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The British Columbia Federationist Apr 2, 1915

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THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATTO
pTOUSTBIAL U/ ■£? : S'l*BEnf}TH.5i
OFFICIAL PAPEB: VANCOUVEB TBADBS AND LABOB COUNCIL AND B.C. FEDERATION OF LABOB
►politioai, matt t VICTOBT
pVENTF^flAR,
No. 14.
VANCOUVER, B. CjPRIPAY, APRIL % 1915
/la Tiaioinr \
$1^0 PER YEAB
m!m for
|Union Signs the Agreement
Providing Belated
Awards
Dead   Austrian's   Dependents Must Wait Until
War is Over
COMMITTEE WUL
.  DEAFT ELECTION
,. OAMPAION PLATFOBM
A Joint meeting of ttae parliamentary committee of Vancourer Trades and Labor councU
and the candidates' campaign
committee will be held in Labor
Temple to-morrow (Saturday) afternoon for tbe purpose of preparing tbe election' platform of tbe
candidate!. Thla was'decided et
ttae parliamentary committee
meeting laet Wednesday night.
All members of both committees
should make lt their special bust
ness to be present. After being
drafted the platform will be submitted to the Trades and Labor
council for lti approval.
In December lust, officers of District
Kfo. 18 and of the Hillcrest union met
(with officials of tbe Hillcrest collieries
nt tbe offices of Judge MacNell at Mac-
leod, and after, negotiations an agree*
[ment nun reached ana was entered in
Hbo district' court  at Macleod on Jan*
liary 22.   The agreement is signed by
lbe union officials, and by the president,
Jmanuging director and secretary-treas-1
[irer of tbe company.  It iejatreed that
■n the discharge of the  liability, the
■bompany shall pay into the office of tbe
Klerk, of the court the sum of $9,000
hnonthly until the liability Is fully paid
1—the flrst payment to be made on June
\\, 1815. "*
Dependents Mut Defray "funerals
An account of all funeral expenses
baid for by tbe company shall be submitted to the district court judge, and
■ipon his approval the amount is to be
HedOctcd from the amount of compensation paid the dependents. *
T The   parties   concerned   recommend
Mat the moneys paid into tke court in
pursuance of the agreement be paid out
Eo the dependents in amounts to \be
■lied at his discretion,   the , following
Tuggestions being made:           '
[ (1) To each widow the sum of 420 a
|aontb.
(2) To each child the sum of (5 per
|nonth. ,
(3) The balance of the said each
1*3,000 to partial dependents until their
Jlaims are fully paid and discharged.
Classes ef Compenaation
There are four schedules included1 in
Ihe agreement.   Schedule   A   Includes
Ihose cases where the full compensation,
hemely, 41,800 is to be paid.   The nnm-
er as included in the schedule attached
i the agreement is 57, though lt is exacted that thia number  mil  be in*
reased when a number of cases of de*
endency which will bave to be gone
ato are proved.
Tha Austrian Vietima
Schedule B comprises 32 cases where
eceased miners were Austriana. Their
Ights have been acknowledged by the
ompnny, but no compensation will be
aid their dependents, wbo reside in
.ustria until peace has been declared
etween that country and Oreat Bri*
lin. Schedule 0 comprises eight cases
presented as those having only partial
(pendents, which are recognized by
it company, but where compensation
ill not bo paid until the matter is ud*
isted.   Schedule E covers all oases in
Eloh dependency will hnve to be prov*
As this is done, the names will be
ansferrcd to schedules A and C. The
.tal number of killed is placed at 189.
Congreu Oommltte* Meets.
The Congress convention committee
eetlng oa Wednesday evening was at-
inded by Dels. J. T. Brooks, macbin-
t»i Andy Qraham, Cooks, Waiters and
'oitresses; John Sully, Laborers, and
. P. Pettipiece, printers. Del. Sully
ras delegated to Took after the $1,000
rant from the city council; Del. Gratia will seek suitable hotel head-
uarters for the convention, and/ Del.
[rooks will be chairman of the sub-corn*
ilttee having oharge of entertainment
f delegates. In view of the absence
I members of the committee it was de-
ided to recommend tnat several more
[(legates be added at the next meeting
f the central labor body, The next
■eetitfg of tho committee will take
lace on Wednesday evening, April 14,
t 7:30 o'clock, ln room 217.
dene te Beep Reward
Frederick W. Taylor, known In tho
ndustrial world as the originator of the
■Taylor" system, died in a Philadelphia hospital last week, after a week's
Illness.
Reports of Unions Show but
Little Improvement Iti
Trade Conditions
Routine Business
Attention of Delegates
at Regular Session
VANCOUVER CITY
WILL STOP
RELIEF
Two Thousand Destitute on
Bread Line To Be
Turned Adrift
Ignore  Officers'  Warning
and Stop Relief
April 5th
"Safety First"
Shop Bules and Bcgnlatloni.
, Every employee whose duty requires
Urn to work with appliances of any
nd muat carefully examine same and
irt any defects.
.igilanoe and   watchfulness   insure
jfety. To avoid danger adopt the safe
bum.   Employes must not trust to
[ho care exercised by   another   when
heir own safety ia involved,
Keep off all railway br crane tracks,
tcept at regular crossings provided for
hat purpose.   Use great care*   Before
rossing   any track, "Stop, Look and
listen.''
Do not turn on any electricity, gu,
team or water, or set in motion any
machinery, or throw down any material,
rithout seeing if anyone is in a pes*
lion to be injured.
Wrestling, throwing of material or
fooling" of any kind la positively
Inhibited.
The rules prescribe tbat all dangerous
aohlnery must be guarded; that all
orklng appliances shall   be   kept in
>od order; that   all   stairways,  plat*
rms and overhead runways shall be
lied; that elevators shall be equipped
lth safety gates at eaeh floor, and
ings or other signals to give warn*
g of the approach of the elevator,
Warning signs and notices are print-
in various languages for the bandit
employees who   cannot   read   ths
glish language.
Hetlce te Advertisers.
htr. 0. Jamleson is ne longer in the
Iploy of The Federetlonlst. Adver-
lere ere asked to govern themselves
fccrdlngly.
FIBST ELECTION
OAMPAION MEETJNO
07 TBADES OOUNOIL
 fi.
, .The flrst meeting of Vancouver
Tradee and Labor council election campaign win ne held in
Leber. Temple next Wednesday
evening at 8 o'clock. The candidates trim have Men selected to
contest Vancouver city will address Uie meeting.. All working
men and women ere invited to be
present,. Miss Helen Outterldge,
the campaign manager, will be In
thechelr.
Vancouver city council decided last
Monday night to cut off the relief
which is now being distributed to nonresident single men, on April Oth. There
are, and have been for some time, 2,000
single men in the bread line working
for the bed and soup tickets handed
out to tbem dally.
Belief Officer's Beport
Mr. Ireland, the relief officer, gave
the information that other cities were
in a similar condition. In Edmonton It
was even more acute aB 1703 single
non-domiciled men were being cared
for there at the present time. In Win*
nipeg they claimed to have only 1006
unemployer and Kamloops with 80 had
been giving assistance throughout the
winter to 80. Victoria had a bread line
of between 1200 and 1600, though officially the oity had not made a report.
Calgary informed him they were* caring
for 220 non-domiciled men, but he had
information from other sources that
1000 single men were receiving assistance from that oity. The men Edmonton was looking after were mostly from
railway construction camps.
The Alberta government notified him
the spring work had not yet started
and the prospects wero that Alberta
had all the workmen it would require.
The Saskatchewan government replied
that the supply of labor was at present
greater than the demand. Where were
these men going when the relief was
cut off! The C. P. B. would not allow
them to cross their bridges and it riding on freight trains bad ever been
winked at, thnt policy had been]
changed in the last few weeks.
Let Bowser Do It
Ur. McVety said it would be a good'
idea to send an advance guard of 400
or SOO to Victoria, giving them their
fares and the address of the Hon. W.
J. Bowser. He agreed with those who
claimed the responsibility belonged to
the provincial government, but he did
not think there was any considerable
body of citizens who wanted to see
these men cast adrift.
Aid. Bogers strongly, contended that
the recommendation to cut out the meal
ticket line on April 1st was fully justified and he objected to an extension to
even April 5th. It was costing the city
♦800 a day to feed these men, most of
thom foreigners.
A Blot Likely
Aid. James expressed the view, judging from the temper of ratepayers in
Ward Five, who came demanding work,
there would be a riot in that quarter
if conditions were not relieved.
Mayor Taylor told the council there
are families where thore were five or
more ohlldren which were actually
starving, and he tea tbat If anybody
must suffer lt was upon .single men
that tbe blow should fall. He had as
many as fifty applications a day made
to him for work from men who wero
citizens, nnd one not long ago told him
ho did not Intend to see bis family
starve, but would take food flrst by
force.
Typoi. In Sesslom
At last Sunday's meeting of the
Typo, union Messrs. Trotter, Wilton
and Corey were eleoted as delegates to
attend the Vancouver convention of the
Northwest Typographical conference,
which will meet in conjunction with tbe
Prefosmen on Monday, April 12th. It
was also decided to levy an assessment
of two per cent, on the entire member*
ship during the month of April for the
purpose of supplementing the relief
fund for out-of-work members. It was
shown by the relief committee that
there wore at least 50 too many printers
in town for the jobs .offering, with very
Utle prospeot of an improvement.. The
Todd case against the union for 410,000
damages, It waa announced, would go
to court on April 12th.
Meeting Stewards Wanted.
It is expected that there will be a
largo atendance' at the Trades and Labor election campaign meeting In Labor
Temple next Wednesday night. Stewards and ushers will be needed to attend to the seating of the audience,
and to make any other prevision for
Its comfort during tho progress of the
meeting. A number have already promised to undertake the duties, and
few more ere needed. All who are
willing to assist shonls come to room
210, Labor Temple, next Tuesday night
at 8 o'clock when final arrangements
will be made.
NEW WESTMINSTER, B. C, March
24.—The regular meeting df, New
Westminster Trades and Labor council
was held this evening, with President
Cropley in the chair.
A communication from the city couneil was read re May-day celebration
request.' Delegate Maiden told of the
attitude of Aid. Melius who said he
would not be dictated to by any public
or semi-public body, and objected to
criticism by them being made of members of the city council. Delegate
Maiden said there waa no dictatorial
note in'the communication sent to tbe
council, and he thought that Aid, Ma*
Hns was going out of Ms way to stir
up unnecessary trouble. Delegate
Stoney said Aid. Melius evidently plays
too much golf, and does not devote
enough time to civic business, and he
should get down to brass tacks, when
he would find out that the people have
say in the business .of the city.
Filed. ,-.
From Bartenders' local of Chicago,
saying Welsh Grape Juice company
had donated 450,000 to the prohibition
fund. Delegate Paulsen said the local
bartenders would not handle the brand
any more and urged the union men to
drink other brands when they took
grape juice. Delegates instructed to
notify their unions tp that effect. Filed.
Beporw
Delegate Stoney. special committee,
said the Royal City hotel was now on
the fair list. Adopted and committee
thanked and discharged.
Delegate Tates told of B. C. Consumers' league, which hell an organization
meeting, elected officers and decided to
recommend that trade be concentrated
in stores that handle B. C. products.
Delegate Knudsen favored home products flrst, and wanted to know if Vancouver bread was union made. Delegate
Tates did hot know, but said he would
find out before the next meeting. Delegate Feeney asked if It would be poll
cy to buy from Vanoouver union men
or from New Westminster non-union
bakeries. . President Cropley said
tronize union men by all means,
ceived and .filed.
Beports ef Unions
Typos.—Same as   usual;   Coquitlam
Star again fair and  published  under
union conditions.
Bartenders—Thanked the Trades and
Labor council committee for its work,
as they were again 100 per cent strong
in the city, with 12 men on the free
list; good as could be expected.
Cigarmakers—Eight working.
Street Railway Employees—Very lit
tie change, six laid1 off, only about 20
out of 300 on full time.
Carpenters—No change.
Electrical Workers—About the same,
six working.
Engineers—No improvement, pretty
punk. Trouble on government dock at
Vancouver being taken np at Ottawa.
Brewery Workers—Business picking
up some.
Molders—Two men working; things
pretty bad. President Cropley said
there should be from 12 to 15 men
working bere instead of two, but the
N. W. Foundry company at Sapperton,
owned by molders who work from 10
to 12 hours per day, and on Saturday
afternoons and Sundays, at a rate of
about $2 per day, was a serious handi
cap to fair concerns, and should be
placed on a fair, competitive basis or
driven out of business.
Timber Workers—No improvement.
Hod Carriers—Three men employed.
Unfinished Business
Delegate Knudsen wanted to know if
Delegate Paulsen has brought in writ
ten charges against him or was willing
to apologize. Delegato Paulsen said it
was out of order, bnt the chair held
otherwise and after considerable argument Delegates Flynn and Klrby moved
that charges made against Delegate
Knudsen had not been substantiated,
and the council exonerates him from all
blame. Delegate Stoney made a point
of order In vain. Delegates Tates and
Rushton moved an amendment—"That
tho council considers the charges
ogainst Delegate Knudsen retracted by
failure of proofs being submitted to
substantiate them. Amendment was
carried—8 to 6.
Delegate Tates reported that there
was a new propsltlon up regarding civic
baby bonds, and on motion of Delegates
Tates and Stoney; tho secretary was instructed to write to the finance committee of the city council to arrange
for the meeting to discuss the matter.
Oood and Welfare
Delegate Tates said that meetings
would be held throughout the province,
Including New Westminster, to consider the attorney-general's Workmen's
Compensation, act, which he said was
the best in the world to-day, and he
hoped that it would Decome law, with
a few changes, but he expected no such
iuck. He hoped workingmen would
attend the meeting here to consider the
bill and offer suggestions.
Delegate Stoney said that the oouncll had often criticized Aid. Goulet in
the post, but now he believed it was
time to hand him a bouquet, because ho
objected to the' School board renting
the high school auditorium In competition with private halls.
Workera Birred from B. O.
Tho order-in-councll prohibiting the
entry at any port in British Columbia
of skilled or unskilled artisans has been
extended from April 1st, the date on
which the prohibition expired, until
September 30th next, a period of six
months. The reason given for the extension is: "The present overcrowded
eenditlon of the labor market in British
Columbia."
W. E. Denning of 'Longshoremen's Union Tendered Nomination
Active Official of Organized
Labor Has Confidence
of Membyship
BAD GOVERNMENT
IEIEC1BY
Parliaments Represent the
Wisdom or Ignorance
of Electors
Working Pass Legislation
Depends Upon Action
of Workers
The local 'longshoremen's strike, as
the result of a reduction of wages,
which has spread to other ports along
the Pacific coaat, has resulted in a number of union officials paying a visit to
Vanoouver. Among them are International President T. IV. O'Connor and
officers of the Paelfle coast district organisation, including Vice-president W.
Denning, of Prince Bupert, upon
whom a good deal of the responsibility
was placed In this district of the organ*
isatlon, and who has worked diligently
to bring about a aettlement. Mr. Denning is also vice-president for the
Prince Bupert district of the B. C. Federation of Labor and an active unionist
in his home town. So much so that he
is being urged by friends to return immediately, where he will be tendered a
nomination on the labor ticket to contest the riding against Wm. Manson,
the sitting Conservative member, and
A. M. Manson, a lawyer and the Liberal nominee. Just' how to get away
from Vancouver at this stage of the
'longshoremen's trouble is the thing
that seems to be bothering Mr. Denning, but he is hopeful that a settlement will be reached in time to make
it possible for him to meet the wishes
of tbe trade unionists of the northern
metropolis. If things break right Mr.
Denning will bo a strong acquisition
to the number of Labor representatives
who will make a try, when election day
rolls round, to secure an effective
means of strengthening the position of
organized labor in this corporation-ridden province.
United Brotherhood ef Carpenters
A meeting ofearpenterswhohavebeen
affiliated with locals No. 617 (city), No.
1435 (North Vancouver), and No. 1208
(South Vancouver) will be held ln
room No. 306, Labor Temple, on Monday, April 5th, at 8 p. m.
Organizer J. A.Kinney has been sent
by the general office to report upon conditions pertaining to the craft in Vancouver. A discussion of the -situation
will take place with a view of determining the best policy to persue in maintaining the organization to its greatest
efficiency.
WHEN A BIG STBIKE takes
place some one Is sure to
suggest compulsory arbitration, so Lloyd George was only following many others when he suggested it
in   his   speech   on
February 28th, as a
means   of ' settling
the  strike   on   the
Clyde.   Now,   compulsory   arbitration
has boen used for some years ln Australia, and to see how it works there at
tho present moment is of interest.   In
a recont issue of the Australian Worker, published   at  Sydney,  tho   editor
says:
Judgo Heydon, of New South
Wales, hns practically abolished
the wage boards of that state. Tho
war, ho said, had created a situation so serious tfiat applications for
increases of wages were entirely
out of the question. In languago
weighted with judicial gravity he
held that no worker with any sense
of bis obligations to the community
would tiBk for a higher price for his
labor just now; and ir any should
be found unpatriotic enough to do
so, that no board could possibly
dreum of granting the request. He
therefore suspended the operations
of wage boards in this respect, and
with a wave of his arm, aB it were,
wiped out of existence legislation
which the workers of New South
Wales had been twenty years in
winding.
Judgo Heydon's decision might have
been expected. The last word is always
with the privileged masses. Trade union leaders and employers meet together to talk things over, but it is always
a nominee of the employing class who
eventually decides. Food hogs may
raiso prices and every necessary of life
may surpass the purchasing power of
wages. But It is the age-old burden of
the working clus to suffer and sacrifice,
that capital may disgorge its insatiable
maw.
.    (y   -
[By Helena Gutteridge.]
Many of us in our very green youth,
thought that in countries where "Britons never will be slaves" was shouted
lustily if not musically, that government meant the making and administration of laws by a group of benevolent gentlemen whom the people elected to do this work, (electing them on
account of their desire to help a struggling humanity.
(Haas Bias of Governments
With this very beautiful theory went
hand in hand a belief that aU "foreign" people were despotically ruled by
self-appointed tyrants, the awakening
came, of course, not all at once, bnt
gradually and somewhat painfully, one
eautlful illusion after another was dispelled and governments and people seen
for just'whet they are, entirely claas,
and self-interested,
Workers Are to Blame
.A great deal has been said daring
the lest few years of the wickedness of
the conservative government in regard
to workingclass legislation and the enforcement of taws for the protection of
the workers. There are use faint echoes
of a like nature in regard te the liberal party when in office. Why complaint The workers are in tbe majority
throughout the province and a majority
of their votea elected conservative or
liberal governments, Why bother about the faults of these governmental
They are both recognized as upholding
the capitalist system, and they would
both do exactly what tney were elected
to do, namely, look after the Interests
of their klnd> and If the workere expect their interests to be attended to
they must do likewise—elect men of
their own kind to sit in the legislature
and attend to the interests of the work*,
ers.
Ignorance ef Voters
When representative government is
mentioned some people smile derisively,
but nevertheless we have " representative " government, representative of
the wisdom or ignorance of the voters
that-elect to office the men who make
the laws which all must live under.
HOW DABE
THETASK
FOB MOBE.
FEDBBATIONIST TO
receive ruins FOB
*      THB OAMPAION
The B. O. Federatloalat If u-
thorfxed by Vancouver Tradee
ud Labor counco, to appeal fer
and receive contributions te the
ororindal (lection campaign fund
of the council. The last time Ths
Federationlit made aVi appeal far
fundi wu fer tbe women and
children of tke striking miners
en Vancouver islsnd. At that
time mere than 17,000* was
relied. All contributions received
will be acknewledged In The Federationlit Send year nbaerlp-
ttoni along. DO IT NOW.
LONGSHOREMEN 1
•Meeting Thursday Decided
to Accept Basis of
Settlement
Further Negotiations Will
. Take Place With
Companies
Working-class Lawi   .
There is an increasing tendency year
by year to enact legislation affecting
the interests of the working olass. But
it depends entirely on the working
class if, in the future,-such legislation
Is to be elected from the point of view
of their own kind, br frbm the point of
view of those whose interests are diametrically opposed.
The Coming Election
The coming provincial election is
both an opportunity and a test, as to
whether the workers are yet awakened
to their own Interests, and are not following the red herrings drawn across
the trail by both of the capitalist parties in the shape of promises of unlimited benefits to be conferred on the
workers, if they will only vote for their
party.
Up te the Workeri
With six labor candidates in the field,
and a majority of the votes to be cast
in the possession of the workers, it will
be somewhat difficult for fault to be
found, if the workers, having a majority of the votes, we find after the
election that Vancouver has returned
either of the capitalist tickets to office.
What are you going to dot
DISTRICT 18 AGREEMENT
Possible Badi of Terms Upon Which
Settlement May Be Beached
While it is not possible as yot to say
what aro tho exact terms of the suggested now agreement submitted to the coal
miners of the Crow's Nest valley, the
following report from Calgary gives a
hint as to the likely basis of settlement:
"The conference'of tho Wostorn Canada Coal Operators' association, and
the representatives or district No. 18,
United Mino Workers of America, who
havo been engaged in a verbal tug-of-
war for the last fow wooks in Calgary, fraught wtth the fato of 6,000
mlneworkers in Alberta, ended yesterday in a settlement.
"Tho new agreement to replace the
old one, expiring March 31, will bo
substantially tbo same as to conditions
and wage scale, with some slight modifications and adjustments.
"Instead of running for four years,
as the old, lt will run for two years.
"The whole thing has still to be mod
ifled by the unions by n ballot of the
men.
"If it gets a general endorsement,
thero will be a final meeting of the operators and men at Frank on March
31st, to complete final arrangements for
the ngreement, which will go into force
next day."
Later Advices Received
According to advices received just
provious to going to press, and since
the foroging was received the following
has reached us:
"The referendum taken by the miners yesterday shows that by about 5 to
2 the men are in favor of continuing at
work and accepting the new agreement
arrived at in Calgary between their representatives and tho operators. So far
as can be figured only two campa voted
against the ngreement. It flailed to
flnd favor In Bellevue and Blalrmorc,
but in fernle, Hlllcrest and other
camps the sentiment was overwhelmingly in favor. The result at Coalburat
is in doubt, but it la believed the result
there was against tho adoption of the
agreement. A large vote was polled at
all campa."
Vancouver Longshoremen have been
on strike since the beginning of March
whan their wages were reduced 25 to
80 per cent, by the local atevedorlng
—impanies. '
After failure to settle locally, the or*
ganlzatlon extended its efforts te other
ports on tke Pacific cout below the international boundary-line, aad-all vm*
wis which arrived in these ports, and
which had been loaded at Vancouver
by strike-breakers were boycotetd by
the union men down there.
That   produced   a situation    	
brought the companies into a mora reasonable frame of mind. In the meantime, Mr. T. V. O'Connor, the Inter*
national president of the Longshoremen
arrived in Vancouver thla week and
took up the question with the companies
Terms ef Settlement.
The result of thie was that the Longshoremen held a meeting laat Thursday afternoon whloh contlnuod with ono
Interval for food, until 11.80 that night.
The outcome, of the gathering waa
that they decided to return to work
the following day at noon.
It la stated that the basis of settlement is that all strike-breakers who
have been taken on in place of the
union men will be discharged. Work
on deep sea vessels will be at the same
rate of wagee which prevailed before
the tronble.
Wages and conditions relating to
work on coast-wise vessels and on piling und trucking work, are to be subject of further conferences between
the representatives of the companies
and the longshoremen. This arrangement was agreed by a majority of]
seventeen In the meeting.
VANCOUVER TRADES
COUNCIL MET
LAST NIGHT
First   Election   Campaign
Masting is Next
Wednesday
Federationist   Win   Tate
Subscriptions for
Campaign
"Inquest Net Necessary."
Struck on tho head by a falling limb
from a tree which he, in company with
another man was falling, O. Hansen
sustained a fractured skull, and died be*
fore reaching tho hospital on Monday.
Tho accident occurred at McNnugh-
ton's camp,'near Pender harbor, where
deceased was employed as a logger, and
tho injured man was rushed to the harbor hospital, but died before reaching
that Institution. Tbe romainB were
brought to this .city, but an inquest was
not considered nocessary by Coroner
Jeffs.
A fairly good attendance of delegatee
was present laet night at the meeting
of the Vancouver Trades and Labor
council. A few new delegates w(jre
seated.
The executive' committee reported
having received a letter from a worker
on the Kettle Valley railroad, reporting '
tbat Chinese cooks were being employed
contrary to, the lew in respect to government subsidized railroads. The letter waa referred to Attomey-generel
Bowser.
Delegates McVety, Outterldge aoi
Trotter were electid to represent tke
council at the annual meeting bf tke
Civic Belief auociation nut Friday.
ParUamantary Oommlttee
- The report of the committee, whieh
Waa   adopted,  recommended that Ota
Suestlon of nominating a candidate fee
ichmond riding be laid over for twb
Weeks. Tke commltt» win meet in tor
turn Wednesday nights before the regular eouncil meetings.
Election Campaign
The provincial electron campaign !
committee reported that it had decided
to hold tho first public meeting in th(
tabor Temple next Wednesday night,
when the candldatea of the Trades and
Labor council will address the meeting.
Council's Election Platform
The following waa adopted by the
council aa tha first clause of its (lection platform: "Independent polttuel
action In tke interests of ths working
claas, for th( purpose of carrying Inte -
effect the legislative proposals of Vea-
wUeh|eouver Trades apd Labor counoll."
New Butae*
Ths Tradea end Labor congreu re- **
caption committee reported having
made progress in plans for tha congress convention here in September. A
lengthy discussion took place about jitney bus regulation. The payment of
wagea lower than the schedules provide^
on the government dock job at the foot
of Salsbury drive, has been made the
aubject of further protest by Preeldent
MeVety, according to a latter read by
htm to tke meeting.. Protect wae made,
against the elty council cutting off relief to single men next Monday.
Send Funda to Federatlonist.
The B. C. Federationist was instructed to publish an appeal for funds to assist in financing the Trades and Labor
council provincial election campaign.
All money thus received will be acknowledged in the paper.
Disorder at Bowler's Meeting.
President McVety, just before the.
meeting closed, said: "I want to take
exception to the Impression tbat may be
gathered from newspaper reports that
members of organized labor were responsible for the disorder which took
place at the meeting held in Labor
Temple last night. Then were very
many union men there, but they had
come to hear whet waa to be said about
workmen's compensation, and were not
responsible for the disturbance. That
was caused by a minority of people who
had grievances against the government
on account of the Dominion Trust."
Several other delegates expressed the
opinion that the incidont was like presenting Bowser with an argument in
favor of suppressing free speech.
Probable Election Date,
If there Is such a thing possible as
being able to sort out an Intelligible
forecast from the myriad of political
rumors in Vancouver it Ts probable that
an'announcement of the date of the
provincial general elections will be
mado during the coming week, for
some time early next month. The whereabouts of one Sir Biohard McBride
seems to be bothering the old party
politicians.
Seattle Streetcar Strike
According to news advices a striko
was callod last Tuesday night of tho
carmen in the employ of tho Puget
Sound Traction, Light ond Power com
pnny in Seattle. Tho step was token
aftor a mass meeting by the Trades and
Labor Counoll thero. Later reports
state tho call was unsuccessful.
Congress Convention Edition.
The Federatlonist has bcon compelled
to abandon tho idea of getting out a
daily morning papor during the September convention of tho Trades and Labor Congress of Canada in Vancouvor.
Instead n special edition will bo Issued,
to be printed on book paper, for general distribution.
Musicians to Put on a Dance.
Tho Musicians' union report trado
conditions very dull, but the member*
ship are filling most of tbe engagements
open. It is the intention of tho officers, says Secretary Braafiold, to give
a dance at an early dato, probably
April 15th. They Intend to mako it the
best yet.
OOAL MINEBS AMALGAMATE
Big Section AnitreUen Unlona Decide
to Federate
[Special Australian Correspondence]
'SYDNEY, N. S. W„ March 10.—All
tho coal miners' unions of the Australian commonwealth wave decided to
amalgamate. During last wcok representatives from Victoria, Tasmania,
Queensland, South Australia, West Australia, and N. K. Wales met and (lis*
cussed tho amalgamation schemes. They
decided to amalgamate and drew up
drnft rules. This i» n direct move in the
direction of the "big union" movement inaugurated by the Austrailan
Workers' union. Big unionism is the
Watohword of the future now in Australia.
Still No Work for the Workless.
The wot weather of the past week
hns not helped to jmprovo tho unemployed problem any in the coast cities.
Hero and thero a little work has been
started, but there Is nothing Uke
onottgh to guarantee evon a subsistence
to thoso in need. Every institution in*
Vnncouver is still taxod to the utmost
in nn endeavor to meet tho situation.
The city .will discontinue relief work
for more than 1,500 singlo transient
workers on Monday noxt. Just how they
will mako out remains to be seen. Em*
ployers gcnorally, with a few notable
exceptions, are taking full advantage of
tho necessities of the workless to out
wages and prolong tho hours of labor.
TMe workers generally nre In a critical
framo of mind. And thoy have much
reason to bo.
Labor Tsmple Directors' Meeting.
Tho regular monthly meeting of Vancouver Labor Temple Co., Ltd., directors, usually held the flrst Friday of
eaeh month, has been postponed until
next Tuesday evening.
Toronto Street Eallwaymen.
Toronto Straet Banwaymco's union
is kcoplng those of its members who
hnvo gono to the war In good standing.
Prassmcni' Organizer Here
Charles Hall, representative of the
pressmens' union was a visitor In Vancouver during the week, on official business.
Building Bate Falling.
During March this year Vancouver
issued 75 building permits valued at
630,015, ns against 178 Issued March
Inst year, valued at (568,845. During
tho three months ending March 81 this
year, 192 permits were Issuod valued at
(271,037. Laat year for the corresponding period the number was 417 valued
nt (1,042,438. It will be seen from
thoso figures that tbo building trade ts
doad.
"Ledger" Editor a VlHtor.
J. W. Bennett, editor-manager of the
District Ledger, Fernio, waa a visitor at
tbo Labor Temple during the wmk. He
is over on the coaat on ledge businsss.
He left for home yesterday.
••■ -'"'
**r . -1 ^f
PAGE TWO
THE BRITISH COfiUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FBIDAY X.......... APBIL 2, 1915
INOOEPOBTED 1856
THE
MOLSONS
Bank
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93 Branches In Canada
A genual banking business transacted.  Circular letters ef credit.
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Interest allowed at highest
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of Canada
INCORPORATED 1M»
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Reeerve      12,100,1X10
Tetel Aeeete 180,000,000
WE ALLOW INTEREST ON DEPOSITS IN OUR
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DEPARTMENT
One   Dollar will   open  i
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TH-fBTEEN BBANOHEB IN
VANCOUVEB
THE
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Assets.
.   ..160,000,000
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Paid-up Capital 15,000,000
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IM HASTINOS STBBBT WEST
ud
doner Hutlngi end Carrall lti.
THE B. C. FEDERATIONIST
Publlihed (very Friday morning by tha
B. C. Federatlonist, Ud,
B. Farm Pettlpleoe.
3. W. Wilkinson....
Office: Room 217, Labor Temple
Tei.  Exchange Sey. 7495.
Subscription: 81.50 per year: (n Vancouver
City, 82.00; to unlonsAibscrlbing
In a body, 81.Ho
REPRE8ENTATVE8
New Westminster.. .W. E. Haldol, Box ll(
Prince Rupert. ... .W. E. Denning. Box 681
Victoria A. 8. Walls, Box 1888
Affiliated with tbe Weitern Ubor Pros!
Association.
"Unity of Labor; the hope of ths world."
FBIDAY   APBIL 2, 1915
M'
BOWSEB'S
BEDLAM
MEETINO
B. BOWSEB'S MEETINO ln
Vancouver Labor Temple last
Wednesday night, was a disappointment to those members of organized labor who have been waiting for
an opportunity of
criticising his pro*
poBed Workmen's
Compensation act in
public, and telling
him what they
think of it. It was also a disappointment to a large number of union men
who went there to hear what he had to
offer in the way of legislation which
has occupied a prominent place in union meeting discussions for the past
year or two.
e
AU- such expectations were unsatisfied as the result of the disturbance
which characterized the meeting from
start to finish. The majority of it
seemed to come from critics of the government's action in respect to the Do
minion Trust scandal. They have a
grievance and a genuine one too, but
how that grievance could be discussed-
in the face of the pandemonium which
prevailed, heaven only knows.
#   .    #        •        •
If they had wanted to see Bowser
put on the grill, they would have received satisfaction from the flaying
which had been prepared for him on the
subject of workmen's compensation,
Members of organized labor had been
getting ready, ever since it was an*
nounced by the Conservation association that he would speak, to give him
one of the severest gruellings of his
life. But that waB rendered useless by
the element whloh would not allow him
to speak.
....
The main kick we have against that
British Columbia
LAND
Splendid opportunities in Mixed
Farming, Dairying, Stock end
roultry. Britlah Columbia
Grants Pre-emptiona ot 160 acres
to Actual Settlers—
Free
TEBM8—Residence on the land
for at leut three years; Improve*
mente to the extent of 65 per
acre; bringing nndar cultivation
at leaat five acrac.
For further Information apply to
DEPUTY MZHISIBB OF
LANDS VIOTOBIA, B.O.
SEOBBTABT, BUBEAU OF
PBOVINOIAL INFOBMATION,
VIOTOBIA, B.O.
G
— paid-up union oard tntltlas
you fo all ths_ privileges of ths
Labor Tomplo Olub.   Try lt
look like a martyr, and instead of taking vojes away from him, we believe it
makes votes. What we want is
chance to get at him in the open, with
the opportunity of proving by argu-
ment and orderly discussion that, during the time he has heen in office, he
has been the consistent opponent of the
working class upon every occasion when
it has tried to make a step forward.
WATOH
FOB THE
RESULTS
APBIL 1ST, ALL POOLS DAT,
was a very appropriate day for
those city council wise-acres to
pick out who want to cut off the food
relief which is now being given to the
2,000 starving and
workless men who
stand in Vancouver
-city bread line eaeh
day. Aldermen like
Mr. Rogers, in
whom the property instinct is the dominant characteristic, seem to think that
all they have to do is to atop the relief
and thereby abolish the cause which
makes men seek it.
• •      •      •
It is the shallowest of shallow-minded
ideas, and we firmly believe the results
will prove our opinion true. We know
the nature of workmen a great deal
better than most city aldermen, and we
do not believe that 2,000 men stand in
the bread line daily; and undergo all
the indignities whioh such an ordeal involves, unless' they are absolutely
forced by sheer want of tread to do so.
To talk as some aldermen did, about
these unfortunates going elsewhere, was
fools" chatter in face of the figures
presented to them by Belief Officer Ireland.
* t      •      «
He proved conclusively that Winnipeg, Edmonton, Calgary, Kamloops and
other cities in western Canada, are
filled with unemployed men. Even if
they were not, how are starving workless dead broke men to get to those
places! By boating their way on the
C. P. B., and being thrown into some
companyf The reason most of these
country? The reason most of these
men are here is because the real estate
interests and the provincial government spent money and did all they
could to get them to come here when
times were good. Now let them look
after them. If they do not, we prophecy it will cost them far more than
the $800 per day .which is now being
distributed in the shape of food.
SUFFRAGETTES
AND COMING
ELECTIONS
VOTES FOB WOJIEN is a question which, from all present appearances, the various local societies of suffragettes intend to make
an iBsue in the coming political campaign. The women
are already, preparing to secure a public expression pf
opinion on the subject Jrom overy candidate. That is alright so far. But
having obtained those answers what do
they propose to db about itf Piously
to file them away, along with the rest
of the polite platform lies of old party
politicians f Tho candidates of Vancouver TradeB and Labor Council were
asked what would be their attitude to
women's suffrage, if elected. Naturally
the answer given was the only one
which organized labor knows to such
a question—that women have an equal
right to the political franchise, , with
men. Both in its political and industrial organizations the labor movement
has proclaimed its belief in and support
of that principle so often, that it is
common knowledge now among all who
take active and intelligent interest in
the world's affairs. This question from
the women is very reasonable and right.
It merits both an answer and a question.
■  •      •      «      •    .
The answer iB already given. The
question is. what use have the majority
of the women active in the suffrage
movement for the labor movement, beyond the willingness to accept its help
without feeling the least interested in
its objects? What support would they
give to the candidates of the labor
movement in their; effort 'to achieve
success at the polls? Where will they
be found working and using their influence on election day! On the side of
the working clasB candidates? Some of
them may. But not the majority. The
majority are not well enough informed
on tho more important questions and
movements of the day to understand
the significance of the labor movement
or the desire of the working class to acquire more political power. They are
swayed by personal preferences, not by
considerations of principle, and the
term "workingman" is associated in
their minds with something which is
not fitted to enter the larger affairs of
life. We might get sentimental, and
slop over, and pretend we believe things
to be different. But we won't. Because we don't. Just the same, the
labor movement will go on supporting
votes for women, and in the hope that
the Woman'a Movement and Underlying also the idea of a Federation,
and United States of the World,
namely, the religious principle of
the sacredness of human life and
the political principles of democracy. The Americans in Colorado,. I said, have solved this problem, so apparently impossible to the
"Powers" of Europe, of bringing
into the body politic the two'halves
of the human race, and thus forming a vital union of men and women in government.
Oh, it's alright. Votes for women Ib
a great idea, and a great ideal if—
well, Colorado explains the rest.
GAUGING
THE
LIMIT.
is, that it has the effect or making hint! 1^ Umfl wiU co'mfl when ^ *
IaaIf    l&lrA-   n    -mnvi+vn.     n-nrt    inflfanH    n-F   4nlr_ , -
element among the suffragettes
will have less "superiority," and
more intelligent grasp of the precise position of their Bex in the economic system of our time. VOTES FOB WOMEN.
M'
FEMININE
SUFFBAOE
IN OOLOBADO.
'Votes for Women,'
MONEY
TO LOAN
In multiples of $5,000 at 8% on inside
revenue producing business property.
Our client will only consider property
that is now paying its way.
(Canadian Financiers Trust Company
HEM) OFFICE 839 HASTINGS ST. VV.     VANCOUVER. B.C.
Patrick Donnelly-General Manager
ES. PETHICK LAWRENCE,
the well-known and ardent advocate of votes for -British
woolen, is in British Colombia and is
expec.ted to speak here shortly. On her
way through the
United States to the
Pacific coast she
visited Denver, Colorado, and in a
cent issue of
tells how sho was
invited to address the house of representatives of that state, and did so. Eer
account of the experience, makes it perfectly plain that she deemed it no small
honor-to address such an assembly,
especially as women have had the vote
in Colorado for the past twenty-one
years and are numbered among the representatives in both the upper and
lower houses of the Legislature. It was
evidently a most delightful experience
for a very charming woman, who is obviously not averse to being lavishly
complimented upon her ability to voice
the cluiras of the oause in whioh she
has labored so long and well. The
"honorable members" positively
eclipsed themselves in the congratulations they showered' upon her at the
close of her speech.
But apparency she forgot something,
or else did not know. Surely it must
have been that she forgot, for all the
world rang less thai! a year ago with
the shame and infamy of Colorado
when, at the behest of the authorities,
the state militia, ana -hired gunmen of
the Bockefeller interests, shot down the
women' and children of the striking
miners at Ludlow. Tbey shot the miners too, but we will not dwell on thoir
case so much as on that of the women
and children, because we feel their fate
would appeal to Mrs. Lawrence most.
In one blaok hole in the earth after the
massacre of Ludlow finished, no less
than twenty charred bodies of women
and babies were found. They had been
put there by the miners to save them
from the bullets of the mllltla, tnij to
be smothered and roasted alive by tha
fire which burnt up the camp.
1   .      •      .      .
Mrs. Lawrence never yet had—and
never will have—a better opportunity
to champion the cause of her sex than
when Invited to address that house. As
the'western slang has it, "it was right
Into hor mit." She is a clever and
powerful speaker, and taongu it is hardly likely she could have shamed the
honorable members," she could have
made them wish they had invited
Christ himself to speak to them about
what had been done to -'these my
littlo ones," rather -than her. Imagine
what Mother Jones would have donel
But apparently Mra. Lawrence wasted
her golden hour, for in her account of
her speech she says:
I went on to refer to the two
fundamental principles underlying
THE END   OP   THE   WAB will
come, regardless of whether or
not the official ideals for which
the* variouB   nations   are   supposed to
have entered it, have been attained or
not.   To smash the
semi-feudal  militarism of Germany. To
relieve    the.   Slav
from    the    Teuton
yolk.   To  maintain
the sacredness of treaties, and the inviolability ot smaller nations. All these
reasons and any others used for the purposes of the moment, will have to stand
aside and take a bncR seat when the
international Shylocks who are  financing the business cry Holdl   The masses of the common people in each of the
belligerent countries may plunge into
a veritable riot of war iremty.   They
may talk about the last man, and the
last gun, ahd the last drop of blood, and
use all (he rest of the pitifully theatrical terms so popular at such times.   But
they will have nothing to do with it
really.   It is their business to do
they are told, and keep on doing it,
and dying in the doing of it, until they
are told to stop.   They must like it,
otherwise it could not be.
«...
But none of- the nations will be exterminated. They will not be reduced
to that condition where they cease to
have corporate entity capable of being
held responsible for debt. Even Turkey will not be allowed to fall so low
as that. She owes too much money.'
A good deal of it to British bond-holders. And so do all the countries involved. They are mortgaged to each
other and interest is greater than all
else in the eyes of international financiers. The whole question is put very
plainly by the London "Economist"
in its leading editorial last Saturday.
It says:
"As soon as the main issue for
which we are fighting can be achieved it is just as muoh the duty
of every statesman to make, peace
as it was in the view of Sir Edward.
Grey to make war at the end of
July lost. The time may come before long when it will be possible
to consult the.dictates of humanity
and at the same tame secure the
objects indicated by Sir fdward
Grey. If such an opportunity Ib lost
the -#ar will not go on forever. It
will end in revolutionary chaos, be-
- ginning no one knows where and
ending in no one can say what!"
In other words, care must be taken
not to kill the goose which layB the
golden eggs.
«...
Just by tho way, what is "the main
issue for which we are fighting'" At
the outset of the war all the newspapers were full of arguments in favor of
fighting to preserve the integrity, and
to avenge the fate of Belgium. But
now one reads more about the need of
fighting to capture German trade. Elaborate statistics have -oeen compiled
and published, shewing how that end
may be achieved. British workmen
have been asured that a golden future
awaits them if they will voluntarily
take their part in the task of conquering these hitherto inaccessible spheres
of economic influence. This argument
has been labored so much of late that,
the junkers of trade have come to be
looked upon by thousands of thinking
people as being as much of an anti-
progressive element as the military
junkers of Germany. The war has been
waged with such bitterness and intensity that,tho thin film of idealism
which deceived many at the start has
been entirely destroyed; and the war
appears as a titanic struggle for the
material advantages which are ■■ to be
obtained from domination of the
world's trade.
But the money merchants will not let
it go to that degree wnere it threatens
to pormanontly rob them of their usury.
Thnt is what thoy moan by "the dictates of humanity." If humanity*really waa the prime consideration, the war
should be stopped now before the millions of lives nre lost which are going
to'the slaughter during tne coming Bummer. But it is not. -And the coming
misery is not tho main factor in the
business. The last sentence in the excerpt we quoto is the keynote to the
situation. There are already signs that
in Europe defeat and destitution are
bringing somo of the combatant states
perilously close to internal revolution,
with its consequent possibility of dissolution and repudiation of the war
loans lent by financiers to those states.
And when they figure that the limit of
risk in that respect haB been reached
"the dictates of humanity" will be
called in to proaerve the governments
from destruction which nave guaranteed the loans. The money bugs do not
intend to take any chances on the possibility of the proletariat being driven
to the desperation where its eyes might
be opened to the real enemy.
We are told that Christ died pretty
near 2,000 years ago today to save the
world from itself and its-sins. Take*-a
look at Europe to-day. Calvary and
Golgotha were pleasant compared to it.
Millions of dollars worth of mankill-
ing contrivances are .being made at
Bethlehem,.U. S. A., by the steel trust
for the armies of Europe. This isn't
the Bethlehem where Christ was born.
All official denials which may be
to the contrary, one of the chief reasons why Bev. Dr. Mackay would not
accept nomination from Vancouver Liberals wai that ht insisted upon Balph
Smith being "ditched," as he did not
consider his political record wu one
which justified o parson going into the
same party with him.
Most of the British newspapers speak
in terms of strong condemnation now
that workmen are asking a better price
for their labor power, Because they believe for one thing that the market will
Btand for it. But we have yet to see
in any of those organs any expression
of disapproval of the shipping hogs and
others who are strangling the life out
of working class wages by raising the
price of food stuffs.
The United Mine Workers' Magazine
records that a Mr. Conrad- of Falmouth,
Kentucky is fifty-nin- -rears old, and
that he and his wife have had fifteen
children. Tho thing this fellow is alleged to be most proud of is, thtt the
family cradle waB never empty for
thirty years. To us the boast sounds
like the merest ignorant animalism. We
would much rather hear what Mrs.
Conrad has to say about that never-
empty cradle.,
Harry Cowan waa one of the nominees put forward as a suggested candidate at the Liberal convention in Vancouver this week. He nae a long and
honorable record both in the Typographical union and the Trades and Labor council, which would have stood
him in good stead, in any gathering
which had any real sympatny for the
aspirations of the organized workers.
But when in the course of making the
nomination his backer mentioned his
connection with the movement, it was
as though a blast from the Arctic had
blown over the meeting. That's how
Mr. Cowan came to be in the "also
rans."
The fisheries of British Columbia in
1014 made a catch worth nearly fourteen million dollars, chiefly caught by
Oriental fishermen, who have driven the
whites out of the industry.
Of all the different types of wage
slave, surely the bank clerk is the most
pitiful, and oftener than not contemptible too. The irony of handling thousands, and in the course of months millions of his masters' money, while he
himself gets a wage which a bricklayer
would soorn! He must spend his days,
must this money slave, in the little
metal cage which his master has built
for him. Should anyone threaten his
masters' money, he must be ready to
esist that threat at the risk of Mb life.
Killing a man, or being killed by him,
nre all in the possibilities of the day's
work. His evenings and leisure time
must be spent in Buch places and company as his master approves of, after
the secret reports of his confidential
agents on the manner in whioh the
money slave takes his pleasure. Finally, should he have the colossal conceit
to think the world would be better if
he took measures to continue his kind,
his masters' sanction must be obtained
first. And this poor wretch is usually
found right in the front row of tho jingoes,, bawling his head off about the
freedom which he would not know how
to use if he got it.
Westminster ^rust Co.
HEAD OFFICE NEW WESTMINSTER, B.C.
J. J. JONES, Man. Director. j. A. EENNIE, Sec.-Treas.
ACTS AS ASSIONEEB, LIQUIDATOBS AND BEOBIVEES
-      INSUEANOE IN ALL ITS BBANOHES
HOUSES, BUNGALOWS, STOBES AND MODEBN SUITES FOB BENT
at a Big Seduction
Safety Deposit Boxes for Bent at 12.60 np
Wills Drawn Free of Charge
Deposits Accepted and Interest at Four Per Cent. Allowed
on Dally Balances.
■UIINlee AOINT  DIRECTORY
Ask fer Labor Temple  'Phone Exchange,
Seymour .7488   (inlus otherwise stated).
Bartenden—Geo. W. Curnock, Room 208.
Bricklayers—Wm. S. DSBa.ll, Boom 316.
Cooks,   Walters,    Waitresses—Room   SOB;
Andy Graham; phone Sey. 8414.
Electrical Workers  (outside)—E. H. Morrison, Room 307.
Electrical Workers   (Inside)—.;. L.  Esting*
hausen, Room 207.
Engineers (steam)—Room 218; E. Preader*
last
Laborers—John Sully, Room 220.
Longshoremen's  Association — Offloe,   146
Alexander street 1 F. Payne;   phons   Bey.
OSSO.
Musicians--H. J. Brasfleld, Rooms 804-805,
Labor Temple.
Btreet Railway Employees—Fred. A, Hoover;
phone Sey. 608.
Typographical—R. H. Neelands, Rooms 212-
18-14.
TRADE UNION  DIRECTORY
Allied Printing Tradea Oouncll—R. H. Nee-
lands, Box 66.
Barbers—8. H. Grant, 688 Georgia street.
Bartenders—Geo. w. Curnocn, Kuom
101, Labor Temple.
Blacksmiths — Malcolm Porter, flaw
Hill P. O. "■•'
Bookbinders—W. H. Cowderoy, 1686 Thirty-
fourth avenue eaat.
Boilermaker.—A. h'raeer, 11J1 Howe Ht
Brewery Workers—Prank Graham, Labor
Temple.
Bricklayer*—William 8. Dagnall, Room
216. Labor Temple.
Brotherhood of Carpentera Dlstriot Council-* L. Barratt, Boom lot, Labor Tarn,
pie.
Clgarmakers—-Care Kurts Cigar Factory, 72
Water Straet,
Cooks, Walters, Waitresses—Andy Graham',
Room 206, Labor Temple.
Electrical Workers (outside)—E. H. Morrison, Boom 107, Labor Temple.
Electrical Worker. (Inside)—Room 307; P.
L, Estinghausen.
Engineers—E. Prendergaat, Boom iM, Labor Temple.
Granite cutters—Edward Hurry, Columbia Hotel.
Garment Workers—Labor Temple.
Honeshoers—-Labor Temple.
Letteroarrlera—Robt. Wight, District 11.
Laboren—George Harrison, Room 330, La*
Take that Watch to
APPLEBY
who will tell you what is the
matter, cost and guarantee all
Bepairs.   438 Bichards Street.
Phone:   Seymour 9086
NOW IS THE TIME TO MAKE
AND TO SAVE AS MUOH
MONET  AB   TOU OAN
against a time when LIVING
EXPENSES may be HIQH-
EB and EABNINO opportun-
•   lties LESS  than they  are.
to-day.
We Pay i% Interest on
Deposits Credited
Monthly
DOW FRASER TRUST CO,
< Notary Public
122 Hastings St. West.
Vaneouvar, and McKay Station,
Burnaby, B.C.
CIom at 1 o'oloek Saturday.
bor Temple.
Uthert—Victor R. Midgley, Ubor Tamp]
LoconlotiTo Firemen and EnfiflMrs—O. Ho<
srd, 007 DaWs atreet.
Loco,  Engineer*—A.   B.   Solloway,   1031
Pacific.   Tel. Soy. 867 IL.
Longshoremen—P. Payne, 10 Powell atreet.
AlauliintatH—J. H. MoVety,    Hnom   211,
Labor Temple.
Mnilclani—H. J. Brasneld, Booms 104*106,
Labor Temple.
Mtrbleworkers—Frank   Hell,   Janei   Road,
B. 0.
Holden.
Moving Picture Operators—L,  B.  Good
men, Labor Temple.
Palntors—J.   Train,   Room   SOS,   Labor
Temple.
Plumbers—Room 208 1-3, Labor Temple.
Pressmen—P. D. Edward, Labor Temple.
Plasterers—John   Jamea   Cornish,   180»
Eleventh Ave. Eaat
Pattern  Makers—J.  CampMl,  4869 Argyle Street.
Quarry Workers—Jamea Hepburn, car*
Columbia Hotel.
Railroad Trainmen—A.   E.    McCorvlllt,
Boi 248.
Railway Carmen—A. Robb,   420  Nelson
Street.
Seamen's Union.
Structural Iron Workers—Room 206, Labor
Temple.
Stonecutters—James   Rsybnrn,   P.   O.   Box
1047.
Sheet Metal Workers.
Street Railway Employees—James X. Oriffln,
180 Twenty-fifth arenas east.
Stereotypers—w. Bayley, care Province.
City.
Telegraphers—E. B. Peppln, Box 482.
Tradea and Labor Counoll—Oeo. Bartley,
Room 210 Labor Temple.
Typographical—H.  Neelands, Box 66.
Tailora—C. MoDonald, Box 608.
Theatrical Stags Employe*!—Geo. W. Allln,
Box Til.
Tllelayers   and   Helpers—Evan Thomas,
Labor Temple.
MENTION THE B. O. FEDERATIONIST
Phons;    Seymour 8960
Supplies and Bepairs of All Kinds
M. SOOTOL
BICYCLES
Harlsy-Davldson Motorcycles
1018 Pendsr Stmt Wait ,
VancottTar. B. O.      	
WILLOW HOSPITAL
FOB
SICK CHILDREN
Corner Broadway and Willow
Phons Balrmont 8166
Miss HaU and  Mils  Wsitlsy,
Graduate Nurses
PANTAGES
Unequalled Vaudsvllla  Maana
PANTAQES  VAUDEVILLE
THRU (HOW* DAILY
SM, IM, 8.15    Mason's Prlcaa!
Matinee, <|(o,| Ivanlnga, 1(o„ Ho.
VANCOUVER UNIONS
TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL J
™,..M-»-» «rst and third Thursdays, mat
outlve hoard: Jaa. H. MoVety. prealden
S'...i:„ A_>lhtma, vice-president; Q.
Bartley, general seoretary, no Latx
Temple* filu H. Qutteri/ge, treaifr™
Fred A. Hoover, statistician: soman
i___'_l Bully; A. 3. Ora^ordTftSi
Knowles, V7. R. Trotter, truatees.
ALLIED PRINTING TRADES COOK
«....?   »M!St'  "oond  Monday  In  th
sr *ss?ft oW.*--11 —*
^™NM»S' LOCAL No. J78.-OJ
„'•"• Boom 208 Ubor Tempi..  Me.
F F uL*Xw2? S"h P?"lh- ""'don
w n..iS iTC* Unanolal seoretary, o..
W. Curnook, Room 208, Ubor TempleT
BRICKLAYERS' AND MASONS', NO.
s „ „ eo" "yef '■' «*•* Srd tfuesde*
f, Pi™!. R«>m  307.    President,   Jami
h B5S;i_.0i °?' iMnolal seoretary, J
BROTHERHOOD OF BOILER MAKIR
and Hu Ship Builders and Help*
of America, Vancouver Udgo No. ?«!
lleeta drat and third Bonders i . .
Pre.ld.nt, F. BarolsyV 261i cSjov! _!t
secretary, A. Fraaer, 'iltl Hon a£Sl.
J""* «,*»0 P* m., Ubor Temnl.. A. Sri
™VS!?,,8 »»,~"M«tl»e. Onee: 'ifiS
?S?' aU!™E Tu">l.. Honr.! 1:30 a. ST,
10| 8 to 5 p. m. Competent help furnish
on shpn notice.   Phone Seymour S4U.
DISTBIOT COUNCIL OF OABPIHTIB
M ■.« In room JOS. Ubor Temp", »
end aa* toarth Tharadar of tekhtwata?
& ."'.Preaident, O. It Hardy: s.cntar
„iLi.B,7fi,i —moot, W. TTTsylaT^!
wl No. 117 meeta frit and third; Mra
day of eaeh moath, and Looal IMT mZ
drstandthlrtTaMdaySf Tiff moVtt.
.E0TRIOAL WOBKBBS, LOOAL NO. 91
«..r"*^-* •**""•- "H. Lai*" Tediple, atal
S?*,"*1!?' 8, "• m*   -Presldsat, Sam. dawk*
H. Hojan, Ubor Temple: »n..d.l ■eeretar
BLECTRIC/L WORKERS, LOCAL N'
Ml , (Iniido  Men)-Meet»   am   -
SSI
»hiJ,"i,>*2'",",i   «enf—Meets   flrst
third Mondays of eaoh month.   Room ivi
LSiK-.   Pr"!"-**'t. H. R. Van Siokle; re
SiS*;* •«■«««*, 3. M. Campbell; busl
ness agent, F.L. Estinghausen, Roim «8
HODOARRIEBS, BUILDING AND COMMOI
.., ^Laborer.' union. No. 66—Meeta drsl n3
SS3*5!*ta/ 5,' I-*", ?"»"■' Lab" TemJ!
President, |. O. Appleby, 1119 Pendrill _
John Sully, room SSO. Labor Temple,™
laborera Invited to meeting.
MAOHINIS'I'S,  NO.  182—MEETS SECON1
T M-SiS™* FJ!'""" " • •"• •»• -?reslden
J. Melvor; recording secretary, J, Brooked
financial secretary, J. H. MoVety.     """""j
MU-S9^NS.'    MUTUAL    PROTECTIV^
Union, Looal No. 1*6. A. F. of MU
"oet" second Sunday   of   each montl
802 Ubor Temple.   PMaldent,  1.x-—"
Seymour'7400.
W.    Fowler.
PLASTEREBS' OPERATIVE INTEBNi
. TIONAL ASSOCIATION, No. e» ■
Meets every first and third Wednesday in t
month ln room 801, Ubor Temple. Prei
dent, A. Hurry: vice-president, A. Berentae
oorrespondlng aeeretary, Joe Oornlah, 181
Eleventh avenue east; financial aeeretaV
Qeorge Montgomery; treasurer, Harold Re|
PAINTERS',. PAPBRHANOERS'. AN
•mJ22Fm*\r-(' Local 1'8-Meets eve
Thursday, 7.30 p.m. President. H. Gran
rSKS" ,M0r<,t,ry' J* Freckleton, 11)
£™°* »■"•'• recording secretary.
D°»*'*>'t. 828 Howe street. BUjIne
gent, James Train,  Room SOS,  lib
PATTERN MAKERS' LEAGUE a
NO/TH AMBRICA.-V.ncouver .,
vlclnlt* Branch meets lot and 3rd Fi
days at Ubor Templo, room 206. Robe
C. Sampson. Pres., 747 Dunlevy Ave
i*"'„,°*   ^ron,  nnanclal  secretary,   17
_3___$_____ "-■-& ■■"
BTERBOTTPERS' AND ELECTROTY1
V!„Ah1 "a""1.' No- "• »' V«nooiIii?2
_^_—W* '""!?"■? Wednesday"
SiS. /Sn.01' i*-*- !"■• L*bl»* Temple, j-res
A. Birnle, co, ''News Advertiser."
""WZJUSi vamao bailwat km
PLOME8, Fleam Division, No. 101-3
Meets Ubor Temple, aecond and fourth We3
SSffly." 2:29 'nd 8 ->• "*■• Pre»ident, Jo3
tM*fe' "."til!* >*——*• 3ee. 1. OritUl
».6.,.Jw";■l",'?•, *""">• ■""■■■ finaneSlaeJ
ssrdS gftr *"""• Whl a* -*"-"•■]
OT1iHJH-85'EJRS' intbrnationI
s » mL*2!L,,fc,Wf "a1*" Wednesdaj
• p. m„ room 104, Ubor Temple. Flnan*
clal sscretary, B. Prand«r.*Mt, room fit, i
TAILORS' INDUSTRIAL UNION (InJ
i. n'tF-iMS""*- lMM No. 178-MeotllSJ
—USB*. T$S'ilrl« ••"••• month, ™p.S
S?™£;*'nMIS-?- 9-J'twWuei reoordlffl
aeeretary, O. McDonald, Box SOS; Inanl
olal sec, K. Patoreon, P. O. Box 608.
TyPOMUPHIOAL    ONION,    NO.    Mi-
Meets last Sunday er eaeh month al I
H.nNXSv^rkr^.!,^,m*,^*
PBOVINOIAL UNIONS
SYNOPSIS  OP  COAL   MINING   RIOU
LATIONS
Coal mining rights of ths Dominion,
In Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta
the Yukon Territory, tho Northwest Territories and ln a portion of ths Province
of British Columbia, may be leased for
a, term of twenty-on. yean at an annua)
rental of 11 an aore. Not mon than
8,(10 ures will bo leased to one applicant.
Application, for leaa. must bs made by
the applicant In person to the Asent or
Sub-Afsnt of the district In whloh the
rights applied for ara situated.
In surveyed territory tha land must he
described by seotlons, or legal subdivisions of sections, and In unsurveyed territory ths tract applied for shall he
staked hy tha applicant himself.
Bach application must be accompanied
by a fat of 16, whloh will ba refunded If
the rights applied for are not available,
but not 'Otherwise. A royalty shall be
paid on the merchantable output of the
mine at the rate of five oenta per ton.
' The person operating the mine shall
furnish ths Agent wtth sworn returns
accounting for tht full quantity of merchantable ooal mined and pay th. royalty thereon. If the coal mining rights
are not being, operated, such returns
should be furnished at leaat once a year.
The lease will Include the ooal mining
rights only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available
surface rights may be considered necessary for the working of the mine at the
rate of 110 an aoro.
For full Information application Bhould
be made to the Seoretary of the Department of the Interior, Ottawa, or to any
Agent or Sub-Agent of Dominion Unda.
W. H. CORY,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N. B.—Unauthorised publication of this
advertisement will not be paid for—S8888.
MBNTION THE B. O. FEDERATIONIST
0. FEDERATION OF LABOB—Meeti
in annual convention in January, Exec
ntlve oncers,M»15*l«| President, A. Watch
man; vice-presidents—Vancouver, W. I
Dunn, J. H.-McVety; Victoria. B. Slmmona
New_W..tmInster, W. Yates; Prince Bupert
W. E. Denning; RevclstokeL J. Lyon: Dli
'rt.'88, O. ht W. of A. (fancouvir I'slaid
f. Outhrle: District 18, V. M. W. ol! *
(Orow'a Nest, Valley), A. J. Carter; aecr
tarytroaaurer, A. S. Wells. P. O. box 1681
Victoria, B. 0. ^
KIMBEBLEY MI^EBS' UNION, NO. IM
Westsn Federation of Minera—Meat
tP^JZ*-**1 In Unloa hall. Praalden
Alex. WBaoaj aecretary-treaaurer, J. «
Stewart, Klmberley, B. O.
NIW WISTMINBTIR. B.C.
NEW WESTMINSTER TRADES AND LA
. JOB Council—Me.ta everv seeond aa
fourtS Wednesday at a p. m. u Ubor tal
Preaident, O. Cropley; financial aeeretar
S ,T "•STO tjnerel   secretary,   W.
VICTORIA, ■■ e.
VICTORIA TRADEB AND LABOB OOOI
. v 0,Wtt.i,!., ui "** Wedoesda*
Ubor hall,  1424 Oovernment atreet,  at
h ,*5*.Jp'M'd«*'l. A. 8. Wells: aeeretary, .'
Holdridge, Box 802, Victoria, B. O.
OBOANItBD LABOB OOMPAK1SS.
LABOR TEMPLE COMPANY, LIMITED
Directors: Jaa. Brown, president; B.
Pettlpleoe, vice-president; Edward ' Lothla
Jamea Campbell, J. W. Wllklnaon, Oeo. W
by, W. J. Nagle, F. Blumberg, H. H. Fn
Managing director and secretary-treasurer,
H. MeVety. room 211, Ubor Temple.
B. 0. FEDERATIONIST. LIMITED—Mel
at call of president, Labor Temple, Va
couver, B. 0. Director.: Jamea Campbi
preaident; J. H. McVety. aecretary.treasure
A. Watchman, A. S. Welle. B. Perm. Pet
pleoe, manager, 217 Ubor Temple. Ta
phone:. Seymonr 7491. ■BH
■■
I OrPIOIAL    PAPBB    VAMOOUVBB
I TBADES   AND   LABOB   OOUNOIL
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST [|E1
fBDBBATION  OF LAwhm
EVENTHYEAR.   Ng, 14.
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, APRIL 2,1915
-SIX PAGES.
Our Display of Summer
Wash Goods is the Talk
of the City
We never hsd such a showing as this season.. The variety
Is almost unlimited and the prices are enticing and tempting.
Wise shoppers are purchasing now, while the stock Is complete, instead cf waiting Ull later, when many lines will naturally he broken, i These several lines are specially worthy
of notice.   Bead
WHITE VOILES—1 Inches at, per yard 40c. to 66c.
OEIMPLED WHITE OBEPES Yard 20c.
WHITE OOTTON MABQHIBBTTEB at  ..die.
and Mc.
WHITE SPOTTED SWISS MUSLINS-Per Yard 30c.
WHITE OOTTON BATINES-Yard ....88c.
WHITE POPLINS—40 inches wide, Yard 60c.
WHITE PIQUE COEDS At 60c. ind 86c.
SWISS EMBBOIDEBED V011.ES 11.00
to WO
MATTING WHITE SHIBTINOS — Per Yard 26c. and 36c.
WHITE OOTTON OBEPE-Yard 60s,
WHITE OASHMEBE DUOK-Yard 28c.
ffil^lidson'sBauCornpans. ffl
_.      J      iMW-Huns u»    m*mmt__mm%\,\'tamt mhhiwmh \ ^"^ i
GRANVILLE AND GEORGIA STREETS
MAKE THE HOTEL LOTOS YOUB
HEADQUARTERS
VANCOUVER,    B.C.
Large Oom-
modloos Lounge
Tariff:
Without Bath
fl.00 np
With Bath
♦1.60 UP
Absolutely Fire-Proof
HOTEL LOTUS
Howard J. Sheehan, Manager
WRITE HOW FO? TOUB RESERVATIONS
High Class Dental Services at
very Moderate Prices
OOLD AND POBOELAIN CROWNS, Each I 6.00
BRIDGE WORK, per Tooth      6.00
PEEFEOT FITTING PLATES     10.00
AMALOAM FILLINOS      1.60
ENAMEL FILLINOS      2*00*
Diseases of the gums, including Pyorrhea, successfully treated.
All work guaranteed.
Dr. BRETT ANDERSON
'Phone Seymour 3331 Offlce:  101 Bank of Ottawa Building
602 Hastings Street West
Grow Your Own
Vegetables, and cut down household expenses. In all our experience we
never had better vegetable growing stock. Decide now—the Ideal time
to sat; climate conditions are favorable.
SEED
POTATOES      Lettuce. Badiah. SETS
All the Best for
Early Setting
Parsnips, Carrots,
Lettuce, Radish,
Bhubarb, Beans.
At All Our Branches.  Catalogue and Information Free.
Extra Good
2 lbs, for 36c.
Brown Bros. & Co. Ltd
FLOBISTS, SEEDSMEN AND
INUBSEBYMEN.
mm
r.—$~?~**b
Good Beer quenches the thirst, stimulates the appetite, aids digestion and nourishes the body. It is a
real food product.
6e5&
'freer
Is produced from the very best hops and barley, by J
expert brewers, in a union brewery.
6 Pints  -   -   -   50 cents
3 Quarts    -   -   50 cents
PHONE ANY LIQUOR STORE
Vancouver (Breweries Limited
BCt Workmen's Compensation Ad
[Continued from Last Week.]
s '• Penalty.
,2.) Every person who   contravenes
any of the provisions of subsection (1)
shall incur a penalty not exceeding live
hundred dollars.
Recovery asd Application of Penalties.
78. The penalties imposed by or un*
der the authority of thiB Part' shall be
recoverable under the "Summary Convictions Act," and when collected shall
be paid over to the Board and shall
form part of the Accident Fund.
Assessments.
Provisional Assessments. •
70. (1.) The Board Bhall, before the
day named by Proclamation as mentioned in section 3, make a provisional
assessment on the employers in each
class of such sum as in the opinion of
the Board will be sufficient to meet the
claims for compensation which will be
payable by that class for the first year
after the day named and to meet the
expenses of the Board in the administration of this Part for the year, and
also to provide a reaerve fund to pay
the compensation payable in future
years in respect of claims in that class
for accidents happening in that year,
of such an amount as the Board may
deem necessary to prevent the employers in future years from being unduly or unfairly burdened , with payments which are to be made in those
years in respect of accidents which
have previously happened.
How Assessment May be Based.
(2.) The sums to be bo assessed may
be either a percentage of the pay-rolls
of the employers or a specific sum, as
the Board may determine.
Provisional Assessment to Form Special
Beserve.
(3.) The amount raised by such provisional assessment shall be retained by
the Board as a special reserve to provide for paying the compensation which
becomes payable in future years for
which assessments are to be made after
the close of the year, and whenever the
amount of such special reserve is not
equal to the amount of the estimated
expenditure of the Board for the current year the Board shall make a special assessment on all employers in each
class sufficient to bring the amount of
the special reserve up to such estimated -amount,. and whenever the
amount of the .special reserve Ib greater
than such estimated amount the Board
shall deduct the excess from the amount
for which the next annual assessment
is to be made.
Subsequent Assessments.
80. (1.) The Board shall in every
year thereafter assess and levy upon
tho employers in each of the classes a
sum sufficient to pay the compensation
which was paid in the next preceding
calendar year in respect of injuries to
workmen in tho industries within the
class, and to provide and pay the expenses of the Board in the administration of this Part for that year, and also
to provide a similar reserve fund to
that mentioned in subsection (1) of section 70, and such assessments may be
based upon the pay-roll of the employers.
Deduction From Pay-Boll of Proportion
of Wages,
(2.) Where the assessment is based
on the pay-roll of the employer and
there is included in it the wages or
salary of a workman who has been paid
more than at tbe rate of two thousand
dollars per annum, the excess shall be
deducted from the amount of the payroll and the assessment shall bo based
on the amount of it as so reduced.
Assessments Need Not be Uniform.
(3.) It shall not be necessary that the
assessment upon the employers in a
class or sub-class shall be uniform, but
they may be fixed or graded in relation
to the hazard of eacn or of any of the
industries included in the class or subclass.
Proportion of Assessment Payable by
Employer to be Fixed.
Notice of Assessment.
81. (1.) The Board shall determine
and fix the proportion or part of tho
sum for which a class is so assessed
under the provisions of either of the
next preceding two sections which is
to be paid by tbe employers within the
cIubb or within any sub-class, and every
employer Bhall pay to the Board the
sum payable by him within fifteen days
after notice of the assessment and of
the amount so payable has been given
to him.
How Notice May be Served.
(2.) The notice may be sent by registered post to the employer, and shall
be deemed to have been given to him
on the day on which the notice was
posted.
Insufficient Assessment To Be Made up
by Supplementary Assessments,
82. If the amount intended to be
provided for by the aBsossmout in any
year is by reason of tho failure of nn
employer to pay his proportion of it or
from any other cause insufficient for tho
purpose for which it was made, tho
Board may make supplementary assessments to make up the deficiency, and
section 81 shall apply to such assessments, but the Board may defer assessing for such deficiency until the next
annual assessment is made and then include it in such assessment.
Insufficient Assessment ln Any Glass To
Be Made up by Supplementary
Assessments in That Class,
83. In case the payments made by
the employers in any class are insufficient to meet the amount of any assessment upon the employer embraced in it,
or in case the estimated amount of an
assessment in any class proves insufficient for the purpose for which it was
made, the Board may make supplementary assessments upon the employers in
that class as may be necessary, or may
temporarily advance the amount of any
deficiency out of the reserves and add
such amount to any subsequent annual
assessment or assessments. Section 81
Bhall apply to such supplementary as
sesBments,
Where Deficiency Made Good by Employer, Mode of Application of
Payment.
84. (1.) If and so far as any deficiency mentioned in the next preceding
two sections is afterwards made good
wholly or partly by tho defaulting employer, the amount which shall have
been made good shall be apportioned
between tho other employers in the proportions in which the deficiency was
made up by them by the payment of
supplementary assessments upon them,
and shall be credited to them in making
the next assessment.
Employer not Assessed Liable to Pay
Amount for Which He Should
Have Been Assessed.
(2.) If for any reason an employer
liable to assessment is not assessed in
any year, he shall nevertheless be liable to pay to the Board the amount for
which he should have been   assessed,
and payment of that amount may be enforced in the same manner as the payment of an assessment may be enforced.
Amount Collected to be Taken Into Account ln Making Subsequent
(3.) Any sum collected from an employer under subsection (2) shall be
taken into account by the Board in
making an assessment in a subsequent
year on the employers in the class or
sub-class to which such employer belonged.
Employer Liable to Pay unpaid Sums.
85. Notwithstanding that the deficiency arising from a default ,in the
payment of the whole or part' of any
assessment has been made up by a special assessment, a defaulting employer
shall continue liable to pay to the
Board the amount of every assessment
made upon him, or so much of it as remains unpaid.
Lieut-Governor in Council May Require
Supplementary Assessments to
be Made.
86. Whenever the Lieutenant-Governor in Council is of the opinion that
the condition of the Accident Fund Ib
such that with the reserves, exclusive
of the special reserve, it is not sufficient to meet all the payments to be
made in respect of compensation as
they become payable, and so as not unduly or unfairly to burden the employers in any class in future years with
payments which are to be made in
those years in respect of accidents which have happened in
previous years, he may require the
Board to make a supplementary assessment of such sum as in his opinion is
necessary to be added to the fund, and
when such a requirement is made the
Board shall forthwith make such supplementary assessment, and it shall be
made in Uke manner as hereinbefore
provided as to other special as-'
sessments, and all the provisions of
this Part as to special assessments shall
apply to it."
Formation' of Reserves.
87. In order to maintain the Accident Fund as provided by section 66,
the Board may from time to time and
as often as may be deemed necessary
include in any sum to be assessed upon
the employers and may collect from
them such sums as mny be deemed
necesBary for that purpose, and the
Bums bo collected shall form a reserve
fund and shall be invested in securities
in which a trustee may by law invest
trust moneys.
Penalty for Non-Payment of   Assessment,
If nn assessment or a special assessment Ib not paid at the time when
it becomes payable, the defaulting employer shall be liable to pay and shall
pay as a penalty for hla default such
a percentage upon tho amount unpaid
as may be prescribed by the regulations or may be determined by tho
Board.
Collection of Unpaid Assessments,
89, Where the default is made in the
payment of any assessment or specinl
assessment, or any part of it, the Board
may isBue its certificate stating that the
assessment was made, the amount remaining unpaid on account of it, and
tho person by whom it wns payable,
and such certificate, or a copy of it
certified by the Secretary to be a true
copy, may be filed with any District
Registrar of the Supreme Court, or with
the Registrar or Deputy Registrar of
nny County Court, and when so flled
shall become an order of that Court
and may be enforced as a judgment of
tho Court against such person for the
amount mentioned in the certificate.
Case of Industries Established   After
Assessment Made.
90. (1.) Whero an industry .coming
within any of tho classes for the time
being included in Schedule 1 is established or commenced after an assessment has been made, it shall be the
duty of tho employer forthwith to notify the Board of tho fact, and to furnish to tho Board an ostimato of the
probable,amount of his pay-yroll for
the remainder of the year, verified by
a statutory declaration, nnd to pay to
tho Board a sum equal to that for
which he would have been linblo if his
industry had been established or commenced beforo such assessment wns
made, or so much thereof as the Bonrd
may deem reasonable.
Powers of Board.
(2.) The Board shall havo the liko
powers and be entitled to the like remedies for enforcing payment of tho sum
payable by tho employer undor subsection (1) as it possesBOs or is entitled
to in rospect of assessments.
Penalty.
(3.) For default in complying with
tho provisions of subsection (1) tho employer shall incur the like penalty as is
provided with respect to defaults by
section 73.
Case of Industry Temporarily Carried
On.
01. (1.) Where an employer engages
in any of tho industries for the time being included in Schedule 1 and has not
been assessed in respect of it, the Board
if it is of opinion that the industry is
to be carriod on only temporarily, may
roquire the employer to pay or give security for tho payment to the Board of
a sum sufficient to pay the assessment
for which the employer would have
been liable if the industry had been in
existence when the next preceding assessment was made.
Powers of Board.
(2.) The Board shall have the like
powers and bo entitled to tho like remedies for enforcing payment of any
such sum ns it possesses or is entitled
to in respect of assessments.
Penalty.
(3.) An employer wno makes default
in complying with tho provisions of
subsection (1) shnll incur n pennlty not
exceeding two hundred dollars, and nn
additional penalty not exceeding twenty dollars per day for evory day on
which the default continues.
Case of Industry to which "Mechanics'
LieiUlct" Applies.
92. (3.) Inlpe an employer engages
to perform a work or service in any of
the industries for the time being included in Schedule 1 for which he would
be entitled to a lien under the "Me:
chanics' Lien Act," it shall be the duty
of the employer before entering upon
the performance of such work or service to pay or to give security for the
payment to the Board of any aum which
the employer ii liable to contribute to
the Accident Fond, and to procure from
the Board and deliver to the owner ae
defined by that Aet a certificate stating
that such payment has been made or security given.
(2.) If the employer fails to deliver
to the owner the certificate required by
the provisions of subsection (1) before
entering upon the performance of the
work or service, it snail be the duty of
the owner forthwith to notify the
Board of such default.
(3.) Every employer and every such
owner who makes default in complying
with the provisions of this section shall
incur a penalty not exceeding two hundred dollars, and an additional penalty
not exceeding twenty dollars' per day
for every day on which the default
continues.
Returns of Accidents.
Employers to give Notice of Accidents.
93. (1.) Every employer shall, within
three days after the happening of an
accident to a workman in hie employment by which the workman is disabled from earning full wages, notify
the Board by registered post of the—
(a) Happening of the accident and
nature of it:
(b.) Time of its occurrence:
(c.) Name   and   address   of   the
workman:
(d.) Place where the accident happened:
(e.) Name and address of the physician or surgeon (if any) by whom
the workman was or is attended
for the injury.
Penalty.
(2.) For every contravention of subsection (1) the employer shall incur a
penalty not exceeding fifty dollars.
Industrial Diseases.
Certain Industrial Diseases to be
Deemed Accidents,
04. (1.) Where a workman suffers
from an industrial disease and Ib
thereby disabled from earning full
wages at the work at which he was employed, or his death is caused by an
industrial disease and the disease is
due to the nature of any employment
in which he was engaged at any time
within twelve months previous to the
date of his disablement, whether under
one or more employments, the workman or his dependents shall be entitled
to compensation as if the disease were
a personal injury by accident and the
disablement were the happening of the
accident, subject to the modifications
hereinafter mentioned, unless at the
time of entering into the employment
he had wilfully and falsely represented
himself in writing as not having previously suffered from the disease.
By whom Compensation Payable.
(2.) Where the compensation is payable by an employer individually, it
shall be payable by the employer who
last employed the workman during such
twelve months in the employment to
the nature of which the disease was due.
Names of Former Employers to be Furnished by Claimants.
(3.) The workman or his dependents, if so required, shall furnish the
employer mentioned in the next preceding subsection with such .information
as to the names and addresses of all
tho other employers by whom he was
employed in the employment to tbe
nature of which the disease was duo
during such twelve' months as such
workman or his dependents may possess, and if such information is not furnished or is not sufficient to enable that
employer to take the proceedings mentioned in subsection (4), that employer
upon proving that tho -disease was not
contracted while the workman wns in
his employment, shall not be liable to
pay compensation.
Last Employer may wing In Former
Employers.
(4.) If thnt employer allegeB that the
disease was in fact contracted while tho
workman wns in the employment of
somo other employer, he may bring
such employer beforo the Board, and
if the allegation is proved, that other
employer Bhall be the employer by
whom the compensation Bhall bo paid,
Where Disease Result of Gradual Process, Former Employers to Contribute.
(5.) If the disease ia of such a nn-
ture ns to bo contracted by n gradual procesH, any othor employers who
during such twelve months employed
tho workman in the employment to tho
nature of which tho disease was due
shnll be linblo to make to tho omployer
by whom the compensation is payable
such contributions ns tho Board may
determine to be just.
How Compensation to be Fixed.
(6.) Tho amount of tho compensation shall bo fixed with roferenco to tho
earnings of tho Workman undor tho employer by whom tho compensation is
payable, and tho notice provided for
by section 20 shall bo given to the omployer who last employed the workman
during such twelve months in tho employment to tho nature of which the
disease was due, and the notice mny
be given notwithstanding that the
workman has voluntarily left the employment.
presumptions as to Disease Being Due
to Nature of Employment.
(7.) If the workman at or immediately before the dato of tho disablement
waB employed in any process mentioned
in tho second column of Schedule 3,
and the disease contracted ia the disease in tho first column of the Schedule
set opposite to the description of tho
process, the disease shall be deemed to
have been due to the nature of that employment unless the contrary is proved.
Right to Compensation where Disease is
Result of an Injury not to be
Affected.
(8.) Nothing in this section shall
offoct the right of a workmnn to compensation in respect of a diseaso to
which this section does not apply if tho
diseaso is the tobuU of an injury in respect of which ho Ib entitled to compensation under this Pnrt.
Formation of Associations and Committees.
Associations of Employers may be
Formed.
95. (1.) The employers in any of the
clnsacB for tho timo being ineludod in
(Continued on Pago Four)
(Is Vaaeo*w\
OUT, tS.OO )
$1.60 PER YEAR
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
DAVID SPINCIR, LTD.
Good Reasons Why Meg's Socks Should
be Bought at Spencer's
■ **
We believe we have the beat values In men's socki to be
found anywhere. It in our object to maintain thia pre-eminence. With our reeerve stock and quantity on order last
August we were enabled to escape paying the higher prices
that have since been established.
To see and to handle these socki is to be convinced that
you are getting big value for your money.
OUR 26c. CASHMERE SOCK is of beautiful quality
with reinforced heels and toes; in black and tan.
OUR 86c. BLAOK CASHMERE SOCK ia made absolutely seamless and ia soft and springy, and *n excellent
wearing weight. -
THB 60c. SOCK ia beautifully soft and fine; choice here
of black, tan, grey and oxblood, with linen heel and toes;
plain black llama and fine ribbed hose.
DARNLESS SOCKS, very tightly knit; all-cotton socks,
strongly reinforced, are here in black and tan at 26c.; two
pair for 25c.
LISLE SOCKS in black and tan; excellent value at 860.
—Main Floor, East Wing.
BOYS' CLOTHING DEPARTMENT
Spring Clothes, Economically Priced
1 mty sf. sad eten post ie t» ftta
Ottw Twist, Bust.?, StWtty. atOte.
0 Doutls Bnast, J.H.S. TwMdi ui
All Uttss sn Mngopwud ap to salt ttetr ett aad etetr I
> iwus tt 18 jsars.   n. stilts —-»--- -™— -—-   	
Jsck Tsr, Norfolk, Bnette, Osaa
Worsteds sn npnssaM la all
CLUBB & STEWART, Limited
308*315 HASTINOS STBBBT WMT Phon. Otrmmt TM
No More Tooth Trouble
WHEN yon bring yonr tooth troublei to me, yon need worry nt mon for at
lent ton years,
MT GUARANTEED HALLDINE painless method hu banished oil pain ond
■hook—no discomfort whatever.
, NATURE TEETH
WHEN I hove fitted yoa with my NATURE TEETH—after thonmghly pre*
poring your mouth, earing any pouible yum trouble (Pyorrhea or Rlgp Disease)
and rendering the oral cavity absolutely healthy—yoa may trust In my tea-year
guarantee of perfect service.
HT CHARGES ore no higher than thoee of other dentists, although every
cose receives INDIVIDUAL STUDY and treatment, and only the greatest care and
the highest grade of materials are used.
FREE
Make an appointment for FREE examination.   Phono or call.
Dr. HALL
TBS MODERN DENTIST
STANDAID BANK BUILDING
 ROOM 212	
PHONE SEY. 4679
OPEN BTEN1NOS, 7 to I
ow-atMi   ,    a j* a i sou tr at       g%tt,ta*r    *-*» *>«p '<"
Couln, PflAI •* rllxT "« •""- T"°»
8. wslimiton UUHL pnwueslly UUw I       Employed
Wo bar. sn tmpl. supply of this cosl, sll statements to ttt
contrary notwithstanding
DBLI7EBBD PBIOES
Screened Lump—Wu rescroeu it bere $6.60 per net ten
Nut, No 1—Good for tho range $5.50 per net Ion
Pen*—No better valuo ever given * $4.00 per net ton
Fir Bark $3.50 load delivered
Inside Fir. $8.00 load delivered
Thoroughly Dry Cordwood, 12-lp. and 10-in $2.75 load delivered
Thoroughly Dry Cordwood, .-ft. long $1.00 cord delivered
Thoroughly Dry Cordwood. 12-in. and 10-in .$5.50 cord delivered
Short Slabs and Edgings $2.00 load delivered
&£-& J.Hanbury & Co., Ltd £»«
LABOR TEMPLE CLUB, POOL
AND READING ROOM OPEN
SEVEN DATS A WEEK.
SPEND TOUR SPARE TIME IN
THE LABOR TEMPLE FREE
READING ROOM.
The Cost of Operating Elec-'
trie Household Appliances
is Merely Nominal
STUDY THIS TABLE OF HOURLY COSTS
FOR OPERATING A NUMBER OF THE MOST
POPULAR APPLIANCES AND REMEMBER
THE COMFORT AND CONVENIENCE ENJOYED, ESPECIALLY DURING THE SUMMER
MONTHS, BECAUSE OF THEIR USE.
ELECTRIC IRON
4 to 5 Cents per Hour
Total cost varies according to frequency
and duration of use.
COFFEE
PERCOLATOR
31-2 Cents per Hour
Generally used from 15
to 20 minutes for one
operation
ELECTRIC GRILL
4 to 51-2 Cts. per Hour
From 15 to 20 minutes-
use prepares an ordinary light meal.
ELECTRIC TOASTER
5 Cents per Hour
Gives very intense heat,
but is operated for only
a very short time.
ELECTRIC WASHER, 3 CENTS PER HOUR
Total cost depends upon amount of washing
to be done
ANY OF THESE APPLIANCES WILL BE
DEMONSTRATED FOR YOU AT
OUR SALESROOMS
B.C. ELECTRIC
Carrall and Hastings Sts.
1138 Granville St
Near Davie PAGE FOUR
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FBIDAT APBIL 2, 11
Ask for   "NABOB    Products
TEA SPICES
COFFEE ICINGS
JELLY POWDER PUDDINGS
FLAVORING EXTRACTS BAKING POWDER
AT YOUR GROCER
Get and use "NABOB" everytime
10c.
APkt.
Apckt    THE BEST YET
RED ARROW
BISCUIT
When its Biscuits say "RED ARROW"
Manufactured by the
National Biscuit Co., Ltd.
Manufacturers of Red Arrow and National Biscuits
Haida Confections
VANCOUVER
B.C.
We Unhesitatingly Recommend
ROYAL CROWN
SOAP
ia being the best SOAP on the market for general household purposes.
Positively the largest sale of any Soap in Western Canada.
There is a Reason   Try it and See
MOUNT PLEASANT HEADQUARTERS
For Hardware, Storm and Range*—
Everything f« the Kitohen
W. R. OWEN & MORRISON
Phone Fair, 447 8887 Main Btreet
Office Furniture
Less Than Wholesale
Bastings Furniture Co., Ltd., 41 Hastings St. West
We are making a Clearance of
all present stock of Offlce Furniture.
Oome early and make yonr
choice.
AN EGG SUBSTITUTE FOR
ALL BAKING PURPOSES
Use it Instead of
Expensive Eggs.
PUBE AND WHOLESOME
60c. Tins contain the equivalent
of 6 doi. eggs.
26c. Tins contain the equivalent
of 2'/2 dot. eggs.
SPECIAL LARGE TINS FOB
BAKER'S USE
See Our Demonstration
in the Grocery Department of David Spencer
Limited.
Crown' Broom Works, Ltd.
332 FRONT STREET EAST
VANCOUVER, B. C.
PHONE:   FAIRMONT 1H8
Manufacturers of the
Mother Goose, Duchess, King, Janitor Special,
Peerless, Princess, Province, Ladies' Carpet Perfection, Favorite, Ceiling
Broom, Warehouse Brooms
SUPPORT HOME INDUSTRY
B.C.1
^iS^—mmm_____a________________m———ma———mA^im^y
HOME INDUSTRIES
■at    s    i_jS^
KEEP YOUR MONEY IN CIRCULATION AT HOME
o .      =====
THE MEMBERS OF ORGANIZED LABOR IN GREATER VANCOUVER ARE SPENDING J20.000 PER DAT. FEDERATIONIST ADVERTISERS ARE ENTITLED TO THB PATRONAGE OF TRADE UNIONISTS AND
THEIR FRIENDS AND STMPATHIZEB8.   LOOK OVER THE LIST ON THIS PAGE:
B. C. WORKMEN'S
COMPENSATION ACT
(Continued from Page Three.)
Schedule 1 may form themselves into
an association for accident-prevention
and muy mako rules for that purpose.
Rules of Associations if approved to
be Binding on the Members of
the OIosb.
(2.) If the Board is of opinion that
an association ho formed sufficiently represents the employers in the industries included in the class, the Board
may approve such rules, and when approved by the Board and by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council they Bhall
bo binding on all the employers in industries included in the class.
Payment of Salary of Inspector or Expert out of Accident Fund.
(3.) Where an association under the
authority of its rules appoints an inspector or an expert for the purpose
of accident prevention, the Board may
pay the whole or any part of the salary or remuneration of such inspector or
expert out of the Accident Fund, or
out of that part of it which is at the
credit of any one or more of the classes
aB the Board may deem just.
Committee of Employers.
I. (1.) The employers in any of the
classes for the time being included in
Schedule 1 may appoint a committee of
themselveB, consisting of not more than
five employers, to watch over their interests in matters to which this Part
relates.
Board may Act on Certificate of Committee as to Payment of Compensation.
(2.) Where a claim is for compensation for an injury for which the employers in any such class would be
liable, if the Board is of the opinion
that the committee sufficiently represents such employers, and the committee
certifies to the Board that it is satisfied that the claim should be allowed,
the Board may act on the certificate,
and mny also act upon the certificate
of the Committee as to the proper Bum
to be awarded for compensation if the
workman or dependent is satisfied with
the sum named in the certificate.
Medium of Communication.
(3.) The committee may be the medium of communication on the part of the
class with the Board.
Contribution by Employers ln
Schedule 2.
Contribution by Employers Individually
Liable to Expenses of
Administration.
07. Employers in industries for tho
time being included in Schedule 2 shall
pay to the Bonrd such proportion of
the expenses of the Board in the administration of this Part as the Board may
deem just and determine, and the sum
payable by thom shall be apportioned
between such employers and assessed
nnd levied in like manner as in the case
of assessments for contributions to the
Accident Fund, and the provisions of
this Pnrt as to making such assessments
shall apply, mutatis mutandis, to
ments made under the authority of this
section.
Application of Part I.
i)8. This Part shall apply only to the
industries mentioned in Schedules 1 and
2 and to such industries as shall be added to thom under the authority of this
Part and to employments therein,
PART II.
Application of w, 106 to 108.
90. Subject to section 103, sections
100 to 102 shall apply only to the industries to which Part I. does not apply
and to the workmen employed in such
industries.
Liability of Employer for Defective
Ways, Works, etc., and for Negligence of his Servants.
R. S. B. Os, 1011, c. 82.
100. (1) Where personal injury is
caused to a workman by reason of any
defect in the condition or arrangement
of tho ways, workB, machinery, plant,
buildings, or premises connected with,
intended for, or used in the business
of his employer, or by renson of the negligence of his employer or of nny person in tho sorvico of his employer act
but not so that double damages shall
be recoverable for the same injury.
Liability of Contractor and Subcontractor.
(3.) Nothing in subsection (2) shall
affect any right or liability of the person for whom the work is done nnd the
contractor or sub-contractor aB between
themselves.
Effect of Continuance in Employment
after Knowledge.
(4.) A workman shall not by reason
only of his continuing in the employment of the employer with knowledge
of the' defect or negligence which
caused his injury bo doomed to have
voluntarily incurred the risk of injury.
ClasB 22.—Canning or preparation of
fruit, vegetables, fish, or foodstuffs;
pickle-factories and sugar-refineries.
Class 23.—Bakeries; manufacture of
diments.
biscuit or confectionery, spices, or eon-
Class 24.—Manufacture of tobacco,
cigars, cigarettes, or tobacco products.
Class 25.—Manufacture of cordage,
ropes, fibre, brooms, or brushes; work
in manlla or hemp.
Class 26.—Flax-mills; manufacture of
textilos or fabrics, spinning or weaving,
and knitting manufactories; manufacture of yarn, thread, hosiery, cloth,
blankets, carpots, canvas, bags, shoddy,
or felt.
Class 27.—Manufacture of mon'si or
Certain Common Law Rules Abrogated, women's clothing,   whitewear,   shirts,
R.S.B.C. 1011, c. 82 | collars, corsets, hatB, caps,    fun,    or
101. A workman shall hereafter bejro5K'
deemed not to havo undertaken the,
risks due to the negligence of his fellow-workmen, and contributory negligence on the part of a workman shall
not hereafter be a bar to recovery by,
him or by any person entitled to damages under the "Families Compensation
Act" in an action for the recovery of
damages for an injury sustained by or
causing the death of the workman while
in the service of his employer for which
the employer would otherwise have been
liable.
Contributory Negligence to be Considered in Assessing Damages.
102. Contributory negligence on the
part of the workman shall nevertheless
be taken into account in assessing the
damages in any such action.
Farm-Laborers and Domestic Servants
Excluded.
103. This Act shall not apply to farm-
laborers or domestic or menial servants
or their employers.
Repeals R.S.B.O. 1011, c. 244 and c. 74.
104. The "Workmen's Compensation
Act," being chapter 244 of the "Revised Statutes of British Columbia,
1911," and the "Employers' Liability
Act," being chapter 74 of the "Revised Statutes of British Columbia,
1911,"  are hereby repealed.
Date when Fart to Take Effect.
105. This Part shall take effect on,
from, and after the day named in the
Proclamation mentioned in section 3.
SCHEDULES.
SCHEDULE 1.
Industries the Employers In Which Are
Liable to Contribute to the Accident Fund.
Class 1.—Lumbering; logging, river-
driving, rafting, booming; sawmills,
shingle-mills, lathe-mills; manufacture
of voneer and of excelsior; manufacture of staves, spokes, or headings.
Class 2.—Pulp and paper mills.  ,
ClaBB 3.—Manufacture of furniture,
interior woodwork, organs, pianos, piano
actions, ennoes, small boats, coffins,
wicker and rntan ware; upholstering;
manufacture of mattresses or bed-
springs.
Class 4.—Planing-mills, sash and door
factories, manufacture of wooden and
corrugated paper-box ch, cheese-boxos,
mouldings, window and door screens,
window-shades, carpet-sweepers, wooden toys, articles, and wares or baskets.
Class 5.—Mining; reduction of ores
and smelting; preparation of metals or
minerals.
Class 6.—Quarries; sand, shale, clay,
or gravel pits, lime-kilns; manufacture
of brick, tile, terro-cotta, fire-proofing,
or paving-blocks; manufacture of cement, asphalt, or paving material.
Class 7.—Manufacture of glass, glass
products, glassware,, porcelain, or pottery.
Class 8.—Iron, steel, or metal foundries; rolling-mills; manufacture of castings, forgings, heavy engines, locomo-
Class 28.—Power laundries; dyeing,
cleaning, or bleaching.
Class 29.—Printing, photo-engraving,
engraving, lithographing, embossing;
manufacture of stationery, paper, cardboard boxes, bags, or wall-paper; and
bookbinding.
Class 30.—Heavy teaming or cartage;
fe-moving or moving of boilers,
heavy machinery, building-stone, and
the like; warehousing, storage.
Class 31.—Stone cutting or dressing;
marble-works; manufacture of artificial
stone.
Class 32.—Steel building and bridge
construction; installation of elevators,
fire-escapes, boilers, engines, or heavy
machinery.
Class 33.—Brick-laying, mason-work,
stone-setting, concrete-work, plastering; and manufacture of concrete
blocks.
Clnss 34.—Structural carpentry.
Class 35.—Painting, decorating, or
renovating; sheet-metal work and roofing.
Class 36.—Plumbing, sanitary or
heating engineering, operation of passenger or freight elevators, theatre
stage or moving pictures, including the
operation of passenger or freight elevators used in connection with an industry to which this Schedule does not
apply,-or in connection with a warehouse or shop or an office or other building or premises.
Class 37.—Sewer-construction, deep
excavation, tunnelling, shaft-sinking,
and well-digging.
Clnss 38.—Construction, installation,
or operation of electric-power lines or
appliance?, and powor - transmission
lines.
ClaBB 30.—Construction or operation
of telegraph or telephone lines.
Class 40.—Road-making or repair of
roads with machinery.
Class 41.—Construction or operation
of railways, street-railways, incline railways, and aerial tromways. *
Class 42.—Ship-building.
Class 43.—-Navigation.
Class 44.—Dredging, subaqueous construction, or pile-driving.
SCHEDULE 2.
Industries the Employers ln Which Are
Individually Liable to Pay the
Compensation.
1. The construction or operation of
railways operntod by steam, but not
their construction when constructed by
any person other than the company
which owns or oporates the railway.
2. The construction or operation of
car-shops, machine-shops, steam and*
power plants, and other works for the
purposes of any such railway or used
or to be used in connection with it
when constructed or operated by tho
company which owns or operates the
railway.
3. The construction or operation of
telephone-lines and works for the purposes of any such railway or operated
or to be operated in conjunction with
it when constructed or operated by the
2rf? SSSr7'-^ Tw**' ca*,eM™mp"aVwM^ £
rails, shafting,    wires,   tubing,   pipes,[railway.
sheet metal, boilers, furnaces,   stoves,
structural steel, iron, or metal.
Class 9.—Car-shops.
Class 10.—Manufacture of small castings or forgings, metal wares,   instruments, utensils, and articles, hardware,
nails, wire goods, screens, bolts, metal
bods, sanitary, water, gas; or electric
fixtures,   light machines,   typewriters,
cash  registers,  adding-machineB, carriage mountings, bicycles,    metal    toys,
tools, cutlery,  instruments, sheet-metal
products, buttons of motal, ivory, pearl,
or horn.
Class 11.—Mnnufncruro of agricultu-
.    . -..-«- .ral     implements,     thraBhing-machinoB,
ing within tho scope of his employment, traction-engines, wagons, carriages,
the workman or, if the injury results a\eiR_St vehicles, automobiles, motor-
in death, the lega personal represen- trucks, toy wagons, slolgbs, or baby
tntives of tho workman nnd nnyper- nni-Plnfl>«n • ■■■ "
carriages.
Class 12.—Manufacture of gold or
silver ware, plated ware, watches,
watch-cases, clocks, jewellery, or musical instruments.
Clnss 13.—Manufacture of chemicals
or explosives, corrosive acids or salts,
nmmonin, calcium carbide, gasolene, pe-
",   - . .._ ,- --        itroleum, potroleum products, celluloid,
tho workman or by or on behalf of per- j        charcoal, artificial ice, gunpowder,
sons entitled to   damages   under   the "   ammunition
Families Compensation   Act," _they,    CInM   14,_Mnmifacture
son entitled in case of death shnll have j
nn action against the employer, nnd if
tho action is brought by the workman
ho Bhall bo entitled to recover from the
employer tho damages sustained by the
workman by or in consequence of the
injury, and if the action is brought by
the legal personal   representatives   of
shall be entitled to recover such damages as they are entitled to under the
Act.
Liability of Person Suplying Defective
Ways, Works, Plant, etc.
(2.) Where the execution of any
work is being carried Into effect under
any contrnct, nnd the person for whom
the work Ib done owns or supplies any
ways, workB, machinery, plant, buildings, or premises, and by reoBon of any
defect in the condition or arrangement
of them personal injury is caused to
a workman employed by the contractor
or by nny sub-contractor, and tho defect arose from tho negligence of the
person for whom the work or any part
of it is done or of pome person in his
service and acting within tho scope of
his employment, the person for whom
tho work or that part of the work is
done shall be liable to the action as
if the workman had been employed by
him, and for that purpose shall be
doomed to be the employer of tho workman within tho meaning of thiB Act;
but any such contractor or sub-contractor shall be liable to tho action as if
this subsection had not been enacted,
of paint,
colour, varnish, oil, japans, turpentine,
printing-ink, printers' roljers, tar,
tarred, pitched, or asphalted paper.
CIbbb 15.—Distillerios, breweries;
manufacture of spirituous or malt
liquors, alcohol, wine, vinegar, mineral
wntor, or soda waters.
Class 10.—Manufacture of non-hazardous chemicals, drugs, medicines, dyes,
oxtracts, pharmaceutical or toilet preparations, soups, candles, perfumes,
non-corrosive acids or chemical preparations; shoe blacking or polish.
Class 17.—Milling; manufacture of
cereals or cattle-foods, warehousing or
handling of grain or operation of grain-
elevators.
Class 18.—Packing houBes, abattoirs,
manufacture or preparation of meats or
moat products or glue.
CIcbb 10.—Tanneries.
Class 20.—Manufacture of leather
goods and products, belting, saddlery,
harness, trunks, vnlises, boots, shoes,
gloves, umbrellas, rubber goods, rubber
shoos, tubing, tires, or hose.
ClasB 21.—Manufacture of dairy products, butter, cheese, -ifplensed milk or
cream.
4. The construction or operation of
telegraph lines and works for tho purposes of any such railway or operated
or to be operated in conjunction with
it when constructed or operated by tho
company which owns or operates the
railway.
5. The construction or operation of
steam-vessels and works in connection
therewith for the purposes of any such
railway or operated or to be operated
in conjunction with it when constructed
or operated by tho company which owns
or operates the railway.
6. The operation of the business of an
express company which oporates on or
in conjunction with any such railway,
or of Bleeping, parlour, or dining cars,
whether operated by tho railway company, or by an express, Bleeping, parlour, or dining car company.
SCHEDULE 3.
Description of Disease and Description
of Process.
Anthrax—Handling of wool, hair,
bristles, hides, and skins.
Lead poisoning or its sequelae—Any
process involving the use of lead or its
preparations or compounds.
Mercury poisoning or its sequelae—
Any process involving tho use of mercury or its preparations or compounds.
PhosphoruB poisoning or Its sequelae
—Any process involving the use of
phosphorus or its preparations or com-
Arsenic poisoning or its sequelae—
Any process involving the ubo of arsenic or its preparations or compounds,
Ankylostomiasis—Mining.
VICTORIA, B. C.
Printed by William H. Cullen, Printer
to the King's Most Excellent
Majesty.
1915.
Calgary Unions Are Fighting
Tho labor unions in Calgary are fighting like Trojans to maintain their wago
scale in face of the unprecedented unemployment which prevails there, and
the decision of the city authorities to
reduce salaries and wages all round.
B.C.
B.C.
Distillery
1 —>*fw>^wp—■■—_B—___w_t—-——mst_
Co., Ltd.
__ma_______m__m_____mam_aimm__
■   Established 1903
B. C. Special
Whisky
Nine Years in Wood
UNSURPASSED
IN QUALITY
AND FLAVOR
ASK FOR SAMPLE
BOTTLE AT ANY
LIQUOR STORE
B.C. Whisky
Is a
HOME PRODUCT
Ask for -*B. CSpecial"
"Satisfaction—or Money Back, at Any Grocer's."    -
ESTABLISHED 1904.
B. C. VINEGAR WORKS
Mamifacturers of
Vinegar - Cider - Sauerkraut
BRANDS:
"Sunset" Malt and White Wine Vinegar, "Special" Malt and
White Wine Vinegar, "Mackenile's" Malt Md White Wine Vinegar,
Okanagan Older Vinegar, Okanagan Sweet Older, Boiled Older, B. O.
Sauerkraut.
Manufactured In Bond under Inland Revenue Supervision.
Factory:   1366 POWELL 81, VANCOUVEB, B. O.
CAPACITY 15,000 GALLONS PES MONTH
Manager:  Junes H. falconer Phone:  Highland 285
HealthfulnesB, combined with good flavor and taste, means real quality ln
Beer. These are Impossible without the
very best material and the highest order of treating.  In
PREMIER BEER
we provide the public with a good palatable and wholesome Beer of the highest duality.
Order a ease from yonr own dealer.
New Westminster Brewery
PREMIER
Pancake and Waffle Flour
Best Ever - Agreeable To All Sense
MADE IN VANCOUVER
How Can I Make a Success
Of the Poultry Business?
EASILY    AN8WEBBD
Use an Essex Model Hot
Air or Jubilee Hot Water Incubator, and an International Sanitary Hover.
SUCCESS WILL
POLLJW
Wa specialise ln all
kinds of Poultry Sup-]
piles.
MARK DUMOND
Hardware and McOormlck Farm Machinery
1048 MAIN STBBET Write for Catalogue and Pricei] *****
mm
mmnm
FRIDAY   APRIL 2, 1915
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
PAGEliVE
"(Bailt ior Wear.
Made In   5s^
British
Columbia
le
■rt
EASTER-—the
season which
announces springtime is
a good time to try a
pair of LECKIE
SHOES
You'll find real loot comfort, linked with itrle In every pair of
LECKIE '8.
And you'll find nil leather—the choicest on the market. You'll flnd
a pair of LECKIE'S will outwear moit other makei and they will atay
"new" beyond your own expectations. LECKIE SHOES are made to
"make the flrat sale"—they are built up to the highest standard and we
stand behind every pair.   The name LECKIE la your QUABANTEE.
Leading Shoe Dealers Everywhere Sell
LECKIE SHOES
p
LACE your order to-day with your Grocer for
TETLETS TEAS
War-times Make Hard Times, bnt in Spite of This There Is
no Change ln the Price of
Tdlcy'S 40C TEA— b,ttM r*a* u"n ****-** obtainable at all
grocers for 40c. per pound, NOT 46c. PER POUND.
Those Wbo Are Not Already TETLBT Drinkers should take thia
opportunity to make a permanent change to any of the lines of theae
world-famous Teas aa sold at 40c, 50c. and 60c. per pound.
"BOSINBSS AS USUAL."
A*
LL UNION MEN
SHOULD HAVE THEIR WIVES ORDER
Gong Soups 5
c. Per
Tablet
Six Tablets for 28c.
Made ln Six Varieties
TOMATO, MULLIGATAWNY, OX TAIL
PEA, MOCKTURTLE, SCOTCH BROTH
Each Tablet is sufficient for three portions
Corneille David & Co.
Distributing Agent!
Toronto, Montreal, Winnipeg, Etc.
R
"Canada's Best Flour"
oyal Household Flour
SHOULD BE IN THE HOME OP
EVERY UNION MAN IN BRITISH COLUMBIA
Telephone your grocer an order to-day. "QUALITY THE BEST."
The Ogilvie Flour Mills Company, Ltd.
o
RDER Your Coal Today
The Main Supply Co.
102S MAIN STBEET
Are selling the famous MIDDLESBORO COAL
MINED IN MEBBITT, B.O.
LUMP $6.75        NUT $5.50 TON
Phone SEYMOUR 8491 A LITTLE BURNS LONG
Gardens
Pender St, W. near Richards
BRITISH PATRIOT
ROBBERS OF
I POOR
Shipping; Shareholders Reap
Rich Harvest from
Dearer Food   ..
Why  Liberal Government
Does Not Control
Food Supply
UNION SHOP
Juat a whisper off Granville, 704 Robson Street
The DELMONICO
VANCOUVER'S LEADING CAFE
Harry Beokner.   Ervin Switser.    Phone Sey, 3343.   VANCOUVEB, B.O.
BeiUUaco: ssss Blnh stmt.
Hum:    Btjrlnr 1S0SB
Ofloe:   494 Birks BalUlnf
Phona:   Seymour 707S
Vancouver, B. 0.
DR. A. McKAY JORDAN
*** 20 Yean a Spedallat
Byes Examined    —     Olanai Fitted
Pirsonal consultation Friday aal Saturday
ElsMeen tfconsanS patients In A, 0,, Sheet-
ul> of wkom previously suSerti from
chronic stomaoh aal Hurt tronUos, Back
anl Headache, tn Imoranoe of the am.
Don't ToU Ho Tour Troubles.   I'U Mud
thon.
Boforoico:   Huofor of thli paper.
EVERYMAN'S LIBRARY
Tho moot Important, tbo moot wondorfnl anl tho moit popular library o
linod.  Ono hundred Tolamoi to ootoet from.
SEND rOB LIST
THOMSON STATIONERY CO., LIMITED
OeskeU Book * Stationery Oo., Itl.
325 BwUnit Street Wort 679*881 Oranvlllo Street
[Note—Food prlcea ln Britain have
reached mch a high figure that wagei
no longer niffice to purchaae the neceial-
Uei of life. Th* remit ia strikes aad
minora of itrlkea for higher wagea. The
retort of the Liberal government to
these demand! ia that lt will itwlf take
complete control of. all lnduitry as lt affect! the war. Borne ministerial newipaper! have gone so far aa to raggeit
that the' government should prosecute
•trlkeri under the Defence of the Bealm
act. , Demands have been made ln parliament, huge protest meetings have
been held all over the country demanding that the government take control of
the food supply. It is made plain that
the supply Is all sufficient, but the shipping Interests, freed from German competition, have a monopoly, and are gouging the working class to the last limit
of endurance. The government refuses
to move, One of the probable reasons
la made plain ln a recent lime of the
Labor Leader over the signature of 3.
T. Walton Newbold. It constitutes an
indictment aa damnable as that where*
in the Leader some time ago exposed
the relations between the armament
Anns and the house of commons. The
article is here reproduced for the lnfor
mation of Federationlit readers. Comment Ib unnecessary beyond the remind,
er that this the Liberal government,
"the friend of the people."—Editor
Federatlonist.]
Amongst the several causes to whieh
the rise in the cost of the necessaries of
life Is attributable, none is so potent as
the high freightages which the shipowners are charging in the favorable cir
cumstances in which they now   find
themselves.   Say these patriots, of the
shipping "pools" in their organ,   the
Journal of Commerce, November 27th:
The opportunities  now open to
British shipping are obvious. There
are no more out rates by subsidised
German vessels,   German ships being swept off the seas, we have now
no serious competitors in the carrying trode of the world.
At the same time that the German
mercantile marino has been cleared off
the ocean, the  German  cruisers  have
been   destroyed .and  their  commerce-
destroying   capabilities    ao    seriously
checked that war risks have fallen to
1% per cent., with a consequent fall in
insurance premiums,    tfuge profits are
being netted by the owners of ''our"
merchant shipping, *who   pursue   their
nefarious commerce   most   advantageously behind the shelter of the British
fleet.
Wat Brings Profits.
From a certain   financial   source   1
have culled this exquisite flower of capi
talist philosophy:
It is an axiom that war brings
big profits to shipowners, for (n)
we keep the seas free for our own
mercantile   fleet,   while   those   of
enemy nations are forced to remain
idle; (b) after the   war   there is
enormous carrying work to be done
on behalf of the exhausted belligerents,   who   must   replenish   their
stocks from abroad.
Wo aro told, moreover, that freight
rates have risen with astonishing rapidity, and that, in  spite   of  delays,
higher rates of wages   and   coal and
heavier insurance, "the business pays
handsomely."   Freight UneB are what
you should put your money on, or in,
at this juncture, for it is considered by
"shipping experts" that tne profits of
these lines "will probably average during 1015 an increase or SO per cent,
over those of 1914."
Can't you hoar the prayer of the
shipowners: "Oh, God, 'we thank
Thee for the President of the Board of
Trade, the londline, and the British
Fleet, from whom we profit would
without end, Amen."
Dividends of Shipping Companies
Trade is going to be good for these
gentlemen. Not, of course, that it has
been so bad in tho past.. The following
are aome of the dividends earned in re*
cent years:
Anchor Line—Capital, £575,000. Dividends: . 1912, 714 per cent.; 1913,, 15;
1914, 15.
P. A 0. Lino—Capital, £3,500,000. Dividends: 1912, 15 per cent.; 1913, 15;
1914, not announced.
B. M. 8. P. Line—Capital, £4,200,000.
1912, 6 per cent.; 1913, 6; 1914, not announced.
Manchester Liners—Capital, £451,790.
Dividends: 1913, 714 per cent; 1914, fi.
Lamport A Holt,—Capital, £1,000,000.
Dividends: 1912, S per cent.; 1913, 8;
1914, not announced.
Field Line—Capital, £200,000. Dividends: 1912, 10 per cent.; 1913, 10;
1014,10.
Furness, Withy & Co.—Capital, £3,500,
000.    Dividends:    1912, 10 per cent.;
1913, 10; 1914, 10.
Moor Line—Capital, £386,490.   Dividends:   1912, 15   per   cent.; 1913, 25;
1914, not announced.
These are but a few, and are representative of the cargo rather than the
passenger traffic, which, at present, is
not paying.
The system of interlocking director-
ates and mutual holding of each other's
capital has proceeded %o such a length
that it ia scarcely practicable to consider them apart from each other. There
are two main clusters, the one grouped
Sir Owen. Philippe and the Boyal Mail
Steam Packet Company, and the other
about the Booth, interests and the Furness, Withy line.
The Furness interests are closely allied with the Vickers section of the armament firms; the International Mercantile Marine with Hanand and Wolff
and John Brown and Co., as well as
with Lamport and Holt and the Boyal
Mall Steam Packet.
- Armaments, shipowning, shipbuilding,
iron and steel, engineering, coal mining,
oil, transport, and finance are but. sec*
tions of one immense Battle line, terrible as the host! of tne Kaiser and,
like him, responsive to a common impulse, legions of the great tyranny of
capitalism.
Walter Bundman's £2,500 a Year.
Labor ia calling upon .the. government to take action against the monopolists, to deal with the shipowners, to
legislate or to temper the administration in the Interests of the workers.
IS
Methods  Since  Hypocrisy
Became Gospel of Social Salvation
But Not One Step Taken
Towards Any Effective
Lasting Remedy
The Labor party asks the President of „f*fMMU«,11*0l»f *° *i0,-> tow*
the Board of Trade to appoint a repre- S".?™ "Ww sl*W « the unemployed.
All things come to thoie who wail*,
ppoint a repre*
sentojtive of the transport workers to
the oommlttee of Inquiry into the congestion of the ports, and meets with a
rebuff. It demands that he shall assume control of the merchant shipping
in order to bring down prices and reduce freightage, gets no satisfaction.
Is the Labor party aware that in the
latest share list of the Moor Line
(which pay! a dividend of 25 per cent.)
he appeara aa the holder of 1,012
shares of £10 each! Is it aware that Ub
father, Sir Walter Bunciman, the member for Hartlepool, is chairman of the
company with a holding of £87,8001
The company's telegraphic address is
"Bunciman, Newcastle." We wonder
whether the President of the Board of
Trade should be addressed as "Bunciman and Son, Whitehall"!
Perhaps the tram-pore workers remember a certain Bight Hon. Sydney
Buxton, also sometime President of the
Board of TVade, holder of £3,200 in the
Boyal Mail Steam Packet Company) At
the Admiralty they may find Mr.
George Lambert,* M. P., Under Secretary, with £7,000 in Furness, Withy
and Co.
Then there is the member for Haver-
ford West, a loyal supporter of Mr.
Lloyd George, the heroic raiser of tbe
load-line. We refer to the chairman
of the Boyal Mail Steam Packet and
the Union Castle Lines, lately member
of the Boyal Commission on Shipping
Blngs (!), vice-chairman of the Port of
London Authority, Sir Owen Philipps,
M. P. There iB his brother, a director
of the Court and the King Lines (oh,
these patriotsl), Col. Ivor Philipps, the
member for Southampton.
There is Lord Claud Hamilton, M. P.,
of the British Indian Steam Navigation
Co., Ltd., Mr. Fred Hall, M. P., shareholder in Furness, Withy & Co., Sir J.
D. Bees, M. P, shareholder in the EUer-
man Lines, and the dockers' kindly
mentor, Mr. B. D. Holt, M. P., debenture trustee of the Booth Lino, director
of the China Mutual Steam Navigation
Co., and Alfred Holt A Co.
Peers and M. p.'s aa Shareholders.
Below we give a list of peors and
members of the Ho.*.-;c of Commons
whose interests do not always coincide
with those of the workerB, who are now
suffering by reason of heavy   freight
CENTER & HANNA, Lti
UNDERTAKERS
Refined Service
1041 GEORGIA STRUT
One Block weit of Court House.
Use of Modern Chapel and
Funeral Parlors free to all
Patrons
Telephone Seymour 2425
HARRON BROS.
FUNBRAL   DIRICTORS  AND
EMBALMERS
Vancouver—Ofllce and Chapel,
1034 Oranvllle St., Phone Sey. 8lB«,
North Vancouver — Ofllce and
Chapel, 122-Slxth Bt West, Phone
1J4.
The Earl of Albemarle (shareholder
Manchester Liners.
The Earl of Corrick (debenture trustee, Elder Line.
The Earl of Harrowby (shareholder
in trust, Ellerman Line!.)
Viscount Hampden (debenture trustee, Orient S. Navigation.)
Viscount Ridley (Shareholder, Ellerman Lines.)
Lord Airedale (director, London and
Northern Steamship Co.)
Lord Allendale (shareholder, Boyal
Mail Steam Packet.)
Lord Allerton (debenture trustee,
Brocklebank Line.)
Lord Balfour of Burleigh (director
Peninsular and Orient Line.)
Lord Berwick (shareholder, Furness,
Withy.)
Lord Boxall (shareholder, Furness,
Withy.)
Lord Burghclcre (director, Peninsular and Orient Line.)
-Lord Furness (director, Furness,
Withy and Houlder Lines and Furness*
Houlder Argentine Lines.)
Lord Gorell (shareholder, Lamport
and Holt.)
Lord Inchcape (director of British
India S. Navigation, Peninsular and
Orient Line, Australian U. S. Navigation, and debenture trustee of General
Steam Navigation Cos.*)
Lord Inverclyde (director, Cunard
Line.)
Lord Kennedy (shareholder, Lamport
and Holt.)
Lord Killbracken (shareholder, British India S. Navigation.)
Lord J&nburnholme (director, Wilson Line.")'
Lord Nugent (director, African Line,
International Mercantile Marine, Union
Castle Line, White Star Line, Leyland
Line, Lamport and Holt.)
Lord Bevelstoke (debenture trustee,
Cunard Line.)
Lord Bowollan (shareholder in trust,
Shaw, Savill, and Albion Line.)
Lord St. Davids (director, King
Line.)
Lord Wynford (director, Court Line.)
C. P. Allan, M. P., (shareholder B. M.
S P. Co.)
Sir J. Harmood Banner, M. P. (director, British and African S. N. Co., debenture trusteo, Imperial Direct Line
and Elder Line.)
Sir Edward Bcauchnmp, M.P. (director, Indo-Chlna Steam Navigation
Co.)
J. H. M. Campbell, M P. (shareholder,
Furness, Withy & Co.)
Sir F. Cawley, M. P. (shareholder,
Manchester Liners.)
Sir C. J. Cory, M. P. (shareholder, B.
M. S. P. Co.)
Sir J. F. Fortescue, M. P. (shareholder, Houlder Line.)
Hon. C. H. O. Guest, M. P. (director
Cressiugton Steamship Line.)
G. B. Haddock, M. P. (director, Ley-
land Shipping Co., Wesford Line.)
Sir C. S. Henry, M. P. (shareholder,
Furness, Withy Line.
R. P. Houston, M. P. (shareholder,
Lamport and Holt.)
Henry Keswick, M. P. (director,
Indo-Chlna S. N. Co.)
W; F. Lawrence, M. P. (shareholder,
B. M. S. P. Oo.)
Sir J. B. Lonsdale, M. P. (share,
holder, Anchor Line.)
Sir C. E. Swann, M. P. (shuroholdor,
Lamport and Hull, Ellerman Lines, B.
M S. P. Co.)
Sir S. E. Scott, M. P. (shareholder,
R. M. S, P. Co.)
Joaiah 0. Wedgwood, M. P. (shareholder, Moor Line.)
John W. Wilson, M. P. (shareholder,
Moor Line.)
G. G. Wilson, M. P. (director, Wilson
Line.
The list of members of the House of
Common's Interested in shipping companies would be considerably extended
If they wait long enough something
will come—either death or a job. In
either case the problem of unemployment is solved, observe! the Milwaukee
Leader.
So wai the problem lolved thie time.
During the winter months there was
misery to the point of death and desperation in million! of American homes.
During thia time there was more hypocritical sniveling rot poured out about
the problem of the-unemployed than
was ever' distributed over an equal
amount of territory since hypocrisy be-'
came the orthodox goipel of social salvation.
. Thero was the charity rot, the scientific investigation rot, tho whole mess
of demagogic political, rot, all mixed
together into a sort of social "mulligan/' from which the unemployed were
supposed to obtain relief. A dozen citfes
promised "immediate relief," and are
still faintly promising. There were investigations enough to satisfy even the
most stupid that hungry men and women and children need food and to
teach a few that the way to relieve the
unemployed is to employ them.
But not one step was taken towards
any effective permanent relief.
Now spring is almost here and the
regular stories are appearing about the
great need of men on the farms. This
is the inevitable, final, favorite aoliition
of the problem of the unemployed
among the dispensers of social hypocrisy.
Here is the way the solution is applied. One job, 500 miles from the city
to be "relieved," is offered to ten unemployed In the city who cannot leave
their present location. Then the problem has been solved. There are more
jobs than workers.
This is the way the new government
employment agencies—one in every
post office, Count 'em—are going to
solve the problem.*
Those unemployed wto nave a trade,
a home, a family or anything else that
causes a foolish attraction for one place
are respectfully notified that if th& solution does not apply to them, they
should get rid of their encumbrances,
as soon as possiblo and become "bundle
stiffs."
But they should not expect to get a
job when they have bo fitted themselves. They will then be "bums," unworthy of consideration, and will be
clubbed off the earth. Thus the problem will be solved once more.
ISN'T IT A PUZZLES?
Simon Newcomb, the American as*
tronomcr, who turned his mind to economics and wrote a book on that sub*
ject,a imagined a visitor from Mars conversing with a man on earth to some
such effect as this:
Why is everybody so terribly de-
:«edt"
Because there is great depression in
trade and industry."
"And why is thatt"
^ "There has been a great overproduction of things, people have been thrown
out of employment  and  evorybody is
poor."
"Overproduction of whatf"
"Of everything, nearly—of food,
which is so cheap that agriculture is
ruined; of manufactures, which are so
low in price that there is no longer any
proflt in production."
"Then, the season everybody il poor
is that they have produced more gdods
than they can consumef Your ebuntry
is overflowing with goods, and yet you
think yourselves poor?"
And the man of earth was pusxled
how to answer.—Los Angeles Citixen.
had not the Government been bo lib-
oral with its gifts of peerages, nine of
which, at least, have gono to leading
figures in the shipping world. This fact
is perhaps the clearest Indication of the
Government's friendship towards the
plundering shipping rings.
I have only searched the UbIs of
seventeen companies, not Including
many of the most influential lines; this
directory should not, therefore, be
taken as -exhaustive. Yet it is an illuminating guide to the manners and cub*
toms of our legislators, and shows how
firmly entrenched are the apostles of
Capitalism in the councils of the nation. t
3. T. WALTON NEWBOLD.
fRENNIES SEEDS
OUR 1915 CATALOGUE IS FREE a
Write, Call or Phone for a Copy TO-DAY
Wm. RENNIE CO., Ltd
1138 Homer St Phone Sey 8550. Vancouver, B. C.
Alio at Toronto, Montreal and Winnipeg
WHITE STAR SERVICE lARGESrV^CmflA
PORTLAND, MAINE • HALIFAX - LIVERPOOL
Valor tke British Hat
SS. "HORTHLAND" (Twin Strew, 19,000 Tom) SB. "BODTHLAID"
OaMa aal Tain Oass Only
Portland li the nurast Canadian ■enrice winter port.   Train pmooedt to look.
Lnitsso cheeked through to stumor.   No trailer; ao troiblo wilh eaitona.
AMERICAN LINE
Larfs fast American steamers.   Operated aaler the American lu.   Weekly
Eipnn Service.   New York-Liverpool.   Cabin and Thirl Clou Oaljr.
,        SB. -'Philadelphia," April 10th SS. "St. Louis," April ITIk
SS. "St. Paaf" April 9«th SB. "Now Terk,'^br >S
Oompur'l OOeos:    IIS 1BOOMD AVWTOl, SBATTL1, WB.
USE ONLY
SHAMROCK
LEAF
PURE LARD
VANCOUVER
Pn A   n VANCOUVER
. Burns & Co., u _jgg_
HAMILTON OABHAETT
The world's largest Overall Manufacturer.
VANCOUVEB, B. O.
Toronto, Detroit, Liverpool, Dallas, Atlanta   you.
Mr. UNION MAN
Do yen believe In Brltlih Columbia;
LET ni stud together
My long yeara of experience ku
made Carhartt'a overalls perfection.
I nave opened a factory in Vancouver
to supply British Columbia trade.
THB WOBK IB DONE BIGHT
HEBB BT UNION LABOB.
BIB. UNION MAN, if year dealer
won't supply yon Carhartt 'a overalls,
■end me a postal with yonr waist and
leg measure, and I wiu see that von
get them.
Write me anyhow for a weekly time
book, engineer's time book, or farmer's account'book.  Theee are free to
Named Shoes we frequently made ia Not-
Union F»ctoriei-Do Not Bay Any Shoe
no matter what Its name, unless It beers a
plain and readable Impression or this stamp.
All shoes without the Union stamp are
alwaya Non-Union.
BOOT A SHOE WORKERS' UNION
246 Bummer Street, Boston, Mass.
J. r. Tobln, Free.   C. L. Blaine, Sec.-Treas
JINGLE POT COAL
UNION MINED AT NANAIMO
MORE HEAT-LASTS LONGER
THIS COAL WILL SAVE YOU MONEY-TRY A TON
Lump, $7.00; Nut, $5.50; Pea, $4.00; Slack, $4.00; Briquettes, $6.00
.   WOOD, Choicest Dry Fir, 13.00 per load
McNEILL, WELCH & WILSON, Limited
formerly
VANCOUVER OOAL OOMPANY
TELEPHONES :  SEYMOUR 5408 and 5409
1
HOTEL REGENT Ah*»lutely Fireprept   Local and Lont-Dieuince
T'.Y.       ., ...   Phone In Every Room.Ca(e In Connection. Rates
11.00 per day up.    Attractive Rates to Permanent Quests.
OotUnibam A Beatty. Proprietors  in Button Itnsl IM
26% OFF ALL TRUSSES THIS MONTH
' BED STAB DBUO STOBE.
53 Cordova Street West Vancouver, B. 0.
Phone: Fairmont 810
Patterson & Chandler
Manufacturer! of
MONUMENTS
Vault*, Curbing, Etc.
Offlce and Works:
Cor. 16th Ave. and Main St.
Branch Offlce: 40th A Fraaer Avea.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
ALL   UNION   STORES   DISPLAY
THIS CARD
Pkoae Soy. 221 DajorNifkt
Nun, Thomson & Clegs
'      FUNERAL DIRECTORS
and EMBALMERS
SU *—tttt St.        Vaacemr, R. C.
*> VANCOUVER ->
City Market
MAIN STREET
A TT r T T rt K Are Md every Tuesday and
A U V J- J V/ll Friday at 10 A. M.  H you
QATFQ reanjr wiBh to reduce the
OnLDu cost of living, you can do so
Potatoes
by attending: the AUCTION
SALES
At Market Prices; these are
the lowest prices in Vancouver. Stock always fresh
and in best condition
Vodai_ hloe   AH kinds at most reasonable
YCgClaUlCO   prices; in quantities to suit
all buyers.
Large variety winter stock
at $1.00 and $1.25 per Box
Apples ■ ■
Now    T aid   Are now arrivin* in large
i'vff    uaiu  quantities. You can always
1? P r* C   re,y on Eggs which are sold
liUUO  as new laid
AT THE CITY MARKET .-■m?
PAGE SIX.
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
tfBIDAY  APBIL
2, 1915
HOTEL ST. REGIS
H. TOLFORD FITZSIMMONS, Manafcer
Greater Vancouver's
Newest Hotel
European Plan
RATES:
$1.00 per Day and Up
Seymour & Dunsmuir Sts. Vancouver
One Block from Labor Temple
ORGANIZATION FOR
I
PI
General Organizer Kinney
Here to Assist Work of
Organization
Hopes to Spend Some Time
Here and Put Unions
in Better Shape
J. A. Kinney, general organizer for
the United Brotherhood of Carpenters
and Joiners, with headquarters at Edmonton, Alberta, arrived in Vancouver
on Sunday last, accompanied by Mrs.
Kinney. Organizer Kinney has been
directed by headquarters to come here
and assist in every way possible the
carpenters' organizations, and he bas
lost no time in carrying out instructions. Several conferences with local
active members of the various locals
have been held during the week and
these are apt to develop into a few
man meeting! later on.   At any rate
it will not be Mr. Kinney's fault if
some improvement does not accrue aa a
result of his visit. Admittedly loeal
conditions in the building trades are
anything but brisk, but a slight improvement has been noticeable during
tho past week or two in the matter of
building permits.
Organizer Kinney, who has been associated with the U. B. of C. and J. in
the Northwest prairie territory for the
past number of years, is a man of considerable experience and ability. A
year ago last December he was elected
as an alderman in the city of Edmonton for a two-year term, and ho figures
tbat not only will he be re-elected next
time, but that he will have company
from labor's ranks,
Special Meeting of Local 617
A meeting wai hel(l in Labor Temple
last Monday evening with . Organizer
Kinney and a number of the members
of local union No. 617 of the carpenters
present. The situation of the trade
here vas discussed, as also were many
matters pertaining to extending and
holding together the union during these
bad times.
A special meeting of local union 617 is
called in Labor Temple for next Monday night at 8 o'clock. All old members, whether still members or not, are
specially requested to be present. The
meeting will be open and informal.
Matters of special interest to those
members who. have -fallen behind by
reason of the bad times will be taken
up and they are urged to be there.
DOB WORLD REALLY
IE
?
If Feeling Expressed Had
Sufficient Depth Wars
• Could Not Go on
Wealth That Lies Buried in
the Big Possibilities of
Human Growth
Pessimiim ie the state of mind of the
frog who buries himself in a mud bank
and mourns beeause there are no stars
there.
ALD. J. A. KINNBT
General Organizer for the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and'joiners, of
Edmonton, Alberta, who is now inVancouver on official business. Or.
ganizer Kinney is serving his second year as alderman in the Northern
Alberta Capital City.
What About the Wages.
In Birmingham it ib said that between 60,000 and 70,000 artisans have
enlisted and that the places of a large
proportion have been taken by women
earning 12s. a week!
In Northampton boot making, factories, the employers attempted to em*
ploy women on men's work. The Boot
and Shoe Operatives' trade union objected because they thought that the
introduction of women workers would
bring the prices down. The shortage of
labor was met by working overtime.
This can only be a temporary expedient.
As more men go to war, more workers
will be needed. The only safe course is
to demand that if a woman is employed
she shall receive a man's pay.—Woman's Dreadnought..
"Jaures, who was worth more to
France than ten army corps and a hundred archdukes."—Bernard Shaw.
Copyright Hart Schaliucr Si Man
New Spring Hats
Snappy models for men and
young men, soft and stiff hats
from the most renowned makers
$2, $2.50, $3 and $3.50
Easter Neckwear
Ih the very latest shades of
silk. Extra values, 50c, 75c. .
Men's Silk Hosiery
With Lisle toe and heel, in popular shades, per pair, 25c.
Getting yonr money's worth
is what counts now-a-days
It calls for honest service from the man who sells you the
gbods. It calls for honest service from the goods themselves.    ■
It means paying only a small profit above the manufacturers-
cost for the clothes, the hats, the shirts and underwear you wear.
Our business is founded on just these lines.
The fact that We sell
Hart Schaffner &
Marx Clothes
(5 a pretty good indication of our quality standard
1 SUITS (15, (20, $25 and $30
=
Hotel Irving Grill Room
101 Hastings Street East
ARE YOU ONE OP THE PLEASED PATRONS
OF THE FINEST GRILL IN VANCOUVER?
FRENCH CHEF.  MUSIC 5 TO 12 P. M.
The Finest of Wines, Liquors and Cigars sold at
buffet, with courteous Union mixologists to serve
you.
JOHN L. SULLIVAN, Proprietor.
Phone: Seymour3380.
[By John 3D. Barry.]
Just. now we can aee all about ua
illustrations of different ways of caring.
Observe those people who lament over
the war and make remarks like, "Isn't
it terrible! I never thought that auch
a thing could happen in my life." They
speak aa if they cared. But do they
really care very deeply! Do they evor
think of doing anything about* the war,
of helping in any way!'
• #   *
If the whole world really cared aa
much as it seems to care, if the feeling
expressed had sufficient depth to break
spontaneously into action the war
wouldn't go on. It would have been
stopped weeks ago. In fact, if humanity had been in the habit of expressing
such feelings no monarch or president
would ever think of plunging his country into war.
■   .   .   .
Thia business of caring is .very
curious. We often think we care and
care deeply when we only care superficially or care not at all. As soon aB
the world cares deeply about poverty,
as soon as it cares enough it will, as we
say, move heaven and' earth to put an
end tdN poverty. Meanwhile, the best
those Who care or thin* they eare can
do is to express their caring, not by
words, not by saying, "Isn't it terrible!" but by doing something, by actually getting to work and keeping at
work perhaps doing only a little, but
making that little eount.
...
If for five minutes we were to think
deeply and steadily about the anguish
in the* world, the anguish that goes on
all the'time, many of us would faint
away. Would all the fainting do any
good! I believe it would not. On recovering, the people that fainted' would
be tempted to think highly of themselves, perhaps to boast, and then they
would do nothing. Ihey would take it
out in fainting.
• «   •
Now, fainting might typify a good
deal of the whining that goes on in the
world over poverty. "Bishop," • said
a young cleric, standing on the deck of
a damaged Atlantic liner that might at
any moment go down, "don't yon
think it'8 time to pray!" The bishop
replied: "I think it's tim« to work,
sir."
• t   •
There are times for putting onr burdens up to the Almighty and asking
that they be lifted from our shoulders.
And there are times when energetically
to carry our burdens Ib to give the AR
mighty our best possible worship. But
there are no times when there is &of
excuse for lamenting over onr plight or
over the plight of otners. Where the
plight is real it has invariably been
brought on by ourselves, by the conditions we, or others just like ua, have
created. Now our task is to bring it
to an end.
• «   «
There are those, it is true, who have
had the effrontery to lay the responsibility for poverty at the door of tha
house of Ood. But thla kind of blasphemy is going out of fashion. There
are few who would venture in its indulgence nowadays. Poverty is recognized for what it is, a denial of the
bounties of nature, a contradiction, a
gross and degrading paradox, a atate
that must make way before the remedies bound to release for the whole
world two kinds of wealth, the wealth
that comes out of the teeming abundance of the world and the wealth that
lies buried in the teeming possibilities
of human growth.
Men's Zimmerknit Balbriggan
Shirts and Drawers,
Just the weight to wear now.
All colors and sizes. Usually
sold at 50c. the garment,
Special 25c
B. V. D. Combinations
All sizes,  Special price, $1.25
Men's Fine Cashmere Hose
Extra value, five pairs, $1.00
Silk Hose
Extra good quality, newest
spring shades. Three pairs, $1.00
Men's Shirts
For wear and dress. Some
soft cuffs, some-stiff cuffs, negligee and' semi-stiff fronts. Some
with a separate collar to match.
Splendid values:
$1.00, $1.25, $1.50 and $2.50
HEADQUARTERS for everything a workingman needs, except shoes.   Union-made overalls, jumpers, gloves and work-
* ingshirts at lowest prices.
HOME OF HART SCHAFFNER t MARX CI0THES'
153 HASTINGS ST. W.
THE LARGEST EXCLUSIVE MEN'S HOUSE IN CANADA
UNION ^ OFFICES
This Official List Of Allied Printing Offices
OAN SUPPLY TOU WITH IBB ALLIED PBINTJNO TBADES ONION LABEL
BAQLEV & SONS, 151 Hastings Street '     Sevmonr 1116
BLOOHBEBOEB, P. 8., S19 Broadway East....  ..........      . F.ff£? 203
BBAND * PERRY, 629 Pander Street, West ..................£?Mar 8678
BCBBABD PUBLISHING  CO..  711  Seymour Street.......      tUXi 8630
CHINOOK PRINTING CO., 4601 Main Street ..".........    .Fad 1874
OLABKE t, STUART, 820 Seymour Stnet ...........V.......Seymour 8
COMMEBOIAL PKlNTINO * PUBLISHING CO.,    .Word — ldini  Sevaaa«.a7
COWAN * BBOOKHOUSE, Labor Temple Building..„.„..!..  ."•sevMur 4«0
•DUNSMUIR PRINTING CO., 487 Duasmalr Street........ E2SJ 1108
EVANS * HASTINGS, Art. sad Crafts Bide., Seymour 81 ., ££££ 6880
OBANDVIEW PBINTEBS, 1448 Commercial............       ffiT', !!_
JEWELL, H. L., 841 Pender St   .........,  ..    .____ \ul
KERSHAW, J. i„ 689 Howe St  ...... ......     UK5 saw
UTTA,B.P„888 0oreAve..°  ..." "ESSE Sail
MAIN PhlNtaG CO., 8861 Mala St..   .......... .fYiKmi 1088*
MoLEAN * SHOEMAKER, North Vancoaver   .. .'... NVii,  an
MOORE PRINTING CO., Cor. Granville aad Robson SU..    . . SimoU-iaSa
NEWS*ADVERTISER, 801 Pender St  .7 . S»mS?l5a!Sl
NORTH SHORE PRESS, North Vancouver  .TvSiao
PAOiriO PRINTERS, World Building     ....    Somen■ osoa
PEABCE * HODGSON, 518 Hamilton Street...... ....        . SwSSX Haa
ROEDDE, G. A, 816 Homer Street   .....     SEEEria!
SCANDINAVIAN PUBLISHING CO., 817 Cambie St....      . sJiSJ. asnS
TERMINAL OITT PRESS, 2408 Westminster Road.......'..    .raKEX llio
THOMSON STATIONERY; 826 Hastings W..*...° ....  ....      .!___ JJoS
TIMMS, A. H., 280 Fourteenth Ave. ft.   . ...iBKSK[ oaiH
WESTERN PRESS, 828 Cordova W.    .. gSSoai 7888
WESTERN SPeSaLTY CO., 881 Donimulr St...      .... ....      ..___ Isle
WHITE * BINDON, 167-150 Cordova St     . 2X5 1«1B
Writ. "Paloa Label" oa Toai Oopy trtsn Tea Send It to tbe Pitetar
PENDER HOTEL -^SS5
ei.-fwpM stiwi wwi ______W_f\jj
P. Bants s* Oo,
Among the many home industries is
the important one of P. Burns A Co.,
Ltd., who have a huge plant situated
at the foot of Woodland drive. It is
safe to assert that thia is the most replete and up-to-date plant of its kind
in Canada. The arrangements are per-
fected and simplified to avoid any pos*
slble chance of dislocation. Thousands
of hogs, sheep and cattle are slaughtered weekly. Important to the public
is the assuring fact that it is all done
under the scrutinizing eyes of the ever-
present government inspectors. This inspection, though not compulsory, is carried out by the express wishes of the
firm, who realize the Importance of supplying a quality of the highest standard, satisfactory to themselves and security to the consumer. The operations
of this firm are so eitensive that they
command the largest share of Western
Canada meat trade, and greater the
trade higher the quality and lower the
price This is in evidence today,
thanka to a great wholesale and retail
business. An inspection of their yards,
operating department, machine Bhops,
snusage mill, lard refinery, fertilizing
plant, refrigerators, and the mammoth
clerical staff in the beautiful and elaborately arranged offlce building proves
a magnificent tribute to the energy and
organizing abilities of the flrm.--P.
Burns A Co., Ltd. •«*
The Willow Hoipltal
The above hospital is conducted by
Misses Hall and Westley, who are graduated nurses of twenty years' experience (graduated in England). Particular attention is given to tbe nursing of
sick children. In many notable cases
the results have been wonderful. Misses
Hall and Westley. have the confidence
and recommendations of the best doe-
tors in the city, a most striking testimonial of their ability. There are private rooms for, all medical, surgical and
maternity cases, in whioh they specialize. To all urgent eases graduated
nurses are sent out at all hours. The
location of the "Willow" is a good and
healthy one, 778 Broadway west, Phona
Fairmont 2165.
Steamer St. Pail
TheAmerican Line steamer St. Paul—
from New Tork, noon Saturday, March
27th, with 203 cabin and 157 third class
passengers—la due to arrive at Liverpool to-morrow (Saturday) afternoon,
April Sri. ***
START NOW!
-*•-* PITMAN'S _,
oldest and best business college,
in British Columbia
Up-to-date business methods
Individual tuition.  Success guaranteed*  Ne charge for booka
Established 1898
Oor. Hastings and Bichards Sts.
Vancouver, B. O.
T.B.OUTHBEETSDN400.
Men'a Hatters and Outfitters
Three Storei
TOO MUCH
EMPHASIS
cannot be placed on the statement that the
Edison Diamond Disc
excels beoause it is the product
of a mastermind in the science
of acoustics.
It was not given to the public
until it had reached a degree
of perfection to satisfy the Ugh
ideals of the inventor, Thomaa
A. Edison, who said: "If music
is worth anything—and in my
opinion it is worth much—it is
worth recording and reproducing
properly."
Mr. Edison spent 37 years perfecting his New Phonograph.
Will you give 15 minutes of your
time -to near his latest! Come
today.
THE
Kent Piano
COMPANY LIMITED
858 GRANVILLE STREET
ALL RED LINE, LIMITED
S.S. Selma-S.S. Santa-Maria
Lea.ee Johnson's wharf 0.80 a.n., Mob.,
Wed. aad frldav, <°r Wlioa Creek, Seehelt,
Half Moon Bay, Redroofe'i, Welcome Pass,
Hardy Island, Neleoa Iilind, Pender Harbor,
Stillwater, Myrtle Point and Powell Biver;
returning tho following daya.
Johnson's Wharf  .Seymour eJSO.
Phones:   Seymour 8258 and 8259
THB
Hose & Brooks Co., Ltd.
Wlnee, Liquors and Cigars
504 Main Street, Vanoouver, B.C.
Of America JQxr
_____$_______mi__
THB TELEPHONE
Tho advance agent ot
COMPORT AND CONVENIENCE
Forme a closer union oi Home. Bob!*
ness aad Friends
FOB A LIMITED TIME
Buelaeee   or   Residential  Telephone!
will he InitaUed upon payment of
18.00 Rental in Advance'
For particular! call Seymour 8070 .
Contract Department
B. O. TELEPHONE COMPANY,
LOOTED
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
Capital 815,000,000        Best 113,500,000
Main Offlce:   Corner Hastings and Oranvllle Streets, Vancouver
OITT BRANCHED LOCATION
ALMA ROAD. Cor. Fourth Avenue and Alma Road
COMMERCIAL DRIVE. .Cor. Flret Avenue and Commercial Drive
EAST END t Cor. Pender aad Main Streeta
FAIRVIEW Cor. Sixth Avenue and Qranvllle Street
HASTINOS and CAMBIE. Cor. Hasting! and Cambie Streets
KITSILANO. Oor. Fourth Avenue and Yew Street
MOUNT PLEASANT Cor. Eighth Avenue and Main Street
POWELL STREET Oor. Victoria DHvo and Powell Street
SOUTH HILL ....'. Cor. Forty-fourth Avenue and Fraser Road
Also North Vancouver Branch, Corner Lonsdale Avenue and Esplanade
Don't Procrastinate—Act Quickly
The British Columbia apples, In a -world competition, captured the Oold Hedal
ThlB means that the B..O. orchards will lead the world. A word to the wise Is
sufficient. '' >
We are offering choice varieties of onr one-year-old apple tree stock at Ten Dollars per 100; two and threB-yesr-old stock reduced accordingly. Our other fruit
tree stock and general nursery stock we give 90 per eent. off catalogue price allowed In additional stock   Cash to accompany order.
In our stock of over 190,000 we have everything you want to make your orchards
greater and your gardens more bautiful.   Catalogues mailed free on application.
Patronise hone growers, add. build up a home pay toll.
ROYAL NURSERIES, Limited
Bead Mee:   no Dominion Building, MT Haitian gtrset West
aad (,»•-■^«•j»j?V•miti!J^*, Um ■**• °- *3Mta>

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