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The British Columbia Federationist Jan 8, 1915

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TRE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONNT
IND^./MTY.STBBNOTH-^ . ,■ ^m____-s^--t-^9__Z A l\/ll IO X
THE PROBLEM FOR
liUMN
|;Courses To Be Taken
Economics at Social
Science School.
in
[More Want* Admission to
Classes Than Can*Be
Accommodated.
\
An interesting experiment is being
carried on in New York by the International Ladies' Garment Workera'
union, the third largest organisation in
the ranks of American organized labor.
The convention held at Cleveland laat
June took up the question of education of union members. It was universally recognized that this union,, like
many others, suffers from the fact that
very few of its membera have any thorough understanding of the labor movement and its problems, so that all the
burden of responsibility in the international and the various locals falls on.a
comparatively small number of persons.
The international union has entered
into an agreement with the Band School
of Social Science, a workingmen's college, located at 140 East Nineteenth
street. New Tork city, and having,
branches In various parts of the country, which has been doing a valuable
work for education for more tlfan eight
years.- Under the joint direction of tbe
union and the school, a regular course
of instruction is now being given to a
class of.more than 100 members of the
organization. The claas meets twice a
week, ota Thursday evenings and Sunday afternoons. It began its work the
flrst week in December and will go on
till the end of April.
The course includes such subjects aa
an outline of the history of the labor
movement, with special reference to the
garment industry, labor politics, labor
legislation, and workmen's insurance;
the legal rights of trade unions; practical problems and methods of union
■activity, both in time of strike and in
time of peace, these subjects are being
treated partly   through   carefully   arranged lectures given by. such men as
Morris Hillquit and Jacob Panken, lawyers well known for their services- to
the garment workers' unions; Meyer
■London, another labor lawyer who was
■elected to congress last November in
■the Twelfth district of New York; I.
^M. * Bubinow, the foremost   American
authority on tip subject of insurance
■against accident, sickness, old age and
■'inemployment;   Algernon   Lee, educational director ot the Band school, and
others.   Besides the lectures, there are
Bplass sessions in which   the   students,
(meeting; in small   groups, review   the
;opics dealt with in the lectures and revive instruction in elementary civics,
■nethods of union work,, and to some ex-'
^ent in grammar and composition.
( Oreat interest is being shown, and at
;he last moment the number of union
■nembers applying for admission to the:
lass, was more than could be accom--|
odated. If ia expected that the course
111 be repeated on a larger scale next
enson, and it will probably be extend-
A to other cities where the 1.1. G. W.
is largely represented.
A Woman Socialist Writer
Surveys the. Whole
Situation.
VANCOUVER, B. C., FRIDAY, JANUARV 8,19161
-.-- .   ■■' -    ■■ -    * •   ■.■*■-—      "i — ——--—■—— — — ..—
.POLITICAL ONITT.-ernOTOBTI
Peace Depends upon the
Workers Fighting
Militarism.
City Voters' IM tot UU.
Following is a comparative statement
howing increases and decreases of
antes for the respective wards on the
Uy voters' list for. years 1913 and
»U:
1013
5,130
5,467
2,371
6,542
5,314
Ward One..
Sward Two..
ard Three,.
■Ward Four.,
RVard Five
IWard Six 7,B86
[Ward Bevon 5,204
|Ward Eight.'.  ....  . ^ 1,810
Total    ...30,172
.  "Decreases—Ward   two,   035
toot, 673 j total,, 1,608.
1014
5,222
•4,532
. 2,381
•5,860
5,608
8,203
5,744
__—
30,552
ward
Following ara some representative
quotations' from an interesting articlo
published recently and written by Ida
OrouCh-Hazlett of the American socialist party press service:
'The proposed international conference of socialists confronts th* hardest
problem that the historic working class
has ever met. * Will the working class
hold the key to the future or will <t
prove that it is yet inadequate to the
task of humanizing society, and* banishing the junjlejawt"'
"As the future is obscure, so far as
the socialist -movement . is coneerned,
and as there are possibilities of working class uprising in Europe, it is highly important that an international convention take action,' Bhould revolution break out there will be heavy finances required, and we in this country
want to be prepared to give our moral
and material support, including the ere-
a tion. of a healthy public sentiment,
that in case the working class succeed
in establishing a government in Europe, we would be In a position to influence the American government to give
it early recognition We should be prepared for emergencies."
"The-British working class movement, which was showing such militant
and clear-cut action, haa bflfen halted..
The German movement has bewildered
us. Perhaps we overestimated the German socialist movement; perhaps it
largely reflected the personality of Wil-
helm Liebknecht and August Bebel, and
they being dead, the movement lost its
vigor. At any rate'the German social*
ist movement showed a yellow streak;
it showed 'that it lacked the spirit of
international solidarity. The spirit of
militarism was inoculated into it. The
psychology off the fife and drum has
proven more powerful than the social*
1st philosophy."
"There is no denying the fact that
the German socialists gave their aid to
militarism. The magnificent stand that
Liebknecht, Bon Luxemburg, Franz
Mehring, Clara Zetkin, Kutsky . and
Ledebour are taking against the war,
shows that reaction baa already Bet in.
Germany wanted the Belgian mines
and the Belgian seaboard'. It was ne-
Icessary for her expansion or eommer*
rial development. But it looks as
though she had over-reached herself."
"A revolution is liable to take place
in Austria-Hungary, but if it does it
will be more of a social affair than an
economic or democratic one. It is
doubtful if a revolution will take place
in Germany. That depends on the developments in the next few months.
Russia made a big advance after the
Crimean war when the czar voluntarily abolished serfdom; and it is quite
reasonable to expect that the influence
of British and French capitalists' will
operate for reforms in Russia in order
to still farther secure and enhance the
mortgage they hold on the Russian government by hastening economic development. ''
"American socialists are deluding
themselves by supposing that the Italian socialists prevented Italy from being involved in the war. The war is
not over and Italy will line up with
the triple entente With all due respect for the influence of the Italian
socialists Italy is tbe poorest country
in Europe and has tho greatest illiteracy among its people of any of the great
powers. Its geographical position {ind
not its militant proletaire was the deciding factor in its polioy. Of course,
the Italian socialists are apparently opposed to Germany, as' Germany is the
invader. France and Belgium are repelling invasion."
"There is no hope of lasting peace
after this war is over unless the socialist movement becomes mighty enough
to stop militarism and capitalism. The
big bait that is still left is that
stretch of territory between the Mediterranean and India, Siberia and. tho
Gulf of Persia.   Tho triple entento is
UNEMPLOYMENT IV
AVSTBALU IS ALSO
BEING KEENLY FELT.
[From Our Special Correspondent.]
SYDNEY, N. S. W, Dec. 4.—Today the minister for Ubor and Industry sends mo * report of Un
printing trades, ln which lu says
that 30 are completely unemployed
! ln tht state, and 276 an In pup
employment, and generally the
trada la stagnant. (
Ha estimates Hut u a remit of
the war Mot 18,000 nun wert ont
of work. Of these 10,000 havt
boon absorbed' by tho military requirement!, and anotker 3,000 are
doing part work. That leaves 6,000
untmgloyed at the present time.
BOTLDEBJ8 BBDUOE WAGES.
WUl Endeavor to Ont Alt Trades from
January 1, 1016,
Vancouver Builders' Exchange met
last week and- announced that from
January 1st the following rates of
wagea would be paid by members of
the exchange to building trades work*
Pef
' Day.
Bricklayers  flj.00
Bricklayers' laborers .. 2.40
Mortar mixers,. ;. ..-, 3.00
Stonecutters  5.00
St'ono masons  .... 5.00
Plasterers.... , 5,00
Plasterers'helpers.- .. ' 8JS0
Tile and marble setters. 5.00
Tile and.marble helpers 2.80
Building laborers..'..., 2.40
Excavating laborers.   , 2.00
Metal lathers • 4,80
Carpenters  3.60
Pn-nters  3.60
Glaziers      2,50
Plumbers..     4,00
Plumbers' helpers .... J(40
Steamfltters...  ...... 4.00
Steamfltters' helpers.   . ■ 2.40
Gas fitters........ .. 4,00
Sheet metal workers, . 4.00
Eleqtrical workers..  .. 4.00
Structural iron workerB 4.50
Hoisting   engineers
(steam).'  4.00
Hoisting   engineers
(electric).. ..'.", . 3.00
One man, horse and cart -4.50
One man, team and
waggon  6.00
Hours,
L MET
LAST NIGHT
Officers Are Nominated for)
the Ensuing Six
\ Months.
Ex-mayor C. 6. Douglas aiid
Mayor T. S, Baxter Address the Meeting
STREET EAILWAYMEN.
Officers Elected for the Ensuing Six
Months.
Officers for the term ending June 30,
1915, have been elected by the local
Street Bailwayraen's union as follows:
President, Jos. Hubble (acclamation);
firtt vice-president, Jos, Armstrong; second vice-president, F. Logee {acclamation) ; recording secretary, Jas. B. Griffin; financial secretary and business
agent, F. A. Hoover; treasurer, W. J.
Harper (acclamation); first conductor,
H. Blazier (acclamation); second) conductor, Bobt. J. McDowell (acclamation); first warden, H. Whittington
(acclamation); second warden, J, Hendry (acclamation); auditors, Wm. Murray and Jos. Byron; press correspondent, Thos. Clinton; executive member
for day conductors, H. Blazier (acclamation); executive member for dayi
motormen, Jos. Armstrong (acclama-
tion); executive member for night conductors, John Hendry; executive member for night motormen, Jas. E. Griffin
(acclamation); executive member for
extra conductors, Wm. Murray; executive member for extra motormen, Job,
Connors; delegates to the Trades and
Labor council—Jos,' Armstrong, H.
Blazier, A. Bunting,'F.'Haigh, F. A.
Hoover, A. V. Lofting and B. E. Bigby.
Despite the wretched weather, there
was a good attendance of delegates at
last night's meeting bf the Trades and
Labor council. This being the first
meeting of the new year a number of
new delegates wero obligated.      «
The call for the eonvention of the B.
C. Federation of Labor to meet in Nanaimo, January 2fith was laid on the
table till next meeting. A number of
routine matters were dealt with under)
the report of the executive board.
President McVety reported that in
response to a joint request from Messrs.
Baxter,. Taylor and Douglas, the mayoralty candidates, that they be allowed1)
to address the council, he had arranged
for them to do so at 10 o'clock. The
order of speakers bad been balloted ior,
with the result that the speakers would
be in the following order: Douglas,
Taylor, Baxter. Each would be given
twenty minutes, and any one of them
arriving later than the time set for him
would lose his chance to speak.
Delegate Kilpatrick reported that arrangements had been made with the
trustees of the balance of funds which
belonged to a labor party which existed in Vancouver at one time, to hand
that money over to the council for use
in the, coming elections.
Miss H, Gutteridge reported that the
-Women's Employment league had 1,000
needy women on its books. Up to the
present no women who had applied for
relief had been refused food and shelter. With the passing of the Christmas season many more women and girls
were out'of work, and tbere was every
reason to expect thfcy would increase.
President McVety reported on his
work in connection with civic relief.
Tailors reported a strike on at Stor-
rey's. Letter-carriers were trying hard
to have their annual convention meet'
in Vanoouver this year. Musicians reported business very bad; they had removed their headquarters into the Labor Temple.
Officers for the. ensuing" six mouths
were nominated as follows: President,
J. H. McVety; vice-president,   F.   Es-
/lu Van worn \
\  _____2.00 )
$1.60 PER YEAB
Say That They Will Eiid or
Mend Industrial'
Arbitration.
LegisIators^Told That They
Must Get New Act or _
Get Out
JOSEPH A. OLAKKB.     -
An old-time Yukoner, well known to
the labor world, who stood the gaff in.
that country for yea* among as smooth"!
a bunch of governmental grafters as
ever went unhung, and ultimately landed at Edmonton flat broke.
After a rather stormy career he was
last year elected as an alderman there,
and is now charged with inciting three
yeggmen to commit crimes for the alleged purpose of discrediting the police
administration, and is out, on $10,000
l>ail. The charge, if true,* will be a
matter of surprise to his many friends,
here, and a matter of regret to the pub-1
lie life of western Canada if .such things
can be really as "Joe" Clarke has been
charged with. It is diflcult to conceive of Clarke falltng for any such
proposition as is now stirring Edmonton to its foundations, and which promises to be one of the most celebrated
criminal trials In.Canada.    -
1 COMPENSATION
ACTOFSTATEOF
WITH THE OULINABY CRAFTS.
Say' -Usion  Man  Patronise  CMne»
I W. 0. DAIBON
688 Elgnth Avanue Wut
rour Vote and Influence
ii requested for
ll
as ALDERMAN
Latbor Candidate
FOB WABD SIX
lection Day, Thuriday, Jan. 14
liable to split on account of the spoilB
of war."
"Talk of starving the war and feeding America shows a lack of economic
knowledge on the part of those responsible for it. Industrial paralysiB
brought on by the war is one of the
causes of the present high prices and
working class suffering. Restricting exports to Europe would only make more
workers suffer on the European side,
and cause further industrial depression
on this side. It is zeal misplaced for
American socialists to antagonize the
farmers by spoiling their markets and
looks as though tney did not understand capitalism and the socialist philosophy, or did not want the support of
the farming element.''
"The theory of the Armageddon of
capitalism is fanciful—at least for
awhile; capitalism has lasted a long
time and may yet last twice as long.
It all depends on the desire of the people to change the system, and of a conscious effort on their part to that end,
and of capital being able to adapt itself to the everchanging situation. If
capitalism can adapt itself to the new
conditions as they arise, there is practically no danger of its falling by its
own might, The exploitation of the
many by the few has existed for ages
under different forms, and will continue
to exist aB long as the explotiter can
adapt his tools to meet conditions, or
until the workers consciously move to
stop exploitation, *"
MACHINIST ORGANIZES HERB.
Says Organization WlU Oppose Attempt
to Beduce Wages on Railroads.
Organizer McCallum,   organizer   for
district No. 2-which includes all railroads in Canada—of the International
Association of Machinists, came to Vancouver at the latter end of last week
in the interests of his organization. His
mission is to visit all lodges west of
Toronto for the purpose of maintaining
and wherever ^possible increasing membership, and to supervise generally the
interests of the machinists in the west.
Asked if he had anything to say about
the statement that wages were to be reduced on the Grand Trunk1 Pacific system, Mr. McCallum said:   "I have no
othor information as yet beyond that
contained in tke newspaper reports, but
I can say tbat if the report is true, we
shall oppose the1, step to the limit of
our ability.   The wages now being paid
by the Grand Trunk east of fort William, are the loweat that are being paid
to railroad men anywhere on thiB continent."   Mr. McCallum said that employment among* railroad men is much
duller than it has been -for some years.
He left for Victoria last Wednesday.
BOILER MAKERS.
Membership Hu Increased in Recent
Months and Work Has Been Fair.
Secretary A. Fraser of the Boiler
Makers' union reports trade conditions
fair, considering the general situation.
Their union has increased in membership during the paat few months from
40, to 95, and up till a few days ogo
most of them were employed. There
has been a temporary cessation of work
in their line, but enough jobs arc in
sight to take up the slack during the
coming month. A big job at Prince
Rupert, another-at North Vancouver,
in addition to considerable tank work
round Burrard inlet, are all helping to
make the wheels go round. Altogether
the boiler makers are getting along
nicely.   /
Winnipeg Roll of Honor..
The growing list of elected labor representatives in Winnipeg now reads:
Aid. B. A. Rigg, F. J. Dixon, M. P. P.,
Aid. W. B.JSimpson* Councillor W. J.
Bartlett. I
Electrical Workers Elect Officer's.
Electrical Workers, local union No.
213, have elected tho following members to be their officers for tho ensuing
year: President, Sam_Cnwker (re-elected); vice-president, G. Morisette; financial secretary, E. H. Morrison (reelected); recording secretary, H. Ho-
gan (re-elected); press secretary, H.
Hogan;' foreinan, G. McVeay (re-elected); inspectors, E. Hoore and E. Emerson; trustees, G, Hessel, E. W. Wysong,
D. Cu'mmingfl; treaiurer, J. Dubberly
(re-elected); delegates to Trades and
Labor council, L. E. Denham, H. Harrington, Rio Elgar, M, Souder, J. Whit-
tol. H. HOGAN,
Becordlng Secretary.
The -N. S. W. Btate bakery is now
making a profit of £80 per week.
tinghausen; general secretary, G. Bartley; secretary-treasurer, Miss H. Gutteridge; statistician, F. A. Hoover; sergeant-at-arms, J. Sully'; trustees, Trotter, Curnock, Knowles, Crawford. These
nominations will .be on the table till
next meeting, when they will be re-opened and elections held*
A special committee of three was appointed to compile a schedule of union
building trademen's wages for publication. This step wns suggested as the
result of the general reduction in wages
announced by the Builders' Exchange.
The committee, composed of Delegates
Bartley, Sully9and Estinghausen, was
given authority to co-operate with those
organizations not affiliated with the
council.
Delegate Pettipiece called attention
to the fact that a child had been killed
in a factory during the week, and that
the factory inspector had stated he had
no authority over the factory because
less than six people were employed
there. The council decided to ask the
provincial legislature to hove the Factory act so altered us to include all factories, no matter how many people
were employed therein. A copy of the
resolution.will bo sent to the various
women's organizations throughout the
city for en'dorsation,    ,
At 10 o'clock Ex-mayor C. 8. Douglas arrived, and wns given the floor for
20 minutes. A delegate asked him
whether he was in favor of paying $3
per day 'of eight hours to city laborers. He said he would not pledge himself to do so, but that if in his opinion
it was a fair deal for the city he would
maintain that rate.
Mr, Taylor had not arrived at 10:35
—fifteen minutea nfter the time set for
him. Mayor Baxter was consequently
called upon. He referred to the fact
that laboring men on the False creek
work had to be paid tbe some wages as
city laborers according to n clause in
tho agreemont made with tho railway
company. He stated he had always advocated day labor as opposed to the
contract system on city work. Asked
ns to his attitude oa the laborers' $3-
wage> he said he could not see how n
man could live on less thon 43 per day.
The price of living was too high. At
the close of Mayor Baxter's speech,
Mr. Taylor had arrived^ but according
to the decision previously made the
meeting then adjournod at 11:10 p. m.
UUion Men Patronlxe
Restaurants.
The regular weekly meeting of local
No. 28, Cooks, Waiters and Waitresses
union, was held in room 206, Labor
Temple, on Wednesday night, December 30th. There was rather a poor'attendance of members present. Some of
our boys and girls require to wake up
to the fact that it takes more than the
payment of dues and a vivid imagination to run a local union successfully.
After several items of routine business had been-disposed, of the proposed
new by-laws of local No. 28 were read
a second* time and one or two alterations made. Owing to the holidays
business in our line picked up a little
during the past two weeks, several of
our idle members being able to secure
a Uttle much needed extra work.
Apropos of this I would like to r#
mind secretaries of labor unions which
may be contemplating something in the
banquet lino this winter that they ean
assist us very materially by getting in
touch with Business Agent Graham/^
room 206, Labor Temple, who will see
to it that' their catering needs are fully
taken care of. ,
I would like to draw the attention
of union men who eat on Main street,
to the fact that several new restaurants have opened up on that thoroughfare, three within ' the past month,
which are owned and operated by
Chinamen but who employ white waitresses—presumably to attract white
trade. Thanks to the patronage bestowed upon them by the white working men of the city this scheme seems
to be working successfully, so much
so in fact, that I venture to predict that it will only be a matter of a
very short time until every Chinese
joint in the city adopts ihe same tactics. .And if the Chinaman figures that
the end justifies the means his contention is amply borne out by the support
and encouragement he receives from
some of the workingmen of Vancouver,
particularly so when that end, in his
Oriental mind, is the hope that what
is now British Columbia will some day
be Chinese Columbia.
JOHN CUMMING,
Vice-president, local No. 28.
[Special Australian Correspondence.]
SYDNEY, N. S. W., Deo. 20.—As I
anticipated in my last communication
the court case, which involved the Miners' Federation of Northern N. S.
Wales in the huge penalty of 112,500,
has led to the1 only conclusion It could
possibly lead to. It is the beginning
of the end of industrial arbitration, as
made by the parliamentary machine. I
say this in all regret, because for a long
time I myself believed thai some good
would come out of our industrial arbitration. I have, unfortunately been under a delusion. In theory it is good—
in practise it is rotten. The court has
fined the Federation of Miners $12,500.
What follows f The Federation says
it cannot—and will not—pay. The court
cannot gaol 13,000 mineie, for the simple fact that N.' S, Wales is not one
huge gaol. Thus* the court is powerless
to enforce the penalty it lays down,
The law then, in this respect, is stillborn. And then again the boomerang
of retaliation is coming back on the
parliamentarians in a way least expected. No sooner did the law show its
power, than the miners showed their
teeth. Andl I give you my word that the
N. S. Wales miners are of the.same
stamina as tfie B. C. men When it comes
to a fight. Parliament says it cannot
help in the matter, because of an overwhelming majority in the upper house
that will not allow an alteration of the
act. Well, the miners will not accept
this. So they are taking the bit in their
own mouth. They say in effect to the
members representing mining constitu-
ences: "If you do not force legislation through the parliament to cancel
the present law which is inimical to the
working man, then we will get men who
will."
.The men have taken a atand that has
breathed fright into the parliamentarians' lungs. They say: "Do what we
want, or get out." Already some of
our members are shaking at the knees.
To give some idea of the men's feeling
I must mention that the following resolutions are being passed by all the.
miners' lodges throughout N. B. Wales
by large majorities:
(1) ''That in view of the failure of
the Industrial Arbitration law of N. 8.
Wales to proteet the interests of employees engaged in the coal mining industry, we ask tbe government to immediately amend the Industrial Arbitration act as to leave it optional for
any industrial union to register under
PriBciple Provisions of the
Act Are Hare Summarized.
Readers Should  Compare
Bowser's New Act
with Theee
i      . ■■ ■"' '■"
[In view of the promlneooe wttch
will be givtn to tht subject of workmen's compensation In British Columbia, during tbo ant yonr, bjgreaeon of
tho new act promised by Attoreey-Oeii-
•ral Bowser, Tbe Federotlflfft U publishing summaries of compJfcatlou aeto
of various states ond countries wtiok
are supposed to bare had oootftfoMMo
experience of legislation of tkla kind.
Tho various aeto of Australia and Toe-
mania will bo mmmartnot flnt, and
appear woeMy, Following is a oum-
maqr of tho Workmen's Compensation
aet of TAmanla.]
Tbo Tasmania Act
The Workers' Compensation act,
1010, in the definition of employen includes "any body of persons, corporate
1 unincorporated'
Nature of work to wblch the aet applies.—Manual In any railway factory,
mine, quarry or engineering work, or
any other industry included by resolution of parliament.
; Workers expressly excluded.—Casuals
.(defined as employed for not longer
than 27 hoars per week), manual workers earning over £106 per year.
Employer not liable to pay compensation for.—First week of injnry, if disabled for less than two weeks.
In the event of insolvency, maximum
amount of compensation admitted ao
first charge on assets per individual.—
£100.
Compensation in case of death (whew
dependents left).—Three yean' earnings or £100, whichever is larger. Maximum, £200. If no dependent*—maximum amount for medical attendance
and funeral expenses, £30.
Compensation in cose of incapacity.-^
Weekly payment—half average weeki]
earnings, maximum 30s.   Maximum to>!
tal liability, £200.
Compensation* to worken over 6C
years of age who have entered into ai
agreement.—In ease of death (when
there are dependents), minimum, £50,
Incapacity—minimum weekly payment
10s, after first week. Maximum total
liability, £50. .
'   Compensation for infirm worken who
have   entered   into   an   agreement.-
On death (minimum payment), £20, <
39 times   »»•■"»■»   ——-*-    --    *
it or be governed -by its provisions,
(2) "That in view of the growing
BUILDING PERMITS FOB 1914.
Lower Last Tear Than They Wen Any
'  Period Since 1906.
The building permits for the year
1014 amount to (4,484,226 and not
since the year 1906 have they previously reached suoh u low mark. In value
tbey amount to less than half that recorded in 1913.
Among the new public works begun
is the big dock for the dominion government at the foot of Solabury drive,
and tho preliminary steps have been
token for the construction thereon of
tho torminal elevator.
The building totals for the yeara
sinco 1903 nre os follows:
1903 $ 1,426,148
1004    1,068,891
1905 P....    2,653,000
1900     4,308,410
1907     5,022,744
1908 r     5,950,803
1009     7,259,825
1910 13,150,305
1911 17,652,042
1912 19,428,432
1913...; 10,248,803
1914     4,484,226
A. A. Brookhouse for Burnaby.
A. A. BrookhoitBe hns decided in response to numerous requests, to run for
the offlce of school trustee in Burnaby
municipality. The olection date is January 16th^ Mr. Brookhouse is a mom-
ber of tho Typographical union, and
has boen for many yeara. During thot
time he haa held many offices of truat
und confidence within the gift of the
union, and has earned tho universal
respect of his follow members by tho
efficient manner in which he carried out
tho duties assigned him. At a lorgely
attended mooting of Ward Six (Burnaby) Ratepayers' association ho wns endorsed ^aa their candidate,
O. J. Mengle's Meetings,
O. J. Mengle, candidate for councillor in ward seven, South Vancouver,
will address a meeting in Gordon high
school, corner of Ferris rood and
Knight road next Wednesday ovening,
January 13th.
B. H. GALB
Employer of Union Labor—Candidate
for Alderman in Ward Six.    **
First Studont—I'm so glad you've
taken Greek I
Second Student—I haven't tnkon it;
I've only been exposed to it."
power of the Employers' Federation of
Australia, and as a preliminary to the
consolidation of the industrial organizations throughout the Commonwealth
of Australia, we are strongly in favor
of the immediate formation of a Coal-
miners' Federation to embrace all per-
Bons who aro or who may be eligible
for membership."
The reason for the second resolution
is that the Miners' Federation at the
present time only covers the men in
Northern N. S. Wales and it ia intended to cover all men engaged in the other coal districts, southern and western,
which at the present timo have separ-
ate organizations.
Well, so far the move made by the
miners has had somo effect. It hns
compelled parliament to act. To-day,
as I write I have before me a draft
bill, hot from the government printer,
of the amended Arbitration act that
parliament says it will pass, if possible.
Under the new act the system limit
of industrial arbitration to those organizations specified in the old act is
abolished, and the new act will cover
all workers in all industries. The
moaning of tho term "industrial matters" is to be extended to cover all
possible questions involving the relationship of master and man. The court
will bo left to use its own wisdom as
to whether .or not, it will regulate tho
conditions of industries, and if it determines not to lay its hand to a mot-,
tor of claim if will be expected to have
sound reason of public interest or public inconvenience" for not doing so.
The influenco of tho self-employer
who is not bound to observe tho restrictive provisions of awards aa to
working hours hos beon felt in many
trades and industries, where tho desire
of both sides is for n shortening of the
working hours. To get over this, tho
Early Closing act is to bo amended to
provide such nn inter-relation between
them as to permit of the provisions of
the latter net being modified where no-
ccssary not at present covered by tho
law.
An extension of the law to permit
of tho determination of claims of victimization, which are always tho cause
of industrial strife in any eoutry, will
be embodied in tho bill. A provision
will be included under which, if an employer dismisses a man by unfair methods, thore will bo a means of constitutional redress tot tho employee.
Thero te to bo preference to unionists,
nnd thiB will be renl nnd not illusion-
ary. Unionist* will have no single
cause for misgiving with regnrd to the
intentions and purposes of the sections
which refer to preference.
As regards enforcement of awards
the law will net to tho fullest extent.
When an employer is found to bo evading his duties bo will bo charged, of
course, in tbe ordinary punitive way,
but ns Boon ns ho is found guilty hia
conduct for tho year preceding tho offence will bo subject to reviow, and
ho will bo compelled to expiate nil of
tbe offoncca which will thus bo laid
baro in reapect to tho employed injured. Contemporaneous with this will
'bo brought in a statutory 48-hour week
It now remains to bo seen how the
draft bill will faro when it is being
. average weekly earnings,
whichever is larger. Incapacity—minimum weekly payment 5s., or quarter
of weekly wages, whichever is larger.
Maximum total liability, £50.
Compensation for workers under 21
years of age earning less than 20s. per
week. —Weekly payment — average
weekly earnings, maximum 10s.
Period after which lump sum can be .
substituted for weekly payment.—Two
weeks.
Tribunal, if claim not settled by
agreement.—Commissioner (under Local Courts act, 1896) acting as arbitrator.
Regulation for injured worker leaving the state.—If permanent incapacity
likely, quarterly substituted for weekly
payments.
The offices of Tho World, the pro
posed Sydney, N. S. W., labor dailj
newspaper, are crowned by a roof gap
den, *where it- is proposed to establish
a refreshment cafe when the paper get!
going.
passed through the parliament houaea.
I should Bay bere that if there is any
deviation from the principle of the bill,
I can foraee trouble, for the working
men have about reached the limit of
endurance on tne coalfields.
To Electors of Ward IV
B. B. BAILEY
1623 Parker Street.
Your Vote and Influence it
requested for
B. B. BAILEY
as ALDERMAN
FOR 1915
Labor Candidate
FOR WABD POTJB
HONESTY and EFFICIENCY
IN CIVIC AFFAIRS
Election Day, January 14th. PAGE TWO
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
FBIDAT JANUARY. 8, 1911
MOLSONS
BANK
Capital and Heservo,    -    $8,800,000
85 Branches in Canada
A general banking buBineas  transacted
Savings Department
Interest allowed at highest
Current Bate
EAST END BRANCH
150 Hastings Street East
A. W. Jarvls. Manager.
The Royal Bank
of Canada
INCORPORATED 1IM
Paid-up Capital ■ • • » 11,900,00
R.s.rv.         12.MM0O
Total Aeeeta 100,000,000
«WE ALLOW INTEREST ON DE-
f OBITS IN OUR
SAVINGS.
DEPARTMENT
On* Dollar will opon
tho account, and your
bualnoai will bo welcome bo It largo or
amall
FOURTEEN   .BRANCHES    IN
VANCOUVER
THE
INCORPORATED
1155
BANK OF
TORONTO
Assets....   ....158,000,000
Deposits.. .. ..l4i.ooo.ooo
Joint
Savings
Accounts
A BMlng. Account In tbe n«m.« of
two or mora individuals frequently
pou.ua. .Urnent. ol eon.ldBr.bl.
convenient,. In an oeeount ol tbll
n.lure land! mor b. depailted or
withdrawn ot will bjr either P»rtr
lo tbe oeconnt, oo bis or ber Individ-
sol .Ignltnre. Interett U odded to
boluoel bill-reulr-
MS HABTINOS STREET WEST
and
Corner Hastings and Carrall Sta.
British Columbia
LAND
Splendid opportunity ln M&ed
Farming, Dairying, Stook and
Poultry. Britlah Oolumbia
Granta Pre-omptloni of 180 acree
to Actual Settlor*—
Free
TEEMS—Residence on tbe land
{or at leut three yean; improvement! to tbo extent ot (5 per
aoroj bringing under cultivation
at leut It* acre*.
For turtner information apply to
DEPUTY IONISTBB OF
LANDS. VIOTOBIA, B.O.
SECRETARY, BUREAU OF
PBOVIlfOIAL INFORMATION,
VIOTOBIA, B.O.
OBee Pbone
Seymour IM
Residence Phone
mrmtnt HIS E
D. W. F. KcDOKALD
■airlrtn*. aolldter. Notary Public
Otlee: tt-tO rtack Block
Cor. HMtlnp and Crobie SI,.
Vancouver, B. O.
THE B. C.
Publlihed  every  Friday morning  by the
B. C. Federationlit, Ud.
Parm Pettipiece Manager
J. W. Wilkinson Editor
Directors:    Jas.    Campbell,    president;    J.
H. McVety,    secretary-treasurer;    H.
Gibb; G. J. Kelly; U. P. Pettipiece
Office: Room 217. Labor Temple
Tel. Exchange Sey. 7495.
Subscription: $1.60 per year; in Vancouver
City, |2.00; to unions subscribing
.   In a body, $1.00
REP^SENTATVES
New Westmlnater.. .W. E. Maiden, Box 931
1'rincB Kujiurt W. E. Denning, Box 631
Victoria: .A. S. Wells, Box 1638
Affiliated with the Western Labor Press
'       Association,
'Unity of Labor; the hope of the world.'
FRIDAY JANUARY 8, 1915
MR. H. H, STERNS, M. P. had
a brain storm laBt Sunday
— evouiiig when lie preached in
the Trinity Metlimlist church. It ought
to be a lesson to him to keep out of
pulpits.     In   these
HER VON du5's ** only Beoms
,„„.„„.„„ necessary for a man
BERNHABDI
oim.ua«yi to get  into.one  in
STEVENS, M. P. oraei to commence
glorifying the
breach of the sixth commandment. The
parsons of all creeds and denominations
seem to have granted themselves by
common consent nn injunction ngainst
God with respect to his dictum, "Thou
ahalt not kill.'' The very atmosphere
of a pulpit,just now is not safe for an
ordinary man much less a member of
parliament. Little wonder it "got*
Stevens. And whilst he was at it he
certainly made the most ot his opportunity. He out-parsoned - the parsons,
he knocked Sam Hughes into a cocked
hat, and rode rough shod over all the
small fry. He did not stay at any halfway house, or compromise by sitting on
the fence. He ranged himself shoulder to shoulder with nothing less than
the great von Bernhardt himself.
«       «       «       e
I
From the account of his sermon,
which appeared in the newspaper last
Monday morning, he said that war is a
blessing because peace brings vice, oppression, and sensuality. War, he declared, brings out the best in mankind
and stops the reversion to vice which
peace brings in its train. In slashing
style he reduced the trite old sayings,
"Peace and Plenty," "Peaee and
Learning," to a. heap of ruins, and in
their stead placed "Peace and Oppression" and "Peace arid Sensuality."
Yes, it was a pretty bad attack. Compare Mr.-Stevens' sentiments with the
I following representative quotations
from Bernhardi's book "Germany and
the Next.War." It reminds one of
"two minds with but a sigle thoughts
War ia in itself a good thing. It
is a biological necessity of the
first importance.
The inevitableness, the idealism,
the blessing of War as an indispensable and stimulating law of development .must be repeatedly emphasized.
War is the greatest factor in the
furtherance of culture and power.
Efforts to secure peace are extraordinarily detrimental as soon bs
they influence politics.
Fortunately, these efforts can
never attain their ultimate objects
in a world bristling, wjth arms,
where healthy egotism Btlll directs
tho policy of most countries. God
will see to it, says Trietschke, that
war always recurs ac a drastic medicine for the human race.
.Efforts directed toward the aboli
tion of war are not only foolish,
but absolutely immoral and must
be stigmatized as unworthy of the
human race.
Huge armaments are in themselves desirable. They are the
most necessary precondition of our
national health.
The end all and be all of a state
is power, and he who if not man
enough to look this truth in the
face should not meddle with politics.
The state's highest moral duty is
to increase its power.       ■
The state is justified in making
conquests whonever its own advantage feems to require additional territory.
We feel sure that all who knew Mr.
Stevens before his illness will join with
us in wishing him a speedy and complete recovery.
' Bread is one .of the great facts of
life. It writes history. It declares war,
and makes peace."
'* -ym^:
Start the New Year
for your Family's Sake
Do not let your family suffer hurt because you havo failed
to comply with tho forms of the law.
You cannot be sure that the legal outcome will be as you
wish unless you do the right thing now.
Now is the time to provide for proper distribution of your
estate by making your will.
Canadian Financiers Trust Company
HEAD OFFICE 839 HASTINGS ST W.     VANCOUVER. B.C
Patrick Doixrxclly General Mftrigjeg
NO CHRISTMAS TRUCE, was the
official decision of the nations
engaged in the European war,
but from news reportB it would appear
that the coiBmon humanity of some of
the    combatant
HOW DO YOU       unit8' ■"*«"*> be
.««««*»- submerged   and
ACCOUNT - .
came out in a man-
FOR IT? ner which leaves ub
absolutely bewildered as to the mental attitude of men
who fraternize one day, aid then tbe
next nre killing each other. Thoae who
think they understand these things may
be able to explain, but the following
quotation from a letter sent from the
fron} by a soldier in the trenches^
passes the point where the understanding of many people will be able to account for it:
"All tho time there was singing,
cheering and trumpet calls in both
lines, .and the Germans had lights
all along, their front. We were
walking with our wood in the
bright moonlight, but not a shot
was Jircd at us all the time.
"Next day would have made a
good chapter in Dickens' Christmas
Carol. It was indeed a tribute to
the spirit of Christmas, Many of'
our men walked out and -met the
Germans between the lines, I wont
over in the afternoon and was photographed 'in a group of English
and Germans mixed.
"We exchanged souvenirB. I got
a German ribbon and a photograph
of the Crown Prince of Bavaria.
The Germans opposite were awfully
decent fellows—Saxons, intelligent,
respectable-looking men. I had
quite a decent talk with three or
four, and have two names and addresses in my notebook.
"It wa^the strangest scene you
could imagine, going out unarmed
to meet our enemy, also unarmed.
After our talk, I really think a lot
of our newspaper reports must bo
horribly exaggerated."
What is the explanation of itf How
can men who have been together in a
social way one day deliberately blow
each other to pieces, or tear put each
others entrails the next? Can it be that
some men think on the water-tight
compartment system! ' And that one
part of their thinking faculties is absolutely shut off and disconnected from
the other part, preventing logical
thought from bringing its natural conclusions f One thing at least this incident Beoms to denote- and that is, that
the basic humanness of the common
people who aro slaughtering each other
at the behest of statesmen and politicians would, if they were properly informed as to the real why and wherefore of the situation they are now in,
make them refuse to any longer be the
victims of this appalling conspiracy in
the making of which they had no hand.
In any case, those of them who return
to their homes offer the war, will be responsible for some rock-bottom thinking, which will be likely to put a different stamp.on the face of European politics.
CAVE MAN ETHICS applied to hu
man affairs lies at the very root
of nearly all our strife, national
and international.   We are told by the
teachers of this philosophy   that,   not
only is it true in all
our   national    pursuits, but, many of
PEOOBE88
DEMANDS
of them also tell us,
CO-OPERATION,  that   war   between
nations is the necessary test as to whioh nation is fittest
to survive. The teachers of such a doctrine forget that men are more than
brutes ,and that the evolution of man
has reached far beyond the savage
stage.
«      •      •      •
War may at one time have destroyed
the weak and left only the strong to
reproduce their kind but now, even
physically, this ia no longer true. Instead of war as it is carried on to-day
eliminating the unfit it secures their
survival by keeping them out of the
conflict. The strongest are chosen for
the fighting line, where thousands over
thousands will be slain. Thia inevitably
will leave the weakest and unfit in a
far greater proportion among those who
will be left in all the countries now at
war, to propagate the race. It will
take many generations for these countries to overcome this destruction of
the flower of their physical manhood.
*      *      #      «
There aro maty forces operating and
modifying each other in the evolution
of life, which, if applied separately,
would destroy life altogether. The
struggle to survive at the expense of
others is only one of these forces. Its
counteracting or modifying force is mutual assistance. This latter force dominates more and more as life reaches iti
higher forms, but even in the lower
forms of life a closer scrutiny has revealed the fact that co-operation, Or
working together, at least within each
species, has played as great a part aa
competition has done in the march upward. In human life we have reached
that stage where the highest cannot be
reached without complete co-operation.
Therefore, war in itself, instead of
building a higher and nobler race engenders hate and tends to destroy in
the human soul tbat which distinguishes it from the brute.
If you think things in your local are
run by a "gang" get into the gang.
"My greatest regret ia that I have
been the nuthor of three wars in which
thousands of lives were lost."—Bia-
marck. Thia ia the conclusion of a
master hand at the game, and based on
his experiences. It should serve as a
guide to irresponsible and inexperienced novices like Mr. H. H. Stevens,
M.P.
It has to be done once a year as long
as printers' bills htivi. to be paid from
the receipts of advertising.
When they tell you that the worker
should be content with his lot, of
course they mean with his little. -
It is often the case that the most
vigorous workers for progress are
young men in a hurry to Bet the world
right, and the most stubborn opponents are reactionaries living in the past
nnd believing it possible to hold back
the tide. But when the step has been
taken, and time is needed to demonstrate its truth the reactionaries often
become even more expectant than the
young men in a hurry.
According to tho Nanaimo correspondent of the District (Fernie) Ledger, Alderman Rigg of Winnipeg is an
"executive board member" of the
Trades and Labor congress of Canada,
While not so it might be just as well
if it was. J6hn T. Joy of Halifax
could also be added without Iosb to tho
usefulness and effectiveness of the
congress. Following the example of the
I. T. U. the executive board should bo
increased from three to five.
Take that Watoh to Appltfcy, MM
Pander Wut, Cor. Pender and
Richards, for nigh-class watch,
clock and Jewellery repairs. All
cleaning and mainsprings Jobs
guaranteed for 12 months.
Attention!
We start our  •
January
Sales
On Monday
i
llth Instant
Take advantage of
them to supply your
present and future
needs.
EVERYTHING
IN THE STORE
WILL BE
REDUCED
Hudson's Bay
Company
Granville ud Georgia Streets
MR. W.0. BUCK ENDORSED
Central Ratepayers' Executive Favor Him a> Candidate for
Licence Board
Tbo Control Ratepayers' Association hold a mooting last night at
City HaU. Mr. 0. H. Gordon, the
president, was in the chair. Mr.
Kidd, secretary and many ratepayers also attended. Mr, Bailey addressed the meeting strongly in favor of Mr. W. 0. Black, who is a candidate for the position of .Licence
Commissioner.
Mr. Gordon, Mr. Kidd and Mr. G.
H. Miller and several others warmly
recommended Mr. Black, who has
been elected president of Ward VII
Association. Mr. Black said he had
had considerable experience in licensing matters In -Ontario. The
"McCarthy Aot," the "Scott
Act," the "Crookes Act" and the
Federal Acts had all engaged his
attontion. In districts whore local
option had been adopted he had
worked at putting down illicit trade.
He was in favor of a vigorous inspection of the quality of liquors.
He would like to see a more careful
selection of licensed bartenders. He
would mnko licensed houses Hvo up
to a good standard, keeping' their
liquors and houses as pure as possible—and he would rigorously sup
press all illicit trading.
Tho candidature of Mr. Black was
unanimously and enthusiastically
endorsed.    ..
I RESPBOTPULLT SOLICIT
YOUR ▼9TB
YOUR VOTE AND PERSONAL INFLUENCE ARE RESPECTFULLY
SOLICITED FOR
A.P.BLACK
FOR
Alderman
for Ward V. 1915
Election Day:
THURSDAY   JANUARY   14th,   1916
Polling Station:
ODDFELLOWS'   HALL,   MAIN   BT.
Hours of Polling: 9 a.m. to 7 p.m.
South Vancouver
Should be of interest to
many of our readers
Below is tho plntform of Mr. Edward
Gold, a candidate for the Reeveshlp,
It is well worth porusul and consideration. .  -
PLATFORM OF   -
Edward Gold
Candidate for Reeve of
South Vancouver
STANDS FOR A STRICT. JUST AND
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION,
WHIOH MEANS AN END TO
JOBBERY, GRAFT AND
INEFFICIENCY.
1. All Municipal Work wherever
possible to be done by Day Labor.
2. Preference given to Resident
White Labor, The up-keoping of tho
Standard Rate of Wages and* a Maximum Eight-Hour Day.
3. Endeavor to put our Finances in
such shape so that there would be sufficient money from our sources of income
to give employment to our men all year
round, instead of wasting it, on useless contracts to favorites, extravagant
purchases and pleasure trips.
4. Specific By-Law Monies be not
kept in General Fund but in separate
accounts at the Bank so as to prevent
diversion or mis-appropriation.
5. Wherever it is necessary to let
Contracts, same to bo open to competition by Tender.
6. To further the principle of Annexation to the City in every way, on
a just and equitable basis.
*-   .
7. Municipal Ownership of Publlo
Utilities in tl Greater Vancouver,
8. Equitable Assessment and taxation.
9. Strictly opposed to holding of a
"tax sale" during the present unsettled conditions nor until suoh times as
conditions are normal, and in view of
the disastrous effect lame would have
on our financial standiing.
10. That immediate endeavore be
made to start work on the Construction of lateral sewers,'in harmony with
the Greater Vancouver Sewerage
Scheme. ,
11. That all Work on Roads be of
Permanent Nature, so that the Municipality may have some asset for money
expended. All main and through roads
and streets to be paved,
12. Efficiency in all Municipal De-
partmenti.
IF THB ABOVE PLATFORM MBBTS
WITH YOUR APPROVAL, AOT
ACCORDINGLY, AND  ,
Vote for Edward Gold
ELECTION:
January 16th, 1915
Baxter for Mayor
Candidate for Re-election
MAYOR
T. S. BAXTER
Election Day, Thur;, Jan. 14
TO THE WORKINGMEN OF THB OITY OF VANCOUVER:
In coming forward as % candidate for re-election there are aome few
things I would say to you. The paat year haa been one of the moat difficult that Vancouver haa ever had to face. During that time I have endeavored to do Justice to all reasonable claims made to me aa Mayor on
behalf of the working claaa electors. I am prepared to atand or fall with
regard to thia matter by the reporte of the. various labor delegations
which have appeared before me from time to Ume, If any workman
will carefully and conscientiously examine the record of my term of offlce,
with regard to labor matters, I ahall not fear comparison with the records of any of my predecessors. They occupied the mayoral offlce when
times were very good compared with what they are to-day, and many
of the difficulties which have confronted me during my term were created by their lack of foresight and wanton extravagance.*; My view of
the working class situation is that it is without precedent in the city. In
order to cope with it aa much as possible I have had to take special
measures and create special civic machinery. To assist me ln this work
I have gathered together a, small body of representative citizens from
whom I have received the most loyal co-operation and support. I am
convinced that it is to the best interests of the working class voters that
' this special provision to deal with the distress wMch prvaila ahould not
be interrupted or interfered with, as would be the caae If any one of my
opponenta were elected. That la one of the chief reasons
why I have . agreed to stand for re-election. Finally I would
appeal to you to carefully weigh and consider the account of. my
stewardship, which I Intend 40 make public from the platform between
now and January 14th, upon which date I believe I can legitimately hope
that I ahall again be honored with the eupport of the working class electorate of Vanoouver. T. S. BAXTER. "
Electors of Ward Five:
YOUR VOTE AND INFLUENCE ABE
SOLICITED FOB ,
C. E. MAHON
AS ALDERMAN FOR 1915 IN WARD FIVE
Third Term
AS
ALDERMAN FOR WARD 1
YOUR VOTE AND INTEREST ARE
REQUESTED FOR
JAMES D.BYRNE
AND*
Business methods in administration of civic affairs.
ELECTRIC
HOUSEHOLD
APPLIANCES
CONVENIENT TO USE
are AND
CHEAP TO OPERATE
Coat of Current for Moat Popular Appliances
COFFEE PERCOLATOR
1 Cent for sufficient coffee for an
ordinary family.
ELECTRIC TOASTER
1 to 2 Cents provides toast for
tho family breakfast.
ELECTRIC GRILLS
I to 2 Cents according to amount
of cooking.
ELECTRIC IRON
.   * to 5 Cents per hour.
Cost out of all proportion to convenience afforded.
ELECTRIC WASHER
3 Cents per hour. Actual cost
varies according to amount of
washing.
CHAFING DISH
1 to 2 Cents covers cost for soc*
ial evening calls.
Canalised
Hutiap Street
B.C. ELECTRIC
ll»CnariUeSt.,
Near Darn DAY JANUABY 8/ 1915
THE BBITMH COLUMBIA FED1CRATIQNI3T.
PAGETHRE4
DAVID 8PENCER, LTD.
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
Men's Underwear Bargains at Spencer's
Stanfleld'8 Blue L»b«l—Heavy weight, cream ribbed. Reg. »1.75
garment.    Sale       11.29
Stanfield's Natural Wool—Light weight, elastic rib.   Beg. 11.25 a
garment.    Sale price   95c
Combinations   $1.90
Stanfleld'8 Natural Wool—Medium weight uid soft finish.   Begular
81.50 a garment.   Sato price  $1.10
Combinations    $2.20
Stanfield's Natural W*il—Heavy weight, double breasted.   Beg. $1.75
a garment for. .".■;... T  $1.20
Combinations, a salt    $2.58
Stanfleld'i 811k and Wool—Cream, medium weight, single- breaited.
Begular $2.00 a garment.   Sale price  $1.49
Combinations, a suit .,   $2.98
Stanfield's Cream Wool—Heavy elastic rib, double breasted.    Beg. „
$3.00 a garment.   Sale price .....,.....:.........  $2.20
Combinations, a suit ■_.,   $4.40
All Stanfield's lines in this sale carry the unshrinkable guarantee
and are offered In all sises from 34 to 44.
Natural Wool Underwear—Medium weight Sizes 32 to 44. Sale
price, ■ garment.....,...,.. i ;..;.......   89c
Heavy Blstic Bib Underwear—Cream finish, double breasted; alios
32  to  46 "*,.'. .V....'..-.. . ■ ,. -.,    98o
Spencerla Natural Llama Underwear—Pure natural wool; sices 32 to
88 only.   Begular $1.95 a garmefL   Sale price.  ..$1.29
Turnbull's $3.50   Underwear   $1.19—Two   numbers—medium   and
heavy weight, pure lambswool, high grade in material and finish,
and a great bargain at the sale price.   AU sises 34. to 42 In the
.    two lines together.   Sale price....'.  $1.40
Penman's "Blue Tip," 79c—One of the most popular lines of underwear on the market. Heavy weight, unshrinkable. Shirts ln sties
34 to 44. Drawers lh sises 36, 38 and 40 only. Begular $1.25 a
garment.    Sale price       79c
David Spencer Limited
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
DAVID SPINCIR, LTD.
VANCOUVER *
City Market
MAIN STREET  «•
APPLES—Large variety of winter stock at $1.00
and $1.25 per Box.
POTATQE^At Market Prices; these-are the lowest prices in Vancouver.   Stock always fresh
1     .and in best condition.
NEW LAID EGGS—Ate how arriving in larger
quantities. You can always rely on Eggs which
are sold as new laid at the City Market.
VEGETABLES—All kinds at most reasonable
prices; in quantities to suit all buyers.
AUCTION SALES are held every Tuesday and
Friday at 10 A. M. If you really wish to reduce
the cost of living, you can do so by attending the
AUCTION SALES.
VANCOUVER
City Market
MAIN STREET
Did You Get Yours
This Morning?
Braids
Best
Coffee
:•.„,*""■ HHAIPft*-0 ....
BRAID'S
BEST
COFFEE
WfYTITT RfrnEWT Absolutely Fireproof. Looal and Long-Distance
nUl£/Li KEjUftm Phone )n Every RoomCafe ln Conneotlon. Ratea
$1.00 per day up. Attractive Ratea to Permanent Quests.
Cotttainaal-■ Beattr, Proprietors   , ISO ~
nciiYw
Endorsation of Aldermanic
and School Trustee
Candidates
D. S. OAMBEON
Who is again an aldermanlc candidate
on the Labor tioket in the Royal
City, with good prospects for election, .
BURNABY
A. A. Brookhouse
SOLICITS YOUR
SUPPORT
AS
School Trustee
ENDORSED BT WABD TI BATEPAYBBS'
ASSOCIATION
whose efforts will be directed for the betterment of the
children, mentally, morally
and physically.
Polling Day, Jan. 16, 1915
Printers and
tabor Temple
Building
Phont Sey. 4490
Printers of The Fed,
TO THE
CONSUMER
We have a small quantity of semi-anthracite Coal
on hand. This Coal has 20% more efficiency than
any other Coal sold in Vancouver, and we do not expect another supply for some time.  Try a ton.
MACDONALD MARPOLE CO., Ltd.
437 Seymour Street
\W0RKERS UNION/
Phone Sey. 210
Named Shoee ire frequently nude in Non-
Union Factories—Do Not Buy Any Shoe
no matter whtt ltt name, unless It bean a
plain and readable Impression or thla atamp.
All ahoea without the Union Stamp ara
alwaya Non-Union.
SOOT * SHOE WORKERI' UNION
Ut Summer Street, Boston, Haas.
J. F. Tobln, Proa.   C. L. Blaine, gee.-Troaa.
"Nature Teeth" are not only LUXURIOUSbut-they
are NECESSARY for EFFICIENCY
BUILT -    npHESR "Nature Teeth" of mine (entirely different from
X.   ordinary and ally "Fall. Teeth) whieh are made to
nr ihb
MOUTH
Luxury
Necessity
Efficiency
Stantard.Bank
Bldfj. Blehuda
Second riser
match the ones that grew la your Jaws—in shape aad elie
and exaet hint—and to OS like the ones Mature gave you.
fpHESE "Meters Teeth" are truly luxurious benuse yoa
X    ean bite, chew and smile with them la perfect confidence and comfort.
BUT they are also necessary to health aad efielenoy. The
old "raise Teeth" are traly false, for they aro but
makeshifts and do not perform the functions of Nature's own
'teeth,
mastication ot the food—which means stomach health and
NATURE'S own teeth, then, or their worthy successors
—my "Nature Teeth"—are necessary to the proper
general efficiency—and to the luxurious sense of well-being
which makes for that efficiency.
"TOO MOTH HO PAW" CHMMIRIBD
I HEREBY GUARANTEE that all dental Work
performed by me will be absolutely palalsss.   If the
slightest twinge of pain Is experienced by ths pa-
"—* ao money need be paid io me. or If say aas
will bo instantly refunded by me.
_ j an
Plane Sep.
OPEN
EV-MMM
been paid tt i
f farter guarantee that all erown or bridge work
-' llliog will remain la trst-class eoaditlon for a
Ssrlod ot TEN TEAR8,   It any of my work becomes
efeetlre during tot Urns I wUl replace It absolutely
Dr. HALL, "The Modern Dentist"
ALDERMAN JOSEPH HOSK1N
Your Vote and Influence
REQUESTED BY
Joseph Hoskin
...FOR...
ALDERMAN
Candidate forRe-electif n in Ward 4
whose platform includes:
The re-organliatlon of Olty Markets;
The patronising of local Industries;
Clean Oovernment: Good Wagea; Fair
Play to All. I
PRESIDENT
5U5PENDER
MADE IN CANADA
Of America  ^c^r
___2______W____
MENTION TEE B. 0. FEDERATIONIST
HARRON BROS.
PUNiR*.UMBVL,MC.TR0.,,, AN°
Vancouver—Offloe    and    Chapel,
1034 Qranvllle St., Phone Sey, 3486.
North  Vanoouver — Offloe  and
Chapel, 122—Sixth St. Weat, Phont
134.
Alderman Dodd Says City
' Laborers All Receive
$3 Per Day.
Last regular meeting of New Westminster Trades and Labor oounoil was
held with President H. Knudsen in the
chnir. Minutes of previous meeting
-adopted as read. Communications:
From Royal Columbian hospital re labor
there; filed.   From War Office, London,
Jaying that canteens for Canadian con-
ingent had not been abolished; filed
with thanks. From B. C. F. of L. .Referred to new business.      ,
Reports: Delegate Stoney reported
for the campaign committee that the
concert and public meeting field in the
lodge room of the Labor Temple was a
great success and this had been largely
due to the Musicians' union furnishing
an orchestra free of oharge under the
able leadership of Mr. W. Breacher.
Upon his motion the council formally
endorsed the candidacy of Mayor Gray
and W. Dodd and D. 8. Cameron for aldermen, and T. A. Barnard and W.
Oreenway for school trustees.
Credentials were presented for W.
Dodd, W. Yates, J. Rushton, A. Roe, A.
Rowell and J. Humphrey, street railway men, and they were ordered obligated and seated,  j
Reports , from h unions: Typos,
Nothing new; about five men out of
work. Cigarmakers—Six working out
of 19 members. TJ.- B. of Carpenters—
Pretty quiet. , Brewery Workers-
Twelve memben, jtwo leaving, rest
working two or three days a week.
Timber Workers—Lumber and timber
picking up a little, put not wages,
gineers-r-Thirty members, half working.
Electrical Workers—About fifty men
four laid off, two left town, two out bl
work. Street Railwaymen—About 225
working out of 840.
B. 0. F. of L. Delegate.
President H. Knudsen was unanimously selected as the delegate to the
B. C. F. of L. eonvention at Nanaimo,
on January 25, 1916, after the couneil
had decided to send only one delegate.
W. Tates was elected alternate. Replying to a query by Delegate Iyison as to
what steps had been taken to stop
Asiatic immigration, Delegate Tates
said he did not see that any effective
steps were being taken.
Delegate Stoney presented the following signed statement from Delegate
Cropley, who was absent: "Heaps'
Engineering Works men on strike for
wages; some men behind as far aa ten
weeks; average from seven to ten
weeks; all brunches included. Molders
not yet out; executive of molders meets
to-night, which will decide as to whether they Bhould quit or not. No doubt
but that all molders will also quit work,
Delegate Cropley is in favor of such
action by his'local' Received and filed
Stoney^Oienbury—That the councU
does not meet on the next regular meeting night, but attend political rally and
boost labor candidates.   Carried.
Delegate Stoney naked if any of the
delegates had anything to report as to
civic campaign fund donations, as some
unions had responded, while others had
not been heard from. Last year's bills
had all been paid and a slight balance
was on hand. It was stated that the
Brewery Workers would give $6 and
Street Railwaymen a notice of motion
calling for $25.
Delegate Dodd said that last week
provincial government representatives
were here inquiring into the unemployment situation. Over 200 men outside
the regular staff are now working for
the purpose of keeping men employed.
The government might advance the
city money to institute work that
would employ about 278 men. This
would cost about $101,000, and the city
was also trying to get the provincial
government to clear two reserves here,
at a cost of about $16,000 to the government, but no news had yet been received as to the projects.
Delegate Dodd said that not a man
working for the city received less than
$3 per day for common labor. On motion the statement was received and
filed and the delegate' commended for
the stand he had taken in the matter.
Investigation Board Set.
Billy" MacAdams, member of Edmonton Typographical union, editorial
writer on tho, late lamented "Edmom
ton Capital, "'and one of the few men
on the Alberta press who havo the natural brains to be able to write for men
who know the difference between renl
estate "bunk" and real political economy, has just been appointed by the
federal department of labor, under the
provisions of the Industrial Disputes
Investigation act, as the representative of the men, to enquire into the dispute which has arisen between the J,
D. McArthur company and its machinist employees engaged upon the Alberta, British Columbia ft Dunvegan
railway. The balunce of the board consists of Judge Hyman, chairman, and
Mr. Oli-fcr M. Biggar, representing the
company.
FRANK FARRINGTON
President-elect of District No. 12 (Illinois), TL M. W. of A.
Frank Farrington, newly-elected president of the Illinois district, comprising 85,000 mine workers, prides himself on the fact that all of his ancestors, as far back as he can. trace were
coal miners, in England and in thiB
country.
He joined the Knights of Labor in
J68fi, and has been a member of organized labor ever since. He served his
local union, No. 800, of Streator, 111.,
seven years, as financial secretary;
served one year as secretary-treasurer
of his subdistrlct; two years as vice-
president of district No. 12; one year
as organizer for the Illinois Federation
of Labor, and five yean as member of
the International Executive Board.
Tour vote and influence are respectfully solicited for aldermanic honors in
ward five by Alfred Williams, a business man of executive ability, careful
administrator, and an engineer of vast
experience and long standing in the
development of municipal work.      *•*
MENTION THE B. O. FEDERATIONIST
'     ALD. WALTER DODD
Who will seek re-election as Alderman
in New Westminster, on the Labor
ticket.
/More Trouble for Crothers
The Pere Marquette Railway company, with Canadian headquarters in
Quebec, notified its employees that the
agreement between them and the company would be terminated by the company December 31st, and that no further agreements would be made. If necessary the men will press the matter
to a board of investigation under the
Industrial Disputes Investigation aet.
To the Electors of Ward I.
YOUB VOTE AND DiTLuAfOE
RESPECTFULLY  SOLICITED
FOB HY RE-ELECTION AS .
ALDERMAN
FOB IHE YEAB 1916
Walter Hepburn
Polling Place, Fender Hill, comer of
Homer and Pender Street!
POLLING DAY: JANUARY 14th, 1915
"Everything Bat
the Girl" for Your
New Home
At Pries, ud terms to mlt
roof pockflt'book.
Our Stook of
FURNITURE
must be teen to. be appreciated.
OaU In ind look it over.
Hastings Furniture Co.
Mattel
»1 HASTINOS STREET WUT
In the heart of ihe retail district- Absolut,
fireproof and modem in every raped. Cuisine'
unexcelled. European plan, $1 lo $3 per day.
FREE AUTO 'BUS MEETS All TRAINS. Omtl ttt
operant br The Provincial Hotel. Compiny. Limited.
HOWARD I SH_E£H« fmt-
South Vancouver
Ratepayers Ward 3
Use your vote and Influence for
F. W. WELSH
Member Plumbers' Union
For Councillor
Tbe abolition of Contract System on
Municipal Work.
Construction of Sewers and other permanent improvements.
All work wherever possible to be done
by DAY LABOB at a minimum
wage of 13.00 for 8 hours.
Annexation to Olty of Vancouver.
Free Garbage Collection.
Equal Rights to all, special privileges
to none.
A practical and experienced man for a
responsible position.
CENTER & HANNA, Ud.
UNDERTAKERS
Refined Service
1041 GEORGIA STREET
One Blook west of Court House.
Use  of Modern  Chapel and
Funeral Parlors  free  to all
Patrons
fteaoSey. 221
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
aad EMBALMERS
S2t HI—til Si.       Vsacoanr, B. I
Phone:  Fairmont 110
Patterson* Chandler
Manufacturer! of
MONUMENTS
Vaults, Curbing, Etc.
Offloe and Works:
Cor. 16th Ave. and Main St.
Branoh Ofllce: 40th ft Fraser Aves.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Mr. Union Man
Are you eating Union-made Bread, are you
helping td maintain tbe Union Standard of living by
using goods produced by Union Labor t
BREWER'S XL BREAD
has the Union Label on every loaf, and in quality
and flavor it is unexcelled.
Phone Highland 573 and we will call at your
house.
BREWER'S XL BAKERY,
,  Corner 4th Avenue and Commercial Street.
YOU HAVE A CHANCE TO OET
YOUB DOLLARS BAOK
When you buy
British  Columbia  Made
Goods
Every dollar spent lu Easterns or
Foreign Ooods ia gone forever
Leckie Boots are Made in
Vancouver
Insist oa gating them, and you get
honest -nine for your money ovary
time.
J. LECKIE CO., Limited
Vancouver
MOUNT PLEASANT HEADQUARTERS
For Hsrdware, Staves sad Binges—
Everything for the Kitchen
W. R. OWEN & MORRISON
Phone Fair. 447 ,        3887 Main Street
PENDER HOTEL
eii nmvaa. nun won ■
Sew, Medera, Drt-Otass I
"&»3SS?itf,t
ntu.li.to yu Per mt oa |
1915 Diaries and Calendar Pads
TRANSFER BINDERS, ** •     FILES
LOOSE LEAF BINDERS AND SHEETS
Complete Lines of all Offlce Requirement!.
Wa do all kinds of OOMMBBOIAL PBINTINO
Wa IM BLANK BOOK MANUTAOTUBBBS
Thomson Stationery Co., Ltd.
i HASTINOS STREET WBST
BEST IN THE WEST
VANCOUVER, S.C.
ESTABLISHED t
•v.'Vt*! u** *•""* -Mas**? Movement by baring.
a? ss? «suus' BSfjaa? ass
'watts aaa Oa a*Mldfi| oMae dl*9' ^^
,  allied psnrento nuns   ,
Composed et TppompHlcal Union, Web Piestmoa'a Union, PrinUai -Hess-
m.e'. Union. Pr.it AttlsUoti' Union. Stmotrpen' and Electrotype^ Calea.
Bookbinders' Union, Photo*onfxavors' Union.
WM. TURNER iE-SriS
-DEALER IN-
New and second-hand China, Crockery, Furniture,
Hardware and Stoves. Furniture moving and shipping. Telephone us when you have furniture for
sale. Highest prices paid.
TELEPHONE SEYMOUR 3745
26% OFF ALL TRUSSES THIS MONTH
RED STAR DRUO STORE.
: Cordova Street West     ,        Vancouver, B. 0.
THE POPULAR PRICED, EUROPEAN PLAN
HOTEL RITZ
VICTORIA, B.C.
FORT ST., AT DOUGLAS
RATES 75c, $1.00, $1.26, $1.50, $2.00
O. J. LOVEJOY, MOR. FREE AUTO BUS
IV« BOTTLtNO
me acftt without » net
ssoaaacBia ___m__m__ _____
VANCOUVER   0 C
When You Want a
First-Class Beer
-ONE THAT YOU CAN'T BEAT AT ANT PBIOE, IN ANT
OOUNTBT, OET BEEB WITH THIS LABEL ON. PINTS, SIX
FOB -flTTT CENTS.
BBEWED AND BOTTLED IN VANCOUVEB BT
VANCOUVER BREWERIES, Ltd.
T.B. CUTHBERTSON 4 Oo.
Men's Hatters and Outfitters
Three Stores
PANTAGES
Unequalled Vaudeville  M.ana
PANTAOII  VAUDEVILLE
THREE SHOWS DAILY
«.«, IM, 0.\t    Season'. Prleeei
Matinee, 1k. I Evenings, llo., Me. PAGE FOUR
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIBT.
I
FBIDAT. JANUABY 8, ISIS |
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
Capital $15,000,000        Best  $13,600,000
Main Offlce:   Corner Hastings and Oranvllle Streets, Vancouver
CITT BRANCHES LOCATION
ALMA ROAD Cor. Fourth Avenue and Alma Road
HASTINGS and CAMBIE Cor. Hastings and Cambie Street!     '
EAST END. Cor. Pender ond Main Streets*
COMMERCIAL DRIVE Cor. First Avenue and Commercial Drive
FAIRVIEW Cor. Sixth Avenue and Oranvllle Street
MOUNT PLEASANT Cor. Eighth Avenue and Main Street
KITSILANO Cor. Fourth Avenue and Yew Street
POWELL STREET Cor. Victoria Drive and Powell Street
SOUTH HILL. Cor. Forty-fourth Avenue and Fraaer Road
Also North Vancouver Branch, Corner Lonsdale Avenue and Esplanade
THOMAS KIRKPATRICK
Dr. Moody
For licence
Commissioner
And His Platform
1. Enforcement of the law impartially and strictly.
2. Licensing of bartenders, in which
character and previous records
of new applicants will be considered. All misdemeanors or infractions of the law to* be
promptly and impartially dealt
with.
3. Strict enforcement of the law in
regard to maintenance and suitability of premises.
4. Realizing that the duty of a Licence Commissioner is to'see to
the enforcement of the statutes
and the by-laws, I pledge myself
to that course if elected to the
Board.
I have been asked what my attitude towards earlier closing
hours for bars will be. My answer is that if the City Council
passes a shorter hour by-law it
will be my bounden duty,. if
elected, to see that the law is enforced.
'.■      • -
5. 'I am strictly opposed to any in-
, increase of licenses in Vancouver, believing there are now
more than enough to carry on
the traffic in this city.
DR. T.GLENDON MOODY
FOR RE-ELECTION AS
ALDERMAN for WARD 3
Civic Elections Ward 5    ||H
YOUR VOTE AND INFLUENCE RESPECT
FULLY SOLICITED FOR
C N. JAMES
FOR ALDERMAN
Phone Fairmont 2416
LEEK
For Licence Commissioner
YOUR VOTE AND INFLUENCE RESPECTFULLY SOLICITED
WALTER LEEK
VOTE FOR
G. S.
FOR MAYOR
1915
You want a Mayor who has made a success of
his own private business, and who is able to handle
the city's business successfully.
You want a Mayor who is not a party to any
Clique, Organization or Corporation.
You want a Mayor who will force the Railways
to live up to their agreement with the city, thus producing work for the citizens of Vancouver.
If you want a Mayor with these qualifications,
and a Mayor who will look after the city's interest,
then cast your vote on January, the 14th, for C. S.
DOUGLAS.
Ward l,South Vancouver
I appeal to the thinking, impartial ratepayer to support me with vote and influence in a straight fight and square
deal as
COUNCILLOR FOR WARD 1.
D.  A.  TIBBOTT
VOTEjFOR
A. WILLIAMS
ALDERMAN for |WardS   \\
To represent you as Alderman In
Ward Five, and secure the services
of a competent and active business
man.
RE STANDS FOB:!
No Hiilarii-H for Mayer or Aldermen.
No reduction in salaries of Police
and Firemen.
Civic Control of fublio Utilities.
I am in Javor of un Eight-hour Day nt tho Standard Hato of $3.00.
Complcto revision of Assessment Boll.
Encouragement of Local Industries.
Committee Booms:  2217 Main Btreet.      Phone Fairmont 1973.
Full Weighty
In buying Deither South Wellington coal you' get full weight of
fuel and nothing else. Tou are not
paying for 20% water as you do
if you buy Lignite from Wash*
ington, U. S. A.  And you
DO NOT PAY FOB WET
SACKS
as we guarantee net weight without sacks, and a City Weight
Ticket with loads of two tons
and up in bulk.
Washed   *        . Lump
Pea 98.60
J4.25
WOOD
BEST 16-inch Fir Oordwood af $3.00 per load. This is an
exceptionally good lot, and just what you need this cold
weather. '
Phone Seymour 1936 for trial load, ,,
JINGLE POT COAL
will save you money.  Quality guaranteed.'
this is the only UNION MINED Ooal in British Columbia.
McNEILL, WELCH & WILSON, Limited
formerly
VANCOUVER COAL COMPANY
Phone Seymour 6408.
553
%-£L
'KEEP YOUB HONEY TN B. 0.'
BY USING
South Wellington Coal
as supplied by
The Main Supply
Company
1Q29 MAIN STREET
Best Lump, ton.. .$6.75
Washed Nut, ton..$5.99
Delivered free within two miles.
Phone Your Order Now. ,
SEYMOUR 8491
Mined ln B. 0. by B. 0. Labor for
B. 0, People.
JANUARY CI&ARANCE SALE
OBEAT SEDUCTIONS on all onr Mens* and Boys' SOUS AND OVEBOOATS, some as low as HALF-FBIOE.
All Winter UNDEBWEAB except Penmans' BS at BABOAIN PBItfES.
CLUBB   &  STEWART
309-815 Hastings St. West      Phone Seymour 792
J. J. DOUGAN
Solicits your support for re-election
I have bad a Ions, connection witb educational matters, both as aTleacher,and a achool tns-
toe. Daring my terms of oflce I ban consistently striven for free tent books, night schools, and
free medical inspection of adhool children, I
bar* given special attention to tbe education of
those of our unfortunate children who an deaf
and dumb, and whom I believe should ba educated ln the city ratber than lent ont of tbe
.province, My local experience of school administration bas been supplemented by visits
paid to a very large number of schools ln Canada
and the United States whither I bava gone from
to time seeking new ideas and methods whereby ■'
our local schools could ba made second to none.
My whole effort baa been directed to making tbe
child better physically,- mentally, and morally,
for X believe that in thoee thingsWhe child le
the father of the future citlsen. I anl'strongly
In favor of bringing our, recently adopted system
of technical Instruction in Connection with our
public schools, up to the highest degree of effl*
donay possible. If re-elected, I shall continue
tbe polloy which haa brought tbe consistent support of tbe electorate of Vancouver to uy can-
dldature for many yeara past. Tours faithfully, J. J. DOUOAN,
, \ School Tntstee.
WOW? | ALD. McBEATH
>aeco.
PHONE SEYMOOB 9088
^S'*W
respectfully solicits your vote and influence for |
re-election as Alderman for
WARD 7
A vote for Aid. McBeath is a vote for a clean
civic government and a vote for a square deal
to all. •
Don't Forget
We Write
FIRE
Insurance
IN GOOD BOARD
COMPANIES
DOW FRASER TRUST CO.
122 Hastings St. West* |
Vancouver, apd  McKay Station,
Burnaby, B. C.
Cloae ad 1 o'clock Saturday.
Electors of Ward Four
RETURN
ALD. THOS. EVANS
TO THE 1915 COUNCIL
AS YOUR REPRESENTATIVE
I have supported a standard wage of »3.00 per day of eight hours for
the past two years,and will do so for 1916.  Ihe man working for 13.00 '
per day on elty work Ib not to he compared with th. man earning the
same wage and employed ln an offlce.   Ihe man ln the offlce geta ln full
Ume and draws full pay, while the man working outside on. tha streets '
geta practically half time or not more than   three-quarterB . owing   to _
weather conditions.
YOUB VOTE AND INFLUENCE SOLICITED.
INDUSTRIES.  LOWER TAX RATE..
"   PRUDENT ECONOMY.
Special
Edison-
Phonograph
Outfit, No. 10
Outfit Includes cabinet ef Fumed Oak
beautifully finished, hinged cover,
very latest homiest type of phonograph, giving the purest tonal quality,
new type diamond pointed reproducer.
Powerful spring motor perfectly ad.
Justed and regullted. Removable
front and top, Outfit includes 12 four-
minute-Blue Amberol (Indestructible)
records of your own selection. Terms
..6.10 cash, balance at the rate of
tB.OO per month.
the •
KENT
PIANO CO. Ltd.
558 GRANVILLE ST.
JAMES A KERR
The present Reeve of South Vancouver
SOLICITS YOUR   VOTE   AND INFLUENCE
AS
REEVE TOR 1915..
THE FOLLOWING MEETINGS WILL BE HELD: "i
To-night, Friday, Kalenberg Hall, Main Street and.
Bodwell Road.
Monday, Jan. 11, Marfew Hall, Cedar Cottage.
Tuesday,- Jan. 12, Fraser Hall, Fraser Si aqd 49th.
Wednsday, Jan. 13, McBride's School House, Ward 3
Thursday, J an. 14, Carlton Hall, Collingwood.
Friday, Jan. 15, Sexsmith Shool, Ward 6. "
fjAjm I
Candidates running for Councillors for the Wards, and also School
Trustees, will he given an opportunity to address the meetings,
The Eeeve will deal with the flnancl|l condition of the Municipality
as compared with other cities of the Dominion, also the famous Gold-
Kerr disqualification case.
A Progressive Business
Administration
for the  .
CITY of NORTH VANCOUVER
as advocated and supported by
WILLIAM JOHN IRWIN
Candidate for Re-election as Mayor
Election, Thursday, 14th Jan., 1915,9 a.m. to 7 p.m.

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