
Chapel, 1M-Slsth St. West, Phone
MA0HIMST8, HO. 183-MEETS SECOND
end fourth Pr days tt s p. m. President,
J. BolTor* recording secretary, J. Brooki*
jgjMltljeerjttry, J. H, McVety     ■""»■•••
Engliiffseerelary, HiS.
—    W.   fowler.   Pheae
Tlee.pretldeeL
Brasleldj    treasurer,'
Seymour 7495.
PLASTERERS' OPERATIVE iSwiifl
TWNAL ASSOOUTIOnT ttTsfi
Meets every tret ud third Wednesday In the
month In room >01, Ubor Tempi.: PreeT
it—tS^!1 ,lM;»'M*dI-**«. A* Ber.nl.en
swKi"";* """trr, Joe Oornlsh, 180)
Eleventh ataaae   ,Mt,   an,„e„|   ,„'„,
oeorge Montgomery; treesnrer. Hsrold Reld!
PAINTERS',.   PAPERHANGERS'.   AND
Decorators',  Looal  131-Meets  bvptv
Thursday, 7.S0 p.m. Pwtlden" H. oSS7
nnanclal  secretary,   J.   Preokleibn,   loli
recording   secretary,   R.
i!*"™   »<reet* „ Business
Train,   Room  103,   Labor
Comox street.
Dowding, 031
agent, James
Temple.
?« »SBBS~gSS£ ffl
______*____ "-*** m
STREET AND BLEOTRIO RAILWlf~iif
Meete Ubor Temple, eeeond tnd four h Wed
ffilSff *• 2.£? ,nd B "■ m*   Prwldent, Jos
__)___$__ __ **■ f >»
•"•W-OS-ffiRS*? "NTERNATION-
s »1L<2S-?,fcM?e? 'W Wednesday
I p. m., room 104, Labor Temple. Flnan-
elal secretary. B. Prendergut, "ilom 110
TAILORS    INDUSTRIAL   UNION   (IN*
t, u".r"?"^"ali Ll!cal No* ""-Meetings
h«M «r»t Tuesday In each month, 8 p. m!
President, Miss ti. Outterldge; recording
secretary, O. McDonald, Bo? 608; -""
clal sec, K. Paterson, P. o. Box so
TYPOGRAPHICAL    UKIOH, To7Tis=
MeeU laet Sundty « etch month It I
•• -   !reeldent, B. P.'P.lt|ph»r?**'
lent, W. 8. Metsger; etentarrtnannri'B,
J. Neelands. P. 0. Box 08.
PBOVINOIAL UNIONS
ft FEDERATION OP LABOR—MeeU
.... ■■>•»»■>" "invention In January. Exec
utlve offlcere, Hlt-18; President, A. Watch*
man; vice-presidents—Vanoouver. W. F.
Dunn J. H.'MoVety; Vletorl., B. Simmons;
New Westmnster.fr. Yates; Prince Rupert
W. E. penning; Revelstoke. J. Lyon; _Z
«"»'>«, U. C W. of A. (VeneouWiland),
S. Outhrle; District 18, V. M. W. of A
{Orew'e Nest VtUey). A. J. Carter; ..ere*
Vll'".^!*).*4' 8' Wel"' P' °' "« ""'
NEW WESTMINSTER. B.C.
HEWWESTMINSTJSR TRADES AND LA-
•   -.S°*8 J5™"!'"—?•"• •»7 SMoad aad
nurth Wedneaday at 1 p. a. In Ubor kail.
President, O. Cropley.* Unsocial secreUry,
R* _   Stoney; general   seeretsry,   W.    I.
__mJ-Sr,m% T'-»"•"•"■•
VICTORIA, m. C.
VICTORIA TRADEB AMD LABOB OOUN-
r u w^rrPtWJty ind *hW w«dBMd»,
Labor  hall,   1424   Governmont  itreet,   at   8
6 m.    Preaident, A. 8. Wella; iecretary, F.
oldrldge, Boi 803, Vlotoria, h. Q.
OBOAgggD LABOB COMPANIES.
LABOR TEMPLE COMPANY, LIMITED—
Dlrecton: Jaa. Brown, preaident: R. P,
Pettlplece, vlce-prealdent; Edward Lothian,
Jamea Campbell, J. W. Wllklnaon, Oeo. Wll-
bv, W. J. Nagle, F. Blumberg, H. H. Free.
Managln- **--— ■ 	
Jamea Campbell,
F. Blumber,
„. „  1 and aeoretary-tr
H. MeVety, room 8U, Labor Templt.
an aging dlreotor and aeoretary-treasurer, j,
*    1STaVa(H    Mum   ett 0     Y >!._-   rh ._
B. O. FEDERATIONIST, LIMITED—Heeta
at call ol preildent, Labor Temple, Vanoouver, B. O. Dlrecton: Jamea Campbell,
preildent; J. H. MoVety, aecretary-tretiurer;
A. Watchman, A. B. Wella. R. Parm, Pettlplece, manager, 217 Labor Temple. Telephone:    Seymour 749f.
^b,
_ . Of America -^r
aajai *woi ffiffiggpSSSai
Vote sgslnst prohibition! Demsnd t.f
sisal liberty In oEoosIni what you will drink.
Ask for this Label when purchasing Beer,
Ale or Porter,
Ion I" *
This Is Onr Label
funeral Directors
.   anJ EMBALMERS
IMUdurisft.       Vstttmr, I. C.
mmmSam^mammmm
urn \ *■
FFBIDAT  JUNE tt, 1915
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
Le
OCktdftLogVers
OOt
B
DOB many yeans the
*   ITAXBABS heary boou
Ud shoee hart Mtn meat
by TiWrrri Hut dtUen,
adman, loggert, farmers
all whs Emnr good hotter
boot*—have ulTtrtally acknowledged LaozaiAon
at   tht  BIST   THAT   CAM
roiusLT aa nostras.
repnutlom
   TLBOXES
•hot whether tt U tht heary
boot er tht gwntmaa'a
attttt walkug thot. avtqr
LBOXia thot U made of
aoaaar itatatr-aoaaiT
ttrlal tlueaghenv
Ttu dealj^wUl be glad to
today.
mow
w you I.BQ¥tl I
■SOU. Atkhlat
Made in British Columbia
World Shoe Co.
64 Halting! St, W., Phona Sey. 1770
Beit Shoe Repairing "While You Walt'
Work called fur ud delivered
Loggen' Minora' Crlpplea1 and any kind
of ipeclai Shoee made to order
UNIOt^fclAMPl
Jicrary
Ask for   "NABOB    Products
TEA SPICES
OOPPEB I0IHOS
JELLY POWDEB PTOMNCHS
FLAVORING BXTKAOTS BAKINO POWDEB
AT YOUR GROCER
Get and use "NABOB" everytime
Jingle Pot Coal
ONLY UNION MINED OOAL ON THE PACIFIC COAST
More heat. No Clinkers
WOOD
Millwood and Kindling $2.80 load
Choice 10 inch Fir (3.00 load
CARTAGE
General Cartage, Baggage and Furniture Moved and Stored1
McNEILL, WELCH & WILSON, Limited
Phone Seymour 1936
$  DOLLAR DAY $
Straw Hats regular $2.50, $3.00, $4.00
Special Clearance at $1.00 each
Richardson & Potts Limited
MEN'S  HATTERS
417 GRANVILLE STREET
PENDER HOTEL
619 PBJTD1B ITREET WBIf
Mew, Modem, Flrt-Olmea
Steam Heated, Electric Lie bud
Telephone Seynour ISM
Ratea 11.50 par Der and Up
Working Men!
We have just placed lo stook a full line of Bob Tory's Union Made
Gloves, Headlight Overalls, Union Made Fine Shoes; also Working
Shoe; Stanfleld's Underwear, the beBt for working men.
<*> W. B. BRUMMITT ~
18,20 Cordova St.
Named Shoes are frequently made in Non-
Union Factories—Do Not Buy Any Shoe
no matter what its name, uolesi It bears i
plain ud readable lmpreesion or tbl* stamp
All shoes without th* Unloa Stamp on
always Non-Union.
■OOT A SHOE WORKERS' UNION
IM Summer Stnet, Boston, Mass
J. F. Tobln, Pros.   C. L. Blaine. Sso.-Trsas.
AI
Five Hundred Parade in a
Deputation to Meet the
Acting Premier
Memorandum and Petition
Presented—With Usual
Result
VIOTOBIA, June 23.—On Tuesday
morning last in Capital City the provincial executive had appear before them
a deputation the like of which had not
happened before for some time. The unemployed of the city had arranged for
a hearing before the Acting Premier,
and in pursuance of the interview being granetd, they paraded to the parliament buildings something like 500
strong. Owing to the site of the deputation an effort, was made to have the
executive receive them on the steps of
the building. It was arranged that this
deputation should assemble in the executive ohamber. This room was obviously too small to accommodate them all
and the corridors were filled, the result
being that many were unable'to hear
what was being said.
J. L. Martin, chairman of the deputation .ntroduced the bunch and explained briefly the purpose of their
visit. Other bodies, he claimed) had
been before the hon. gentlemen with
various schemes, for the alleviation of
the conditions due to unemployment,
and consequently it was not the purpose of the present deputation to go into details, as such would take considerable time in doing so. The situation
was acute, nevertheless, and was one
that called for prompt and thorough attention. He pointed out out, also, that
while the deputation was large it did
not represent by any means the full extent of the unemployment in the eity.
After these few introductory remarks,
he read the following
Memorandum and Petition.  ,
To the Eon. W. J. Bowser, Acting Premier of the Province   of   British
Columbia.
Sir: The deputation now assembled
in your presence desire to have your attention drawn to a question of serious
importance.
In the Capital City of the provinoe,
conditions prevail among the unemployed, that in addition to being grave
at the present time, are fraught with
serious consequences for the future.
In a province luxuriously provided with
immense natural resources, we flnd the
gruesome spectacle of a people, who
through no fault of their own, are face
to face with actual destitution. To this
we wish to draw your attention.
The situation is not by any means
exaggerated; there being 2,200 or
more unemployed registered at the City
Bureau. For some time it has been
growing in intensity and for the future
Bhows no signs of abatement. Circumstances of acute poverty unprecedented
in tho history of the city are daily the
lot of many of the unemployed; the
experience of which can only be understood by actual association with those
whose misfortune it is to be in these
conditions.
It is admitted by all whose work it
is to deal with conditions of this kind*
in the city, that the extent of the des
titution is assuming grave proportions
and that the situation offers little hope,
of future abatement. It is felt that if
the present conditions prevail much
longer, the prospects for the coming
winter are anything but cheerful for a
large proportion of Victoria citizens,
and will call for prompt and thorough
attention from the authorities.
Various bodies have been dealing
with the problem for some time and
they have had to admit failure. The
municipal oounoil of Victoria have been
appealed to time and time again to alleviate the suffering and have come te
the same conclusion. In spite of the
fact that the Municipal act states specifically that each municipal council
shall make suitable provision for its
poor and destitute, the above municipal
council has admitted that they are unable to deal with the unemployed problem of the city, In that cose, inasmuch
as the said council finds itself unable
to live up to the provisions of the atatute in this connection, the onus of re*
sponsibility for making provision for
the destitute of tlie city reverts, in the
opinion of the deputation, reverts to
the shoulders of the provincial government.
The provincial authorities being the
parent of the statute regulating the
municipalities, have a duty to perform
in this regard. Either they must compel the municipalities to live up fo the
provisions of the act, or they must
make some contribution of assistance to
them, so as to enable them to do so.
Foiling this, the only course left to
your government is either to open up
some work independent of the council,
or to devise means of providing the
necessities of life to those in need. It
is not the work of this deputation to
outline the details,of the work to be
done, as your government has already
had suggestions offered to it, as measures of immediate relief, and which by
this thue should have received some
consideration. It cannot be urged too
strongly, however, the pressing neces*
sity of what is to be done by the gov*
ernment, being done at the earliest possible moment.
Second only to the seriousness of the
actual circumstances experienced by unemployment, are the consequences that
often follow acute* destitution. This
also carries to the shoulders of the gov*
ernment an obligation to perform. It
often follows, that circumstances such
aB previously mentioned, are associated
with publlo* discontent and are sometimes expressed in, a pronounced manner derogatory to the publie peace.
While not in any way desirous of conveying any alarm, yet we would have
your government realize the gravity of
Buch a contingency should conditions
.become worse.   As the first law
PAGE THREE
Your home decanter should be filled
with "B.C. Special." One trial will
convince. For sale at all leading retail
liquor stores.
Secure the best whisky—'fB.O. Special"—for the least money. Made in
B. C. for particular people. Sold everywhere.   Ask for it. •*■■?■*
PHONE:   SEYMOUR 9086
•.N    s£ e-TV.d.7
A DEPOSIT BOX
? Safety Vault mar be rented from
$2.50 PER ANNUM
The comfortable feeling of security alone
| la worth the money. -
DOW FRASER
Trust Company
122 Hastings St. West.
Vancouver, and  McKay Station.
Burnaby. B. C.
Reference!:    Dun'a,  Braditreeta   or   any
I Financial Houie of repute tn Vancouver.
CENTER & HANNA, Ltd.
UNDERTAKERS
Refined Serrice,
1049 GEORGIA STRICT
One  Block  west of Court  House.
Use of  Modern Chapel .and
Funeral  Parlors  free ' to all
Patron*
Telephone Seymour 2425
Phone;  Fairmont 810
Pattersons Chandler
4 Manufacturer! of
MONUMENTS
Vaults, Curbing, Etc.
Office and Works:
Cor. 16th Ave. and Main St.
Branoh Offlce: 40th * Fraaer Avea.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Acting Premier, we look to you so to
act that such conditions be maintained
in the community that will make public
discontent an impossibility. With the
destitution remaining as it is at present
there is little or no hope of public
tranquility being maintained in the
community.
We therefore submit that it is imperative that your government, in the
interest of the publie peace, and in the
interest of the people whose representatives you are, to immediately, or aB
soon as possible, take such steps as will
guarantee tbem ample protection from
the ravishes of hunger and destitution.
All of which is duly submitted for
earnest consideration and action at the
earliest possible date,
On behalf of the unemployed.
JOHN h. MABTIN.
The other speakers were W. Inward
and J. Taylor, after whioh the chairman called on Mr. Bowser for a reply.
Mr. Bowser's Reply.
He replied at length, stating what
the government had done so far to re*
lieve the situation. He stated that the
government was responsible for what
relief had been given in the rural districts. In the cities, while the municipal councils wero responsible for , the
care of the poor and destitute, yet they
had assisted the municipalities that had
asked for relief, mentioning some of
them that had obtained the same. He
also pointed out that suggestions had
been made relative to the need of men
to reap the prairie harvest.
The government hnd taken up the matter with the railroad companies for
cheap fares to the prairies. This was
to apply to married men only. The
single men, he said, would have to
"walk and beat tlieir **way to the
prairie," a statement that waB met by
derisive laughter. Observing the laughter, he pointed out that it was no
laughing mater. He stated that if be
was a single man he would not stay in
the city and starve; he would, if in
tneir position) and learning of a job in
the distance, start walking as quickly
as possible to get that job, and advised
all single men to do the same. In conclusion, he said' that the government
had done aft it could do and that the
responsibility now remained with the
municipalities to contribute to tne relief of the situation.
Much Ado For Nothing.
The net result of the hearing was nil.
The only significant statement made by
Mr. Bowser waB his remarks anent the
single men beating it to the prairie.
That excited the derision and contempt
of everyone present on the deputation.
The hon. gentleman might have suggested some patent kind of arrangement
to enable them to walk across to Vancouver. We have heard of one man
walking on the water before to-day, but
the avoirdupois of the average man
prevents tho samo in these days. In
fact he haB overlooked the laws that
the tramp in this case would be up
against.
While walking on the water he would
have the law of specific gravity to contend with, and while walking along the
C, P. B. be would have another law to
contend with, if caught doing so. When
making arrangements with the transportation companies to carry the married men to the prairie, Mr. Bowser
might have at the same time obtained
permission for the single men to walk
on the tracks. For it is questionable,
that even with the sanction of the first
law officer of the province to break the
law in this regard, whether the C. P. R.,
for example, would grant the jobless
the privilege of walking their ties. The
hon. gentleman was correct when, after
the derisive laughter that' followed his
keep-on-walking advice had subsided,
he said that it was no laughing matter.
It certainly would be no laughing matter to walk two or three thousand miles
in order to make connections with a
job. • ;
It seems strange, in view of the fact
that Sir Bichard McBride said in the
city of London, the other day that
wbat the province was in need of, was
population, that steps should be taken
to send mechanics to the Old Country
and laborers to the prairie. Sir Bichard
clamors for more "population." Mr.
Bowser says "bent it to the prairie."
Somebody evidently wants to catch the
workers coming and going. The same
parties might catch the workera thinking some of these days.
JOHN L. MABTIN.
A Bit of Keel Advice.
The mission of organized labor is to
organize. That is Us primary and preeminent purpose. As it succeeds in organizing, it Ib truly successful. As it
neglects organisation, it is a failure.
The office, of the labor official is to
promote organization. The business of
the business agent is to organise' men
and jobs. When organization ceases,
the growing power of organized labor
ceases. Here's a juicy bit fjrpm the
Mixer and Server: "Don't slam the
door on opportunity. Tou may talk until you f (ice takes on a purple hue, until
you,, have exhausted every argument
whieh you possess, but, unless you grab
the chances offered to increase the numerical strength of your local union,
your labor ia lost so far as immediate
results are concerned and your looal as
well as yourself and all working at the
catering industry are losers by your
failure. Every addition to the roster
of your union means advancement.
Every new union worker converted to
trades unionism is a direct help to our
progress."   '
\      * i i i    —.
Hunger In Belgium.
VorwaertB," the leading Socialist
newspaper in Berlin, publishes an interesting letter from a German socialist
who is serving with tne army in Flanders. The soldier describes the devastation of the country, and dwells on the
regrets the inhabitants who left must*)
have felt at the parting hour. "But
those who remain have suffered most
of all," he continues, "One feels involuntarily drawn to them, Silent and
grave are for the most part the faces
of the men; the women go about
weighed down with care. Their dresses
are for the most part black. Everything makes upon you a sad impression.
The only relieving touch is supplied by
the children, who crowd round you, and
whose desires and requests are centred chiefly upon foodstuffs. 'Soldier,
please a piece of bread—father and
mother are dead.' . This may not always be true, but the end notoriously
justifies the means. It is a good thing
that my appetite is only moderate, so
I can give away a portion of my rations. At first it was very painful to
me to see how these poor peole starve,
but now my feelings have become somewhat blunted. Tet 1 give what I oan.
But we are now forbidden to give away
bread."
The Modern Viewpoint
The daily press reports that Pat Mai-
loy, a logger, worked and scraped and
saved and in so doing shortened hla life
and died and left $4,983 which had to
be turned into the state treasury   be-
, .cause he was apparently possessed   of
o* the province, lu addition to being ^neither kith or kin, says the   Seattle
Becord. Think of what he lost in real
living by accepting the advice to be
"thrifty." Spend your money, boys
and girls, and when .you die you will
have it all and everybody will have
been better off while you were here.
It is the tightwads who primarily make
panics. The spender Ib the foundation
of prosperity.
How Is It Paid For?
In Australia there is an allowance for
the new-borne babe and a pension for
the old worn-out toiler. But it's a long,
long way between the cradle and the
grave; and the exploiter takes a heavy
toll between the two.
World Progress.
Hume discovered a couple of centuries ago what he might as readily
have discovered if he were living today: "Nothing appears more surprising to thoee who consider human affairs
with a philosophical eye than the easiness with which the many are governed
by the few."
Whenever you can consistently do bo,
when yon require anything you see advertised in The Federationist, be sure
and explain that you saw his-ad. in The
Federationist, and that it was becnr.se
of that that he iB patronized. Don't
forget this. •"
"B.C. Special"—beat rye whisky—|
distilled in B. C. by competent workmen and dispensed at all leading bars.
Ask for "B.C. Special." #fc*
The Terminal Steam
Navigation Co., Ltd.
TAKE A TeRIR
On one of the Company'a (teamen to
BOWBN ISLAND and HOWE SOUND
points. Three palatial steamera leave the
Union Dock daily at 9:15 a.m., Sunday at
10:30 a.m. This trip affords passengers a
magnificent view of the scenery among the
islands and glaciers all day.
ROUND  TRIP
Good for Day of Issue Only
Phone Seymour 6360
$1
PANTAGES
Unequalled Vaudeville   Means
PANTAGES   VAUDIVILLI
THREE SHOWS DAILY /
*.«, 7.20, 9.11    Seaaon'a   Prlcea:
Matinee*, 16o.j Evenings, 1Sc, Me.
Sunday Summer Sailings.
B ijoy the Sunday on the water by uklng
a trip to Gibson's Landing, Robert's Greek
and Seehtlt by tbe fast pleasure steamer
SANTA MARIA.
Leave Johnson's Wharf at .... 0:30 a. m.
Arrives Gibson's Landing  ....  11:80 a. m.
' *       Robert's Greek ..    .. 12:18 p. tn.
''        Sechelt       1:00 p.m.
Returning leavea Sechelt at... 5:00 p, m.
Arriving Vancouver about .... 8:15 p. m.
FARR FOR ROUND TRIP ONE  DOLLAR.
Full particulars Phone Sey. 4380.
PRESIDENT
SUSPENDER
NONE SO  EASY
Women Are Enlisting
Hut An Needed ta Vtt
Royal Crown Naptha Soap
Thousands of women ue nuking -wiling totltt br letttaf BOTAL OBOWK
NAPTHA SOAP do the herd put of tbt
wMb&f for th.nl. Try * eekt aal 701
will low no time enliitini.
SOW  NOW
Sweet William
Impd. Ptok Beinty, rttjefte—, b—utkeidelicateshad. 10c pkt
WALLFLOWER^ separate colors 10c. pkt
GAILLARDIA,-riOLFTS 10c. pkt
BROWN BROS. & CO. Ltd.
' Seedsmen, Florists and Nurserymen
VANCOUVER -  HAMMOND - VICTORIA
High Class Dental Services at
very Moderate Prices
OOLD AMD PORCELAIN 0B0WN8, Bach.... ....... I M0
BEIDOE WORK, pn Tooth     1.00
PBRPBOT PITTDIO PLATES  ....   10.00
AMALGAMFILLINOS      .». ..........     ISO
ENAMEL PILLINOS       tM
DlHBMa of tba ru-u.-ni-ltti.lnf Fjrorrhta, taaeeetolly treated.
All work (saraataad.
Dr. BRETT ANDERSON
Phona Seymour MSI Office: 101 Bank af Ottawa Balldlni
602 Haatinga Stmt Weat
BOYS'  SHIRT WAISTS
For Ages 6 to 16 years y
from 50c. up
CLUBB & STEWART, Limited
MMll HA8HKOS STBBBI WBST nm i^*, „,
To England Under Neutral Flag
American Line from New York-Liverpool
I*"1'   {AE AA        ■*■««*•-'«■•' American Stamen under American ttf
Clui JStt.UU ..New York-  June ^
Sttmi SCC AA \    V "pW»*deJphia" j„|y 3rd
Clin tSddM a%_ m%_ "St Louis" ;... July 10th
Third fiftAft "StPaul" J"'?™,
Cisu   -I4U.UU and week,y thereafter.
Company's Offices: 619 SECOND AVENUE, SEATTLE  WN
OB LOOAL BAIL AND STEAMSHIP AGENTS.'
Furniture
Largest ud moit select stock In Wut-
eta Canada. Easy Terms ud decent
treatment, at war time prices.
Hastings Furniture Co.. Ltd., 41 Hastings St West
UATirr  PVPfiFNT Absolutely  Fireproof.   Local and Long-l'ittiuJitt-
nUiliii IUjU£j1i1   Phone ln Every Room-Caft In Connection. Katea
$1.00 per day up.. Attractive Ratea to Permanent Gueatn.
Ootttnghaa ft Batty. Proprietors 181 Haitian Itreet Baal
You Can Save Money
BT USING
Tango Street Car Tickets
25 Cents
Rides
for
THIS 18 HOW IT WORKS OUT
32 Bides at 32 Bides on Yo„r Saving On
A 5 Cent Pare Tango Ticket. »1 Investment
$1.60    $1.00      60c
Tango Tickets Are Now On Sale
They are Mid by conductors on tbe cars, at the B.O. Electric Salesrooms,
Carrall and Hastings streets and 1138 Granville street; the Company's
Interurban Terminals at Hastings and Carrall streets and south end of
Granville street bridge; Depotmaster's Offlce at Main and Prior streets;
Mount Pleasant Car Barn, Main street and Thirteenth avenue, and at the
places of business of the following firms throughout the city:
HASTINOS STREET—
Woodward's   Dept.   Stores    (Drag
Dept.) Abbott Streot Corner.
Spencer's Dept.   Store   (Cashier's
office,  Information Bureau and Kx-
change Desks), near Richards.
Wood's Pharmacy—Seymour Street
corner,
Csmpbell's Fhanmcy — Oranvllle
Street*-, corner,
Owl Drugstore—Main Street corner.
Harrison's Drug Store—Near Car*
rail street
MAIN STREET—
Brown*    *    Beaton,      Druggists,
Pender street corner.
Law'a    Drugstore — Harris street
corner,
OOBDOTA STREET— \
Owl    Drugstore  —  Abbott  street
comer
POWELL STREET—
Owl   Drugstore — Dunlevy street
corner.
DBMHAN STREET—
(English Bay)
Torrence Drugstore — Davie etreet
GRANVILLE   STREET—
Hudson's Bay Oo. All departments
Georgia street corner.
Gordon   Drysdale's   (Notion    Counter) near Dunsmuir.
Owl Drugstore — Dunsmuir street.
Harrison's    Drugstore —    Robson
street corner.
Browne a Beaton, druggists, Davie
atreet cornor.
Pill Box Drugstore — Nelson street
corner
Law's Drugstore — Davie   street
corner '
Harrison's     Drugstore — Fender
street corner.
PAIRVIEW—
Harrison's   Drugstore — Oranvllle
atreet   and   Seventh  avenue.
MOUNT  PLEASANT—
Law's Drugstore — Near Broadway
ORANDVIEW—
Campbell's Drugstore — Broadway
and Commercial Drive.
STANLEY PARK—
Mitchell'!  Confectionery— Georgia
atreet entrance.
B.C. ELECTRIC
Carrall and Hastings Sts.
1138 Granville St
Near Davie PAGE FOUR
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
SHOES for the Children at
Very "Tiny" Prices
Tou envy your child's foot as you view it now, yet in a few years that
same foot may probably be like thousands of others, deformed with
.corns, bunions, ingrowing nails, callouses, etc.—the result of putting the
foot in ill-Bhapen shoes. Btart your child's feet right—put them into
thoee made in the shape of a natural, perfect foot. We sell shoes that
are foot-form, and we have children's shoe experts to fit them. The following descriptions will give you an idea of the lines we carry for growing girls.   Bead:
PATENT LEATHER PUMPS in BROWN LEATHEB OXFOBDS
strap style at prices from in vici hid and gunmetal calf.
$2.75 to $3.75 Per Pair   13.50 to »t*00
STBAP PUMPS in black calf, BUTTON BOOTS in patent, vioi
tan calf and brown kid .Very kid and gunmetal calf, welted
special values .... 13.75 to 14.00 and very dressy 13.76
OOTS in lace and button styles        BUTTON BOOTS   with dongola
with gunmetal calf upppers.               kid uppers and patent tip.
Per pair  '13.60 Special, pair   13.00
V  .   V      .. mamsma nta     warn t Jg*______jm «*■**"■"""""*    ,,   ■ \ ^gy J
GRANVILLE AND GEORGIA STREETS
Consumers  Buy Direct
from Producers
The Vancouver City Market
Main Street Bridge
There will be an abundance of all varieties of Food Products on sale at the VANCOUVEB CITY MARKET this
Saturday.
It will certainly be to your interest to visit the market
and buy direct.
Fresh Fruitsand Vegetables
Selling at Wholesale Prices
Boost the Market
for your own interests
Strauss wurks
Ladles Mats Cleaned, dyed, rasawed or
blocked lnt« the latest etylei.
ALL WORK GUARANTEED
135 Hastings W., Vancouver
HOYT'S
10 Cent Cakes
"ALWAYS FRESH"
ASK  YOUR GROCER
HOTEL IRVING
101 Hastings Street East
—as the only all-union hotel of its kind in Vancouver, has been designated as'
OFFICIAL HEADQUARTERS for UNION MEN
The Finest of Wines, Liquors and Cigars sold at
buffet, with courteous Union mixologists to serve
you.
JOHN L SULLIVAN, Proprietor.
Phone: Seymour 3380.
I
T STATE
Because Money Paid Goes to
Injured or Their
Dependents
Insurance  Business   is
Gamble on Cheating
Workingmen
UNION ♦ OFFICES
This Official List Of Allied Printing Offices
OAK SUPPLY TOU WITH TBE ALLIED PEINTmo TBADES UNION LABEL
BAQLEY A SONS, 161 Hullnn Stmt Ssjmour Sl»
BLOOHBEROER, P. R„ 819 Broadway Eait Fairmont 203
BRAND A PERRY, 629 Ponder Streot, Wut  Seymour 2678
BURRARD PUI1LISH1NO CO.,  711  Seymour  Street   Seymour  8580
CHINOOK PRINTING CO., 4601 Hiln Street   Fairmont  1874
CLARKE A  STUART,   320  Seymour  Streot    Soymour  3
COMMERCIAL PRINTING A PUBLISHING CO., ..World Bnlldlni, Sey. 468637
COWAN A BROOKHOUSE, Libor Templo Building     Soymour 4490
DUNSMUIR PRINTING CO., 437 Dnmmilr Street Soymour 1106
EVANS A HASTINGS, Arte tnd Crafte Bide., Seymour St Soymour 6650
GRANDVIEW PRINTERS, 1443 Commercial. Highland 741L
JEWELL, M. L, 341 Pender St Seymour 1444
KERSHAW, J. A., 639 Howe St Seymour 8674
LATTA, R P.. 833 Ooro Ave Seymour 1099
MAIN PRINTING CO.. 3851 Main SI Feirmont 1988
MoLEAN A SHOEMAKER, North Vancouver N. Ven. 68
MOORE PRINTING CO., Cor. Granville and Robion Sta Seymour 4548
NEWS-ADVERTISER, 301 Ponder St Soymonr 1028-41
NORTH SHORE PRESS, North Vanoouver N Van. 80
PACIFIC PRINTERS. World Bulldlnj Soymonr 9592
PEAROE A HODGSON, 618 Hamilton Straet - Seymoar 9028
ROEDDE, G. A., 616 Homer Streot Soymonr 264
SCANDINAVIAN PUBLISHING CO., 317 Cambie Bt Seymour 8509
TERMINAL CITY PRE88, 2408 Weitmlmter Road Fairmont 1140
THOMSON STATIONERY, 825 Haatinge W Soymonr 1620
T1MMS. A. H., 230 Fourteenth Ave. E Fairmont 621R
WESTERN PRESS, 828 Cordova W Seymour 7566
WESTERN SPECIALTY CO., 331 Dunemulr St Seymour 8626
WHITE A BINDON, 167-159 Cordova St Seymour 1916
Write "Union Later* on Yonr Oopy whan Yoa Send It to the Printer
THE CANADIAN  BANK
OF COMMERCE
Capital 916,000,000 Best 913,600,000
Main Offlce:   Corner Hastings and Oranvllle Streeta, Vancouver
OITT BRANCHES LOCATION
ALMA  ROAD Cor. Fourth Avenue and Alma Road
COMMERCIAL DRIVE Cor. First Avenue nnd Commercial Drive
EAST END Oor. Ponder and Main Streets
FAIRVIEW Cor. Sixth Avenuo and Oranvllle Street
HASTINGS ind CAMBIE Cor. Hastings and Cambie Streets
KITSILANO Cor. Fourth Avenue and Yow Street
MOUNT PLEASANT Cor. Eighth Avenue and Main Street
POWELL STREET. Cor. Victoria Drive and Powell Street
SOUTH HILL Cor. Forty-fourth Avenuo and 'Fraser Road
Alio North Vancouver Branch, Corner Lonsdale Avenue and Esplanade
[By Jbb. McVety.]
"During the year previous to the
enactment of the Washington Compensation act/' says Mr. F. W. Hinsdale,
an insurance expert and auditor before
Sir William Meredith, the Ontario commissioner, "the employers of the state
paid approximately $000,000 in premiums to the liability companies, of
which $500,000 was absolutely wasted
as between the employer and workmen. Under the present law/' continued Mr. Hinsdale, *' we cannot spend
a single dollar except in payments to
injured workmen or their dependents."
Insurance Companies Answered.
Briefly, and yet conclusively, the
foregoing paragraph which shows that
only one-sixth of the money paid by
employers ever reached the injured
workmen, explains the fulminations of
Jot. A. S. Matthews against the new
principle, In Canada, of state administered workmen's compensation. While
tue '' Sun,' 'a local Liberal paper, in reporting his address before the Builders'
Exchange, an organization of building
contractors without contracts, leads its
readers to believe that the insurance
companies are opposing only the pre
sent draft act under consideration, the
record of the various investigations
show that the insurance companies fight
the state administration regardless of
the political complexion of the government and in whatever country the
question arises.
The Only Objectors Are Parasites.
The insurance companies and the
lawyers are the principal objectors to
state compensation. Both object for
the same reason, because the money
paid by the employers will all go to
the workmen and their dependents instead of five-sixths to the lawyers and
insurance companies and one-sixth to
the workmen. Naturally they are putting up a bitter fight and the writer doea
not blame them and merely aims to
show why they are fighting. Some employers are opposing the new legislation, principally because in their ignorance of the subject they liave accepted
the demagogic utterances of such men
aB Mr. Matthews. Here is a sample
sentence from a pamphlet published
and circulated by Matthews:
'' And now in the midst of the insecurity with which the laboring classes
have been menaced, and having constantly before their gaze the fantastic
Utopias evolved out of Socialistic tobacco smoke, they have been worked up
to such a hysterical pitch that they are
ready to go to any extreme, to. try any
remedy, however perilous, and any
experiment, however adventurous."
Would "Destroy Incentive."
From there he drifts into the old
time-worn argument about the "State
destroying individual enterprise and
incentive," and because he knows
something of the insurance agency business he professes to speak with authority on tbe question of state controlled
compensation.
Function of Insurance Companies.
Employers are required, under the
present compensation act, to insure
their employees to the extent of $1,600,
tbe maximum allowance under the act.
About twenty-five per cent, of the employers go further and insure against
damages under the Employers' Liability and the common law, not, however,
to exceed $5,000. When tney pay their
premiums their responsibility to their
employees ceases. The insurance companies actually make a bet with the
employer that they will be able to settle
all claims during the year for less than
the amount of the premium, otherwise
there cannot be a dividend declared for
the shareholders in the insurance companies. The less they pay the higher
the dividend, and it will be readily Been
why the injured worker receives so
little consideration, even in cases where
the employer is anxious and wilUng
that' the worker shall be paid.
Workmen Against Expert "Adjusters."
Injured workmen, because the liability of the employer has been assumed
by insurance companies, are required to
make and adjust their claims with tbe
exports employed because of their ability to settle claims economically. Tho
workman, if he has a good claim,
usually "stood off" for a number of
weeks until he is "broke" and is being
pursued by creditors. The adjuster
then offers him a lump sum payment,
and glad to get the money, the worker
signB away all further right of action
against the company. The worker
knows little or nothing of the law und
has an inherent suspicion of lawyers.
If he happens to be a member of a labor organization or has friends who belong, then he is able to secure the advice of men familiar with the devious
ways of insurance companies and with
at least a working knowledge of the
laws relating to the compensation of
injured workmen. If there are any
lawyers who are to be trusted with
working men's cases, officers of labor
organizations are able to advise where
they are to be found, and to see that
fair treatment is given. Usually, the
only way in which a proper settlement
can be made-with insurance companies
Is through a lawyer, and even then the'
lawyer should be one with a considerable
experience in cases affecting workmen.
Settle Some Oases Quickly.
In cases where accidents occur where
the damugeB are likely to be heavy and
whore it is clear that there is very little
chance of escaping payment, particularly in the transportation industry,
the insurance companies send their adjusters with tho doctors and if possible
sooner, to settle tne claims nnd secure
releases. In a conversation with an acquaintance occupying a position with a
local insurance agency, tho question of
the adjustment of cla'ms arose, particularly regarding personal injury cases,
and in criticizing tho policy of the
western casualty companies in fighting
claims in the courts, ho made tho fol*
FBIDAY JUNE 26,^
.915
lowing amazing statement:
"The policy of the company with
which I was connected in the east was
to have five adjusters to whom the company presented fully equipped traveling bags and on receipt of information
that an accident had occurred, they
went by the quickest means to the injured ones, even if tney were dying,
and settled tbe claims and obtained releases. ''
This policy has been carried to such
a length that the courts have, of late
years, been setting aside releases obtained under such conditions and
awarding damages in accordance with
the merits, merely deducting the
amount paid for the release by the insurance company.
On the Horns of a Dilemma.
If the worker attempts to settle direct with the insurance company    he
loses heavily; if he takes his case to a
lawyer, and is without funds, he is re-
?uired to agree to allow the lawyer
rom 25 to 50 per cent, of the amount
recovered for his services. In either
case he is the victim of parasites who
can be easily and profitably eliminated
by the adoption of the principle of
state control of the compensation act.
A-e employer will be better satisfied if
he is assured that his payments - are
going to the injured workers; the
workers will be in receipt of their allowance and relieved of the present insecurity and uncertainty, which frequently requires them to parade their
deformities before the citizens in order
that they may eke out an existence
through inability to collect or until the
courts reach their cases on the calendar.
Lawyers and insurance companies are
aB inseparable as the Siamese twins
and about as useless. Why, as Sir
William Meredith Bays,'' bother cutting
their tails, an inch at a timet Why not
start at the head and cut it off at
once!"
Omar Khayyam To Date,
A Book of   Verses   underneath the
Bough,
"B.C. Special,"a Loaf of Bread—and
Thou
Beside me singing in the Wilderness—
Oh, Wilderness were Paradise enow!"
Edgett's
Tbe Big Orocery Store
118 Hastings Btreet West
Sensational Out ln   Prices   for
Saturday Dollar Day
TEA—Victor, limed black, 10c lb.
breakfait S lbs. |1.00
COFFEE—Mocha  snd    Java,    40c
lb., fresh ground .... S lbs. fl.00
SUGAR—18 lb, sack    Furs Cane,
$1.50 value.    With  $5.00 other
groceries for $1.00
FLOUR—24 lb. sack, best No.  1,
$1.25 value, hard wheat flour $1.00
BUTTER—Finest Creamery ln oity,
"Edgewood"  , 8 lbs $1.00
CHEESE—Full   cream,   250   seller,
reduced  5 lbs $1.00
EGGS—Large white,  8-day old lo
cats 40c value .... 8 dosen $1.00
LIBBY'S CANNED SOUP—Regular
15c each, dosen can.   $1.00
LIBBY'S Large    Tins    Asparagus
Tips, reg. 35o, 5 tins for .. $1.00
LIBBY'S—Large bottle Olives, reg.
25c eaoh 6 for $1.00
JAMS—Kootenay Pure Fruit,* 5 lb.
tins, reg. 76c esoh .... 2 for $1.00
SAUCE—H. P. Sauce, ostra special, 85o she 5 for $1.00
RICE—Extra Slam quality. Special  26 lbs. for $1.00
CANNED   FRUITS — Del   Monto
celebrated, SSo values 4 for $1.00
SOAP—Pure  French  Castile,    85c
long bars 4 for $1.00
SALMON — Fancy   Rod    Sockeye
Brand, 25c values .... 6 for $1.00
Strawberries — Raspberries,     half
orates fer     $1,00
Special Atention to Mall Orden
Tlie Above Prlcea for Saturday,
Dollar Day, Only
Sey. 5868
Migrating From Canada to V. 8.
United Statea statistics show tbat immigration to that country is increasing, despite tbe prevailing unemployment. A large percentage of tbe new
arrivals are from Canada.
CANADIAN
STANDABD FLOUB IS THE HIGHEST IM THE WOULD
OGILVIE'S
ROYAL HOUSEHOLD
is
CANADA'S BEST FLOUR
TRY IT
UNION MEN
The DELMONICO
Just a whisper off Granville, 704 Kobeon Street
UNION  SHOP
VANCOUVER'S LEADING CAFE
Harry Beokner.  Ervin Switaor.    Phone Sey. 3343.   VANCOUVEB, B.O.
WHY
The Federationist Hits the
Bull's Eye Every Week
i
I
[THE FEDEBATIONIST IS THE OFFICIAL PAPEB
IOF THE B. C. FEDEBATION OF LABOB AND VANCOUVEB TBADES AND LABOB COUNCIL, EN-
DOBSED BY NEW WE8TMIN8TEB AND VIOTOBIA TBADES AND LABOB COUNCILS.
[ITPBINTS MOBE LOCAL LABOB NEWS THAN ANY
SHOTHEB PAPEB IN CANADA.
fjTGOES TO PBES8 PBOMPTLT   EVEBT   FBIDAY
ilMOBNING AND NEVEB DISAPPOINTS ITS BEAD-
EBB. *
"[[KEEPS THE WOBKEBS INFOBMED OF WHAT IS
JI GOING ON IN THB VAEIOU8 OBOANIZATIONS.
FUBNISHES INFOBMATION OF   VALUE   THAT
NEVEB APPEABS IN THE DAILY PAPEBS.
1 TELLS THE GOOD THINGS'ABOUT UNIONS AND
MEMBEB8.
1 LOOKS UPON THE OPTIMISTIC SIDE AND LETS
THE HAMMEB BUST.      -
KEEPS BRITISH COLUMBIA LABOB   ON   THE
1MAP BY BEING ONE OF THE MOST WIDELY
QUOTED LABOB PAPEBS PUBLISHED".
1 PRESENTS LABOB '8 SIDE OF INDUSTBIAL AND
POLITICAL ISSUES IN THEIB TRUE LIGHT, AND
WINS FRIENDS FOB LABOB.
GIVES BE8ULTS TO ADVEBTI8EBS, BECAUSE IT
GOES INTO HOMES OF THE BEST PAID CLASS
OF WOBKEBS, AND IS ACCEPTED AS A GUlLii.
BY TBADES UNIONIST PURCHASERS.
f
REFUSES TO ACCEPT ADVERTISING FBOM ANY
CONCEBN DECLABED UNFAIB BY VANCOUVEB
TBADES AND LABOB 'COUN0IL. *,
flTYOU MUST HAVE THE FEDERATIONIST IN THE
*J]h0ME EACH WEEK TO KEEP IN TOUCH WITH"
THE CITY, PBOVINOIAL AND   FEDEBAL   AND
INTERNATIONAL LABOB MOVEMENT,,
HJSUBSCBIPTION:   $1.50 FEB YEAB; IN'VANCOU-
*J|VER CITY, $2.00;   TO UNIONS'SUBSCBIBING IN
A BODY, ♦1.00.
The B.C. Federationist
Room 217,' Labor Temple
Vancouver,, B. C.
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
TRQUS.ER VALUES  THAT
SHQULE INTEREST MEN
 _ j—. ,—
' This season wo ue allowing a very large range of Men's Trousers, rude ta
Wool, Cottonado, Denim, Khaki and Cotton Whipcords. A price and quality to
suit all needs.
MIXED TWEEDS-Oray and Brown Tweeda In stripe patterns and mliture..
Made to five pockets Prices $2.50 to $3.60
FAWN WHttOORDS $8.85—A strong Cotton Whlpoord.   Fve pockets, belt loops,
self belt and cuffed buttons.   Price  $2.86
ORAY OOTTONADE TROUSERS $1.85-Dark Oray, Cottonado ta six neat stripe
pattern.   A well shaped, good Uttlng Trouser.   Fire pockets.   Price ....$1.25
HAIRLINE TWEED TROUSERS $8.00—A strong Dark Gray   Hairline   Tweed
Trouser.   One of tho best wearing Tweed Trousers made.   Five pockets.
Price $8.00
CORDUROY TROUSERS $8.50—A Fawn Corduroy Cloth In a food weight and •
medium wale. Fhe pockets, bolt loops and cuffed buttons,   Pri $8.50
KENTUCKY JEAN PANTS $1.50-Thls Is the King ot all Overall Pants.   Made
of heavy black Kentucky Jean.   Five pockets.   Prl  $1,60
REINFORCED DUCK PANTS $1.75—Made of heavy brown Duck, double stitched,
double fronts and seats.   Fivo pockets.   Prlea ... .*  $1.75
NAVY SEROE TROUSERS—Dark Navy 8erge Trousers ln two grades. Belt
lops, «ve pockets and plain bottoms.   Price  $8.50 and $4.75
David Spencer Limited
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.      |     DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
Dollar Day Bargains
for Men and Boys
AT THE RED ARROW STORE
Saturday, June 26th, 1915
AU our Men'a Fancy Tweeda and Wonted Suits j regular price (15 to
$32.50, will be aold Saturady in three special groupa
$10 $15 $20
Any Men'a Working Sblrt; regular price up to *2.   On aale
Batur<lay   t_,  (Oft
Begular $1.25 and $1.50 Dressy Shirts for «pl.UU
A special lot of Men's Soft and Stiff Hats; regular price*)  f\r\
$3.50 for , «pl.UU
8 pairs of Darnless Socks, Saturday for * <•   A A
i pair Llama Socks, Saturday for ap 1 tUU
The papers will only tell you balf the story.   Come to tho store and aee
for yourself. Look for tbe "Bod Arrow" Sign.
J. N. Harvey Limited
125-127 HASTINOS STREET WEST   Also Yates Street, Victoria, B. 0.
"Things Cooked as You Like Them"
GOOD EATS CAFE
110 Cordova Street, Weat, 3 blocks east of C. P. B. Station.
Take borne one of our Chicken Loaves—bait 75c, whole $1.50.
Trays delivered to all parte of tbe olty at any boor.
OPEN ALL NIGHT. phona Soymonr SS16.
B. B. Perry p. L. Wood
Patronise the Union Label
by using
IDEAL (UNION-MADE) BROOMS
For Sale at All Dealers
IDEAL BROOM WORKS
205 Dufferln Street
—Awning Time Is
Certainly Here!
Keeps us all busy keeping cool and looking for shady
spots.
"Pioneer" Awnings help make Bbady spots. Nice cool
retreats from the hot June sun. Either for your Store,
Offlce, Besldence, or for Sleeping Canopies, Porch and
Verandah Curtains, ate., eto.
We are making lots of awnings now.   Let us make YOUBS.
Sey. 740 and our expert will call with samples.
AND do it TO-DAY, before tha aun gets any hotter.
Phono
C. H. JONES & SON, Ltd.
(10 Alexander Strut        (Opposite North Vanoouver ferry) Phone Seymour 740
Superior
Printing
AT MODERATE
PRI
PRICES
Telephone:
Sey. 7495
LABOR TEMPLE
The FEDERATIONIST
can supply all your Printing
needs. No Job too large or
too small. First-class workmanship, good ink and high-
grade stock have given our
Printers a reputation (or
SUPERIOR PRINTING
Union Work a Specialty.
Our Prices are right and we
deliver when wanted.

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