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The British Columbia Federationist Dec 25, 1914

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Array TAT
THE  BRITISH  COLUMBIA FEDERATIONiqf
n^BTBUL^TY, STBEN0TH.«» °™*^*: VANTOB TBA^^ -t 1 VJH-jLOl
SIXTH YEAF / n. 194. "          f* ' ' — ♦««Bfl4iiomtr.mftljtfft
Bff!
fill
Writer  in  a  Well-known
Journal Says It Is Common Knowledge.
OFFICIAL PAPEB : VANCOUVEB TBADB8 AND LAfiOB
VANCOUVER, B. C, FRIDAY, PECJlMBER 25, 1914
Labor Candidate
FOB WAKD FOUB
[ Everybody Knows but Few
I /     Move  to Apply  the
Remedy
i;
'
If it were possible to get the attention of millions of people to the fact
that capitalism is the fundamental
cause of war it might naturally be ex
pec ted that the result would mean d
great impetus to the peace propaganda
of the labor movement.
Since the present war broke out millions of people have heard that statement made innumerable times, but the
i belief has little or no effect in Btirau-
) lating the demand for the abolition of
| capitalism.
The Saturday Evening PoBt, for example, is a magazine that claims, and
no doubt correctly, to have millions of
readers. One of its literary staff, Mr,
Samuel 0. Blythe, is considered by e
host of people as a keen political analyst. His contributions have appeared
in .the Post for many years and have
(.always been regarded as one of its most
valuable features, What, he says on
matters political, social and e'eonomic
is always considered to carry great
weight.
In a recent issue of tbe Post we find
Mr. Blythe holding forth on the subject of the great world war, and among
other things he has to say about its
a-POse is this:
And what is the real cause of
this,   war   that   has   transformed
Europe into one great battlefield,
and brutalized   civilized   nations!
If we look beyond all the immedi-
r) ate causes to the fundamental one,
we will find it in the trade rivalry
of two grenJ0i nations.
Mr. Blythe is referring of course to
Germany and Great Britain.   Continuing the subject farther along, he says
in conclusion, after fully demonstrating thhe above atatement:
What those familiar   with   the
situation know is   that  the  rock-
bottom   reason   for   the   feeling
which exists between Great Britain and Germany and which no
one familiar with the circumstances
will dtfay is a burincss reason, a
trade reason, a commercial supremacy reason,   Aa these reasons are
infinitely more vital than treaty
reasons or diplomatic   reM^y^jyt^"
political reasons—$$.tt_#ty*&&_„ at
theJ^ftftrtr^S3tional things—the
'desperate nature of the toll this
war will take is clear
This is surely plain enough, and there
lean be no possible mistaking what he
Weans,   At the very least  a  million
leoplo most of whom pride themselves
jn their intelligence, have   read   this,
ind in all probability not one in 1,000
bias disagreed with   the   writer.   But
there is every reason also to believe
-hat not one in a thousand reached
;he   plain   conclusion   that to abolish
1 war, capitalism must first be abolished,
and not one in 10,000 perhaps resolved
to do his part for such abolition.
The vast majority will still go on
'deploring" war, and regarding as up-
/setters of society those who would destroy it by destroying its fundamental
cause.
They might perhaps get a passing
glimpse of the nature of the price to be
paid for the destruction of war but
with all due respect of course to the
grei<t Mr. Blythe, it is altogether too
13high to be practical.
' ■ In a fleeting, incoherent, instinctive
way, fragmentary thoughts of this kind
apparently pass through the brains of
people who read statements like those
(of Mr. Blythe, but they are too imperfect to inspire action for the abolition
of war.
The writer himself seems to sense
this, for in another part of his article
he says, referring to the dally output)
of war news:
You read unoomprehendingly in
the official dispatches that the centre advanced or the left wing was
repulsed. You read that there was
a sharp engagement at some place,
a daring assault at another; that
tho troops are entrenched; that the
great flanking movement has succeeded or failed. You read these
things and then what! Nothing.
It means little.
BUNG TRADES
t
More Than Half the Local
Union Membership Are
Unemployed
B. B. BAILBT
1B23 Parker Street.
Vanoouver Trades and Labor  Council
candidate, for  Alderman   in   Ward
Four—A member of the Laborera
(civic employees) union.
A
UNEMPLOYED   INCREASING.
McBride "Considering" While Work-
less Have No Place to Sleep.
The provincial government, through
a commissioner, has been gathering
data this week with relation to the
unemployment and destitution which
prevails in and around Vancouver. Mr,
G. D. Ireland, the relief officer, has
presented some figures whioh he expects will make an impression on the
government. At the meeting of the
civic relief committee a letter- from
Premier McBride stating that tho question of unemployment waa receiving
the serious consideration of the government, was received with smiles by some
of the committee
The sum of $2,05(5 was spent in city
relief for the month of November. Conditions are bo acute that after filling
up all the beds in the Vancouver Mission, the Salvation, Army, the Bed
Cross rooms and the Whitehouse at 10
cents a night eaeh, there were 200 men
reported by the relief officer to whom
they could not supply beds* He suggested that accomodation be .provided!
for 200 beds in the old police jrtoJfci.'rfa|
on Bailway street, but wa^rM to secure- aH tfa^wtMiA-MMt -he 'could at
10 cents,,per night, and then, if any of
thoBj-^Yeft ovev had blankets, to let
U-WSm sleep in ?he old building.
BREAD GOES UP IN PRICE.
General Rise in tbe Staff of Life
Agreed upon by All Local Bakers.
The price of bread has been increased
in Vancouver during the past week.
The old price was twenty 16-ounce
loaves for $1. The new price iB sixteen loaves. The old price for a 20-
ounce loaf was sixteen loaves for $1.
It is now twelve loaves for $1. But,
under some fluke in the civic bread bylaw, the bakers are enabled to label
thoir product aB "fancy" and thus
escape the necessity of turning out the
standard loaf. Whatever the cause or
however much the justification the rise
is working an additional hardship upon
those who are endeavoring to make $1
take the place of $5.
RESIST WAGE REDUCTIONS.
Trades Unions of Guelph Ont., Are
More Than Holding Their Own.
- Despite the general industrial depression throughout Canada, which has also
extended to the "cent belt," W. ,B.
Parker, of Guelph, Ont., reports that a
local of thhe Electrical Workers, No.
274, has recently been organized there
and that the Sheet Metal Workers are
now being lined up. Other organizations are standing up well under the
strain and so far there has been no reductions in wages among trades unionists, proving at once the value of organization.
City Built Years Ahead of
industrial Pay Roll
Basis.
Out of more than 200 union bricklayers in Vancouver 40 are working at
present. I haven't done a tap at my
trade in five months." This statement
to The Fed. from a member of the
Bricklayers' union seems to be typical
of the entire building trades. The
building permits issued at the city hull
tell the tale. Outside of a few minor
jobs and the proposed big elevator
the building trade is absolutely at a standstill in this oity. Nor is
there prospect of any substantial
improvement such as would absorb even
I a fair proportion of the building tradesmen unemployed in the city for some
years to come. Vancouver is built five
[years beyond its present social and industrial' requirements, with landlords
practically begging tenants to stay in
their houses for the purpose of keeping
them from falling to pieces from wet
rot, with w)me office buildings contain-
iujf, sbj-Hpty storeys, with store and
warehou#j*|pace offered and going for
almostititf' price which looks like real
iiwriqyV Mjr one who thinks that there
wJH K» aay real improvement in the
building trades situation here yet a-
while, mutt surely be blind.
Th.is situation is gradually being real-
IPF  '
Labor Candidate
TOt, WARD SIX
I And that criticism ia quite aa appll*
'coble to Mr, Blytho 'a demonstration of
the fundamental cause of war being
[found in our economic system. It rolls
Moff Ub readers "like water off a duck's
Iback."
From all of whioh it would seem to
bo only too obvious that the conclusions
of labor unionists, though uncontradicted, accomplish little or nothing with
people who give no attenntion to the
itudy of suoh questions at ordinary
ilmes.
First Domestic Help Strike
For the flrst time on record domes
ilo servants have organized a strike.
Members of the Domestic Workers1
Jnion of Oreat Britain have picketed
he house of one of the officials at Fen*
onville Prison, London, two, weeks ago,
| Trouble arose between a maid em*
Joyed at the house and her mistress
ind the girl alleges that she was badly
rented. Business relations between
Kniatress and servant were broken off;
tho servant put her case before the un*
lon'and pickets were put on day and
'vening duty outside the house. An
Lpen-air meeting was held outside the
(rison.
T. H. Bolton WUl be a Candidate.
T. H. Bolton, presidont of tho Seattle Central Labor oouncil, last Wednesday night waB unanimously urged by
the delegates to that organization to
become a candidate for the office of
councilman at the coming election, with
the assurance that if he concurs in tho
request no other endorsements for this
office will be mode by the central body.
President Bolton said that he would
be a candidate for thu offloe if he found
organized labor solidly behind him
Typos, to Heat Sunday
Typographical union, No.  220,  will
Ibnvene   in   regular session at Labor
1 ample next Sunday, at t\. u, sharp,
very member should make it a point
» be present aa there are a number of
bestione vitally affecting   the   inter
Tha "Work Tut,"
Aid. Crowe, chairman of the board
of works, is very anxious, like Aid. McBeath, to make what he calls "a work
test," and ho haa made arrangements
for putting a big gang to work with
pick and shovel on the hospital grounds.
If they do not work to his satisfaction
thoy will be added to those who are
now ineligible to apply for relief at the
offices on Bailway street.
No Monty for Belief Work
Burnaby unemployed were told by
the reeve last Monday night that the
municipality has no money to, start re-
lief work for the large number of men
who are out of work there.
Saturday Half Holiday In Seattle.
Seattle labor unionist, are agitating
for state legislation to make Saturday
afternoon a legal half holiday. This
is part of an effort to relieve the unemployed situation.
Building Less Than Half
Building permits lost year reached a
total of $10,423,197, while they amounted to $10,428,432 in 1912. So far
this year they amount to less than half
the total of 1913.
War ought to be the only study of a
its of the membership to be up for prince,   fle   ought to consider   peace
Hraalderatlon. 'only a breathing time—Machiavelli.
PRISON LABOR IS
PROPOSED IN
f
Agricultural     Commission
Says Employ Convicts
for Farms
CcSTSg)    Sl-W PER YBflj
Labor Candidate
. FOB WABD SEVEN
W. 0. BAIBON
668 Bighth Avenue Weat
Vancouver Trades and Labor Council
candidate for Alderman in Ward Six
A member of the-.Plasterers' union—
Twenty yeara a resident of the ward.
laid by every building tradesman with
sufficient money saved to enable him to
get out of the olty. Carpenters by the
score have left lor the four corners of
'the earth during the paat few months,
fully convinced, from the condition of
the trade here, and the. prospects in
front of it, that there oan be any other
place which offers worse prospects of
meptoyment for them.
The First Attempt to Introduce a Rotten
Practice '
The report of the Boyal Commission
on Agriculture, which has just been
issued by the Provincial Oovernment,
contains an item under the head of
'Prison Labor." Some f the recommendations ' in this, report will' likely
be enacted into law by the government. This one is worth reading and
thinking over.
Advise Convict Labor.
'There are considerable areaaof land
in the province theproductive value of
whloh would be greatly increased by
drainage. The present very high cost
of tiles, especially with the addition
of an* ordinary freight rate on auch
heavy material, almost entirely prevents
their use—the rather limited amount
of draining now being done being carried out in a less permanent way. In
many diatriets liming would be of great
benefit to the soil, but for the same reason little ia practiced, A cheap supply
of these two materials would be of
great assistance in increasing production.
A small number of prisoners in the
province are at present employed) in
1 breaking stone for road purposes, showing clearly that the state, in its penal
system, recognizes the reformatory and
a.t. loptino
SMI ftlnlty Straet
Vancouver Trades' and Labor Council
candidate for Alderman   in   Ward
Seven — Recording Secretary of tho
Street Bailway Employeea' Union,
Warning to Street-Car Men
Street railwaymen do not appear tojbe at the end of their troubles yet by a
long way.   On the contrary there is good ground to think that they We only
just at the beginning. ,        „Jt     ,     ....,,„. r...„^ -_„1„, „„w_
In the News-Advertiser of last Saturday, there appeared a verbatim account of a speech delivered by Mr. E. M. Home Payne, ohairman of the B. C.
Electric Bailway company, at the annual general meeting of the company held
in London the previous day.
Unless we are very much mistaken, that' speech marks the beginning of a
deliberate and determined attempt to break down the scale of wages now being
paid by the company to its employees in British Columbia.. The report of the
speech was very explicit—especially that part of it which dealt with wages. At
the head of the article was the date "London, Dec. 18."
People who know anything about newspaper editjng know that a date line
does not always mean what it says. The chances are that this speech was not
cabled at all, but was written beforehand and copies sent over for what is
known in newspaperdom as "release" on a certain date. This was probably
done and the publicity for it arranged through the local officials, sb that it
could have an effeot which will fit into other plans later on. -
Let that be as it may, that speech contains statements which no employee
of the B. C. Electric Railway company can afford to ignore. It means bread
and butter to every man working on the system—and to every woman and
child dependent upon him.
We believe there is a mountain of meaning at the back of it, arid we do
not intend to let it slip by and then fed when trouble comes that we neglected
it because we did not realize the significance of it.
That is the work of The Federationist, and it is not necessary t_ remind
the street railwaymen or any other body of workmen that The Federwlonist is
the only newspaper in the city which they can rely upon in a case of ths kind.
Consider carefully this extract from the speech. It is full to the brii> with
statements which can only mean one thing. After referring to the fallirijr off
in traffic and income, and blaming those things partly ,on the war, Mr. ftW
went into what he considered would be the conditions in British Columbia V
a little while from now.  He said: ;\
"I think the cost of living, especially in the matter of rentals,
will have considerably decreased, and that a lower basis of wages will
be in force, which will remove what hitherto has been the greatest obstacle to the prosperous development of tho country. The high cost
of labor is throttling) and has throttled undertakings of advantage to
the province; has prohibited the establishment of many industries,
and chocked tho investment of capital in productive works> which in
turn has tended to keep up tlie high price of living. ... If one
looks back on the past ten years there can be no doubt that but for the
cost of labor, which has rendered it impossible to compete with other
parts of the world, British Columbia would have become a beehive of
industry, and capital for industrial purposes would have flowed freely
into the province, thus providing a prosperous living for double the
present population."
It will thus be seen that the wages of street railwaymen are to be made to
bear the blame for a report which shewed a reduction in the yearly earnings of
the company of between $450,000 and $500,000. In order to pay tho "usual
dividends"—it is very significant that the actual figures of those dividends
were not mentioned in the article—$50,000 was taken from the reserve fund.
Not a word was said about the boom in real estate prices, which is one of
tho principle reasons why industrial development has been retarded in this
province, and from which tho oompany has reaped a rich harvest,
Not a word about the fact that the present wages of street railwaymen are
based on the report and recommendations of a board of investigation, operat-
. ing under the provisions of the fedoral Industrial Disputes Investigation act,
under which act no wages have ever been awarded which were more than equal
to the price of living.
Not a word about such things, but just a plain straightforward onslaught
against the wage rates of the men who operate the cars and other parts of the
company's system.
The meaning of it all is obvious enough to any one who can read and understand plain English, and it is full of grave warning to the street railway-
men. Perhaps some simple soul will infer that Mr, Payne was not referring to
the wages of street railwaymen at all, but to the wages in other industries.
Let anyone with that idea just take his memory back a little, and recollect
the struggle which the street railwaymen's union had with the oompany when
the present wage scale was being negotiated. That should be enough to convince him, if facts oount for anything with him. The agreomont which contains the present wage soale is terminable by either party giving thirty days
notice to the othor if ter June 30th no^t , It looks ss if Mr. Payno is giving no(-
tioe in good time.
disciplinary effects of 'healthy work.
In some parts of the United States,
itate prisoners are employed upon the
roads, and while this may be satisfactory from the point of view of preventing idleness, it is not conducive to the
[development of the prisoner's self-respect.
(1) We would suggest that by employing prisoners into) Drain-tile making; and
(b) Quarrying and crushing of lime
for farm purposes*—
the prisoners and the province would
be benefitted.   The work might be per*,
formed under prison  conditions,  and,
owing to area required, would not .en*
tail much.expense, nor any serious apprehension r.s to escape, while at the
same time it would provide healthy and,
useful occupation.
Although realizing that the following proposal may be somewhat outside;
the scope of thia inquiry, we would also
(8) That where prisoners are employed at such useful nnd productive
work, a small wage should be allowed,
which, in the eaae of. those who have
families to support, should be payable
to those dependent upon them, and in|
'the- iiaSB--i)rTrtnghSHlnuu sVonM *-ho'***)aMI **"
to the prisoners themselves upon their
.release.
B.C.F.ofL Win Meet in
Nanaimo on Monday,
January 25th
Workmen's   Compensation
Among Chief Matters
.    1\> Be Debated.
The Executive Board of the B. O.
Federation of Labor has sent out to the
various unions the official call forth*
fifth annual convention,, to take float
[in Nanaimo, January 25th next, Baof
rotary-Treasurer Wells, in sending oil
the call, makes mention of the portal
of financial stress through whieh all
unions aro now passing. Thia difficulty,
and the questions which tre expect**
to occupy an important position In th*
debates of the convention are dealt
with in tho official call, u followa:
Bnsipt r«b OMal OalL
•The present period of tnui* depression will no doubt have offeet*d eD of-
ganitationa, but the need of * good attendance of delegate* wu naves »or*
apparent, and local unlona are urged
to make all efforts pouible to te %
presented at thia convention. Looal
union* that ton not. boon aftUtMd
' art urged, la ttet of the promt aeods,
to send representative* and become i
part of tho provincial body, by th*
payment of par capita tax for tht Srat
half of tho year UU.
"The probabilities ere that legislation
affecting the worken will be brought
before the Legislature it the coming
session, among whioh will bo the net
regarding workmen's compensation for
accidents, jnd other matters dealt with
by the Boyil Commission, and it ia
possible that those matter* may be
shelved owing to the present war situation. It ia therefore necessary that*
organized labor ahould be prepared to
deal with these matters, as the occasion
arises
."The present unemployed situation ■
has been considered by all kind* ot.oz- ■,
ganizatiou charitable and other****,
but aa no solution or palliative can to
advanced unless of a provincial character, it ia necessary that lt should to
considered by the labor movement of
the. province. , To thia end you ar*
urged to send your representatives anl
support the Federation by your active
cooperation, and affiliation with that
body.
K^SKftir-"
\
TO HELP UNION MINEBS.
Union Men Should Buy Ooal Mined by
Minora' Union Membera,
Robert Foster president of District
28, C. M. W. of A, who was in Vancouver a few days ago en route to Seat- J
tlo on official business, had some things
to say to the trade unionists of this
and other coast cities. "Tho only
union-manned coal mine on Vancouver
island is the Jingle Pot, near Nanaimo,
and probably Federationist readers will
be surprised to learn that there has recently been a reduction of forces there
owing to a shortage of orders. The
union men of Vancouver have always
shown a keen desire to assist the miners of tho island to establish the right
to organize. Now if they desire to be
consistent ond show, in a practical way,
that they are with the miners let them
demand union mined coal. I understand the price is as low as the nonunion product sold in Vancouver and
any old-time coal miner' will toll you
that Jingle Pot coal Ib the best on the
market. If the trades unionists of Vancouver arc true to thomselves the membership of our Jingle Pot local could
be doubled in less tban a month."
Mr. Foster also expressed himself as
being strongly in favor of the B. C.
F. of L. holding a convention next
month. Ho appreciated the obstacles
in the way, but felt that the members
of organized lubor could not afford to
"give up tho ghost" just because they
wero broko.
a union norm matob
AN UPSIDEDOWN TOWN
Local Industrial Situation Aptly Bleed
Up By Visitor
The industrial situation in Vancouver
was aptly summarized by a visitor to
Tho Fedorationist this week. Ho said:
"It seems to mo that Vancouver is
an upsidedown town. You havo houBOs,
officoH, and storage space in abundnnco,
in a word, you havo all that equipment
which, in a normally developing city,
follows tho establishment ot industry,
but thoro are no industrios worth
speaking of. Moreover, it seems to me
that some of those peoplo who bought
industrial sites at high prices, during
tho boom timos, hnve to be bitten; and
pretty badly too, before thoy learn tho
few rudiments of political economy
which would havo saved them from the
dilemma in which thoy find themselves. ''
'Mike" OosteUo Elected Mayor tt
Biggest Little Olty in th* Wut
The dizzy height* of social and political eminence to which tho natural
vanity of a printer will often lead him!
Twenty-four years ago this month
"Mike" C. Costello and the manager
of The Fed. were "devils" together in
the office of the Calgary Herald, at that
time a hand-set daily. Yeara after
"Mike" decided to quit the print* and
in due time became a physician. Civic politics later became hia hobby and
laat week ho wu elected mayor of th*
biggest little city in western Canada.
Meanwhile sundry of hia old-time cronies look on from afar with feelings
of admiration and amazement. Like
Columbus with, the egg "they eould
all have done "it if they tod only
thought of that particular way."
But 'twas ever thus. ."Mike" ia ia
the mayoral chair. He didn <t bother
his head aboot any of that "nonsenae"
which led some ot his early-day colleagues into schemes for. Improving th*
| social and political status of their alas*.
' Finding the world an eminently practical affair be evidently concluded that
the only practical thing to be done wu
to bo practical. And perhaps after all,
tho world will think just aa well of
him.
ENOnrSBBS
POINT OBEY ELECTIONS
J. E. Wilton Has Been Asked to Stand
as Councillor and May Accept.
J. E, Wilton, secretary of tho central
labor body parliamentary committee,
an executive officer of tho Typographical union, and a resident of ward ono,
472, Point Orey, for some yoars, is
spokon of aa a candidate for councillor
in that municipality. The Federationist hopes that Mr. Wilton's many coworkers will prevail upon him to accept
the nomination, as he is big onough
man for tho position and enjoys the
confidence of his fellow unionists and
o host of friends in the business world.
Patronize "Fed" Advertisers
While you are doing your Christmas
shopping, just remember to give your
patronage to tho merchant whoso advertisements you sco in The Fodorationist. And whilo you are about it, do not
fail to mention to him the faot that
you saw his advertisement in these col-
[ May Call Strike oh Government Wharf
to Enforce Union Bat* of Wages
Bueiness Agent E. Prendergast of the
Steam and Operating Engineers' union
reports trade conditions generally
slack. They also have a wage dispute
on hand with Messrs. Henry, McPhee
& McDonald, contractors on the government wharf, undor construction on
Burrard inlot. Mr. Prendergut saya
Fnir-ivogo Officer McNivon has been
tinkering nround for three woeks, but
as yet has secured no satisfaction for
.the live engineers involved. By somo
skilful manipulation or other tho "fair
wage" portion of the contract seems to
be conspicuous by its abaence. Unless
the engineers secure a satisfactory adjustment they propose to call a strike.
Tho union has consistently maintained
a tt wage here since Inst June,
and they propose to maintain it, come
what may.
From Davy Jones' Locker.
Miss Francos Foxcroft, the popular
exchange" attendant at Labor Templo, is this week in receipt of a
returned letter, posted at Vancouver on May 2*0 lut, stamped "Be-
covered by divers from wreck of S.S.
Empress of Ireland." Other than the
stamp being removed and 'the manuscript being blurred the letter is tolerably well preserved, considering the experience through which it hu paaaed.
Fight Batwaan Doggy Delegates.
Bight lifter the meeting of Vancouver Trades and Labor Council lut
week, a very flne dog flght took place
in the mooting hall between a big
"huskie" belonging to Delegato Pipes,
and a brindle bull. Most of the delegates wero still in the hall and "a very
pleasant timo wu had" for about ten
minutes Blood wu drawn and honorj
looked about even.
\
r?4
Be sure when your wife purehaau
a loaf of bread, it carries the union label, u that is abaolute proof of ttt
best labor conditions having been can-
piled with. PAGE TWO
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
FBIDAY. DECEMBEB 25, 1914
MOLSONS
BANK
Capital  Ud Reserve,    -    $8,800,000
86 Branches in Canada
A general banking  business  transacted
Savings Department
Interest aUowtl at highest
Current Bats
EASI BUD BBASOB
150 Hasting! Strest B»«
A. W. Jtrvls, Manager.
The Royal Bank
of
INCORPORATED 1SSS
Paid-up Capital
Reeerve 	
Total Aaaata • -
. | 11,1
12,1
. 110,000,000
IN-
WE  ALLOW
TEREST ON DE-
POSITS IN OUR
SAVINGS
DEPARTMENT
On* Dollar will open
the account, and your
bualnaa* will b* wel-
com* b* It l*rg* «"*
•mall
FOURTEEN BRANCHES IN
VANCOUVER
THE
INCORPORATED
1S5S
BANK OF
TORONTO
,, .158,000,000
. .141,000,000
Joint
Savings
Accounts
A Savings Account In lh* names of
two or mon Individual! frequently
possesses elements of considerable
convenience. In an acctymt of thii
nature fundi may bo deposited or
withdrawn at wUl by either party
to tbe aoeount, on his or ber Individ*
nal signature. Interest la added to
balance!  half-yearly.
446 HASTZHOB STREET WEST
and
Corner Hutlngi ud Oixrtl Sta.
British Columbia
LAND
Splendid opportunities In Mixed
Farming, Dairying, Stock and
Poultry. British Colombia
Orant* Pre-emption* of ISO acres
to Actual Settler*—
Free
TEBMS—Besidence on the land
for at leaat three yeara; improvements to the extent of SS per
aore; bringing under cultivation
at leaat five urea.
For furtuer information apply to
DEPUTY MIHI8TBB OF
LANDS, VICTORIA, B.O.
SBOBETABT, BUREAU OF
PROVINCIAL INPOBMATION,
VIOTOBIA, BO.
K. Farm Pettipiece Manager
J. W. WilkinBon Editor
THE B. C. FEDERATIONIST
Published every Friday mprnlng by the
B. C, Federationlit, Ud.
Directors:   Jas.    Campbell,    president;    J,
H, McVety,    secretary-treasurer;    11,
Gibb; G, J.Kelly; B-^Pettlplece
Office: Roam 217, Labor Templo
Tol.  Exchange  Sey.  7495.
Subscription: $1.50 per year; In Vancouver
City, $2.00; to unions subscribing
ln a body, $1.00
REPRESENTATVES
New Westminster.. .W. E. Maiden, Box 084
PrincB Rupert W. E. Denning, Box 531
Victoria A. 8. Wells, Bos 1688
Afflliated with the Western Labor Pren
Association.
'Unity of Labor; tho hope of the world.'
FBIDAY DECEMBER 25, 1914
INDEED
A MERRY
CHRISTMAS
HE DIRECTORS and management of The Federationist extend their greetings to readers.
The majority of our readers are workingmen. Thousands of workmen in
British Colombia
this Christmaa are
literally at their
wits' end to know
how they are going
to find bread and
shelter for their families and themselveB. Nuuseous charity is the only alternative to starvation which confronts
thousands of citizens of this province
who have never before been, and never
expected to be now, in such a humiliating position.
*      «       *       •
The sting of their dilemma is not
made any less severe by the knowledge
that they are able, willing and anxious,
to' earn all they need for them and
theirs, but in this, a country richer than
most in natural resources, there is no
opportunity to work for bread. Sir
Richard McBride, the flrst minister in
that aggregation of incapacity known
as "the government," recommends the
citizens, with a rich vein of Machiavellian humor, to "comport themselves in
calm dignity." It is the pompous piffle
of a scurvy politician trying the best
he knowB to hide the worst.
a        a        a        a
In face of what we know, it would
be mockery to wish readers a merry
Christmas, but there is certainly lots of
room to wish them a "happier" New
Year, and we do that. In another*week
we commence our seventh year. During
the latter part of the year 1908, the
Trades Unionist, endorsed by Vancouver Trades and Labor council, published monthly by S. J. Gothard, and edited
by the council's press representative,
R. P. Pettipiece, was discontinued, and
in February, 1909, The Western Wage-
Earner, also a monthly publication, was
brought into being.
  t       a.      •       a. ,
It was "published" by Vancouver
Trades and Labor couneil in the interests of organized labor," with Jas. H.
McVety as managing-editor. In October of 1911 Mr. McVety was called upon to devote his entire time as managing director of the Vancouver Labor
Temple Company, limited, and under
the management of R. P. Pettipiece,
the Western Wage-Earner was changed
to the British Columbia Federationist,
and issued twice a month in its present newspaper form, until June 8, 1912,
when it became a weekly. Since that
date the fortunes of The Federationist,
like many other newspapers which have
to depend upon advertisers to pay the
printer, have fluctuated.
a       a       a       a
Some of its editions have reached as
many as 36 pages, with a minimum of
eight pages until last August, when it
became necessary to reduce to four
It is the only newspaper in the
coast cities devoted exclusively to the
contemporary affairs of the working
class, and it does hot require much inside knowledge of the policy of the ordinary press to Bee how necessary it is
that labor should have a journal of its
own to voice its views and claims. With
slender financial resources, its scope is
of necessity limited, but with continued support and better times we look
forward to the day when The Federationist will be on a footing to become
a daily labor newspaper for the workers of the coast cities.
gether from all parts of the province,
is no unimportant side of such a gathering, especially at a time like the present. And it may be taken for granted
that the executive board, in making ita
decision is fully satisfied that the serious nature of the questions to be discussed, warrants it taking the action it
has done.
* *      «      *
The callous and systematic manner
in which the reasonable demands of organized labor have been ignored by
the present provincial government, iB
well known. Thousands of dollars have
been spent by the labor movement in
this province during the last five years
for the purpose of trying to improve
the conditions of the workers. Hundreds of the more active minds have
given their best reasoning and intelligence for the same object. But all that
has been secured for this time, brains,
and money expended, is the smooth
humbug of McBride in reply to the
labor deputations which have appeared
before the government. In fact, the
annual pilgrimage of the pleading proletariat has now become one of tho
hardy annuals of the parliament house
at Victoria. Not only has new legislation been refused, but laws already
in existence for the supposed purpose
of giving some measure of protection
to the workers, have not been applied.
Such use as they might have been, has
become atrophied by the deliberate refusal of McBride and Bowser to enforce
them.
• #      #      »
In addition is the chronic unemployment which is rife from one end of the
province to the other. There have been
other periods of depression in times
gone by, but there has never before
been one so extensive and so entirely
devoid of promise of improvement for
years to come, as the present one,
Men, women and children are absolutely destitute, and wanting bread. McBride has announced that the government is to bring down a scheme to alleviate this condition. How far the
Federation will be able to favorably
[influence any suoh action, remains to
be seen. The proposed new Workmen's
Compensation act is to be brought in
at this session, but, as announced by
Attorney-general Bowser at Fernie last
Friday night, it will be laid on the
table for one year. Doubtless Borne of
the deliberations, of the convention will
be taken up with this question which
is one of the most important matters
which the labor movement in thiB province has to deal with during the next
year. It is to be hoped that in spite
of the financial strain which all unions are undergoing, there will be a
well attended convention in Nanaimo,
M'
THE
MAYORALTY
CANDIDATURE
Offloe Phone
Seymour 143
Residence Phone
Fairmont 1593 R
d. w. r. Mcdonald
Barrister,  Solicitor, Votary Public
Offloe:  44-46 Flack Block
Cor. Haetlnga and Gamble Sts.
Vancouver, B. O.
THE   FIFTH   ANNUAL   convention of the B. C. Federation of
Labor,   is   officially -called to
meet in Nanaimo Monday, January 25,
39.15,   The executive board of the Federation, in deciding
upon   this   step, Ib
doubtless convinced
from Its knowledge
of i    the     working
class       situation
throughout the province, that such action is nocessary.   It would not come
to such a decision",  without  thorough
and mature consideration.   The trouble
and expense of calling   delegates   to-
A
PRINCIPALLY
PROPERTY
VIGOROUS PROTEST iB being |
made in some quarters of the
city against the reduction of
the wages of the police and civic fire-
The outcry seemed quite puzzling
at  first because it
waa   bo   novel  and
unusual  to   hear   a
kick against reduc-
PROTEBT ing   Wages   coming
from such people.
They do not object to another section
of civic workers—the city laborers for
instance—being reduced. On the other
hand, through their mouthpiece the
Board of Trade, they nave demanded
that the laborers' wages be reduced.
Some pf them even going so far as to
describe the laborers' standard of $3
for eight hours as "the curse of the
city."
»      •      »    -. •
Quite a lot of people have been trying to figure it out, and we admit that
to the novice, unversed in recognizing
the mark of the economic beast, it must
seem rather perplexing. But the reason
is this: It is the* voice of Property,
protesting against a -proposal which
seems calculated to reduce the efficiency of the services performed by that
section of the working class whoso
work is the protection of property. The
argument that the work of the police
and firemen Ib more hazardous than
that of other workmen iB not borne out
by facts. Electricians for instance:
Thoae in the employ of the city are
also reduced in wagos. The number of
electricians killed or injured at work,
averages one per month, as is shewn by
the statistics of their union.
»      •      «      *
The number of policemen and firemen killed while on duty, does not exceed more than three of each during the
last five years. A comparison of the
casualties in those occupations, with
those among longshoremen, carpenters,
sewer-diggers, and other workers, shews
that the latter occupations are far more
risky. The wages of all these workers
have been reduced, but no outcry
against it comes from the quarter
whence comes the protest on behalf of
the police and.firemen. We do not want
to Bee the wages of civic employees of
any kind reduced. It does not augur
well for the wages of other workers.
But it !b just as well to point out that
Borne of those.who are posing as the
champions of the police and firemen;
are not really animated by the altruistic motives they would appear to be in
the eyes of some. It iB their property
they are worrying about. Just that
and no more.
R. L. D. TAYLOR, ex-mayor, and
present aspirant for the may*
oralty, addressed a meeting of
the Civic Employees' union, at their invitation, in the Labor Temple, last Friday night. The aldermanic candidates
of the Trades and
Labor council were
also invited to be
 I       present  and speak.
day night. The aldermanic candidates
of the Trades and Labor council were
also invited to be present and speak.
Some of them were there. A notice of
the meeting apeared in a prominent position in the World last Thursday and
Friday evenings. The wording of the
announcement evidently gave some the
idea that Mr. Taylor, by being at that
meeting, was in some way connected
with the civic election ticket of the
Trades and Labor council.
a       a       a       a
That this idea occurred to some people, was apparent from the fact that
the matter was raised on the floor of
the council meeting last Thursday. It
was then made plain tjur Mr, Taylor
was in no way connected with or responsible to the coune/, and that the
council was in no wt»y connected with
or responsible tor/mP. Taylor. It was
in the best inters of both Mr. Taylor and the j/P"Al'il to clear up that
point right/at the start. The council
has not shewn the slightest disposition
to fav?r the candidature of Mr. Taylor,
and ife feel sure he will agree that, to
allow any Impression to the contrary
to get abroad, might not ultimately
bring the favorable results which some
of; his, over-zealous supporters perhaps
hope for.
BOWSER
SAYS WAIT
AND SEE
ATTORNEY-GENERAL BOWSER
told a meeting at Grand Forks
last week that the government
realizes that the Workmen's Compensation act aB at present on the statute
books is practically
useless. He has at
last acquired enough political honesty or common-
sense to be able to
see that what organized! labor has been
telling him for years is true. He points
out that under the present act even if
a workman does succeed in getting
verdict in his favor, the award is eaten
up by legal expenses or in fighting insurance companies.
*       •       *       o
Yet in spite of these admissions, he
stated that the government does not intend to put a new compensation act on
the statute books this year, but that it
will be laid over for at least another
year. He says the reason for this is,
that the government wants to see how
the new compensation act works in Ontario. The real reason is, that a provincial election will be held before another session of the legislature meets.
The government will need all the election bait they can get to capture the
working class vote when that election
comes along. The promise of a new
Workmen's Compensation act will be
paft of that bait.
K'
FEDERATION
CONVENTION
JANUARY 2BTH
SPLIT IN
THE SOOIAL
DEMOCRATS
To Our Friends:
Thai Christmas present, and the
year to come
To you, in worth, may prove like traders'
gold,
Well used, Productive—So -wish we.
May joys increase in number as the year
grows old.
.CANADIAN FlN^CIERS TRUST COMPANY
HEAD OFFICE 839 HASTINGS ST. W.     VANCOUVER. B.C
II Patrick Donnelly-General Manager?	
described as fine fellows, who would do
credit to the province. Now that the
speculation bubble has burst, and no
chance offers for. these men to earn
bread, they are spoken of and treated
as loafers sponging on the community.
Men of Alderman McBeath's way of
thinking sowed the wind in British
Columbia; now they * are reaping the
whirlwind, which threatens to blow
them off their feet What is needed here
is not a "work test" for workmen,
but a "shirk test" for the real estate
sharks and financial harpies who have
never done any work, except the work
of working those who work.
HE
WORKERS
AND PROFIT
SHARING
ENRY FORD when starting his
profiting sharing scheme reserved the right' to look into
the homes of his workingmen and see
how they spent the money he paid
them. He stated
Mb purpose to make
a selection of workingmen who were
most thrifty and
temperate and domestic, and who showed the greatest
efficiency in labor in his factory. A
survey of the social conditions of tho
10,000 men in his employ was made
when he began paying dividends to
them, and a second survey wae made
five months later. In the five months
the average gain in bank accounts was
$173.86, or 130 per cent. The gain in
life insurance was 86 per cent. The
gain in the value of homes owned was
87 per cent., and of homes bought on
contract 95 per cent.
«      •      «      •
The company gave its pledge that the
men who owned their homes] and who
invested in life insurance, and who
saved in other ways Bhould have the
preference when men were toi be laid
off. So much for the worker. Now. for
the company. The figures given are for
February, 1913, under the old Wstem,
and for February, 1914, under jtho impulse of profit-sharing. February, 1913
—Number of motor cars matte and
shipped by 16,000 men, working ten
hours a day, 16,000. February, \l914—
Number of cars made and shipped by
15,800 men working eight hours a day,
26,000. Mr. Ford Bays that he is Satisfied with his experiment. Most likely
his employees are too. There ia so inueh
sugar round the pill that ninety ou-t of
a hundred would never notice the pill.
= 1
PROVINCIAL UNIONS
B. C. FEDERATION OF LABOR-
Meets In annual convention In January. Exeouttve officers, 1914-16: President, A, Watchman; vice-presidents, W.
F. Dunn, Jas. H. McVety, G. H. Fraser,
J. W. Gray, H. KnudBon, J. J. Taylor, B.
Simmons. Secretary-treasurer, A. S.
Wells,  Box  1536,   Victoria,   B, C.
NEW WESTMINSTER B.C.
NEW WESTMINSTER TRADES AND LABOR Council—Meets every seeond and
fourth Wedneaday it 8 p. tn, in Labor hall.
President, H. Knudson; financial seoretary,
R. A. Stoney; general secretary, W. B.
Maiden. P. O. Box 634. The public U Invited to Attend.   _
VANCOUVEB UNIONS
TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL —
Meeta flrat and third Thursdays. Executive board: Jas. H. McVety, president;
Frank Estlnghauser, vIce-preBldent; Geo.
Bartley, general secretary, 210 Labor
Temple; Miss H. Gutteridge, treasurer;
Fred A. Hoover, statistician; sergeant-
at-arms, John Sully; G, Curnock, F.
Knowles, W. R. Trotter, trustees.
PLUMBERS AND STEAMFITTERS* LOOAL
No. 496—Meets every aeoond and fourth
Friday of month in Laoor ball, 7:80 p. ra.
President, D. Webster; seoretary, A. Mo-
Uren. P. O. Box 950, New Westminster,
B. O.
VICTORIA,
VICTORIA TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL—Meets first and third Wednesday,
Labor hall, 781 Johnston street, tt 8 p. m.
President'A, S. Wells; seoretary, Thos. F.
Mathlson, Box 802, Victoria, B. O.
KIMBERLEY MINERS' UNION, NO. 100,
Western Federation of Mlnen—Meeta
Sunday evenings in Union hall. President,
Alex. Wilson; secretary-treasurer, J, W.
Stewart, Klmberley, B. 0.
Born in a manger Died on a cross.
The first and last experiment ln fully
applied Christianity.
Canada is spending nearly as muoh
in relieving the unemployed as it pavl
the immigrant concerns to bring then
here.
\
Says "Solidarity/' the organ of thej
I. W. W.: "There is an opening for \\
good soapboxer in Vancouver, B. C,
one who can talk good industrial unionism and no side issues.1'
War always yields a rich harvest to
military contractors, and never haB a
war yet been fought without some of
these gentlemen taking advantage of
the crisis in which the nation ia placed
to make exhorbitant profits at the expense of the Btate
British Columbia has an area of
305,000 square miles; a coast line of
7,000 miles; 20,000,000 acres of wheat
land; 5,000 acres of fruit land; 15,000,-
000 acres of standing timber; largest
coal areas in North America; its mines
have produced $60,000,000; its fisheries
$165,000,000; the finest and safest harbors on the Pacific coast; the best all-
year climate in Canada—and as rich a
crop of political numskulls as could be
found anywhere in the seven seas.
WANTS
A WORK
TEST
AliL LIEBKNECHT, in defying
the caucus of social democratic
members of the German Belch-
stag and voting against the second war
loan, has aroused considerable feeling,
as waa not entirely
unexpected. Recently Liebkne cht,
Franz Mehring,
Bosa Luxemburg
and Clara Zetkin issued a statement through the press of
Switzerland declaring that they did not
agree with the majority of the social
democratic members' of the Beichstag
in supporting the war. They added that
owing to war conditions they would not
elaborate on thoir views at this time.
«      *      ii      #
If the protestants are expelled from
tho party, as hns been threatened, according to cable diBpatchost a serious
situation will be developed in the social democratic party of Germany, The
Liebknecht faction has a very strong
following among the working class, but
thoBe who are opposed to the present
war policy are unable to make their
power felt because of the fact that martial law exists, and they could be arrested and summarily dealt with by the
military rulers.
How many more commissions are
necessary to flnd out what's wrong
with Canada.
?
ALDE KM AN McBEATH, who
earnestly hopes that the working class electors of Hastings
townsite will return him to the city
council at the coming civic elections—
despite the fact
that he is neither a
workman nor does
he live in Hastings
townsite — is very
much exercised as
to how a "work test" ean be devised
and applied to persons seeking employment on the civic relief work. From
what he says it would appear that some
of them do not show a disposition to
work like dray-horses in return for a
daily wage consisting of board, bunk
and 25 coats Moreovor he protests
against men from camps and other
works outside the city coming here
when those works are shut down and
expocting to get a job on civic relief
work.
»      *      •      *
The case of Alderman McBeath, nnd
those who think with him, is a sad one.
But we fear they will have to grin and
boar it with aB much fortitude as the
profits of real estate speculation can
bring to them. One thing they might
just as well be told iB, that all the
wealth which has over been produced
in British Columbia, haB been due to
the labor of these men whom he seems
to look upon ns more or less of a nuisance. When the boom was on, all the
cry waB for immigrants. We were told
at every turn that it was men and more
men who were needed. The federal
and provincial governments paid vast
Bums to the Salvation Army, the shipping and railway companies, and other
immigration concerns to bring men.
They came; and with their labor and
savings made a juicy harvest for the
real estate sharks  ^henaday they were
The BuBsian Social Democratic Party
arranged a council meeting near Petrograd on November 17 to consider how
best to further its efforts to obtain a
democratic constitution for the country. The tyrannical suppression of the
Socialist movement by the Bussian
autocracy made it necessary that the
council should sit secretly, but news of
the meeting reached the government
andl the council was raided by a detachment of police. Eleven leaders of
the party were present, including five
members of the Duma—MM. Petro-
vsky, Badayoff, Mouranefl, Sanoiloff,
nnd Chngoff. All were searched and
the six leaders who were not members
of the Duma were arrested. "The object of tho conference was clearly antl-
governmental," say the Russian authorities in justification of their action." "Our ally" is certainly a credit to US.
'' Everything is getting higher,'' said
the annoyed housewife as she surveyed
the grocer's bill. Oh, I don't know,"
replied the disgruntled hubby.
"There's your opinion of me, and my
opinion of you, and the neighbor's
opinion of both of us."
"Do you care for Crabbe's Tales!"
she asked. "I never ate any," replied her partner at the fancy dress
ball; "but I'm juBt dead stuck on lobster's claws."
City Auction and Commission Co.
Cash paid for houses and suites
of furniture or Auotion arranged.
Satisfaction snerantoed, prompt
settlement! ■
ARTHUR B. BETOHLET
Smytfae and Oranvllle Streets
Phone Sey. 8973
"Everything But
the Girl" for Your
New Home
At  Prieea  and terma to nit
yonr pockot-book.
Our Stook of
FURNITURE
must  be  seen  to  be  appreciated.
Cell in and look it em.
Hastings Furniture Co.
Limit*
•1 HASTINOS STREET WEST
SOUTH WELUMOION
SCREENED LUMP
COAL
$6.50
In TON LOTS, USUAL LOUTS
Phone Seymour 2930
508 PENDER STEEET
DOMINION FUEL CO.
We are now prepared to aeeept
orders for delivery of our
Washed Nut Coal
$5 PER TON
Delivered
This ooal, becauee of it* price,
la by no means a small alio, Inferior nut coal, but Ugh grade,
large sized WASHED NUT
COAL for kitchen use
W».inow what this coal will
do, havhsfc.Jfild JtuiP Victoria
for a number of years^-We are
therefore prepared to stariiKbe*
hind it and guarantee that it wiffvllJ
give you as good a kitchen fire as "*■
any high-priced coal you are now
uBlng. If you use wood, we
guarantee that it will give you a
cleaner, quicker and more economical kitchen fire than either
cord or mill wood.
Do not take our word for lt,
but try it on our money back
guarantee.
KIRK & CO.
929 MAIN STREET
"26 Tears in Victoria."
Seymour 1441
LABOR TEMPLE COMPANY, LTP.—
Directors: Fred. A. Hoover, J. H.
McVety, James Brown, Edward Lothian,
James Campbell, J. W. Wilkinson, R. P.
Pettipiece, John McMillan, Murdoch McKenzle,    P.    Blumberg,    '"
Managing Director, J,
Sll.
_    H.   H.   Free.
H. McVety, Room
I
ALLIED   PRINTING   TRADES    COUN-  ,
CIL.— Meets second Monday ln the
month. President, Oeo. Mowat; secretary, R. H. Neelands, P. O. Box 66.
BAKERS*  AND CONFECTIONERS'  LOCAL ,
Iiiuimimhi No. 46—Meets second and ]
II C-Jtaff i     fourth   Saturdays  at  7:80 ,
tf9*rf$3     P* m    P»bI<Uhl u o. Lee-
-""JI* worthy;^corresponding see- |
retary, R. J. Adams;  business agent, J. Blac'
■ 220 Labor Temple.
BARBERS'    LOCAL    No.    120.—MEETS
second  Tuesday ln eaoh month 8.30 i
a.    President, J. Bruce; reeoorder, C.
Herrltt;  secretary-business agent,  C. i
F. Burkhart,  Room 208, Labor   Temple.
Hours: 11 to 1; 6 to 7 p.m.
BARTENDERS'    LOCAL   No.  676.—OF-
flce, Room 208 Labor Temple.   Meeta /
flrat Sunday of eaoh month.   President, i
F. F. Lavlgne; flnanclal secretary, Geo.
W. Curnook, Room 208, Labor Temple.
BRICKLAYERS' AND MASONS', NO. •
—Meets every iat and 3rd Tuesday,
8 p.m., Room 807. President, Jamea ,
Haslett; corresponding secretary, W. ,
Dagnall, Box 63; flnanclal secretary, F,
R. Brown; business agent, W. S. Dagnall, Room 216.
BROTHERHOOD    OF   BOILER    MAKERS
and Iron Ship   Builders   and   Helpers  I
of America, Vanoouver   Lodge   No.   191—
Meets   first   and    third   Mondays,   8   p. l
Presidont, F. Barclay,   868   Cordova   East;
seoretary, A. Fraser, 1161 Howe street.
COOKS,    WAITERS    AND    WAITRESSES
Union—Meets    flrst    Friday    in    each
month, 8:80 p. m., Lsbor Temple.   A. Gra- i
ham, business representative.   Ofllce:    Room
206, Labor Temple.   Hours:   8:B0 a. m. to
10; 2 and 6 p. m. to 8:30.    Competent help j
furnished on short notice.   Phone Sey. 8414, \
DISTRICT COUNCIL OF CARPENTERS I
meets in room 200, Labor Temple, see- f
ond and fourth Thursday of eaoh month, 0 i
p. m. Preaident, G. ET, Hardy; aeoretary,
F. L. Barratt; treasurer, W. T. Taylor. Local No. 217 meeta flnt and third Mon* i
day of eaoh month, and Looal 2647 meeta
flrst and third Tuesday of each month.
ELECTRICAL WORKERS, LOCAL NO. Sit
—Meets room 801, Labor Temple, every
Monday, 8 p. m. President, Dave Fink}
vlce-pres ident, M. Sander; recording seoretary, Roy Elgar, Labor Temple; flnanolal
secretary and business agent, E. H. Morrison,
room 207, Labor Temple.
ELECTRICAL WORKERS, LOCAL NO. ;
621 (Inside Men)—Meets flrst and'
third Mondays of each month. Room 206,1
8 p. m. President, H. R. Van Sickle; recording secretary, J. M. Campbell; busl-
ness agent, F. L. Estinghausen, Room 207. |
HODCARRIERS, BUILDING AND COMMON J
Laborers' onion. No. 86—Meeta flrst and 1
third Friday of each month, Labor Temple. I
President, Oeorge Gibson; aeeretary, .George J|
Harrison, room 220, Labor Temple.   All laV^
orers Invited to meeting.
MACHINISTS,  NO.   182—MEETS  SECOND,
and fourth Frldys at 8 p. m.   President
A.   R. ■ Towler:    recording   secretary,    «,
Brookes; financial secretary, J. H. Mo vety.
*
MOVING PICTURE OPERATORS, Lo-L
oal 848 I. A. T. S. E.—Meets flrst Sttn-1
day of eaoh month, Labor Tem--]
pie, 8 p.m. President H. C. Roddan; eec-f
retary-treasurer, L. E. Goodman; recording secretary, A. O. Hansen: busl
ness agent, G. R. Hamilton. Officii
Room 100, Loo Bldg.   Tel. Sey. 3046.
MUSICIANS" MUTUAL PROTECTIVE
Union, Local No. 146, A. F. of M.-
Meets second Sunday of eaoh month,
rooms 29-80, Williams Building, 418 Gran<
villa street. President, J. Bowyer; vice*
president, F. English; secretary, H. J.I
Brasfleld; treaaurer, W. Fowler.
in tne month In room 801, La
Resident, A. Hurry: cot respond!
F. SrmpV&L 1830 Twenty-third i
financial seoTWtt^* J?- Scott, 6'
ISTdmM
OPERATIVE    PLASTERERS'     INTERNA-1
TIONAL     ASSOCIATION,   No.   89 —L
Meets   every   flrst   and   third   Wednesdays
the  month in room 801, Labor Temple-H
*  ~' ..spending secretary^
•third avenue eaaiif
677 Richer*
street; treaflurer,"L^"*Ty¥fl*2>^»rKtT..T-—-^H
PAINTERS',.   PAPERHANGERS'.   Aft'jM
Decorators',  Local   138—Meets  everyw
Thursday, 7.80 p.m. President, H. Grand ;_*
financial  seoretary,   J.   Freckleton,   10231
Comox  street;   recording   secretary,   R.P
Dowding,   622   Howe   street.     Business]
agent, James Train,  **—  ""   " "
Temple.
Room  803,   Laboil
SYNOPtlt  OF  COAL   MINING   REGULATION*
Coal mining rlghta of tha Dominion,
In Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,
tht Tukon Territory, tht Northwest Ter-
ritoriet and ln a portion of tht Province
of Brltlih Columbia, may bt Itaaed for
a term ef twenty-one yean at an annua)
rental of $1 an aore. Not more than
1,660 acres will ba leaaed to ont applicant.
Applications for least muat bt made by
tht applicant ln person to tht Agent or
Sub-Agent of tht dlatrlct ln which the
rlghta applied for art situated.
In surveyed territory ttat land muat be
described by sections, or legal subdivisions of sections, and In uniurvtyed territory tht tract applied for ihall be
staked by the applicant himtelf.
Eaeh application must be accompanied
by a fat of 16, which will be refunded If
tht right! applied for are not available,
but not otherwise. A royalty shall be
paid on tht merchantable output of ttat
mine at the rate of Ave centi per ton.
The person operating tht mine shall
furnish the Agent with sworn returni
accounting for tht full quantity of raer-
ohantablt coal mined and pay the royalty thereon. If the coal mining rights
are not being operated, such returns
ihould be furnished at least once a year.
The least will Include the coal mining
rlghta only, but the leasee may be permitted to purchase whatever available
surface rights may be considered necessary for the working of the mine at tht
rate of 110 an acre.
For full Information application ihould
be made to the Seoretary of the Department of the Interior, Ottawa, or to any
Agent or Sub-Agent of Dominion Lands
W. H. CORY,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N. B.—Unauthorised publication of thie
advertisement will not be paid for—306A6
PATTERN    MAKERS'     LEAGUE     OF,
NORTH AMERICA.—Vancouver and
vicinity.   Branch meets 1st and Srd Fri-^
days at Labor Temple, room 206. RobertH
C.   Sampson,   Prei.,  747  Dunlevy Ave.-^
Jos.  Q.   Lyon, financial  secretary,   i72H
Grant street; J. Campbell, according aeo-4
retary, 4869 Argyle itreet. \
STBRBOTYPBRS* AND ELBCTROTTP-L
tn' Union, No. 88, of Vancouver andl
Victoria—Meets second Wedneaday ofl
eaoh month, 4 p. m„ Labor Temple. Presl-1
dtnt, Chu, Bayley; recording secretary,!
A. Birnle, co. "News Advertiser." ■
STREET AND ELECTRIC RAILWATl
Employees, Pioneer Division No. 1011
—Meets Labor Temple second and fourth!
Wednesdays at 2 p.m., ahd first and]
third Wednesdays, 8 p.m. president,!
W. H. Cottrell; recording secretary.f
Albert V. Lofting, 2661 Trinity streetil
flnanclal secretary and buslneas agent, ]
Fred, A. Hoover, 2409 Clark Drive.
STEAM   ENGINEERS,   INTERNATION-_
al Local 897—Meets every Wednesday 1
I p. m., room 204, Labor Temple. Financial atcntary, B. Prendergaat, room lit.
TAILORS' INDUSTRIAL UNION (IN-_
ternatlonal). Local No, 178—Meetings!
held flrst Tuesday ln each month, 8 p. m. I
President, Miss H. Gutteridge; recording I
lecretary, C. MoDonald. Bos SOS; fli
clal sec., K. Paterson, P. O. Box 603.
THEATRICAL   STAGE   EMPLOYEES,  LO-,
OAL No, lit—Meets second Sunday ol I
eaoh  month at room 204,    Labor Temple. I
President, H. Spears;   recording   seoretary,
Geo. W. Allin, P. O. Boy Til, Vanconver.
TYPOGRAPHICAL    UNION,    NO.    936 —
Meets lut Sonde? er each month at S I
S, m.   President, R. P. Peltlptseej vloe-preal* I
ent W. 8. Keillor! aeeretary-treasarer, B.
H. Neelands, P. 0. Boi 66.
Printers and
Labor Temple
Building
Phone Sey. 4490
Printers of The Pkd.
BU-ftlNKBS   AGENT   DIRECTORY
Ask for Labor Temple   'Phone  Exchange,
Seymour .7496   (unleu  otherwise  stated).
Bartenders—Room 208; Geo. W. Curnock.
Bricklayers—Room 216; Wm. S. Dagnall.
Barbers—Room 208; O. F. Burkhart; phone
Sey. 1776.
Cooks,    Waiters,    Waitresses—Room    208;
Andy Graham; phone Sey.  8414.
Electrical Workers (outside)—Room 207; E.
H. Morrison.
Electrical Workers (inside)—Room 207; F.
L, Estinghausen,
Englneera (steam)—Room 216; E. Prendergut.
Longshoremen's   Association —  Offloe,   146
Alexander street; 7. Payne;   phone   Sey,
0869.
Moving Picture Operators—G. R. Hamilton;
room 100, Loo building; phone Sey. 8046.
Musicians—H.    J.    Brasfleld;   rooms   29-80,
Williams  building,  418  Granville atreet;
phone' Sey. 2680.
Street Railway Employees—Fred, A. Hoover;
phoue Sey. 608,
Typographical—Rooms 212-18-14; R. H. nee*
FREE!   FREE!   FREE!
Sixty Watt
Tungsten Lamps
A Sixty Watt Tungsten Lamp ot tbe highest grade (such as Is regularly sold over our counters at 40 cents) will be given any lighting customer of the B. O. Electric who purchases at regular sale an Electric
Household Appliance, valued at $3.00 or over at any B, O. Electric sales
room during the month of December.
THIS SPECIAL OFFEB IB MADE TO CALL TOTO ATTENTION
TO ELZOTBIO HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES AS HANDSOME, USEFUL, DURABLE AND SENSIBLE CHRISTMAS OIFTS.
VISIT OUR SALEBROOM8-OUR LINE INCLUDES OUTS
SUITED TO EVERY NEED AND WITHIN THE BEACH OF ALL.
Curtll ud
HutinpStreel
B.C. ELECTRIC
H38G...Yill.St
NuiOm DAY.. ..'■ ..DECEMBER 25, 1914
TUT
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
mama
PAGE THREE
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
Good Novels, 50c Each
CLOTHBOUND
. Marie OoreUl—
God's Good Man
The Master Christian
Holy Orders
The Treasure of Heaven
H. A. Cody—
The Long Patrol
The Fourth Watoh
W. A. Westcott—
David  Harum
Nellie McLung—
Sowing Seeds in Danny
The Second Chance
Marlon Keith—
The Silver Maple
Duncan  Polite
Treasure Valley
R. W. Service
The Trail of '98
B. T, Thurston—
The  City of  Beautiful  Nonsense,
The  Greatest  Wish  in  the
World
H. G. Hutchinson—
The Happy Warrior
H. McOrath—
The* Garden of Allih      ■
Bella Donna
The Call of the Blood
Alice Began Bice—
Mrs. Wlggs of tbe Cabbage
Patch
Levey Mary N
Ralph Connor—
The Foreigner
The Dootor ■
The Prospector \'
The Sky Pilot
Black Rook
The Man from Glengarry
Glengarry Schooldays
Joseph Hocking— \
The Purple Robe
The Scarlet Woman
Bex Beach—
The Ne'er Do Well
The Net
Stewart Edward White—
The Biased Trail
John ; Fox,  Jan.
The Little Shepherd of Kingdom Come
David Spencer limited
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
VANCOUVER
City Market
MAIN STREET
Turkeys!   Turkeys!    Turkeys!
Large consignments are arriving
daily, dressed and live
« also
LfVE and DRESSED GEESE
LIVE and DRESSED  FOWL
Quality the highest
Prices the lowest
VANCOUVER
City Market
MAIN STREET
y
Braids
Best
Coffee
Wm kuaid rt -"
Did/You Get Yours
This Morning?
BRAID'S
BEST
COFFEE
Granville SL
to th*  Market
WM. TURNER -
-DEALER IN-
New and second-hand China, Crockery, Furniture,
Hardware and Stoves. Furniture moving and shipping. Telephone us when you have furniture for
gale. Highest prices paid.
TELEPHONE SEYMOUR 3745
25% OFF ALL TRUSSES THIS MONTH
RED STAR DRUG STORE.
53 Cordova Street West Vancouver, B. 0.
Forth.! th. Bom. Industry Mov.rn.at by h.vlnf
thl. X*bel appur on roar prlnttd matter.. It standi
(or food workm.nitlp, fool dtlniuhlp, doeut
vsgti nd th. up-houdltif of tho city.
ALLIED PBDranrO I8ADES
Compose! of Typoitspatad Moll, Web Fninun'i Onion. Frtnttos JPieis-
msa's Onion. Pr... AMUfimU' Union. St.notn.ri' ud BUotrotjp.nr Onion,
Bookblndui' Onion, Fhoto*«n|rmn' Onion.
"Nature Teeth" are not only LUXURIOUS but-they=
are NECESSARY for EFFICIENCY
BUILT
IN THE
MOUTH
Luiury  .
Necessity
Efficiency
IM Sew
gund.rd.Buk
Bldi., Blchuds
B.cond Floor
lottaaee
Boom 119
Phon lor.
s.o.T.S
OWN
EST
WL.
THESE "Nature Teeth" of mine (entirely different from
ordinary and ugly "False Teeth) whloh are made to
match the one. that grew In your Jawa—In shape and .Ue
and exact bint—and to fit like the ones Nature gave you.
FilHESE "Nature Teeth" are truly luxurious beoause you
M. can bite, ohew and smile with them in perfect conn*
denoo and comfort.
BUT they are also necessary to health and efficiency. The
old "False Teeth" are truly fals.,  for they  are  but
makeshifts and do not perform the functions of Nature's own
teeth,
mastication of the  food—whloh means stomach health and
NATURE'S own teeth, then, or their worthy successors
—my  "Nature Teeth"—are necessary to tbe proper
general efficiency'—and to the luxurloue sense of well-being
which makes for that efficiency.
"TOO SOFFEB NO PA»" OOABADTEBD
I HEREBY GUARANTEE that all dental work
performed by me will b. absolutely palnl.se. If th.
slightest twinge of pain-is experienced by th. patient no money need be paid to me. or if any haa
been paid it will be instantly refunded by mn.
I furter guarantee that aU crown or bridg. work
or fllling will remain In flnt-olaw condition for t
Serlod of TEN TEABB.   If any of my worr boromo.
efectlre during that tlm. I will riplac. It Absolutely
FREE OF OHARGE
Dr. HALL, "The Modern Dentist"
FIFTH ANNUAL MEETING OF
LABOR TEMPLE SHAREHOLDERS
The fifth annual meeting ef the
shareholders of Vancouver Labor Temple company was held in the Temple
last Friday evening with a good attendance present. The yearly report and
balance sheet of the directors'was presented and vigorously, discussed for
two hours Secretary-Treasurer McVety, in presenting the report of the
auditors—Messrs. Orehan, Martin ft
Co.—-referred to their statement that
the Labor Temple Oompany was one
out of four or five of all the business
firms whose books were audited by
them, which showed a profit for the
past year.
The volume of business done by the
company during the year, like all other
concerns, showed a reduction as compared with last year, but considering
the nature of the enterprise and the
very bad industrial conditions which
prevail, it was felt that a very fair
showing had been made.
A Very lively interest was displayed
in the present standing and future policy of the oompany, the various items
on the balance sheet being taken up
seriatum and thoroughly discussed, especially in those cases where it.was
felt such discussion would result in
bringing out points for the guidance of
the company's affairs in such fashion
as would enable it to get over the
period of depression with advantage
for the future.
Several shareholders to whom official
notices had been sent, had not been
able to get those notices owing to them
being returned by the postal authorities for lack of correct address. Those
shareholders should notify the manager as early as possible of their change
of address.
Below will be found the annual atatement of the company for the year ending October 31st, 1914, ai prepared by
the firm of Crehan, Martin ft Oompany,
chartered accountants and municipal
auditors:
BALANCE SHEET AS AT OCTOBER 31st, 1914
Vancouver, B. 0., December 4, UU.
To the Dli-eetors and Shareholders of the Vancouver Labor Temple Company, Limited, Vancouver, B. 0.
Gentlemen—According to instructions we have audited the books of the Oompany for the year ended October 31st,
1914, nnd herewith prosent you with the result of our examinations as set forth on the following exhibits:
Exhibit "A"--Profit and Lobs Statement for year ended October 31, 1914.
Exhibit "B"—Balance Sheet as at October 31st, 1914.
Profit ud Loss Statement.
On. Exhibit "A" we present you with a detailed statement of this account, which shows a profit for the year of
♦1^177.76. . "
Balance Sheet.
On Exhibit "B" we submit a detailed statement of the Company's affairs as at Ootober 31st 1914.
Cash—We have verified the correctness of this item. Sundry Debtors—All accounts considered bad have been
written off. Building and Fixtures—No depreciation has been written off. Liabilities—We have taken to account
all accrued interest on the Company's liabilities.
Ths Balance Sheet annexed and signed by us as relative hereto is, in our opinion, a full and fair Balance Sheet, containing the particulars required by the regulations of the Company, and is drawn up so as to exhibit a true and correct
view of the Company's affairs, according to the best of our information and the explanations given to us, and as shown
by the books,
We lave obtained from the Directors and Officers of thdrCpmpany all the explanations and information we have
required./ Yours faithfully,
j (Signed)       CEEHAN,  MABTIN  ft CO.,
Chartered Accountants and Municipal Auditors.
Cash-
On hand $
At Bank of Mont*
treal 	
Sundry Debtors— '
On Open account
Unexpired Insur-
suranee .',	
Labor Temple
Building	
Furniture and Fixtures  	
Billiard Boom
(Fixtures ....  ..
RJsal Estate—
[Lots 21/ 22 and
j23, Blk 35, S. D.
,541. Cost ....
[Addition in revaluation (added
"ot. 31st,  1912)
ASSETS.
.50
100.87
4,133.30
378.00
*- V.
101.37
4,511.30
$153,622.86
3,591.55
.  1,498.16
4,612.67
-$158,712.57
$50,000.00
80,000.00
Incorporation
penses
Ex-
-$130,000.00
328.50
$293,653.74
LIABILITIES.   ,
To the Public:
Sundry Creditors-
Prudential Assurance Company,  secured  by   flrst
!    mortgage $107,000.00
C. Doering, secured by second mortgage    15,350.00
Accrued interest     3,418.50
Accrued Salaries         390.00
Accrued Taxes 2,457.71
Bills Payable       1,800.00
On Open Account         207.50
To the Shareholders:
Profit and Loss Account—
Undivided Profit as at
Oct. 31, 1913..     3,276.27
Profit for year ending
Oct. 31, 1914 .     1,177.76
Appreciation Account
Capital Stock Account:
Authorized: 100,000 shares of
$1.00 each .. .$100,000.00
Allotted: 80,346 shares of
$1.00 each ...   80,346.00
Less cancelled 185 shares of
$1.00 each  ...       185.00
-$130,623.71
4,454.03
80,000.00
80,161.00
Less Unpaid .... 1,635.00
Paid on Cancelled Shares.,
78,526.00
50.00
163.030.03
$293,653.74
PROFIT AND LOSS STATEMENT FOR YEAR ENDING OCTOBER 31st, 1914
To
Salaries  $1,433.00
Janitor's Wages. 2,663.00
Janitor's supplies   360.03
Repairs     343.00
Fuel   1,093.53
Light     224.97
Taxes 1,218.82
Insurance       978.35
Water        390.70
Telephone         113.74
Elevator Power and
'  Repairs        139.25
Scavenging .... 71.50
Towel Service .. 132.00
Legal and
Audit Expense 76.50
Office Expense .. 218.45
Int. on Mortgages 7,023.10
Int. and Discount 263.25
General Expense 27.00
Office Rent .... 240.00 •
Tool Room Rent.   180.00
By Rentals Earned $18,921.00
$17,190.19
553.05
1 Bad Accounts written off
' Balance being profit
carried to Balance Sheet       1,177.76
$18,921.00
$18,921.00
PRESIDENT
SUSPENDER
NONE - SO   EASY
MADE IN CANADA
MENTION THE B.  O.  PEDEBATIONIST
Union
MADE
Deer ^
Of America ^Sb*'
COfmUHT ___ __________ 1103
MENTION THE B. O. FEDERATIONIST
HARRON BROS.
FUNERAL   DIRECTORS AND
•EMBALMERS
Vancouver—Offlee and Chapet,
1034 Oranvllle St., Phone Sey. 3486.
North Vancouver — Offlce and
Chapel, 122—Sixth St. West, Phone
184.
SECRET   DIPLOMACY
THE   OCTOPUS
Seerot diplomacy is tho barrier which
separates the peoples; which prevents
a reasoned and reasonable discussion
of international disputes and precipitates the peoples into wnr. It is the
octopus whose all-embracing tentacles
drng down the peoples into the abyss
of desolation. Secret diplomacy is the
dominating factor in the statecraft of
Europe, the basic cause of militarism,
armaments, incendiary press campaigns, and the rest of the paraphernalia leading to war. Substitute for it
public instruction and discussion; a tribunal where the real or aupposed conflicting interests of the nations can be
thrashed out in advance by impartial
assessors, and militarism, with its gigantic and insensate waste of the communally-earned wealth of the peoples,
its piteous misdirection of talent and
devotion, and its criminal and imbecile
consummation — tho slaughter of tens
of thousands and the misery of millions,
would cease to exist because it would
cease to possess relevancy to human issues. War as the solution for international disputes would disappear as it
has disappeared in religious disputes.
Had tho needs and requirements, the
reasonable fears, the j general problems
and difficulties of the now belligerent
peoples been known}o,nd realized by
public opinion; had thoir adjustment
not boen at the mercy of tho intrigues,
narrow prejudices, and ignorance of a
handful of bureaucrats tunneling in
the dark and escaping all effective pub*
He control, the nil ;rs of so-called
Christian Europe woald not to-day bo
assisting at the mut al destruction of
their peoples
CENTER & HANNA, Ud.
UNDERTAKERS
Refined Serrice
104» GEORGIA  STREET
One  Block  west of Court Houie.
Uae of . Modern Chapel and
Funeral  Parlors  free  to all
Patrons
Phon Sir. 221
Dit er Niiht
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
and EMBALMERS
520 Rickirii SI.       Vsacoaw, B. C.
Phone:  Fairmont 810
Patterson* Chandler
Manufacturers of
MONUMENTS
Vaults, Curbing, Etc.
Ofllce and Works:
Cor. 16th Ave. aad Mala St. i
Branch Office: 40th ft Fraser Aves.!
VANCOUVER, B.C.       ( |
Mr. Union Man
Are you eating Union-made Bread, are you
helping to maintain the Union Standard of living by
using goods produced by Union Labor!
BREWER'S XL BREAD
has the Union Label on'every loaf, and in quality
and flavor it is unexcelled.
Phone Highland 573 and we -will call at your
house.
BREWER'S XL BAKERY,
Comer 4th Avenue and Commercial Street.
YOU HATB A CHANCE TO OET
TOUB DOLLARS BAOK
When you buy
British  Columbia Made
Gooda
Every dollar spent in Easterns or
Foreign Ooods is gone forever
Leckie Boots are Made in
Vancouver
Luto oa feting them, ud you gtt
honest nine for yon money mty
Umt.
J. LECKIE CO., Limited
Vancouver
HEALTH il mott to ho desired ud if of mon Tint Important* to tta
well-being ud happiness of tta Individual thu mat ricbee. Poor,
tooth sooner or later mean poor health. To ta healthy we mut tan
tta power to assimilate on food. Bofore lt cu ta assimilated, it mn
ta thoroughly digested, before lt cu ta dlfMted lt mut ta thoroughly
maattgated, ud before lt cu ta maatljated yoa mut tare good tooth
with whloh to maiUgau.
Owing to tho stringency of tho money market I am ottering to do dental
work at very moderate prices
Silver filling  $100
Platinitefilling..  2 00
Gold Crowns or Porcelaine Crowns. 5 00
Bridge-work, per tooth  5 00
Plates .7.  .. 10 00
Dr. BRETT ANDERSON
Phone Seymour 8331 Offlce: 101 Bank of Ottawa ]
„ 5555
PRIVATE GREETING CARDS MUST BE
ORDERED NOW FOR ENGLISH MAILS
•XMAS OOODS ARRIVINOEVERY DAY
AU UH1B HOW BHNO SHOWN
Thomson Stationery Co., Ltd.
US HASTINOS STRUT WUT VANCOUVIN, I. C.
■UT IN THI WIST UTAILItHID IMS
lt$l
WORKERS UNION
UNIOJ^STAMP
Jicrary
Named Shots ua frequently mtde ia Non-
Union Factories—Do Not Bay Any Shoe
no matter wtat Its name, unless It boars a
plain ud readable Impression or thli stamp.
All eboes without tho Union Stamp an
always Non-Union,
HOOT A SHOE WORKERS' UNION
IM Summer Btreet, Boston, Hue.
J. F. Tobln, Pros.   C. L. Blaine, Seo.-Treu.
COAL!!
WHICH WILL YOU
SUPPORT ?
The Company which sells
BRITISH COLUMBIA
OOAL
8
The Company whieh sells
AMERICAN
OOAL
and Employs
White Labor
and Employs
Oriental Labor
Fifteen Yean in Vancouver Ooal Trade
WELLINGTON AND COMOX COAL 	
WHITE LABOR ONLY
MACDONALD MARPOLE CO., Ltd.
427 Seymour Street Phone Sey. 210
THE POPULAR PRICED, EUROPEAN PLAN
HOTEL RITZ
VICTORIA, B.C.
FORT ST., AT DOUGLAS
RATES 75c, $1.00, $1.26, $1.60, $2.00
C. J. LOVEJ07, MOR. FREE AUTO BUS
When You Want a
First-Class Beer
-ONE THAT TOU CAN'T BEAT AT ANT PRICE, IN ANT
OOUNTBT, OET BEER WITH THIS LABEL ON. PINTS, BIZ
FOB riTTT CENTS. ~*
BREWED AND BOTTLED IN VANCOUVEB BT
VANCOUVER BREWERIES, Ltd. PAGE POUR
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FBIDAT..... .DECEMBER 25, 101
MEN'S BOOTS
Values to $7.00
to sell
for ..
$3.75
These go on sale Saturday, December 26th. Every pair is made in Canada by two of the most reliable firms in the Dominion. Many styles to choose
from with goodyear welt soles, and with uppers of
Gunmetal calf, Box calf, tan Russia calf, Vici Kid,
Patent colt, and brown chrome waterproof leather,
with double waterproof soles, single soles, and half-
double soles. Every pair is guaranteed by the makers, and backed up by the Hudson's Bay Company
to be as represented.
ACTUAL VALUES TO $7.00.
PRICE..	
SALE
$3.75
K(iS»BuiJson'sBauCompnnif. iju
\~:._*J mmnmt i» ' «»imsSBiii is—» 1 ^~^
\1
PENDER HOTEL
sis numna stbbet wnsi
Mew, Modern, Flrt-Olsis
Steam Boated, Electric Lighted
Telephone Sejmear late
Bates S-..S0 per Dor and Up
THFXANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
Capital.
...111,0110,000      Rest..,
 llt.800,000
Main Offloa: Corner Hastings and Oranvllle Streeta, Vanoouver.
CITV BRANCHES
HASTINOS and CAHBIB-
BA8T END .
COMMERCIAL DRIVE .
FAIRVIEW	
MOUNT PLEASANT .....
KITSILANO .
POWELL STREET	
SOUTH HILL ..- 	
LOCATION
 Cor. Heatings and Cambie Streeta.
...-Cor. Pender and Main streets.
......Cor. First Avenue and Commercial Drive.
,.:...Cor, Sixth Avenue and Oranvllle Street
...Cor. Eighth Avenue and Main Street
 Cor. Fourth Avenue and Tew Btreet.
-—.-.Cor.* Vlotoria Drive and Powell Street
............Cor. Forty-fourth Avenue and Fraaer Road.
Alao North Vanoouver Branoh, cor.   Lonsdale   Avo.  and   Eeplanada.
The 8,000 Members of Organized Labor in Vancouver, affiliated with 52 Unions, Are Earning and
Spending $24,000 Every Work Day
Merchants, Manufacturers, Professional Men, Caterers and those wbo
desire a share of the above patronage can secure tbe most direct results
by using the columns of Tbe
B.C. Federationist
Official paper of Vancouver Trades and Labor Council and the B. C, Federation of Labor—issued every Friday morning from its offices in Organized Labor's Quarter-of-a-mllllon-dollar Home, at the corner of
Homer and Dunsmuir Streets.
If Interested Telephone Seymour 7495 and Our
Advertising Manager Will Call
In the heart of ihe retail districts Absolute^
fee-roof ami mode*** in «iy respect Cuisine
unexcelled. European plan, $1 lo $3 per day.
FREE AUTO BUS MEETS All TRAINS. Owned tm
apenled hy Tlie Provincial Hotel. Compiny Limited.
HOW AHD 1 SHEEHAN, Pwto.	
T.B. CUTHBERTSON ft Oo.
Men's Hatters and Outfitters
Three Stores
Ti*. that Watoh to Appl.br. sos
Feeder Weat, Cor. Pender and
Richards, (or nlgh-class watoh,
clock and jewellery repairs. All
cleaning and mainsprings Jobs
guaranteed for 12 months.
The Federationist
Will bo mailed to aay address outside
of Vancouver Olty, ln Canada, from now
until January 1, 1916, for $1.60.
Superior
Printing
AT MODERATE
PRICES
Telephone:
Sty. 7495
LABOR TEMPLE
The FEDERATIONIST
can supply all your Printing
needi. No Job too large oi
too small. First-c' s workmanship, good ink and high-
grade stock have given our
Printers a reputation (or
SUPERIOR PRINTING
Union Work a Specialty.
Our Prices are right and we
deliver when wanted.
THE HOME OF ORGANIZED LABOB AT WINNIPEG, MAN.
COMPENSATION ACT
Workmen's    Compensation
Will Be Topical in Coming Year.
Federationist Will Summarize Representative
Legislation.
In view of the prominence which
will be given to the subject of workmen's compensation in British Columbia, during the next year, The Federationist-will publish summaries of compensation acts of various states and
countries which are supposed to have
had considerable experience of legislation of this kind. The various acts of
Australia and Tasmania will be summarized1 flrst, and will appear weekly.
Following is the Workmen'a Compensation act of New South. WaleB, and
which became law in 1910:
New South Wales Act.
The Workmen's Compensation act,
1010, defines an employer as "a person
who habitually employs at least four
persons," and includes companies, corporations, etc.
Nature of work to which the act applies—Manual labor in railway, tramway, factory, mine, quarry, wharf, vessel, engineering or building work, and
proclaimed dangerous employment.
Workers expressly excluded—Casuals: miners who come under the provisions of the Miners' Accident Belief
act.
Employer not liable to pay compensation for—Injury disabling for less tban
two weeks.
In spite of insolvency the full amount
of compensation must be admitted as
flrst charge on assets.
Compensation in case of death—If
dependents left—three years earnings,
or £200, whichever is larger. Maximum, £400. If no dependents—maximum amount for medical attendance
and funeral expenses £12, if not payable by a friendly society.
Compensation in case of incapacity—
Weekly paymenl^-half average weekly
earnings, maximum £1. Maximum total liability £200..
Compensation to workers over 60
years of age who have 'entered into an
agreement—Death (where there are
dependents), minimum £50. Incapacity
—minimum weekly payment 5b. Maximum total liability £60.
Compensation for'infirm workers who
have entered into an agreement—
Death—minimum payment £25, or 39
times average weekly earnings, whichever Is larger. Incapacity—weekly
minimum payment—5s. or quarter of
weekly earnings, whichever is larger.
Maximum total liability £50.
Compensation for workers under 21
years of age earning less than 20s.
weekly—Weekly payment — average
weekly earnings, maximum 10b.
Period after which lump sum can be
substituted for weekly payment—Six
months.
Tribunal if clnim not settled by
agreement—District court if claim over
£30. Stipendiary or police magistrate
if £30 or less.
No special provision is made as to
payments to an injured worker leaving
the State of New South Wales,
Civic Qualifications.
Editor B. C. Federationist: Now
that the civic elections are drawing
near It may be well to take note of
the absurd qualifications that are required of candidates and electors. That
obsolete document tho present city
charter says that before a person can
run for mayor he must be possessed of
firoperty to the assessed value of at
oast $1,000. Aldermen half this amount and electors any amount or a tenant. That the civic officials' qualifications aro much greater than that of
those who elect them is like saying that
the servant Is greater than his master,
and "he that Is sent greater than he
that sent him." No one can honestly
maintain that the possession of property either by electors or elected tonds in
the .slightest degree towards efficient
■Jministration; in fact experience
<>wi it is really tho reverse as the re-
tad flf Vancouver or any other city
ni.owi. A person that is qualified to
il for the premier of Canada or
rat Britain is surely qualified to vote
elty mayor, for the former has the
iol of millions of dollars where the
V tinkers with hundreds. Perhaps
fas than ninety per eent. of those
k
who have gone, and are going to fight
in defence of Canada, and, of course,
Vancouver, have any say in the administration of the cities tney are defending, for while Aey are qualified to die
for the city, yet they are not qualified
to have any say in how its affairs
should be administered,
I have recently heard several persons
boastfully proclaim that they were taxpayers, in fact one would think that
tax-paying was a voluntary action on
their part, and that they become possessed of a piece of property merely
for the pleasure it gave them of paying
taxes, and that therefore they are entitled to special privileges because they
do that which they cannot hetp doings
but would rather not do if they could
get out of it. It is eaBy to see these
days where the. taxes really come from,
when the majority of the working people of Vancouver were busy, taxes were
easily obtained, but now that they are
idle taxes are about as difficult to get
as oil in Alberta
The provincial or dominion voters
list is good enough for cities, and we
would then be able to choose practical
men to manage civic affairs instead of
as now being limited to a few of the
most undesirable class. I am pleased
to see the Trades and Labor council
butting in in spite of this property
handicap, and trust that ell the labor
candidates will be elected They will
be quite an improvement on the present
bunch. KKADER.
Vancouver, B. <L Dec. 24, 1914.
Cooks, Waiters and Waitresses.
The past year has been extremely
bad for employees in the catering trade
and from what it seems at present is
not likely to get much better unless we
can get the employers to give us a better deal than they have done in the
past.*
They still stick to the Asiatic in preference to a white worker in the catering trade.
I would like to know who the employers get their trade from, certainly
not from the Orientals. Their trade
comes from the white population, still
they won't even give a sporting
chance to white help to make a living.
We hear a lot these days about B. C-
made goods. I should like to see the
public have a preference for B. C. white
labor ln the' catering Industry.    J, B.
TRAD! UNJON  DIRECTORY
Allied Printing Tradei Council—R. H. Nee-
lands, Box 66.
Bakers—J, Black, Room 120, XAbor
Temple.
Barbers—S. H. Orant, Room 208, Labor
Temple.
Bartender*—Geo. W, Curnoch, Room
101, Labor Temple.
Blacksmiths — Malcolm Porter, View
Hill P, O.
Bookbinders—Geo. Mowat, 816 Dunlevy
avenue.
Boilermakers—A. Fraser. 1151 Howe St.
Brewery Worken—Frank Graham.
Bricklayers—William 8. Dagnall, Room
216, Labor Temple,
Brotherhood of Carpenters District Council—P. L. Barratt, Room 309, Labor Temple.
Hurl Carriers, Builder" and Comnrnn Laborers—Georgo Harrison, Room 220, Labor Temple. -
Clgarmakera—Care Kuril Cigar Factory, 72
Water Street.
Cooki,  Walters,   Waitresses—Andy  Graham,
Room 206, Lahor Temple.
Electrical Workera   (outside)— E. H. Morrison, Room 207, Labor Temple.
Electrical Workers (lnaide)—Room 207; F.
L. Estinghausen.
Engineers—E. Prendergut, Room 216, Labor Temple.
Granite -.-utters—Edward Hurry, Columbia Hotel.
Garment Workers—Labor Temple.
HoraeHhoem — A." C. Mac Arthur, City
Heights, B.C.
Letter-carriers—Robt. Wight, Dlstriot IS.
Lathers—Victor R. Mldgley,  Box  1044.
Loco. Firemen and Engineers—James
Patrick,' 1188 Homer street,
Loco. Engineers—A. E. Solloway, 1088
Pacific.   Tel. Sey. 8071L.
Longshoremen—Geo, Thomu, 146 Alexander Street
MachlnlstH—J. H. McVety, Room 211,
Labor Temple.
Musicians—H. J. Brasfleld, Rooms 29-80,
Williams Bldg., 418 Granville street.
Marbleworkers—Frank Hall, Janea Road,
B. C.
Molders—D. Brown, 842 Broadway West
Moving Picture Operators—L. B. Goodman, Room 100, Loo Building.
Painters—J. Train, Room 808, Labor
Temple.
Plumbers—Room 208, Labor Temple.
Pressmen—P. d. Edward, Labor Temple,
Plasterers—John Jamea Cornish, 1801
Eleventh Ave, East.
Pattern Makers—J. Campbell, 4869 Argyle Street.
yuarry Workers—James Hepburn, ears
Columbia Hotel.
Railway Conductors—G. W, Hatch, 711
Beatty street.
Railroad Trainmen—A. E. McCorvllle,
Box 248.
Railway Carmen—A. Robb, 420 Nelson
Street.
Seamen's Unlon-Cor. Main and Hastings.
Structural Iron Workers—Room 208, Labor
Temple.
Stonecutters—Jamea. Rayburn, P. O. Box
1047.
Sheet Metal Workers—H. C. Dougan, No.
6, Fifteenth Ave. West
Street Railway Employees—A. V. Lofting, 2686 TrlnHr*. fltrent
Stereotypers—iffl llayley, care Province,
City. j     r
:tP«ppln, Box 481.
Buncil—Geo. Bartley,
temple.
T.J Nlelands, Box 18.
ikm.  Box 608.
ilploycus—Geo. W. Allin,
Telegraphei.   ,.
Trades and Laj«
Room 210 Lai
Typographical-]
Tailors— C. Moll
Theatrical  Stage]".
Box 711.       JjL.
Tllelayers   and .Helper-.—Evan Thomas,
Labor Tempi ti f
Upholflterera-H. Duthte. 1068 Homer St.
PAMAGES
Un.qu.ll.J Vauti.ylll.   Mum
PANTAJlEli VAUDEVILLE
THRBjf Iftdv/s DAILY
t.«, 7.J0,,Ml!   •'(••on1,  Prluit
Mnge, 11c, tte.
■—Here is Actual Coal=
Economy which
means MORE HEAT
for LESS MONEY
Buy a two-ton bulk load of Blether,'
Genuine South Wellington Coal,
which is bituminous and highest in
beat value.
Two-ton loads are guaranteed full
Weight by a City Weigh Ticket. You
do not buy wet sacks, but all coal.
Diether Coal—mined In B. C—
highest' heat value—and full weight
without aacks. That's the story.
Look at the pric-4.
Washed
Lump
Ooal
Pea Ooal
$4.26
$6.60
a ton
a ton
±== S53
WOOD
BEST 16-ir.ch Fir Oordwood at $3.00 per load, This is an
exceptionally good lot, and just what you need this oold
weather.
Phone Seymour 1936 for trial load.
JINGLE POT COAL
will save yra money,  Quality guaranteed.
This is the only UNION MINED Ooal in British Columbia.
McNEILL, WELCH & WILSON, Limited
formerly
VANOOUVER OOAL OOMPANY
Phone Seymour 6408
°oaV
'KEEP YOUR MONET IN B, O.'
BT USINO
South Wellington Coal
as supplied by /
The Main Supply
Companyj
1029 MAIN STREET
Best Lump, ton.. .Sfi.75
a
 1 ..—
Washed Nut, ton. .$5.00
Delivered free within two miles.
Phone Tour Order Now.
SEYMOUR 8491
Mined in B. O. by B. O. Lahor for
B. O. People.
PHONE SEYMOUR 9086
BARGAINS
Wo are. giving 20% of all our Men's and Boya'
Clothing and Underwear
And Regular Prices on Everything in the Store
CLUBB   &   STEWART
309-315 Hastings St. West       Phone Seymour 702
Five Thousand Labor
Temple Shares at Par
The Vancouver Labor Temple Co., Ltd., is still on a paying
basis, despite the general unemployment and industrial depression.
During the past fiscal year its earnings have exceeded all
expenses by nearly $100 per month, placing it among the few
businesses in Vancouver which have a balance on the credit
side of the ledger at this time.
With the completion of the Georgia-Harris street viaduct
very shortly, another step towards this section besoming
"newspaper row," Labor Temple stores will soon be in demand, which should result in dividends at the close of next
year.
Vanoouver Labor Temple Co. shares are a good investment
—conservatively estimated the property is worth three times
the par value of the shares.
The executive board have authorized the sale of five thousand shares at the par value of $1.00 each.
»   Every union man in Vancouver should own at Ujast ten of
\them.
i Call at Boom 211, Labor Temple, for particulars.
VANCOUVER LABOR TEMPLE CO., Ltd.
,„#«    MOUNT PLEASANT HEADQUARTERS
For Hardware, Stoves and Ranges—.
Everything for the Kitohen
W. R. OWEN & MORRISON
Phone Fair. 447 2337 Main Btreet
Safety First
Private Deposit
Boxes
In Our Safety Vault
from
$2.50
per Annum
DOW FRASER TRUST CO.
122 Hastings St. West.
Vancouver, and McKay Station,
Burnaby, B. C.
Cloae at 1 o'clock Saturday.
Special
Edison
Phonograph
Outfit No. 10
$46.80
Outfit Include! cabinet of Famed Oak
beautifully flnlihed, hinged eoter,
Very lateit hornless type of phono*
graph, glrlng tht purest tonal quality,
new type diamond pointed reproducer.
Powerful aprlng motor perfectly adjusted and regulated. Removable
front and top. Outfit includes 12 four>
minute Blue Ambarol {Indestructible)
records of your own selection. Terms
..0,80 oath, balance at the rata of
16.00 per month.
THE
KENT
PIANO CO. Ltd.
558 GRANVILLE ST.
MAYOR
T. S. BAXTER
Election Day, Thur., Jan, 14
TO THE WOEKINOMEN OF THE OITY OF TAMOOUVEB:
In coming forward aa a candidate for reelection there are aome few
thlnga I would say to you. The paat year haa been one of the moat dim-
cult that Vancouver hu ever had to face. During that time I have endeavored to do Justice to all reasonable claims made to me aa Mayor on
behalf of the working claas electors. I am prepared to stand or fall with
regard to thla matter by the reporta of the various labor delegations
which have appeared before me from Ume to time. If any workm
WlU carefully and conscientiously examine the record of my term of offl
with regard to labor matters, I shall not fear comparison with the records of any of my predecessors. If re-elected my policy during the
forthcoming year will be directed to the formulation and carrying ont of
plana which will enable the working class citlsens of Vancouvtr to pass
through this period of stress with the minimum amount of sacrifice and
discomfort. This haa been my policy during the paat ytar and ont of my
chief reasons for again allowing myself to bt brought forward aa candidate for Mayor la ln order that that policy may bt continued, Finally
I would appeal to you to carefully weigh and consider tht account of my
stewardship, which I Intend to make publlo from tht platform between
now tnd January 14th, upon which date I believe I oan legitimately hope
that I lhall again bt honored with tht support of tht working elate electorate of Vancouvtr. T. 8. BAXTEB.

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