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The British Columbia Federationist Sep 18, 1914

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Array HE BRITISH: COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
PUSTRIAL UNITY:   STBBNQTH.
tXTHYE/ / ______
OFFICIAL PAPER: VANCOUVER TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL AND B. C. FEDERATION OF LABOR.
VMCOTJVER, B.C., FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 18,1914.
POLITICAL UNTTT: TICTOOTI
/In Vaneouver\
V Ctty.ttM )
$1.50 PER YEAB
■ill Ask the Federation to
] Draft a Compensation
Act for Workers
BE DONE
Aid. Cottrell Says Laborers'
Wages Are Now Too
High
loposed Cut of City Labor-
(ers' Wages Is Strongly
.Protested
1'. fairly attended meeting ot the
pncll met at 8 o'clock last night,
der the chairmanship ot President
H. McVety. A few new delegates
|re Initiated, as follows: Messrs.
rtrldge, Bunce, Healy, Webb and
heelwright.
rhe council decided that lt would
t endorse the scheme which certain
'eons submitted for the establish-
of a 10 cent soup kitchen. The
. council wrote saying that, ln
ppohse to the request of the TradeB
d Labor council, the office of the city
irk would be kept open trom now
the end of the month, during the
•nines, for the convenience of work-
in who are entitled to be on the city
Ing list, and who wish to register,
ie request of the Red Cross Society
funds had to be filed owing to lack
.finance.
South Wellington miners wrote ac-
pwledglng the (BO contributed by
f council to aid the victims of the
tent Are which devastated that town.
e convention call of the American
[deration of Labor was flled. The
■men contributed $25 to the B. C.
Plerationist, as part of the expense
preparing special matter Inviting
next convention of the Trades Con-
>os ot Canada to Vancouver.
[The council refused to be represent-
._ the civic relief committee
rough an organization called the Soil Service council, and had claimed
Ihe represented directly, which re-
jsst had been agreed to by the mayor.
Workmen's Compensation,
hie parliamentary committee re-
pimended that the council write the
,C. Federation of Labor, suggesting
it the special committee appointed
(ft the proposed workmen's com-
psatlon bill, to be printed and disputed among working men of the
evince. The sum of |60 was voted
nsslst ln defraying the cost, and thr
[deration is to be asked to invite the
|p ot other councils. This recom-
indatlon was concurred In.
' was decided to ask Mayor Baxter
declare a halt holiday next civic
ictlon day.
City Laborers' Wages,
rhe council appointed a committee
|go to the city hall, and protest tbe
Miosal to reduce city laborers' wages
)ow S3 per 8-hour day. The com-
ttee is Sully, McVety, Estinghausen,
ilker and Pettlplece, With respect
■this matter, considerable discussion
Jk place.
Bel. Sully wanted the meeting to
Bte its views on the question plain
fause, he said, lt would affect many
[era besldeB the city workmen.   In
It would be taken as an excuse
i general reduction of laborers'
s all over the city.
BieU'Fiite Kllpatrlck said he would
the question to be decided by the
rarers' union which would have' the
itter before it tonight. •
Belega.te Pettlplece pointed out that
_ Trales and Labor council was en-
Bed to more than a word when such
Jquestion was to be decided. The
|uncll had fought for the $3 per day
laborers some years ago, and had
feed it by agitation Into a political
lue, and the electors of the city had
pported the council by plebiscite
ite ln favor; If the laborers' union
>s likely to agree to a reduction, he
It they should have the seriousness
such a step fully Impressed upon
em by the' same committee which
is to visit the city council. He protested that If once the wage was
wered from $3, it would never be
Ised again.
Delegate Pipes also felt It was a
friouB proposal against which em-
latlc protest should be made. '
Congress Committee Report.
The committee appointed to invite
ie Trades and Labor Congress of
inada to bold Its convention in this
ty next year, reported that at Its re-
uest the B. C. Fodcratlonlst had pub-
shed an edition containing Illustrated
latures and setting forth reasons for
le congress coming here. Three nun-
red copies had been sent to this
bar's convention to be distributed by
elegate W. R. Trotter, the council's
jprcsentatlvc. _ .
'President McVety reported as the
Liuucll's member of the civic War
lellef committee. He said that the
jork of that body had disclosed an
bpalling amount of distress and want,
lith ln the city and ln South Vancou-
;r. In some cases, families of a
[other and six children were without
|od, bouta, or clothing Many casnr
mortgagees attempting to foreclose,
Id lake possession of the little homes
such people, had been stalled off,
fear of the odium which would be
night upon those practicing auch
sanness.
illef was being chiefly paid In
jcks so that persons receiving lt
[ould not be embarrassed by the dire
jesslty which forced them to accept
He Was using his efforts to have
relief made to apply to all ln dts-
whether they were relatives of
in gone to the war or not, In some
pes, those who had canvassed the
ly tor contributions to tbe fund had
[ind conditions bo bad that, Instead
collecting a contribution they had
[ea relief.
Union Reports.
She street rallwaymen reported that
er a new schedule lust lsaued by
company the street car service
^ to be reduced 15 per cent. To
let that, men having regular runs
fe going to lay oft one day In each
A Reduction Would Reduce
Wages on the False
Creek Work
LOCAL RELIEF COMMITTEE'S PROBLEMIODJECT LESSON F0R|PR0SPECT OF PEACE
Org. W. R. Trotter Does
Good Work at Winnipeg Convention
The persistent talk about reducing
below tho minimum of $3 per 8 hour-
day, found its way into the meeting of
the railways and bridges committee last
Wednesday night. It arose in connection with the building of tho concrete
causeway which is to take the place of
the present wooden bridge loading into
Stanley Park at Cosl harbor.
A committee of non-union champions
from the builders' exchange appeared
in response to a generous-hearted impulse to do the workmen of the city a
good turn.   They urged
"that tho duty devolved upon the
government and the city to do all it
possibly eould to relieve the very
serious conditions which threatened the laboring mon of the city this
winter.  They were not pressing tho
city to do thia work by contract,
although it could be done cheaper
that way, but if they had monoy
available for this and other work,
it should be started."
It wss the plight of the laboring men
which they were concerned about, not
the profits which might come their way
if the job was done by contract.
Then the question of the laborers' $3
per day came along. Alderman Cottrell,
of Wnrd 6, has been trying to have that
wage reduced for some time, and, as recorded in The Federationist, even went
so far, a weok or two ago, as to come
to tho Lubor Temple to see if the
Trades nnd Labor Council would back
him up in his efforts. At this meeting
of the railways and bridges committee,
he strongly advocated contract labor,
and declared that the city was making
a great mistnko by keeping up the $3
wage when contractors could get men
for *S.
There is more in this proposal than
many workmen are aware of. In tl'
first place, city laborers Kro only making $8.25 per week—providing they do
not have to stand off for ruin—because
thoy are working two weeks out of
every four. Then again there is the
agreement made between the city nnd
the Canadian Northern Railway com-
fwny- lost year, with regard to the filing in of False Creek.
When the contract Wob first drawn up
the wage clause read that, workmen on
the job should be paid "the current rate
of wages.paid in the city for Bimilar
work." The Trades nnd Labor Council
vigorously opposed thnt clauso and asked that the specific wage of $3 for eight
hours should be paid to laborers. Finally,, after protracted effort, the most that
eould he got was that the wages of
laborers, engaged on tbe work of filling
in False Creek, should be the same as
paid by the city to its laborers.
The work of filling in ia now going on
and is to be pushed ahead this winter.
Sn it means that if the city reduces laborers' wages below $3 for city work,
the Canadian Northern- railway company will be able to lower their rate
also.
Alderman F. Woodsido, the chairman
of the committee, pointed this out, nm*
voiced his opposition to contract labor,
stating that' in his opinion the cltv
Bhould use tlfis opportunity of providing work for unemployed men nt day
wages.
An Interesting Prophecy.
"It may interest this country to
know that there will bo a sensational
development in tho European situation
on or about September 23. On that day
there will be a secret eonference in Europe which will cause BusBia to desert
tho allies and support Germany. We
will get the news here nbont September
25 or 26. I know what I nm talking
about."—A. K. Graves, New York, an
ex-German Bpy.
Congress Executive Council
Assisted in Release
of Miners
Unionists generally throughout Canada will be pleased to learn that W. B.
Trotter, western Canada representative
bf the Trades and Labor Congress of
Canada, haa been successful in securing
the reaffiliation of the Canadian membership , of the International Brotherhood of Maintenance-of-way Employees,
numbering some 6500. The trackmen
have been in annual convention at Winnipeg during the past week, and Org.
Trotter was present to press the claims
of tho Congress upon the delegates. Besides this splendid work for the Congress, Org. Trotter has accomplished
muoh in the way of stimulating interest
in the national labor body among the
unions of Winnipeg, A number of Winnipeg delegates left for St. John during
the week, and among them was Mr.
Trotter, who will represent Vancouver
Trades and Labor Council at tho Congress convention.
Helped the Miners,
Now that all save one of the imprisoned coal miners of Vancouver Island have been relensed, it may not be
out of place to mention that President
.1. C. Wattora and the other two members of the executive council of the
Congress played nn important part in
the result. They worked unceasingly
among the authorities at Ottawa, and,
backed by strong influences in B. C,
were in no small measure responsible
for tho release of the minors.
Capitalism places tho workerB on exactly the same piano ns its inanimate
machinery—mere meana of production.
Both are speeded up to the minute,
whether the time be long or short.
eight. They had sent 150 to relieve
South Wellington fire victims.
Commercial Telegraphers reported
conditions very slack, many being laid
off. The cookB Btated that they had
put Allen's cafes on their unfair list.
Painters had 80 membera out of work.
Their wages had been reduced on the
Vancouver hotel Job from 14.50 to $4.00
per day. Pattern-makers had 60 per
cent, unemployed.
Machinists reported that the C. P. R.
had decided to have practically no repair work done here ln future. A new
big shop had been erected at Calgary
and the work was to be done there Instead. This matter is to be taken up
with the city council also, in view of
the exemption from taxation and the
free water which tbe C. P. R. receives
at the expense of tbe city.
The steam engineers want the city
I to re-establish Its free employment bureau. It was reported that the federal
law calling for an 8 hour day on work
carried out for the Dominion government was being violated at the dock
being built for the government at the
[foot of Salisbury drive. The Minister
of Labor Is to be notified, also /the
local fair wages officer for the Dominion.
Delegate Miss H. Gutteridge an
nounced that the local Council ot Women were calling a mass meeting to
deal with the question of the great
number of unmarried women and girls
of all occupations who are out of employment. She pointed out the gravity
of thl-t from a moral point of view, and
said that the time and place of the
meeting would be advertised In the
newspapers tomorrow and Monday
night, '"
PRINT SHOP CONDITIONS
Messrs. Cowan ft Brookhouse Purchase
Plant of Lefeaux Bros.
A number of changes have taken
place during the past month in local
prlntsho'p circles. In a few cases it has
become necessary to hang up the "high
Bign," while all of them have reduced
.their working- forces.. Consequently
a couple of dozen more printers are frequenting typo, union headquarters lh
tho Labor Temple. Secretary Neelands
reports more travelling cards being issued than received. During the week
Messrs. Cowan & Brookhouse purchased
the printing plant of Lefeaux Bros., (E.
T. Kingsley) nnd hnve moved from the
Dunsmuir lane corner of tho Labor Temple to the basement occupied by the latter, and The Federationist is issued
from the "merger" promises this week.
RAILWAY BROTHERHOODS
FEEL THE "WAR" PINCH
The railway brotherhoods membership is feeling the pinch of the war
panic and industrial collapse along with
the rest of organized labor. No attack
has yet- boon made upon their wage
schedules, as is the caae among the
<maller and meaner employers, but tb
crews have been cut on western divisions at least two-thirds. All other railway employees in tho operating department are likewise affected. War IS hell.
If the inside story of the work of tile
committee which is engaged in distributing the fund collected for tbe relief, of dependents of reservists and
others gone to the war were known it
would expose s story of want snd destitution absolutely appalling.
Unemployment hsd kept hundreds of
these families on ths very edge for long
enough before ihe war started and the
last push was all thst was nssdsd to
send them over into the abyss of
poverty. They sre, ot course, sll wo-
sn and children.
In addition to those ln Ute elty Itself,
there are many from South Vancouver
and outlying jarts, where the severity
of the unemployment of last winter hu
not abated to, any measurable degree
during the past summer. .In addition
to these particular Und of cases there
are thousands of others equally as had,
It Is confronting the authorities with
a problem such ss they little expected
would ever hsvs to bs faced, and the
idea is growing tbat one central civic
relief body, directly under the control
ef the city council, ahould he formed.
Such bodies as the associated charities
-which worked very well as long as
they had nothing to do—should be done
away with or merged in a central body,
At anyr ate, the need for a more comprehensive plan for dealing with the
general privation which prevails, Is obvious, .Everybody knows some cases
within their own circle of acquaintance, hut very few realise the extent
of poverty ln the city and the degree
of Intensity with which it has fallen on
some families. . ,
The situation is becoming graver
with each day and sooner or later it
will either have to be met with something more effective tban charity or tbe
accumulated distress will be mere than
any one group of men can handle.
The part to be played by the Trades
and Lahor council cannot he of a flnanclal kind, hut lt can, by practical
suggestion and participation do something towards the general result. At
the session of'the committee tbls week,
Jas, H. McVety, on behalf of tbe
Trades and Labor council, suggested
that this would he a good time for patriotic people to discbarge their Oriental domestic servants and replace
them wltb some of the hundreds of
white women who are dally hauntig the
female employment agencies for work.
The chief difficulty with these patriots
up to the present has been that they
have only been willing to give a white
girl half the Wages they pay to a yellow
man.
Even the Conservative daily press
now admits that the High Cost of Living Commission's report will be useless.
The Labor press of Canada pointed tbo
inevitability of the present partisan admission nt tho time the commission was
appointed.
IN
Evacuation of Vera Cruz by
Forces Hastens Day
of Reckoning
Zapata to Enforce His-Land
Policy or Fight with
Carranza
I UNORGANIZED
President of Timber Workers' Makes Instructive
Comparison
Says Unionists Should Start
Organization Revival
Next Spring
IN COLORADO IS
Plan of Conciliation Propo*
ed by U. S. President
Woodrow Wilson
U. M. W. of A. Officers, at
Trinidad, WiU Consider
Its Adoption
FEDERATION OF   LABOB FOBOES.
Tasmania Unionists Follow Example of
Other Australian States,
The state of Tasmania ia but a small
island oft the south coast of the Australian mainland, but it forms part of
the great Australian commonwealth. It
was only natural when the great unions
of Australia formed a federation for
solidarity that Tasmania would do the
sumo. According to latest advices from
the island state the unionists, who number some 10,000 in all, hove resolved
thnt tho time is npportuno when thoy
will band themselves into one big federation. Tho movement haa been on
tho cards for some time now, but last
week the mater received tho official
sanction Hobart Trades Council. All
that remains now is for a conference
to bo called of tho whole of tho unions
that the flunl touches may be put on tho
matter. The consolidating of tho unions
moans much to tha unions of that state.
At the present timo unions are in two
camps, so to speak. There is tbe political party and the industrial party.
The new amalgamation will have the
object of cementing the two bodies and
handling all matters, whether political
or industrial, from one head. This will
bring Tasmania into line with the other
Australia ii states.
The United States government has ordered the evacuation of the port of
Vera Cruz by American forces. Tho
Constitutional government of Mexico i
going to take control of the city again,
and the Carranza administration is going to be recognized by Pres. Wilson.
On the surface it looks as if peace was
assured in Mexico, but the second part
of the tragedy is yet to eome. The
common people are not in accord with
the agreement made between Carranza
and the United States government, be
cause the oil fields will remain in th.
hands of the Standard Oil, which means
the practical ruling of the country by
the magnates bf 20 Broadway. The latest action of the United States government brought out a confession of the inability of the Wilson government ti
cope with the situation.
The situation will greatly serve the
Zapata followers' interests, in their
campaign for the extension of further
territory. These forces have been holding their positions in the Southern
States since last April and although not
actually fighting, they are ready to take
the field and carry on their work
throughout the country. Zapata has refused to attend a convention that Carranza called for October 1st in the capital of the republic. He has refused to
tie himself by any promise of assistance and once more he has made the
statement that nothing but the occupation of the land by the farmers can
stop his armed movement. The new
government is afraid of the renewal of
the campaign, and is taking all kinds of
precautions to prevent the forces of the
other states, disgusted with the agreement of Carranza and the Standard Oil,
from supporting the Zapata plans.
REDUCED TO ''WAB'
BUT STILL IN THE FIGHT
While The Federationist regrets a reduction to four pages this week, there
was no other alternative. During the
last six weeks its revenue has been cut
in half, for causes at once apparent to
every one in Western Canada. Ab soon
as conditions will permit, The Federationist will keep up with the procession.
The "Oolo'd Gen'man" at Butte.
If every anyone had any doubt as to
the causes underlying the Butte labor
troubles, it ought now to be completely
dispelled, says . the Spokane Labor
World. It is the same old game that
has been played against the. workers
time and time again, until it would
seem that the workers could not again
be fooled by this hoary tool of capitalism. At the outbreak of this trouble
The Labor World voicod the suspicion
that the Amalgamated Copper Mining
Company, the copper trust, was behind
tho split in the Butte Miners' Union.
This suspicion is now confirmed beyond
nny ronsonnble doubt, and for the time-
being the trust Ib on top and the power
-of the unions broken.
J. G. Brown, president of the International Union of Shingle Weavers, Sawmill Workers and Woodsmen, with headquarters at Seattle, was a visitor in
New Westminster and. Vancouver during the week. On Tuesday he mot a
number of sawyers and filers at the Labor Temple, when the question of organization was discussed.
Pres. Brown, in oommon with other
union officials, is of the opinion that industrial conditions will continue very
dull throughout the coming winter, but
lis likewise confident that next spring
'will witness a general revival of business. He advises trade unionists to
stick to their guns and mark time for
the next few months; and then to start
an organization revival campaign.
"If there ever. was. any proof needed," said Pres. Brown to The Federatlonist, "to show unorganized workmen
the advantages of organization, sorely
the present crisis is supplying the lesson. In the timber industry everywhere
the organized workers are the last to
receive a cut in their wages. Show me
a hundred per cent, organization and
I'll show you a bunch of men who are
maintaining wages under adverse circumstances, True their staffs may have
been reduced, but the organized Work-
ers are 'dividing up' the work, i
they are inaugurating shorter, hours,
putting into effect five-day week laws
and otherwise looking after their membership. It is surely an object lesson
for the unorganized workers of the Pacific coast.''
Mr. Brown says that in Washington,
too, the industrial panie prevails,
though probably not to such an extent
as in B. C.
Any trade unionist in possession of
information likely to interest readers of
The Federationist will be doing a service by sending it along.
LET US
KEEP TO
BU8INE88
AN INSPIRED SCRIBE, on the
"special assignment" Hat, has recently
been investigating the operation of a
minimum wage for young women workers in
New Zealand, where the minimum wage fixed
by law for such is eight dollars and fifty-three cents per
week. With an insight of the
matter which is almost human
he emerges from his probing
with the following jewel of
opinion: "Another feature observed in New
Zealand was, that the indolent worker, entering on a minimum wage on which she could live,
lagged, lacked incentive to jump higher, and
sometimes lagged so that she had to be dismissed for laziness." The pressure behind
men and women in the dawn days of the race
was that of hunger. If they did not catch
their minimum wage of enough to cat, they
died. Can it be that this worthy scribbler
would have us accept the inference which he so
plainly occurs; that young women workers are
still so crude and elemental that nothing short
of hunger will extract service from them in return for pay?
The callousness of the mental attitude reflected in the words quoted is typical of the
"impartial scrutiny" exercised by the unbiassed
inquirer whose findings are put into his hands
when he sets about his job. Grant, for the
sake of argument, that the facts are true. Girl
workers in New Zealand may be more profitable to their employers when they begin for
less than a living wage. The hope of some
day getting the nourishing food they need, and
the pretty clothes and amusements young girls
are entitled to, may hold them to their tasks
with a desperation lacking under the certainty
of getting the eight dollars and fifty-three
cents a week on which they can just exist.
Go even further, and say that their employers
themselves may be under the pressure of an
economic situation which inclines them to
choose between paying low wages or giving up
their business to others with less scruples.
But none of those factors, or any other, can
in the slightest degree justify paying a girl, of
all workers, less than she needs to maintain
personal fitness and self respect. To those
who take but casual interest in such matters,
the path to improvement may seem beset wilh
difficulties, but to those who know what it
often means, all other considerations are submerged beneath the appalling possibilities behind the fact of just one girl who gets just
one dollar less than the least amount she can
exist upon. Critics, barren of the desire to
tackle the question fundamentally, find solace
for their ineptitude in the hoary old horrors of
that school of political economists who fill the
gap left by them when they ignore the human
clement in industry by babbling of "the survival of the fittest," and sundry other jungle
ethics as applied to human affairs. Of all
English ideas it is the most stupid. Born in
Manchester, it postulates the theory that starvation stimulates ambition, "Give 'em lots of
bible, some beer, a little bread, and we can keep
'em in such shape as will make our fortunes."
Nearly all the statues of successful merchants
which deface the already ugly streets of the
great textile cities of northern England, have
been built of such material—and they certainly
look like it The fact that they are permitted
to remain there shows that we still have a long
road to travel. When a move is made, it will
be women who will point the way.
A. F. OF L. CONVENTION
To Meet at Philadelphia on Monday,
Nor. 9.
The thirty-fourth annual convention
of the American Federation of Labor
will be held at Philadelphia, Pa., beginning Novehmber 9, and will continue In
session ffom'dtty to flay until1 the business of the convention has been completed.
The official call says: "It is, of
course, entirely unnecessary to enumerate the imminent important subjects
with which our forthcoming convention
will concern itself, but the reminder is
not at all amiss that every effort must
be made to broaden the field and means
for the organization of the yet unorganized workers, to strive to bring
about more effectually than ever, a better day in the lives and homes of the
toilers, to defend and maintain by
every honorable means in our power the
right to organize for our common defense and advancement, for the exorcise of our normal and constitutional
activities to protect and promote the
rights and interests of the workers;
and to assert at any risk the freedom
of speech and of the press and the
equal rights before the law of every
worker with every citizen; the tremendous conflict now being waged in Europe and its possible consequences and
results, not only upon the people of
European countries but upon the people
of Americn, as well as on tho whole
civilized world, must of necessity receive tho deepest solicitous consideration of tho working people of America.
These and other groat questions of
equal importance will, of necessity, occupy the attontion of the Philadelphia
convention."
TRINIDAD, Colo., Sept. Iff.—Toto,
one year after the minen decided to
strike for an enforcement of Colorado
mining laws, 185 offleen and memben
of the United Mine Worken of America are meeting-here to decide whether
or not they will consider a plan of eon-
ciliation suggested by Preaident Wood-
row Wilson. The text of tht propoaed
agreement followa:
Whereat the industrial conflict U
the eoal mining fields of Colorado hai
disrupted the peace of those sections of
the atate to the extent that a state of
war has practically existed for. eome
time, and, whereaa, a temporary peaee
is maintained by the presence of federal
troops, '■
Therefore, there ahould be *. ._.
ed a three-year truce, subject tot
1, The enforcement of mining aad
labor laws of the atate.
2, That all striking mlnen who hat«
not been found guilty of violation of
the law shall be given employment by
the employer they formerly worked for,
and where the place of the employee
haa been filled, he shall be given employment ae a miner at tbe same or
other mines of the company.
3, Intimidation of union or non-union
men strictly prohibited.
4, Current scale' of wages, rulet and
regulations for eaeh mine to be printed
and posted.
5, Each mine to have a grievance
committee to be selected by majority
ballot at a meeting catted for the par-
pose, in which aU employeea (except officials of the company) have the right
to participate.
Members of said committee must be.
employed at leaat six months at the la*
dividual mine before being eligible.
Married men to be in the majority oa
each committee.
Grievances to be flnt taken up in-
of the
A. F. of L. Pres. Gompers on War.
Intimating that the European war Is
one Bolely of nn aggrandizement and
conquest—"a war to divert to peoples
from their constructive work of humanizing and democratizing tendencies"—
President Gompers of tho A. F. of L.
predicts that its outcome will be n
world government and a world federation competent to maintain penco. He
declares the war will mean tho "van-
quisbment of autocracy, the emergence
of a society in which the people shall
be supreme nnd in which men V
thoughts shall be given to tho things of
penco. . . .In the general roor-
gnnizntion thnt will follow tin* war, the
workers must havo voice nnd influence
Thnt voice nnd thnt influence hnve ever
been used for liberty, justice and humanity."
Dissatisfaction at Valcartier.
Tho Federationist is in receipt of a
letter from one of the volunteers now
nt Valcartier, in which ho declares that
probably the choice of rustling for a
living in Vancouver this winter might
have been preferable after all to life in
a military camp. The food is "punk"
and to make matters worse the authorities nre inoculating them with typhoid
antitoxin, with the result that many are
suffering and three are reported to have
died. Some of the recruits have refused to stand for the treatment meted
Oiit, which has resulted in their being
let out.
U. S. Unions Are Pleased.
The passage by the United States
senate of the Clayton bill, the provisions of which exempt labor unions from
the workings of the Sherman Anti-Trust
law, has occasioned much pleasure
among unionists. They express themselves aB highly plensed with the vote,
which was 46 to 37, and almost all
agree that the credit for securing its
passage belongs to the American Federation of Labor, which had backed the
bill.
"Have you   had   any   breakfast!
queried the chairman of tho chapel of
tho printer touriBt.
"Not a drop,'' quoth tho p, \,
dividually with the proper officer of	
company. Failing adjustment, they ean
refer to their local grievance committee for farther consideration with the
mine officials. Still falling agreement,
the matter ahall be, submitted to a com"
mitteecompoeed^f.three mm to be appointed by the preaident of the United
States, and which shall be repres
tive of each side, with the third i
ber to act as umpire, whenever n	
sary. This commission shall, during the
three years of truce, serve ae adjustew
or referees in all disputes (whether Individual or collective) affecting wages,
working and social conditions.
Said commission shall devote primarily all the necessary time to the consideration and adjustment of such disputes.
6. It is understood aa a condition of
the creation of said commission that
during the life of the truce—
(a) The claim for contractual relations is to be waived, but this shall not
prevent the voluntary agreement between any employer and their employees during the life of this truce.
(b) No mine guards to be employed,
but this does not preclude tho employment of necessary watchmen.
(c) In the establishment of the truce
tho presence of tbe federal or state
troops should become unnecessary.
(d) There shall be no picketing, parading, colonizing or mass campaigning
by representatives of any labor organization of minen that are parties to
this truce, which will interfere with
the working operations of any mine during the said period of three years.
(e) During said truce the decisions of
the commission in eases submitted shall
be final and binding on employers and
employees.
(f) There shall be no suspension of
work pending the investigation and
reaching a decision on any dispute,
(g) The suspension of a mine over
six consecutive days by tbe company
may be authorized for cause satisfactory to the commission, but not pending
nny dispute.
fh) Wilful violations on any of these
conditions will be subject to such penalties ns may be imposed by the commission.
Employers and employees each to pay
one-half of the expenses of the commission.
Berlin Socialists' Message,
The Berlin branch of tho social Democratic party has sent out a message to
their comrades throughout the world,
An extract reads: "Wo now sec the
uncurbed tyrant surrounded by his
parasites, directing the most desperate
devilish and selfish campaign ever
waged against humanity. With the
toilers la all lands wo have no quarrel,
nnd to-day we extend our hands In the
heartiest friendship to every French,
Belgian and British democrat. We
know that tho internal revolution proceeding in our midst will depose this
despot whose insatiable egotism is
drenching Europe with tbe blood of Its
workers and wage earners."
Believe in Publicity.
The unionists of Australia are doing
things. The Daily Herald haa been
launched in Adelaide, South Australia,
and on Nov. 6 another paper, the
World, will be started at Sydney, New
.Smith Wales. Arrangements are also
being made to convert The Worker, a
weekly at Brisbane, Queensland, Into a
daily. This ought to make a formidable battery for labor on the world'e
smallest continent.
"Homes that are homeless, children
that are fatherless, mothen whose boys
are in nameless graves—such Is the sacrifice. War's glory Is in its calamities,
the widowed women it leaves behind;
the unborn babes who ean inherit
naught but sorrow and bondage. Out of
the wreckage of Europe must rise a nee
of mon whose common sorrow will make
for them a common brotherhood, a unity
of purpose, a n.~ desfinjr,?\      ' M,W'f PAGE TWO
THB BRITTBH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FBIDAT SBPTEMBEB 18. UI
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IE branches tn Canada
A suural baa-kins business transacted.
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WE ALLOW INTEREST ON DEPOSITS IN OUR
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THE B. C. FEDERATIONIST
Published evary   Friday  morning  by tht
B. C. Federatlonltt, Ltd.
B. Parm Pettipiece, Managing Editor
J. W. Wilkinson     -     Assistant Editor
Ons Dollsr will open
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Directors:  Jaa.  Campbell,  president;   J.
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Unity of Labor; the hop, of th. world."
FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 18, 1914
THE B. C. WESTERN CATHOLIC
is very desirous that the mayor
of the city should instruct the police to suppress what it calls the soap
box orators who are preaching sedition
and blasphemy at
sundry of the street
FREE corners  of  the  city
SPEECH each night.   The sen-
AOAIN. timent expressed by
onr local contemporary is not a new oae.
In fact, we recognise in it sn old acquaintance, who flourished like the proverbial green bay tree, with a very lusty hut short lived career, during the
mayoralty of one James Findlay, whose
doughty deeds in the way of head-
cracking earned for him the sobriquet
of Findlaykovsky, and the- disgust of
the conservative party machine, which
had put him in offlce, to such a degree
that, at the end of hla year, they kicked
him out to make way for a saner and
broader man. We are not so much interested in any particular brand of politics, whose advocates may come beneath
the disapproval of our religious contemporary, as in the principle which is
involved. Neither do we see how street
speaking ean produce much effect—
either good or bad—*vhen it has to compete with the continuous rattle of atreet
cars, the ringing of their bells, the tooting of automobiles and the countless
other noises which go to make np the
hideous din which goes on from early
morn till late at night in the city
streets.
* .   .   •      *
The B. C. Western Catholic speaks, in
the same article, of the advantages
which are part of the privilege of living in a British community. Quite so.
One of them is the liberty to speak
freely about anything under the sun,
without having to go to prison for doing so—ns is the case in some parts of
the world where the religion of our
contemporary haa far more influence on
the administration of the law than it
has In the average British community.
Free speech is by no means a spontaneous gift from the ruling class to the
masses. It is a matter of governmental
polity, baaed upon a knowledge gained
by years of experience, of the weak'
spots of the working class. The secret
of it is this. So devise the policy of
government, that the masses get the
impression that they are governing,
themselves, then you can do as you Uke
with them. The logical outcome and
application of that idea is nowhere seen
so practically illustrated as In the very:
heart of the elty of London itself. Just
inside Hyde Park, every "1st" and
ism" on the face of the earth are
given all the room and freedom to express themselves whieh even the most
ardent devotee might desire. The consequence is, nobody interferes, very few
take any particular notice, and nothing
happens to seriously disturb the
sway of the ruling class, whieh looks
with approval on snch gatherings, as
the safety valves necessary to maintaining itself In authority.
• ■ »      .      .
About this little matter of "sedition" and "blasphemy." It is not quite
clear what is meant by our contemporary. The terms are used in an Indefinite way, without anything to Indicate precisely what is to be understood by them. Perhaps it is meant
that the sayings complained of are subversive of the supreme authority anil
tbe teachings of the church on whose
behnlf the B. C. Western Catholic
speaks. Bearing in mind the denunciations which have been issued from that
quarter ngainst the ndvanced sections
of working class thought, tbo reason for the action of our contemporary
becomes a little plainer. Still, we believe that It would be difficult to disprove the contention thnt every man
and every movement which, in all the
history of the world have contributed
anything to the progress of mankind,
were, in their day, denouncod aB seditious and blasphemous. Christ himnelf
wa. crucified for it, nnd millions of
others who, in their time, and accord
ing to their lights, have sacrificed all
nnd Inbored long and hard for tbe benefit of mankind, hnve heen sent to suffering nnd denth bv authority sheltered
behind tho craven's excuse of sedition
und blasphemy—tho martyrs of Smith-
field and St. Bartholmew'a eve amongst
them.
...»
However, we have no reason to think
that the chief magistrate of this city
will lend his authority to extremists,
either religious or otherwise, in the
manner which his narrow-minded predecessor did. He will see that the ob
ject of our contemporary is, to use pub
lie feeling-as a tool with which to deliver a blow for them against people
who profess a political belief for which
the B, .0. Western Catholic has a keen
dislike. As long as their partisan
wrath can be appeased they will be satisfied. Bat there is more than a usual
amount of social discontent abroad just
now, as the result of the vast amount
of unemployment and general economic depression which prevails, and it
will be wise on the part of the authorities to give that discontent an opportunity of expressing itself in speech.
THE  McBRIDE-BOWSER government evidently does not intend to
.make any attempt to alleviate
the appalling condition of unemployment and economic depression which
prevails  throughout
the province, if the
MAKE people can be kept
McBRIDE quiet and things al-
HOVE.    - lowed    to    muddle
through     somehow.
As an aggregation
of political mediocrities they are,
from a Working class standpoint,
a tragic joke at the best of
tlmoB, but in face of the present crisis their ineptitude and indifference is
the rankest insolence to thousands of
the working men and women who, in
one part or another of this province are
literally starving. Every deputation
which has gone to Victoria during the
last twelve months to try snd urge them
to action, bas been entertained with
the flow of dialectical drivel which McBride keeps permanently on tap for
such purposes. But nothing has been
done for the very simple reason that,
by doing nothing, McBride did not feel
that his political prestige would be at
all impaired. The condition of the people does not worry him as long as it
does not threaten his political power,
And there haB not yet appeared any
combination of forces formidable
enough to scare him into action. But
unless we are much mistaken, the present situation is so acute, and is pinching so many people who in previous
times have not felt the pressure, that
an agitation to demand that a special
session of the legislature be called to
devise ways and means of alleviating
conditions, would receive so much general support that McBride's politics]
sagacity would grasp the meaning of
it, and he would be forced to act.
* -    »      •      «
The main factors of the situation as
it confronts us today are these. On
the one hand are thousands of acres of
land, capable of being made arable and
productive of the things which the people of this province need for their ov-
ery-day existence, and will continue to
need for just so long as we live here.
On the other hand are thousands of unemployed men, able, anxious and willing to secure that land in return for the
labor needed to make it productive. In
the task of bringing those men and that
land together, what obstacles are there
in the way other than those deliberately seen or made by thoae in Vic
toria who control the political power
of the provincet McBride's usual answer is, that there are now no available
tracts of land sufficiently large and at
the same time close to the few big
cities. Also that tho government has no
money—or the means of raising sny—
for carrying out such a scheme. Take
the land difficulty flrst. There are millions of acres, many of them comparatively near to the cities, which have
been handed over by the government
during the past six years to individual,
and coporations of, speculators. They
have held those lands in the hope of
selling them te settlers at fancy prices,
and out of the monies thus received to
pay the nominal price charged for the
land by the government- in the flrst
place, and to pay taxes on unsold portions until such time as they were
disposed of. But the land boom has
burst. Buyers have not been forthcoming. And in hundreds of cases not one
cent has been paid by those speculators
as yet. In fact, the (9,000,000 surplus
which McBride made out the province
had to its credit last year, was nothing more nor less than the money owing to the government by speculators
who do not intend to pay one single
bean until they sell their land, unless-
they are forced' to do.
«...
Now why should not those lands be
taken back by the government, then
cleared, and cut up into holdings of
various sizes from ten acres upwards*
Work would be provided for thousands
of unemployed, who could be given
first call on the land when it was ready
for cultivation, and Instead of thousands of industrious citlsens falling into
the hopeless desperation which continual unemployment breeds,, they would
have n chance to live under self-respecting circumstances. But McBride
would say: "We have not got the
money to float the scheme, to pay for
the clearing, and to make the loans
which these settlers would need to finance them to start out with." If there
is tho will the way would come of Itself.
If the credit of the people of British
Columbia is good enough security upon
which to borrow money for the personal advantnge of private shareholders In
the Pacific Great Eastern and other
railway companies, it is certainly good
enough to bnck up a productive enter-
price of such a public character as the
one we suggost. The further objection
will be mnde that money cannot be borrowed now. owing to financial conditions. Very well, there is the chance for
McBride to shew whether his govern.
ment contains one statesman, or whether they are all what they seem to be—
scurvy politicians. Let the government
take the bull by the horns, and issue
government script in the form of notes
of various denominations to be paid to
those who de work or supply material
for carrying out the scheme, Those
notes would exchange for commodities,
and would be the expression of real
wealth produced in the shape of land
made fertile and productive. If the
government shewed that they were
really in earnest, it is doubtful if they
would have to go to the point of actually issuing that script. For this reason: It would mean that the state was
going into ths banking business, and
it would be a blow at the private banking monopoly, which iB the worst of all
the commercial vampires whioh. are
Bucking the very life blood of that portion of the inhabitants who are the
real and actual wealth producers of
this province. If such a move could be
set going, it would open the eyes of
thousands of the voters of British
Columbia, in such a fashion as would
start them thinking along lines whioh
would bode no good for the gang of
political pirates who are now in control of the administrative and executive power of this province.
FOOD  CRANKS  always  seem  so
funny when they are serious, and
so serious when they are funny,
that to the ordinary person they aro a
very difficult quantity to understand at
any   time.   One   of
the   most    widely.
PEEUNOS known of the "food
FOR THE reform" experts in
PROLETARIAT England, ia Eustace
Miles who haa commercialized the gastronomic crankiness of the grape nutters and the fruit fanatics with considerable material advantage to himself,
The Eustace Miles restaurants are nothing less than an institution in London.
He has also produced quite a deal of
literature on the subject of food from
the standpoint of the faddist. But of
all he ever wrote he never put forth
anything quite so naive as a letter
which he aent to the press at the outbreak of the war, and in which he
shewed how economy may be practiced
in the matter of food. The gentleman
says:
Sir,—The war will soon cause distress to the poor. Let thoae who
can, save the peelings of potatoes,
carrots, apples, and the outside layers of onions and leaves of cabbages, lettuces, pea-pods and marrow seeds Wash theae well, let
them simmer in water, and after
straining, add milled bread crunibs
and crusts, milled cheese, and some
soaked and cooked peas or beans or
lentils, and distribute to the needy,
or else send to some central place
of distribution It would mean a
little individual trouble, but would
cost hardly anything, and would
help a good deal.
EUSTACE MILES.
Now that strikes us as being a really
statesmanlike proposal to make in the
richest country   on the   face   of   the
earth, especially just now.
•      »      . -   *
It looks like one of two things—
either the babbling which comes from
the lopsided mentality of a faddist, or
that damnable insolence which assumes
that nothing is too poor for the poor.
Just now in England, the authorities
are calling on every able-bodied man,
who can possibly do so, to take up mill
tary duty. Alright. The ohief part of
that burden will fall on-the poor. But
as long as there are so many rich left
in England, there should not need to be
any among those left behind who are
so poor as to have to eat the garbage-
can soup so highly recommended by
Miles. Men in England are told that
the present situation has broken down
all class barriers. Let it be shown in
practical fashion. Let the rich break
down the walls and fences which surround their parks and coverts which
teem with hares, rabbits, partridges,
pheasants and deer, for baring to take
one of which, the poor are,sent to prison in ordinary piping times of peace.
Let them give never so lavishly of the
fruits of the land stolen for them by
their ancestors from the common people, and yet not all the piled-up heap
of their giving can put the breath of
life back iato one bullet-riddled body.
Give them the peelings of potatoes,
carrots and apples," forsooth! Marie
Antoinette, when told the poor had no
bread, asked why they did not eat cake.
Poulon, told the same thing, advised
them to eat grass. The head of the flrst
parted company with the rest of her
anatomy on the scaffold; the letter's
finished on a lamp-post, the mouth
filled with grass. History has a nasty
habit of repeating itself.
Three years ago the only talk heard
in public places was about lots and real
estate speculation. Now the only thing
to be heard is talk about hard times.
One is the logical result of the other.
The legislature of the province ef
Manitoba met in special session last
Tuesday to deal with conditions
brought about by the war. Are conditions worse in Manitoba than British
Columbia, or ia it that the people of
this province can be more easily fooledf
The ultra conservative London
Times, under the head of advice for
wartime says: "Explain to the young
and the ignorant what war is, and why
we aro forced to wage it." ThlB- is
alarming. Can it be that now that the
Harmsworth group control tne Times
they intend to make lt tell the truth t
Unthinkable!
The Russian government has changed
the name of the capital from Petersburg to Petrograd. The official reason
given is that the "burg" at the end'of
tho old name was too German. There is,
uowever, a place near Petrograd called
underground dungeons where thousands
of the best and bravest of Pussla's
mon and womon have gone insane in
filth, chains, and starvation, That name
too, has the same German "burg" at
the ond, but there is po mention, of
changing it. Even if the name was
changed, the prison would still remain,
Siberia and "Bloody Sundaya" are not
dead yet by a long way.
An injury to one is the concern of
all—ln theory. JuBt now—in praotice—
a job for one iB the envy of all, and
so is the lucky slave who gets it.
Even Miles' potatoe peeling soup is
better than McBride's "courage and
confidence" when it comes to practical
things as compared with a politician's
platitudes and mental bankruptcy.
Bullets are impersonal. They go as
far, whether they are directed from the
rifle of a prize-fighter or a poet, and
they pierce with equal ease the brain of
incalculable value to mankind, and
that which is not worth its keep, They
do not turn aside beoause it Ib not well
that a young man should die before his
time. The philosophy of bullets and
shells, and the war lords who direct
them is that men—if they happen to
get in the way—are so much material
to be destroyed.
Winnipeg for 1918 I, T. u. Convention.
For some years the Typos, of Winnipeg have more than hinted that it was
about tjme to invite the International
Typographical Union to meet in the
Prairie Capital. At the Providence convention the agitation took concrete
form, and announcement was made.by
Dels. Freeman and Ryan that Winnipeg would be out after the 1916 convention. The local union has already
begun ita campaign, and by the time
the I. T. U. meeta at Los Angeles it will
be pretty well agreed among all typo,
unions on the continent that Winnipeg
ia entitled to the convention. Western
Canada typo, unions can be depended
upon to assist the 'Peg boys io their effort.
Quoth the Winnipeg Voice: The
patriot is the man who makes patriotic speeches at meetings and then
sits on a board of directors to raise
the price of necessities to the hero'
family. Be a patriot—it pays—a hero
doesn't know any, better.
PHONE   SEYMOUR   tOSS
We Pay
4%
Interest on Deposits
Subject to Cheque
Credited
12 Times a Year
We give special atten-
tion to Naturalizations.
L
DOW FRASER TRUST CO.
122 Hastings St. West.
Vancouver, and McKay Station,
■urnaby, B.C.
Close at 1 o'clock Saturday.
City Asction ami Commission Co.
.Cash paid for houses and suits.
ef furniture er Auotlon arranged.
Satisfaction guaranteed, prompt
settlsments.
ARTHUR  I.  BETCHLEY
•myth, and Oranvllle StrMts
Auetlenser sey silt
nose fey, 221 DaywNlih
Nora, Thomson & Clegg
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
snd EMBALMERS
SN Riclardi St.        Vaacoaver, I. C.
HARRON BROS.
FUNERAL   DIRECTORS  AND
EMBALMERS
Vancouver—Office and Chapel.
1034 Oranvllle St., Phono Sey. 8486,
North Vanoouver — Olflcp and
Chapel, 122—Slxtli St. West, Phone
134.
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By all mesns come and see our
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GET OUR PRICES AND
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Use of Modern Chapel and
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Never forget that an Individual Trustee might become insolvent : but the affairs of Corporate Trustees are open to all
the world, so that you can choose a safe Corporato Trustee"
„»A?J.''?|V,I*U"*1 Jrusl^e "^i 'J lEMtsnee commit a breach
ot TruBt for which he would be held responsible but no
have sufflclent funds to make restitution. ftU would result
In heavy loss to tho beneflclatea.
This Oompany Is very unlikely to make mistakes, but' If it
should do so, It has.ample funds to refund any money lost.
Canadian Financiers Trust Company]
HEAD OFFICE 839 HASTINGS ST. VV.     VANCOUVER., B.C. {
 Patrick Donnelly-General Man&f en
Keep the Children Health]
by sending them out In the fresh air thu. On. days.   There's nothing b.t-1,
ter for keeping them exercised than wheeled goods. j
Our stook of WHEELBARROWS, AUTOMOBILES, EXPRB**"-  WAGONS: ]
PERAMBULATORS, IRISH MAILS, ROWINO WAOONS, VELOCIPEDES1,
SIDEWALK SULKIES, Is easily the finest and most comprehen.lv. In I
city and the prices are right.
Thomson Stationery Co., Ltd
•as    UitTIUAt   BTDBKT   \AJ_t\T \J A Urftl li/a*a»     m   I
SIS HASTINGS STRUT WIST
BEST IN THE WIST
VANCOUVER, ■•jj.l
ESTABLISHED It
w-/0 OFF ALL TRUSSES THIS MONTH
RED STAB DRUG STORE.
i Cordova Street West Vancouver, B.
~—>. I FBIDAT SEPTEMBER 18, Uld
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA PED1ERATIONI8T.
FACM _HA
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
Made-in-Vancouver
Sweater Coats for Men
This little article Is not Intended to be an appeal to your
civic loyalty. There Is no need for lt, for the coats are not
surpassed anywhere, and we know If you-buy one of these
magnificent coats you will be glad to think that you not only
have the finest coat money could buy, but you have' also
supported one of the city's Industries,   The coats wa show are:
$4.80 for a hand-knit, medium weight pure wool coat with
V neck; In all colors.
96.75 for a superior coat with roll collar, good medium weight;
all   colors.   Heavy   weight  at         ....96.78
17.60 for a hand-knit, shaker style coat sweater with roll
collar. Thia coat Is made absolutely without Beams and
Is unequalled anywhere at the price.
$8.76 for the double breasted heavy wool auto coat with a
military collar.
98.96—An exceptionally fine coat of the shaker knit type, with
roll collar. Hand made from start to finish. A man
would be well off with a coat like this, ln the Yukon.
910 for the best coat that can be made at any price,
David Spencer Limited
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
DAVID SPENCER, LTD,
VANCOUVER
City Market
MAIN STREET
Auction Sales are Held
Every Tuesday and Friday, at 10 a.m.
Private sales are held daily when you can
purchase in any quantity.
OUR SALESMEN ABE ALWAYS AT
YOCK SERVIOE. GOOD DELIVERY
AT    LOWEST    POSSIBLE    RATES
Saturday Is Our SpeeCal Day for Snaps,
See the Producers' Stalls in Front of the Market as Well as tho
Inside Displays.
Everything sold in the Market is produced
in British Columbia.
SUPPORT HOME INDUSTRIES.
John McMillan, Manager.
^ (&}
Braids
Best
Coffee
i„,W"** HHAIDft (0,.,.
Did You Get Yours
This Morning?
BRAID'S
BEST
COFFEE
WM. TURNER
906 Granville St
Next to the Market
-DEALER IN-
New and second-hand China, Crockery, Furniture,
Hardware and Stoves. Furniture moving and shipping. Telephone us when you have furniture for
sale. Highest prices paid.
TELEPHONE SEYMOUR 3745
Westminster Trust Company
Oapttu. »i,ooo,ooo.oo.
■uboeriaMt, W01.000.00
aenrve hu, 1000,000.00
We hnve MONEY TO LOAN oa Improved property.
Eit^tei mutated tor out-of-town and city client!. Payments col-
lected and forwarded or Invested. We aet ai agents only for the
purchaie and aale of real estate.
Deposits accepted and Interest at 4% allowed on dally balance.
8AFETY DEPOSIT BOXES POR RENT
Head Ofllce:
Columbia and Begbie Street, New Weatminster, B. C,
1.1. leant, muuftaf Mseoter
I. A. Beasle, Mentarr-Tneeun.
61S COLUMBIA STREET
THE S. BOWELL COMPANY
■aoeeeson to Center A Banna, tM.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
lien in ,
BU inaST NBW WESTMINSTER, B. C.
UNION HATS AND OVERALLS at
J. E. BROWN & CO.
NEW WESTMINSTER/B.C.
Electric Elevator
Frt* Bus to and from all Trains and Boats.
Uf/YTI? I       IDl/IM-O     Cor' Co,umW* Avt. msI Hutbw Street
n\J 1 mLL*    IfxVlllVl    McPHAIL A MACKENZIE, Proprietor.
European Plan.
Hot and Cold Water and Telephone In every room.   Rooms with baths,
single or en suite.
I
DOMES IN
lNeWs-Ad. Reporter Barred
for Making Inaccurate
Reports
| Reports of Committees Indicate Activity of Central Labor Body
NEW WESTMINSTER, Sept. 9.—
Pres. H. Knudsen presided over the re*
gular meeting of New Westminster
Trades and Labor Oouncll, held this
evening. Credentials were accepted from
Martin Pratt, electrical workers; Wm.
Jardlne, cigarmakers; Oeo. Atkinson,
plumbers. '
Communications—From Mayor Oray,
in re public meeting for purpose of
looking after dependents of service
men. Filed, as delegates had been sent
to meeting. From school board in re
night school courses. Filed, as delegation had been named, but was unable to
attend. From Moving Picture and Projecting Machine Operators' Union, Local No. 348, Vancouver, stating that
they had unionized the operators at the
Royal and the City theatres, but had
not organized tho Edison theatre here.
Received and referred to locals to pat*
ronize the two unionized theatres. From
D. S. Cameron, tendering Ms resignation as a trustee and chairman of the
municipal committee, and withdrawing
as a delegate because of the impossibility of keeping • together the Retail
Clerk's union, whioh he represented.
Received and resignation accepted.
From the Vancouver News-Advertiser,
in re the debarring of their represents-
tive as a result of alleged untruthful!
statements regarding proceedings of the
Council. Laid on table till next meeting.
Local Sale of Debentures.
Thos. Turnbull. was given the floor
H | and delivered an address on his plan to
form an organization of individuals who
would subscribe a certain stated
amount monthly for the purpose of purchasing unsold city debentures so that
development work could be done by the
city this winter and a large amount of
interest money now going abroad be
rotni nod here. After Mr. Turnbull stated thnt only white labor could be employed on work under his plan, the
council endorsed it and Delegate Yates
was selected to represent the council at
a meeting to be held by various public
bodies to consider the details of the
plan.
To Aid the Needy.
Dol. Maiden reported on the public
meeting in the oity hall, held for the
purpose of devising ways and means of
caring for dependents of soldiers. He
stated that care would bo taken to see
that the needy ones .were provided for
and those who did not need assistance
would not receive it. Report received.
Reports from Unions.
Typos—The Daily News has gone out
of business, leaving five more printers
out of employment.
Plumbers—About the same, but a little more doing in the steam-fitting line.
Bnrbers—Pretty quiet, another unfair shop (the Cosmopolitan) in town.
Bartenders—Pretty quiet; about al
dozen men out of employment, and may |
bo worse
Cigarmakers—All working, but some
on a limit.
Brewery Workers—Not much doing.
Moulders—Just about aB bad as ever.
known, but prospects are brighter, as
there is some work in sight.
Painters—Pretty quiet, about two
working. i
Timber Workers—Tried to get China-1
men to join them on strike, but failed;;1
feel assured that unless wages are restored in this province, the tariff will
be replaced on shingles going into the
United States, to preserve the equation
with the higher wages now paid in the
States.
Steam   and * Operating   Engineers—
MINARD'S LINIMENT CURES
GARGET IN COWS
Free
Guaranteed
American
We Want You to Know
' These Hose
They stood the test when all
others failed. They give real foot
comfort. They have no seams to
rip. They never become loose and
baggy as the shape la knit In, not
pressed ln. They are GUARANTEED for fineness, for style, for
superiority of material and workmanship, absolutely stainless, and
to wear six months without holes
or replaced, by .new pairs free.
OUR   FREE   OFFER
To every one sending us 60 cents
to cover shipping charges, we will
Bend, subject to duty, absolutely
free:
Three pairs of our famous men's
AMERICAN BILK HOSE with
written guarantee, any color, or
Throe pairs of our Ladles' Hose
In Black, Tan or White colors,
with written guarantee.
DON'T DELAY—Offer, expires
when dealer ln your locality Is selected.   Give color and size desired.
INTERNATIONAL  HOSIERY CO.,
21  Blttner Street
DAYTON, OHIO, U. S, A.
Phone Your Printing Order
 T0:	
SEYMOUR 4490
Phone Barman* mi
DIXON & MURRAY
oAftrarrna, ava
Ofl-M ui Iters fritting.   0wstml
Jobbing
001m andtnepi
ion Buranm
J, J.  TAYLOB
One of the imprisoned Vancouver Island
miners recently, released on parole.
The father of eight children, an
officer of the U. M, W. of A., and a
vice-president of the B, C. Federation
of Labor. Sentenced last year to two
years penal servitude.
Things not so good as usual, several
men laid off. ■ >
Electrical WorkerB—Only about two
laid off, good as seen for awhile.
Street Bailway Employees—Worse
conditions than for years; mechanical
department laid off twenty men and
may shut down car shops and lay off 40
more men.
Hod Carriers—Nearly all gone soldiering, about three left in town and at
least one working.
Ntw Officers.
W. E. Ivison was elected trustee in
place of D. S. Cameron. T. A. Barnard,
W. Yates and C. Cropley were eleoted
on the municipal committee, vice D. S.
Cameron, D. McGuire and J. McLean.
-Jas. Feeney was eleoted to the auditing
committe in place of Jas. Mackie..
Committee Reports.
Report of progress by the executive
committee was received and the committee was instructed to call the attention of the provincial government to
conditions existing at Fraser mills and
ask that the provisions of the Truck
act be enforced there.
Answering a question by Del. Cropley
as to the work contemplated by the
city council this winter, Dol. Dodd said
that day labor would be employed on
the outfall for the. Glen Brook sewer,
to cost $10,000; outfall for Sapperton
sewer, with pipes, will go over $40,000,
other sections to run $10,000; reservoir,
$45,000, may be by day labor; stable
on Eighth avenue by day labor, $6,000;
and then the outside routine work.
Some of the work will be started soon
and others only talked about. Columbia street paving will run close to
$100,000. Bithulithic paving problematical.
Del. Stoney. said- A. S. Mills & Co.
now carried union shirts and collars as
a result of demand for them, by unionists, and they deserved the patronage
of the unionists. Del. Flynn said J. E.
Brown carried a large lino of union
goods and has an ad. in The Federationist and deserved his share of the
union men's trade.
Del. Cropley nsked for information
about waterfront leases made by the
City Council without the anti-Asiatic
clause, and was informed by Del. Dodd
that some firms objected! to the insertion of the anti-Asiatic clnuse in their
leases, and won out in the council, despite his objection and contention that
it was unfair to similar concerns that
had the clauses in their leases. It looked to Del. Dodd as though the city council favored Asiatic labor. Del. Cropley
believed Del. Dodd should be commended for his attitude in the matter and
the Trades and Lnbor Council should insist that the white labor clause should
be inserted in all waterfront leases.
Answoring it question by Del. Paulsen, Del. Dodd said that the city intended to lease all the street ends along
the new wharves and that small boats
would bo taken care of at Tenth street,
where there aro about seven acres. Del.
Paulsen wanted to know where cannery
boats would tie up, ns well as strange
boats. Del. Dodd said lessees must allow
boats to tie up at their wharve when
their own ships are not there, and a
scale of wharfage charges is being arranged. On motion of Paulsen-Maiden,
the council went on record as strenuously objecting to the city council leasing
the street ends, especially Eighth and
Sixth streets.
The Norway Way—And Canada.
There is at least one European government that is attempting to play fair
with the people, even though it be ne-
, cesaary to choke the life out of tho
robbers who plunder .the public by
boosting food prices, observes Max
Hayes in the Citizen. The government
, of Norway decreed that prices on articles of food, ennl, coke, wood, meat,
mineral, oils nnd such commodities,
shall be fixed by the authorities., Tho
raising of prices was attomptod ns soon
ns the news of the war reached Bergen.
The government took swift and sure action and in two days prices wero nt
normal o£jnin. The reason that the
blood-suckers let go was that a number
were thrown into jail and others were
forced to mnke restitution for overcharging. There was no red-tope about
it, nnd the envornment did not stnrt in
to mnke a silly investigation into something that everybody knew about.
Those Who Can May Do.
Some union, somewhere, asked for a
mise of wages in theso troubled times,
and as a result we Hvere treated to an
editorial, the burden of which was that
unions should refrain from asking higher prices for their labor, says "Working Card," in the Regina Lender. We
have yet to see the editorial which will
condemn the employers for reducing
wages, which action seems to have become a matter of course, amongst the
unorganized. Nor do we see the merchants refraining from raising the price
of the commodities they nre selling. It
secmB "to us that it is perfectly in accordance with existing conditions for
every one to rnise prices except, the
worker, who seems fated to be the gont
which ultimately bears the burden.
During the past week or two a large
number of Federationist subscribers
have been notified of their expiration
dates, along with return slips for renewal. It may become necessary for
The Federatfonlst to cut off delinquents, not as a matter of choice but
of necessity. However, if there Is a
wage-worker in Canada wbo desired
The Fed. and lacks the price let him
or her drop a card to this offlce and it
will be done. The Fed. has no desire
to become a Weekly Wail, but, along
with others, it is feeling the pinch of
Industrial stagnation and consequent
unemployment among <tg readers,
BE
TAXED
Peace Party Should Include
I Prohibition of Manufacture  of War Arms
Churches Bave Failed to
Do Their Part in Preserving Peace
[By Aid, Job. A. Clarke, Eamonton]
The public Institution or person
that can make the most Out of the
most distressing circumstances or
conditions, is the one that, in the
long run, will be most remembered by
humanity. The terrible war ol
greed, selfish ambitions, aristocratic
jealousies and ignorance aow engulfing the allegedly civilized and Christian portion' of Europe, Is Indeed a
hard condition to secure any advantage to the human race from.
The conclusion that no peace
should be signed that did not prevent
that hereafter any private company
or person for profit should be allowed
to manufacture any engine of destruction for sale to any government
or private individual, and to be made
broad enough to Include battle or
war ships, dreadnoughts or submarines, cannon, armor plate, fortifications or small arms, is one good
step.
That all countries should be bound
by an International agreement, which
would prevent the starting of a war
(for remember, these civilized countries actually start war before they
declare It), without ample notice and
consultation and .authorization from
the representatives of the. people,
who will be affected by the war when
it does come, but more Important
than all, In my opinion, Is when I
write this, because stresB has not
been laid upon this aspect of the
case, excepting ln a very superficial
way, by the publication to date, Is
that the countries now at war are
Christian countries.
The facts are, that, owing to the
claim of the various Christian
religions tbat they are primarily the
servants and representatives of the
Great Apostle of Peace, all the combined property of the combined Christian churhces have been to all intents and purposes, In all the countries now engaged ln this war, exempt
from taxation, facilities for the accumulation of tremendous Incomes
free in many cases by actual taxation or by facilitating the collection
of alms or voluntary contributions
for church purposes, have been encouraged more than any other class
that ever was associated ni the collection of money for other private
use, not even excepting the collection
of money tor government purposes.
The capitalization of the property
exempt from taxation, and the money
which the connivance of the government enables the religious denominations to collect, would ln a very few
years amount to more than the entire cost of the war, .and I believe
that the campaign of permanent
peace which must follow this war,
must take into consideration the
fact that no leaders ot any church and
no governing body in any church In
any of the countries involved, has
made any effort to throw the weight
and power of their influences on the
side of those who believe that the
war Bhould be stopped before it began, that the shedding of blood
should be prevented.
If there is any Justification now, or
ever has been for this tremendous
subsidy of the human race, regardless
of belief or disbelief, in any or all ot
the various Christian denominations,
that justification must be that any
crisis, such aB arose about the first
of August, the influence of the
church, to prevent the shedding
ot blood, to prevent the normal followers of the Prince of Peace from
shedding each other's blood, to prevent the fighting machines of different Christian nations from making
countless orphans, all these included
in the Prince's words, solemnly uttered, "Suffer little children to come
unto me," and that in spite of this
subsidy, ln cash paid continuously
for 2000 years, there has been no result beneficial to the human race,
from either an individual or the entire Christian churches combined,
then lt us up to thu alleged Christian
nations to find if such an enormous
subsidy should not be used for some
other purpose, more beneficial to the
human race. It is up to those who
believe that murder iB a crime
whether carried on by an Individual,
a corporation, a nation or a nation
with the connivance, support and
prayers of the church, is just as much
murder in one instance as the other,
to refuse to longer subsidise such a
useless appendanges of Christian nations as the tax exempted church
property, and It Is a matter of very
grave doubt If the church, generally
speaking, have not earned the confiscation of all their property by their
Inactivity or by their publicly siding
with one or other of the belligerents,-
in the present war and adding sacrilege to uuelessness of representatives
of Ihe one church praying to the ono
Ood for success of both sides in the
bloody Hunt-liter.
MINARD'S LINIMENT CURES
DISTEMPER
I
WhflU Whut Braid
Choio. Family Braid
Wedding and Birthday Caku.
We Vet Vain float,
BELYEA'S BAKERY
ALL KIND! OF
CAKES, PASTRY AND
CONFECTIONERY
Hot Drink, ud Lunch..
All Ooods Frail Dally.
tea auBvou «*.
t.l ner. not.
««
MAKING CLOTHES
IS OUR BUSINESS
We make tht beat You want the beat Our prloea are tht
Ibweat. Our material tha bttt Our workman Al. Wa
guarantee tatiafactlon.   Gtt your ntxt Suit from
S. McPherson, Sr.
MODERN PRICED TAILOR
432 Main St., Vaneouvar
Mr. Union Man
Are you eating Union-made Bread, are you
helping to maintain the Union Standard of living by
using goods produced by Union Labor!
BREWER'S XL BREAD
has the Union Label on every loaf, and in quality
and flavor it is unexcelled.
Phone Highland 573 and we will call at your
house.
BREWER'S XL BAKERY,
Corner 4th Avenue and Commercial Street.
COAL!     COAL!!        |
Special Reduction to Small Coiuumen.
WELLINGTON LUMP now 40c per Sack of 1001b*
. Quantity Guaranteed.      Prompt Delivery.
Macdonald Marpole Co., Ltd.
427 SEYMOUR ST. PHONE SEY. 210
NimedSkoetvefre^iMdY-udeiaNee-
UnioD Faetoriw-Do Not Bay Aay Shot
no matter what ttl name, onlttt tt bttn a
plain ud rtadablt lmpreeslon or thla item.
All ihow without tho Union Stamp an
alwaya Non-Union.
BOOT 4 SHOE WORKI*** UNION
IM Bummer Straet, Boa ton, .Meat.
3. r. Tobln, Proa.   C. L. Blaine, Btc.-Tma.
Abbotsford  Hotel!
921 Pender St. West Phone Sey. 5860
| Fireproof Vancouver, B. C. European
Rates $1.00 a day up
J. M. McLUCKIE, Proprietor.
Flrat-eltM OHM In connection
Lrl. L. Milk, Proprietor
EUROPEAN PLAN        Fr«d«ttck A. EulUa. Manaier
I Hot .nd Cold Water la
Every Room. 130 Room.
Connected with Beth..
HOTEL EMPRESS
BSr-SBT 235HMtiHiSt.E.,Vuc.wer(B.C. KSUHSS
PENDER HOTEL
law, Modwa, Plrat-Claa* |f
^      ^____t__tum
tut II l» p«f Day aat Op. jj
New, Baron
Stwn.kwMd.
NEW ENGLAND HOTEL     «• •»—■ •*"-*
Booms elegantly furnished, classed with the best.   Low rateB.
BREWED AND BOTTLED IN VANCOUVER BY
VANCOUVER BpWfcRliS Limited PAGE FOUR
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FBIDAT SBPTEMBBB 18, 1914
J. LECKIE CO., LIMITED
SHOE
MANUFACTURERS
We manufacture every kind of
work shoe, and tpecialize in linet
'or minen, railroad conitruction,
io|fing, etc.
VANCOUVER
■   B.C.
A Tip about our
Good Clothes
Any clothing store can Bell a man a Suit or an Overcoat.
But few atores can dress him, however, as this store can!
Pall Suits and Overcoata of real quality, that not only clothe a man
but dress him, are here ln unstinted variety.
More labor waB put into them than into any garment similarly priced.
More Light and Better Light for
the Home
TOE TUNOBTUN LAMPS.
Thlo le advlaed aa the Tungsten Lump jives three times the
amount of light of a carbon lamp on the oame consumption of
current.
USE CONTINUOUS WIBE DRAWN FILAMENT LAMPS.
Thla type ie the only claee of Tungeten Lamp you ahould uee. Don't
fill to aek for It when you buy Tangeteni. It beare the earns relation to other typee of Tungetena ae doea tho beet grade of eteel to
WE CARRY AT OUR 8ALE8R00MS A FULL LINE OP THE
BEST TYPE OP TUNGSTEN LAMP8 AS NOTED ABOVE. OUR
PRICES ARE EXCEPTIONALLY LOW WHEN THE HIOH STANDARD OF OUR LAMPS IS CONSIDERED.
Aek our clerk to demonstrate for you the difference between a
Tungeten and Carbon Lamp uaing the oame amount of current
c«.u..d       n r   FI FPTPIP
ll3SCe.ill.Si.
NeeiDerie
[joh
JOHNSTON & SALSBURY
The Hardwaremen
SUCCESSORS TO
McTAGGART & MOSCROP
We carry a complete line of MECHANICS' GOODS, including SANDS' LEVELS. FRISCO MASONS' TAPE.
STANLEY'S PLANES. LEVELS, etc.. STAR-
REITS FINE TOOLS. SIMONDS' SAWS. CORBIN
LOCKS. SETS.
UNDERWEAR
MEN'S BALBHIQQAN UNDERWIAR
At No. and 78c. per garment.
BRITANNIA
Light Woollen Underwear—Just right for this warm weather
LIQHT WIIOHT UNION 0UIT8
From 11,00 per Suit up.
 X B. V. 0. UNDERWEAR
With Short Sleeves and Knee Length Drawers, 71c. per garment.
CLUBB & STEWART, Ltd.
Tel, gey, nt US-SIS HAOTINOO OTRIIT W.
Some people may think this great painstaking unnecessary, but we
don't.	
If you think it worth your while to have clothea made better without
adding to their price, you will wear1 one of our Suits and Overcoata
this season.
shop of FASHION-CRAFT
THOS. FOSTER & CO, LTD.
514 GRANVILLE STREET
STOVES and RANGES
EVERYTHING FOR THE KITCHEN
Mount PleauBt headquarters ior Carpenters' Tools ud til
kinds of Builders' snd Contracton' Supplies
W.R. OWEN & MORRISON
Phots Fair. 447. 2337 Main atreet
THL CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
Capital ~— $11,000,000        Rest   112,000,000
Main Office: Corner Haatinga and Qranvllle Streets, Vancouver.
CITY BRANCHES LOCATION
HASTINOS anl CAMBIE. Cor. Haatinga aim Cambie Streets,
HAST END ........... Cor. Pender and M.in streeta.
COMMERCIAL DRIVE Cor. Firm Avenue end Commercial Drive,
TMSEF&jrrzrSm £°r' !!."£ *»•»»• »"d Oranvllle street.
MOUNT PLEASANT Cor. Eighth Avenue and Main Street.
KITBILANO Cor. Fourth Avenue and Tew Street.
POWELL STREET Cor. Victoria Drive tnd Powell Btreet.
SOUTH HILL Cor. Forty-fourth Avenue and Fraaer Road.
Alao North Vanoouver Branoh, eor.   Lonsdale  Ave.   and   Eaplanade.
■ ■. nrwawf'Trnwfi
ABE YOU REGISTERED?
No Excuse Now for Any Qualified
Voter Being Off the List.
In answer to a communication from
the parliamentary committee of the local Central Labor body, Mayor Baxter
announces that arrangements have been
made to keep the city clerk's office open
for the registration of voters, between
the hours of 7:30 and 9 o'clock every
evening, except Saturday. The new arrangement went into effect last Wednesday. Every qualified municipal
voter in Vancouver should avail himself
or herself of the opportunity provided
for registration. There is now no excuse but negligence.
No New Discovery.
The United States Commission on Industrial Relations at its recent session
in Lead, S. D., discovered that 3000 employees of the Homestead Mining Company are practically slnves. The testimony showed that no employee is permitted to enjoy the right of membership in a labor organization. Applicants
for employment must submit to a physical examination and must state their
political affiliations.
The rapid increase of armaments
could only end one way—the way it has
done. A man cannot stand on tiptoe
beyond a certain length of time. Military competition could scarcely have
been pushed further. There had to be
a let-up—or bust up. The proximate
cause—Austria's irritation against Ser-
via—was trivial enough. But the real
cause was national jealousy, suspicion
and hatred—carefully nursed and exploited everywhere by the military
class and the noisy few who find a proflt in war. The grand stook in trade
of these formenters of war is that of
false patriotism which is merely a modern extension of the tribal sentiment
that made the Indian who lived on the
south side of the creek consider it a
pious duty to kill one living on the
north side whenever he got a chance.
Whatever the cost of this war there
will bo another some day . if racial
hatred iB allowed to be cultivated by
those who profit from it.
It is civilization that is being shot
down by machine guns in Europe.
There are Erlichs serving as privates in
the ranks and in the French corps are
Rostands. A bullet, then, not only kills
a man, it destroys a generation of
learning, annihilates the mentality
which was about to be humanity's instrument in unearthing another of nature's secrets. The very vehicles of
progress are the victims. It will take
years to train their equals, decades perhaps to reproduce the intelligence that
was ripe to do its work. The chanceB
of tho acquisition of knowledge are being sacrificed. Far more than half of
the learning on which the world depends for progress is turned from la-
bratories and workshops into the de
structive, arena of batle.
Britlah Columbia potatoes won the
Stlllwell $1,000 cup In 1912 at New
York City, U.SJA., for the best collection of potatoes. Open to the whole
continent of America.
England's workingmen have allowed
themselves to be half starved to death
on condition that they be permitted to
go to Hyde park on Sundays and talk
their heads off.
By Christmastime there will be more
workers praying to employers for jobs
than the number praying to Heaven for
peace.
MINARD'S  LINIMENT  CURES
COLDS, ETC.
Karl MalloTBkl Wanted.
If any reader knows the whereabouts
of a carpenter named Karl Mallevski,
or if this should meet his eye, communicate at once with the B. C. Federationist. Information to give which will
be to his advantage.
Minard's Liniment Co.,
Gentlemen.—I have used MINARD'S
LINIMENT on my vesflel and ln my
family for years, and for the every day
Ills and accidents of life I consider lt
has no equal.
I would not start on a voyage with
out lt, tf It cost a dollar a bottle.
CAPT. P. R. DBSJARDIN,
Schr. "Storke," St. Andre, Kamouraska.
New Conditions Call
for New Methods
FRED PERRY
The Labor Temple Tailor
Completes plans to produce
Custom (trade Suits of British Woolens at
LOWER PRICES
The only thing cheapened in
the Suite will he the price.
I have installed in my larger
premisea in the Lahor Temple,
power machinery. I have also
organized a specialized system
ln which all operations at an
stages will be conducted and
supervised by skilled
Membera of the Local Tailora'
Union.
I expect by these methods to
produce Suits at (30, $32.50 and
$35 that will compare favorably
with the very best gradea of
Suits secured under the old hand
craft system previously adhered
to. i
The quality of tbe fabrics employed will be the very beBt that
money can buy—the only kind
that a man of limited means can
afford to buy—The Beat Britlah
Woolens.
I respectfully solicit your business.
New Fall SuKlngs and Overcoatings now ready for your
inspection
UNION LABEL
on all Parity Clothes
FRED PERRY
LABOR TEMPLE
MINARD'S LINIMENT CURES
DIPHTHERIA
Stock Dinnerware
We have a' flne selection of open
stock dinnerware patterns. Tou
can purchase these as you require.
Sold by the dozen' or by the piece.
MILIAR A COE    120 Hutiap St. W.
What Everybody Should Know
MEN'S NEW NOBBY SUITS can he bought at BRUMMITT'8 from
♦10.00 up to 130.00        And they are worth*, more
HATS, bearing the onion label, at 12.00, $2.50,13.00.
8HOE8, sll makes ud prices, bearing the label, at "live and let live
prices, $2.00 up to S8.00
CHIPPEWA SHOES It *7.00, 18.00 and $10.00
W. B. BRUMMITT
18-20  CORDOVA  ST. W.
101-4 BANK w OTTAWA BUILDING
602 Hainan Street Watt
DR. BRETT ANDERSON, Dentist
Operates by die latest, saost scleno'Sc sad painless methodi
Specialist is Crown, Bridie, Plate ud Cold Inlay Work
HOURS 10 AM. TO 4 P.M.
BRITISH COLUMBIA LAND
Splendid opportunities in Mixed Farming, Dairying,
Stock and Poultry.   British Columbia Grants Preemptions of 160 acres to Actual Settlers
 FREE
TERMS—Residence on the
land for at least three years;
improvements to the extent
of $5 per acre; bringing under cultivation at least five
acres.
For further information apply to
Deputy Minister of Lands, Victoria, B.C.
Secretary, Bureau of Provincial Information, Vi
Brown Bros. & Co. Ltd.
Florists and Nursery Men
tl Haetlnsc et.
THMI STORIS IN VANCOUVER
Phene Ssy. NS 401 Qnmllle St      Phene Sey. 1717
nt Oranvllle St.    Phone Sey. N1I
flCTOHU STOM, 111 VUtW ST.
OMBNXOUSBS
Slat Ave. aas Mala et. Vleterle, a. O.
Phene Mlnaoat fM.
HimmenS, I. Q,
■——
IT
1——-
Phone:  Fairmont 810
i
Patterson& Chandler
Manufacturers of
MONUMENTS
Vaults, Curbing, Etc.
Office and Works:
Cor. 16th AVe. and Main St.
Branch Ofllce: 40th & Fraser Aves.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
/<£*?
&Mi "V/M
PRESIDENT
5U5PENDER
DsconifoloiallyGuranteed
"WttMielnayaawiadus
'HEADQUARTEftV I
In the heart of the retail district. Abs
fireproof and modem in every respect.    (,—,-
unexcelled.  European plan, $1 lo $3 per day.
FREE AUTO 'BUS MEETS ALL TRAINS.  Owned ut |
aperaled by  "The Provincial Holcla  Company.  Limited.
HOWARD I SH.EEHW, P""*"
If you are one
who doesn't know
the wonders of the Blue Amberol
played.on an Edison Cylinder
Phonograph. Let ui show you
what you are misting. We've
been in business a long time, Mr.
Reader. No one knows the
talking machine line belter than
we do. We've watched the
Edison develop until to-day we
unhesitatingly claim it to be the
most perfect on th: market today. You'll not lose anything
by hearing it. We'll arrange
terms to suit
THE
KENT
PIANO CO. Ltd.
558 GRANVILLE ST.
NO
ROOM FOR
THE HINDU
IN OUR
FACTORY
We Don't Employ Asiatics!
BOYS—When you want any Paint, Stain,
Enamel, Varnish, Wall Finish, White Lead
or anything else in the Paint Line, demand
goods made by us.
WE GUARANTEE THEM
BRITISH AMERICA
PAINT COMPANY, Ltd.
Victoria   Vancouver   Calgary
Edmonton
THE POPULAE PRICED, EUROPEAN PLAN
HOTEL RITZ
VICTORIA, B.C.
FORT ST., AT DOUGLAS
RATES 75c, $1.00, $1.26, $1.60, $2.00
C. J. LOVEJOY, MOR. FREE AUTO BUS
HOTBL BBOBWT
Absolutely Fireproof. Local and Long-Distance Phone In Every Boom.
<'ufe tn Connection. Rates $1.00 per day up. Attractive Ratea to Permanent
Guests.—Gottlnffham ft Beatty. Proprietors.
ItMlkes The Mountain Smile.
PHONE
Seymour
9288
"-*""- ____
WESTERN CANADA LIQUOR CO.
LEE R. BARKLEY, Agent
137 WATER STREET

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