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The British Columbia Federationist Nov 27, 1914

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 OFFICIAL PAPEB : VANCOUVER TRADES AND LABOB COUNCIL AND B. C. FEDERATION OF LABOB
FEDERATIONIST
.POLITICAL UNITY: VICTORY I
VANCOUVER, B. C, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER^, 1914
("JSTa-t),   $1.60 PER T|&R
'S E^Lfll
MENT IK-
Is a Hive of
Industrious Girls and
Women
[Store To Be Opened Soon
for the Sale of Goods
Made by League'
tt
VICTORIA TRADES
IL '
Financial Aid for B. C. F. of
L—Efforts to Get Good
CompensationaAct.
Plans Formation of a New
Building Trades Council
for Victoria.
Any man obsessed with the idea that
[capacity for organization and manage*
meat is an aptitude confined exclusively to his sex, can   have   his   conceit
Kknoeked into a cooked hat in record
I time by paying a visit to the Women's
[Employment   League headquarters  in
[Robson   street.   There,  in a 33-room
house which waa as empty as a Mo-
/Bride promise three weeks ago,- are 130
women and girls working busily, who
.would otherwise have been on the edge
I of hell trying te keep body and soul to-
[gether in face of the appalling conditions of the female labor market in this
[city.   When The Federatlonist representative called there last Wednesday
afternoon the place wae a positive'hive
bf disciplined industry.   No Hurry, no
bluster, but just smooth running effl-
Blenoy under the quietly business-like
| direction of a mere handful ef tireless
women, obviously content in the assurance that they are helping aa many of
their sex as they can to make the best
of a bad situation.   Only one man waa
to be seen, and he looked aa though he
knew enough to do as he was told.   In
the amall entrance hall which gives access to the registration offlce, waa a
number of women and girls each plainly
cogitating her load of bread-and-butter
worry while waiting to Interview Miss
C. A, Walker who has charge of that
department. For let it be clearly understood that those actually working in the
[building do not by any means include
lbe whole of the problem being tackled
by the League.   On the books were re-
restored 808 girls and women desirous
)f being assisted to gain employment,
ind the number increases every day.
Making Dolls and Toys.
The majority of those working on the
premises are engaged in making toys
|ike doll-houses and dolls. Those dolls
ire a revelation. Big dolls and
jttle doll. Short dolls and tall
lolls. Clown dolls, soldier dells, sailor
lolls, Walloon maids and admirals. Ev-
iry kind, variety, nation, and station of
lolls, from cute Cupies with fat stom-
ichs, short shirts and brownie caps, to
he most life-like young damsels with
ipen-and-shut eyea, blonde hair and real
ye-lashes and wbo look as muoh like
r he real thing as human ingenuity can
aake them. All these—with the excep-
lon of the superior young ladies last
nentloned—are made on the premises
y the women and girls, right up from
so cutting of the rag shapes to the
minting of the coy blushes which
hould make them sell easily. And there
i no 'adding or fooling about it at any
tage of the work. System and organl-
ation are the keynote. Whole piles of
oils are rapidly approaching that point
I their careers when they will make
J aeir debut Into society. This will be
bout December 1st when the League
HI open a large retail atore en Hast-
igs or Granville street. All trade-un-
Ernsts and others Interested in helping
ese women to help themselves should
take a point ot buying anything they
lay intend to do in the way of things
eing made by the League, at that
[ore. Dolls, saucy cute affairs of rag,
atience and paint, will be on sale for
0 low as 25 cents. Inspect them be*
'ore going elsewhere.
Other League Work.
Besides all thla doll and toy work, the
,eague rune an up-to-date lunch count*
r where a full course meal ean be
ought for 15 centa. No "chink hash"
t that. Good plain wholesome food
ooked by white women who know how
o do It, and do it. In the kitchen—
vhere the saying about clean enough to
iat off the floor is actually true-
Christmas pudding galore are being
nade for sale,
Sleep on ths Premises.
Upstairs on the third Door are a num-
>er of bedrooms where many of the
[iris sleep. Everything ia clean and
lomfortable in return for the $3.50
harged for room and board per week',
altogether the enterprise is a great
sredit to the women who have organ-
aed, and who are managing It. Copious critics and pettifogging busy-
bodies with nothing to do but find
fault with the work of people abler
ban themselves, might think they
ould do better. But there are none of
holr kind in that house, and no plaoe
or them, to get in. Mrs. J. K. Uns-
rortb and Miss H. Outterldge are work-
ng with might and main from early
torn till late at night, fixing and planing and contriving to make the ven-
ure a success despite the pessimistic
iredictions of blue-devil' critics, And
* anybody thinks tbelr efforts have not
fted a load of desperation from the
earts of those women and girls—well
ust let them ask those girls and wo-
len.
VICTORIA, B. C, Nov. 18.—Regular
meeting of Victoria Trades and Labor
council was called to order by President
Wells. Minutes of previous meeting
read and adopted.
Committee Reports
Delegate Day (plumbers) reported
with reference to the employment of,
and the opening of, barber shops on re*
:ular holidays. He stated that the bar-
era, through their delegate, had requested him to make arrangements for
an interview with the council. He had
seen the mayor and gone into the question with him, and he (the mayor) had
Informed him that the council could not
help them, there being no by-law, but
advised him to see the city solicitor and
be certain upon the point. On inter*
viewiqg the solicitor he was informed
that no help eould be given.
Del. Day emphasised the necessity of
carrying this through and suggested
that the barbers do this and get the
help of the Trades and Labor couneil
to baok them up.
Del. Wells moved that at the next
meeting of same the matter be brought
before them and the Trades and Labor
council in conjunction with the B. C.
Federation of Labor deal with lt. ThiB
was carried.
Pattern Makers Affiliate
Del. Day reported that the pattern
makers had requested him to attend
their meeting and give them information to enable their members to consider the question of affiliation with the
central body. He had done so. The
members promised to consider the mat-
ter, and had decided in favor. Motion—That the two delegates' credentials from the pattern makers be accepted and the delegatea seated. Carried. They received a eordial reception.
Union Reports
The various delegates reported trade
very bad and a great number of members out of employment, with the ex.
ception of letter carriers, boiler makers,
brewery workera, and stage employees,
who reported trade fair.
The secretary was instructed to advertise in the press that anyone wishing
to hire labor could be supplied by
'phoning Labor Hall.
Local Press Criticised.
Strong comments were made respecting treatment by local press. The
Trades and Labor council, representing
as it does many different trades, should
receive aa fair treatment as other
bodies.
Secretary waa Instructed to write to
the two papers and ask that better
treatment be given to matters that may
be sent from the labor council.
Workmen's Compensation.
In reply to the communication re
funds to enable the B. C. Federation to
proceed with the Workmen's Compensation act the following cheques were
received: District Council Carpenters,
$10; Letter Carriers, $1; Painters, (1.
It was decided that if at a later date
funds allowed and the B. C. Federation
made a further call, the Trades and Labor council would mnke further donations. It was expected that after the
various locals had meetings .the . fund
would reach a substantial amount.' The
question being of great and vital importance to every worker.
Building trades delegates reported
that they had received a communication from the Master Builders' association, and that the various locals were
dealing with the question.
Naw Building Tradss Oouncll
Del. Wells (carpenters) stated the
matter of a Building Trades council was
being again considered. a
A very lengthy discussion took place
as io the advisability of forming a
building trades industrial union. Delegates Day, McMurtrie, Philbrooke, ex-
President Perrott, A. S. Wells and others discussed the proposal in all its
phases.
Tha office of ths civic official ln chugs of relief work is a painfully human Institution just now.
Ths atmosphere of charity and almsgiving Is nscss*
sartly a mean one, no mattsr how human ths ojldals
may be to whom that work is entrusted. It is doubly so at this time, when so many havs been forced
to seek and accept charity as ths only alternative
to starvation.. Man and woman come there by ths
score who obviously from thslr manner and appearance have never been driven to such extremity bs-
f ore.
Some of them, at Hist visit, positively tremble
with embarrassment, and explain thslr casa ln ths
faltering clumsy language whieh denotes an absence of confidence snd self-command.. Thsy file in,
wretched snd dejected, all day long.. It Is ons long
repetition of misery snd destitution from morning
til) night.. In most cases ths salient facts are similar.. No job. no money, no fool. So ths stories nm
ons af tar ths other.. Bnt svsry now and again soma-
thing comes up which Is out of ths ordinary. And
that which gives lt an additional touch ot poignancy Is usually soms feature pf wretchedness over
■ and above ths average csss.
Chancing to visit ths rslisf office lsst Monday
afternoon, just such an Instance came to my attention. As I sat talking with ths relief officer his
telephone rang. As undertaker was calling him
np and I listened to one aids of a dialogue whtcb ran
something like this. "Yes, yes, speaking." Followed a listening silence. Thsn, "Yes, ths bsdy
is at ths Oenersl Hospital.   Eh?  Oh, just an or
dinary pauper, burial; I havs so authority to give
any other Instruction. Where will he be buried did
yon say? Well, ln the cemetery, of course." Mors
silence thsn, "Oh, on, I see what you mean. It
will havs to bs in ths paupers' section.. I'm sorry,
but I sss nothing elss for lt. Ha died without
money or Mends with money.. Alright, good-day."
As the officer put ths 'phons down hs looked
rather glum and muttered, "Too bad, too bad."
It sounded Uke s "story.". And lt wss ons.. It
was ths "Lsst Psst," being sounded for a military
veterss of 20 years' service.. His King no longer
needed him, but his country wu calling him to ths
lsst muster, clad ln his pauper uniform.. His same
wu Gordon Bolph, an old mas sf aa, a veteran of
ths Fenian Balds, and formerly a member of ths
Royal North Watt Mounted Polios.
Ths officials of ths rslisf office described him
u "a fins old chap, sobsr, self-respecting and In-
tsUlgsst, tat broken in health*. For font years ha
had lived et the dty mission supported by the dty.
During occasional spells of better health hs worksd
ths elevator at the mission. His only known relative wu a Captain R. W. A. Bolph, of Winnipeg,
who, lt wu stated, sithsr would not or could sot
assist ths old sum.
The chaplain of the N. W. M. P., conducted ths
funeral service at ths dty mission last Tussday.
Then the body wu taken away to bs buried ln
Potter's Field.. A pointed moral will adorn a tals.
A tale wtth a point so pointed, nssds no moral to
adorn lt J. W. W.
I
Bolief Work in Parks
J The Park Board at   their   meeting
In Wednesday last,   decided    to com*
Aence improvement work in both Stan*
By and HaBtings parks, providing employment for   about 60   men in each
Tark.    Five, hundred dollars from the
bntingent fund will be set aside for
Iving married men work of a general
uture in Stanley Park on the scale
1 25 cents an hour on a six-hour day.
Hastings   Park, also, general im-
Iovement work will be begun. Single
in are to be offered this work in re-
rn for board and shelter. A wood
ng will be employed to remove before
b end of the year the dead spruce
>m Stanley Park, as directed by the
minion forester.
It Speaks Volumes.
■Editor B. G. Federatlonist:    Please
Ticontinue   sending  me  The   Federalist as I am leaving Nanaimo, and
Vt know where I will settle. Sincere-
I youn, J.	
Ifenaimo, B. C., Nov. 23,1914.
VICTORIA NOTES,
[By J. Day.]
It is mooted in Victoria that there
Ib a slight possibility of the working
class of that elty getting sufficiently educated to believe that In the near future there are at least a few men in
their own ranks who could manage
council and other affairs quite as well
and perhaps a little better than some
of the present progressive ones.
Till this time arrives would it not be
more "British" to stand the kicks and
stop kicking. If through the fault of
the individual trouble comes along, why
complain. Ib It not better to get busy
and remedy the evil, especially when
"you know you can."
When a man gets the Victoria cross
it is for saving the situation under exceptional circustancca.
It is bo easy to get into difficulties,
but the man's the man who gets out
of it.
Now is the opportunity of the leaders
of the government to shew they are the
men they profess to be.
Considering the eagerness there appears to be by Victoria locals of getting under one roof, the sooner they get
busy and get their own roof tne better. The Regina Labor Temple workers' are Betting a good example. Let
them remember thiB.
RELIEF FOR SINGLE MEN.
Olty WlU Erect Camp—Wages, Board
ud Bonk.
A relief work catop for single men is
to be established by the city at the
new cemetery site in Burnaby. The
Board of Works lost Tuesday gave orders for bunkhouses to be constructed
to accommodate 100 men. The work
will be land clearing. The wages will
be board and bunk. Sir. G. Ireland, the
city relief officer, Ib fully confident that
more men will apply for the work tban
can be taken on, and it is expected
that provision will have to be made for
500 men before winter Ib over.
Mr. Ireland explained that there were
150 young men, permanent residents of
the city, registered with him now for
employment and in addition there were
between 40 and 50 men every day who
had to be provided with temporary
relief, such as soup or meal ticket and
a bed. Not more than five per. cent,
were "bums." The rest were bona-
fide working men who expressed a
willingness to work for their board
and lodging.
Chief of Police McLennan intimated
that from the police point of view it
would be an advantage to have such
work initiated. There were hundreds
of men who were willing to do the right
thing but were up against it.
TRADES OOUNOIL     ■      -
PARLIAMENTARY
COMMITTEE
An additional impetus was given to
the movement to elect working class
candidates to the city council, at the
meeting of the Parliamentary committee of the Trades and Labor council
last Wednesday night. The meeting
was well attended and several candidates appeared before it. But the
most favorable outcome of the meeting,
and one which was commented on by
several of the delegates, was the enthusiasm shewn In the short talks made
by various members of the committee.
Five labor men are out for ward honors in as many wards in the* city, in
addition to two in South Vancouver.
Arrangements were made for ward committee work, and at the big anniversary
meeting of the council next Thursday,
the movement will be started. From
all indications it should meet with suo
cess, and if the workers will do their
part, there is no question about the outcome.
Another matter dealt with by the
committee was the reduction of the
wages of the electrical workers employed on the city police and fire department systems. Representatives of
the electrical workers made strong pro
test inasmuch as the wages in those departments are based on the wages paid
by the B. C. Electric Railway company,
and for which the Electrical Workers'
union were responsible. The committee will recommend that the council
make a strenuous effort to resist the reduction.
Boom Parade.
During the recent convention of the
American Federation of Labor in Philadelphia, a parade of- trades unionists
was held. It took three hours, to pass
a given point and 60,000 union men and
women marching 16 abreast, were in it.
LABOR TEMPLE LIBRARY
Tradss Council Ventura Meets General
Approval
The additions to the Labor Temple
Library by the Trades and Labor Coun-
I cil, are meeting with the approval of
many of the members, particularly
those out of employment with plenty
of time to read.
The Library committee desires to
acknowledge the receipt of further con
tributions of books which are-sufficient
to render the purchase of additional
book caBe units immediately necessary.
The following are the names of
books, authors and donors :—Studies in
Trades Unionism in the Custom Tail
oring.Trades, by, Charles Jacob Stowell
donated by Vancouver Tailora Union i
The Revolt of Democracy, Dr. Alfred
Russell Wallace, doanated by J. Davidson, Carpenters Union ; John Marvel,
Assistant, by Thos. Nelson Page; History of Canadian Wealth, by Gu'stavus
Myers; The Iron Heel, by Jack London;
The People of the Abyss, by Jack London; Essays on the Materialistic Conception of History, by Antonio Labri-
lola; Economic Foundations of Society,
by Archille Loria, donated by Jas. H.
McVety, Machinists Union.
i The committee will be glad to receive
and acknowledge further contributions.
Dominion Capital's Charity.
Ottawa board of control has voted
|500 to the Salvation Army to equip a
shelter for unemployed in the Capital
City. Men are to break stone and do
other rough work in return for food and
shelter.
QUARTERQFCENTURY
il
UBOR
Trades and tabor Council's
25th Anniversary Saturday, Dec. 5th
When first Shot in Municipal Elections Will gg
Fired
Ths twenty-fifth snslTSrssry msst-
ing of the Vancouver Trsdes snd Lahor
CouncU will not. b» hold on December
Srd, ss originally Intended, hut will
take place ln the large hall of the
Lahor Temple on Saturday, December
6th, at 8 p. m., which la, aa a mattsr
of fact, tha actual aanlvnrsary data.
Tha regular meeting of ths Council
will bs hsld next Thursday as usual.
Special effort is being made by the executive board and tha entertainment
committee to make the annlTsrssry
gathering of such s chsractsr ss beau
ths occasion. Wtth better times, greater things might perhaps ■ hare been
done, but with fineness nssdsd so badly
for mors urgent purposes, caution has
to be ths keynote with rsgard to expenditure. But that will not prevent tt
from being a memorable data ln the
history of organised labor ln Vancouver. As is lit and proper, the chair will
bs occupied by Mr. Jos Dixon, ths first
president of the Council had, and as
good a union man now aa he was thsn.
Along with him will bs ss many of ths
past officers and delegates as can bs
mustered. All union men are urged
and Invited to be present, and a crowded house should bs thsrs If only to show
thst, though times msy bs bad, ths
spirit is ss good as ever. There will be
no intoxicating drinks and no smokes
by way of attraction, but there will be
some excellent addresses, music and
songs. In addition, tha parliamentary
committee of the Council havs decided
thst ths meeting is ths psychological
moment to start ttelr municipal election
campaign. And thsy will bs there with
bells on, The candidates too will be
there, ready to demonstrate their fit
asd properness for ths distinction
which hss been conferred upon them.
It is expected that they will address the
gathering on the subject of labor being directly represented on the dty
councU. This feature alone should be a
notable event ln the history of the
councU, Altogether the meeting should
be weU worth while for sll union men
seriously Interested ln the affairs and
future of the movement. Bo don't for.
get, Saturday, December 6th, Labor
Temple, 8 p. m.
UNEMPLOYED   IN   THE   WEST.
Report Made to the Department of Labor by Fair Wage Officers.
Ottawa, Nov. SM.—That conditions of
employment in Western Canada are,
generally speaking, no worse than In
eastern centres is the gist of a report
on labor conditions in the west prepared by Messrs. McNiven and Hood,
fair wage officers of the Department of
Labor here. Many of those affected by
unemployment are Austrians and Germans who will be provided for by internment regulations. Owing to the
shutting down of mines and lumber
camps Alberta and British Columbia
have perhaps suffered most by lack of
work. In Alberta 9,000 miners are out
of work, the production having fallen
30 per cent. At Winnipeg are 3,000
men, mostly unskilled, out of work, In
Saskatoon, and Moose Jaw 900, in Calgary 1.000, In Reglna 1,000, In Edmonton 4,000. in Vancouver 8,000 and In
Victoria 8,000.
Foster Is Re-elected
Robert Foster, president of District
28, U. if. W. of A., covering Vanconyer
Island, has been re-elected by a vote
of three to one. j
THE RICH AND
Noted Journal Strips Some
Hypocrisy from
Charity.
The Rich Are Rich Because
the Poor Are
Poor    m.
NATIONAL BANKS.
T. and ii. Congress of Canada BnggssS
Systsm of Nations) Banks.,
Following is a resolution, introduced
and concurred in at the St. John convention of the Trades and Labor of
Canada, by Delegate Joe Wall, of Montreal:
"Whereas—This congress believes
that the real financial stringency and
industrial, depression in Canada at the
present time are due mainly to the
close-fisted and short-sighted policy of
our Canadian banks in peremptorily denying legitimate credits to the people
notwithstanding the fact that the dominion government in its recent emergency session, came to the relief of the
banks by making their notes legal tender, arranging for re-discounts to protect and help the bdnks, and otherwise
give every incentive to these public
utilities to help the public; and
"Whereas—In clearing-house transactions some of the banks refuse to accept bank notes in daily settlements,
but insist upon 'bank legale' or sold
certificates, thus preventing other better-disposed banks from taking advantage of the privilege given by statute
to issue bank notes to the extent of 15
ptr cent, excess on their paid-up capital
and reserves; and
-"Whereas—This restriction of credits, by these well-protected institutions,
means calamity to the people generally,
while at the same time the banks have
millions out on 'call' loans, out of Canada, In other words, in stock gambling
transactions; be it
"Resolved—That the dominion government be called upon to institute a
system of national banks with the sole
right to issue money."
OALGABY LABOB TICKET.
Comment of a Local Nswspapsr Un-
nsnsl and Significant.
Calgary unionists are to make strong
efforts to elect a ticket of their own at
the forthcoming municipal elections
there. Speaking editorially, the Morning Albertan of Calgary says:
The Trades and Labor oouncll has entered the municipal contest in a very
modest and sensible manner, by placing
in nomination strong candidates for the
counoil,athe school board end the hospital board. They have apparently selected from among their ablest men, and
have named two for each of the boards.
They have an Intelligent and sensible
platform for each of the contests.
Labor men have been devoting more
thought along progressive, economic
lines than most other citizens.
The wage earners should have men
upon each board who will represent
them. But not only is it to the interests of the .wage earners, it is also to
the interest of the othor members of the
community, that at least two of each
board should be from the labor circles.
The citlsens would make no mistake
in choosing a good representation of labor candidates for the different municipal bodies."
O. H. A. ETHICS.
Oermen Method Is Qnosttonsblt bnt
"Benefit Was.Obvious."
"Industrial Canada," the organ of
the Canadian Manufacturers' Association, says: "The Germans attained
their industrial superiority largely
through their remarkable organization
of employees. Though the labor unions
were powerful, strikes were almost unknown because they wero avoided by
the expedient of calling the strikers,
who were oIbo army reservists, to tho
colors. While the method was questionable, the benefit was obvious. Because the workers enjoy more liberty In
Canada is no reason why they should
make their liberty a license to do poor
work. The German workman were loyal
to their country when they produced
articles which competed successfully in
world markets. If Canadian goods are
to equal German goods, Canadian workmen must decide, of their own freo wilt,
to put their best thought and efforts
into their dally tasks."
To judge by recent statements of the
C. M. A. Canadian manufactured goods
are second to none. So what becomes
of that argument*
Banner Owns Plant.
Unlike the Federatlonist, the Industrial Banner, Toronto, owns its own
printing equipment. Three journeymen
composers, one "two-thirder,'1 one
pressman and one pressman and feeder
are kept constantly busy. If such
things can be dono in the "good" city,
it should be possible to accomplish them
here in time.
■*■?*
KtLLAMAN
« :t
French General Figures It
at More Than FVteen
Thousand DoBars
Fatigue, Cholera, Typhoid
More Devastating Than
Rifles and Cannon
This editorial from the San Francisco
Bulletin Is reproduced for the benefit
of Federatlonist readers, as timely snd
tolerant comment on a matter which is
all too much in evidence in Vancouver
just now:
"Half the charities of our day are
Eoiaoned and made bitter for their
enelciaries by the cruel injustice re-
fleeted in the use of this word. Is it
reaUy true that people with money,
with health, with education, with comfortable homes, are qualified to judge
of the morals—of the worthiness—of
others who are living in poverty!
If they ara so qualified what
footing in the world.
3ualif.es themf Is it that tbelr free*
om from eare and worry freee them
also from prejudice aad error' Are
they Uke the old Gods upon Olympus,
so far above the lower order of mortals
that they caa aee all and understand
aUf In view of the processes by
which wealth Is sometimes acquired it
hardly seems likely that this ean be
true.
- "Bnt these must be the views upon
which some dolors out of charity form
their methods. They could not use the
word 'deserving' if they did not. They
could not withhold help here, because
there was no virtue to earn it, and
give it there, where the morals of the
needy fitted better with their approval.
"Consider the vices which keep a
man poor ".nd the other vices which
tend to make him rich. Of thoee which
keep him both poor and 'unworthy'
only two or three come immediately into one'e mind—drunkenness, lasiness
and a rebeUious fondness for freedom.
This lest wae once a virtue, "but how the
man who will not put on chains of
some sort can   hardly flnd  a secure
"Of the vices whicn make a man
wealthy there is acquisitiveness,
which has been elevated into a kind of
super-virtue, selfishness, herd-heart-
edness, and social irresponsibility.
Not all wealth comes in this way, but
enough does to make the eases of undeserving rich at least counterbalance
the cases of the undeserving poor.
- "But very few charitable institutions ever ralee questions about the deserts of the rich. No one is ever turned
away from a charity ball because he
made his money In questionable ways,
or merely inherited, uselessly, money
that aome one else earned in ways
either worthy or questionable.
"No one Is ever denied what some
one recently called the 'privilege of the
rich,' of being charitable, just because
he got his money by creating and in*
tensifying poverty Only those who are
without money have their motives questioned and their characters examined,
and that for the purpose of finding out
whether they should suffer a great deal
of want and humiliation, or only a
little.
"Perhaps poor humanity—'poor' in
the sense of the dreadful poverty of
spirit that it sometimes shows-
should not be blamed too muoh for all
this. We no longer believe that bodily
suffering on earth is the best prepare*
tlon for a future Ufe, and therefore to
be counted as an asset; and apparently
some of us are driven to think, when
we .learn of suffering; that it is due to
some moral defect. Some of us, appar*
ently, go through life with the idea of
an orderly world, in which God makee
all those poor who are not very good
or very wise, and makes all those rich
who are both good and wise.
"It is comfortable to think that
way; we can stop worrying over economic injustices, and we can condemn
with an easy conscience tbe visionaries
and dreamers who look forward to a
day when no man, good or evil, will
have his powers for good diminished or
his impulse toward evil strengthened,
by privation and want.
"If we could see clearly we would
know that there is more nobility in a
loaf of mouldy bread shared by one
In need with one in greater need than
in all the charity balls that were ever
given or ever will be givon If we could
see clearly we would know tbat there
Is more true charity among tho poor
who help the poor than In the full list
of every society blue-book from New
York to San Francisco
"If we could see clearly we would
know that there are none so 'undeserving,' none so truly pauperised, as those
who live in comfort and abundnnce
end pass judgment upon tho poor and
the afflicted
"We would still give, if we had anything to give, but we would give humbly, in the knowledge tbat we were
paying only a little of a great debt, and
that the very ones to whom we give, in
having loss than ourselves, have earned
infinitely more than we the right to
call themselves charitable; and we
would look forward to a day whon no
one, least of all the over-rich, will have
to think of himself—ns the idle rich,
if they think at all—as a pauper, depending upon 'charity'."
'   TYPO. MEETING SUNDAY
Several Important Matters Up for Consideration of Membership
The regular meeting of Typographical union, No. 220, takes place next Sunday at 2 p. m. sharp. Provision for unemployed members, consideration of tbo
new newspaper scale, the quostion of
becoming a party to the arbitration
agreement of the American Newspaper Publishers', association, nnd nomination of officers for the ensuing year,
will be among the Important matters
for the* consideration of the mooting.
It is important that every printer in
town be present.
"Doctor, is lockjnw n painful affliction t"  " Unspeakably so."
In La Science et la Vie, Oen. Perein
of the French army states thst he read
in aa American newspaper that to kill
a men ia modern warfare costs in the
neighborhood of #16,000. "This figure
seeming to me to be excessive," he.
says, "I sought to verify it. My results show that reaUy ths newspaper
waa below rather than above the {rath,
To get at the cost of killing ons soldier
it is necessary to divide the coet of ths
wsr to ons of ths belligerents' by ths '
number of men killed on the other ride.
"In 1870-71 France spent about two
billions of francs in ths actual warfare
and a blUlon more in restoring lte own
property and in payments for injuries
caused to others, which ii is perfectly
fair to.tnelude In the costs. Then there
were five billions for war indemnity
and still two biUions more for. interest,
loss of revenue and seizure, by the
enemy for maintenance during the German occupation. The last may or may
not be a eost in a given war, so that it
had better be left ont of the reckoning.
In the same way the Busso-TurkisY
war of 1877-78 coet two bilUon francs
to the Turke, aad the Russo-Japanese
war, 1906, eost the Russians six billions.
In the Franeo-Prussisn war there were
18,600 Germane killed or mortally
wounded; in the Busso-Turkish war
16,600, and in the Busso-Japaneoe, 58,-
600, in the later instances, of Busslana
and-Japanese, respectively. From theee
figures it is evident that the price per
man killed to the opposlog side wae, in
1870-71, a21,000; 1877-78, tlS.OOO, aad
in 1906, $20,400, all of the figures in excess of those named in the Americas
journal.
"I rather expected wben I undertook
this calculation to find that the costs
were Increasing. On the one aide the
engines of war eost more aa they are
Rerfected. On the other hand, progreea
i the art of killing Is alwaya surpassed
by progress in the art of defence. Ths
result Is that the ratio of mea klUed or
wounded in actual battle Is continually
diminishing. This ratio was fi per eent.
under Frederick the Great, 3 per cent,
under Napoleon, 2 per cent, in 1870,
and 1*2 per cent in Manchuria.
But in 1870 there were not a dosen
great battles. The German armies
fought little between Froachwiller and
Sedan aad the French little between
Sedan and Coulmlers. The fight was
taken up again in December, but leaa
sharply than at the beginning. During
much of tbe time men did not kill, but
the expenses rfever ceased. In Manchuria, on the contrary, they fought
nearly every day. The battles were
long ones, fifteen days at Mukden,
twelve at Cha-Ho, and eight at Lino-
Yang.
This Inoreese in duration of the battles compensates for the slight loss in
any individual hour of the fight. One
may see also why the cost of a man
killed is not higher in 1905 than in
1870.
"It will be impossible to predict with
exactness how much It will cost per
man killed in the next war; the sum
wlU depend on the nature of the'
struggle. If fighting continues nearly
every day, as in Manchuria or in the
Balkans, the' cost will be approximately
the American estimate. If the battlee
are as In 1870, at rare intervals, the
cost will increase in very appreciable
ratio. It will not diminish, that is certain.
"That which kills and reduces efficiency in war is not the cennon or the
rifle, but fatigue, cholera and typhoid.
In 1870 there were registered in the
hospitals no less than 380,000 Germans,
who, although they survived, were in*
active for some time. The Crimean war
cost tbe Allies four times as many
deaths from sickness as from battle.
This ratio was three to one among
the Russians in 1877-78 and only two
to one among the Japanese, thanks to
their excellent hygiene. I count more,
therefore, on improved hygenic methods
and tbe art of avoiding losses in wur
than on -progress of ballistics and of
tbo means of destruction."
THE MEXICAN MIXUP
Boot of Whole Trouble Is the Land
Monopoly.
Thero is no middle clues comfortably
fixed to confuse the Issue in Mexico. On
ono band there is a landed aristocracy,
with a monopoly of the source of
wealth production. On the other en impoverished peasantry unable to get access to the land and therefore compelled to work as wage slaves, competing with each other for the privilege of
producing wealth for the land owners.
The peasants nro allowed barely enough
to exist; all the rest of the wealth pro*
duced by their labor goes to the privileged class.
But the Mexican common people, ignorant though they are supposed to be,
have become conscious of one fundamental fact; they aro slaves bo long as
the land Is held by monopoly interests.
The continuous revolution would seem
to prove that thoy would rather flght
than continue in bondago; and, moet
notable, those common people refuse to
be hoodwinked by political evasion.
Zapata is a rough leader, without
that debatable European accomplishment, culture. He is a leader of the
peasant class; and, with the people behind him.
Moving Coton's Weakly,
Cotton's Woekly, the well known organ ot tho Social Democratic Party of
Canada, is to be moved to Toronto, snd
tho name changed. The new name Is
not yet announced.
"Well, madam, le your husband out
of danger)" "It isn't quite sure; tne
doctor is coming again."—Le Blre. PAGE TWO
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
1
PBIDAY.. .. . .NOVEMBER 87, 1914
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L
WE ALLOW INTEREST ON DEPOSITS IN OUR
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FRIDAY NOVEMBEB 27, 1914
ALDERMAN McBEATH te making
a gallery play by advocating
the1 abolition , of  the   monthly
siilury of $100 which is now paid to
aldermen.   He is doubtless well aware
that the civic vot-
OHBAPEE 0r8'  li8t  "  chiofly
ALDERMEN *** "P °* *Pr0P6rty
owners of one kind
WANTED or another, a large
element among
whom aro feeling so mean at
the collapse of the real
tate boom that they are anxious
to "bite somebody's ear." So what
better place to start than on theBe al
dermeji, wallowing in the licentious luxury of their $100 monthly job! Doubtless it sounds sweet music to the ear of
property-glutted electors who can
neither sell their real estate nor pay the
taxes on it because they have got so
much of it. To them it must seem eminently plausible.
But from Mr. McBoath's own statement it would not appear that he is animated by any desire for cheapness. His
nominal object is to secure a more pure-
in-heart type of city father. As he
says:
I have repeatedly opposed the al-
dermanic salary on the grounds
that $100 per month is no inducement for men big enough for the
job; but is very attractive to a certain class of civic politicians who
are utterly unfitted to assume the
management of civic affairs—
while, were the position an honorary one, bigger and broader men
for whose ability the citizens
would have no occasion to blush,
would offer themselves for civic
service, men who now absolutely
refuse to seek public office under
existing conditions.
# » a    \   a
All of which soundB very lofty, nnd
breathes the 'spirit of self-sacrifice of
those white souls ever-itching to immolate themselves on the altar of public
service for the common weal.
»       *       *       *
But aB we see it, if Mr, A^eBenth's
plan succeeds, then it will be impossible
to ever secure any direct representation of the working class on the city
councU. Mr. McBeath says:
■ "There is not a member of the
council bnt could live comfortably
for some time to come at least,
without a dollar of civic salary."
Working men are not in that position. Neither would the aldermen, or
those whom Mr, MeBeatli would like to
see aldermen be, if it were not that
some workmen somewhere worked for
them. According to his argument it
would seem justifiable .to assume that
unless a man lives from rent, interest,
or profit, he is "utterly unfitted to assume the management of civic affairs."
While if be does, he can be considered
one of the "bigger and broader men,
for whose ability the citizens would
have no occasion to blush." There are
several working class aldermen in various city councils in Canada, but! we
have yet to learn that the ability
which they have brought into their
work has caused, those who elected
them to feel ashamed.
• • t •
Ono thing they have done and that
is, they havo proved a thorn in the Bide
of men of the McBeath way of thinking. Can it be that Mr. McBeath is
trying to forestall disaster of that kind
to himself! He represents a working-
class ward — Huntings townsite — although he lives on Shnughncsay
Heights. Last year he wns opposed by a
working-class candidate, but ho scraped
through. If his Bcheme proves successful, opposition of that kind will be
squashed without him being required
to prove the wisdom of electing men of
private means to reprcBont workmen.
His high-sounding phrases may pass
very well on Shaughnessy Heights. But
reduced to plain facts they mean that
h*e would, if he could, cIobc the doors of
the city council to workingmen with
enough bruins and ability to participate
MUNICIPAL DEBENTURES
OF B.C. NEVER MORE
ATTRACTIVE THAN NOW
The yields to-day ere more fnvorable to the investor thnn
nt nny time during the pnst six years.
We offer n wide rnngo of Debentures in JlOO, $500, $1,000
or larger denominations at from 84 upwards and paying 6%
to 7%.
Full particulars on request.   Send for latest list.
Canadian Financiers Trust Comr\ny
HEAD OFFICE 839 HASTINGS ST W.     VANCOUVER* B.C.
Patrick Donnelly-General Mana-f^
in civic affairs with quite as much honesty and credit as he and his present
colleagues.
AMERICAN  UNDERTAKERS are
casting an eye of trade* regret;
on the European situation.   The
etiquette of the profession prevents too
plain speech on the  part   of   men,  to
whom delicacy is a
ACtttlMLY commercial   as
set. So it would not
HUMOROUS do to be too public
DILEMMA. in expressing an op
inion likely to have
an economic reaction. In the family circle the fraternity feels more freedom to
let loose the flood of its woe ahd trouble.   A recent isBue of '' The Casket,'
the organ of the trade, contains articles
concerning "War Mortality from the
Economic Standpoint," the standpoint
in question being, of course, the undertaker's.   A choice blend of trade and
bedside deportment is the following:
The funeral director has every
reason for deploring warfare that
other people have, and lie has the
added   reiison   that   although   the
death rate greatly increases, there
is no opportunity for his good services,   resulting  in   a  disgraceful
burial for the dead, grief for the
deceased, and idleness for.the undertaker who is powerless to give
the dead a decent interment or to
snrry   consolation   to . those   who
mourn.
The situation must be tantalizing despite the grim humor of it. The
thought arises as to, what change of
heart would take place if all .the bodies
of those killed could, by some means,
come into the undertakers hands for
conventional burial. It seems a little
unkind to consider such a possibility
too curiously, but the urge of economic
interest leads to strange places. Even
those who live by death must live, and
business is business.
TAYLOR
SYSTEM
V^XLD TIME FACTORY OWNERS
\J thought the beBt way to get-the
most for their money out of
their workmen was to work them always to the limit of endurance and pay
them starvation
wages. That was the
short-sighted policy
Of the early manu-
OUTDONE facturers,   intoxica
ted with the profit
making possibilities of the newly discovered mechanical aids to industry.
But bye and bye, in their wake, came
much longer-headed generation, who
could see that a half-starved workman
could not produce, nearly as much as
one properly fed. Wherefore aroBe a
type' of utilitarian philanthropist of
the Lever and Cadbury school, equipped
with rules and plans for the regulation
of the lives of employees, in all mat-
tera pertaining to the bodily and mental fitness necessary to make them more
contented and efficient wealth producers. In place of the old-fashioned haphazard, hotch potch ways, has come
organization, system, regulation, subdivision and specialization of labor, all
to the end that the highest productive
capacity of the worker may be expressed, in greater product with correspondingly greater profits.
*       «       *       »
Schemes and systems, having in view
that object, have followed each other
with amazing quickness and marked
by ingenuity positively devilish in cunning contrivance. The "Taylor System, '' when it came, was felt to be
the last word in such things. It dissected every movement of a workman
at work, like the diBpasBionnte scalpel
of an anatomist separating the organs
nnd nerves and tissues of a human
body, to show why and how a living
man could do this and that, and thus
and so. It applied the unimpeachable
test of. photography through the cine*
matagraph to the shoveling of a laborer, the mechanic at his bench, and
the girt weaver at her loom. It seemed
to express the limit of curiosity in the
expert searcher for hidden sources of
profit. But now comes one better. It
is called tho Museum of Devices for the
Elimination of UnnecesBnry Fatigue. It
hails from Providence-r-not above—but
Rhode Island. It is due to the scientific
invostigntions of nn eagle-eyed youth
looking for latent and elusive productiveness in workers, with a microscope,
tt has been discovered thnt standing,
for instance, absorbs part of a worker's strength, which can be conserved
in many occupations by the use of a
chair, and ultimately expressed in increased productiveness. So among the
devices is a chair fitted with spring
shock -absorbers to prevent tho devitalizing    effect of vibration    upon    the
As explained in the Scientific American it is put thus:
Ask any manufacturer to walk
through his plant and spend a half
day himself making a fatigue survey; that is, deciding juBt what fatigue the work done in his'plant is
causing, and what proportion*>f it
is actually necessary or productive.
It is all part of the modern commercial policy of striving   with   scientific
persistency, to arrive nt the minimum
amount of labor necessary to the maximum   amount   of   product.   This kind
of   thing   is   going   on   all the time.
And while it pursues its abaolutely non-
human course, trade unions can be Been
wrangling over jurisdiction claims, involving some kind of work, which will
quite likely have parsed into the Umbo
of discarded processes before the squabble is settled.   It is to laugh.
British Columbia has actually bought
hundreds of its unemployed by paying
the Salvation Army and other immigration concerns bonuses to bring men and
women here.
•WUTCH SOCIALISTS, doubtless
I J with the beBt of intentions, are
making an energetic effort to
call a conference of the International
Socialist Bureau to meet at the Hague
next month, M.
PROPOSED Troelestra, c h a ir-
„«„,..,„„- man of the Dutch
SOCIALIST 	
section,   ib  visiting
CONFERENCE various countries for
the purpose of organizing the gathering He is supported in his efforts by the socialists of
America and other countries not involved in the war If the success of
such a plan would lay the foundation
of lasting peaee, nothing would be
more desirable than to see it carried
out But the question arises whether
the present moment promises the beBt
results from a gathering of that kind,
The national pasBious aroused by the
war Beem for the time being to have
obscured the broader and international
aspect of the working class position.
Without entering into '-liie rights or
wrongs bf the action of socialists ih
any one of the countries at war, the
outstanding fact in the situation is that
there is a great deal of ill-feeling existent.
# •   ■ #       t      «
Moreover, there is every likelihood
thnt auch feeling will remain at high
pitch as long as war is actually going
on between thV'VariouB nations which
woulcTbe represented at the conference,
While thnt lasts it would most likely
be that even if the gathering did convene,'its sessions would be marked by
a great deal of bitter recrimination,
which would only make matters worse.
Delegates would probably leave with
no more kindly feelings than they
brought. That would not improve the
chances of holding a real conference
when the war is over and feeling has
begun to subside. In a word, it seems
hopeless to expect much good from such
a meeting as is now proposed, while the
men who would be represented" through
the delegates are actually engaged killing or trying to kill each other. That
is most likely the view of M. Longuet,
who, writing in L'Humanlte, says the
scheme is premature. That opinion
loses nothing from the account of the
visit of Leibknecht and other German
socialists to Belgium thiB month, when
they met with a very cold reception
from leaders of the Belgian party.
Taken altogether, the signs are not
propitious for a conference now. When
the war is ended, the situation will be
difficult enough to handle without endangering 'the success of that gathering by attempting to hold one now
while human judgment is so much influenced by the horrors of, the past
three months.
DEAN INGE, the well-known English cleric, who is dean of St.
Paul's, London, has been making some unusual sermona about the
war sinoe it began. A while ago when he
preached   in   West*
DEAN OTOE'S      1»in8ter  Abbey'   wo
SERMONS AND
found     reason     to
comment   upon   his
INVESTMENTS,   peculiarly     gloomy
/ style. He has been
at it again. This time at Manchester. He
declared thnt the ruin of Belgium was
the outcome of devil-worship and barbarity. He made it very plain that ho
considered Nietzsche and his philosophy had done incalculable harm to the
cause of human progress, nnd argued
the cause of Christianity against him
in trenchant fashion. In his opinion, if
the, world had not drifted so far away
from the Church and the spirit of its
teaching, the horror now in Europe
would not have been possible. He
seems to be a queer old chap this dean.
Certainly he has his own original way
of looking at things. *
•        •        •        •
We have to confess,we cannot exactly figure out where he stands. Vide-
ers limited, is one of tlip most powerful in the British group of armament
manufacturers. Now unless Dean Inge
has unloaded his shares in Vickers' recently he iB Btill a .shareholder in that
firm, aB also are the Bishop of Chester
and the Bishop of Newcastle. The same
applies to Armstrong, Whitworth nnd
company, in which Dean Inge is still
a shareholder unless he hns disposed of
his holdings recently. Up to the outbreak of war those firms had working
understandings with international armament firms through the Harvey United
Steel company, limited. The throe German firms in the group wore Actien
Gesollschnft der Dillinger Huttinwirko,
Essen, nnd Frederick Krupp. It ia distinctly funny to flnd this follower of
the lowly Nazarene expressing fear
that Westminster Abbey and other of
London's sucrcd fanes may be damaged
by the fire of big guns, when he haa
been deriving part of his income
from tho manufacture and sale of Buch
things. It would be a delightful lesson
in the art of casuistry to hear the reverend gentleman defending the moral
aspect of his investments
A BIG DIFFERENCE will be noted
between the Mexican war and
the war in Europe in its effect
upon  the  common  people   In  Europe
great   suffering   has   come   upon   the
poorer     ,clnsseB,
MEXICO among whom many
are actually starv-
AND ing to death.   The
EUROPE richt    on the . con
trary, have Buffered
little, beyond a reduction in income.
In Mexico, however, the poor have Buffered comparatively little from the war,
while the rich have had to.
a * * #
One cause for this difference is the
fact that the peon was already living
at the point of bare subsistence.   Any
change waB sure to bring relief.   The
rich, however, had been bo oppressive
that despoiling them seemed the aim-
t
plest form of justice. The question 'now
seems to be to find a man who will Bet
up an administration ln favor of the
mass of the people, the peon poor. This
cannot be done except at the expense
of the beneficiaries of tlie present system, and they are not going to relinquish their hold until they are compelled to do so.
• • • •
Had the United States or any other
country used force to restore order in
Mexico, it would have meant nothing
less than the restoration of this clasB
to power, with another revolution at
the earliest opportunity. Aa it iB, the
people have been able to make a new
estimate of each other.. The privileged
class now knows tke peons can and will
fight, and the peons know their oppressors can be whipped.
The wages of singlo men working on
the civic relief work at Burnaby will
be board and bunk—"bunk" is good.
They will -clear the top side of the
cemetery to avoid getting on the underside.
One black-listed champion of the union miners of Vancouver Island, is trying to bent the slow starvation squeeze
of the operators by taking up a piece of
land on which, to quote one of his fellow unionists, it would be impossible to
raise anything, "even a disturbance."
If you like to '' pray for them that
despitefully use you," do it. But for
Heaven's sake don't vote for them.
Of course we should never have
thought bf it that way, but the Scientific American says: "War is indeed a
splendid device for bringing out commercial pettiness."
Premier McBride came back from
England last Tuesday. He guve out his
usual string of windy platitudes about
railways and reciprocity, but not a word
did- he mention about the appalling conditions prevailing throughout the province. Men, women and children starving.   He should worry.
The war has not ended all industrial
disputea, as the British Board of Trade
reports that twenty-three took place in
September, .involving 13,025 workpeople. A shortage of agricultural laborers is reported owing to the large number of enlistments. There ia a general
decline in employment, most marked in
the pig-iron, tinplate, textile, and pottery trades,
Last Monday night 435 unemployed
men of Burnaby appealed to the municipal council for relief work. The
reeve practically stated that, as the unemployed had not been able to pay
their taxes bocause they were unemployed they would not be able to employ themselves because there waB no
money in the treasury to pay themselves with.
It would never do to let labor itself
say what waa the matter with it, what
it wanted and what would content it.
That would simply result in confusion,
for labor as a whole doesn't know. If
it did, Rockefeller would have no need
to spend $100,000,000 to find out, chiefly
because he wouldn't have it to spend,
and there would not be nnything to discover anyhow.      •-
'Constant Reader."—No, we do not
think Joe Martin cures a brass button
about being mayor next yonr. But he
is going to run for either the provincial
or federal parliament-Hind maybe
both—-at next election. If he comes to
the conclusion that the mayoralty would
be a useful stepping-stone to either
place, he will run for it—providing he
can be practically assured of election.
The New York Board of Aldermen
instructed- the bureau of standards to
prepare an estimate shewing what was
a living wage in New York city. The
finding of the bureau is that $1,200 is
a living wage. That should be useful
information to millions whose yearly
wage is less than $500. The average
yearly income of all who work for
wagea—-including salaried officials—was
leaa than $700 in the United States last
year.
NEW BREWERY IS
MOST MODERN ON
PACIFIC COAST
The now brewery which the Vancouver BrewericB, limited, has been erecting on Yew street, between Eleventh
and Twelfth avenues, has been completed. It ia said to be the most complete aad modern plant, on the Pacific
const. It cost more thnn $300,000 to
build nnd is constructed of concrete,
steel and bricks, covering the greater
portion of the blosk. Tho brewing
bottles, storage tanks, bottling and
racking machinery are of the very
latest type, No expense hns uecn spared.
All storage tanks are of steel and lined
with the finest glass enamel. The beer
is consequently protected and kept
clean from the time the malt and hops
nre boiled to 'the time the bottle, is em-
tied by the consumer. No hand
touches the beer. Copper, glass and seasoned wood nre used to hold the beer
and convey it from one machine to the
other. The storage cellars hold 30,000
barrels of beer, amounting to 18,000,000
bottleB, and tho beer is aged for from
three to four months. The moat impressive thjng about the plant is its cleanliness and freedom from all dust, dirt or
grime. All processes are clean, the machinery is swift, 86.000 bottles being
filled, crowned, labelled and delivered
to the packers in the nine-hour day. Every employee of the brewery is a member in good standing of tbe International Brewers' union.
MINARD'S LINIMENT CURES
DIPHTHERIA
COLUMBIA
OPTICAL PARLORS
Lorn* P. Mcintosh
Eyesight Specialist
619 GRANVILLE STBBBT
Seymour 7075
3VW(
PROVWOIAL UNIONS
C. FEDERATION OF LABOR—
Meets ln annual convention in January. Executive officers, 1914-15: President, A. Watchman; vice-presidents, W.
F. Dunn, Jaa. H. McVety, O. H. Fraeer,
J. W. Gray, H. Knudaon, J. J, Taylor, B.
Simmons. Secretary-treasurer, A. 6.
Wells, Box 1638, Victoria, B.O.	
NBW WESTMINSTER, B. C.
NSW WESTMINSTER TRADES AMD LA-
BOR  Council—MeeU every aeoond tad
fourth Wednesday ftt'8 p. m. in Libor hall.
President, H. Knudson; flnanolal seoretary,
R. A. Stoney; general aeeretary, W. E.
Maiden. P. O. Box 984. The public-b invited to attend.
PLUMBERS AND STEAMFITTERS' LOOAL
No. 486—Meets every aeoond and fourth
Frldav of month in Lioor lull, 7:80 p. m.
President, D. Webster; seoretiry, A, McLaren. P. O. Box 956, New Westminster,
B. O.
VICTORIA, B. O.
VICTORIA  TRADES  AND  LABOR  OOUNOIL—-Meets flrat and third Wednesday,
Labor hall, 781 Johnston street, at 8 p. m.
President A. 8. Wells; secretary, Thos. F.
Mathlson, Bof 802, Victoria. B. O.
KIMBERLEY MINERS' UNION, NO. 100,
Western Federation of Minera—Meets
Sunday evenings In Union hall. President,
Alex. Wlbon; secretary-treasurer, J, W.
Stewart, Klmberley, B. 0.
del
N JOWLS
esnoobaceo.
Jn ihe hurl ol ihe -retail district,. Absolutely
reproof and modem in every respect. Cuisine'
unexcelled. European plan, $1 to $3 per day.
FREE AUTO 'BUS MEETS AU TRAINS.  Owned ut
operated by   The Provincial  Holela   Company.  Limited.
HOWARD I SH_EEHjW1, Plata
Phone:  Fairmont S10
Patterson & Chandler
Manufacturers of
MONUMENTS
Vaults, Curbing, Etc.
Offloe and Worki:
Cor. 16th Ave. and Main St.
Branch Offlce: 40th A Fraser Avea.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
City Auction and Commission Co.
Cash paid for houses end suites
of furniture or Auetton arranged.
Satisfaction fcaarenteed, prompt
settlements.
ARTHUR 8. BETOHLET
Smythe and Granville Streeta
Auctioneer Phone Sey. 9878
SOUTH WELLINGTON
SCREENED LUMP
COAL
$6.50
In ION LOIS, USUAL LIMITS
Phone Seymour 2930
EOS PENDEB STBEBT
DOMINION FUEL CO.
8YNOP8I*   OF   COAL   MINING   REGULATIONS
Coal mining rights of the Dominion,
In Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,
the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Ter*
rltorles and In a portion of the Province
of British Columbia, may be leased for
a term of twenty-one yean at an annual
rental of $1 an acre. Not more than
2,660 acres will be leased to ont applicant.
Applications for lease must be made bj
the applicant In person to the -Agent or
Sub-Agent of the district In which the
rights applied for are situated.
In surveyed territory the land must be
desorlbed by sections, or legal subdivisions of aectione, and In unsurveyed territory the tract applied for ahall be
staked by the applicant hlmaetf.
Bach application must be accompanied
by a fee of IB, which will be refunded if
the rights applied for are not available,
but not otherwise, A royalty shall be
paid on the merchantable output of the
mine at the rate of five cents per ton.
The person operating the mine shall
furnish the Agent with sworn returns
accounting for the full quantity of merchantable ooal mined and pay the royalty thereon. If the coal mining rights
are not being operated, auch returns
Bhould be,furnished at least once a year.
The leaae will Include the coal mining
rlghta only, but the len«ee may be permitted to purchase whatever available
surface rlghta may be considered necessary for the working of the mine at the
rate of 110 an acre.
For full Information application should
be made to the Secretary of the Department of the Interior, Ottawa, or to any
Agent or Sub-Agent of Dominion Lands
W, H. CORY,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N. B.—Unauthorised publication of thla
.advertisement will not be paid for—30690
VANCOUVER UNIONS
TRADES AND LASOR COUNCIL —
Meeta 0r»t and thlM Thuredaye. Ett.
outlve board: Jaa. H. McVety, president;-
Frank Estinghauter, vice-president: Oeo.
Bartley, general eecretary, 210 Labor
Temple: Hies H. Outterldge, treaeurer:,
Fred A. Hoover, statistician; sergeant-
at-arms, John Sully; O. Curnock, F.
Knowles, W. R. Trotter, truetees.
LABOR TEMPLE COMPANY, LTD a
Directors: Fred. A. Hoover, J. H.
MoVety, James Brown, Edward Lothian,
James Campbell, J. W. Wilkinson, R. P.i
Pettlplece, John McMillan, Murdoch McKenzle, F. Blumberg, H. H. Free.
Managing Director, J. H. MoVety, Room
ALLIED  PRINTING  TRADES    COUNCIL—Meets  second   Monday  In  the
month.    President,  Geo.  Mowat;  secretary, F. R. Fleming, P.O. Box 66.
BAKERS' AMD CONFECTIONERS' LOOAL
,   UnaM No. tt—Meeta second tm
■UExrafl E '""-r"*   Be-urdaya  st  TM
Ol_f__tit P. tn.   Preaident, H. G. Lee*
oBtMCE worthy;  correaponding aec-
^^011*1 ""*''■  R   J   Adema:   bual-
iSRiJI SSi',*-!™-. 3. Blaok,
820 labor Tempi..
BARBERS'    LOCAL    No.    120.—MEET!
IHii.ii™. -A'.! .    B£uoe; reecorder. C*
u„™i..       "' "• "ruce; reecoraer
E' S.ffi Ltt: »ecretery-buslness agent,   ..
HmSfr-'iW' ,RW z°8'  Lsbor  T'emple.
Hours: 11 to 1; 5 to 7 p.m.
BARTENDERS' LOCAL No. 676.-OF-
flr.,"Sf,'.S?0ln.,M %,bor Temple. Meet*
Orel.Sunday ot eaoh month. President.
*. F. Lav me; flnanolal secretary, Geo.
W. Curnook, Room 208. Ubor Temple.
BRICKLAYERS' AND MASONS'. NO. I
i „ ~"l"^lveH.1*" *"1-1 'rd Tuesday,
ii.Si".-.' Rol,m ,0?- President, Jamea
Sfi.'.'aV 2-rrespondlng secretary, W. g,
i"*5Si!!™BoJ 6?: ""enclal eecretary, F
StofSSSi J?.".""" age"*' W' "' °-
BROTHERHOOD OP BOILER MAKERS
end Iron Ship Bulldera and Helpers
of Amerlcs, Vsncouver Lodge No. 181—,
Meets tnt, and third Mondays, 0 p. m.
Preaident, P. Barclay, 9SS Cordova Ea>t;
aecret.ry, A. Frswr, 1161 Howe street.
COOKS. WAITERS AND WAITRESSES
Union—Meets Srat Friday In each month,
8:80 p. m., Labor Temple. W. B. Walkeiv
busmea. repreaentstlve. OBce: Room 206,
. •ff,.JmlS,v H-"-r"* » •■ m. to 10:>0; 1
to 2:80 and 6 p. m. to 6:00 p. m. Com.
pentent help tnrnlahed on short notlee
fhono Sey. 8414,
DISTRICT OOUNOIL OF CARPENTERS
meeta la room 209, Ubor Temple, second snd fourth Thnradny of each month, 1
n. m. President, O. H. Hardy; secretary,
F. L. Bsrratt; treaanrer, W. T. Taylor. L»
csl No. 217 meets flr.t and third Mon
day of each month, and Local 2647 meet.
Onl and. thlrd.Tn.idav ■ ol eseh month.
ELECTRICAL WORKERS. LOOAL NO. 21*
—Meeta-room 801, Labor Temple, every
Mondsy, 8: p. m. President, Dave Finkf
vlceprea Ident, M. Ssnder; recording see'
ret.ry, Roy Sign, Labor Temple;  dnsnelal
!*"!L°"!,r,!','"¥1 t"*'l™ ■"■'>■■•• E* H. Morrison
room 207, Labor Temple.
ELECTRICAL WORKERS, LOCAL NO.
.kiJ2!» Si™14" Mon)-Meeti flrst and
third Mondays of each month. Room 206,
« p. m. Preeldent, H. R. Van Sickle: re-
SErHLfWytt'. "• Campbell; business agent, F. L. Estinghausen, Room 20T.
HODCARRIERS, BUILDING AND OOMMOl
.•.. jH-^f"1 !nl™l No- ••!—Meets «rat am
third Friday of eseh month, Labor Temple
Preaident, George Gibson; secretary, Oeorgl
Harrison, room 220, Lsbor Temnle. All lab
orera Invited to meeting.
MACHINISTS. NO. 182—MEETS BEOONI
snd fourth Frldy. at 8 p. m.   President.
A.   R.    Towler:    recording    secretary.    J
Brookes: Unsocial sscretary, J. H. McVety
MOVINO PICTURE OPERATORS. Lo.
cal 848 I. A. T. S. E.—Meets Bnt Son
dsy of eseh month, Labor Tem
pie, 8 p.m. President H. C. Roddan; sec
retary-treasurer. L. E. Goodman: re,
^",L"e.ori>!fr^A- °- Haneen: busl
ness agent, G. R. Hamilton. Offlce
Room 100, Loo Bldg.   Tel. Sey. 3045.
MUSICIANS' MUTUAL PROTECTIVI
Union. Ucal No. 146, A. F. of M.-
Meets second Sunday of eaoh month
rooms 16-80, WHIIame Bulldlng7418 GraV?
vllle street. President, J. Bowyer: vloe,
__}*& /' Em.»"!!J. eecretary, H. J
Brasfleld; treasurer, W. Fowler.
0PESf,T-5YF PLASTERERS' INTERNA
TIONAL ASSOCIATION, No. 80 -
Meeta every «rat and third Wedneida]
In the month In room 801, Labor Temple
Prcaldont, A. Hurry: coinspondlng aeoretary
F. Suniftcr. I860 Traity-third svenno ea.u.
flnanclal aeoretary, D. Scott, 677 Richard!
atreet; treasurer,   L.   Tyaon.
PAINTERS',. PAPERHANGERS'. ANll
Decorators', Local 188—Meets ever!
Thursday, 7.30 p.m. President, H. Orandl
financial secretary, J. Freckleton, 102|
Comox street: recording secretary, IT
Dowdlar 622 Howe street. Buslnesl
agent, James Train, Room 303, Labo!
Temple. *
PATTERN MAKERS' .LEAGUE .0*
NORTH AMERICA.—Vancouver anl
vicinity. Branch meets 1st and 3rd Frll
days at Labor Temple, room 205. Robert
C. Sampson, Pres., 747 Dunlevy Ave.f
Jos. G. Lyon, flnanolal secretary, 17-jL
Grant street; J. Campbell, secordlng seel
retary, 4869 Argyle Btreet. ■
STEREOTYPERS' AND ELECTROTYPI
era' Union, No. 88, of Vancouver anff
Vlotoria—Meeta second Wedneaday ot
eaoh month, 4 p. m., Labor Temple. PreslI
dint, Chai. Bayley; recording aecretar"
A. Birnle, o.o. "News Advertiser."        '
STREET AND ELECTRIC RAILWAlL
Employees, Pioneer Division No. I Oil
—Meets Lnbor Temple second and fourtljf
Wednesdays at 2 p.m., and first nny|
third Wednesdays, 8 p.m. President*!
W. H. Cottrell; recording secretary*
Albert V. Lofting, 2661 Trinity street!
financial secretary and business agent!
Fred. A. Hoover, 2409 Clark Drive.
STEAM  ENGINEERS,   INTERNATION-
al Local 897—Meeta every Wednesday!
• p. m., room 104, Labor Temple. Klnan-]
clal secretary, B. Prendergaat. room 616.1
TAILORS' INDUSTRIAL UNION (INj
ternatlonal). Looal No. 178—Meetings!
held flrst Tuesday In each month, 8 p. m.l
President, Miss H. Gutteridge: recording!
secretary, C. MoDonald, Box 601: flnan-i
clal Bee, K. Paterson. P. O. Box 608
THEATRICAL STAGE EMPLOYEES. LO-J
• CAL No. 118—Meets aecond Sunday of*
each, month at room 204, Labor TempIeJl
Preaident, H. Sneers; recording aecret.ry,!
Oeo. W. Allln, P. O. Bos 711, Vancouver.    "
TYPOGRAPHICAL    UNION,    NO.    116-
Meets last Sunday of each month at 31
S. m. Pre.id.et, B. P. P.tllpl.«o; vle.-pr.rt-f
cut, W. S. Metsstr: s.er.tsry.treHur.r, R.I
H. Neetsnds, P. O. Boa 66.
Phone Yonr Printing Order
TO	
SEYMOUR 4490
More Light and Better Light for
the Home
USE TUNGSTEN LAMPS.
Thlt It advised » the Tungtttn Limp glvti thret timet tht
tmount of light ef ■ oarbon lamp on tht ttmt consumption tf
current.
USE CONTINUOUS WIRE DRAWN FILAMENT LAMPS.
Thlt typt it tht only ctttt of Tungtttn Lamp you ihould ute. Don't
fall to atk for It Whin you buy Tungtttnt.  It bears thl same rtli-
tio* to othtr typti of Tungtttnt at doei thi bill grada of ttttl to
WE CARRY AT OUR SALESROOM! A PULL LINE OF THE
• BEST TYPE OF TUNGSTEN LAMPS AS NOTED ABOVE. OUR
PRICES ARE EXCEPTIONALLY LOW WHEN THE HIGH STANDARD OF OUR LAMPS IS CONSIDERED.
Atk our cltrk to dimonttrttt for you tht dlfftnnet between a
Tungtttn and Cirbon Lamp uilng tht umt amount of currant,
Cansll sgd
Ha.tmgi Street
B.C. ELECTRIC
H3SC.ss-ill.Sl.
Nsw Davit ■FRIDAY NOVEMBEB 27, 1914
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
I
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
Stanfield's  Uuderwear and
Spencer's Prices
STANFIELD'S NATURAL WOOL DNDEEWSAE—Medium weight,
elastie rib; a very popoler line—
Slaea to 12 11.85
Siio.MtoSO |l.7t
Combinations, sises to 43.... 18.00
STANFIELD'S LOGGER UNDERWEAR—Heavy grey.   Sises te 44.
STANFIELD'S HEAVY WEIGHT NATURAL LLAMA WOOL UNDERWEAR—Per Garment $1.75
STANFIELD'S CREAM LLAMA WOOL ELASTIC RIB UNDERWEAR—Hesvy weight.   Per gsrment     18.00
Combinations 16.00
STANFIELD'S FULL WEIGHT NATURAL WOOL UNDERWEAR—
 J 51.50
Combination.. 58.00
STANFIELD'S HEATT LOGGER UNDERWEAR—Blue Label
 11.75 •
STANFIELD'S BLAOK LABEL—Heavy weight, pure wool underwear ' .;* 68.00
STANFIELD'S SILK AND WOOL UNDERWEAR—Cream, medium
weight.   Per garment 18.00
Combinations 64.06
STANFIELD'S HEATT WEIGHT WOOL UNDERWEAR—Red label
   ;  61,50
Comblnatlona..... ,  8H.0O
David Spencer Limited
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
VANCOUVER
MAIN STREET
APPLES
Are now at their best and cheapest. Your choice of
No. 1 Apples at $1.00 per Box. Cooking Apples all
varieties very low prices.
POTATOES
Potatoes are now at their best for winter storing. Highland, well graded, 85 cents per Sack.
DRESSED POULTRY
Prices are very low this season, also butter and eggs
Auction Sales are Held
Every Tuesday and Friday, at 10 a.m.
SPECIALS EVERY SATURDAY
UNION PEWTERS' HOME
MilUoa-doller   InttttnUon   lltlnttlntd
TV Printers at Colorado Springs.
This institution is situated at Color
rado Springe, Col., contiguous to Pike's
Peak, and in a country enjoying a reputation that ia world-wide for the salubrity and curative quality of its climate. The building, waa erected and
furnished in 1892 at a cost of $70,000,
every cent being paid on completion—
an almost unprecedented occurrence in
the history of benevolent institutions.
'Not only was it free from debt, but a
surplus of over $13,000 was in bank to
the credit of the fund. With the »cep-
tion of the unsolicited gift of $10,000
to the union from the multi-millionaires,
the late Oeorge W. Quids, of the Philadelphia Ledger, and Anthony J. Drexel,
of the international banking firm of
Drexel, Morgan & Oo., as an appreciation of the worth of the organization,
this building was erected by the efforts
of the union printers of America. A
hospital annex was erected at a cost of
$40,000 at a later date; then a library
addition, laundry and boiler plant, superintendent's cottage, greenhouses,
barns, lawns, etc., were added. In 1912
a tuberculosis pavilion, accommodating
twenty patients, and costing with furn
ishings $10,000, was added to the sane
torlum. The home is situated on eighty
acres of land donated by the citizens of
Colorado Springs, and this land is rapidly increasing in value. The property
is now set down by conservative Colo*
rado real estate men as being worth at
least $1,000,000, an evidence that the
Indianapolis Journal was entirely within the truth when it said "the Typographical union had proven itself equal
to every emergency that confronted it
during a long and useful career." The
International Typographical union has
expended in nineteen years in building
and maintaining the Union Printers'
Home more than $1,250,000!
BELGIAN CONSTITUTION
In Somo Ways Milts Ahead of tht Do.
minion of Canada,
D^'5?»*—
Braids
Best
Coffee
Did You Get Yours
This Morning?
BRAID'S
BEST
.   COFFEE
LUDWIG THANK'S END
One of the BeBt Known German Socialists Killed.
Dr. Ludwig Frank, who waa killed In
a battle at Luncville, was one of the
beBt socialist orators and writers in Germany, and waB always in demand at
party demonstrations. He was born at
Mannheim, in 1874, became a socialist
early in 1910, joined the party, and immediately saw the necessity of building
up a movement of young socialists. Accordingly the following year, he organ*
ized the flrst Young Socialists' League
in Germany, a movement that has
grown to such enormous power and size
that it has become one of the feared
institutions to the rulers of the nation,
. Dr. Frank has been a tireless worker on
behalf of the youngsters, often coming
'in unpleasant contact with the government because of the repressive measures it brought to bear against his favorite activity. Dr. Frank was also
known ua one of the most ardent anti-
militarists of Germany, making fervid
speeches in denunciation of the growing
power of the war lord.
Washington Miners
In the state of Washington the United Mine Workers' union has signed an
agreement with the IsBaquah Superior
Coal Mining company in which the contract between the union and the Washington Coal Operators' association is
recognized. It is further agreed that
house rents shall be the same as prior
to December 1, 1013, and that other local conditions remain the same with the
exception that drum men shall receive
$3 per day; rock hoisters, $2.00 por
day; washer mon, a minimum of $2.90
per day.
THB WAB IV COLORADO.
Prominent Journal Bays Nation Unit
Bun Mines.
The crisis in the Colorado coal fields
has ceased to fill much space' in the
newspapers since the army screwed
down the lid and sat upon it. Colorado's problem, nevertheless, 4s still as
unsettled as it was six months ago. The
miners seem to have done their best to
make peace: they consented to the
three years' truce proposed by /President Wilson, which the mine owners rejected.
Both sides have nourished black, bitter hatreds,, but the miners, who have
suffered most, are. willing tb make concessions if the interests of the community demand it. Only the operators, who
seem to be the real anarchists of Colorado, still refuse to recognize the community's right to industrial peace and
industrial justice.
If the mine owners really owned the
mines—really possessed a moral right
to them—the community might let them
flght it out with their employees, giving its sympathies to the side that
seemed to need them. But the fact happens to be that the mines belong to the
I people of the United States, that they
| are privately operated only by the people 's Buff ranee, and that the people
have the right to fix tho conditions under which they shall be operated, or to
take them over bodily.
There seems to be very little doubt
that this final step will eventually have
to be taken.—San Francisco Bulletin
Belgium has a constitution dating as
far back as 1830 which guarantees free-
j dom of conscience, a free press, a free
education and the right of freedom of
meetings.
It is in advance of Canada in the respect that 76 senators are elected for
eight-year terms and 26 appointed by
the provincial governments. Its 166 representatives are elected for four years,
half of the number every two years,
and they receive, besides railway mileage, $800 a year.
In their electoral franchise every Belgian of over 25 years is entitled to one
vote, but married men of over 35 have
two votes, and there is a property qual-
■ ification by which certain citizens may
exercise three votes.
As an offset to this plural voting,
Belgium has proportional representation, making it possible for the minor
ity to 'get representation. The govern
, mental system is in all essential respects similar to Canada, the cabinet
being chosen from the senators and representatives and the lieutenant-governors being appointed by the central
authority the same as they are in Canada.
i If the Belgians came to Canada in
large numbers they would have little or
1 no radical changes in the systems of
government to acquaint themselves
with.
WfiTlTT  PPfiPNT Absolutely Fireproof.   Local and Long-Distance
l-MllmU AUUCilll   phone In Every  Room.Cafe in Connection. Ratos
il.00 per day up.      Attractive Rates to Permanent Guests.
ottinf ham * Butty, Froprlttori ISO Haitian Strsst Bast
WM TURNER
906 Granville St
Nest to the Market
-DEALER IN-
New and second-hand China, Crockery, Furniture,
Hardware and Stoves. Furniture moving and shipping. Telephone us when you have furniture for
sale. Highest prices paid.
TELEPHONE SEYMOUR 3745
25% OFF ALL TRUSSES THIS MONTH
BED STAR DRUG STORE.
i Cordova Street West Vancouver, B. C.
Oh, Mr. Conductor!
Tlie other day n young lady carrying
n very small baby boarded a street car.
By and by the conductor came around
to collect the fares, and the lady tendered him a dollar. He looked at her and
said, "Is that your smallest?" The
lady blushed and said, "Yes; I've been
married only n year."
A War Song.
Sing a song of conflict
Feoling running high
Thirteen million soldiers
Going forth to die;
When the war is over,
\fill the widows sing,
"Wasn't it a privilege
To perish for the kingf'
■Life.
Wages and Baths ln Chicago.
There are 357 families totalling 1,596
persons, of whom 805 are children, living in one block in a Chicago tenement
district, the bureau of social survey reports.
the investigators found only eight
bathtubs in the block—an average of
one tub for each 200 people. Forty-six
persons have the eight bathtubs, the remaining 1,550 having no tubs at all.
More than one-fourth of the families
live in three room apartments and have
only one bedroom. Wages of the householders were found to average $12.27
a week.
Headquarters for A. F. of L.
The recent convention of the A. F.
of L. instructed the executive council
to provide a home of its own for the
American Federation of Labor. .The officers are given wide latitude in the
matter, and are permitted to cither purchase or construct an office building.
The question has been discussed for
years, and tbo executive council hns
devoted much time to the subject,
which bocomes more pressing for a solution as the continued growth of the
A. F. of L. tests the facilities of the
present quarters in the Ourav building
at Woshington, D. C.
Beaetion Would Puih Back the Hands
of Time.
The social depths are breaking up.
All the mental and physical foundation
of things as they have been is crumbling as the foundations of supposedly
impregnable forts crumble under the
mighty siege guns.
Not alone in the midst of tbe powder,
smoke are great forces, fighting for mastery. Reactionary influences that for
more than a century have been driven
back to their oaves are returning to assert their -right to rule and curse the
world. ' Not alone in Europe, but even
more in this country, the rise of militarism, autocracy, class arrogance and
opposition to democracy, furnish signs
that unless a fierce counter-attack upon
these forces Is made at once, mankind
will be compelled to flght over again
the victories gained for progress during
the last century.
Tet we are at the cross roads. If the
bars are down that lead back to the society of ten generations gone, the road
is also wide open, wider and freer than
ever before, to the establishment of all
the things of which the world has only
dared to dream and hope for. If the
bursting shells of war have broken the
props to which the newly erected structures of* democracy still looked for support,' they have also torn up the very
foundations of the outgrown institutions and cleared the ground for building.
We are at the fork of the roads. The
powers of privilege know which way
they wish to go. Their forces are always mobilized for action. The press-
ure downward and backward is constant. All the inertia of society works
with those who would have things as
they are or were.
If this dark year is to be but the
time of preparation for a brighter day
than the world has yet known it will be
because those who wish a better time
are alert now.—Milwaukee Herald.
HIS MAJESTY THE BABY
Infant Mortality Bates in Principal
Countries Varies.
Statistics just published show that
the death rate of infants varied all the
way from 326 per 1,000 birtba in Chill
to 76 per 1,000 in New Zealand.
Bussia comes next to Chili in. the
number of children who die before they
reach the age of one year, with a total
i of 283 in each 1,000 births. Some of
1 the other countries in which 41 are now
vitally concerned present interesting
comparisons,
For each one thousand births the following countries have the given number of deaths of children before they
reach the age of one year: Austria,
222; Germany, 107; Belgium, 154;
France, 148; Canada, 140; Great Britain, 139; New South Wales, 99; Victoria, 98; Sweden, 96; South Australia,!
93; New Zealand, 76. In the United1
States the number is 149.4.
MINABD'S LINIMENT CUBES
COLDS, ETO.
ORGANIZED   LABOR   EVERYWHERE
Tbll II Our New UNION LABEL
If you bolleve in and stand for Working Claim Solidarity and really want to
assist tho Clothing Workers organize
you will rocogntie this label and demand
it from your tailor, merchant and deal-
Aik for It—roiiit on It
Crime and Jobs.
Even if a large proportion of criminals should be feeble-minded or ignorant, that does not relieve economic con'
ditions of responsibitty for crime. Ignorance and vicious environment aro
equally the result of economic conditions, as also, to a large extent at least,
may be feeble-mindcdnoss. That in the
struggle for jobs the feeble-minded
should fail is only natural) and, having
failed, should be pushed into crime, is
also naturul. Until all who* desire opportunities for work shall be assured
of them, crime will continue in spite of
all superficial tinkering.—The Public.
Further ths Horn* Industry Movement by having
thia Label appear on your printed matter.. ft stands
for good workmanship, good citisenshlp, decent
wages and tbe up-building of the olty.
ALLIED PRINTING TBADES
Composed of Typographical Union, Web Freiamen'a Union; Printing Pressmen's Union, Preaa Assistants' Union. Stereotypers' and Electrotypers' Union,
Bookbinders' Union, Photo-engravers' Union.
BERRY BROS.
Agents for
Cleveland Cycles
The -Bicycle with  tbe Beputatlon.
Full  line  of  Accessories.
Bepalra promptly executed.
63S HASTINGS ST. EAST
Phone Highland 896
A. F. of I., at 'Frisco 1916.
The A. F. of L. convention which
closed last week re-elected Samuel Gompers, Secretary Frank Morrison and
i practically all members of the executive
council.
San Francisco wins the 1915 convention of the American Federation of La-
I bor by an almost unanimous vote*.
A Case of Cold Feet.
A young lady complained about the
way her sweetheart treated her. "Why
don't you give him the mittenf" said
her chum. "Mitten, nothing," responded the forlorn one. "He doesn't
need the mitten. I had better give him
a pair of socks; he's getting cold feet."
Brother John Bunny.
John Bunny, known wherever there
are "movies," was made an honorary
member of the Detroit Motion Picture
Operators' union a week ogo Inst Wed-,
nesday night. The veteran fun maker:
was givon a life membership enrd in'
the organization. .
I Do Not Practice "Hurry-up" Dentistry
Tbe Mouth
and tba
The New
Standard. Bank
. Bldg. Blohards
I and Heatings
Seoond Ploor
Entrance
Boom 21S
Phone Bey.
4.6,7.1
OPEN
EVENINGS
TWENTY-FIVE FBB CENT. DISCOUNT TO ALL UNION
MEN OB THEIB FAMILIES
"The Lut Word
in Dentistry"
"HUBBT-UP," "cut-rate," and slipshod dentistry Is
distasteful, to say the least, to people of -refinement. In audi
an Important matter as setting the mouth In proper condition
to prepare the food for the stomach, omy the highest skill,
the most Improved methods sal the best materials should be
considered.
ONLY the most consolentlout care and the most scientific
methods are employed In my offlce. My "Nature Teeth" are
worthy successors to Nature's own. My guarantee Is plain
and sincere. I oharge nothing for examination and sdvlee. Be*
fore I established my own offlee I was In demand at the high*
est salary as a skilled operator.
"YOU SUPPBB NO PAIN" ttUABANTBED
I HEREBY GUARANTEE that all dental work
performed by me will be absolutely painless.   If the
sltghtost twinge of pain Is experienced br the pa* j
tlent no money need be paid to me, or If any haa |
been paid It will be Instantly refunded by me.
I furter guarantee tbat all crown or bridge work
or Ailing will remain ln first-class condition for a
Serlod of TEN YEARS. If any of my work becomes
efectlve during that time I wtll replace It -absolutely
FREE OF CHARGE I
Dr. HALL, "The Modern Dentist"
PANTAGES
Unequalled Vaudeville   Means
PANTAOE8   VAUDEVILLE
THREE SHOWS DAILY
8.48, 7.80, 9.15    Season's  Prlcea:
Matinee, 16c.; Evenings, ISo., SSo,
Unemployment and Crime
Chief Justice Mathers' emphaHis to
grand jury on the close connection between the nbnormnl amount of crime
and tbe nbnormnl amount of unemployment is a chullenge to nil of us to do
somo hard thinking. One has only to
approach tho subject from a fresh
angle, to come upun it, as it wero, suddenly, to see in the present lnrge volume of unemployment not only something crude and criminal, but some-
thing ridiculous.-—Manitoba Free Press..
Same in Seattle.
Several thousand unemployed men
und women arc roaming the streets of
Beattle hungry, homeless ami half-clad
and the bright minds of several of the
council nre grnvely concerned over
whether nutos shnil in the future carry
bright lights or dim lights.—Seattle
Union Record.
Seattle Unemployed Belief.
An appropriation of $2,400 to care for
unemployed men and women in Seattle
has been agreed to by the finance committee of the city council. A bill appropriating the money was recommended for passage Monday.
Hamilton Labor Candidate,
It. Rollo, independent labor candidate, Hamilton, Out., for the provincial
legislature, was only defeated by 39
votes running against Mr. Allan, conservative and mayor of Hamilton.
MINARD'S LINIMENT CUBES
DISTEMPER.
AND
JPorteri
i w»i» tarn SffiSL-^&g. |
Bedford Street Carmen.
The street car companies of New Bedford, Mass., allowed their opposition to
unionism to go so far that they issued
a statement to employees "that they
did not wish them to belong to a union." Now the attornoy gonoral has
ruled this is in violation of the state
law. *(
Killed by Bucket Blow.
Struck by an excavation bucket
while working in a trench between
Eleventh and Twelfth avenues, west of
Woodland Privc, last Tueaday morning,
a man named Delmonico suffered internal injuries which resulted in his death
at the General Hospital some four hours
later.
CENTER & HANNA, Ltd.
UNDERTAKERS
Refined Service
104t GEORGIA  STREET
One  Blook  west of Court  limine.
Uae  of  Modern  Chapel  and
Funeral  Parlora  free  to all
Patrons
PAGETHREB
Mr. Union Man
, Are yoil eating Union-made Bread, are you
helping to maintain the Union Standard of living ny
using goods produced by Union Labor!
BREWER'S X-L BREAD
has the Union Label on every loaf, and in quality
and flavor it is unexcelled.
Phone Highland 573 and we will call at your
house. ,
BREWER'S XL BAKERY,
Corner 4th Avenue and Commercial Street.
======s=    ;      '      ===== i   i 111 r ii
HEALTH li more to be deelied ud It of aien vital Importance to the'
well-Mac ud happiness ef tbe laSMdoal tban mat riebee. Poor
teeth eoonor or later mean poor health. To be healthy wo not have
the power to entallatt oar food. Before it eaa le atolartHtod; It am*
he thoroughly digested, before it ua he dlgeitod lt matt be tboroafklr
maaUgatad, and before lt eaa be maatlfated yon net bave good teeth
with whieh to aufUfate.
Owing to the strfngeney of the money market I em offering to do deatal
work et very moderate prices
Silver filling.. ..  .. .. (100
Platinitefilling..     2 00
. Gold Crowns or Porcelaine Crowns.    SOO
' Bridge-work, per tooth.         5 00
Plates..   ....   10 00
Dr. BRETT ANDERSON
Phone Seymour 5331 Offlee:  101 Bank of Ottawa BaUdlag
Halifax
Liverpool
Portland, He.
fton Portland        tttm Halifax
Deo.   1st Dee.   8rd...
Dee.   5th Dso.   eik
Dee. Uth Dee. lath....
as. "Anble," le.ooo tons, loo .	
third elm passengers.   SB. "Zealand,    ix.uuu; at. " Valeriana," 12,000, carry
flrat, aecond snd third el..., operating ander the British Pile.
Oanaaiaa PaeUo Tourist ueeplif Can to Halifax oporatad la owaeotlaa with
these salllies.
88. "Arable"—H.0O0 Ten
 oo.   "MKLAND"—11,000 Tola
 88. VADERLAKD"—12,000 Tons
0 feet lone, carries oae elsas cabin (XI) and
id," 18,000; 88. "Vatsrland," 19,000, earn
ie under th. Rpld.l. »l«
WHITE STAIf UNK
New Tork Queenetown Liverpool
Deo. 2nd.—88. "Oedrio" Dec. 9th, Mew 88. "Lapland," 19,000 tons.
Dee.  10th.—88.  "Bailie."
New York AMERICAN LINS Liverpool
PA8I BXPBBSS OKI OLAM OABIH (8) 8BBVI0B 19,000-TOV dtlAMBH
Dec. 12th.—88. "81. Paul."      Dec. 19th.—88. "Hew Tork,"
PRIVATE GREETING CARDS MUST BE
ORDERED NOW FOR ENGLISH HAILS
•XMA8 OOODS ABKIVINO EVERY DAY
AU LINES NOW BEING SHOWN
Thomson Stationery. Co., Ltd.
IAS HAtTINO. .T...T lN.t- * - VANC0'UVIRj 2 c*
lOTABLiemO IM
i HAOTINOt STREET WMT
BI8T IN THI WMT
Workers union^
UNIOWTAMP
Named Shoei arc frequently made ia Nop-
Union Factoriee—Do Not Boy Any Shoe
ao matter'what lta aame, unleu It been a
plain aad readable Impression or thie etamp.
All ahoea without tbe Unloa Stamp are
alwaya Non-Union.
BOOT A 8HOE WORKERS' UNION
246 Summer Street, Boston, Mass.
3. F. Tobla, Proa.   C. L. Blaine, Seo.-Treaa.
PENDER HOTEL -^ggyafifr-
THE POPULAR PRICED, EUROPEAN PLAN
HOTEL RITZ
VICTORIA, B.C.
. FORT ST., AT DOUGLAS
RATES 75c, $1.00, $1.26, $1.60, $2.00
O. J. LOVEJOY, MGR. FREE AUTO BUS
J. LECKIE CO., LIMITED
7SHOE
MANUFACTURERS
We manufacture every kind of
work shoe, and specialize in lines
'or miners, railroad construction,
egging, etc.
VANCOUVER
B.C.
»»et»eo»peciAt.i.v ran
"Orel a rAMILV TOAoe
tne seen wrnour t nen
VANCOUVER   tt C
SPEND TOUR SPARE TIME IN
SSABM&Bg§6MTBMPLB    FBBB
.T. N. Harvey, limited, aro this week
celcbrnting their fourth anniversary in
business here, nnd tho sixteenth year
in which Mr. Harvey has been in tho
men's clothing business. Note advertisement elsewhere. *#*
The chief difference in babies is tho
difference in their mother's personal
opinions about them.
HARRON BROS
FUNERAL   DIRECTORS  AND
EMBALMERS
,.}?y?ovy'fr1m':'>    ""d    Chapel,
1024 Qranvllle St., Phone Sey. 3M,
North   Vancouver — Onlce   anil
Chapel, 122-Slxth St. West, Phone
When You Want a
First-Class Beer
-ONE THAT TOU CAN'T BEAT AT ANT PRICE, IN ANT
COUNTRY, OET BEER WITH THIS LABEL ON. PINTS, SIX
■COR riTTT CENTS. "**
BREWED AND BOTTLED IN VANCOUVER BT
VANCOUVER BREWERIES, Ltd. PAGE FOUR
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
FBIDAT,. .. ,.NOVEMBER 27, UU
Great Sale of
Mens' Boots
FOR WINTER WEAR
Regular $6.50
Values to Sell
for
$4*
Every pair selected from regular stock, every pair
sold with our guarantee to wearing qualities and
general satisfaction.
Made with uppers of box calf, in blucher style,-ih
heavy and medium weights, with different width
All sizes ih the showing.
Our regular $6.50 values... .SALE PRICE $4.25
jS"! OhpfiudsonsBauCompanij.
V':  J     _ mtmmmu tan    mmsat a maJE tnm omotaaamt*. m    I
GEORGIA AND GRANVILLE STREETS
MOUNT PLEASANT HEADQUARTERS
For Hardware, Stoves and Ranges—
Everything for ths Kitchen
W. R. OWEN & MORRISON
Phono Fair. 4<7 «g? Main Btreet
TO READERS OF THE B. C. FEDERATIONIST
I have under formation a Oompany for the purpoie of
breeding Silver Blaok Foxei in captivity in British Columbia.
This industry, after careful investigation in Eastern Canada
and the world's Fur-buying centres, impresses me with its
almost unlimited possibilities. We already have our Banoh
in going order and have a very flne stook of Foxes, obtained
under most favorable conditions.
Our oompany will not be widely advertised as but a few
shares will be available to the General Public."
If yon are interested drop me a line to Bevelstoke, and
I will so* that you get a Prospectus when ready.
Very small sums oan be invested.
W. W. LEFEAUX,
(Late of Labor Temple Building.) Bevelstoke, B. 0.
COAL!!
WHICH WILL YOU
SUPPORT ?
The Company which sella
The Company which sells
BRITISH COLUMBIA
'   ^
AMERICAN
OOAL
OOAL
and Employs
and Employs
Whito Labor
Oriental Labor
Fifteen Tears in Vancouver Coal Trade
WELLINGTON AND COMOX COAL
WHITE LABOR ONLY
MACDONALD MARPOLE CO., Ltd.
497 Seymour Street Phone Sey. 910
THL CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
Capita
..111,000,000        Rut*.
...111,100,010
Meln Offlee: Center Heetlnge end Oranvllle Streets, Vancouver.
CITV BRANCHES
HASTINOS anl CAMBIE....
BAST END .
LOCATION
...Cor, Hasttnta Md Cambie Striata.
...Cor. Pender anl Main Streets.
COMMERCIAL DRIVE Cor. Flrat Avanua anl Commercial Drive.
PAIRVIEW  Cor. Sixth Avanua anl Granville Street
MOUNT PLEASANT . Cor. Blihth Avanua anl Main Street
KIT8ILANO . ................Cor. Fourth Avanua and Taw Street
POWELL STREET - ...............Cor. Vlotoria Drive anl Powell Street
SOUTH HILL ...........—._...........-Cor. Forty-fourth Avenue anl Fraaer Real.
Alee North Veneeuver Branch, cor.  Lenedele  Ave.  and  esplanade.
JOHNSTON & SALSBURY
The Hardwaremen
SUCCESSORS TO
McTAGGART & MOSCROP
We carry a complete line of MECHANICS' GOODS, including SANDS' LEVELS. FRISCO MASONS' TAPE,
STANLEY'S PLANES. LEVELS, etc., STAR-
RETTS FINE TOOLS. SIMONDS' SAWS. CORBIN
LOCKS, SETS.
PHONE SEYMOUR SM 4»  HASTINOS ST.  EAST
The Federatlonist
Will lie milled to oar addien outside
of Vancouver Olty, In Canada, from now
until January 1, ISIS, for S1.60.
' 'i'> .* '*    ■ W*
Tho Homo of Organlied Labor ln Seattle, Wash.
CUBE OF TUBERCULOSIS.
A. F, of L. Convention Urges Afflliated
Bodies to Seek Its Extermination.
The following resolution, conourred in
by the American Federation of Labor
convention, which concluded its sessions at Philadelphia last week, was introduced by Delegates II. O. Scott,
Frank Morrison, Max S. Hayes, Hugh
Stevenson and T. W. McCullough, of the
International Typographical union, and
speaks for itself:
" Whereas — Recent experience haB
denionstifted that the public interest in
the warfare against tuberculosis has not
been maintained at that pitch of en*
thusiasm which marked its beginning,
evidences of apathy being apparent in
the failure of many Well-founded plans
having for their purpose the betterment
jof conditions under which people are
compelled to live, these conditions be-
ing in themselves the most prolific and
fruitful source ot this scourge of humanity which has been called, and
rightly called, 'The poor man's
plague'; and
"Whereas—The workers of America
are entitled to greater support than
they have yet received in their efforts
to bring about such conditions as will
make lot the complete prevention of
danger of contracting tuberculosis,
either in factory, workshop, store, offlce
or home; therefore, be it
1'Resolved—That we urge upon all
affiliated bodies, together with their
locals, and especially upon tho state
and central bodies, that they bring before their legislatures or other law-mat
ing bodies the necessity of better provisions for the prevention and cure of
tuberculosis; that more rigid inspection
of housing conditions be insisted upon,
with more adequate provision for the
sanitary conditions of places in which
men and women are called upon to toil
for their livelihood, and that more extensive and more suitable provision be
made for the proper core and treatment
of "those who havo fallen victims to
tuberculosis, to the end that .the ravages of this disease may be checked,
and that it may be ultimately extinguished from among the list of plagues from which humanity suffers."
BRUTE rOEOE ENTHRONED.
Brute Force is King
And rules his world with ghoulish glee.
Home, hearth and happiness his prey,
Churn'd up with peace and joy eaoh
day
As pagan feast.
Wild carnage re(gn»—
To thousands of the human race
The heavens have become as brass.
And faith and hope  themselves  will
pass
As withered things.
Is there a Ood
Controlling with directing arm!
Is there indeed a Christian Church,
Or has the sword replaced the torch
In lifted handt
'Mid War's alarms
Has the last word of hope been said!
Surely there somewhere lives a spark
That will illume a nighhmore dark
Than yet conceivedl
Who speaks of Peace;,
Are all our one-time prophets deadl
Shall all the weary work of years—
The serious dreams of soulful seers—
Now go for nought t
Abandon all!
Olve hate and blood-lust open Sold;
Close ev'ry avenue of thought;
Sink every virtue—all we've taught—
And fold our arms)
Blind toola ot fatel
Is that the melancholy end
Of bigger, better brotherhood!
Then let there be no motherhood!
The race is through.
—W. R. Trotter.
Same Twenty Tears Ago
From the News-Advertiser of Nov.
89, 1894, the following is taken:
"At a special meeting of the Vancouver School Board and as a result of the
present state of the civic finances and
the altered conditions of the past year
or two, a large number of teachers' salaries were reduced, effecting a total
saving <of (5,000.
Building Tradei Worse. >
All the building trades unions report
trade conditions as still very bad, with
no prospects of improvement. Hundreds of unionists have left the city
for interior and other points. Quite a
number have been compelled to seek
work at other than their trades, whioh
has had the effect of increasing the
competition for jobs among the un*
skilled workers. The outlook is anything but rosy and unless the provln*
olal government soon makes .a move to*
wards solving tho problem nothing but
severe privation can result.
MNABD'S UNIMENT CUBES
OABOET Of COWS.
Land Clearing.
Editor B. C. Federationist: There has
been suggested to me lately a new-old
method of alleviating the congeston of
the larger centres, and, at the same
time build up the tangible resources of
the province. There are reserves and
tracts of land of easy access to Vancouver, Victoria and New Westminster
that might well be turned to good advantage by the government and relieve
the congested out-of-work settlements.
Unless the plan Is followed up and
handled in a business-like method it
would be better not to start it at all,
but if correctly handled will make substantial citizens of what are now unwilling drags on the communities. Taking for an example: Supposing that the,
government take over the Squamlsh reserve and engage the services of some I
practical man (eliminating political*
qualifications) and then say to what un*!
employed there are, "The province of
British Columbia is going to clear up
this reserve, paying a little more than
the cost of living, and sell it baok to -
you if you want it, .and start you up in'
business," that thoBe whose prospects
the coming winter' are not of the best
would gladly take advantage of the
chance offered. While the actual cash
these men would got would not be large,
it would tide over a very rough spot
in the year's work. In clearing a tract
of land it would be better not to try to
get rid of everything, but a "portable"
sawmill could be . installed and logs
worked up into lumber, shingles and
fencing. After the entire tract is put
into shape the services of an expert
ahould be secured and the land out up
Into 40, 25, 10 and 5-acre tracts, keeping in mind the idea of the community
plan of building homes. The farm
should be a place to live on, not merely
a square piece of land with the nearest
neighbor half a mile away. After the
"villages" or centres are picked out
then tne lumber taken off the land
should be hauled onto different tracts
and moderate-priced dwellings, barns
and outbuildings erected. This could be
handled cheaply, as when the lumber
waa.being sawn it could be out to the
lengths desired; and a large number of
possible tracts in a reserve like the
Squamlsh would make it cheaper for the
government to put up the buildings
than for a prospective settler to go onto
the raw land, and buy Us lumber,
stock, etc., when in many cases the most
desirable have not the wherewithal to
do it. After thia has all been done the
different tracts would be appraised and
the public informed that desirable and
bona fide settlers would be welcomed,
even though they did not possess a dollar. Those needing further assistance
should have it, even to the extent of
furnishing a team, cows, cattle or
chickens, oV the necessary groceries to
carry through until the first money
comes in. The smaller places could be
planned out for chicken ranches, and
they could be made to pay almost from
the first. Where'there are a number
close together it 'Would be economical
for shipping in of supplies, feed, etc.,
and shipping out of eggs and stock, and
would practically place the settler in
as easy reach of the business centre of
Vancouver as though his farm was as
near as the Hastings sawmill. As to
the financial end of it the government
should get a fair rate of interest,
slightly better than tho banks pay
them for the use of their funds. No
payments should be expected until the
first crops are turned Into cash, when
the settler would be able to look out for
himself and not need further assistance. The probable eost would be in
the neighborhood of (500,000 or *750,-
000 and it would be a grand stroke of
business on-the part of the government,
a blessing to. the land seeker and would
make Vancouver a leader in the producing class. As to the character of
the settler the only suggestion offered
is that the settler be of the Caucasian
race, preferably British. There are
many details that could be worked out
later, but the plan is that Immediate
action be taken as "an emergency exists."
BALPH O. HABTSON.
Vancouver, November 25, 1914.
jm Oalgary WlU Out Wages.
*Vlc employees of Calgary have been
notified that with the new year their
Wages will be reduced. N
,*_ ■  '       I
Before we were married you called
me an angel." "I know it." "And
now you don't call me anything."
"Tou ought to be glad that I possess
such self-control.
The publlaher of the beat Fsrmer'a paper
in the Maritime Provinces in writing to na
statea:
"I would aay that I do not know of a medicine that haa atood the teat of time like MINARD'S LINIMENT. It haa been an on.
failing remedy in onr household ever aince I
can remember, and haa outlived doaens of
would-be competitors.and lmitatora."
I like this quaint little mountain village of yours, waiter. I suppose I can
get plenty of oxygen here." "No, sir;.
we've got local option. ;
Mr. Shyboy—I love you more than
ngue can tell.   Miss Clincher—Then
let the parson do the talking.—Boston
Transcript. • a
Remember the union label. I
Take that Watoh to Appleby, 60S
Vender West, Cor. Pender and
Richards, for nlgh-olass watch,
clock and Jewellery repairs. All
cleaning anl mainsprings Jobs
guarantee! for 11 months.
We are now prepared to accept
orders for delivery of our
Washed Nut Coal
$5 PER TON
Delivered
This coal, beoause of its price,
is by no means a small site, inferior nut ooal, but high grade,
large sited WASHED NUT
COAL for kitchen use
Wo know what this coal will
do, having aold it in Victoria
for a number of years We are
therefore prepared to stand behind it and guarantee that it will
give you as good a kitchen fire as
any high-priced coal you are now
using. If you use wood, we
guarantee that it will give you a
cleaner, quicker and more economical kitchen fire than either
cord or mill wood.   /
Do not take our word for it,
but try it on our money back
guarantee.
KIRK & CO.
929 MAIN STREET
" 26 Tears in Victoria."
Seymour 1441
<s
PHONE SEYMOUR 9088
^tRES'/VQ.
Some people are getting
rich on what you squander. Isn't it time you
thought a little of yourself.
4%
On Deposits
Regular—Safe
DOW FRASER TRUST CO.
122 Hastings St. West.
Vancouver, and McKay Station,
Burnaby, B.C.
Close at 1 o'clock Saturday.
MENTION THE B. O. FEDERATIONIST
MENTION THE B. O. FEDERATIONJST
MENTION THE B. O. FEDERATIONIST
labor Paper as sn Advertising
Medium
Printer's Ink, s rsoognlsed so*
thority on advertising, after a thop-
ongh Investigation on this subject
ssys:
"A Ubor paper is a far better advertising medium tban sn ordinary
nswspapssr In comparison with circulation.. A Ubor paper, fer example, bating 8.000 subscribers. Is ef
■ore value te tbo baslnsss man who
advertises In It. than aa ordinary
paper with 12,000 subscribers.
$5 Down and $5 per Month
No Interest—No Taxes
Secures You a Choice 10-Acre Farm
0*11 or write at once for fall particular! of this choice acreage, situate In
the heart pf the Bella Coola and Llllooet District!. Open meadow-like land,
suitable for mixed farming, chicken ranching or hog railing. Soil a rich, ailty
loam. Plenty of good water, the land lying on river and lake. Good roads,
telegraph and telephone oonmnlcatlon right to the property. WUl . hare nil*
road communication with Vancouver In a abort time.   Price only ISO per acre.
j. i. BAKnr * oo.
60S Holden Building Kama	
16 Halting! Stmt Bait
Vaneouvar, B. O. Addreu .,,... .	
Phone Seymour 8888
BARGAINS t
We are giving 20% of all our Men's and Boys'
Clothing and Underwear
And Begular Prices on Everything ln tbo Store
CLUBB   &  STEWART
309-315 Hastings St. West      Phone Seymour 702
Superior
Printing
AT MODERATE
PRICES
Telephone:
Sty. 7495
LABOR TEMPLE
The FEDERATIONIST
can supply all your Printing
needi. No Job too large or
too small. First-class workmanship, good ink and high-
grade stock have given our
Printers a reputation (or
SUPERIOR PRINTING
Union Work a Specialty.
Our Prices are right and we
deliver when wanted.
TRAD! UNION DIMOTORV
Allied Prlntlni Trade* Counoll—P. &
nomine, P. o. Box II.
in-pi.   Blaok,   Boom   IM,   Labor
Temple.
Barber*—C. P. Burkhart, Boom IM, la-
bor~Temple.
Bartenders—-Oeo. W. Curnoeh, Room
Ml, labor Tempi*.
Blacksmiths — Malcolm Porter, Vl*w
Hill P. O.
Bookbinders—Qeo. Mowat, 111 Dunlevy
avenue.
Boilermakers—A. Fraser. 1161 How* St.
Brewery Worker*—Frank Graham, SMI
llth Avenue West.
Bricklayer*—William a. Dainall, Room
216, Labor Temple.
Brotherhood of Carpenten District Council—F. L. Bsrrstt, Room 309, Labor Temple.
Hud Carriers, Builders and Common Laborers—Oeorge Harrison, Room 330, Labor Temple.
Clkurmaker*—Robt 3. Craig, oars Kurts
Cigar Factory, 72 Water Street.
Cooks. Walters. Waltreese* — W. B.
Walker, Room 306, Labor Temple.
Electrical Workera (outside)—E. H. Moral-
aou, Room 207, Lsbor Temple.
Electrical Workere (Inside)—Room IDT;
P. L. Eatlnghauaen.
Englneera—E. Prendergut, Room 310, La*
bor Temple.
Granite Cutter*—Edward Hurry, Columbia Hotel.
Garment Worken—Miss MoRu, labor
Temple.
Horeeshoen — A. C.  MacArthur,  City
Height*. B.C.
Lettorearrloi    **
 lers-Robt Wight, District II.
Lather*—Victor R. Mldgley, Box 1041.
Loco.   Firemen   and   Engineer*—Jamea
Patrick, HII Homer atreet
Loco.  Engineer*—A.  E.  Solloway,  1091
Paelfle.   Tel. Sey. U71L.
Longshoremen—Geo.  Thomaa, IM Alexander Stnet
Machinists—J. H. MoVety,   Room  ill,
Labor Temple.
Musician*—H. J. Brasfleld, Rooms Il-M,
Williams Bldg., 411 Oranvllle stnet.
Marbleworkon—Fnnk Hall, Janes Road,
B   C
Molders—D. Brown, III Broadway West.
Moving Picture Operators—L. E, Oood-
man, Room 100, Loo Building.
Palnten—J.   Train,   Room   SOI,   Labor
Temple,
Plumber*—Room 111 labor Temple.
Pressmsn—P. D. Edward, labor Temple.
Plasterer*—John   Jams*   Cornish,   ISO!
Eleventh Ave. East.
Pattern Makan-J. Campbell, 4MI Argyle Btreet,
Quarry Workers—Jams* Hepburn, ean
Columbia Hotel.
Railway Conductors—O. W, Hatoh, Ml
Beatty street.
Railroad Trainmen—A.   B.   MeCorvllle,
Box 141.
Runway Carmen—A. Robb,  410 Nelson
Street.
Seamen's Union—Cor. Main and Haatinga.
Structural  Inn  Workera—W.  L.   Tula,
Room 101, Labor Temple,
btonecutters—James Rayburn, P, O. Box
1047.
Sheet Metal Workers—H. C Dougan, No.
6. Fifteenth Ave. Weat
Street Railway Employees—A. V. Lofting, llll Trinity Stnst
Stereotypers—W. Baylsy, oan Province,
City.
Telegraphers—B. B. Pepnln, Box 411.
Trade* and Labor Counoll—Geo. Bartley,
Room 110 labor-Temple.
Typographical—H. Neelands, Box II.
Tailors—C. McDonald, Box Ml,
Theatrics) Stags Employeea—Oeo. W. Allln,
^Box 711.
Tllelayers   and   Helpers—Evan Thomas,
labor Temple.
Upholsterers—A. Duthle. toll Homer Bt.
«*r—"Wm
PRESIDENT
5U5PENDER
NC1NF     ',0   E
'tmsselysaysmfsadsss
MADE IN CANADA
BUY ONLY
iVUa»4h\    bread star.
SMmW'      ••*•<» THI* LABIL
MENTION THE B. O. FEDERATIONIST
'KEEP TOUE MQHET IN B. O.'
BT UMNO,
South Wellington Coal
sa euppll.1 by
The Main Supply
Company
1029 MAIN STREET
Best Lump, ton...$6.75
Washed Nut, ton.. $5.00
Delivered free within two miles.
Phone Tour Order Now.
SEYMOUR 8491
Mlntd ln B. O. by B. O. Labor for
B. O. People.
MENTION THE B. 0. FEDERATIONIST
Special
Edison
Phonograph
Outfit, No. 10
$46.80
Outfit includes cabinet of Fumed Oik
beautifully finished, hinted core*,
Tary litest hornless typo of phono*
graph, tiring the purest tonal quality,
now typo diamond pointed reproducer.
Powerful spring motor perfectly ad*
lusted and regulated. Removable
front and top, Outfit Includes 13 four*
minute Bine Amberol (Indestructible)
recordi of your own selection. Terms
. .6.80 cash, balance at the nte of
15.00 per month.
THE
KENT
PIANO CO. Ud,
558 GRANVILLE ST.
.   , ,.;■. _k_-^X\   . l,.   .

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