BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

The British Columbia Federationist Jul 31, 1914

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcfed-1.0345068.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcfed-1.0345068.json
JSON-LD: bcfed-1.0345068-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcfed-1.0345068-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcfed-1.0345068-rdf.json
Turtle: bcfed-1.0345068-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcfed-1.0345068-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcfed-1.0345068-source.json
Full Text
bcfed-1.0345068-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcfed-1.0345068.ris

Full Text

Array THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATI
INDUSTRIAL T   5   :  STRENGTH.
= j   ■
SIXTH Y  &i.  No. 173.
OFFICIAL PAPER: VANCOUVER TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL AND B. 0. FEDERATION OF LABOR.
. VANCOUVER, H, P., FRIDAY, JULY 31,1914.
SIX PAGES
TO M
Jontroller James Simpson
Will Attend Convention
at Vienna
Elected as Canada's First
Representative by Clear
Majority
Readers ot the Federatlonist will
be pleased to learn that James Simpson, olty controller of Toronto, Ont,
has, as the result ot a referendum
rote of the various locals of the sooial democratlo party of Canada recently taken, been elected Canadian
representative to the International
Socialist congress, which will be
held ln Vienna, Austria, from August
21st to the 29th, This will be the
first time that Canada has been re-
JAMES SIMPSON
lember   of Toronto  Board   of Control.
Elected to attend socialist congress in
Vienna August 21st to 39th.
resented, and wtll convey some Idea
f the growth of the working class
lov&ment throughout the Dominion,
Ihe popularity of the controller Is
tteated by the fact that while the
ate was taken ln every province
•om the Atlantic to the Paelfle ocean,
^ had a dear majority over the com-
ned votes of all the other candidates,
hlch included Parker Williams, M.
P., Ladysmlth, B. C; Austin B.
oKela, Sointula, B. C; F. H. Sanger, Stouffvllle, Ont., and Thos. Balls,
ondon, Ont.
The great convention will be at-
nded by representatives of the
Drklng class from every civilised
tuntry on every continent ln the
orld. Eight delegates will be proof from the United States, lnclud-
g such renowned men of national
>te as Vlotor Berger, Emil Seldel,
larles Edward Russell and Morris
llliiult. Among a large delegation
om Oreat Britain, Ramsay Mac-
onald, S. Webb and Keir Hardle,
111 be ln evidence.
Many Important questions will be
p for discussion, among others:
[■he cost of living," and "Imperial-
m and arbitration." While the dele-
ateB will be hard at work, no efforts
ill be spared by the comrades in
ie capital of Austria to minister to
lelr comfort, and a great garden
arty Is to be held In their honor,
hlch will be participated in by a
irklngman's choir, consisting of
ore than 1,500 singers, . Shortly
tfter the opening of the congress an
jtunense procession will be held
trough the main streets of the city,
neetlng in the oity hall place.
'While the congress Is in session
he delegates will Jose but little time,
ver bearing ln mind that they are
here as representatives of the work-
ng class. Expenses will be kept
town to the lowest possible mini-
turn. When the congress has con-
iuded Its business, excursions will
e held to different points of Interest,
mong them being Included a trip
own the beautiful Danube. It may
0 taken at the Individual expense
f the delegates themselveB, and not
t that of the party.
r Reports at hand go to show that
{lis will be Incomparably the largest
pelallst congress that has ever been
eld. Not only will there be a far
tore numerous attendance of dele-
ales, but many countries will, like
anada, be represented for the flrst
lOne-significant fact In conneotlon
111 be the large number of men who
UI take part ln the deliberations who
ive been elected to the various par-
intents and legislatures in their re-
leotlve countries, so tbat lt may
ill be said that the after effects
this great gathering can hardly be
tlmated,
LABOR CLAUSE
'
lerted In the Contract for tht Old
people's Home
the city counoll at its last meeting
sided to have Inserted ln the con-
ct with Messrs. Campbell ft WUkle,
itractors for the Old People's
ne ln ward seven, a olaiue corn-
ling the contractors to secure
at unskilled labor they require
m the applicants for work at the
hall, who are residents, taxpay-
and British subjects. The const has not been signed by Mayor
tter, he withholding his signature
11 the council had expressed Its
lion. The suggestion was made
his worship.
The Men Ask the Assistance
of Organised
Labor
That They May Achieve the
Right to Have an
Organisation
The striking miners on Vanoouver
Island are making an appeal to organised labor of British Columbia for
assistance so that they oan achieve
the right to have an organisation and
thereby be able to enforce- the laws
tbat govern the conditions of their
employment and enjoy other advantages that .flow from organisation.
It will be to the advantage of organised labor to have the facts of the
strike on the Island briefly reviewed so that they can learn the
significance of that struggle and
what a defeat of the miners will ultimately mean to themselves.
The cause of the strike was a desire to protect their gas committees,
which, in the last analysis, means
the protection of their lives; this
broadened out to a demand for a recognition of their union. For theae
perfectly just and reasonable de
mands the miners have been striking
for 22 and 16 months respectively.
They have shown a spirit of determination that has not been excelled
in this country, Nowhere has labor
displayed a finer sense of solidarity.
Manfully and heroically have they
struggled for a fair measure of justice. Tet though their demands are
fair and moderate they have been
met by absolute despotism and brutal treatment The strikers were
Imprisoned on the slightest pretext-
refused ball—kept ln the hell holes
ot British Columbia for three months
without a trial. Men whose moral
standing will rank as high as any ln
the community were given long terms
of imprisonment Why? Presumably because they were leaders
of the union. At the request of the
companies strikers and their families
bave been evicted from their homes.
They have had to bear all manner of
insults from strike-breakers and
speolal police, and If they retaliated
they were thrust into prison with
Russian severity. None know but
those engaged ln tlie struggle the
hardships and suffering the strikers
have had to undergo. And, all for
what? To protect their own lives
whilst following a dangerous employment and tfie right to organize—
the right to try and keep the jewel
of liberty shining In this country.
In this struggle the government
has frankly and openly taken the
side of the coal companies. Their
power and Influence, ln the form of
speolal police and militia haB been on
the side of the coal barons. Their
so-called justice of the courts has
mocked us. Laws have been violated
by the companies and all Is well with
the government. The strikers have
asked for a publlo Inquiry Into the
workings of the Coal Mines Regulation act and It has been refused. The
strikers claim that not one half of the
men at present engaged at strikebreaking can qualify for a miner's
certificate of competency, before an
Impartial board of examiners. During
this strike certificates of competency
have been given to all sorts and conditions of men. They bave been
handed out in a wholesale manner to
Chinamen, Japs and southern Europeans, whom we venture to suggest
are not conversant with the English
language.
The coal operators have scoured
the continent for strike-breakers.
Shipments have been brought from
the States, Calgary, Edmonton and
Oreat Britain. The men brought ln
were of one voloe In declaring that
they knew nothing of the existence
of a strike. This despite the Deception of Workmen act, saying that
workers going to a strike district
must know the true conditions. The
government has never prosecuted the
companies for violation of the law,
In faot, lt appears as If they were
aided by the government. However,
the struggle Is still on. Tbe miners
up to the present have been unable
to enforce their demands. The combined efforts of government and capital are too strong for them. They
now appeal to organised labor for assistance. The miners feel that organised labor should have a voloe' ln
Baying whether the miners shall go
back to work defeated or not Organized labor should have a Bay beoause they will be up against the
same conditions If they should be engaged In a strike. What other union
can stand against the combined efforts of capital and the government?
None. United we can. In unity
there Is strength, and lt Is more true
of class action than craft action. In
order that the labor movement shall
exist and perform its Inherent functions It must solidify its ranks. It is
doing this all over the world, It
must do the same tn British Columbia
if lt wants to live. It must do bo, for
Its own protection. What Ib happening to the Vancouver Island miners will happen to any other section
of the workers, under similar conditions, if we do not get together. The
great argument against the general
strike is the violation of agreements.
It Is a peculiar feature bf the workers to respect agreements, and- If
the oompanles lived up to them as
the workers do we might respect
them; At the present time lt is a
notorious fact that the various companies only   live up to the agree-
WORKMEN'S
COMPENSATION
[By Jas; H. MoVety]
Of all the laws on the statute books, probably the least understood by the
workers engaged in industry are those dealing with payment for injuries received in the course of their employment. But a small percentage take the
slightest interest in the subject until they are seriously or permanently disabled and confronted with the possibility of having to stand on a street corner and sell pencils or newspapers to eke out an existence.
Generally Recognised
One thing is, however, very generally known, and that is the extremely
poor Compensation act in force in jhe province of British Columbia/ With
that knowledge, the British Columbia Federation of Labor has for years been
agitating for improvements in the legislation that would place the workers
in this province who are injured in, at least, as favorable a position as those
of many other countries. So far, their efforts have not resulted in any actual
results, except that the labor commission, through the evidence submitted by
officers of the-federation, has made a recommendation to the provincial government favoring compensation legislation along new and progressive lines.
Special Committee
With a view to following up this report and also with a desire to emulate
the excellent example recently set by the Ontario unionists, the federation
has appointed^ special committee to, carry on an agitation and educational
campaign for a better Compensation act for the province of British Columbia.
To accomplish this, it is necessary that the workers of the province
convince the government that a mew act is really wanted, and that the
workers know what they desire the jtet to cover, so that when the legislature
meets, there will be no conflict, of opi*{rion among the various organizations,
and particularly among those crafts from which the largest percentage of
cripples are produced.' In this and succeeding issues it is proposed to deal
with the various laws under which damages and compensation are now col-,
lectable and to compare B. C. laws with those of other provinces, states and
countries. A comparison wilj also b<3 made of the B. C. act with the new
legislation just enacted in the province of Ontario.
Common Law
Prior to 1880 the only way in which an injured workman could recover
damages was by recourse to the common law, the law made by judges' decisions in cases where no legislative enactments existed. Under these old
laws, or high court decisions, it was, and is still, possible to sue for unstated
damages, provided it can be shown that the injury was due entirely to the
negligence of the employer, and that, the worker is in no way responsible for
the injury. In the year 1837 the exchequer court of England, in the case of
Priestly vs. Fowler, held that because a fellow servant of the plaintiff was
partially responsible for the accident, the employer was not liable for damages. This decision virtually established the "negligence of fellow servants"
defence, although it was not until 1858 that this view was taken by the
house of lords in a case appesileH'ftbih' the Scottish courts; The far reaching
effect of this decision will be appreciated, when it is understood that a railway
man cannot recover under the common law, if the employer is able to show
that a fellow employee, maybe an operator two hundred miles away, whom
the injured railwayman has never seen, was negligent, and thereby contributed to the accident causing the injury. The same line of reasoning applies in
all common law actions and present day industrial methods, with an increased
use of machinery, has greatly reduced the number of cases where fellow-
workmen do not, in some form or another, through the instructions of foremen or otherwise, contribute to the cause of industrial accidents.
Workers Demand Change
In 1876 the government of Great Britain, in response to the clamor of
the workers in industry, and as a political expedient, appointed a select committee of seventeen to investigate and draw an act that would enable the
workers to get around the fellow-servant defence always pleaded by the employers in common law actions, Four years later, in 1880, the house of commons passed the first Employers'Liability act, in which employers were
made liable for defective ways, works, machinery, plant, buildings, stages,
scaffolding or other erections for the use of the employer. They were also
made responsible for negligence of their supervisors or foremen and for the
negligence of other workmen proceeding under the instruction of a foreman.
While this legislation improved the status of the injured worker, he still was
unable to recover if the injury was a result of an accident, or if he contributed, by his own negligence, to the accident by which he was injured.
Neither could he succeed if he knew the machinery or workings were defective and did not report the defective condition to the employer or his foreman". The act also fixed a maximum amount of damages recoverable under
its provisions. This legislation was copied in the various dominions of
the British Empire, the British Columbia government passing similar legislation in 1891.
Its Use Limited
From the foregoing it will be seen that the negligence of the employer
must be established beyond peradventure to succeed. The act has therefore
been limited in its usefulness to cases where the defective machinery could
be produced, or where witnesses could be secured to testify as to its condition. In mining accidents all the witnesses are invariably destroyed and the
relatives of the deceased are unable to succeed under this legislation because
of being compelled to rely on the pious opinions of experts who are usually,
for a price, as available to one side as the other. The miners are, therefore,
compelled to depend entirely on workmen's compensation acts which are
based on an entirely different principle to either of the two methods already
described. The writer will deal with that phase of the situation in a later
issue. /
IL1RYT0
I MAD
STRIKE
Mediation and Conciliation
Board WUl Sit at
Chicago
Fifty-five  Thousand   Men
and Ninety-eight Lines
-   Involved
Hundreds of Idle Men —
Laborers Organise —
Politicians'Visit
Working-class Representatives to Oo to Victoria
—Plenty of Rain
ments ln parts. However, agreements should not stand ln the way
of progress. If It Ib a question of
humanity or agreements, let lt be
humanity. In this case lt is. Loyalty to the employers or loyalty to
the workers. Which shall it be? Men,
women and children on Vancouver
Island appeal to you. To whom else
can they go, If not to their brothers
and slaters of the working class.
They ask for your assistance ln this
time of need confident that with your
help they can yet win a victory for
organized labor. What are you going
to do to help them? It Is now your
question to decide for the welfare of
the men, women and children on
Vancouver Island and ultimately the
welfare ot yourselves and wives and
ohlldren. -C. P.
Elliott Klrkpatrick, of Fernle, Is ln
town on a visit to hla brother Ernie,
who runs a linotype on the Sunset
BANCROFT HAS GONE EAST
Visited   Olympia     and   Interviewed
Compensation Act Officials
Fred, Bancroft, vice-president of
the Trades and Labor congress of
Canada,' left Vancouver last Monday
on his way east. Since his work ln
this locality, he has been at Olympia
to gain first hand Information regarding the work of administering the
Workmen's Compensation act in
Washington state. He reports having been received with every courtesy by the commissioners who have
charge of the administration of the
aot, and that he has bsen -Ne to secure much advice and data which
will be valuable In conectlon with the
new Workmen's Compensation act of
Ontario, On his way east he will
visit Revelstoke, Nelson and points
ln the Crow's Nest Pass, and speaking
at Fernle next Sunday.
MONEY VOTED
Five Hundred Dollars to Aid Two
Families In Fire Losses
On recommendation of Aid Hepburn, chairman of the civic finance
oommlttee, the city council has voted
♦600 In two sums of $300 and |200 to
two of the families In the southern
portion of Hastings townsite who lost
their homes and effects recently by
fire. Aid. Woodslde, who supported
the proposition, said he held that the
city was partly responsible because
of the lack of Are protection in that
portion of his ward.
The United States board of mediation and conciliation announces It
has accepted the invitation of the
railroads to attempt mediation of the
pending etrlke of 65,000 employees on
the lines running west of Chicago and
Port Arthur, says a Washington, D.O.,
despatch. The request of the railroads for mediation came ln the form
of a telegram a tew days ago from A.
W. Trenholm, chairman of the railroad managers, representing ninety-
eight railroads of the west. The
members ot the board are: Judge
Martin A. Knapp, Judge William L.
Chambers and Dr. O. W. W. Hanger.
It is said thst the plan of the board
provides for separate conferences
with the railroads and employes. The
board will centre its efforts on trying
to" find a common ground of agreement for the two factions, and if thoy
fail ln this, it will recommend that
the dispute be submitted to arbitration.
"The board will go to Chicago with
an entirely unbiased mind, said Dr.
Hanger. "Wis have read little or nothing ahout the impending strike. In
order to keep our minds free from
prejudice, as we anticipated we might
be called into IL"
The Brotherhoods of Englneera and
Firemen have made publlo a pamphlet In which is presented their side
of the controversy, and ln which they
charge the railroad managements
with terminating existing schedules
for the flrst time In railway wage negotiations. This point Is brought out
as follows:
Men's Statement
"In October of 1913, committees representing all locomotive englneera,
firemen and hostlers on western railroads presented a request to thenr
respective managements for an increase In wages and Improved working conditions, accompanying such request with the usual notice, required
by existing schedules, that within
thirty days the schedules would be
opened for these revisions.
"Immediately the railroad managements served noUce on the engine-
men's committees that all existing
schedules would be terminated within
thirty days, thus, for the first time in
the history of railway wage negotiations, taking from railway employees
schedules that had required more
than thirty years, ln many Instances,
to build up,
"The railroads then proposed that a
'service period' be substituted for the
mileage basis of pay, a basis long ln
effect on practically all railroads.
Negotiations between committees representing the railroads and the enginemen culminated ln both of theee
committees submitting revised propositions, the railroads insisting upon
a modified form of their 'service
period' and the enginemen Insisting
upon retaining the mileage basis of
pay and allowance for extra work as
In the past,
"Upon submitting the matter to tbe
engineers, firemen and hostlers employed on western railroads lt was
learned tbat by an almost unanimous
vote the proposition of the managers
was rejected and a atrlke approved."
Later—The railroad engine-men absolutely refuse to arbitrate for tbe
reasons that when awards have been
agreed to in the paat they have been
flagrantly violated by the companies
With regard to said past awards of
arbitrators the award of firemen could
not be diminished, but notwithstanding this fact, It was applied in such a
manner by many railroads that the
pay of firemen was materially reduced, A number of railroads also
adopted a method of evading payment
of the rates granted to "hostlers" by
changing the titles of such employees
to "watchmen," "engine prepalrers,
"foremen," "assistant foremen," etc,
and, although then duties, which consist of the care and handling of engines engines at roundhouses and
terminals, have not been changed,
many of these employees have not received the increases to which they
were entitled. To be specific, the
rates of pay granted by the award to
"hostlers" have not been applied on
the following railroads to all "hostlers" employed thereon: Baltimore &
Ohio: Bessemer & Lake Erie; Boston
ft Maine; Central Railroad of New
Jersey: Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton; Delaware, Lackawanna & Western; Detroit, Toledo & Ironton; Erie
Railroad; Lake Erie & Western; Long
Island railroad; Monongahela; New
Vork Central A Hudson River; New
York, Philadelphia & Norfolk; Pennsylvania Lines(east), Toledo A Ohio
Central and several other railroads
[Speolal Correspondence]
PRINCE RUPERT' B. C. July «.—
Things aro pretty slow In this nil
estate sharks' paradise, nearly everyone now realisea that muskeg and
rocks are hard to digest. Then an
several hundred Idle men in town,
and the outlook for the near future '
Is gloomy indeed, but, as than it •
silver lining in every cloud, (tie man-
ben ot the working class will not
give way to despair.
Apropos of thla state ot affairs a
meeting was held recently, under tha
auspices of the Trades and Labor
council for the purpose ot organising the general laboren in tha olty,
with the result that over twenty memben were enrolled. Another meeting waa held later, with District Organiser J. O'Brien In tha chair, when
it was decided to keep the charter
open a little longer, after which offlcen were elected, namely: D. Dunlop,
president and W. H. Derry, seoretary. More memben were enrolled
and lt Is to be hoped that aro long
all the laboren In the olty-will be
lined up showing a united front to
the, employen.
"Dick" MoBrlde's right and left
bowen visited Rupert the otter day
and they told the people all about tha
beautiful scenery, the fertile valleys,
and other natural resources of th* Interior (no doubt as seen through (ha
hate of cigar smoke from tha windows of an observation car). Of
course, they did'nt sea any boi ean
over crowded with men working for
the O. T. P. nor eat any ot ths rotten grub supplied In the camps.
When one la full of something
stronger than grape juice and smoking a good cigar at someone else's
expense everything looks rosy, In
fact, "Billy" Bow-Wowser and hla
stde-klcker peddled about tha rankest
kind of slush heard at a public gathering hen, and "that la going aome."
It they are fair samples ot "the
people's representatives," the working class memben who will go to
Vlotoria after next election wtll sura
have a picnic.
History la repeating Itself hero
rain having fallen for twenty-four
days and nights, the indications aro
all for the other sixteen. One ot
the dallies is out with an editorial
advocating compulsory swimming lessons, but those who are classed aa
old-timers merely smile, having already developed webbed feet.
Mr. and Mra. Thomaa Crombie, and
son Alfred, returned today from Bow
en island, where they had been enjoying a vacation. Tom Is looking
well and fit, and Is ready to take up
again his duties sb recording secretary of the Cooks' and Waiters'
union.
W. T. KERR DEAD
Fatal Accident on Georgia-
Harris Viaduct
A aecond fatality occured on the
Georgia-Harris street viaduct on Saturday, the unfortunate victim being
W. T. Kerr, carpenter, 1003 Richards
street, who died later at the general
hospital. He was trying to swing a
beam on a pivot when the huge
timber fell, striking him on the head
and hurling him fifty feet to the*
ground. His head was crushed by the
Impact and he passed away without
recovering consciousness. The body
was taken to the undertaking parlon
of Nunn, Thomson ft Clegg where
an Inquest was held, the verdict
being accidental death. The deceased
was resident In this city four yean
and was well and favorably known to
the members of his craft He was a
young man, 28 yeara of age and unmarried. A brother, J. M. Kerr, of
Taeoma, Wash., member of the Electrical Workers union, arrived on Sunday and will accompany the body to
that city for Interment.
It's a Olrl
Fred. Knowles, the popular  letter
carrier and trustee of the TradeB and
Labor council, is quite jubilant these
bright summer days.   It's a baby girl
arrived   last Friday.     Mother
who
and child  doing well,
tlons, old boy.
Congratula-
Carpentera Elect Officers
The officers for the ensuing year of
U. B, of Carpentera local union, No.
617, are president, Q. H, Hardy; vice-
president, W. Foxcroft; recording secretary, Chas, Scott, 209 Labor Temple; financial secretary, Oeorge Snell,
309 Labor Temple; treasurer, A,
Paine; conductor, Austen Mlnott;
warden, Ernest Jacobs. The regular
meetings of the looal union are held
every flrst and third Monday ln snch
month.
J. J. TAYLOR AND
8AM GUTHRIE MAY
SOON BE RELEASED
President R. Foster; of the
Island miners, has received a
letter from Attorney-general
Bowser stating that he hae officially recommended the federal minister of justice to parole
J. J. Taylor and 8am Outhrle,
the release to take place August 14,1914. Theae two officers
of the mine-workers were aentenoed by Judge Howay to two
yeara' Imprisonment te date
from Auguet 18, 1913. . They
were charged with participation In the dlaturbancea at
Ladysmlth, which without
doubt might have been far
more serious than they actually
were, had It not been for the
restraining Influence of Taylor
and Outhrle, who both hurried
to the acene of tha dlaturbanea,
and exhorted their fellow mine
workere to refrain from any
acta In violation of the law. —
PAGE TWO
THR BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY ... JULY 31,  1914.
UNION MEN!
EAT UNION MADE BREAD
BREWER'S XL BREAD
ig made by Union Labor, and  is  unsurpassed in
Quality and Flour
Phone Highland 573
Demand Among Vancouver-
ites Is for British Co-    >
lumbia Produce
ABBOTSFORD HOTEL
FIREPROOF Vancouver, B. C. EUROPEAN
921 Pander St. Weat       RATES $1.00 A DAY UP      Phona 8»ymour 5880
F.  L.  WALLINQFORD,  Manager Flral-claia  Qrlll In connection
Latest Addition to Vancouver's Up-to-Date HoteU
Hotel Regent
Absolutely Fireproof.   Local and Long-
Distance Phone in Every
Room.
Abundance of Light and Heat. Cafe in Connection
RATES $1.00 PER DAY UP
Attractive Rates to Permanent
Gieitt
COTTINGHAM & BEATTY
Proprietors
Me LtMIIIe, Proprietor EUROPEAN FLAN        Frederick A. EuUib, Mauser'
HOTEL EMPRESS ESSE*
Jso?r«3s53T 235 Hastings St. E., Vancouver, B.C. SKiferSff
H
PENDER HOTEL HSSf>
•imm
Telephone leymoai 1	
Ratea 81.80 par Day aad Up.
L
THE NEW ENGLAND HOTEL^/J^r^Tr*11
7»e. up; weekly, M up.    MS SEYMOUR 8TREET tranalanta
Free Sue lo and from all Tralna and Boata.
Electric Elevator
HOTEL IRVING
Cer. Columbia Art. uid Hutings Str«*l
MePHAIL t% MACKENZIE. Propri«ton
European Flan.
Hot and Cold Water and Telephone in every room.   Rooms with bathe,
single or en suite.
538 Cambie Street
Phone Sey. 2542
HQPPS&DUKERi
GinUG     BUI1TFDR-WXIR
aMljPlO B\RTIOUlARPURPOSE
BRITISH COLUMBIA LAND
Splendid opportunities m Mixed Farming, Dairying,
Stock and Poultry.   British Columbia Grants Preemptions of 160 acres to Actual Settlers
_____________
TERMS—Residence on the
land for at least three years;
improvements to the extent
of $5 per acre; bringing under cultivation at least five
acres.	
For further information apply to
Deputy Minister of Lands, Victoria, B.C
Secretary, Bureau of Provincial Information, Victoria
The Quality of Our Service, the Quality of
Our Goods, Is Always the Best
The reason our business la Increasing la due to the fact that our bualneaa polloy la correct We adopted tba polloy of Informlni the publlo
through the medium of the preaa aa to what our ohargea would ba for a
complete funeral. Including Hearoe, Carriage for Family, Care of Remains,
Wagon Service, and all our peraonal eervlce for
$55.00
Complete Funeral
$55.00
We ara living up to our advertisement to tha letter. Thla haa eatabllah-
ad confidence with the public In ua, and for that reaaon alone wa ara euo-
eoeaful, and we Intend to continue aa we are doing now.
Mount Pleasant Undertaking Co.
Cor. Eighth Ave. and Main Street Phone Fairmont 188
Commodious Chapel Free to All Patrons
Formerly Center A Hanna'a Branoh
A. C. Miller, Proa. P. H. Qrote, Manager
OKANAGAN FRUIT
Ml ARRIVE
Old Potatoes Offered and
New Ones gelling at
High Figure
Vancouver Heights Grocery
3640 HASTINGS STREET EAST
THE POST OFFICE STORE
Beat of everything at loweat prlcea.
Groceries, Hams, Bacon, Garden Seeds, Freah Fruit and Vegetables, Tea Rose Tea, Reld & Millar's Sausages and Head Cheeae.
Every morning we receive a (shipment of berries from McDonald's Ranch on Keats Island.   They are delicious.
Telephone your orders.   Our delight Is to serve you.
W. R. McMURRAY
PHONE HIGHLAND 5B5L
Among the most noted consignments on the market this week was
a good supply of peach plums, beautifully packed, from Sardis. The poultry section waa rather short and
Okanagan fruit waa conspicuous by
its absence. Many Vancouver people,
ln tbelr loyalty to Britlah Columbia
produce, have waited on their supply
of apricots and peaches from the
Okanagan district, and for their, bene
fit it should be stated that these will
arrive in due course as arrangements
are being made to have them brought
to the coast In car lots, in this Way reducing the present heavy charges,
Apples Were ln good supply.
Duchess, well packed and graded,
made $1.50 per box, while transpar-
ents made from 81 to 11.30 per box,
according to quality and pack. Peach
plums in four-basket cratea made $1
per crate. Preserving cherries from
Duncan, Vancouver Island, were very
flne and as these were packed In 24-
pound crates they were sold rapidly
at 11.50 each.
Tomatoes In Demand
Blackberries and raspberries were
on the market and made—blackberries (1 and raspberries 81.50 per
crate. Tomatoes are arriving ln large
quantities from Mayne island, Gobble
Hill and Okanagan. The demand Is
good, and prices fairly satisfactory.
Yesterday's prices were: hothouse
No, 1, f2.60; No. 2, 82; outdoor No.
1, 81,60; No. 2, 81.20. Peaches made
81.25 per box, and apricots 81.10 per
crate.
In the poultry line, broilers brought
ti to |5 per dozen; ducks, 45c each;
hens, 88 to 812 per dosen; new-laid
eggs maintained last week's price of
32c. per dosen.
Potatoes are still7 difficult to sell
at attractive prices. Some very flne
lots from Abbotsford and Ladner
were offered, but were not cleared
at 81.25 per Back. Old potatoes are
still being offered, but are practically
unsaleable.
Vegetable Qo Quick
Some particularly nice vegetables
were on sale yesterday and it la
satisfactory to report that they were
cleared at the following prices-
Cabbages, l^e per lb.; carrots, 81.40
per sack; beets, 11.20 per sack; wax
beans, 2c per lb.
Old hay made 811 and 812 per ton,
while new hay Is selling at 816 to 816
per ton.
An auction sale for the disposal
of horses, rigs, harness and cattle has
been Introduced. These sales will be
held every Tuesday at 10 a. m., and
should provide an excellent medium
of exchange.
WILL GO TO' AUSTRALIA
H. J. McEwen and W. Foxcroft Are
Leaving the City
H. J. McBwen and W. Foxcroft,
both well-known and active members
of the carpenters' union, are leaving
Wednesday for Australia. Like hundreds of others, they can see that
a workman's prospects for the coming
winter In Vancouver are worse than
for many yeara, especially ln the
building trade. Mr. McEwen, for the
past six months has been tbe business
agent for the carpenters. He took up
the position when the two carpentera'
unions amalgamated, and was re-elected a few weeks ago. He handed his
resignation In to the district council of
carpenters a week ago, and lt goes
Into effect tonight. During the time
he haB been agent'for the carpenters,
he has done good work for them ln
face of conditions which are of the
worst from an organizing point of
view.
W. Foxcroft, In leaving, retires from
the district council of carpenters, of
which he was the flrst president after
the amalgamation took place. He haa
also held the ofllce of president of
the Trades and Labor council, which
position he occupied at the time the
carpenters withdrew from that body.
In company with H. J. McEwen, he
will be remembered as one of the
most sincere and active, members of
the Miners' Liberation league and In
the efforts of that body to secure the
release of the victims of the McBride-
Bowser misgovernment.
Both these workers will be a distinct loss to the local movement, and
while regretting tbat conditions force
them to seek fresh fields and pastures new, The Federationist wishes
them better fortune in the new land
to which they are going.
OF
IN
FAI
Provisions Have Advanced
from Twenty to Forty
per, cent.
Workingmen Are Warned
to Keep Away From
the North
IN COLORADO
Miners Wilt Take Political
Action
[Special Correspondence]
DENVER, Colo., July 28—The convention of the Colorado State Federation of Labor convenes in Pueblo on
(August 17th. It Is certain that plans
will be formulated there looking to
concerted political action at the election this fall. For years the workers
of Colorado have been at the mercy
of corporation-owned state officials.
The lesson of the Colorado coal Btrike
will never be forgotten by the laboring people. The massacre of Ludlow
has so Indelibly Impressed on their
minds (he necessity of drastic action
being taken at the polls that they will
only support candidates pledged to
the hilt in their cause.
From both Fairbanks and Dawson
stories come by every boat of hundreds of idle men ln both places who
are unable to secure work and who
are without means for taking them
selves outside, says the Whltehorae
Star. A Fairbanks man said in
Whiteborse a few daya ago that 800
men are Idle in the former city, where
the price of all kinds of provisions
advanced from 20 to 40 per cent, im
mediately after the transportation
combine in the early spring. At the
same time the merchants shut down
on credit, $5 being the limit to any
man not working.
Three men arrived at Whltehorae
from Dawson this week who walked
there from Skagway some weeks ago
and after reaching Dawson they
claimed to have walked 300 miles
over the various mining creeks in
vain attempt to flnd work. Then they
walked to Skagway, happy ln the
thought that they Btlll had sufficient
money to pay for steerage passage to
the outside.
These conditions are mentioned as
a warning to working men to keep
away from the north until such time
as there Ib a change for the better.
The change Ib bound to come within
the next few years, by which time
the country will be strewn with the
bones of starved men If they continue to flock into It while economic
conditions remain as they are at present.
LAND OF DYKES
The Dally Working Time of the Carpentera In Holland
According to a statement drawn by
the Dutch carpenters' union, the dally
working time of the carpenters in
Holland Is nine and a half hours In
one section of the union with 4,000
journeymen, ten hours ln nine places
with 4,020 journeymen, ten and a halt
hours ln fourteen places with 3,920
journeymen, eleven hours ln thirty-
one places with 3,347 journeymen,
eleven and a half hours ln twenty-
four places with 1,456 journeymen
and twelve hours ln more than twenty-one places with 470 journeymen. Of
these 171313 journeymen ln 100 places
5,605 belong to the unton, and 3,285
to other organizations.
SPOKANE  CONTRACTORS
Drop Their Fight Agalnat the Eight-
Hour Law
The contractors of Spokane, Wash.,
have decided to drop their flght
against the eight-hour law, as applied
to publlo' work. This, changed attitude of the contractors was caused
by a ruling of the attorney general,
who has held the law constitutional.
The act provides that no laborers on
public work shall put ln more than
eight hours a day except In cases of
emergency, and prescribes a fine or
the forfeiture of the contract as the
penalty.
H. J. McEWEN
Who le leaving for Australia next Wednesday.
PORT ARTHUR BARBERS
Form a Union—Will Result In No
Change of Hours or Prlcee
Recently a local union was organized by the Port Arthur barbers
and afflliated with tho Journeymen
Barbers' International Union of
America. The organization starts
out with a membership ot 24 and will
not affect the publlo tn any way as already union hours and rates are ln
vogue, The officers are: President
Harry Qregsby; vice-president, W. E.
Gllmore; secretary-treasurer, J. T.
Leslie,
Plan to Divide Work
Cleveland painters' local la planning to take up with employers a proposition which, it Is claimed, would
result in more equal division of work
among members during the four dull
months—November, December, January and February, The men would
work six hours a day, five days a
week, during these months, being
paid at the regular hourly rate.
Trouble Averted
Threatened trouble at the Ottawa
Car company's shops of Ottawa, Ont,
has been averted as a result of conferences between that concern and Its
machinists. The firm has signed an
agreement wltb local 412 of the International Association of Machinists.
MINARD'S LINIMENT CURES
BURNS, ETC.
Warnings Agalnat Fire
Owing to indications at the weather
office pointing to another period of
dry weather with high temperatures,
the chief forester haa sent emergency
instructions to all deputy Are wardens directing attention to the necessity of Increased alertness. Officials
In charge of the forest Are protection
service are Inclined to the opinion
that the next ten days will be the
crucial period of the year, and fire
wardens have been cautioned to concentrate strong forces at any outbreak.
W. FOXCROFT
Former President of Vancouver Trades
and Labor counoll, who sails for Aus.
tralla next week.
Northern  Paper Sold
The Prince Rupert Dally News, liberal, owned by a local corporation,
has been purohaaed by F. G. Dawson
ot that city,
VANCOUVER
City Market
MAIN STREET
PRESERVING CHERRIES ARE NOW
ARRIVING IN LARGE QUANTITIES,
ALSO RASPBERRIES, BLACK AND
RED CURRANTS, GOOSEBERRIES,
TOMATOES, RHUBARB, NEW LAID
EGGS, DAIRY BUTTER, NEW AND
OLD POTATOES.
Auction Sales Every Tuesday and Friday
OUR SALESMEN ARE At YOUR SERVICE
DAILY FROM 7 AM. TILL 6 P.M.
SATURDAY IS OUR SPECIAL PRODUCERS' DAY
JOHN McMILLAN, Manager
Named Shoei are frequently made in Non-
Union Factoriei—Oo Not Buy Any Sho*
no matter what lta name, unleaa lt bean a
plain and readable Impression or this stamp.
All ahoea without the Union Stamp ara
alwaya Non-Union.
BOOT 41 SHOE WORKERS' UNION
146 Summer Street, Boston, Masa,
J. F. Tobln, Pres.   O. L. Blaine, Seo.-Treaa.
Brown Bros. & Co. Ltd.
Florists and Nursery Men
THRU STORM IN VANCOUVER
N Haatinga at.      Phone toy. M 401 Gnnilk It
nt Oranvllle tt.    Phene toy. Nil
Phene tey. IflT
VICTOWA ITORB, 111 VHW IT.
Mat Ave. and Main tt
Phono Fairmont IN.
ORMNHOU81S
Victoria, a. C.
Hammond, ..O.
Long Dletanoo Phone IT
Ten Acre Farms at $30 Per Acre
Payable $8.00 Down and $5.00 Per Month, Without Interest
Open meadow land situated In the fertile Bella Coola Dlatrlct, on
river and lake and eloae to two new railroads. Wagon road, telegraph
aad telephone lines to property. Rich toll, splendid climate. Bape-
elalljr adapted tor mixed tanning, chicken or hog ranching. Call or
write tor full partlculara before all traeta ara aold.
J. I. Eakin & Co.
soa bomu ainaur
M Seating* Street Seat
TAVOOvras, a. o.
Without  obligation, plsaae mall ma
particulars of your ten-acre farina.
Name   _	
Addresa  .—»„  .    ..
EVERY  UNION  MAN   IN "VANCOUVER   SHOULD   PATRONIZE
LABOR TEMPLE CLUB AND POOL ROOM
Work of "Agltatora"
Two recent occurrences are recommended to the consideration of those
who are addicted to blaming "agitators" for inciting labor troubles, In
the Toronto bricklayers trouble and
also In the hydro linemen's difficulty
ln Hamilton, Ont., International officers did their utmost to prevent a
stoppage of work. This Is the usual
procedure, notwithstanding the claptrap frequently heard about "outside
influence" being responsible for labor
disputes.—Hamilton Herald,
New Idea for Labor Day
The Central Labor union of Wilmington, Del., has submitted a proposal to Its affiliated locals to have
the business men join with them ln a
Labor Day parade. The matter was
brought before the unionists in a letter from the Chamber of Commerce.
The locals are voting on the proposition.
Have No Protection
Laborera In the locomotive shops of
the Canadian Pacific railroad at London, Ont, have had their wages reduced, The organized workers are
showing their shop mates that the
company overlooked those who were
members of trade unions.
J. W. Hayes, secretary-treasurer of
the International Typographical
union, says that the referendum system of election of officers was adopted by that body In 1896, and has
proved quite satisfactory to the
members of tbe International Typographical union.
T
ttMAKESTHEMUNUIN-^^
PHONE
Seymour
9288
„^"«,A.». ,„n..r. _
WESTERN CANADA LIQUOR CO.
LEE R. BARKLEY, Agent
137 WATER STREET OPnCIAL PAfgR VANCOUVER
TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
OFFICIAL PATER   IMlmCOL
mOUPEDatATMNOPLAM*
SIXTH YEAR.  No. 173.
vancouyee; b. p., Friday, july 31,1911
SIX PAGES
Look at These Single Breasted
SUITS
FOR
*12!
You never saw the like of
them for value in all your
life. They are manufactured from pure wool, imported tweeds, in shades
of grey, lovat and brown.
Each suit is custom tailored and guaranteed to
retain its shape Makes an excellent suit for best
or business wear. All sizes. Actual values to $25.
Special to readers of The Federationist for ;
$12.50
BRING THIS AO. WITH YOU
M Oii^Budsoii'sBaufompanji. M
GEORGIA AND GRANVILLE STREETS
REMOVAL SALE
Until AUGUST 1st
LANG SALES CO.
Will give a discount of 25% on all union-made clothing, Boots and Shoes, Hats, Caps, etc.
NEW ADDRESS:, 624 MAIN
OLD ADDRESS:   626 MAIN
J. LECKIE CO., LIMITED
SHOE
MANUFACTURERS
Wa manufacture every kind of
work ihoe, and specialize in lines
'or miners, railroad construction,
ntging, etc
VANCOUVER   -  -   B.C.
Family Shoe Store
823 Granville Street
GREAT  SALE OF  BOOTS AND
SHOES NOW ON
Man's Shoes, Regular $6.00 for $3.95
Men's Shoes, Regular $6.00, for....  $3.45
Men's Shoes, Regular $4.50, for...  $2.95
8KB THE WINDOWS
FRANK NEWTON
THE STATE OF TRADE
Typos Will   Hold   Their
Annual Picnic In
August
Committee Appointed—The
General Strike Voted
Against
.Vancouver Typographical union,
No. 226, held Its regular monthly
meeting last Sunday afternoon In
Labor Temple, there being a large
turnout ot members. Vice-president W, 8. Metzgar occupied the
chair ln the absence ot President
R. p. Pettlplece] who Is at present in
the east, and will attend the Providence, R. I„ convention ot the I, T. U.
to be held next week. It was decided to hold the annual picnic about
the middle ot lAugust and the follow
>.ing committee waa struck to make
arrangements therefor: Messrs J,
BOhle, B. Trumper, A. Pelky, W.
Jones and W. Floyd.
Regarding the referendum of the
proposed general strike in this province, the vote was cast unanimously
against the proposition.
One application for membership
waB received and one Initiation took
place,
Three travelling cards were accepted, namely: C. S. Young, Calgary; Wm. P. O'Leary, Seattle, and
O. R. Beer, Denver, Col.
State of trade reported dull.
A. R. Hoerle, an old-time member, has returned from Colorado
Springs, Col., where he has been recuperating his health at the printers'
home for the past seven months. He
is now lit as ever.
E. Brockman, member of the union,
went to the general hospital on Monday, where he will undergo a, serious operation.
Following Items were gleaned from
the monthly trade bulletin of the
Northwest Typographical conference:
Harry Martin and wife, ot Walla
Walla, were visitors at Seattle last
week, Mr,. Martin Is president of
No. 388.
The secretary, Philo Howard, of the
conference visited Centralla, Wash.,
Portland, Wpodburn, Salem, Albany,
Corvalls, Eugene, Medford, Roseburg,
Coqullle, Marshfleld, Drain and Cottage Grove, Ore., taking up organization and other conference matters.
He has reason to believe that three
new locals will be organized ln Oregon in a few weeks.
Beilingham.—State ot trade rotten
—that's all. More members out of
work by several than local situation
warrants.
Boise.—All offices In city are union,
and at present seem to be on a pretty
solid financial basis, aB the "ghost
walks" regularly. Plenty of substitute printers;  47 members,
Everett.—State of trade fair; work
has improved since last report,, and
things are brighter. Plenty of subs
here at present.
Olympia.—Work poor.
Seattle.—Conditions about the same
as last report, plenty idle.
Spokane.—State of trade slow ln
bcth job and news lines. Last monthly report of newspapers Is as follows: Operators, 24 regulars, 15 substitutes; floor men, 31 regulars, 20
"subB."
Taeoma.—State of trade poor; plenty to do the work. Strike situation
about the same,
Victoria—State of ti'ade dull, with
20 members out of work. The trouble
which has existed between thia union
and the firm of Sweeny & McConnell
for the past Ave months has been
satisfactorily adjusted.
Walla Walla.—State of trade fair.
No members out of work. President,
Harry Martin; vice-president, Charles
W. Liggett; secretary, Clarence W.
Liggett.
FOREIGNERS ARE PEONS
Employed In the Coal and Iron Indue-
tries of the Maritime Provinces
Foreigners employed In the coal,
Iron and steel Industries of the maritime provinces are held ln a state of
actual peonage, la > the report of Organizer Leon Worthall, of the Journeymen Barbers' International union,
who haa returned to Toronto, Ont,
front a trip through tbe eastern section ot Canada. The unionist saya
wagea paid W tha corporations In
control ia pitifully email, the employees being largely composed of foreign-
era Imported direot from Europe and
the majority if whom cannot speak
the English language. MoBt of them,
says Worthall, are herded ln miserable shacks that are not worthy of
the name of habitations.
Quit Work
Joseph Tlnsley, the   oldest active
member  of   Hamilton,   Ont.,  Typographical union, gave up his position
on the Herald laat week.
CENTER & HANNA, Ud
UNDERTAKERS
Refined Service
1049 GEORGIA  STREET
One Blook weat ot Court House.
Use  of  Modern  Chapel  and
Funeral Parlors  free  to all
Patrons
HARRON BROS.
FUNIRAL  DIRECTOR* AND
IMBALMIBS
Vancounr—Offlce   and   Chapel,
1M4 Oranvllle SL, Phona Say. till.
North   Vanoouver —Offlee   and
ohaptl, IM gsoond St. a.    Phone
IpwUlU.si
Wh/ilt Whtat Brill
Chows Family Broad
Wedding aad Birthday Cakss.
We VttValea float.
BELYEA'S BAKERY
ALL KINDS OF
CAKES, PASTRY AND
CONFECTIONERY
Hot Drink* and Lunohu
All Ooods rr.it Dally.
votstr.no*.
Sober,by Act of Parliament
Editor Federatlonist: One Is likely
to fret the Impression (rightly or
wrongly) while reading the editorial In
your issue of July 10th that those reformers who are striving to abolish the
liquor traffic are useless reformers. If
my conception Is right then I have to admit I cannot agree with you. In one
place you say the main factors responsible for immoderate use of alcohol are
Ignorance, poverty and overwork. Then
a few lines further down you say the
workers do not stand in need of any
speolal laws to make them sober; they
(the workers) compare more favorably
than other sections of the community,
If they were only as Intelligent a body
as they are sober thoy would remove the
chief causes of the drink evil, such aa
poverty and its attendant circumstances.
Now, Mr, Editor, 1 do not see how you
harmonize such statements as these. If
there are those who take alcohol more
than working people then It is not
through poverty or over-work, for as
far as I know all the poverty is with the
working class. I believe, sir, the liquor
traffic is one ot the worst economic factors ln the world to-day as well as all
other evils associated with and part of
it. Mr, Turn Richardson, socialist M.P.
for Whitehaven, England, Bald ln a
speech at uflddlesborougli on June 13th
last that some people believed poverty
was the cause of drinking, others that
'drinking caused poverty, but he believed
neither was right. Vet he believed the
liquor traffic was one of the greatest
obstacles in the way of social reform,
therefore one of tho greatest enemies of
the proletariat today, and the only way
to rid the country of It was by prohibition. 'These sentiments were, endorsed
at the same meeting by Philip Snowden,
M.P. I think you will agree with me
that they are tne opinions of practically
all the socialist anu labor M.P.'s in the
old country. You' further state, Mr.
Editor, | experience proves where Increased restriction has been put on the
sale of alcohol, consumption of It has
never decreased and that police rcporis
are to the effect, that the law Is eluded
by purchasing l,lquor in larger quantities
man before ihu saloons wero closed, and
in consequence there was more home
drinking, or, in other words, restriction
does not restrict and prohibition does
not prohibit, .Evidently my information
must be from another source, fur it Ib
exactly opposite. Wlce any other business men. those at tlie head of the liquor
business are ever ready to do those
things that will help expand their business, but so far I navo never heard of
any of them agitating to "abolish the
bar" or give us proliloitlon or any other
restrictive measures and one would Imagine if restricting increased thetr business It ,would be good policy on their
part to advocate restriction, "If not,
then .Why not?"
An interesting table of police statistics
for the city ot Liverpool is given in a
book by John Burns, M.P., "Labor and
Drink." ln miM there were 7474 arrests
for drunkenness on tile days of the weeks
as follows;
Saturday (pay day)   ',, 2317
Sunday (hours of sale restricted)   liiff-
Monday       im
Tuesday       870
Wednesday     815
Thursday  738
Friday   796
Saturday Is pay-day with the highest
number of arrests, and Sunday, whun
there is restriction, there are (tlie lowest
number of arrests, followed again on
Monday with ihe second highest number.
And quite recently in Liverpool during
the transport workers' strike, the saloons
were closed und arrests for crime of
every kind fell UG per cent, to rise Immediately they were opened again.' If,
as you say, restriction does not restrict,
how do you account for the above? In
Liverpool from 1890 to 1901, 486 licensed
houses disappeared and arrests dropped
from 16,042 in jsuu to 7,474 In 1904, although the population increased In that
time by 151,62a, Take again Watorford,
In Ireland, with one saloon to every 78
persons, and Hattersea (London) with
one saloon to every CG0 persons. The
arrests in Watorford for drunkenness are
63 per 1000, and ln Hattersea five for
every 1000. M, Vandervelde, leader of
the socialists in Helgium, is one of the
world's leading prohibitionists, while tho
German social democrats have recently
passed a resolution to the effect that prohibition Is the only solution to tho liquor
problem, and this after the Gothenburg
system has been tried and failed. I eould
go on, but, Mr. Editor, I will not encroach further on your time apd space,
but will close by quoting from the government blue book (Great Britain) the
wages paid out fur each £100 value produced;
Coal   mining       65%
Pock  work     35%
Ship building     41%
Tramway    32%
Railway       32%
Agriculture    28%
Cotton manuraeiurlng   28%
Waterworks    26%
Canals    26%
Gasworks    .,.,.,,.   25',;,
Iron and ntt'i-1 works   24%
Clothing mu mi fact u ring   23%
Linen manufacturing   22%
Woolen manufacturing     22%
Brewing and  Distilling       8%
yours truly,
T. A. BARNARD.
118 Hamilton street,
New Westminster, B. c
THE EARLY CLOSING
BY-LAW PASSES
1/
Aldermen Decide Continuing in Force the New
Regulations
Aid.    Hepburn's-   Motion
Carries by Eight Votes
to Seven
By a vote of eight to seven the recently enacted early closing by-law
was confirmed at the regular meeting
ol the city counoll held last Monday
night In the city hall. It will continue effective until suoh times aa the
council can be prevailed upon to amend lt to exempt certain businesses
or the by-law repealed. 'A number of
representatives of grocery stores
worts present and opposed It, while
the members of the Retail Merchants-'
association declared that they represented 90 per cent of the grocery
business done in the oity, and were all
in favor of early closing. Aid. Klrk-
patrlck maintained that the by-law
took away a man's privilege, and
gave notice of an amendment, Aid,
McBeath wanted a petition presented
showing that 75 per cent, of the
grocers wanted early closing.
Aid. Hepburn moved.tbat the bylaw atand, whioh motion was carried.
Those who voted for the motion
were:
Yeas—Aid. Woodslde,' Hamilton,
James, Ramsay, Hepburn, Enrlght,
Evans and Cottrell—8.
Nays—Aid. MoBeath, Crowe, White,
Trimble, Rogers, Kirkpatrick and
Hoskln,
Pitt Meadows Oil
It must be sffld of the Pitt Meadows
Oil Wells, limited, that they mean
business when It comes to drilling for
oil. If they aro not successful lt will
not lie for lack of hard work and material. Several hundred people have
visited the well at Pitt Meadows and
came away convinced that It Is at
least a good prospect, A small amount
of oil and gas came up In the nailer.
The new casing has arrived and is being placed in position to make the
well dry. Shares are now selling at
75 cents; formerly they were 50 cents.
More Miners Put on Unfair List
South Wellington local union U. M.
W,   of   A.,   local   872,   has   placed
the following on their   unfair   list:
B, Minororla, A, Marulute, Jas.
Aigner, S, Algner, (boy) Thos. Johnstone all of whom are miners, and W.
C, Brown, blacksmith. The boy, 8.
Algner, was forced by his father, M,
Algner, to go to work.
Bakers to Organise
A Toronto, Ont, despatch says that
General Organizer Walsh, of the Bakery and Confectionery Workers' International union, reports success In
his efforts to Interest bakers in the
trade union movement. Members of
the Independent union are now agreeing that It would be to their Interest
to Join the bona fide organization.
-. T. KINGSLEY
On the "Battle of Coal Harbor"
K. T. Kingsley, the local socialist
lecturer, uddressed a large audlenco
ln the Empress theatre on Sunday
night, hlB subject being the "Battle
of Coal Harbor." Speaking from a
socialist viewpoint, he took the occasion to ridicule the manner In
wblch the "battle" was won, and declared that a deliberate effort was
made to Incite the populaee to violence against tlie Hindus on the
Komagata Maru and also against the
shore Hindus. In this effort the
newspapers did their share. That the
attempt failed was due to the fact,
In, bis qptnlou, that the worklngman
was.no longer disposed to excitement,
and incitement to commit acts of violence. Referring to the midnight attack on the steamer when the Invaders aboard the Sea Lion were repulsed, Mr. Kingsley ln describing the
Incident said that the police force,
tire chief, militia and Immigration officials, and others, together wtth a
member of parliament, put out after
midnight to attack the defenseless
boat. "I have no use for those who
work after midnight," he Bald. "They
remind me," he continued, "of burglars, porch climbers, chicken thieves,
etc, The Hindus resented this midnight attack and the naval forces
were defeated. Then tha land forces
and the Canadian navy Joined forces
and the Hindus threw up their hands,
It thus took the combined land and
sea forces to overcome 350 unarmed
and harmless men. Such action on
the part of the officials made a joke
ot the government. The latter could
not repel the few Hindus without
worldwide excitement. Tbe Hindus
were men of spirit but they made one
mistake.' They should have come to
this country as the forefathers of the
people here now did—with guns, Mr.
Kingsley expressed the hope that as
a result of the affair British rule ln
India would be swept away and India
held for tile Indians. He criticized the
recent affair by reviewing the events
that led up to tho "battle." He
claimed that tho treatment meted out
to the Hindus was anything luit just,
They had brought a cargo of coal
with them which they desired to recoup themselves for the outlay they
hud been put to, over (50,000, they
had been prevented from doing so
ond from taking back with them a
cargo. The government, he asserted,
should have sent word to the Hindus
at Hong Kong that they would not
be allowed to land, and when they
did come every effort should have
been made to expedite the hearing of
their case before tho courts,
DAVID (PENCER, LTD.
CfrSrar)    $1.80 PEIl YEA]*
DAVIO SPINCIR, LTD.
HOUSEWIVES NOTE!
AT
SPENCER'S
YOU WILL FIND
Rogers Bros.
1847 Flatware
Reduced
For the balance of the July Sale we will offer these
standard goods at substantial reductions.  The designs
are in vintage (French grey), faneuil, Priscilla, also '
plain and tipped. -
Per Dozen
COFFEE SPOONS  *JJ0
TEA SPOONS  ., <  U.60
TEA SPOONS, plain  *».»»
TEA SPOONS, small   KM
TEA SPOONS, plain, small  «.7»
DESSERT SPOONS and FORKS  HM
DESSERT SPOONS and FORKS, plain, price.... 15.71
TABLE SPOONS  MM
TABLE SPOONS, plain  '.  MM
SOUPSPOONS   18.70
BOUILLON SPOONS  AIM
BERRY SPOONS, each  AIM
COLD MEAT FORKS, each   *1,«
SUGAR SHELLS ...'.:      .«•>
SOUP LADLES, each   *s.M
OYSTER LADLES, each  «M0
GRAVY LADLES, each   fl*>
CREAM LADLES, each  »1.00
CHEESE SERVERS  M
PIE SERVERS  .....*.  ♦MO-
CHILD'S KNIFE, FORK and SPOON combination  I1J0
BREAD KNIVES      U.N
TABLE KNIVES, hollow handles, dozen   tltM
TABLE KNIVES, solid handles, dozen...  KM
TABLE FORKS to match .' H*«
DESSERT KNIVES, hollow handles, dozen IM..60
DESSERT KNIVES, plain, solid, dozen ,.. **•»»
DESSERT FORKS, plain     AtM
INDIVIDUAL SALAD FORKS, set of 6 for .... UM
INDIVIDUAL OYSTER FORKS, set of 0 for .... MM
David Spencer limited
DAVID tPENOER, LTD.
DAVID SPINCIR, LTD.
What Everybody Should Know
MEN'S NEW NOBBY SUIT8 can be bought at BRUMMITTS from
♦10.00 up to 130.00 And thty am worth mora
HATS, bearing the union label, at $2.00, I2.M, 13.00.
SHOES, all makes and prices, bearing the label, at "live and let Uva
prices, 12.00 up to $6.00
CHIPPEWA SHOES at ♦7.00, 18,00 and ♦10.00
St. Josoiih, Levis, July 14, 190*1.
Alliinrd's Liniment Co., Limited,
Gentlemen: I was badly kicked by
my horse lust May and after using
several preparations on my leg nothing would do. My leg was black
as jet I was laid up In bed for a
fortnight und could not walk. After
using three liottlea of your MINARD'S LINIMENT I was perfectly
cured, so that I could start on tho
road.
JOS. DUI1ES,
Commercial Traveller.
lEADQUAPTERy
Jn ihe heart ol the retail district._ Absolulelj;
fireproof and modem in every respect, Cuisine
unexcelled. European plan, $1 to $3 per day,
FREE AUTO 'BUS MEETS All. TRAINS. Oxmd ud
ofwultd by Tlie Pfovinciil Hotel* Company. Limits'.
HOWAF.D J Wl] LHAN, l',«J«,
W. B. BRUMMITT
18-20   CORDOVA  ST. W.
STOVES and RANGES
EVERYTHING FOR THE KITCHEN
Mount Pleasant headquarters for Carpenters' Tools ud ill
kinds of Builders' and Contracton' Supplies
W.R. OWEN & MORRISON
Ph.se Fair. 447. 2337 Mail Stmt
J. A. FLETT, LIMITED
101-4 BANK OF OTTAWA BUILDING
602 Hastings Street West
DR. BRETT ANDERSON, Dentist
Operates by the latest, most scientific ud painless methodi
Specialist in Crown. Bridie, Plate ud Gold Inky Work
HOURS 10 A.M. TO 4 P.M.
7.r) Per Cent, of your Summer Cooki***.**; can
be done with Electric Household Appliances just as well as with a kitchen range
and with much greater comfort and convenience.
Electric Houaehold Appliances are ready for operation, day or night,
on an Instant's attention to connecting the cord with the household
Bocket,
Tbey can do everything ln tlie line ot light cooking, preparing tea or
coffee, making toast, preparing eggs, frying chops, etc. You don't
want heavy meals during the hot weather and the appliances Just
meet this demand and make lt unnecessary to have a hot Are going,
Electric Household Appliances cost only a few cents per hour of continuous operation. To prepare an ordinary meal takes but a fraction
of an hour.   Tbey are guaranteed hy the manufacturers.
SEE OUR FULL LINE OP ELECTRICAL HOUSEHOLD
APPLIANCES
Canalised D   C*     CI CrTDir
Huiin,.SiiM( D.\f.   EJJEiV* 1 KlV»
1138 GiMtill. St.
.  Nisi Dam PAGE FOUR
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY  JULY 31, 1914. i
THE
MOLSONS
BANK
Capital and Reserve, - $8,800,000
SB branches ln Canada
A general banking bualneai transacted.
Savings Department
Interest allowed at highest
current rate
East End Branch
150 HASTINGS STREET EAST
A, W. Jarvls, Manner
The Royal Bank
of Canada
INCORPORATED 1NI
Paid-up Capital . • • 0 11,1
Raasrv*     12,600,000
Total Asaeta 110,000,000
WE ALLOW INTEREST ON DE.
P08IT8 IN OUR
SAVINGS
DEPARTMENT
One Dollar will open
the account, and your
bualneaa will be welcome be It large or
email
FOURTEEN BRANCHES IN
VANCOUVER
THE
INCORPORATED
1855
BANK OF
TORONTO
Capital ind Reserve 111,170,878
WAGE-EARNERS
keep your savings In tho Bank
Of Toronto, and watch your deposits and Interut added by the
bank grow to I molt desirable
bank balance. The financial
strength of thie long-established, well-conducted Institution ensures safety for your
money, and you will receive
every courtesy, md your account eireful ittentlon.
Assets ..
Depoalts
850,000,000
841,000,000
Main Office—
488 HA8TINGS ST. WEST
(Near Rlcharda)
Branches—
Cor. Hutlngi ind Carrall Sts.
New Weatminster
Victoria
Herrltt
THEIBANK OF BRITISH
NORTH AMERICA
Established In 1836.   Incorporated
by Royal Charter In 1840.
Paid-up Capital     -     K8«8,6«J.8«
Reserve Fund    -     -    8,017,280,00
Head Offlce tn Canada:
BT. JAMES ST., MONTREAL
H. B. MACKENZIE - General Mauser
SAVINGS DEPARTMENT AT
-    ALL BRANCHES
Special attention given to Savings
Accounts on which Interest Is allowed from date of deposit,
Open a Savings Account and add
to It every pay day.
Drafts and Money Orders sold
VANCOUVER BRANCH
W. Godfrey, Manager.
NORTH   VANCOUVER   BRANCH
J. R, Chapman, Manager.
' KERRtSDALB BRANCH
D. Neil, Manager.
Traders Trust
company
LIMITED
828-881 ROGERS BUILDING
VANCOUVER      •      .       B.C.
FIRE, UFE and ACCIDENT
INSURANCE
Four per cent. Interest
allowed on all deposits
in our savings department, subject to cheque.
Agreements For Sile purehiud
Sife Dsposlt Vaults
82.60 i yur
Guaranteed Investment of Fundi
for Client!
THE fC. FffiEiai»
Published every Friday morning by the
B. C. Federatlonist, Ltd.
R. Parm. Pettlplece
J. W. Wilkinson
Oeorge Bartley     -
Managing Editor
ABBoclate Editor
- ,     News Editor
DIRECTORS
Jas. Campbell, president; J, H. MoVety, secretary-
treasurer; H. Olbb; Q. J. Kelly
and R. P. Pettlplece
Office: Room 217, Labor Temple,
Tal. Exchange Sey. 7495.
Advertising Manager
• M. C, Shrader
SUBSCRIPTION
81,60 per year; In Vancouver city, 82.00; to unions
• ■ ■--   $1.00
subscribing tn a body,
REPRESENTATIVES
New Westminster -     -     -     -    H, Gibb, Box 834
Prince Rupert    -    -  , - W. E. Denning, Box 631
Victoria-     -     -     -     -     - A. S. Wells, Box 1638
Affiliated   with Western Labor Press Association
"Unity of Labor; the Hope of the World."
FRIDAY JULY 31,  1914.
POLITICIANS WHO KNOW their
business, never miss a chance of improving the shining hour. Wherefore cometh
Mr. H. H. Stevens, M.P., to the conservative
association last Friday evening. Full to the
brim with his experiences on
u u' ,Tc„r.» the firing line at the battle of
?»«lu.T 'Burrard Inlet, and doubtless
I?„I,„„ feeling that the party picnic,
POT BOILING      which ^  ,et for 'fa „,„.
row, might  have had to be
postponed on account of the terrible conflict, he
took advantage of that moment of great national peril to point out to the assembled patriots
that
The Komagata Maru has shown in striking manner that this coast is not adequately defenced.   It is time the people of the
country woke tip to this fact.   Canada
must rise to the necessity and take her
proper place in imperial defence.
Just by the way, we always thought that by
the term "imperialism" politicians meant the
whole of the British empire,' and as that seems
correct, what Mr Stevens really meant was, that
he hoped one part of the empire would realize
that the day might come when it would need to
defend itself from another part. Nothing is
quite so funny in its way as a serious politician
trying to make politics look serious. Still, perhaps we should be duly thankful for the gratuitous amusement furnished us. However, that
aside.'
* »   #   *
What Mr. Stevens was really trying to do
was, to play his part in the agitation to keep
alive the proposal of the federal.government to
spend $30,000,000 on naval armaments. The
scheme is not dead, and it has only been laid
aside until the next wave of "prosperity"
comes along.- The international armament
trust is too wary and tenacious to drop any of
its possibilities, as long as there is the slightest
chance of realizing on them. Stevens may be
quite serious, in his way, but he has never
lived close enough to Whitehall to know where
the heart of the cancer lies. But recent investigation into the affairs and ramifications of the
armament gang ought to convince him, or any
man, that it is a proposition deserving the denunciation and exposure of all who are placed
in such a position that they can speak to the
public, and have their utterances listened to and
spoken about The plan of the armament gang
to get Canadian money is only one part of its
world-wide conspiracy to scare the nations into
arming to the teeth, to defend themselves
against the imaginary aggresiveness of each
other. The particular group handling the Canadian end of the game is in England. Their
friends^ and shareholders in their companies, are
members of the house of commons, and the permanent officials and ex-officials of the war office
and admiralty, and others in position to use
political power or other influence to secure
orders for armaments.
* *    *   *
The British part of the ring is composed of
a few of the big firms in the trade. Messrs.
Vickers, Ltd., have works at Barrow, Sheffield
and Birmingham, in. England. They have a
yard at Placentia del las Armas, in Spain, one
at Spezia, in Italy. They have two places on
the Volga in Russia, and are part owners of
the Whitehead torpedo factory at Fiume, in
Austria-Hungary. They have a yard in South
America, and, by way of getting ready, for that
$30,000,000, have put down a plant in Montreal, so that, John Brown tt Company, who
are establishing one of the biggest ship-building
plants in the, world, in New Brunswick, shall
not be overcrowded. The share lists of Messrs.
Vickers show that the shareholders live in Italy,
Japan, Russia, Brazil, Canada, Australia,
China, Spain and Chili. The firms in the ring
are Vicken-Armstrong, John Brown, Cammell-
Laird, Beardsmore's, etc., with a whole host of
subsidiary concerns all inter-woven with each
other in one vast web. For instance, John
Brown & Company, besides their works at Sheffield, have a very big yard at Clydebank. They
hold seven-eighths of the shares of Thomas
Firth & Sons, and half the shares of the Coventry Ordnance Works. Messrs. Beardmore
not only own a big shipbuilding plant, but also
half the shares in Whitehead & Company, the
torpedo firm. A dozen or more firms have
obviously been established for the purpose of
handling some part of the business more satisfactorily, but examination shows that some of
the directors are on all the companies.
There was a time when the British aristocracy despised "trade" and all its works. But
the rapid evolution of industry, eoupled with
the commercial convenience of the limited liability company, has changed that. Moreover,
until very recent years, a minister financially interested in a company about to handle a government contract, either left the company or the
government. Nowadays they seek to get into
both, for the avowed object of exploiting public
office for private advantage. The trustee for
the debenture holders in Vickers is Lord Sand-
hunt, who now occupies the office of lord
chamberlain in the royal household, and who
by virtue of that office must be a peer and a
member of the government. The Right Honorable Stuart Wortley, member for the Hallam
division of Sheffield, rose in the houie of commons a little while ago to object to orders for
armor-plate going abroad. His right honor-
ableness is a debenture holder of Vickers and
a debenture trustee of Cammel, Laird & Company. A particularly choice patriot is Sir J.
C. Rickett, member for Osgoldcross division
of'Yorkshire, and recently   elected honorary
president of the Free Church Council, He holds
3200 shares in John Brown & Company, and
2100 shares in Cammel-Laird s. Another
Sheffield member, for the Eccleshall division, is
Mr. S. Roberts. He is a shareholder in John
Brown's, a director of Cammel-Laird's, debenture trustee of the Fairfield company, and a
shareholder in the Coventry ordnance works. He
figures in every "bigger navy" Abate, with a
persistency, which speaks volumes for his penny-
wise patriotism. Lord Aberconway is a director of Palmers', and so is the liberal member
for the Bosworth division of Leicestershire, Mr.
H. D. McLaren. Sir C. Swann, member for
the northern division of Manchester, is a shareholder in Cammel-Laird's.
*F *P *fi V
One of the most powerful of these combinations is what is known as the Harvey trust,
Which was formed a few years ago, and which
represents the most up-to-date and complete
form of capitalist organization the world has
ever seen. Its internationalism is complete. It
was formed for the purpose of working certain
rights in the manufacture of armor plate, and it
combined together the interests in Britain of
Vickers-Armstrong's, Beardmore's, ' John
Brown's, Fairfield, Cammell-Laird's, the Projectile Company, Palmer's, and Hadfields-Cov-
entry, and of half a dozen of the leading firms
in the United States, of firms in France, Italy
and Germany (Krupps). The directors were representatives of Beardmore's, John Brown's,
Vickers-Armstrong's, Cammell-Laird's, the
French Steel Company, Schneider's, and others.
Among the list of the shareholders appear the
names of the postmaster-general and the colonial
secretary. So the game goes on. These precious
patriots and imperialists play politics and
become ministers and state officials for the purpose of drumming orders for their warlike wares.
Lord Welby, when permanent secretary for the
treasury department, might well say:
We are in the hands of an organization
of thieves, swindlers! They are politicians,
manufacturers of armaments, and all of
them are anxious for unlimited expenditure; alt go on inventing scares to terrify
the public and to terrify the ministers of
the crown.
It is this same gang which is pulling the
wires at Ottawa, and who use politicians like
McBride and Stevens as their advertising and
advance agents. McBride, a typical political
product of the western back block, goes to
London, and is taken by the admiralty officials
to see a big naval review at Spithead. Despite
all that passes for consummate polish here, they
are past masters at the game and can see the
straws in his hair. What passes fpr brains and
shredness here, is measured for what it really
is, over there, and he proves a valuable addition
to the colonial department of their business. But
if the common people have any common sense,
they should be able to see through the scheme,
and realize the way in which their lives and
destinies are manipulated, under the name of
imperialism, like so many pieces on a chess
.board. It may be demonstrable by economic
formulae that the working class does not pay
the money. But it does pay in lives and misery,
and until the workers are aroused internationally
to what this means to them and their movement
the armament trust will flourish.
THE    NEW  NATURALIZATION
law, which goes   into   effect   throughout
the dominion on January 1st, 1915,  is
well deserving of the interest and scrutiny  oi
the working class.    Under the old law,   any
alien who wished to become
„,„,„. a naturalized British citizen,
.T MORE Wa»  reqUired    t0    *'aVe  three
IT MORE K, prevj0U8   residence  in
DIFFICULT Canadai His applica,ion
had to be signed by two
citizens testifying to the truth ot his ckim, before a commissioner of oaths, and he also had
to observe a number of'minor formalities. Under
the new law an applicant must have lived in
some part of the British dominions for the
five years previous to the date of his application.
One year of that five must have been spent in
Canada. The persons acting as sponsors for
him will have to appear, with him, before the
judge who deals with the application. These
persons may be questioned at length by the
judge, who may also examine the applicant
to such length and detail regarding British institutions as his discretion may deem desirable.
In the United States, an alien desiring to be
naturalized, must declare on oath his intention
to become a citizen of the United States. Two
years afterwards, he must declare on oath his
intention to support the constitution of the
United States and renounce allegiance to every
foreign power. He must prove residence in
the United States for five yean, and in the
state where his application is made, for one
year. When he appears before the judge, he
is questioned as to the form, of government and
the methods of its election. This part of his
examination is capable of so much stretching
that he is practically in the hands of the judge,
who can, if he pleases, make the matter so difficult for the applicant, that he has but a very
poor chance of getting through. The official
reasons given for making it difficult for aliens to
acquire full constitutional rights both in the
United States and Canada is, that the authorities want to make sure that the aspirant will
make a good citizen, according to their definition of the term "good." We confess to a
large measure of scepticism in respect to most
of the official reasons given for laws made by
capitalist legislators. And the case of the naturalization laws is no exception.
*   *   *    *
We suspect that obstacles are introduced not
for the purpose of securing better types of citizens, but with the object of preventing thousands—who would make as good citizens as
those who make the law.anyway—from ever becoming citizens at all. The members of the
federal parliament, and of the house of congress, represent the capitalist element in both
countries. They are in ppssession of the natural
resources, but before they can be of any use
to them, they must have workers to transform
them by their labor, into commodities capable
of being sold in the world's market. To obtain that labor, immigration is encouraged. But
while the capitalist owners of industry welcome the working class of Europe as workers,
they do not want to give them any political
power which they might possibly use to regulate
the terms and conditions under which their
labor is employed. That power can only be
obtained through the possession of (ull civil
rights which, in turn, cannot be obtained except
through naturalization. Hence the reason for
making that process a difficult and tedious one.
Hence also, is perhaps the reason why a strong
movement of the I. W. W. kind is found in
older and settled portions of the eastern states.
Thousands of workers there are absolutely deprived of the opportunity to have and use the
vote. The result is that they are forced to use
the only remaining weapon they have, to improve their lot. That is, the strike, at such rare
times as the labor market is favorable. The
naturalization law makes such men Ishmaels
and outcasts, Little wonder they feel every
man's hand is against them—and act accord-
ROSA LUXEMBURG is one of  the
foremost women fighters in the European
labor and socialist movements.     At the
present moment she is the centre of an intensely
dramatic struggle which will have a far-reaching  effect  for  the  German
working class.   In one of her
speeches  she   declared  that
DILEMMA
OF THE
..... en -.—   youths,   forced   to   become
MAILED FIST    Mm by fa conlct!p, ,aw
of that country, were subjected to gross ill-treatment, and that tragedies
were every day being enacted in German barracks. The authorities at once charged her
with libel and doubtless counted on an easy
victory. But the defence was more than the
war minister bargained for. Over a thousand
witnesses were secured whose evidence covered
no less than 30,000 cases of barrack brutality
which was to be submitted to the court. It
was clear from the start that, even if .a conviction could be secured by using a "packed"
jury, such evidence would have an effect on the
public mind which would more than outweigh
the satisfaction the authorities could get from
winning the case. So little wonder the action
was suspended or postponed by the attorney-
general to give the government a chance to devise a way of backing down without any apparent show of defeat.
*   *   *   *
The fact is, the authorities had hoped by the
trial, to strike a fatal blow at the labor couse.
They have not forgotten the recent rebuke administered by the socialists to the bumptious
Wilhelm when they refused to rise in his honor
at the close of the last session of the Reichstag.
They realized then that to prosecute 70 elected
representatives for alleged disrespect for the
crown, would only mean to make martyrs of
them, and add stimulus to their movement. So
the minister of justice made the sagacious decision that they were protected by the privileges enjoyed by members. Still there are more
ways than one of "getting" a troublesome person in Germany—just as there are in British
Columbia. So another plan has been adopted:
i »   *   »   *
At the last conference of the social democrats of Berlin, a resolution by Rosa Luxemburg was passed, declaring thar only a general
strike could secure equal voting rights in
Prussia, urging such a course to force the concession from the authorities. A prosecution
has been started against her, and those who supported her. There is no law forbidding a general strike, but the one invoked for this particular purpose says "A general strike is only possible by breach of contract. Breach of contract is a contravention of a legal principle.
Therefore this is an incitement to disobey the
law." It sounds an' absurd argument, and high
court of Germany lias previously opposed it,
and demanded at least that the incitement must
be a direct breach of an existing working agreement. It serves to "show the titanic struggle
which is being waged by the workers of Germany against the legacy of the iron chancellor.
HE WHO HAS NO ENEMIES is the
man who js no good to himself or anyone else.   He agrees with everybody and
everything.   If you ask his opinion on a subject he finds out your view  of it,  and then
agrees with you.    He talks
HAS NO BODY bul never says anything! con-
Tn mru nod   "fluently, none have a chance
u  Ji .??,eto take exception to what he
SOUL TO SAVE !ay!    H(, j, _ j^ng mi
a say-nothing. His idea of
life is just simply to eat, breathe and sleep, until
his anatomical machinery wears out and then
die. The man who has enemies is the man who
does things—who makes things happen; who
brings things to pass; a big cog in the wheel of
progress. He has plans and strives to put them
into execution. If he meets with opposition and
obstacles, so much the better—the greater the
obstacles the greater become his efforts and
determination to succeed. He thinks things
and has the nerve and manhood to express his
thoughts, not stopping to inquire who it does or
does not suit.
WHEN FARM  LABORERS in* England can te' roused to go on strike as
they are doing now, it means their condition is so bad that it cannot be made worse.
Ages of soil slavery have made them  as   a
class as stolid and as bovine
FARM as tne very cow< t*wy ■eni*''
, ._„_-_.       Yet, curiously enough, it was
«mJL ""O   °f   """   •»«   Wh°   fo1"
STRIKE     ^ lowe(j fa (jjlrt jn j,, fiercMt
places in the early days of
trade union struggles. Away back in 1834
half a dozen of them formed a union to raise
Mt wages to a little more than $1.75 a week,
and for that they were* sentenced to transportation for seven years. Then again, later, the
agricultural laborers are seen to the front with
Joseph Arch as their spokesman. Arch
carried the agitation all through England and
by the end of 1872, there were 100,000 agricultural laborers organized there. Persistent
and bitter hostility of farmers, landowners and
country magistrates broke the organization. The
isolation, too, of the rural worker is against organization. Where men or women are employed in large masses, side by side, a sense of
fellowship and social feeling arises which make
association after the day's work is over, seem
very natural. With the farm worker it is
different. Little of his work is done in company with others. Fear of dismissal and eviction from his cottage act as a deterrent, and
the very fact that he has stayed with that work
while so many of his kind have emigrated or
gone to the towns, proves that he has a strong
liking for the country side which he will tolerate much for rather than leave.
Says Ottawa Evening Citizen, speaking of
the Hindoos on the Komagata Maru, "It is
doubtful if they were ever very anxious to
land." Well, our contemporary may know.
But there are one or two policemen with broken
heads and slashed jaws round Vancouver, who
have their opinion also.
Some  men  have wives;  others  are  only
married.
One might be "good" if there were any encouragement—but
The essential part of regret is the crystallized
expression of the day after.
Most "good' people seem to be prigs—or
sadly lacking in experience.
It does no harm to hit the bottom occasionally—you learn what is there.
Matrimony is a conspiracy of two, sanctioned
by each, to hide the dissillusionment of both.
Every fool who has something to say, which
the world has not patience to listen to, thinks
he has a heaven-sent mission to write a book.
A play which can survive the gallery, can
survive the critics, even though "the tired business man" fills the stalls with sleeping stupidity.
If a man wants a wife now-a-daya, he puts
on a boiled shirt, Formerly he went out early
in the morning with an empty saddle horse and
a club.
The socialist movement is composed of an
intelligent minority who mistake their own enthusiasm for the growing class-consciousness of
the workers,
You never know how far you can fall until
you have let go a few times.' Oo not consider
yourself a saint until you have experienced the
pleasure of being a sinner. It is not quite certain which you would decide to be.
Preachers, professors, and others who nose
around in mouldy ruins and musty records, do
a lot of worrying about Adam and others who
have been a long time dead and are likely to
stay dead. But they have no time or attention
for the rotten conditions under which men,
women and children must work and live today.
The District Ledger, of Fernie, confers upon
us the signal honor of reproducing our account
of the proceedings of the recent convention of
the B. C. Federation of Labor, in its entirety,
not even excluding proofreader's errors. Beyond
that, our esteemed contemporary omitted to
mention the source from which its article was
drawn. Twould be a shame for us to blossom
quite unseen.
The French senate has been warned by M.
Viviani, the premier, that the state workers have
been promised the Saturday half-holiday in the
English fashion; and he added that there might
be "grievous, disappointment" if this promise be
broken. However, the finance committee has
just refused to vote the necessary sum for this
reform. There are some fools who ask for
revolutions.
The. realization of socialism resolves itself
into the question of whether the result can be
more rapidly attained by working on men or
institutions; Men, when they enter the world,
have an innate conservatism which inclines them
to accept what is, as what should be. To the
socialist, every un-class-conscious mind is a.
piece of mental masonry wheh has to be demolished before the new conception can find
a place.
If the home rule squabble does nothing else
it has produced some useful things worth remembering. Hit majesty King George the
Fifth—husband of the other four fifths—says
"the cry of civil war is on the lips of the most
responsible and sober-minded of my people."
People who raise an army to tell George's
parliament to go to hell, are- "responsible and
sober-minded." If aome fellow persuades half
a thousand workless, weaponless men to
parade their condition through, the street, they
will get their heads split as dangerous characters. But an aristocrat, who raises 10,000 religious bigots into a .frenzy of ignorance is responsible and sober-minded. We wonder
what this funny little talking machine will call
the miners' officials next year if a general strike
of miners seems likely. He must have slipped
out of sight of the four fifths for a minute,
otherwise he would not have been* allowed to
go around talking that way.
For a precious piece of political peddling,
watch the old court house site. It belongs to
the provincial government When requested a.
while ago to give it to the city as a rest park,
McBride could not see his way to do it owing
to the fact that it was "the property of the
whole of the people of the province." The
park commissioners have been given permission
to grade it and sow grass to make it fit to look
and lie upon. By the time the grass is ready
next year, a provincial election will be in sight.
Then McBride will use'the site to buy votes
with, by giving it to the city. "Up to now he
has held office by giving the province away to
outsiders. Now he is going to try a change
by giving a bit of it to those who are already
supposed to own it. Moreover he will do it as
though it were a piece of private benovolence on
his part, knowing full well that the fools he has
to deal with will let him get away with such a
piece of amusing impudence.
Mr. H. H. Stevens, M.P., is a politician,
and, therefore, entitled to contradict his own
sayings pretty frequently. But it is not often
he turns a somersault quite so quickly as last
Friday. First he said lie would stop at nothing to preserve Canada from the Hindoos. A
few minutes afterwards, touching on the new
naturalization law, he babbled about "the
great brotherhood that exists under the British
flag." India is under the British flag. Those
Hindoos were born under the British flag.
Some of them have fought for the British flag.
But where did the brotherhood come in for the
Hindoos*1 With such a recent illustration of
the fact that this "brotherhood" is the veriest
flapdoodle, even Stevens might have given the
mob credit for enough memory -to last two
days. The empire is not run for brotherhood,
but for business. If Stevens has not been at
Ottawa long enough to know that, he had
better spend the better part of next session peeling his eyes and ears, and reading the history of
the honorable body of which'he is such a promising member. Tut I If only Gurdit could get
at himl
PHONE   SEYMOUR
$
*%SCM
every fortune 'to   Its-source :
and you will find there someone
saving money.   Putting it out
at interest:   Making the interest earn   more   money.  . You
can't get away from the   fact'
that most of the men who yoty
know   are   successful   did not
watt for things to happen. They
went out and made them hap-i
pen,    A savings account with .
us will help you command opportunities.
DOW FRASER TRUST CO.
817.881  Cambie Straet; 2818 Main
Street, (between 7th and 8th Aves.)
Vsncouvsr, and McKay Station,
Burnaby, B.C.
Close at 1 o'clock Saturday.
City Auction ud Commission Co.
Cash paid for houses and suites
of furniture or Auction arranfed.
Satlifaetlon tuarantead, prompt
settlements,
ARTHUR  I.  BETCHLIY
Smyths and Oranvllle Streeta
Auctlonsar  Sey SOT
Phone Your Printing Order
 to ■	
SEYMOUR 4490
Strike On
MINERS KEEP AWAY
HP HE strike is still on at the
* Queen Mine and Silver
Dollar, at Sheep Creek, B. 0.
All working men urged to stay
away until the strike is settled
Order Ymir Miners' Union
FURNITURE
By all means come and see our
splendid large new stock of furniture, "Everything but the
girl" for your new home.
GET OUR PRICES AND
TERMS
Hastings Furniture Co.
Limited
(1 HASTINGS STREET WEST
A. W. Woodard
Mgr. CANADA NATIONAL
FIRE INSURANCE CO.
Phone Seymour 3837
Rosen' Buildlns    470 Cnnvilie Street
PATENTS
Trade Marks, Designs, Copyrights.
FITHIRSTONHAUOH  A OO.
The Old Istabllshtd Htm of
FATSNT ATTORNEYS
1IBI Rogers Bldg., Qranvllle Strsst
City. Phene Seymour-87W.
DISEASES OF MEN
Ws Issue a written guarantee
that ZIT will cure or your money
back.
Differs from all other remedies.
Pries Sl.00, Post .Paid.
McDUFFEE BROS.
THU   OBJJOINO   DRUGGISTS
1S2 Cordova St W.
Vanoouver, B. O.
PANTAGEQ
Unequalled Vaudeville
Mesns
PANTAGES VAUDEVILLE
THREE SHOWS DAILY
2.49, 7.20, 0.15
Season's Prices-
Matinee 15o, Evenings ISo, ISe.
none Sojnaou S7SS
DIXON & MURRAY
otmramtmaa, wo.
•aoe aal Stats TlWat.   antral
Jobbla*
Offlee aa( nopi
10SS DUBBMUim SHU*
D.r*NlihlCIU
Phene Bar. 043
Perlon&Cfawel
2388Gr»n.UI.5t.
MACK BROS.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS and
EMBALMERS
Vancouver British Columbia ■■I
HP
I FRIDAY.. JULY Dl, 1914.
THB BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
PAGBfftl
DECIDE TO ATTEND
The Mid-Summer
Clearance Sale
TO-DAY
The values that we are now offering will appeal
strongly to every womian who desires to
and effect great saving.
Read our announcements in the daily papers
575 Granville St   Vancouver, B. C.
Phone Seymour 3540
Store Houra SSO to I p.m.
Saturdays Included
EDWARD LIPSETT
FISHING SUPPLIES
MANUFACTURER OF
TENT5   xk
. FLAGS 5AIL5«»» ORE SACS
DTTDN DUCK ALLWEICHT5'»WIDTHS
ARTHUR JAMES' FI5H HDDK5. ETC
T"«nr l'uv)\ mark
Braids
Best
Coffee
This Morning?
BRAID'S
BEST
COFFEE
WM TURNER
906 Granville St
Next to the Market
-DEALER IN-
New and second-hand China, Crockery, Furniture,
Hardware and Stoves. Furniture moving and shipping. Telephone us when you have furniture for
sale. Highest prices paid.
TELEPHONE SEYMOUR 3745
UNDERWEAR
MEN'S BALBHIQQAN UNDERWEAR
I At SOo. and 76o. per garment.
BRITANNIA
j     Light Woollen Underwear—Juat right for this warm weather
LIOHT WEIOHT UNION SUITS
From $1.00 per Suit up.  '
B. V. D. UNDERWEAR
With Short Sleeves and Knee Length Drawers, 7!c. per garment.
CLUBB & STEWART, Ltd.
Tel. Sey. ltt
S9S-S1S HASTINOS STREET W.
BREWED AND BOTTLED IN VANCOUVER BY
VANCOUVER BREWERIES Limited
PLIGHT
unsanitary, the families practically
living and existing ln the work rooms.
The department haa already closed a
number of such places. Other caaea
will be brought into court and their
.proprietors fined. The Industrial
Banner points to this as proof that
agitation counts, and says the anti-
sweat shop campaign carried on by
the Journeymen Tailors' union is
bringing results.
Quotes Ottawa Despatch re
Dismissal of 1,000 Postal
Industrial   Conditions   All
Over the Dominion in a
Terrible Way
Major J. Thompson, Ontario Immigration agent tor the Britlah Isles,
haa been. devoting hia attention to
Scotland for the past two yeara. In
an Interview with the Ottawa Citlsen
a tew days ago he Bays:
"We are getting the best class of
Immigrants from Scotland we ever
got, and the outlook is aa favorable
as lt ever was ln Ontario, Last year
there were 160,000 Immigrants left
Scotland out of a population of something over four million, and of these
the greater number came to Canada
and 45,000 to Ontario. This year the
number of immigrants will fall off to
gome extent and approximate something like 24,000 for the busy months
of the Immigration season.
Dundee Paper's' Story
"The falling off ln immigration Is
due to the discouraging reports of
conditions ln Canada regarding the
unemployed," said the major, as he
produced a clipping from the Dundee
Advertiser. In this paper, under big
headlines, these oondlttona are announced as facts:
"All over the Dominion oi Canada
unemployment Is deplorable,
"In Toronto from 15,000 to 20,000
people are walking the streets idle,
"Thousands of men are out of work
In every city throughout the dominion.
"Dismissals during the past few
months ln various branches ot Industry total thousands."
The paper, pats Canada on the baok
sb the most popular of all the overseas dominions, yet it tells of the
vanished hopea of the Scottish lads
and lasses who gave way to despair
and longing for bonnie Scotland: The
artlole'proceeds aa follows:
Labor's Lament
"A prominent labor official In Canada addressed a gathering ln Montreal and struck a gloomy note. He
stated that the conditions ln the Industrial world all over Canada were
ln a terrible way at present. During
the laat few months he had covered
the territory from coast to coaat and
the conditions were so deplorable
that he believed there would be a repetition ot the great financial disaster
of 1893.
"Thousands of men are out of employment ln all our cities, and many
of them are in a state of starvation
that la a disgrace to this country of
suoh splendid natural resources.
U despatch from Ottawa regarding
this does not dispel the gloom. Something like 10,000 employees of the
post office—deputy postmasters, letter
oarrlers, messengers, etc.—have been
dismissed during the past three
months."
Mr. Thompson states that the formation ot the union among the farm
laborera under which they get a halt
day a week and increased the wages
compared with a few years ago to
double what they then received, have
heen elements in keeping many of the
farm laborers at home tn Scotland,
ALLIED PRINTING TRADES COON-
„ 9.IL—tf*u ">d Monday In month.
Preaident, Oeo. Mowat: secretary, F. B.
Fleming. P.O. Bo» SS
MINARD'S  LINIMENT RELIEVES
NEURALGIA.
PROVINCIAL UNIONS
B. C. FEDERATION OF LABOR—
Meets ln annual convention ln January. Executive officers; 1914-16: President, A. Watchman; vice-presidents, W.
F. Dunn, Jas. H. McVety, O. H. .Fraaer,
J. W. Gray, H. Knudson, J. J. Taylor, B.
Simmons, Seoretary-treasurer, A. S.
Wells. Box 153ft-Victoria, B.C,
NEW WESTMINSTER, B.C.
NBW WESTMINSTER TRADES AND
Labor Counoll—Meets every second
and fourth Wednesday at 8 p. m. In Labor
Hall. Preaident. D. 8. Cameron; flnanolal
secretary, H. Olbb; general eecretary, W.
B. Maiden, P, O. Box 114. The publlo la
Invited to attend.
PLUMBERS' AND STEAMFTTTERS Local 4SB—Meets every seoond and
fourth Friday of month In Labor Hall,
7.80 p. m. Preaident, D. Webster: seoreUry, A. McLaren. P. O. Box 988, New
Westminster, B, C,
BARTENDERS' LOCAL W-MEBTSIN
Labor Temple, New Westmlnater,
corner Seventh stret and Royal avenue,
every eecond Sunday of each month, at
1.80 p. m. President, F. S. Hunt; seoretary, F. W. Jameson. Visiting brothers
Invited.
VICTORIA, B. C.
VICTORIA TRADES AND LA BOM
Council—Meets flrst and third Wed-
needay, Labor Hall, 731 Johnston street,
at 8 p. m. President, George Dykeman;
lecretary, Thos. F. Mathlson, box 801,
Vlotoria, B.C.
MINERS' UNIONS
KIMBERLET MINERS' UNION, No. 100,
Western Federation ot Miners—Meete
Sunday evenings In Union Hsll. Preeldent, Alex. Wilson; secretary-treasurer,
M. P. Vllleneuve, Klmberley, B, C.
LADYSMITH MINERS' UNION, LOCAL
No. 8888, U. M. W. of A.-Meets Wed.
nesday, Union Hall, 7 p.m. President,
Sam Guthrie; secretary, Duncan MoKen-
sle, Ladysmlth, B.C.
NANAIMO LOCAL UNION U. M. W. ol
A.—Meets every Monday at 7.80 p. m.
In the Athletlo Club, Chapel street   Ar-
thur Jordan, Box 410, Nanalmo, B.C.
CUMBERLAND LOCAL UNION, No.
28S9, U. M. W. or A.-Meets every
Sunday 7 p.m. ln U, H. W. of A. hall.
President, Jos. Naylor; secretary, James
Smith, Box M, Cumberland, B.C.
TRAIL MILL AND SMELTERMEN'S
Union, No. 105, W. F. of M.—Meets
every Monday at 7.30 p. m. President,
James Delgarns; secretary, P. J, Bolam,
Box 26, Trail, B. C.
SANDON MINERS' UNION, No. II,
Western Federation of Miners—Meets
every Saturday ln the Miners' Unton
hall. Address all communications to the
SecreUry, Drawer "K.," Sandon, B.C.
BUSINESS  AOENT   DIRECTORY
BLAMES PIECE WORK
For the Inferiority of Washington
Shingles as Compared
with B. C.
The Timber Workers' union ot Seattle, *WaBh„ has answered the claim
of employers that wages muat be reduced to meet competition with Britlah Columbia mills by declaring that:
"The Inferiority of the Washington
shingle Ib due to the substitution of
the piece work for the day system
ln the Washington mills, and under
the piece work system the men are
pitted against each other and every
possible effort made to force them to
the highest degree of speed. Quality necessarily has been sacrificed to
quantity."
NEW LABOR TEMPLE
Opened at Beilingham, Wash. Ten-
Thousand-Dollar Structure
The new labor temple of Beilingham, Wash., haa been opened and
local trade unions are now meeting
in a home of their own. The structure, which cost $10,000, Is two
atoreya high, built of wood, with an
artistic Btucco finish front. The first
floor Is mostly taken up with a big
assembly hall, ln which 600 people
oan be seated. On the second floor
are three halls for use of the unions.
There la a speolal big room for the
Women's Union Label league, with a
spacious kitchen, from which banquets are expected to be served.
"HELLO" GIRLS
Minimum Wage Nine Dollara for
Forty-four Houra
The Minimum Wage commission ot
the state of Washington has adopted
a rate of td for a week of 44 hours
as the minimum for telephone girls
throughout the state, except ln small
exohanges. Thla la the fourth mint-
mum wage adopted by the commt-
slon, the others being $10 a week for
mercantile workers. $8.90 for factory workerB and $9 for laundry and
dye workers.
TORONTO SWEAT SHOPS
Health Department Has Closed Number Such Places
The Toronto department has reported the existence of unsanitary
sweatshops In that city and has
ordered a i number of them to be
closed up. In many of the shops where
clothing Is made up, some ot them are
mere hovels, overcrowded and very
Ask for Labor Temple 'Phone Exchange,
Seymour 7498 (unless otherwise stated).
Bartendere—Room 208; Geo. W. Curnock.
B. C. Fedarationtat—Room 117; R. P.
Pettlplece.
Bridge and Structural Iron Workers—W.
L. Yule, Room 801.
Brotherhood of Carpenters—Room 100;
Hugh McEwen.
Bricklayers—Room 211; Wm. s. Dagnall.
Barbara—Room 801; C. F. Burkhart;
phone Sey. 1771.
Hod Carrlere, Builders and Commoa Laborers—Room 220: John Sully.
Cooke, Walters, Waitresses—Room III;
W. E. Walker; TeL Seymour 1414,
Electrical Workers (outside)—Room
207; W. F. Dunn.
Electrical Workers (inside)—Room 117;
F. L. Estinghausen.
Engineers (Steam)-Room 216; L. Dawson.
Labor Temple Co.—Room 111; 3. H.
McVety.
Longshoremen's Association — Office.
148 Alexander street; H. Hannlng; tel.:
Seymour 6869.
Moving Picture Operators—0. R. Hamilton, Room 100, Loo Bldg.   Tel. Sey.
Musicians—H. J. Brasfleld, rooms 11-10,
Williams Building, 418 Qranvllle Street
Seymour 2530.
Plasterers—Joe    Hampton;    Tel,    Sey-
,  mour.1514.
Street    Railway    Employees—Fred.    A.
Hoover; Seymour 608.
Tradee and  Labor Council—Room 810;
Geo. Bartley.
Typographical—Rooms  118,    211,    114;
R. H. Neelanda.
VANCOUVER UNIONS
TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL -
MeeU first and third Thursdays.
Executive board: W. E. Walker, president: J. H. McVety, vice-president: Geo.
Bartley, general secreUry, 110 Labor
Temple; Miss H. Gutteridge,. treasurer;
Miss P. Brisbane, sutistlolan: sergeant-
at-arms, John Sully: G. Curnook, F.
Knowles, W. R. Trotter, trustees.	
LABOR TEMPLE COMPANY, LTD.-
Directors: Fred A. Hoover, J. H.
MeVety, Jamea Brown, Edward Lothlaa,
James Campbell, J. W. Wilkinson, R P.
T'.ttlplere, John McMillan, Murdock McKensle, F. Blumberg, H. H. Free. Managing director, J. H. McVety, Room 211.
BAKERS' AND CONFECTIONERS LO
> fcMW       CAL  No.   41—Meets see-
't eiAsa II ond *"d fourth Satur-
OwWwS daye, 7.30 p.m. Preeldent.
"*-*■ *™a H. G. Leeworthy; corresponding eecretary, R. t.
Adams; business agent, 3.
liluuk, Uoum as, Labor
Temple.
BARBERS' LOCAL No. 120 —MBBTS
« m"eS2,d,Jan? /"ST"1.. Thuredays, 1.80
& "V, 5*!ldel,t' J- w- Owen; recorder, ft
I- gOTlltieecretary-buslnees agent, C.
L..?.**"!^', Rf°m .*<»■ I*borTremple.
Hours: 11 to 1; 5 to 7 p. m.	
BARTENDERS' LOCAL No. I7I.-OF-
n^.'j8' ?<"'"> *M Labor Temple. MeeU
Sf"' Sunday of each month. President,
F. F. Lavlgne; flnanclal secretary, Geo.
W. Curnock, Room 801, Ubor Temple.
BRICKLAYERS' AND MASONS', NO. 1
. ■■~Mef.t" •"ery.l't and Srd Tuesday,
L.Ei"l'J Rmm *9_ President, Jamea
Haelett; corresponding secretary, w. g
Dagnall, Box 63; flnanclal oecreury, ».
"•Brown; business agent, W. s. Dag.
nail, Room 215,
BOOKBINDERS' t, LOCAL UNION No.
105-Meeu third Tuesday In every
month, In room Ml, Labor Temple. Pres?
n™*"..E'...J' M"n..,| vloe-preeltffnt. Wm.
Bushman; aeeretary, George Mowat
Haselwood hotel, S44 Hastings Steet E.
A9™»r^asurer, H. Perry, mo Tenth
BROTHERHOOD OF BOILER MAKERS
«r Et—EPJ*1' Builders, and Holpere
of America, Vancouver Lodge No. isi-
SS,*A ar".*'l!S. «&"* •ionkays, I p. m.
Preaident F. Barclay, HI Cordova Bast.
aecreury. A. Fraaer. 1161 HowVairiit
COOKS, WAITERSI ANI1 WAITRESSES
gontb, 8:80 p.m„ Labor Temple. W. jc.
nSSSfim'fV repreaenuuva. Offlce.
Room Ml, Ubor Temple. Hours: I a.m.
to 10.80; l p.m. to uo'and I p.m. to S.M
E'.1?.' "-oW**"""' help furnlahed on short
notice,   pnone Bey. 1414.
DISTRICT COUNCIL OF CARPENTERS
meets second and fourth Thursday of
•aoh month, I p. m.     Secretary, J. Bit-
Sf"', ■" Hornby etreet; business agent,
!".' ?°d ,'blrd Monday of eaoh month,
SS'-i'"*1. lMl meeU "n" •n<1  third
Tuesday of eaoh month
ELECTRICAL WORKERB, LOCAL NO.
Ill—Meets Room 101 every Monday
I p. m. President, Dave Fink; vtce-preel-
S,",,'mM- Sander; recording aecreury,
Roy Elgar, Labor Temple: flnanclal eecretary and business agent W. F. Dunn.
Room 107, Labor Temple,
ELECTRICAL WORKERS, LOCAL NO.
....J2!. (Inaldo Men)—Meeta flrst and
third Mondays of each month.. Room 105,
1 p. m. President, H. R. Van Blckle; recording secretary, J. M. Campbell; business agent, F. L. Estinghausen, Room 207
""SSSSRSHK"   INTERNATIONAL
ASSOCIATION,    No.    ISxiS-Mecla
•yery   Friday   evening,   141   Alexander
street, President, J. Mahone; SecreUry,
H, Hannlng.
MACHINISTS, NO. Ill—MBBTS BBC-
ond and fourth Fridays, I p. m
President A. R. Towler; recording secreUry, J. Brookes; flnanclal secreUry, J, H.
MeVety.
MOVING PICTURE OPERATORS, Local 348 I.A.T.S.E.—Meets every second Sunday of each month. Labor Temple, 8 p.m. President H. C. Roddan; secretary-treasurer, L. E. Goodman; recording secreUry, A. O. Hansen; business agent G. R. Hamilton. Office,
Room 100, Loo Bldg.   Tel. Bey. 3046
MUSICIANS' ' MUTUAL PROTECTIVE
Union, Local No. 145, A. F. of M.-
Mesu seoond Sunday of each month,
rooms 19-80, Williams Building, 418 Granville street President J. Bowyer; vice-
president, F. English; secreUry, H. J.
Brasfleld; treasurer, W. Fowler.
OPERATIVE PLASTERERS' INTER-
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, No. 10-
Meeu flrst and third Wednesday, O'Brien
HaU, I p.m. President, O. Dean; corresponding secretary, F. Sumpter; flnanclal
aeoretary, D. Scott; treaaurer, I. Tyson;
business agent, Joe Hampton. Phone
Sey. 1514.
PAINTERS',. PAPERHANGERS'. AND
Decorators', Looal 131—Meets every
Thureday, 7.80 p.m. President H. Grand;
flnanolal secretary, J. Freckleton, 1021
Comox street; recording secretary, R
Dowding, 182 Howe street. Business
agent, James Train, Room 103, Labor
Temple.	
PATTERN MAKERS' .LEAGUE .OF
. NORTH AMERICA.—Vancouver and
vicinity. Branch meeU 1st and Srd Fridays at Labor Temple, room 105. Robert
C. Sampson, Pres., 747 Dunlevy Ave.;
Jos. G. Lyon, flnanclal secretary, 1721
Grant street; J. Campbell, according sec-
reury, 4869 Argyle street.
STEREOTYPERS' AND ELECTROTYPE
era' Union, No. 88, of Vanccuver and
Victoria—Meets second Wednesday of
each month, 4 p. m„ Labor Temple, President, Chaa, Bayley; recording secreUry.
A. Birnle, co. "News Advertiser."
STREET AND ELBCTRIC RAILWAY
Employees, Pioneer Division No. 101
—MeeU Labor Temple, second fourth
Wedneadaya at I p.m., and flrat and
third Wednesdays, 8 p. m. President
Adam Taylor; recording secretary. Albert
V. Lofting, 2511 Trinity street; flnanclal
secretary, Fred. A. Hoover, 2409 Clark
Drive.
STEAM  ENGINEERS,   INTERNATION-
al Local 897—MeeU every Wednesday
I p. m„ room 104, Labor Temple. Finan-
clal secretary, B. Prendergaat, room 116.
TAILORS' INDUSTRIAL UNION UN-
ternatlonal), Local No. 171—Meeting!
held flrst Tueaday in each month, I p. m
President, H. Nordlund; recording secretary, C. McDonald, Box 603; flnanolal
secretary, L. Wakley, P, O, Box'603.
THEATRICAL STAGE EMPLOYEES,
Local No. 118—Meets seoond Sunday
of each month at Room 294, Labor Tem*
pie. President, H, Spears; recording see*
retary, Geo. W. Allln, P.O. Box 711, Vancouver.
TYPOGRAPHICAL UNION NO. Ill-
Meets last Sunday eaoh month, 1
p.m. President, R. P. Pettlplece; vice-
president, W, S. Metsger, seoretary.
treasurer, R. H. Neelanda. P. o. Box 61.
Nicholson's Gin
is perfectly pure and palatable
IT'S REFRESHING
AND INVIGORATING
TRY IT FOR YOUR STOMACH'S SAKE.
WILL DO YOU GOOD.
ALL RELIABLE DEALERS BELL IT
Westminster Trust Company
ffaidisv asjooo/mojoo.
flnbserlM, OOOlfiOOM
We bave MONEY TO LOAN on improved property.
Batatas managed for out-of-town and elty clients. Payments collected snd forwarded or Invested. We aet as agents only for tk*
purchase and sals of real estate..
Depoalta accepted snd interest at t% allowed on dally balance.
SAFETY DEPOSIT BOXES FOR RENT
Head Offlce:
Columbia and Begbie Strsst, Nsw Westminster,
jr. I. Itate, Naaaflaf Director
. *. A. Snail, SMteUry-Treannr.
THE S. BO WELL COMPANY
■aooeeeore to Oo»u» a mamma, IM.
,    FUNERAL DIRECTORS
NEW WESTMINSTER. B. C
Men who earn thslr Uvln» "by
the sweat of the brow" need soms-
thins to keep thslr bodies supplied
with moisture. A little hear during the day Is a real necessity with
the worklngman.
WINEWEISER
BEER
la popular with all classes.
Ask yonr dealer, or phono 751*
WESTMINSTER BREWERY, NEW WESTMINSTER, B. C
PHONE No. L-7S
A. E. SUCKLING * CO, VANCOUVER DISTRIBUTERS
UNION HATS AND OVERALLS at
J. E. BROWN & CO.
•IS COLUMBIA STREET
NEW WESTMINSTER, B.C.
THE POPULAR PRICED, EUROPEAN PLAN
HOTEL RITZ
VICTORIA, B.C.
FORT ST., AT DOUGLAS
RATES 75c, $1.00, $1.26, $1.60, $2.00
0. J. LOVEJOY, MOR.    FREE AUTO BUB
BE TRUE TO YOURSELVES
■V SMOKINQ THS OLD RELIABLE
Kurtz's "Pioneer" Cigars
YOU  HELP YOUR  FELLOW UNION  MEN AND   BESIDES,  VOU  BET
THE VERY  BEST VALUE  FOR YOUR  MONEY
Komagata
Maru!
WE DON'T WANT
ANY MORE
ASIATICS
We want only good loyal citlsens who believe in buying goods made
In British Columbia.   Our products are
BAPCO PURE PAINT
BAPCO  OIL  SHINGLE
STAIN
BAPCO PURE COPPER PAINT
BAPCO KALSOMINE
BAPCO WHITE LEAD
BAPCO VARNISHES
and they are all guaranteed
MADE BY
BRITISH AMERICA PAINT
COMPANY, Limited
Victoria   Vancouver   Calgary
Edmonton PAGE SIX
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY JULY 81, IM
WHAT CUSTOMERS SAY OF
BUCK
BRAND
-J?
Sciuamish, B. C, June 10th, 1914.
Messrs. Win. J. McMaster & Sons, Ltd.,'
Vancouver, B. C.
Gentlemen: I had a client ln today, ]UBt returned from a trip to
Port George. He was wearing one of your "Surveyor's Suits" which
I sold to him just before he went away. He expressed his great satis-
te tion In the comfort and wearing qualities of this Bult, and placed
an order with me for another.
I thought you would be pleased to hear thla, as it was solely on
the recommendation of your traveller that I was persuaded to take
this line up,
  Yours truly,
" ~  (Signed) ROBT. McKENZIB.
From R. McKenzle & Co.,
Men's Outfitters,
Squamlsh, B. C.
„(Copy)
WM. J. MoMABTBR ft SONB, LTD:
W. B. THOMAS, Manager Director.
New West Manufacturing Co., Ltd.
MANUFACTURERS OF
FURNACES, STOVES •»«■ RANGES
ATTENTION, UNION MENI
These stoves are made by union men, ln a union factory and
under union condltlona.
Remember also, these are the only union-made stoves ln Vanoouver.
Be consistent. Insist upon our goods! Handled by all stores In
tbe city.
2102—llth Avenue West    VANCOUVER, B. 0.
PHONE: BAYVIEW 248
26% OFF ALL TRUSSES THIS MONTH
BED STAR DRUG STORE.
53 Cordova Street West Vanoouver, B. 0.
BASEBALL
Vancouver vs. Taeoma
August 3,4, 5, 6
WEEK DAYS. 4:00 p.m. SATURDAY. 3:00 p.m.
SYNOPSIS  OF  COAL   MINING   BSQU-
LATIONS
Coal mlnluf rights of the Dominion,
In Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,
the Yukon Territory, tbe Northweat Territories and In a portion of tha Province
of British Columbia, may be leaaed (or
a term sf twenty-one years at an annual
rental of 11 an aore. Not more than
1,610 acres will be leased to one applicant,
Applications for leaee must be made by
the applicant In person to the Asent or
Sub-Agent of the dlstriot In whloh the
rlghta applied for are situated.
In surveyed territory the land muat be
described by aeotlons, or legal subdivisions of sections, and In unsurveyed territory the tract applied for shall be
staked by the applicant himself,
Eaeh application must be accompanied
by a fee of II, which will be refunded If
the rlghta applied for are not available,
but not otherwise. A royalty shall be
paid on the merchantable output of the
mine at the rate of Ave cents per ton.
The person operating the mine shall
furnish the Agent with sworn returns
aeeauntlng for the full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay the royalty thereon. If the coal mining rights
are not being operated, suoh returns
should be furnished at leaat once a year.
The lease will Include the coal mlnlns
rlghta only, but tha lessee may be permitted to purohase whatever available
surface rlghta may be considered necessary for the working of the mine at the
rate of 110 an acre.
For full Information application ahould
be made to the Secretary of the Department of the Interior, Ottawa, or to any
Agent or Sub-Agent of Dominion Lands,
ii*   u   CORi
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N. B,—Unauthorised publication of thli
advertisement will not be paid for-30190
GO with the BU.NC.HT0 THE
BRUNSWICK POOL ROOMS
IN AUSTRALIA UNION
Announce That They Will
Not Work With Non-
Unionists
Officials Busy Issuing Union
Cards to the New
Members
[Speolal Australian Correspondence]
SYDNEY, N.S.W., July 10.—Last
engineers, members of the Amalgamated Englneera' union, determined
that the time had oome when they
would refuse to work with non-unionists. It waa thought that some
trouble would come, especially as the
unionists had given notice to their
employers to that effect. A strike ln
tbls Industry at the present time
would do much harm to the employers, and would weaken their case ln
the forthcoming elections, ln whloh
the question of preference to unionists ia to be the big question. At any
rate It seems as If the trouble Is now
overcome. A meeting of tho union
was held the other day, and lt waa
decided to appoint organisers, to go
through the 40 odd works employing
nonunion labor and approach the
men with a view of asking them to
Join tbe union. This haa been highly
successful. Nearly every non-unionist
has paid hia entry fee and come into
the union. For several days paat officials have been busy Issuing union
cards to the new membera. It Ib
thought that the trouble Is now over,
as the union expects to be ln the
happy position in a day or two to announce that every man In the trade
Is unionist The next move now Is
the amalgamation of the union with
the Iron Trades Federation. Several
meetings have been held, and now
that the engineers are a strong Industrial body lt ia thought the amalgamation will be brought about.
Steadily but surely we are linking
up every union ln Australia, into one
grand federation.
VOTES FOR WOMEN
By MBS. X A. CLARKE
Berry Bros.
Agents (oi
CLEVELAND
CYCLES
Ths Bicycle with ths Reputation
Full  Has  of  accessories
Repairs promptly executed
GROCERS' PICNIC
Local Association Holds Its Annual
Outing at Bowen Islsnd
The Vancouver retail grocery
stores were cloned on Wednesday, the
cause being the annual picnic of the
Retail Orocen' association, which
was held at Bowen Island and was
largely attended by the grocers, their
families and friends. The accommodations provided by ths Terminal
Steam Navigation company were
such as to satisfy the most exsettng
on occasions of this kind. There
waa plenty of music and dancing,
field and aquatic sports and a baby
show. After spending the day ln
thorough picnic style all returned to
the elty tired yet well-pleased with
the day's outing.
Death of John Smith
John Smith, 80 years old, a resident
of Vancouver heights, died suddenly
Tuesday afternoon at the home of
his daughter, Mrs. J. A. Fulton, 257
Sixth atreet east, North Vancouver,
where be was visiting. Mr. Smith,
who was the father-in-law of John A.
Fulton, ex-presldent of the Typographical union and alao ex-secretary
of the Trades and Labor oouncll, and
John A. Fraser, M, M, P., of Quesnel,
came west from Dominion City, Man.,
and formerly lived at Paisley, Scotland. The funeral took plaoe on
Thursday, afternoon from the Fulton
home, a large attendance being present.
Sells Scientific Stuff
Henry Slbble of Vsncouver, B, 0„
wbo has probably aold more socialist
literature, almost, than any other man
In America, was sn Angeles visitor
on Thursday. The beauty of lt Is thst
moat ot the stuff he sella Is on- the
scientific order. — Port Angeles
(Wash.) Free Press.
MINARD'S LINIMENT
CURES DANDRUFF
635 HASTINGS ST. EAST
Phone Highland 89S
rteeeSej. 221
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
aad EMBALMERS
520 Mcksrfa St.        Vaaceaver, t. C.
COTTON'S   WEEKLY — Bast
Socialist propaganda  papsr In
Canada.    Price  CO   csnts  per
year; la clubs of tour, 21 cents
for 40 weeks.
Address, COWANSVJLLB, P.Q.
Take that Watch to Appleby, SOS
renter West, Cor. Pender and
Richards, for nigh-class watch,
clock and Jewellery repairs. All
cleaning and mainsprings Jobs
guaranteed for 12 months.
DOLL HOSPITAL
Bring your broken Dollies and get
them made like new
DOLL  HOSPITAL
KttUR * COI    I2S Hasten St. W.
If you are one
who doesn't know
the wonders of the Blue Amberol
played on an Edison Cylinder
Phonograph. Let us ihow you
what you are missing. We've
been in business a long time, Mr.
Reader. No one knows the
talking machine line better than
we do. We've watched the
Edison develop until to-day we
unhesitatingly claim it to be the
most perfect on the market today. You'll not lose anything
by hearing it. We'll arrange
terms to suit
THE
KENT
PIANO CO. Ltd.
SS8 GRANVILLE ST.
END MINERS' SHE
The regular public meeting of the
Mount Pleasant Suffrage leage was
held ln A. O. F. hall, corner of Main
street and Tenth avenue, on Friday
evening, July 24th.
The speaker having been chosen for
that evening, the programme of the
evening was carried out by calling
upon the various members to make
short speeches, the result being a
very enjoyable evening for all,
Mrs. Parr spoke of an incident that
had occurred that day which clearly
showed how unprotected women
really are and how an organized body
of women could use their Influence
to help their aex. When women got
the vote there would be opportunity
for broader action.
Mrs. Robertson thought that the
qualifications for the municipal vote
should be extended. She said a great
many people objected to women talking politics. Pure politics is nothing
more than the use ot the vote, and if
women vote they will have to understand political questions- and there
was no reason why women ahould
not talk on the vote, We get nothing
without the vote.
The speaker thought we would advance our work by more social Intercourse, and suggested that the league
take up more social work.
In regard to the Hindoo question
the speaker thought this a question
that all women should understand.
We were Christians, and should hold
all men as our brothers; on the other
band the Hindoo waa so different
from us in education and religion
that lt would be hard to tolerate this
branch of the human family in our
own midst
Mrs. Clark spoke on the duty of
members. Not only should they attend and assist In the meetings, hut
to be vigilant at all tlmea and In all
places; to see that no opportunity is
lost to awaken interest ln this great
cause. She also declared that no
vote should rest on a property qualification. Man might need the vote
to protect his property, but mothers
needed the vote to protect her children—a possession of greater value
than property. The working, girl
needed the vote to protect her in the
labor market—In regard to wages,
sanitary condltlona, etc.
Ab to the 'Hindoo question, lt is an
economic ■ question. Probably the
ohlef objection to the Hindoo Is that
his manner of living la so crude tbat
he could live on far less, than the
more clvillied races, therefore will
work for leas and thus jeopardize the
opportunity of our own men getting
work It Is to the interest of all'
women to try to understand these
vital questions so that when tbey
get the vote ln the near future they
will know how to use It. All things
oome through the vote. If we want
pure food or morality we have to
legislate to get it.
Mrs. Wm. Taylor spoke for a tew
minutes. She thought we should
practice speaking and ever be ready
to defend our cause. She thought
that women had just as much right
to help make the laws under which
they lived as men had,
Miss Brooks said that If we went
out and got arrested the people might
wake up and realise we had a movement on. She also aald that men
seemed to think that women would
rule as their husbands did or for the
best looking candidate, but she felt
quite sure thst they would not.
Miss Pen-In said that women had a
very great responsibility and needed
tbe vote to back them up. In canvassing for votes for women she had always found the men very nice and
reasonable.
Mrs. Page spoke on the necessity
of reaching the people and said tbat
as a woman in business she found
the men friendly to the cause, but the
men seemed to think that the women
were not doing enough to further the
movement. A great many of them
thought tf the women would speak on
the streets lt would help.
Some of the speakers made their
maiden speeches and from all Indications there ahould be no laok of
speakers on behalf of woman suffrage.
Next Mealing
The next regular meeting of ths
Mount Plessant Suffrage league will
be held the seoond Friday evening ln
August (the 14th), in the A. O, F.
hall, corner Main street snd Tenth
svenue.
Executive Melting
An executive meeting of the Mount
Pleaaant league waa held st the home
of Mrs. Parr, M6 Fifth avenue east,
on Wednesday afternoon, July 22nd,
Tbe following heads of committees
were appointed: Lawa, Mrs, Robert
eon; Entertainment, airs. Darlington;
Refreshment, Airs, Butty; Membership, Mrs. shllvock; Reception, Mrs.
Wm. Taylor; Literature, Miss Brooks;
Convasslng, Mlsa Psrrln; Public
Meetings, Mrs. Parr.
After the bualneaa of the meeting
waa finished tea was aerved and a
very pleasant hour was spent In discussing the questions of the day,
IN
6
IN SOI
Smaller Mine Owners Signing Up with the United
Mine Workers
"Situation Never in Better
Shape," says John R.
Lawson
[Special Correspondence]
DENVER, Colo., July 28.—With the
signing up of more independent
mines throughout the state, the Btrlking coal miners are beginning to see
the early and successful culmination
of one of the most bitter struggles ln
the labor movement "The strike waa
never ln better shape," aald John R.
Lawson, International board member
of the United Mine WJorkers. "Operators ln every section of the state,
after employing scab labor since last
September, are beginning to realize
fully that they cannot hope to obtain
the same work,from these derelicts
as from the experienced coal miners
who worked for them for many years
before the strike. Where the mines
have been completely shut down the
operators have been convinced of the
greater efficiency of the union coal
miners by the state mine Inspector's
report, which shows that union mines
have produced more thau three times
as much coal proportionately as
mines which refused to sign up. The
fact that the smaller mine owners are
signing up with the union offers a
Btrlking forecast In my opinion. Heretofore, the large operators have brow
beaten these small owners ln every
way possible to keep them from employing union men. The signing up
of these mines now would seem to
Indicate that their no longer fear the
former strength of these large owners or that the Independents are thoroughly convinced that,the time is
not for distant when. Rockefeller and
his Colorado representatives will recognize the United Mine WorkerB of
America."
Paris Worksrs Want No War
A mass meeting of ths workers of
Paris, to protest against that country
going to war In the pruent European
jumble, waa prohibited by the government laat Wednesday, Cordons of
police aurrounded the hall to prevent
the meeting, and In the fierce scrimmage whloh enaued SCO were arrested.
May Coat Chief His Job
Wots, agitated by Imported atrlke
breakers at St John, N, B. last week,
caused |25,ooo worth of damage.
Chief of police Clark ts being "Invest!
gated" aa the result ot lt, and ta likely to lose his job for being so willing
to assist the itreet oar oompany In
the efforts to bring discredit on the
striking carmen.
Personal Newa
W. E. Walker, of the culinary
crafts, reports the signing up of the
Delmonlco cafe, 704 Hobson street
with the cooks and waiters.
Thos. B, Kean, a former member of
the executive committee of the Typographical unton In this city, was among the new arrivals this week.
T. Nalsmith, member of the Amalgamated {Society ot Carpenters' and
Joiners, of Sydney, N. S. W„ accompanied by his wife, have arrived from
that oity, and will locate here for
three months on account of Mrs. Nat-
smith's poor health. They will return
to Auustralla In the autumn.
A New Grand-dad
C. F. Burkhart of the Barbers'
union, Is alwaya smiling, but since
Wednesday he's wearing a smile that
won't wash oft. Reason why—he's a
very, very, proud grand-dad. His
daughter-in-law, Mrs. Beatrice Burkhart, of ShuBwap, presented his son
Carl with a bumping nine-pound boy
on July 29, and the nurse says he just
looks like his grand-dad. The happy
event occurred at the residence of
Mrs. J. Richards (sister), Twenty-
second avenue, South Vancouver.
Both mother and baby are doing well.
Mathew Concfrey, an employee of
B. C. Electric Railway company, who
has been laid up in the general hospital for the past four weeks with
kidney trouble has been discharged
aa being cured from that Institution
and will soon be able to resume his
duties.
Nsw Compensation Act for B, C.
In a letter to Mr. J. H. McVety this
week, Premier MoBrlde states that
the government contemplates bringing ln a new Workmen'a Compensation act as the result of the report of
the recent labor commission.
Ceased Publication
The Nanalmo Dally Labor Telegram haa ceased publication. It is
rumored that the liberals will take
over the plant and publish a semi-
weekly paper.
MINARD'S LINIMENT POR SALE
EVERYWHERE.
Fractured Leg
Frank Hall, a atovedore employed
at the C. P. R, wharf and living on
Cordova street, was taken to ths
general hospital yesterday afternoon
suffering from a fractured leg. A
bale of merchandise fell on htm.
Mr. and Mrs. E. J, Burns of the
Elwha are enjoying a visit from their
son, Ernest Burns and wlfa of Vanoouver, B.C.—Port Angelas (Wash.)
Free Press.
$400.00 in Cash
Given Away
TO THB ONE WHO DRAWS
THB LUCKY NUMBER
1 Chance for Erery $5 Purchase
Made ia Either of Onr Sterei
"WHAT CAN I GET POR |25"
You may.have an Imported En-
KllHh Wonted Suit, or
An Imported Irish Homespun
Bult, or
An Imported Scotch Tweed Suit,
or
An Imported English Cheviot
Suit or
A Genulno Imported Blue Serge
Suit.
And you will get—no matter
which kind or suit you seleot—the
(Inent tailoring, the most perfect
fining KnrmentK, and the soundest
values In all Canada.
This Is what you will get for
|20 when you buy your suit here,
FIT REFORM
WARDROBES
311 HASTINGS ST. sad ROGERS
ILDG., CKANVIUE ST.
Permanent Investment
not
Passing Speculation
After a period of yeara, rational interest returns on your
permanent Investments wilt leave you In a better position than
the uncertain returns of ah equal period of speculation.
It Is an astounding fact that the most careful and experienced
speculators make only about 6 per cent, over a long period of .
years. This Is totally Inadequate to the inherent perils of all
speculation. Amongst permanent Investments, B. C. Municipal Bonds stand high. We nave exclusive control of reliable
Issues that yield up to T per cent, without any of the perils of
passing speculation,
Canadian Financiers Trust Company
HEAD OFFICE 839 HASTINGS ST. VV.     VANCOUVER, B.C.
Patrick Donnelly-General Mnnatfer
FINAL REDUCTION
Fashion-Graft
CLOTHES
Any Suit up to and including $22.00
for
$15
.00
Over $22.00 and up to $30.00 for
.00
$18
ALL LONELY SUITS
$12
.00
Each
For just one more week you may buy Fashion-Craft
Clothes—Always Worth 100 cents on the dollar—
at the above prices.
Thos. Foster & Co., Ltd.
514 GRANVILLE STREET
Keep the Children Healthy
by sandlnf them out In th. treth air thsa. flnt day,. There's nothing batter for kMPInf them .zeroised than wheeled goods. i
Our stook ot WHEELBARROWS, AUTOMOBILES, EXPRESS WAOONS,
PERAMBULATORS, IRISH MAILS, ROWINO WAOONS, VBLOCIPJBDES,
SIDEWALK SULKIES, la easily the flnett and moat eomprahanalro la th.
olty and th. prloea are right.
Thomson Stationery Co.. Ltd.
MS HASTINOS STRUT WIST VANCOUVSH, ., O.
BIST IN THI WIST ISTABLItHID
EMPLOYMENT WANTED
-BY-
A Big Healthy, Hearty, Happy Able-bodied Three-
pound Package of
Roya Crown
WASHING
POWDER
COMPETENT TO DO ALL KINDS OF CLEANING: WASHING DISHES A SPECIALTY; NEAT, PLEASANT AND OF
GOOD CHARACTER; CAN REFER TO EVERYBODY WHO
KNOWS ME. WILL NOT "SLEEP IN," CHEW GUM OR
"TALK BACK." WAGES NO OBJECT. I WANT A PLACE IN
YOUR HAPPY HOME. MEET ME AT THE GROCERY
STORE.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcfed.1-0345068/manifest

Comment

Related Items