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The British Columbia Federationist Sep 25, 1914

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Array IMDDBTRlAt TOITY:  ST    s   TH,
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I SIXTH YEAR.-:f *81.
BRITISH  COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
I. -a^ OFFICUL PAPER:  VANCOUVER TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL AND B. C. FEDERATION OF LABOR. ^^ POLITICAL TJNITT:  TOJT*»TI
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25,1914.
■WORKLESS A.
HOLD A M
■Situation of Workless Girls
in the City Becomes
Desperate
■belief Committee Formed
—Will Seek Financial
Assistance
A maBB meeting of women was held
in Wesley church, corner of Burrard
and Georgia streets, lest Tuesday afternoon. The meeting was called by the
local Council of Women, to consider the
plight of the several thousand unemployed women and girls in the city.
Mrs. J. E. UnBWorth presided and tne
speakers included Mayor Baxter, J. H.
McVety, president of the Trades and
Labor council; Miss H. Gutteridge and
representatives from a number of the
women's organizations of the city.
The chairman in opening the meet*
.ng said that the problem of the un
employed women and glrla in Vancouver, had reached gigantic proportions.
Owing to the industrial depression
which had been increased by the wai
business firms had been diaehargir
itenographers and women workers ii
large numbers, while the economy
which had been forced upon private
families had resulted in many domestic
servants being discharged. Those who
knew anything about the wages paid to
women even when times were normal,
realized how utterly impossible it was
for them to put anything by for a rainy
day. She suggested that the meeting
should consider the forming of an Unemployment bureau for women and
girls who were out of work.
Miss H. Gutteridge said that the wo
^^nen were confronted with an abnormal situation, umiBunl in its severity,
which would have to be met with by
unusual methodB. If the meeting were
to propose any scheme of chanty to
deal with the situation, it would be a
mistake. The type of women and girls
out of work did not want charity, but
employment. These girls in ordinary
times barely mndo enough wages to
provide for mere necessities, and
sometimes not enough for that, but
hey should not have charity thrust upon them. Large numbers of waitresses,
domestic employees, tailoresses, garment workers and stenographers were
workless at thia time with no means at
their back. That did not include the
large number of women engaged in
laily casual labor beoause their hufl'
bands were unemployed.
Women's wages had been cut everywhere from 25 to SO per cent., and
hosts of them were not able to earn
enough to keep body nnd soul together.
.The cry of thqse women was work, not
[charity. It behooved those more fortunately placed to come out and make
sacrifices to enable the others to get
along. Not only money, but ideas,
were needed to devise plans which
'would save those women from the
possibility of terrible disiistcr from
which they might never be rescued.
I8he believed that if the meeting understood the Berious problem a generous response would come from it.
i Mayor Baxter said that he had expected to hear that there were even
more unemployed women than had been
itated. So far as the city was concerned he felt that enough employment
could be given on relief work to enable
men who were citizens to get something
to eat. But they did not intend to open
the gates to all the province to come
to Vancouver for tho winter and be
fed. Two thousand dollara had been
appropriated by the board of works to
Btart wood-cutting as relief work on
some C. P. R. property where timber
was lying. He said that 1,000 to 1,500
uniforms would be needed to equip the
second contingent of volunteers going
to the war, and that if the federal department of militia would have them
made here, the city would Bee that tho
coBt would not be higher than in the
east. He promised on behalf of the
city council that any practical scheme
put forward by the meeting would be
met half wny by tho council.
J. H. McVety said he assumed that
the council of women had a real purpose
in view, and assured them that if they
were genuinely desirous of giving real
help, tbey would flnd more than enough
to do. MIbb Gutteridge, whom he believed to be one of the best informed women in tho city on the question of women's employment, had quoted some
startling figures, but he believed that
they were a conservative estimate rather than otherwise. Tho .unemployment
of women wns nn even more serious
matter thnn of men, because of the
limitations placed upon the activities of
women by renson of their sex and social
customs. They hnd to be provided for
here and now, because many of them
were destitute owing to tbe fact that
their wages never permitted them to
reserve any margin after paying for
their maintenance.
His experience on the civic war relief
committee had revealed conditions of
hardship and poverty which absolutely
beggared description, and if they were
any guide to conditions generally, there
waa a desperate situation in the city,
which would need a drastic remedy.
He said it was no use the rich offering theories to tho. poor, they had to
make sacrifices, and would do if they
meant business, and if not they had better cease talking. One immediate and
practical way in which they could show
their sincerity was by discharging their
Oriental domestic help, nnd replacing it
with some from the thousands of white
women who were homeless and workless in the city now. Moreover, if they
were earnest in their desire to save other women from the more dreadful possibilities of their destitution, they would
not hesitate to take them into their
homos until such time as those women
were able to secure a chance to support
themselves by their labor. Concentration of the effort of all women in ths
leity was necessary to meet the terrible
|Condltlon of unemployment which prevailed among their sex.
, The meeting was then thrown open
for general dlscuBBion, in whioh a large
|pumber of women took part.   It was
'ftBnSft   $1.50 PER TEAR
SHALL ORGANIZED
LABOR PARTICIPATE
IN OIVIO ELECTIONS
Tha recommendations of the
parliamentary committee, which
meets the second and fourth
Thursday evening of each month
ln Lahor Temple, will probably
supply ths agenda for a healthy
discussion at next Thursday
night's meeting of tha Vancouver
Trades and Labor oouncll. It has
to do with municipal elections
and every delegate to the central
lahor body should make it a point
to be present at the meeting. For
some years, at different times,
the question of organlied labor
taking part ln municipal campaigns has been mooted, but has
been sidetracked on one pretext
or another.. Changed conditions
demand changed methods, asd it
Is not unlikely that aome definite
action will be taken at the next
meeting of the Ubor council with
a view to securing direct representation on the aldermanlc
board.
OF
Messages Wired Secretary
Legien of International
Federation
Aftermath    Will    Impose
Grave Responsibilities
Upon Unionists
Whatever may be the attitude of organized labor towards militarism and
war The Federatlonist. realizes that
the WorkerB are now confronted with a
condition and, being human, are interested and affected by the great conflict in Europe. The Fed. cannot hope
to compete with the dailies in the matter of ne'ws, but it can and docs supply
news thnt they do not print. Of particular moment this week are the messages .received by Carl Legien, secretary of the International Federation of
Trade Unions, on the eve of the war,
from labor organizations in various
countries. A few of them, printed in
the Berlin Vorwaerts, follow:
President Samuel Gompers of the
American Federation of Labor, wired:
"Curse all wars! I also condemn the
Austro-Servinn vrart Right and good
in every honest'effort to end it!"
Secretary Bigola of the Federation
of Labor in Italy: "The Italian proletariat is unanimous in its opposition
to the war and demands that the
Italian government remain neutral. Wo
shall do all we can to prevent war."
Secretary Mertens of tho Belgian
Federation of Labor: "With the labor
movement in other countries the Belgian Labor, party and Trade Union
Federation joins in the protest against
war.''
Secrotary Jouhaux of tho French
Confederation of Labor: "The French
Federation is decidedly against the
■ and - requests the movement in
every country to compel their governments to keep their hands out of
the Austro-Servian conflict."
Secretary   Appleton     of     England:
All classes of English Bociety took
with fear on the possibility of an
European war. We shall do all in
our power to assist our Gorman
comrades in their efforts in behalf
of peace.''
Secretary Linn of Norway: "Seventy thousand organized wage workers of Norway send a flnming protest against the war which now seems
certain to cause a general world confla-
gratiou,"
Secretnry Huggler wired from
Switzerland! "Down with war and
wnr atrocities! Long live international ponce and tho fraternization
of the nations of the world!"
"Vancouver secured the convention!" Such was the brief but significant telegram
received from Del. Trotter., St. John, N. B., this morning by R. P. Pettipiece, chairman of the central l'abor body's Trades and Labor Congress committee. It means that
upon the trade unionists of Vancouver devolves the responsibility of caring for the
1915 convention of the most important labor organization in Canada, a task that will
be gladly undertaken'and fulfilled to the satisfaction of every delegate in attendance.
The convention will meet here about the middle of September next, and if the local Exhibition association will only decide not to hold the big fair during congress convention week the weather man is sure to be on his good behavior. The local Congress committee has worked diligently and they have been splendidly aided by Delegate Trotter,
Mayor Baxter also contributed his quota by extending a hearty invitation to the convention on behalf of the city. Everybody's happy and the Vancouver Trades and Labor council will cheerfully and fittingly rise to the occasion,
President J. C. Watters, Victoria; Vice-president Fred. Bancroft, Toronto, and Secretary-Treasurer P. M. Draper, Ottawa, constituting the executive council, have been
re-elected and no mention is made as to whether the executive had been increased to
five or not, as was freely forecasted in eastern Canada prior to the convention,
Alderman "Dick" Rigg of Winnipeg, wHo is also secretary - treasurer - business
agent of the central labor body, was this ye$r elected fraternal delegate to the American Federation of Labor, which meets at Philadelphia in November. Advices do not
state who was elected as fraternal delegate to the British Trade Union Congress, but
possibly the elections were not completed at yesterday afternoon's session.
The delegation'was smaller than usual, being under 200, but this is easily accounted for since tne membership pf every union in Canada is affected by unemployment
and the war pinch.
Delegate Trottfer will leave for home to-morrow evening and the The Federationist will thus be enabled to give a more comprehensive report of the proceedings in the
next j.ssue.
ANGELO TO BE RELEASED TO-DAY
Joe Angelo, the last of the imprisoned Vancouver island coal miners and an organizer of the U. $. W. of A., will be released lb-day, according to private telegraphic
advice from Ottawa this morning. Angelo will return to his home across the line at
once.
Will It Happen Again ?
Little Demand for Ooal.
A considerable number of the Vnn-
•ouver Island coal miners, who hnve
been on striko for over a yonr, hnvo ae-
cured employment since the armistice
was declarer!. The majority of them
however are still out of work, nlong
with the strike-breakers This becauBo
there is no market 'for coal. The good
kind patriotic coal bnrons at Cumberland manage to keep tho Chinese at
wprk.
Few Carpenters Working.
All local branches of tho Brotherhood of Carpenters report trade conditions still very dull. Less than half
the, membership'are employed and large
numbers have been compelled to leave
their families and seek work elsewhere.
No business agent is employed.
decided to form nn organization made
of six members of the local Council
Women and representatives from
every other women's organization In
the city to raise funds and devise ways
and means of dealing with tho question. The president stated that she had
received an offer to give $500 If the
women would raise a like amount by
Monday, or $1,000 if they would raise
$2,000 in the same time The womon
will set to work immediately to raise
this amount, and as soon sb representatives are appointed from all the societies a meeting will be held. Collectors
for this fund will carry a card signed
by the secretary of the organization
and will bo authorized to collect funds
for this object
History contains many strange
parallels and, at times, has a curious habit of repeating itself.
Students of political history, particularly that side of it which has
a special interest for the working
class, are beginning to speculate
as to what influence a defeat of
the German forces may have upon
the political fabric of that state.
There is every apparent reason
to believe that during the last
forty years, and especially during
the last fifteen years, the semi-
feudal monarchical element in the
German people, has steadfastly
cultivated the idea that super-efficient and overwhelming military
power was essential to the continued growth and extension of
their country. With the exception of the persistent opposition
of the social democrats, that policy has apparently met with general acceptance, or it could not
have been pursued.
Big capitalists, medium sized
the small ones alike, all seem to
have tolerated the burden of excessive armaments in the belief
that it held the promise of limitless trade expansion with corresponding profits for them. And it
has probably been this one common hope of economic gain which
has held them together and1
which has sanctioned and tolerated the extravagant militarism
whieh has so long been the outstanding feature of German civilization. It bore on its outward
face all the marks and promise of
success. The clank of the omnipresent sabre was sufficient to
drown the Bound of such feeble
criticism as might still come from
the smaller capitalists, who had
their doubts as to the ultimate
wisdom of the policy.
Now that the day of test has
come, the martial junkers of
Germany find their machine faced
by an alignment of opposing
forces which have prevented that
machine from working with the
precision and accuraoy which its
makers and manipulators had expected of it. There is not the least
doubt that by now it was expected to be in possession of Paris,
with all the advantage which
would accrue to the prestige of
German militarism in its own
country as the result of such a rapid and spectacular success, Such
has not, however, happened, and
to all intents- and purposes this
first great part of its plans has
been a failure. In addition to
that, the eoftplfl&'bii'bkade or]
German ports and the consequent
cessation of all export and import
trdde must be having a very detrimental influence upon the economic interests of the capitalists of
that country. It cannot possibly
have any other result than to ruin
them by the thousand. That will
do more to evoke their oppsition
to the ruling militarist element
than the killing of a million working class conscripts. The only
way to their feeling is through
their property, and the general
loss of that will doubtless have a
sobering influence upon them.
So far as the workers of Germany are concerned, there has
never been any indication that
they, as a class, wanted war, and
when it is generally known that
their men have been thrown into
the shambles, in the solid formation which is nothing short of
homicide on the part of those who
order it, disaffection and a desire
for reprisal will be likely to arise.
German soldiers who return to the
civil life of the proletariat, are
likely to be a more revolutionary
element in society than any social
democrat. Bearing in mind these
possibilities, and others along the
same line which will readily suggest themselves, the thoughtful
find reason to compare tho situation with that which prevailed in
Prance in 1870. The Frenoh capitalists were apparently as convinced of the military genuis of
Ijouis Napoleon and his martial
machine at that time as the capi
talists of Germany were. The
hideous exposure of incompetency, which ended in Napoleon's
surrender at Mctz, changed their
minds. The result was that the
bourgeois, or business class, could
see themselves confronted with
ruin. They took advantage of the
universal disgust against the
monarchy among the masses of
the people, and turned it to their
own advantage, by placing themselves in control of the gov-
nincntal machinery and declaring the third' republic in
September, 1870. They could
sei i>at if tbeir interests
were to remain paramount they
•must have control of that power.
This was not   accomplished   by
themselves as a class, but by using the revolutionary spirit abroad
among the common people. Then
mark what transpired, and how
j'&iuicWHrti-^e'ned. 'The Beige of
Paris lasted Ave months, and on
March 1,1871, the Germans entered the oity and remained in occupation two days. After their departure the new National Assembly began to make its plans for
grabbing, everything and leaving
the oommon people who had set
it in power to shift as well
as they might. "With the ending
of the war they were again capitalists and the workers were the
workers. That crystallized the
disaffection which had only been
kept in bounds by the common
dangers of the seige. With a
flash it blazed into the fierce
flame which all history knows as
the Commune, which was declared
on March 18th. The scales had
fallen from the eyes of a patient
and long-suffering proletariat,
and they rose to demand their
share of what they thought waB
the economic re-adjustment made
possible by the republic which
they had created. They found to
their sorrow that Monarchy or Republic, it made no difference,
Xames were but names. Capital
was master. They were the slaves,
It cost more than 30,000 of their
mon, women and children, put to
the bullet and sword by their own
countrymen, to learn a 1
which should stand as a monument of instruction to the world's
workers for ever.
Now the question arises for
those who remember and arc observing to-day; Will history repeat itself in Germany if the militarist party goes down to defeat
in this war? Will the German
business class try to inflame the
working class of that country to
revolt and overthrow the Kaiser
and his militarist bureaucracy
whioh has brought economic ruin
and financial disaster upon them
as capitalists, so that they can
take the control of the state into
their own hands? There arc many
easons why they might try it.
There are some reasons why they
might succeed, and others why
they might not. In any case, to
the student of such things, it will
he one of the most fascinating
pages of human history that men
have ever been privileged to wit^
ness in the making,
MOST THE WOBKEM
OF VANOOUVER AOAW
PARADE TRECt POVEBTY
Unless aome definite action is
soon taken br tbe provincial government to meet tbe present unemployed problem It may become
necessary fer tbe central Ubor
body to start something. Already
tbe suggestion baa been made
ttat a series of mass meetings be
bold to discuss the question, and
prepare plane for demonstrations
of sufflclent ■"ftHolt to command tbe attention of tbe authoritiei.. It u npt .pleasant task,
bnt one that must be faced by organised Ubor if lt ts to assume
tbe responsibilities imposed upon
lt by virtue of the masterly Inactivity of tbe government.. Tbe
problem le no longer one of the
demoralisation of anion conditions.. It la one of self.prsserva-
tlon.. Organised Ubor is not going to Ht idly by and permit
men, women and children to
starve to death ln silence.
TECHNICAL WORK
IN THE CITY
G. A. Laing, M. A., Charge
of the Department
Wfll Explain It
Federationist Sees Some of
the Classes in Their
Operation
Technical and pre-vocational instruction, as given ly the school authorities,
has, at various times, met with criticism both favorable and otherwise from
the organized labor movement. In the
British Isles, where practically every
large city has technical and pre-voca*
tional classes and polytechnics, those in*
ititutions are eagerly used by youn*
men fitting themselves for tho worka-
day world in which they expect to be
soon gaining a livelihood. In this coun'
try, particularly in the west, such
things are as yet in their infancy, and
the general public knows very little ab*
out what is being done in this direction.
Comprehensive Plans.
The plans of the Vanoouver school
trustees in respect to technical instruction would appear to be both comprehensive and up-to-date in all branches
when they are completed. The depart*
ment is in charge of Mr. 0. A. Laing,
M. A., who has lectured and taught in
many of the chief centres of technical
instruction in Britain.
The Federationist, in the course of nn
interview with Mr. Laing, gathered the
impression that there is a great deal
of vital interest in this department of
the school trustees' plans for members
of trade unions. With the object of imparting information we hope to publish
next week a short article from the pen
of Mr. Laing on this subject.
Meanwhile, at his invitation The
Federationist representative was enabled to visit the King Edward high
school ond see some of this work in actual operation.
Practical Btart Hade
In a complete shop erected on the
school grounds, about 20 boys, from 13
to 10 years of nge, were working at
benches under the instruction of Mr. A.
W. Parkor, who has charge of that department. He stated that when the
boys first wont into the shop its contents consisted of two rough planks,
two chairs nnd Bomo lumber and tools.
Since then the boys had constructed all
the benches and entire fittings of the
shop. To an observer, it was plain
that thoy were vastly interested in
their labors. Tho method of teaching
is apparently to cause the boys to use
their thinking faculties as much ns possible. One boy was very industriously
engaged in chiselling nt a piece of
wood, with tho tool in one hand and
the other hnnd firmly planted in front
of the chisel to hold the wood down.
To a practical eye the possibilities
were distinctly interesting.
Personal Instruction
The instructor, observing this, called
the class to attention, at the same timo
telling the boy to keep his hands just ns
ho had them while working. The class
was then invited to point out what wns
wrong. Several answers missed the
mark, but one hit it by pointing out
thnt the boy might cut himself if the
tool slipped. This method of stimulating the boys to puzzle things out for
themselves seems to be tho keynote of
the instructor's method. Tho boys
from the various city schools hnve so
many hours of this kind of work each
week.
Domestic Science Department
In the domestic science department,
under tho charge of Miss M. Rath,
about twonty girls were working. Long
tables are fitted with gns cooking appliances upon which the girls cook
stnndord home dishes under tho demonstration and instruction of the teacher.
This is varied by lectures on tho food
vnliic of various meats, vcgotnblcB, etc.,
A (jucry ns to tho opinion of parents on
the value of such instruction, brought
forth the answer that they express nn
increasingly keen desire for their children to receive it.
Electricity Classes Later
While those two departments aro now
in working order, another, where classes
and practical lessons in electricity will
MUST UNEMPLOYED
START SOMETHING
IN VANCOUVER?
Criminal Inactivity of Government May Force
Such Action
•
Federal Government Must
Abo Rise to the Occasion
What will have to
make tbe McBrtde-Bowser  _
ment at Victoria take eon. actio,
to meet tbe present crista la th. ma-
employed problem? Wait win Mr-
pen If govemmental action la aat
taken before winter weather Mt
conditions aet ln? Theae and other
questions an bring   asked   with
earneatneas whatever men w. fathered together.  That tbo Mutton
la serious, hu almost reached the
breaking point, la conceded era by
employers who are  growing  rick
and weary of tuning my bna- ,
dreds of applicants for a chance to
earn a living dally.
The city and suburban municipality
officials seem to be doing tbelr utmost
to meet the emergency, bnt the provincial government continues to alt supinely by and "let well   enough   done."
the Federationist haa no desire to function as an alarmist nor doea it wish
to convey a threat, bnt it warns the
provincial authorities here   and   new
that unless some steps are taken before
another month 'la over to alleviate sufferings of men and women hnd children
who are hungry on this peninsula they
will have an unemployed demonstration
on. their hands which will make the
incidents of two yeara ago look like
a pink tea.  If the McBrideBowser aggregation think that the working people of this-province are going to lay
down and meekly starve to death they
have another guess coming. '
To tha Federal Oovernment
In this connection it will be well to
remind the federal government that lt
too must increase its efforts to assist
the workless of Canada to tide over tke
coming winter.  As the Industrial Banner says: '
''It is said that the gift of a million
and a quarter bags of flour, four million pounds of cheese, thousands of baga
of oats, a hundred thousand barrel! of
apples, Ave hundred thousand tons of
coal und other vast supplies in the nature of foodstuffs voluntarily donated,
free of charge, by the federal government and provinces ot the dominion to
the motherland is the greatest advertising that Canada haa ever rasaWed. ■■
"It is claimed that not only will It
fully demonstrate that thia country is
the grainary and storehouse of the empire, but impress the fact upon the warring nations of Europe that not only is
this dominion forwarding her volunteer
soldiers to the battle ■ line, but iB also
sending the wherewithal to keep them
and the troops of the motherland amply
supplied with an inexhaustible supply
of food.
"in other words, Canada, the land of
boundless opportunity, cannot only feed
itself, but freely send across the seas
immense supplies for the sustenance of
other nations.
"While all this may be doubtless true,
while tbe dominion probably is astonishing the world by its spontaneous
loyalty and the immensity of its resources, let us hope that the federal
government that can raise millions of
dollars for the dispatch of troops and
supplies to the front will realise its -
obligation to take equally energetic
measures to solve the problem of the
unemployed. Let it not be said to the
disgrace of this country that while
we are willing to1 voluntarily forward millions of dollars worth of food
supplies across the sea for tho sustenance of others we yet neglect the needy,
the unemployed, within our own borders.
"The working classes in Canada have
voiced no protest against the effective
support so loyally accorded to the
motherland in her hour of need, but
they assuredly have a right to expect
thnt the powers at Ottawa shall give
voice to the cry of distress going up
from her own workers within the gates.
"Lot us hope that tho politicians at
Ottuwa will rise equal to the opportunity at hnnd. Let it not be said we
are ready to use our resources for the
successful prosecution of a war in
Europe, while wc fall down in facing
simpler problems at homo.
''Yes, it is clearly up to tho federal
government to act an.! to also act
quickly."
No Work for Brieklayera.
"Unless business picks up a bit most
of the bricklayers will bo compelled to
declare a moratorium, whether tho corner grocorymaii likes it or not," said a
loco] official to The Fed. yosterday.
"Less than half our membership are
working and some of tho boys haven't
done a stroke for two months. What
they will do this winter is more than I
know."
Pressmen Forces Seduced.
Charles 8. Hall Seattle, representing
the International Printing Pressmen
nnd Assistants' union, was a visitor in
Vancouver this weok. He came here to
nssist the local union membership to
rnnko some readjustments in local daily
papers in consoquonco of a reduction of
forces, necessitated by the production
of smaller pupors.
Quiet Among Brewery Workeri.
Tho brewery workers report their
membership fairly well employed at the
prcsont timo, but nothing like the number of mon employed during normal
conditions aro at work. *
be given, is boing fitted up, which is
to contain close upon $6,000 worth of
apparatus. The instruction given will
be available for those attending the
night classes during the forthcoming
winter. The glimpse thus afforded
makes more Information desirable. For
that reason we havo asked Mr. Laing
to give us an article telling of Us plans,
for the benefit or readers,.
.*.( PAGE TWO
THE 3RITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
FRIDAY.
(i
THE
MOLSONS
BANK
Capital and Reaerve, • $8,800,000
li "prmnehea tn Canada
▲ raneral banking buiineu transacted.
Savings Department
Interest allowed at hlgbeat
.
East End Branch
160 HASTINGS STREET EAST
A. W. Jarvis, Manager
The Royal Bank
of Canada
INCORPORATED 1IM
Paid-up Capital
Reaerve 	
Total Aaaata - -
111,
12,60MSS
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I B.C. FEMINIST
Publlihed every Friday morning by the
B. C. Federatlonltt, Ltd.
R. Farm Pettipiece Managing Editor
J. W.  Wilkinson Associate Editor
Directors:  Jas.   Campbell,  president;   J.
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"Unity of Labor; the hope of the world.1
PBIDAY SEPTEMBER 25, 1914
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NORTH   VANCOUVER   BRANCH
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Matinee, 15c; Evening!, 15c, 25c.
T IS QUITE PLAIN, from reading
English. papers,both on the lines and
in between them, that recruiting
for the army is not as brisk as the authorities wish it to be Men are not
coming forward as
readily as it was
expected they would
do. Many things
have happened since
the war broke out,
to prove that this is ho. A month ago,
Lord Roberts was upraiding the youth
of Britain for playing football and at*
tending picture shows, while the army
was calling for men. The Times and other leading newspapers contain articles
dealing with the same subject. Since
then, various methods of encouraging
recruiting have been introduced. Many
large employers, whose business has decreased since the war commenced, bave
found it convenient to kill two birds
with one stone by intimating to thoae
of their unmarried employees between
the ages of eighteen and thirty-five
that, unless they enlisted they
might expect to lose their employment.
Various groups of ladies, of suburban
ancestry, have adopted a unique plan of
their own, and one quite consistent
with the ethics of semi-detached villa-
dom They call themselves the White
Feather society, and frequent the public thoroughfares and other places
where young men are to be found,
and when a likely-looking young
man comes along, they present
him with one of the feathers;
at the same time expressing satircal
surprise that he is not in army uniform.
The various parties in parliament have
selected a number from their ranks to
fo(m a general recruiting committee, to
address large public meetings throughout the country for the purpose of
arousing enthusiasm. The organized labor movement, both politically and industrially, has given its support to this
arrangement, and has contributed its
quota of speakers. It is, however, but
right and proper, that we should mention that there is one exception. The
national council of the Independent Labor party has not identified itself with
the rest of the labor movement with
reapect to the war, but has from the
very flrst, taken up a position in direct
opposition to it.
•      «      *      «
We are not at this time so much concerned with the attitude of the various
parts of the labor movement in Britain
toward the war. They are actually on
the spot and we must presume that
their first hand knowledge of the situation, haa4 caused them to east their influence into that side of the scale
which, they feel, will be in the ultimate
best interests of the workers. . But
there Ib something to be said in answer
to those,-who complain of a feeling of
indifference on.the part of a large section of British workers, and especially
to such as William J. Locke, the novelist. He speaks of the workers as "the
scum of uneducated thought" and
makes an Impassioned appeal to the
press to inspire them with patriotism.
If this gentleman wishes' to make
known the faot that he is a thoroughbred, through the medium of Billingsgate phrases, it is his privilege to do
so, but it will add neither conviction
nor persuasion to his words. Abuse is
not argument or reason. Better balanced minds than his would rather be
occupied in devising the one and seeking the other, than in voicing their disapproval in scurrilous language. If the
masses of Britain are not responding to
the call to arms in such numbers, or as
quickly as the authorities wish them to,
then there muBt be a reason for it.
The working class of Britain are not
made of the material which is afraid
to face danger, or to make sacrifices, if
they can be convinced that their duty
towards their class and kind requires it.
Indeed, the whole life of the average
working class family in Britain is one
continual story of sacrifice. The capacity of the poor for suffering is one of
the worst obstacles in the way of their
progress. It is all very fine for people
who have never known   the   restricted
THIS 18
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and limited life of the working claas,
to grumble about their inability to un
derstand what are called "the larger
affairs of life/' described in auch terms
as ''imperialism,■" "the destiny of our
empire,'' and so «n. Three quarters of
the lifetime of working men is spent in
the task of searching for -employment
and struggling to retain, it when they
have once found it.^ Their, noses are
everlastingly bent over the grindstone,
and little chance is theira to see and
understand the larger life of the world
whose daily round is only made possible
by their labor.
*       *       »       •
The industrial system of the age is
not in itself calculated to produce the
self contained and highly efficient
types, such as the workmen of the days
of handicraft were. The general use of
machinery, and the consequent division
nnd subdivision of the processes of production, have changed workmen from
skilled craftsman into automata, highly specialized in the endless and dull
repetition of merely mechanical move*
ments. Employers themselves, in normal times, do all they can to encourage
a spirit of meekness and subjection in
their workmen. If they find now, that
they have so far succeeded in their efforts that, with altered circumstances
tbeir success has become an embarrassment, it is scarcely for them to com-
plain. And again, the government
which is now in office in Britain, haa
used the army there, something like
twelve times in seven years against
workmen at times of strike or threat*
ened strike. That has had an effect,
which is undoubtedly partly responsible
for the indifference whieh is complained of. It has caused deep seated resentment, and a feeling of distrust and
suspicion which will take time to pass
away. Certainly it will not be dispelled by the vu^ar jibes of ira*te
book-writers or the gentle satire of
the white feather ladies. Tou can lead
a horse to water, but you cannot make
him drink. So it is with the average
British worker. He can be lead a long
way, but if he cannot quite see where
he is going, he will display a stubbornness which would do credit to a Missouri farmer. On the other hand, shew
him—to put it in slang terras—"where
he gets off at," and thai same stubbornness, and more to go with it, will
be at your service. It is no use politicians telling him to-day, that the
workmen of Germany enjoy a higher
standard of living than the workmen of
Britain, because Germany is a protectionist country, and then coming along
to-morrow to ask him to fight. There
has got to be more of reality and less
of politics. The workmen of Britain
do not own a single thing in that country, except the memory that it waB
their birth place. In return for the
sncril.ee which is now being asked of
them, by the privileged classes who
own the land of the British Isles, let
those lordly possessors shew that their
talk of common sacrifice for the common good is sincere. Let them surrender the land of Britain to the people of
Britain. That will give the people a
stake in the country, and heart to do and
dare anything within the compass of
human effort to retain it. The best
weapon to use against the military
junkers of Germany, who seek to dominate not only the social life of their
own country, but that of others as well,
are not men who have taken up arms
to escape starvation due to being forced
out of their employment, but men who
can feel that they will get a square deal
from the country they are fighting for,
when they return from the war—if they
are lucky enough to do so.
..SEPTEMBER 25, 1914
terial point of view alone, it is 'a
fascinating opportunity.
Thus it is, even before theBe poor
wretches have had time to recover from
one oppressor, another whose methods
may not be so sharp but more lingering and insidious,'is scheming how they
can be got.
•       h      ■»      •
He does not want to kill them. They
are no use to him when they are dead.
They are such a gold mine. Their
sturdy bodies are just bursting with
dividend. It is so simple. They are
dividend. We want dividend. As the
wolf said to the lamb, "Come let.us
reason together," And pray if these
peripatetic parcels of potential profit
could be brought here, what could be
done with them or for themf There
are fifteen thousand unemployed in and
around this city now, and likely to be
more this winter. Thousands of those,
who are already here, would be glad to
go on the land to escape the slave markets of the cities, if they felt they
could do bo without becoming in turn
soil slaves, yielding all but that which
is barely necessary to maintain their
bodily strength to land speculators and
railway companies. But In spite of unoccupied land by the million of acres,
men cannot get on to it in British Columbia, even on any conditions. In
face of such a fact, the talk of our contemporary, is very much like that of a
guzzling gourmand, calling for every
passing dish of food even while his
mouth is full and his gluttonous paunch
threatening to well nigh burst. God
help the Belgian peasant if he ever has
to come to this country to farm. The
unspeakable wretches who shot his kind
and despoiled, his harvest, would not
seem quite so bad after he had had a
few years experience of mortgage companies, harvester trusts and the C. P. B.
w
MONET
and arm
TBUSTB
N'
ATTVES   OF   BELGIUM     and
northern France, if  only  half
the accounts which have eome
through during the last six weeks are
correct, have been subjected to   every
form   of   brutality
which a ruthless foe
is   capable of prac
tislng   in   warfare.
Unarmed men shot,
women vi o 1 a t e d,
and even children hacked.  Beading the
list of such things, it would not strike
the mind of the average   person   that
there waB anything left in the condition of those people except their misery.   But when the horrors of wartime
have taken their toll, and when the
iron heel of the military junker has
crushed them so far tKt their suffering
no longer serves to Appease his insensate cruelty,   the vulture   of   profits,
which never quits the   sky   even    in
nencc time, enn still see food left for
him.   It Is very nicely put in a recent
editorial in the Daily Province.   A positive gush of gluttonous gloating over
the possibilities of profit presented by
thousands of men and women  of the
nnasnnt cjass, scurrying for their very
H"i>* In face of the oncoming hordes
who know nothing for the time being
but the power of fire and sword.
*      »      •      »
Note how the eye of your modern profiteer seeB a chance to improve the shining hour:
There are thousands upon thousands of Belgians, one of the best
educated and most thrifty nations
in the world, who have lost their
nil in the war which has come upon
them, for the sake of their honor
nnd their good faith There are
thousands of French people who
have crossed the channel to seek
refuge in Great Britain. . , . How
can we get themf There is a gold
mine of illimitable wealth and
eternal production opened*on the
shores of England by the convulsion of Continental Europe. Is it
not possible for us to exploit that
mine and make an enormous dividend out of Itf   T*pn   tba   *na-
HEN NORMAN ANGELL, in
his "Great   Illusion," propounded the theory that the
great powers would not fight one another, because war does not pay, he overlooked  the    fact
that while it might
not pay the nations,
it offered   the   certainty of huge profits to those who hold
the governments of the nations in the
hollow of their hands.   The armaments
ring is the most gigantic aggregation of
capital that the world has ever known.
Its political and social power' is enor*
Ministers of state are its creatures.   It has diplomats and high military nnd naval officers in its pay.
Back of the armaments ring, again, is
the great money trust—the people who
loan millions to governments to be'
squandered on munitions of war. This
trust, also international in its character, exercises a tremendous influence
over the rulerB of nations.
*      •      *      «
Then there a». other big capitalists,
and combinations of capitalists, searching for foreign markets or anxious to
get rich quick by supplying rotten meat
and brown-paper boots to contending
forces, of by cornering the people's
food, and reaping the famine prices
which war enables them to create.
It is true, as Norman Angell conclusively demonstrates, that it does not
pay any nation to go to war with another. But it may pay those who have
gained an economic and political supremacy over the nation, and while this is
the case war will always be one of the
horrors which make of civilization a
painful and revolting hypocrisy.
lead inside. Mankind goes along from
generation 'to generation staggering under this burden of gold bricks, and the
progress of civilization—if there is progress and civilization—consists simply
of man's discovery that some gold
bricks are lead bricks, and his consequent rejection of them. It would almost seem that progress is the elimination of some old things rather than the
gaining of new ones.
Despotisms may for a time succeed in
prodding mechanical dullards to the
shambles at the point of a bayonet, to
be crucified unseen upon the cross of
war; but. not for long. The mesmeric
allurement of war is disarmed when the
censor squelches the pean of battle. The
folks at home do not go into raptures
of joy over ihe ceaseless tread of the
casuality officer as he makes his gruesome found with the only news that
trickles through to indicate that the
machine guns are aB deadly^ as their
makers have claimed.
The News-Advertiser, ever faithful
to itself, says of a proposed moratorium, "While it relieves pressure on a
large section of a population it also
works hardships, the latter chiefly on
the investing class." Mr. H. H. Stev
ens, M. P., argues that it Is. necessary
to prevent mortgagees foreclosing on
those who have money invested in
large buildings which are not producing
revenue. It looks like a dog eat dog
affair. At anyrate, if a moratorium iB
declared, it should certainly be made
to apply) to the homes of working people which they nre struggling to pay
for, and likewise to the rents of houses
occupied by those workers who have
neither job or money in the bank to
protect them from the rapacity of landlords who would turn them out on the
streets in midwinter. Indeed, with the
exception of the winter part of it, this
is exactly what is happening now in
many places in the city.
The sympathetic comment of the
Daily Province a few weeks ago that
'' tho army of the unemployed will now
bave a chance to flght for a living,
gathers more meaning aB the days go
by. It was bitter truth, bitterly told.
It is worth filing for future reference,
A few sneering, backbiting members
in a union, whose stock in trade is abuse of almost every one else, do more
injury than all of the strikebreakers
who might be imported, for they create
suspicion and animosities, twin evils,
which have done more to weaken the
ranks of labor than anything else.
Newspaper correspondence is not
without its compensating humors. An
individual writing to the News-Adver-
tiserf protests against the best physical
types being the only ones "chosen to go
to "the war. He has a friend with one
eye, whom he would like to send, and
wants to know why they won't have
him. It would almost seem that the
writor himself haB no eyes at all otherwise he ought to be able to see why.
■ Vancouver school trustees on patriotic grounds refused to order coal from
a mine financed partly by German capital. The supply will now come from
mines chiefly worked by Chinese labor
while several thousand British miners
on Vancouver island are starving for
lack of the bread which can only be got
by holding the jobs which the Orientals
arc doing. One has to be alert these
days in order to be able to appreciate
these line points of patriotism.
Most of the well-to-do women, who
constituted the chief part of the meeting which gathered Inst Tuesday to talk
about the plight of the several thousand working girls who are now unemployed in this city seemed to be animated by a nicely upholstered enthusiasm
for "going in" for the poor. Who was
the     Mlcawber-like   soul   that   said
Heaven will protect the working
girl"? Anyhow, from all signs, she
will need it, if some of that group of
noble dames get hold of her.
Our ancestors handed down to us
many gold bricks, glittering enough on
the outside, but pone the Jess genuine
PHONE   SEYMOUR   9086
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Insured
Against
Fire?
If not, consult us
i We write
Fire
Insurance
DOW FRASER TRUST CO.
122 Hastings St. West.
Vancouver, and  McKay Station,
Burnaby, B.C.
Close at 1 o'clock Saturday.
Furniture
By all means come and see our
splendid large new stock of furniture. "Everything but the
girl" for your new home.
GET OUR PRICES AND
TERMS
Hastings Furniture Co.
Limited
•1 HASTINOS STREET WEST
While Wheat Bread
Choice Family Bread
Wadding aad Birthday Cakaa.
We Vri Vales neat.
BELYEA'S BAKERY
AU. KINDS OF
CAKES, PASTRY AND
CONFECTIONERY
Het Drinks aad Lunches
All deeds Freet Dally.
TeL ley. nee.
Citj Auction and Commission Co.
Cash paid for houses and aultee
of furniture or Auction arranged.
Satisfaction guaranteed, prompt
settlements.
ARTHUR  S.  BSTOHLIY
amythe and Qranvllle Streets
Auctioneer Sey m-Tt
Cake that Watoh «o Appleby, dot
Fender Weat, Cor. Pender and
Richards, for nigh-class watch,
olook and jewellery repairs. All
cleaning and mainsprings jobs
guaranteed for 12 months.
ARGUE!
<m
I1JOHES
eonObbaceo.
The Smartest of
Dresses/or
STREET WEAR
The new street
dieBses in our autumn
lines have reached a development unimagined a1-'
few seasons ago, i So attractive have they
come that tho woman
who used to have to go
to the dressmaker to fill
her wants can be better
served with theee ready-
to-wears anM at a price
saving.   For instance:
SMART DRESS of green French poplin, trimmed with veBt and lily
collar of organdie, fastening with fancy pearl buttons. Sleeve is finished
with cuffs organdie, Roman striped silk belt and long tunic skirt.
Price $18.75,
EXCLUSIVE MODEL in navy blue poplin, with tunic overskirt,
pique collar of white, embroidered edge, and deep shirred waistband, finished with new sleeve and embroidered pique cuff.   Price $81,50
STUNNING DRESS of black cord silk in coat effect, with box pleated tunic skirt, organdie collar, black and white Bilk button fastenings,
and Mexican sash of black and white taffeta ailk; long 0OR AA
Bet in   sleeveawith cuffa.   Price  -wttDtUU
—.-^r       - iwewswOTS  is»     mwiht tjMmfSi.row wimmtm \       ( %Er ]
GEORGIA AND GRANVILLE STREETS
What Our Customers Say
BUCK
McINTOBH ft BAILLIE
General Merchants
Lytton, B. C.
MessrB. Wm. J. McMaster & Sons, Limited,
Vancouver, B. C.: •
Sirs,™In response to your inquiry re your "Mac's Mogul" Overalls,
we have beea handling them for considerable time nnd find tbem superior
to any American lines previously handled by ub. The fact that your
overalls are made in Vancouver and bear the Union Label together
with your porsonnl guuruntee with each garment aro features not to
be overlooked.
May your factory grow to twice its present size.
Youra truly,
McINTOBH ft.BAILLIE .
Per G. B. Baillio (Sgd.)
Wm. J. McMaster & Sons, Ltd.
1178 Homer Street
,   VANOOUVER, B. O.
J. LECKIE CO., LIMITED
SHOE
MANUFACTURERS
We manufacture every kind af
work shoe, and specialize in lines
'or miners, railroad construction,
egging, etc.
VANCOUVER
B.C
25% OFF ALL TRUSSES THIS MONTH
RED STAR DRUG STORE.
63 Cordova Street WeBt Vancouver, B. C.
101-4 BANK OF OTTAWA BUNDING
602 Haitian Street West
DR. BRETT ANDERSON, Dentist
Operates by the latest, most scientific and painless methods
Specialist in Crown. Bridie, Plate uid Gold Inlay Work
HOURS 10 AM. TO4 P.M.
BRITISH COLUMBIA LAND
Splendid opportunities in Mixed Farming, Dairying,
Stock and Poultry.   British Columbia Grants Preemptions of 160 acres to Actual Settlers .
FREE
TERMS—Residence on the ,
land for at least three years;
v improvements to the ^extent
of $5 per acre; bringing under cultivation at least five
''.,-■'.':        acres.
For further information apply to
Deputy Minister of buds, Victoria, B.C
Secretary, Bureau of Provincial Information, Victoria -
IDAT 8EPTBMBEE 25, 1014
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
m*mmmWmmm
PAGETHKJ5B
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
Ft
SELLING AT SPENCER'S
SHETLANDM ERINO—A medium weight, natural finish underwear
oi good wearing quality.   All sises1 tb 44, for. 50c
FLEECE LINED UNDERWEAR—A fall medium wpight, probably
the best underwear value In all Canada.   All sizes to 44... .50c
PENMAN'S NATURAL MERINO—Medium weight, nice soft finish.
All sises to 44.   A garment - 75c
PENMAN'S HEAVY RIBBED NATURAL UNDERWEAR—Fleece
backed; all then to 44.   Per garment. 75c
PENMAN'S NATURAL WOOL-p-Medlum weight; all sises to 44. A
garment     '.   $1,00
PENMAN'S SCOTCH WOOL—Heavy weight, double breasted; all
sizes to 44.   A garment ,- $1.00
PENMAN'S ELASTIC RIB UNDERWEAR—Pare natural wool, medium weight.    All sizes to 42.    Per garment .$1.25
Combinations, per salt ,..   .,    ,.  ....$2.50
PENMAN'S NATURAL WOOL—Unshrinkable and one"of the most
popular medium weight winter underwears on the market.    All
sizes' to 42. ' Per garment....  ....  .....  ., $1.25
Sizes 44 to 52 also in stock. A garment. .$1.50, $1.75 and $2.00
Combinations, sizes to 42.    A suit $3.50-
PENMAN'S CREAM CASHMERE—Medium weight, single breasted.
' All sizes to 42., A garment ,.  .., ,., ..$1.75
Combinations; per suit $8.00
Full weight, double breasted.    A garment....... $2.00
Combinations; per suit $8.75
PENMAN'S HEAVY RIBBED COMBINATIONS—A very popular
garment with men who cannot wear wool,    Per ault $1.75
PENMAN'S NATURAL WOOL COMBINATIONS—Heavy ribbed.
Per suit -....  ;,-..-.-, ; $2.75
PENMAN'S NATURAL LLAMA COMBINATIONS—Full weight,
closed crotch.   A suit  ., $8.75
SUPPORT HOME INDUSTRIES.
John McMillan, Manager.
Braids
Best
Coffee
„**•* HHAIDttcD.„.
Did You Get Yours
This Morning?
BRAID'S
BEST
COFFEE
WM. TURNER
906 Granville St.
Neat to the Market
-DEALER IN-
New and second-hand China, Crockery, Furniture,
Hardware and Stoves. Furniture moving and shipping. Telephone us when you have furniture for
sale. Highest-prices paid.
TELEPHONE SEYMOUR 374S
SWORKERS UNION
UNIOJ^TAMP
fadoi-y
Named Shoes are frequently made in Non-
Union Fact oriel—Do Not Bay Any Shoe
nn matter what lta name, unleu It beara a
Plain and readable tmpreaalon or thie etamp.
All ahoea without the Union Stamp are
alwaya Non-Union.
BOOT A SHOE WORKERS' UNION
246 Bummer Street, Boston, Maea.
J. F. Tobln, Prea.    C. L. Blaine, See.-Treaa.
VANCOUVER
City Market
MAIN STREET
Auction Sales are Held
Every Tuesday and Friday, at 10 a.m.
Private sales are held daily when you can
purchase in any quantity.
OUR SALESMEN AXE ALWATS AI   ■
YOUR SERVIOE.    GOOD DELIVERY
AI    LOWEST    POSSIBLE    RAIES
Saturday Is Our SpeeCal Day for Snaps.   x
See the Producers' Stalls in Front of the Market as Well as the
Inside Displays.
Everything sold in the Market is produced
in British Columbia.
ARE UP AND
Vigorously Wrestling with
Serious Unemployed
Problem
WiU Urge Opening Up of
Province and Civic Public Works
VICTORIA, B. C„ Sept. 16.—Preri-
dent A. S. Wells, in calling the regular
meeting of the Victoria Trades and
Labor council to order, stated that at
the request of a committee of the car*
penters who had been appointed to g
into the local unemployed question, he
had instructed the secretary to call a
special meeting of the oounoil and to
invite all unions, whether affiliated or
not, to have representatives present on
the above day, This had been done and
the council could now see that there
had been a ready response, by tho number present, many of the unemployed
being present who were not identified
with the different unions, as well as
delegates from locals not affiliated with
the council. He suggested that the roll
be called, credentials received, and the
minutes adopted, and that the council
then suspend the regular order of business for the purpose of going into ways
and means to alleviate the present conditions brought about by unemployment.   The suggestion was adopted.
Unemployment Committee Rtports
Delegate Simmons, chairman of carpenters' committee, was requested to
give the meeting any suggestions the
committee had as to what should be
done. He stated that the committee
had considered the question of soup kit;
chens to relieve those who were without food, but stated that this would
only be for a start, and that as much
work had been contemplated by the
provincial government and the city of
Victoria and as it had been stated that
the money had been provided, and the
work would be gone on with (but no
Btart had been made), lt was necessary
to demand that this work should be
gone on with before any real relief
could be made.       ,
Delegate Watchman said that it was
no use asking the powers that be unless we organized our' forces, and the
reason the committee, had asked the
council to hold this meeting was so
that steps could be1 taken to organize
themselves to go after not charity but
real relief in the shape of work, much
of which could be done at a benefit
to the community.
Central Organization Suggested.
A letter was read at this stage from
the Imperial Conservative association,
which stated that all organizations in
the city were* being written to asking
them to appoint a small committee to
meet with them to consider the present
situation and to devise ways -and
means to relieve the present distress.
Delegate Watchman moved that a
committee be appointed) as requested,
and that they/ wait on. the government
and civic authorities.
Delegate Sivertz moved, In amendment, that the. executive of the council
and the carpenters' committee act as a
committee in conjunction with committees from any working class organizations in the city, and that they wait
on the government and the city authorities, and lay the matter before them
and demand that work be given to the
needy.   The amendment carried.
Considerable discussion then took
place as to what work should be carried on and many suggestions were offered.
Delegate Oliver instanced work that
noeded doing in the harbor and at the
gorge.
Delegate Day gave a resume of the
work that had been done by another
organization to relievo the situation,
and also suggested work that could be
carried out.
After the discussion was closed and
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the different suggestions had been
made a number of delegates were appointed to aet on the committee and
also representatives of the unemployed
who were .not identified with any union. It was then decided that the whole
committee meet on Saturday evening at
8 o'clock.
Meeting adjourned at 10:45.
Saturday Night's Bleating.
VICTOBIA, B. C.} Sept. 10.—Committee appointed at Trades'and Labor
council's special meeting held a meeting this evening in Labor hall. Chair*
man Wells called the meeting to order
af 8 o'clock, and roll was then called
by the secretary of the council, Brother
Mathieson, who acted as secretary.
The chairman said that arising out of
the meeting held on Wednesday (ven*
ing a meeting had been called in the
Victoria West school on Friday evening
and he understood that a deputation
was present from that meeting to present the views o* the meeting.
Delegate Martin moved that the deputation be heard.   Carried.
Bev. Mr. Connell reported that the
meeting on Friday had made several
suggestions, which he would place under two heads, namely, civic and provincial, those pertaining to the city
were the work suggested to clear the
harbor of polution, and the work in the
upper reaches at the gorge, also point*
ing out the conditions of many of the
streets which were in a very bad condition. Under provincial authority, he
said, much eould be done, and the meet*
ing had suggested that as the natural
resources were here the government
should bring them- and the unemployed
together, instancing " that much had
been said about the Songhees reserve
and the work that was to be done there,
but was not yet started. In his remarks
the speaker stated that the meeting on
Friday was of the opinion that the civic
authorities were hampered by the legislation governing civic affairs, and that
it seemed to be the policy of the government to. centralize the power in the
provincial government.
Mr. Waters, another member of the
deputation, suggested. that if the city
could not raise money for the work ne*
cessary to relieve the present distress,
then steps should be taken to make the
bonds of the city act as a medium of
exchange and suggested that, arrangements be made for men to be paid by
city bonds and that the banks pay half
of the value of the bonds on presentation, and the other half be held by the
bank, so that they could be redeemed
when the present conditions were over,
and if the holder of the bonds had an
opportunity to Bell the balance of his
interest he could do so.
Delegate Sivertz spoke on the muni
cipal act and moved that a committee
be appointed to draw up the statement
to be presented to the powers that be
as to conditions that obtained at this
time  Motion laid on table.
Delegate Beckett spoke of the work
that had been proposed on the Songhees
reserve.'
Delegate Watchman spoke on the
need for different committees, and
moved that a committee be appointed
to secure quarters for a soup kitchen
from some of the patriotic landlords,
and that a committee be appointed to
raise funds for same; a committee to
be appointed to wait on the Saanich
municipality, and a committee to wait
on the city council and the provincial
government Considerable discussion
took place on this motion, much opposition being shown against the idea of a
soup kitchen, and eventually the motion
was split up, and the following committees appointed:
- Committee to appeal1 for funds for
immediate relief—Messrs. Watchman,
Mathieson and Martin.
Committee to wait on the Saanich
municipality—Messrs. Webb, Watchman and Waters.
Committee to wnit on the civic and
provincial authorities—Messrs. Slvertz,
Day, Oliver, Wells, King and Bev. Mr.
Connell.
Moved that tho committee be authorized to urge the building of a dam and
flood gates at the gorge.
It was also suggested that jf the government does not do something that a
petition be sent to President Wilson of
the United States, asking for annexation to the United States, the maker
of the suggestion saying that it did not
matter to the slave under which flag
he lived.
Among the suggestions offered was
one by Delegate Watchman, who stated
thnt at the last session of the legislature it was stated that the lessees of
the timber limits of the province owed
the government live million dollars. He
suggested that the government confiscate the leases and go into the lumber
business, as it had been stated in the
house that many of tho lumber mills
could be had for a song.'
. Delegate Poupard suggested that a
committee be appointed to see after the
people who would not be benefited by
public works, such as clerks, stenographers, domestic servants, etc., and
suggested that the cultivation of. vacant
lands be urged on the government. Committee appointed: Messrs. 'Poupard,
Smith, King, Nuim, Martin, Philbrook
nnd Beckett.
A committeo wns also appointed to
secure tho nnmes of all those unemployed and to mnke arrangements for somo
plnce whore tbey could register. Committee appointed: Poupard, Olivor,
Smith, Varney, Matheson, Simmons,
Jackson nnd Allen.
Meeting adjourned until call of the
chair,
CLOSER UNITY OF
I1DS
Organize  Northwest  Conference at Seattle Last
Week
WUl Hold Next Meeting
Vancouver on April
,      12,1915
in
Vhoae k|Mi MM
DIXON & MURRAY
-aa?
The first meeting of the Northwest
conference of the locals, of the I. P.
P. ft A. union took place at Seattle last
week. The idea of the .conference is
to get the I. P. P. ft A. U. locals of the
various cities of the Pacific North*
west in closer touch with each other
and in a general way to benefit them
all. The conference is in a sense on
the same plan as the Typographical
union conference and will consist.' of
practically the same territory. The
three branches of the trade are to be
represented, namely, web pressmen,
flatbed or job pressmen and the press
assistants, each branch to have a member on the executive board, which will
consist of the president, vice-president
and secretary-treasurer.
Temporary Offican Chosen
Temporary officers were elected aB
follows: David Holtz, of the web
pressmen, president; Lester Wolff, of
the presB assistants, vice-president;
Qeorge W. Anderson, of pressmen, No.
39, secretary'treasurer; Thomas Mul-
cahy, of the assistants, wus appointed
sergeant-at-arms.
Delegates Present
The delegates seated were: B. T,
Madden and George Gaffney, Taeoma
Assistants No. 68; George Pfaff, Vancouver Assistants, No. 8; Lester Wolff,
Thomas Mulcahy, Seattle Assistants,
No. 59; Ben Badke, Everett Pressmen,
No. 185; A. C. Samp, Salem, Ore.,
Pressmen, No. 247; A. Ei Bloom, Taeoma Pressmen, No. 44; William Neil,
Victoria Pressmen, Nd. 70; Harry Draper, . Vancouver Pressmen, No. 69;
Charles Francke, J. S. Manchester, Walter Mitchell, George W. Anderson, Jack
Peterson, Seattle Pressmen. No. 39;
David Holtz, B. Milligan, Seattle Web
Pressmen, No. 26
Philo Howard Present
The conference was addressed by
Philo Howard, secretary of the Typographical conference. His remarks were
given careful attention and he left the
impression that nothing but the best
of harmony would prevail between the
twp bodies.
Next Meeting in Vancouver
On the question of the next meeting
place, the point was raised that it
would be advisable to meet in the
same city and same time the Typographical conference met, bo it was
regularly moved and carried the next
meeting of the I. P. P. ft A, U. conference be held in Vancouver, B. C, on
April 12, 1915.
The conference at the present time
consists of practically twenty locals,
totalling 542 members in all. On motion it was decided that the temporary
officers elected ahould serve until the
next meeting of the conference.
Bigg for Fraternal Delegate
Anent tho convention of the Trades
and Labor congress of Canada, which
has been in session this week at St.
John, N. B., thy Winnipeg Voice says:
"The fraternal delegnteBhip to tho
A. F. of L. is one of the honorB which
the Trades congress has to dispose of,
likewise the selection of a delegate to
the next British Trades congress. R.
A. Rigg just missed election to the A.
F. of L. last year, and it is believed
thnt his name will again be proposed."
Mention The B. C. Federntionist
when purchasing goods.   It pleases tho
advertiser and helps tY**) paper.
Bight Motives
In determining proper motives of
conduct, it is easy to perceive that the
higher are more commendable than the
lower, and that even an act of justice
and benevolence loses something of its
charm when known to be inspired by
the selfish desire of human applause. It
waa the gay poet of antiquity who said
that concealed virtue differed little
from Bepulcreded sluggishness. But this
is a heathen sentiment, alien to reason
and the truth. It is hoped that men
will be honest, but from a higher motive than because honesty is tho best
lolicy, It is hoped that they will be
iinnane, but for a npbler cause than
the fame of humanity.—Charles    Sum-
PATRIOTISM.
Patriotism doesn't require the kind
of bigotry that condemns every
country but one's own. In fact, that
is not patriotism at nil. Patriotism is
fraternal. It has to do with humanity
and not geographical boundaries.
Our country! May wo lovo thee evermore;
Not     servilely,   ob   courtiers   love   a
throne,
But masters of ourselves   to   aid   the
world I
May youthful Wealth be   ancient Wisdom's friend,
The lamp of science   help   the   inner
Bight-—
We love theel    May we love   mankind
tbe more.
Until   around   the   earth   a    common
voice
In   Liberty's   In?}   (MlffS   "^all   re'
jrtwi" • ■..'' :-"
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UNDERTAKERS
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Use  of  Modern  Chapel  and
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Patrons
theee Si,. 221 Da, er Nlfkt
Numi, Thomson & Clegg
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
and EMBALMERS
520 Rldnt* Si.        Vum.tr, B. C.
HARRON BROS.
FUNERAL   DIRECTORS  AND
EMBALMERS
Vancouver—Ofllce    and    Chanel,
1034 Qranvllle HI.. Phone Sey. 3480
North   Vancouver — Ofllce   and
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MACK BROS,
FUNERAL DIRECTORS and
EMBALMERS
Vancourer BrilUh Columbia
MAKING CLOTHES
IS OUR BUSINESS
Wa make the beat Vou want the beet Our prieee are the
loweet Our material the beat pur workmen' Al. We
guarantee eatlefaetlon.  Get your next Suit from
S. McPherson, Sr.
MODERN PRICED TAILOR
432 Main St., Vancouver,
Mr. Union Man
Are you eating Union-made Bread, are you
helping to maintain the Union Standard of living by
using goods produced by Union Labor?
BREWER'S XL BREAD
has the Union Label on every loaf, and in quality
* and flavor it is unexcelled.
Phone Highland 573 and we will call at your I
house.
BREWER'S XL BAKERY,
Corner 4th Avenue and Commercial Street.
Abbotsford Hotel
921 Pender St. West Phone Sey. 6860
Fireproof Vancouver, B. C. European
Rates $1.00 a day up
3i M. McLUCKIE, Proprietor.
Plrat-clan Orlll in connection
Fne Biu te and from all Tralna and Boat*.
■leetrlo El.vitor
HOTEL IRVING ';^£SEar
.  . European Flan.     , .1
Hoc and Cold Water and Telephone In erery room.   Roomi with bathe.
single or en aulte. -mum.
Lrl. L. Milk, Proprietor EUROPEAN PLAN        Fred.** A. Enilkfc, Meneaer
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PENDER HOTEL
HOTEL REGENT QS*}?t&JPT«Bt2't Local and Long-Dletance
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■eetty, Proprietors. »».™a»aa»au a
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HOTEL RITZ
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RATES 76c, $1.00, $1.25, $1.50, $2.00
C. J. LOVEJOY, MGR. FREE AUTO BITS
BREWED AND BOTTLED IN VANCOUVER BY
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''   ' '. * '*'   ■'■ '    ""•'   #*?;'«'.» <*»» PAGE POUR
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
FRIDAY. SEPTEMBER 28, 191
A Tip about our
Good Clothes
i ■      ■
Any clothing store can sell a man a Suit or an Overcoat.
But few stores can dress him, however, as this store can!
Fall Suits and Overcoata of real Quality, that not only clothe a man
but dress him, are here in unstinted variety.
More labor was put into them than into any garment similarly priced.
Some people may think this great painstaking unnecessary, but we
don't.
I" you think it worth your while to have clothes made better without
adding to their price, you will wear one ot our Suits and Overcoats
this season.
shop of FASHION-CRAFT
f HOS. FOSTER & CO., LTD.
514 GRANVILLE STREET
UNDERWEAR
MEN'S BALBRIQQAN UNDERWEAR
At Mo. and Tie. per garment.
BRITANNIA
Light Woollen Underwear-luet right for this warm weather
LIGHT WEIGHT UNION SUITS
From 11.00 per Suit up.
B. V. D. UNDERWEAR
With Short Sleeves and Knee Length Drawers, Tie. per garment.
CLUBB & STEWART, Ltd.
-ttt. ley. TM HM1I HASTINOS STREET W.
STOVES and RANGES
EVERYTHING FOR THE KITCHEN
Mount Plaaaut headquarters for Caipeoten' Took ud all
loads sf Builders' and Contractors' Supplies
W. R. OWEN & MORRISON
2337 Main Strati
Fair. 447.
TRACKMEN'S CONVENTION
New Officers Elected and Canada Still
Predominates
The convention of tlie International
Brotherhood of Maintenance-of-Way
Employees, which convened at Winnipeg on Labor Day, was brought to a
close on September 16th. Many very
strenuous sessions were held, and' on
one occasion a contingent walked out,
but it iB understood that agreement on
the point at issue was finally reached.
The election of officers produced
considerable changes in the administrative board of the international.
The predominance of Canadians has,
for a number of years, been a feature
of this organization, and this still prevails. Portage la Prairie has marched
off with a whole sheaf of honors in
this respect, no less than three of the
executive officers having been chosen
from there, aB follows: Grand president, A. E. Barker; grand secretary,
Geo. Seal, and Harry Irwin, one of
the vice-presidents. Other officers elected were: A. B. Low, Windsor, Ont.,
past grand president; and vice-presidents, M. J. Powers, Toronto; H. A.
Vurpia, Chicago; and W. B. Nichols,
Hinton, West Virginia. Tho advisory
board was appointed as follows: W.
Dorey, Woodstock, N. B.; W. V. Turn-
bull, St. John, N. B,; Lucien Brown,
Profflt, Virginia, and Fred. Fljozdal,
Warroad, Minn.
Keep the Children Healthy
by sending them out In the ttteh air these Sne dajrs. There's nothing better tor kMptnf them exercised than wheeled tooda.
OUT atock Ot WHBBLBAIWOWB, AUTOMOBILES, EXPRESS WAGONS,
MRAMBULATORS, IRISH MAILS, ROWING WAOONS, VELOCIPEDES,
BIDBWALK SULKIES, ta easily the finest and most comprehensive In the
elty and the prices are right.
Thomson Stationery Co., Ltd.
Mfi HASTINOS STREET WIST
BEST IN THI WIST
VANCOUVER, B.C.
ESTABLISHED MN
What Everybody Should Know
MEN'S NEW NOBBY SUITS ean be bought at BRUMMITT'8 from
♦10,00 up to $30.00 And they are worth more
HATS, bearing tbe anion label, at MM, MM, 13.00.
■HOES all makes snd prloea, bearing the label, at "live and let live
'        ' prloea, MM up to 16.00
CHIPPEWA SHOES at tTM, MM and S10.00
LEOISLATIVE WORK
Of the Trades and Lahor Congress of
Canada
The Trades and Labor Congress of
Canada with its 1,096 branches or
affiliations, comprising a membership
of 80,801, is undoubtedly the foremost
and most important labor movement
in the dominion of Canada, says
"Working Card," in the Begins Leader. With executive headquarters at
Ottawa, the congress scans very carefully all legislation introduced in the
dominion house of parliament, and
ahould any proposed legislation have
in its make-up that which would work
a hardship on the worker or the labor
movement; the voloe of the organized
worker, through its mouthpiece, the
Trades and Labor congress of Canada
is immediately heard championing the
cause of labor and protesting against
the putting of laws on the statute books,
of the dominion that would be detrimental to organized labor. Thus in
this manner, much good has been accomplished, and the interests of the
worker, insofar as dominion legislation is concerned, safeguarded. The
congress at the same, time, is ever
alert to the needs of labdr and from
time to time introduces proposed
legislation beneficial to the worker,
and in this way, has been instrumental in having many admirable
pieces of legislation put on the statute
books, '
W. B. BRUMMITT
18-20  OOEDOVA  ST. W.
Westminster Trust Company
■seam "fart. ssee.eoo.ee
aebeeeibeg, eeoi,oeo,oe
Ws have MONEY TO LOAN on Improved property.
Estates managed for out-of-town and elty clients, Payments collected asd forwarded or Invested. We act aa agenta only for the
purchase and sals of real eatste.
Deposits accepted and Interest at 4% allowed on dally balance.
SAFETY DEPOSIT BOXES FOR RENT
Head Offlce:
Columbia snd Begbie Street, New Weetmlneter, B. C
J. I. Itatt,
I. A.
BE TRUE TO YOURSELVES
BT SMOKnra THE OLD RELIABLE
Kurtz's "Pioneer" Cigars
TOU HELP TOUR FELLOW UNION HEN AND BESIDES,
TOU OET THE TERT BEST VALUE FOR TOUR MONET
More Light and Better Light for
the Home
USB TUNGSTEN LAMPS.
Thie le advleed ae the Tungeten Lamp gives three times the
amount of light of a carbon lamp on the same consumption of
current
USE CONTINUOUS WIRE DRAWN FILAMENT LAMPS.
Thie type le the only claee of Tungeten Lamp you ahould uae. Don't
fall to aek for It when you buy Tungstens.   It beara the same relation ts other typee of Tungeteno as doee the best grade of ateel to
WE CARRY AT OUR SALESROOMS A FULL LINE OF THE
BEST TYPE OF TUNGSTEN LAMPS AS NOTED ABOVE. OUR
PRICES ARE EXCEPTIONALLY LOW WHEN THE HIGH STAND-
ARD OF OUR LAMPS 18 CONSIDERED.
Aak our dark to demonetrate for you the difference between a
Tungeten and Carbon Lamp uelng the eame amount ef current.
ELECTRICAL WORKERS
Eastern I. B. E. W. Locals Submit Referendum of Peace
Prospects are becoming brighter all
the time of the coming together of the
two International electrical brotherhoods in the east, and the way things
are shaping at the present moment indicate that the Winnipeg Trades snd
Labor council will be the medium
through which the pleasant paths of
peace will be discovered, ' says the
Voice. Last Monday a meeting was
held when representatives of both tho
McNulty and Beid-Murphy sections,
and also the Canadian district oftlc'n's,
were heard. General Secretary J. W.
Murphy, of Springfield, HI., representing the Reid section, to which bo far
the Canadian district has clung- international Vice-president Buginazet, of
Springfield, 111., represented tho International Brotherhood, which is recognized by the A. P. of L. J. B. Pegg, of
Winnipeg, spoke for the Canadian'district) W. R. Trotter gave the Canadian
'.ongress view of the situation, aud R.
A. Rigg had the oil of peace ready for
tro-jbled waters if necessary on behalf
of the Trades council. There is now a
referendum of all the Canadian loenls
going over in a body, and thus practically healing the breach, and it is
quite expected that the vote will be
favorable, it being generally conccdjd
on .all hands that such is the right
move to make now. '
EEOINA UNIONISTS
Will Place Aldermanlc Candidates In
the Next Municipal Elections
The trade unionists of Begina, Sask.,
have all but decided to participate in
the municipal elections there this fall.
They are emphatic in the declaration
that they have not received decent
treatment at the hands of the "business" administration now , In control,
and have it figured out that the only
way to change the situation is to elect
their own representatives. With the
recent labor successes in municipal elections at Edmonton, Medicine Hat, Winnipeg and other prairie towns the Renins unionists argue that they should
.loin the procession without delay. At
the next meeting of the Trades and Labor council the executive committee
will report as to ways and means and
other details connected with the candidacy of labor candidates in the alder-
manic elections.
Csnsll sad
Hatjiigi Sued
B.C. ELECTRIC
ll38C.sdl.Si.
Nasi Dari.
Trades Congress Treasury
When the Trades and Labor Congress
of Canada convened in St John, N. B.,
InHt Monday morning the report of
Scrretnry-treosuror Draper showed a total membership for 1914 of 80,004) for
101.1 it was 80,801, showing a decrease
of 707 in whnt was generally considered n trying period. The total receipts
showed a considerable increase. For
10M the receipts were ♦10,871.49; for
1914 they were $23,713.14. The expenditure for 1013 totalled $10,474.44,
while in 1914 it totalled $12,782.10. The
balnnce on hnnd is $10,981.04.
Death of Australian Labor Officials
On August 13th thero died nt Adelaide Senator Gregor McGregor, the veteran of the labor senate in the commonwealth parliament of Australia.
Denth seems to havo played sad havoc
indeed with the labor movement in Australia, for in the last few months no
less than four active members of tho
party have passed to the great beyond
—Messrs Batcholor, Prazcr, Roberts
nnd McGregor.
Brewers In Session.
The twentieth convention of the International Union of tho Unitod Brewery Workmen is in session at Baltimore
and will adjourn tomorrow. An exceptionally large number of delegates are
present from the United States and
Canada.
Alberta F. of L. to Meet.
The Alberta Federation of Labor will
hold its third annual   convention   this
year at Calgaty;   beginning   October
12th next.
MINARD'S   LINIMENT  CURES
COLDS, ETC,
O. P. R. GENEROSITT
Gets Land Cleared by Relief Work for
Nothing
The C. P. R. haB a large piece of land
behind Shaughnessy Heights, which
they have no objection to being cleared
on the cheap. So they have made tho
go*:erous offer cf the timber on it to the
■:ity in return fer cutting, Bp'.'tt'uf; unl
luuiliiig it away. The ottir has l""»
accepted by the board of works, which
lias allocated $2,000 for the job. 'ihe
rate of wages to be paid on this relief
work will probably be $1.75 to $2 per
day. The city will get the wood cheaply. The C. P. R. will get its land
cleared free of charge. Some workless
will get work—and lots of it—at low
wages, and everybody will be supplied.
Splendid arrangement.
Why Sailors Don't Marry.
Low wages and frequent unemployment iB the reason why only ' five per
cent, of the Pacific coast seamen are
married, said P. Scharrenberg, a mem'
ber of that organization and secretary
of the California State Federation of
Labor, before the United States commission on industrial relations.
Apropos Seattle Resolution.
Editor B. C. Federationist: The recent convention of the International
Typographical union was opened with
prayer. From subsequent proceedings
it would appear aB though the divine
prayer waB for the membership.
WRONG. FONT.
Vancouver, B. C. Sept. 23, 1914.
Typos. Meet Sunday Next. .
Typographical union, No. 226, will
hold its regular meeting in Labor
Temple on Sunday afternoon next, com.
mencing at 2 o'clock sharp. Considerable-business will be up for disposition
and every member is urged to be present, i
If these daily crios'of anguish from
outraged capital do not cease, an instinct of humanitarianism may lead
our wealthy working class to inflict
upon itself< a cut in wages and an increase of the hours of labor. Anything
to relieve an ''intolerable situation."
R. H. P., in the People.
MINARD'S LINIMENT CO., WD.
Gentlemen,—In inly, 1906, I was thrown
from a road machine, Injuring my hip and
back badly and was obliged to uae a cratch
for 14 monthi. In Sept. 1906 Mr. Wm. Oat-
ridge, o« Lactate urged ,me to try MINARD'S LINIMENT, whioh I did with the
most satisfactory remits and to-day I am aa
well as ever In my lite.
Yours sincerely,
hla
MATTHEW i BAINES.
mark
New Conditions Call
for New Methods
FRED PERRY
The Labor Temple Tailor
Complete! plans to produce
Custom Grade Suits of British Woolens at
LOWER PRICES
The only thing cheapened in
the Suite will be the price,
I have installed ln my larger
premises lh the Labor Temple,
power machinery, i have also
organized a specialised system
in which all operations at an
stages will be conducted and
supervised by skilled
Members of the Looal Tallore'
Union.
I expect by these metbods to
produce Suits at $30, $32.50 and
135 that will compare favorably
with the very best grades of
Suits secured under the old hand
craft system previously adhered
to.
The quality of the fabrics employed will be the very best that
money can buy—the only kind
that a man of limited means can
afford to buy—The Beet Britlah
Woolens.
I respectfully solicit your business.
New Pall Sultlnga and Overooat.
Inge now ready for your
inspection
UNION LABEL
on all Perry Clothes
FRED PERRY
LABOR TEMPLE
If you are one
who doesn't know
the wonders of the Blue Amberol
played on an Edison Cylinder
Phonograph. Let ui show you
what you are missing. We've
been in busineu a long time, Mr.
Reader. Nd one knows die
talking machine line better than
we do. We've watched the
Edison develop until to-day we
unhesitatingly claim it to be the
most perfect on lh: market today. You'll not lose anything
by hearing it We'll arrange
terms to suit
THE
KENT
PIANO CO. Ltd.
S58 GRANVILLE ST.
MINARD'S LINIMENT CURES
DIPHTHERIA
Phone:  Fairmont 810
Patterson & Chandler
Manufacturers of
MONUMENTS
Vaults, Curbing, Etc.
Office and Works:
Cor. 16th Ave. and Main St.
Branoh Offlce: 40th & Fraser Aves.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
PRE5IDENT
SUSPENDER
NONE-SOEASY
MINERS' UNIONS
KIMBERLEY MINERS' UNION, No. IH,
Western Federation of B-fcera—Meets
Sunday evenings In Union Hall. President Alex. WlUon; secre tary- treaeurer,
M. P. Vllleneuve, Klmberley, B, C.
TRAIL MILL AND SMESLTERMBN'S
Union, No. 105, W. F. of M.—Meets
every Monday at 7.30 p. m. President,
Jamee Delgarns; seoretary, P. J. Bolam,
Box 2fl, Trail, B. C.
SANDON MINERS' UNION, No. II,
Weitern Federation of Mlnen—Meete
every Saturday ln the Miners' Union
hall. Address all communications to the
Seoretary. Drawer "K.," Sandon, B.O.
PROVINCIAL UNIONS
B. C. FEDERATION OF LABOR—
Meets ln annual convention ln January. Executive officers, 1014-16: President, A, Watchman; vice-president a, w.
F. Dunn, Jas. H. McVety, G. H. Fraser.
J. W. Oray, H. Knudson, J. J. Taylor, B.
Simmons. Seoretary-treasurer, A. S.
WellB, Box 1638. Victoria, B.C.
NSW WESTMINSTER, B.C.
NBW WESTMINSTER TRADES AND
Labor Council—Meata every second
and fourth Wednesday at • p. m. In Labor
Hall, Praaldant, D. 8. Cameron; flnanclal
aeerstary, H. Olbb; general seoretary, W.
B. Maiden. P. O. Box 934. The public Is
Invited to attend.
PLUMBBRS' AND STKAMFITTERS Local 4H—Meets every second and
fourth Friday of month In Labor Hall,
T.tt p. m. Preaident, D. Webster; secretary, A. MeUren. P. O. Boa Ml, New
Westminster, B. C.
n
Nicholson's Gin
is perfectly pure and palatable
IT'S REFRESHING
AND INVIGORATING
TRY IT FOR YOUR STOMACH'S SAKE.
WILL DO YOU GOOD.
ALL RELIABLE DEALERS 8ELL IT
-1     \
BAKERS' AND CONFECTIONERS LO
CAL  No.   41-Meets seoond   and   fourth   Saturdays, 7.30 p.m. President,
H. Q. Leeworthy; correa-
c-wik-1.     ponding secretary, R. j
p MWBi- .      Adams, business ag.nt. J
Kyra).     "lack,   Room   2:0.   Labor
Temple.
BARBERS' LOCAL No. 120.—MEETS
„ J"""^ .Tuesday In each month 8.30
ft .'■ F"'e.a'den'. J. Bruce; reeoorder, C.
!*'• t, ,,ltl.SB£rctary-buslneB8 "Kent, C.
F. Burkhart, Room 208, Labor Temple.
HourB: 11 to 1; G lo 7 p.m
""""" -- "**■ " to  < p.m.   	
BARTENDERS' LOCAL No. I78.-OF:
„ 'Ice, Room 208 Lahor Temple. Meets
first Sunday of each month. President,
Sr £' kev'gne; financial secretary, Oeo
W. Curnock, Room 208, Labor Temple.
■   -      ,    „_.,.„    nag,    MSUWI      AOIIHJip. ■
iliUCKLAVEKS' AND MASONS', NO. 1
—Meets every 1st and Jrd TueBday,
8 p.m., Room 307. President. James
Haslett; corresponding seoretary, W. a
Dagnall, Box 63; flnanclal secreUry, jf,
R. Brown; buslneas agent, W. S. Dag-
nail. Room 216. "
BARTENDERS' LOCAL 784—MEETS IN
Labor Temple, New Weatminster,
corner Seventh stret and Royal avenue,
every second Sunday of eaeh month, at
1.11 p. m. Preeldent, F. 8. Hunt; seen-
tarr, F, W. Jameson. Visiting broth.™
invited.
victoria, a. e.
VICTORIA TRADES AND LABOH
Council—Meets flrat and third Wednesday, Labor Hall, 781 Johnston etreet,
at I p. m. Preaident, I3.org. Dyksman:
lecretary, Thos. P. Mathlson, box M8,
Victoria, B.C.
 —,, ...  ..—„,,  iw nwwi .ar—a.
COOKS.  WAITERS AND  WAITRESSES
Union-Meet. Snt Friday In eaeh
month, 1:30 p.m., Labor Tempi.. W. a.
Walker, busfnsa rapraaentatlve. oae.:
Room108, Ubor Tomple. Hours: • a.m.
te 10.80; 1 p.m. to 8.80 and I p.m. to I.M
P-m. Competent help furnlahad on short
notice.   Phone Bey. 8414,
VANCOUVER UNIONS
TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL -
Meets flnt and third Thursdays. Executive board: Jas. H. MoVety, preaident;
Frank EJaUnghauser, vice-president; Qeo.
Bartley, general secretary. 210 Labor
Temple; Miss H. GutterldRe, treasurer;
Fred A. Hoover, statistician; sergeant-
at-arms, John Sully; O. Curnock, F.
Knowles, W. R. Trotter, trustees.
LABOR TEMPLE COMPANY, LTD.—
Directors: Fred. A. Hoover, .1, H.
McVety, James Brown, Edward Lothian,
James Campbell, .1. W. Wltktnson, R. P.
Pettipiece, John McMillan, Murdoch McKenzle. F. Blumberg, H. H. Free.
Managing Director, J. H. McVety, Room
211.
ALLIED   PRINTING   TRADES    COUNCIL.—Meets  second   Monday  In   the
month.    Preaident,   Geo.   Mowat;   secretary, F. R. Fleming, P.O. Box 66.
BROTffBRHOOD OF BOILBR MAKBRI
«f ^!r£?n«ah,p *»«•»«». and H¥l|
of America, Vancouver      "
Meets flnt i   "
Preaident, F. .„ „-._„ _
secretary, A. Fraser, 1U1 How street
'IKS
, Vancouver Lodge N6. iiland third Mondays, Ian.
P. Barclay, III Cordova Seat;
DISTRICT COUNCIL OF CARPENTERS
meets second and fourth Thursday of
each month, I p. m. Secretary, J. Blt-
?fnv El»Hornbv atreeti business agent,
H. 3. MeEwen, room 101. Local 117 meets
Srat and third Monday of each month,
and Local 8047 meeta flrst and third
Tuesday of each month.
BLBCTRICAL WORKERS, LOCAL MO.
Ill—Meeta Room 101 every Monday
I p. m. Preaident, Dave Fink; vlee-praal-
dent, M. Sander; recording seoretary,
Roy Elgar, Labor Temple: flnanolal secretary and business agent, W. F. Dunn,
Room 207, Lahor Temple.
ELECTRICAL WORKERS, LOCAL NO.
021 (Inside Men)—Meets flrst and
third Mondays of each month. Room 206,
8 p. m. President, H. R. Van Sickle; recording secretary. J. M. Campbell: business agpnt. RUEstlngliausen. Room 207.
MACHINISTS, NO. 188—MBBTS REC-
ond and fourth Fridays, 8 p. m
President, A. R. Towlen recording seoretary, J. Brookes; flnanclal secretary, J. H.
MeVety.
MOVING PICTURE OPERATORS, Lo-
' cal 848 1. A. T. S. E.—Meets first Sun*
day of oach month, Labor Temple,.! p.m. President H. C. Roddan; secretary-treasurer,   L.   E.   Goodman;   re
cording secretary, A. O. Hansen; busl
ness agent,  0.  R. Hamilton.      Ofllce
Room 100, Loo Bldg,   Tel. Sey. 3045.
MUSICIANS'    MUTUAL   PROTECT!,
Union, local No. 146, A. F. of M
Meets seoond Sunday   of   eaeh month
rooms 18-80, Williams Building, 418 Oran
vllle street.    President, ,t. Boiyer; vice
presldsnt, F. English: seoretary, H. 3
Brasfleld; treasurer, W. Fowler.
OPEIUTIVE PLASTERERS' INTBli
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, No. 89-
Meets first and third Wednesday, O'Brlel
Hall, 8 p.m. President A. Hurry; oorree
ponding seoretary, F. Sumpter, 183M
23rd avenue east; flnanclal secretary, B
Scott, 677 Richards street; treasurer, L
Tyson. Meets every 1st and Srd Wednea
day In the month In Room 801 Labi
Temple.  j
PAINTERS',. PAPERHANGERS'. AN
Decorators', Local 188-Meets evei
Thursday, 7.80 p.m. President, H. Grand
flnanclal secretary, J. Freckleton, 10:
Comox atreet; recording seoretary, 1
Dowding; 122 Howe street. Buslnei
agent,  James  Train,  Room  808,  Lata
PATTERN MAKERS' .LEAGUE .Oi
NORTH AMERICA.-Vancouver ai
vicinity. Branoh meeta 1st and 3rd Fr
days at Labor Temple, room 105, Roba
C. Sampson, Pres., 747 Dunlevy Ave
Jos. G. Lyon, flnanclal secretary, 171
ai?nt "ft*?" 3. Campbell, according set
retary, 4860 Argyle street.
STEREOTYPERS' AND BLBCTROTTP
... .*"** ".I1*""' «*>• «». ot Vancouver an
Viotorla-Meete second Wednesday "
each month, 4 p. m., Labor Temple. Presl
dent, Chas. Bayley; recording sacretan
A. mrnle. co. "News Advertiser."        ^
STREET AND ELECTRIC RAILWA
Employees, rioncer Division No. 1(
—Meets Labor Temple second and fourt
Wednesdays at 2 p.m., and drst an
third Wednesdays, 8 p.m. Preslden
.... V'„C1"^B!1: recording secretar;
Albert V. Lofting, 2681 Trinity stree
nnanclal aeeretary and business ngen
Fred. A. Honypr. 2409 Clark Drive.
STEAM ENGINEERS, INTBRNATK»
al Local 397—Meets every Wednesdl
8 p. m., room J04, Labor Temple. Finer
clal sscretary, B, Prendergaat, room 21*
TAILORS INDUSTRIAL UNION (Ih
ternatlonal). Looal No. 178—Meetlni
held flrat Tuesday In each month, 8 p. r
President, Miss H. Outterldge: recordlt
seoretary, C, MoDonald, Box Ml; final
clal sec., K. Paterson. P. O. Box 608.
THEATRICAL STAGE EMPLOYER
Local No. 118—Meete seeond Sundi
of each month at Room 184, Labor Ten
pie. President, H. Spnra; recording m
retary, Geo. W. Allln, P.O. Box 711, Vai
couver. ^
TYPOGRAPHICAL   UNION   NO.   Ill,
Meets laet Sunday eaoh month,
p.m.   Pruldent. R. P. Pettlplece;   vie,
president,   W    8.   Metsger;   sOTetan"
treaaurer, R. H. Neelanda. P. o. Box I
'IT MaKe* The Mountain J#8ew
'   '' "-    •   '-V?    '"■
Phone Seymour 9288
WESTERN CANADA UQUOR CO.
Lee R. Berkley, Agent
137 WATER STREET
Sa»WHS

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