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The British Columbia Federationist Aug 21, 1914

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Array THE BRITI
INDUSTRIAL UNITY:   STRENGTH.
SIXTH YEAR. No. 176.
AjQFFJCIAL PAPER* VANCOUVER TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL AND B. 0. FEDERATION OF LABOR.
T^SSiafr.**- VANCOUVER, B. C, FRIDAY, AUGUST 21, 1914.
POLITICAL UNITT: TICTOfrtl
SIX PAGES
wsssrc HMvmjtiM
HAST pr/'is OF
JEAN /JN
Ma
An Eye Witness Cf Tragedy
Describes Terrible
/Scene
Famous Socialist Died in the
Arms of His
Friends
A detailed account of> tbe last
momenta ot M. Jaures, the great
'French socialist, are furnished by the
Paris correspondent ot the Manchester Guardian, who was ln the same
restaurant as Jaures at the time the
murder was committed.
"I was dining wtth a member ot my
family and a friend In the Cafe du
Croissant, the well-known resort for
Journalists ln the Rue Montmartre,
. close to many huge newspaper offices,
Including that ot the Humanlte. M.
JaureB was also Mining there, with
some socialist deputies and members
of the staff of the Humanlte.     He
■ came In later than we did, and
1 spoke to him just as he entered  and
(bad a short conversation about  the
[ prospects of war or peace.
Hla Fear of War
"Like everyone else, he feared that
(war  was probable, but  he stIU had
■ some faith that Sir Edward Grey
[might succeed In Inducing Germany
f to be conciliatory. If some sort ot
[conference could be arranged he
ithought peace might even yet be se-
I cured, if tbe French government
I would bring severe pressure to bear
Russia and the German govern-
Iment on Austria.        '- I
"The last word tbat he said to me
I was an Inquiry about M. Anatole
(France, whom he said must be deep-
fly distressed by the situation.
"At about half-past nine, when we
■were just finishing dinner, two pistol
■shots suddenly resounded in the res-
Itaurant. At flrat we did not understand what had happened, and for a
■moment thought that there was
[shooting ln the street outside. Then
we saw that M. Jaures had fallen
Jsldeways on tie benoh on which he
fwas Bitting, and the screams ot the
women who were present told us
■what had happened.
"It Bhould be explained that Jaures
nd hli friends were   sitting on a
bench with their backs to the   open
ndow of   the restaurant, and the
[shots  wore  fired  from  the   street
trough the window.   X. Jaures was
hot in the head,, and the murderer
oust have held the pistol close to hts
Vlotlm.
"A surgeon was hastily summoned,
but be could do nothing, and M.
paures died quietly a few minutes
;er the crime without speaking or
overlng consciousness. Meanwhile the murderer had at once been
elted upon and handed over to the
olice, who had to protect him against
he crowd whioh had quickly collected
i the street For at that hour of the
fevenlng the Rue de Croissant was
piled with newsvendors waiting for
late editions of the evening
papers."
Advices from Detroit, Mich., retarding the question-"Does unionism
lay?" Is answered by officers of the
Amalgamated Association of Street
ind Electric Railway Employees of
Imerloa, who announce: "For the
Irst six months ot the present year,
iur records show wage Increases to
19,300 memben Of fifty-four locals,
»qual to an annual aggregate of
11,410,000. During the six months,
hrough the International association,
here were paid 211 death and dls-
iblllty benefits In the Bum of
1102,888."
I'The "union forward movement" at
Philadelphia, Pa., is bringing large
lumbers of workers under the banter of the American Federation ot
uabor. At an open meeting of the
Hetal Polishers' union, nearly 100
nembers were enrolled. The car
lenters, machinists and other crafts
eport Immense gains. The textile
irorkers are taking advantage of the
inthuslasm, as is also the teamsters,
new union of riggers, with .100
nembers, has been organised and
bartered by the Structural Iron
Corkers.
8TRIKE ENDED
The strike of coal miners on
Vanoouver . Island, which has
lasted two years, was officially
declared off by the miners yesterday. Last Wednesday they
decided by a vote of 1030 in
favor to 863 against to accept
a settlement based upon the
offer of the operators received
through Premier MoBrlde last
June 15th. Tbe main points of
i that offer were: Tbat the com-
companles will employ men who
were employed by them at the
outbreak of the trouble without
discrimination and as they need
them. No new men will be
taken on until all old employees have been reinstated,
The miners have the right to belong to the United Mine Workers of America If they so choose
and tbe companies shall not discriminate against them for that
reason. That does not mean
that the companies recognise
*<e United Mine Workers of
Imerloa. The fight has been
long and bitter, between the
miners on the one hand, and the
:oal operators backed up by tbe
irmed foroe of the government
in the other.
WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION
The On&rio Aet
(By Jas. H. McVety
Vice-president B.,C. Federation of Labor]
In June, 1910, in response to a persistent demand on the part of the workers for a
compensation act, the Ontario government appointed Sir William Meredith, chief justice
of the province, as a commiiioner to investigate the best practice of other countries and to
draft an act for Ontario. More than three years later, in October, 1913, Sir William
presented his final report, and, while it is comparatively short, it is the best of its kind
the writer has seen.
Workers Present Cose ,
Naturally, the commiuioner commenced operations in Toronto, the capital of the
province and the largest industrial centre. The views of the workers were presented
by Fred Bancroft, vice-president of the Tradei and Labor Congress of Canada, assisted
by a local committee. This committee not only presented the ideas and requirements of
the Toronto workers, but also mapped out a plan of campaign and circularized every
point where the commissioner was to hold sessions, pointing out what had been said in
Toronto' and explaining the subject in such a way that there would be little chance of
confusing the witnesses from the outlying points of the province. So successful was this
policy that Sir William finally gave up in despair and said: "There is no use holding more
sessions in this province, the workers everywhere want the same thing and give the same
evidence as those in Toronto." The commissioner visited Belgium, England, France
and Germany, as well as the United States, to secure first-hand information and to settle
disputes between the workers' committee and the representatives of the Canadian Manufacturers' association, a body that vigorously opposed every effort to {secure beneficial
legislation for Ontario,'
Agrees wilh Workers
"At the outlet of the enquiry," says Sir William, "it was contended by those who'
spoke on behalf of the workingmen: (!) That the law of Ontario is entirely inadequate
in the conditions under which industries are now carried on to provide just compensator
for those employed in them who meet with injuries, or suffer from industrial diseases contracted in the course of their employment; and (2) that under a just law the risks arising
from these causes should be regarded as risks of the industries, and that compensation for
them should be paid by the industries." Agreeing, as I did, wilh the contention of the
workingmen, there remained only to be considered in what form and by what means the
compensation should be provided."
Manufacturers' Opposition
Dealing with the request that the "assumption of risk" ihould be considered, the
commissioner said: "The rule is based upon the assumption that the wages which a workman receives include compensation for the risks incidental to his employment which he has
to run. That is, in my judgment, a fallacy resting upon the erroneous assumption that a
workman is free to work or not to work as he pleases, and, therefore, to fix the wages for
which he will work, and that, in fixing them, he will take into account the risk of being
killed or injured, which is incidental tb the employment in which he engages." In equally
vigorous language Sir William disposes of the manufacturers' contentions, that the workers should be compelled to contribute; that the employers be permitted to bring the awards
before the courts for review, and that the compensation be fixed on the flat rate basis, as
is the case in Washington.
Burden Distributed
In arriving at a decision to pay compensation for disability on a percentage basis of
55 per cent of the average wages and in answer to the cry of the association that the
provincial manufacturers were discriminated against, and that they carried all the burden,
the commissioner says: "The workman will bear (I) the loss of all his wages for seven
days if his disability does not last longer than that, (2) the pain and suffering consequent upon his injury, (3) his outlay for medical or surgical treatment, nursing and other
necessities, (4) the loss of 45 per cent, of his wages while his disability lasts; and if his
injury results in his being maimed or disfigured he must go through life bearing that burden also, while all that the employer will bear will be the payment of 55 per cent of the
injured workman's wages while the disability lasts."
Employers Get From Under
"The burden which the workman is required to bear he cannot shift upon the
shoulders of anyone else, but the employer may, and no doubt will, shift his burden upon
the shoulders of the community, or, if he has difficulty in doing that will by reducing
wages of his workmen, compel them to bear a part of it" In concluding his report the
. commissioner naively explains the reasons why the workers should be appeased by the
enactment of "just" legislation He says: "In these days of social and indutrial unrest
it is, in my judgment of the gravest importance to the community that every proved injustice to any section or class resulting from bad or unfair laws should be promptly removed by the enactment of remedial legislation, and, I do not doubt, that the country
whose legislature is quick to discern and prompt to remove injustice will enjoy, and that
deservedly, the blessing of industrial peace and ' freedom from social unrest Half
measures which mitigate but do not remove injustice sire, in my judgment, to be avoided.
That the existing law inflicts injustice on the workingmen is admitted by all. From that
injustice he has long suffered, and it would, in my judgment be the gravest mistake if
Suestions as to the scope and character of the proposed remedial legislation were to be
etermined, not by a consideration of what is just to the workingmen, but of what is the
least he can be put off with; or if the legislature were to be deterred from passing a law
designed to do full justice owing to groundless fears that disaster to the industries of the
province would follow* the enactment of it"
Recommendations Accepted
The legislature accepted the recommendations of the1 commissioner, and at the last
session passed his draft bill, with some few amendments, which is to go into force on January I, 1915. As in Washington, the Ontario act is to be administered by a board of
three commissioners, with practically life appointments, with full power to administer the
act, there being no appeal to the courts in Ontario as there is in Washington.
Scale of Compensation
33.   (1) Where death results from an Injury the amount of the compensation shall
be:
(a) The necessary expenses of tbe burial of the workman, not exceeding $76;
(b) Where the widow of an Invalid husband Is the sole dependent a monthly
' payment ot $20;
(c) Where the dependents are a widow or an Invalid husband and one or more
children, a monthly payment of $20, with an additional monthly payment
of $5 for each child under the age of 16 years, not exceeding in the whole (40;
(d) Where the dependents are children, a monthly payment of $10 to each child
'  under the age of 16 years, not exceeding ln the whole, $40.
(e) Wthere the workman was under age of 21 years, and the dependents are his
parents or one of them, a monthly payment ot $20, ceasing when the workman would have attained the age of 21 years or at s*uch later period as the
board may deem just;
(f) Where the sole dependents are persons other than those mentioned ln the
foregoing clauses a sum reasonable and proportionate to the pecuniary loss
to such dependents occasioned by the death, to be determined by the board,
but not exceeding ln the whole $40 per month,
' (2) In the case provided for by clause (f) of subsection 1, the payments shall continue only so long as ln the opinion of the board It mi tht reasonably have been expected had the workman. lived he would have continued to contribute to the support of
the dependents. **-
(3) WJiere there aro both total, and partial dependents the compensation may be
allotted partly to the total and partly to the partial dependent!.
(4) Where the board Is of opinion that for any reason lt Is neoeaaary or desirable
that a payment In respect of a child should not be made directly to lta parent tha board
may direot that the payment be made to suoh person or be applied in such manner M
the board may deem tor the advantage of the child.
(6) The compensation payable aa provided by subsection 1, shall not In any east
exoeed 65 per eent of the average monthly earnings of the workman mentioned In
section 37, and If the compensation payable under tbat subsection would In any case
exoeed that percentage It shall be reduced accordingly, and where several persons an
entitled to monthly payment* the payment* ihall be reduced proportionately.
34. ,(1) If a dependent widow marries, the monthly payments to her ahall ceaae,
but she shall be entitled in lieu of them to a lump sum equal to the monthly payment* "
tor two years and such lump sum shall be payable within one month after toe day of
her marriage. '       I
(2) Subsection i, shall not apply to a widow in respect of a child,
35. A monthly payment In respect of a child shall oease when the child attain* the
age of 16 years or dies. >
36. Where a workman leaves no dependents such sum aa the board may deem
. reasonable for the expenses of his medical attendance and of his burial shall be paid to
the persons to whom suoh expenses are due,     /
87. Where permanent total disability results from the injury the amount of the
compensation shall be a weekly payment during the life of the workman equal to IS per
cent of bis average weekly earnings during th* previous twelve months If he haa been
so long employed, but If not, then tor any leu period during which he ha* been in the
employment of his employer.
30. (1) Where permanent partial disability result* from the Injury tbe compensation shall be a weekly payment of SS per cent of the difference between the average
weekly earnings of the workman before the aocldent and the average amount which he
Is earning or Is able to earn ln some suitable employment or business after the accident
and the compensation shall be payable during the lifetime of the workman.
(2) Where the Impairment of the earning capacity of the workman does not exceed
10 per cent, ot his earning capacity Instead of such weekly payment the'hoard ahall,
unless ln the opinion of the board lt woujd not be to th* advantage of the workman to
do so,- direct that such lump sum as may be deemed to be the equivalent of It ahall be
Paid to the workman. ■ £*,*•.■'■'■..
38. Where temporary total disability results from the" Injury, the compensation
shall be the same as that prescribed by section 37, but shall be payable only so long aa
the disability last*.
40. Where temporary partial disability result* from the injury the oompenutlon
shall be the same as that prescribed by section 38, but shall be payable only ao long aa
the disability lasts and subsection 2 of that section shall apply.
41. (1) Average earnings shall be computed In such manner u It best calculated
; to give the rate per week or month at whloh the workman wu remunerated, but not so
as ln any case to exceed the rate of $2,000 per annum.
(2) Where, owing to the shortness of the time during which the workman wa* in
the employment ot his employer or the casual nature of bis employment or the term*
of it, lt is impracticable to compute the rate or remuneration u of the date of the accident regard may be had to the average weekly, or monthly amount whieh, during the
twelve months previous to the accident was being earned by a person In the ume
grade employed at the same work by the same employer, or If there is no person so
employed,, then by a person ln the same grade employed in the aame class of employment anl In the same locality.
(3) Where the workman has entered Into concurrent contract* ot service with two
or more employers, under whloh he worked at one time for one of them and at another time for another of them, his average shall be computed on the basis of what he
would probably have been earning if he had been employed solely in the employment of
the employer for whom he was working at the .time ot the accident
(4) Employment by the same employer shall mean employement by the same employer In the grade in which the workman was employed at tbe time oi tin accident
uninterrupted by absence from work due to illness or any other unavoidable causa.
41. (1) In fixing the amount of a weekly or monthly payment regard ahall ba bad
to any payment, allowance or benefit whioh the workman may receive from hi* employer during the period ot hi* disability, Including any pension, gratuity or other allowance
provided wholly at the expense ot the employer.
. 4' (2) Where the compensation I* payable out ot th* accident fund any sum deducted
from the compensation under subsection 1 may be paid to the employer out "of the aocldent fund.
43. Where the oompenutlon is payable out of the accident fund, the board may,
wherever lt Is deemed advisable provide that the payment* of compensation may be
fortnightly or monthly, Instead of weekly.
44. Where a workman or a dependent Is an Infant Under age of 21 year* or under
any other legal disability, the compensation to which he Is entitled may be paid to such
person or be applied In such manner aa the board may deem moat for hi* advantage.
The rates of compensation, as will be seen, are superior to those of any other country, except that of the state of New York which pays 66 2-3 per cent imtead of 55 per
cent as in Ontario.
Objectionable Features
After a very careful reading of the act there appears to be but two clauses to which
objection can be taken.   One ii sub-section E of section 33, reading ai follows:
"Where the workman was under the age of 21 yeara, and the dependents are his
parents or one of them, a monthly payment of $20, ceasing when the workman would
have attained the age of 21 years or at such later period u the board may deem Just"
It would appear that the working of this clause will place a premium on the employment of personi under age, although it is not clear that the dependency of parents
becomes any less after the children have attained the age of 21, although it must be admitted that most frequently the age of 21 is when the youth leaves his parents and starts
a home for himself. This is not, however, alwayi the caie, and it may be that the provision giving the board discretionary power may meet the situation.
Section 8 it, however, the most objectionable clause, providing, ai it does, for the
exclusion of dependents residing outside the province of Ontario, except in cases where
the country in which the dependents reside has passed legislation that would permit the payment of compensation to dependents residing in the province of Ontario. In such cases
the dependents will be paid the amount of compensation the country in which they live
would allow to be paid to dependents living in Ontario. ii
Dependents Reading in Another Country
In other words, if the facts were as in the case of Kruz vs. Crows Nest Pais-Coal
company, where the dependents lived in Austria, compensation would not be paid unless
Austria had a compensation act that would permit payment to dependents of a workman
injured in Austria to be made to them while living in Ontario.
It might be urged, with some degree of success, that Ontario or any other province
might, with propriety, require people drawing money from taxes on Ontario industries
to reside within the province and to spend the compensation within the province. On the
other hand, from the view point of the employers, those who pay the tax from which the
compensation is taken, will, by employing workeri whoie dependents reside in other
countries, thus reduce the number to whom compensation must be paid, and thereby reduce the taxes they are compelled to pay to maintain the fund. From the workeri standpoint the worker who has recently come to this country and left his family at home, while
' compelled to work for the same wages as those entitled to compensation, finds his dependents, in the event of his death, merely because of their residence in another country, shut
off from the privileges to which Ihey should have been entitled had they arrived in Ontario a day or an hour before the accident occurred.
When the time comes, British Columbia workeri ihould remember the funds expended in order to compel the Crows Nest Pass Coal company to pay compensation to Kruz
and to prevent Ihe placing of a premium on the employment of migratory workers, and see
to it that a sufficient protest is made to prevent the inclusion of this section in the British
Columbia act
HOW "tElPSIG" WAS COALED
Western Fuel Company Supplies the
Coal
The Western Fuel company owns
some of the mines ln Nanalmo. They
have been fighting the miners of Vancouver Island for the last two years,
with,the assistance of Premier McBride and Attorney-general. Bowser.
One of the reason* given for their
animosity was tbat the United Mine
Workers of America was a "foreign"
organization.' It has been pointed
out several time* that the Western
Fuel company Is an American concern with headquarters in San Francisco. A copy of the San Francisco
Bulletin Just received by the B. 0.
Federatlonist contains a picture of
the German cruiser Lelpslg taking
coal on board In San Francisco harbor from the barges of the Western
Fuel company. That coal is mined
ln Nanalmo and taken to San Francisco, The company has no other
mines but those on the Island. So lt
works out this way.'   The Rainbow
will help defend the company's mines
at Nanalmo, while the company sells
Nanalmo eoal to the Lelpslg so thst
It can sail north and blow the Rainbow to glory.   It's a great world.
Prlntera1 Picnic
Typographical union, No. 226, will
hold Its annual picnic tomorrow at
Reeve Lawson's grounds, West Vancouver. All sorts of games and
amusements will be features of the
day's outing. Tlokets may be obtained from members of the committee, comprising Messrs. J. C.
Bohle, W. Jones, Al. Pelkey, E. J.
Trumper, T Weedon or H. Neelands,
seoretary of the union. Tickets, 50
cents, Including fare,   All welcome.
Equal Pay for Equal Work
Through the efforts of the Commercial Telegraphers' union the wages of
all women telegraphers ln British Columbia have been raised to the same
figure as the wages of men telegraphers.
EARLY CLOSING
Will Not Hold Water Says
Magistrate
When the first case regarding the
Infringement of the early closing bylaw came before Magistrate South
Tuesday, he gave a decision tn
favor of the defendant Until some
further action Is taken by the council,
the retailers will be able to keep open
tbelr places of business. It Is not yet
known if City Prosecutor Kennedy
will file an appeal. The case which
resulted adversely for the city was
that of G. P. Jones, 1186 Granville
street J. Edward Bird, who appeared
on bebalf. of Mr. Jones, contended
that neither the statutes nor the city
charter gave the aldermen power to
provide a penalty, and without a
penalty the bylaw was of no account.
It was also argued by Mr. Bird that
the Shops Regulation act declared
that a municipal counoll may by a
bylaw close any shops In any one day
after six o'clock ln the afternoon. It
was pointed out by Mr. Bird that a
day consists of twenty-four hours,
and Is measured from midnight to
midnight and that, therefore, In declaring that the shops affected by
the closing bylaw remain close from
six o'clock In the evening until 7
o'clock the next morning, the council
exceeded Its powers. In reply, J. K.
Kennedy argued that under several
different acts and statutes the council did have the power to Impose a
penalty, and that lt had a right to
legislate as lt had done under the
Shops Regulation act That the
magistrate's decision will not be accepted by tbe city council and that
an appeal will be carried to a higher
court seems certain, as this was the
Intention of the city council that ln
the event of an adverse declsllon an
appeal would be entered.
There Is no such thing as lndepen
dence. The richest man In the world
has to have somebody else cut his
hair.—Detroit Free Press.
LABOR HOtfe
HELD A GOOD
MEEU
The Council Voted Belief
to Sojith Wellington   *
* Fin Victims
Will Be BepreMnted On the
Civic Committee for,
Belief of Distress
The Trade* and Labor council met
In regular session lut night undtr
the chairmanship ot President Ju. M.
MeVety and with a fair attendance ot
delegate*.
Th* letter curlers ar* trying to.
get a half •holiday .during . three
month* of th* summer and th* oouncll will rapport thtlr efort* ta. •
memorial to the postmaster-general
The counoll had been requested by
th* mayor to und on* representatlv*
to th* olvlo committee which will administer the fund for th* Mtat of
peraona In dlstnu u tbe remit of
th* wtr or other cause*. The pruldent had gone on the committee oa
behalf ot the oouncll and hi* notion
WM endorsed.
Delegate* to the parliamentary
committee are especially requutod
to b* present at the meeting of tt*
committee next Thuraday at ltt
Labor Temple, 8 p.m. The musician*
complained that union workmen w*r*
playing In the 6th regiment band,
which I* non-union.
Civic employee* 'reported that they
were now put on on* week on and on*
week off. Sheet metal worker* reported a lot of their member* ont ot
work, and tha firm of Scoullar had
reduced the wagu of the aheet m*tal
workeri from HM to $4. Strut
rallwaymen reported having b*ao '
very near a atrlke, but matters had
been adjusted to the satisfaction ol
the men.
Printer* had reported alackneaa,
and men In each newspaper ofllce had
decided to go on a five-day week to
give a bitter chance to those unemployed. Tailora are very alack ai)
over town with no sign of improvement
It wu decided that the oonaoll
should be represented at the sitting*
of the political representation commission which wu dealing with tha
redistribution of aula, A. commltte*
of three wu ulected to take up th*
question ot th* sheet mttal worker*
whose wagu had been reduced by
the Scoullar firm on the Hudson'* -
Bay building.
A delegate uked if the council had
been requested by the provincial government to help them get the province out of bankruptcy.
President McVety left ,the chair to
move that ISO be voted by the council to asBist the miners and their
families wbo have been rendered
destitute and homeless by the recent,
tire at South Wellington. The motion
wu unanimously approved by tba
delegates. It wu pointed out that
olose upon 400 men, women and ohlldren had been burned out of house
and home by tbe disaster.
The reduced attendance at counoll
meetings during these tunes or de.
presslon wu commented upon aa4
organisations ire to be notified of ths
non-attendance of their delegates, an j
otherwise urged to make the council
meetings u large u formerly. A
good deal of business wu transacted
and the meeting concluded by 0.30
o'clock.
BRAVE BRITONS READ THIS
Hospital Ship Fires White Cook* ts
Mak* Way for Chinaman
The steamer Prince George has
been taken over by the British government to be used as a hospital ship.
During the past week It hu been In
dook at Victoria, B. C, refitting for
that purpose and Is now ready for
sea. When the government took lt
over the men In the culinary department were white, The officials who
took charge of the boat bave discharged the white men and taken
Chinamen on In their place. Lute
Blltannla, Kslaer, him hip no good.
Typos Decide on Lo* Angeles
The annual convention of the International Typographical unton,
which met at Providence, R. I., lut
week, decided by a majority of 63 to
hold next year's convention ln the
city of Los Angeles, California.
Printers Strike
A strike of Job printers in Salt Lake
City, Utah, has been called to enforce
the new scale of prices wblch the employers have rejected. Several have
signed, but some of the largest offices are holding out. Printers are requested to stay away from Salt Lake,
as no travelling cards will be received there by Typographical union.
No. 116.	
Organiser Beck
Al. C. Beck, International organiser of the Hotel and Restaurant Employees International Alliance and
Bartenders' International League of
America (If any of that name Is left
out I hope It will be overlooked) is on
the coast In the Interest* of hi* organization. He expects to spend
some little time at Seattle and other
coast cities, Including Vancouver.
The city ot Quebec Is to have
labor temple.
B, C. r, ot L. WILL
NOT CALL THE
GENERAL STRIKE
A meeting of the coast members of the executive board of
the B. C. Federation of Leber
was held In Victoria lut Tuesday night Those present were
President A. Watchman, Vice-
president* H. Knudsen, w.
Dunn, B. Symonds and Jas. H.
McVety. The principal objeot
of the meeting wu to receive
the returns of the referendum
vote recently taken on the
question of a general strike of
all workers In British Columbia
to assist the miners of the
Island ln getting a satisfactory
settlement of their trouble.
Socretary-treasurer Wells presented the figures ot the vote as
received and complied by him.
After full consideration, lt waa
decided by the executive not to
make any announcement of the.
actual figures at the present
time. It waa also.decided not
to take any action to call a
general strike. Various routine
matters pertaining to the Interests ot the Federation war*
also dealt with at the meeting. PAGE TWO
THE BBITI8H COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY AUGUST IL
Mr. Union Man
Are you eating Union-made Bread, are you
helping to maintain the Union Standard of living by
using goods produced by Union Labor?
BREWER'S X-L BREAD
has the Union Label on every loaf, and in quality
and flavor it is unexcelled.
Phone Highland 573 and we will call at your
house.
BREWER'S XL BAKERY,
Corner 4th Avenue and Commercial Street.
Latest Addition >to Vancouver** Up-to-Date Hotels
Hotel Regent
L
Absolutely Fireproof.   Local and Long-
Digtance Phone in Every
Room.
Abundance of Light and Heat Cafe in Connection
RATES $1.00 PER DAY UP
Attractive Rate* to Permanent
Guests
COTTINGHAM & BEATTY
Proprietors
LrU L'MUb, Proprietor
EUROPEAN PLAN        fnivhk A. EnilUh, Hauler
f Hot and Cold Water In
Svery Room, f 50 Rooms
Connected wltb Baths.
HOTEL EMPRESS
'"sass*'1" {235 Hastings St. E., Vancouver, B. C. Absolutely Fireproof
THE NEW ENGLAND li(yaaUJ*__2^_?__™
no. up; WMkly, 13 up.    656 SEYMOUR STREET transients
Free But to snd from all Trains and Boats.
Electric Elevator
hotel:irving
Cer. Columbia Ara. and Hut-lap Street
McPHAIL __ MACKENZIE, Proprietor*
European Plan.
Hot and Cold Water and Telephone In every room.   Rooms with bathf,
single or en suite.
538 Cambie Street
Phone Sey. 2542
HOPPS&DUKER,
sSI-OMG     BUIITR)R'YDUR
OtKlNO WRTICULARPURPOSE
BRITISH COLUMBIA LAND
Splendid opportunities in Mixed Farming, Dairying,
Stock and Poultry.   Britlah Columbia Grants Preemptions of 160 acres to Actual Settlers
FREE
TERMS—Residence on the
land for at least three years;
improvements to the extent
of $5 per acre; bringing under cultivation at least five
acres. __
For further information apply to
Deputy Minister of lands, Victoria, EC
Secretary, Bureau of Provincial Information, Victoria
The Quality of Our Service, the Quality of
Our Goods, Is Always the Best
The reason our business Is Increasing Is lut to tbt faot that our outlasts polloy Is oorrect. Wo adopts* tbt polloy of Informing tbt publlo
throturb tht mtdluro of tht press at to what our diaries would bt for a
complete funeral. Including Hearse, Carriage for Family, Cart of Remains,
Wagon Service, and all our personal ttrvltt for
$55.00
Oomplete Funeral
$55.00
Ws are llvlna* up to our advertisement to tha letter. This has established confidence with ths publlo In us, and for that reason alone wa are successful, and ws Intend to contlnuo aa ws are doing now.
Mount Pleasant Undertaking Co.
Cor. Eighth Ava. and Main Street   , Phone Fairmont IH
Commodlout Chapel Fnt to All Patrofll
Formerly Ctnttr 4 Hanna'a Branch
A. C. Millar, Pnt.
P. H. droit, Manager
Vancouver Heights Grocery
3640 HASTINGS STREET EAST
THE POST OFFICE STORE
Best ot everything at loweat prices.
Groceries, Hams, Bacon, Garden Seeds, Fresh Fruit and Vegetables, Tea Boa* Tea, Beld ft Millar'* Sausages and Head Cheese.
Every morning we receive a shipment of berries trom McDonald'* Ranch on Keats Island.   They are delicious.
Telephone your orders.   Our delight Is to serve you.
W. R. McMURRAY
PHONE HIGHLAND S89L
Select your Cigars from Boxes bearing this Label
E
SAT
Fruit and Produce Sold to
Public at Favorable
Prices
Eggs Advance in Price-
Auction Sales Every
Week
That the city market Is Ulllng the
gap between producer and consumer
was strongly ln evidence Tuesday
morning when the producers' bad
large quantities to sell and consum
ers were there ln large numbers to
buy. Tbe past week has been exceptionally busy and large quantities ot
fruit have been disposed of at prices
tbat were very favorable to the buyers. Plums were the leading line and
these Included gages and damsons,
Eggs are again on the upgrade, while
poultry, owing to the enormous quantities coming forward, are much
easier In price,
In the poultry section white Leg
horns sold at from $4 to |5 per dozen;
broilers, $2.50 to $3.60 per dosen;
ducks, 50c. to 60c. each; eggs cleared
at 40c. a dozen; young hogs sold at
$3 each, while butter ln 5-pound lots
sold at 30c. a pound.
Small Fruit*
Blackberries are not ln demand,, but
all blackberries offered cleared at 80c.
and 85c.per crate; red currants made
70c. a crate. In the plum line a nice
lot ot Victorias from Whonnock made
70c. and 75c. per crate; first-class
Bradshaws made 86c, per orate;
prunes, 76c. per crate; damsons, 76c.
to 86c. per orate; gages, 60c. to 80c.
per crate, while several lots that were
somewhat off color sold as low as 40c.
to 50c. per crate.
Tomatoes are very plentiful. Okanagan basket crates sold at 80c, per
orate, while others were sold as low
as 50c. and 60c. per crate. Apples are
not ln good demand, probably owing
tb the very large quantity of plums on
the market, and the best price yesterday was $1.10 per box, while a
large quantity were sold at 75c. per
box.
From Okanagan
Hyslop crab apples were In good
demand, and these were readily sold
at $1.30 per box. Okanagan onions
made $1.60 per 100-pound orate. New
hay Is selling at $13 per ton, and potatoes at $1 per Baok.
Owing to the large quantities of
produce being offered, It has become
necessary to put on another auction
sale. This sale will be known as the
trade sale, when all produce will be
put up ln lots. The first trade sale
was held on Wednesday at 10 o'clock
a.m., and will be continued.every
week till the end of the season.
MILITARISM IN EUROPE
Local Unionist Tells What He Saw In
Belgium and Germany
Harry Cowan, In company with Con
Jones, visited England, France, Germany, Belgium and Holland last winter and had an opportunity of seeing
the conditions tbat prevailed ln the
war zone. Speaking on his return of
the military he said that everywhere
the nations were arming and the people were apprehensive that at any
moment some minor Incident would
throw them into a cataclysm of
blood. In France the one thought was
of the day when they would again
tackle the ogre from the north.
Everything Is taxed to the limit, and
all for tbe purpose of maintaining
lighting men and machines to kill
fellowmen with whom they have no
real quarrel.
But lt Is In Germany where the military Is firm in the saddle. All defer
to them. It Is Impossible to walk halt
a block ln the beautiful city of Berlin
without encountering an officer or a
soldier. Everywhere and on all Bides
tt is made patent to a visitor that here
more than ln any of the countries we
visited that the soldier was the master
and not the servant. Just think ln that
city alone there were quartered
60,000 fighting men ln a time of peace,
More than the whole standing army
of the United States. Everywhere wo
went the guide would point out fortifications that contained destruction
enough to lay low thousands of men.
And don't forget when you consider
these facts that these are nice Christian nations who every Sunday go to
their respective churches and offer up
supplications to Almighty God for
peace on earth and goodwill toward
men. This war will not be of short
duration either. It will take a tre.
mendous length of time before these
fortifications are reduced on either
side, and oceans of blood will be
split.
It looks at this distance as If there
will either be a new dynasty In Germany or a republic by the time this
war Is over. While the German people
are as patriotic as any people on
earth, yet many that we met told us
under their breath that the military
was an awful burden. But that does
not apply In Germany alone. The
Industrious and prosperous cities of
Liege, Brussels and Ghent are now
In the throes of the flght In Belgium
we were Informed that they were not
concerned ln the quarrels of the
other nations. But they have been
drawn Into the flght, and before lt Is
over these beautiful places will be devastated. ,
Undoubtedly, with the conditions
prevailing this war had to oome. You
can't have a nation, any more than an
Individual, armed to the teeth but
that lt will sooner or later get Into
a row. Possibly out of these evils
may come good. The civilized world
may learn after this gigantic death
and desolation that the entrusting of
autocratic power ln the hands ot a
few doesn't pay, Possibly those who
have worked for universal peace In
years gone by will not ln future be
the victims of sarcasm.
VOTES FOR WOMEN
By MRS. J. A. CLARKE
The regular semimonthly meeting
of the Mount Pleasant Suffrage
league was held last Friday night ln
A. 0. F. hall, corner of Main street
and Tenth avenue.
Attention 1* here called to the fact
that the building has been remodelled
so that a flne new hall has been
fitted up in the basement and ln future tbe suffrage meetings will be
held here. Entrance on the Tenth
avenue side.
Considering that many people are
away on their summer vacations and
that the population is upset in general over present conditions the
meeting waa fairly well attended and
the gain of three enthusiastic members was considered encouraging.
Believing that this world-wide
movement on the part ot the women
Is for the' benefit of the race, this
league stands not only for the extension of the franchise but for humanitarian and educational purposes as
well.
The chief speaker of the evening,
Mr. Osborne, then took up his subject, "Co-operation." As the question
Is a broad one the speaker did not on
.this occasion go Into details, promising at a. later date to speak again.
The speaker said that cooperation
was ot the greatest Importance In this
province In regard to the price of the
food supply, because with proper cooperation the price of food will be
greatly reduced.
The great difficulty In British Columbia was the very kind government,
headed by Sir Richard McBride, giving to railroads and land speculators
lands to hold for profit, and lt was a
great error on the part of the public
to permit this. Not satisfied with the
strangling of Industry by the C. P.
R. more harm was being done by
building a competitive system, for cooperation Ie life, competition is death.
The speaker said the people would
have to get down to facts and cultivate the land for use and not for profit. In the past MoBride had given
all the chance to speculators, but
thai we had no right to burden posterity, publlo utilities should be for
the use of the public.       '
Scientists claim that if properly
handled tbe British Isles alone would
feed 200,000,000 people and that the
means of production would be outstripped by the Increase of population
was a fallacy. Taking Denmark as an
example he said that under co-operation that country ln a few years, had
so developed that 89 per cent, of the
farmers own their own land and lt
was now one of the richest countries
in Europe ln comparison to Its slse.
Mr. Morton, who has made a wide
study of economic questions, followed. He thought the chief difficulty
was to know along what particular
lines co-operation can be worked.
What is success? The Idea of co-operation, as put forth by Robert Owen,
an authority on the subject, was quite
different from the co-operation being
practiced ln those countries mentioned by the' first speaker. In fact
he thought Robert Owen would not be
able to recognize his Idea of co-operation. The extension of co-operation
made not the slightest difference on
the margin of poverty.
Mr. J. Boult spoke very clearly on
the question. He deplored tbe fact
that cooperation as lt exists at the
present time In different countries
meant profit for some. He thought
that instead of trying to compete with
our goods, under co-operation, only
our surplus goods would be sent out
in exchange for commodities that
we could not produce.
After the discussion the question of
helping needy cases ln the vicinity
came up. The league was ot the opinion that the orphans' home should
not be the dumping place of ohlldren
who had mothers capable of caring
for them, and that lt was up to our
civic as well as provincial officers to
make proper provision for such cases.
The next meeting will be held on
the fourth Friday Of the month, Aug.
28th, In the A. 0. F. hall, corner of
Main street and Tenth avenue. The
topic will probably be "The War from
Different Angles." Any one interested may come and take part ln the
discussion. ,
Mrs. Ralph Smith, ot the provincial
political equality league, Is making a
tour ot the Freser valley In the Interests of suffrage. Mrs. Smith is an
able speaker and should bring many
converts Into the cause.
A great many people seem to
think that suffrage has been relegated to the background on account of
war conditions, To thinking people,
however, lt Is apparent more than
ever than women Bhould be enfranchised, and while assisting ln this
calamity as much as possible, women
will still Insist on having their political rights.
Woman Suffer* Most
One of the dally papers Bays editorially; "The horrors of war cannot
be exaggerated, but our women pay
the heaviest toll. None of the excitement Is for them; theirs Is the patient waiting, every moment fraught
with dread. For them there is too
often the struggle with poverty."
The above statement is only too
true and should help to do away with
that old argument that women cannot go to war so should not have a
vote. Ot oourse manhood suffrage Is
not based on whether a man can go to
war or not. There are many men who
from the fighting standpoint are
either Ineligible or are exempted, yet
they vote. But the opponents of
woman suffrage often use the war argument and while such persona show
a lack of knowledge of higher things,
yet they have an effect on a great
many unthinking people.
In the great wars that have taken
place ln the history of the world the
women has not only had to stay at
home and do a woman's share but
has most often had the added bur
den of man's duty under very discouraging conditions.
IA good example of this being during the dark days of the American
civil war, when the women of the
southern states had not only to present their physical strength but
their Inventive genius to .keep alive
themselves and those left ln their
care.
The war haa called out this argument In our behalf, Let It be hoped
IONS
ARE WINNING
I FIGHT
Half Building and Quarter
of Other Unionists Are
. Locked Out •
Viewed from Standpoint of
Unions Situation Eminently Satisfactory
According to latest reliable reports
from Stockton, ahout one dozen
union teamsters were locked out during the past week.
Thirty bricklayers quit work In accordance with the laws of the State
Building Trades council of California
and the rules of the San Joaquin
County Building Trades council. The
bricklayers refused to work with nonunion laborers, By their action the
Stockton bricklayers bave again demonstrated that they are solid union
men, and thus have nailed the lies of
the M„ M. & B, aggregation.
At the present writing about 50 per
cent, of the union building tradesmen
and about 25 per cent, of the union
men ln the other trades are locked
out ln Stockton.
Nearly every national and International union has Its representatives
on the ground. They are getting all
the new building work in the Sau
Joaquin valley for the union artisans
and laborers. To date their efforts
have been crowned with splendid success. Union-made building material
also is being obtained from other
cities in the state ln quantities sufficient to keep the work going on a
number ot good-sized structures In
Stockton.
The strike assessment levied by the
State Building Trades council of California and the State Federation ot
Labor is being paid promptly by the
large union membership In California.
In the words of a veteran union
organizer; "Viewed from the unions'
standpoint, the Stockton situation Is
eminently satisfactory."
Judging from the reports of the
Stockton dally papers, the union mass
meeting held recently, must have
been a record breaker, both as to attendance and oratory. San Francisco's Sunday morning dallies failed to
mention this tremendous Stockton
mass meeting. That Is the way these
monarcha of conservative and yellow
journalism serve their readers with
the news.
Reform Is an attempt to become respectable without stopping the robbery.
that when the- war is over not only
will we not hear such an excuse put
forth, but seeing that women pay the
heaviest toll men will realise the injustice of keeping them trom being
able to at least partly control that
which so vitally affects them. The
only way that this can be done is to
give women political equality. Then
it will be tor the women to broaden
and study to use this power to the
best advantage In protecting themselveB and their homes.
MINARD'S LINIMENT CURES
BURNS, ETC.
Are you a subscriber?   If not, send
In your name now.
VANCOUVER
City Market
MAIN STREET
OKANAGAN APRICOTS, PEACHES, PLUMS
TABLE AND COOKING'APPLES, NEW LAII
EGGS, DAIRY BUTTER, DRESSED POULTRY
DUCKS, NEW POTATOES, VEGETABLES.
Auction Sales Every Tuesday and Fridaj
OUR SALESMEN ARE AT YOUR SERVICE
DAILY FROM 7 AM. TILL 6 P.M.
SATURDAY IS OUR SPECIAL PRODUCERS' DAY-
JOHN McMILLAN, Manager
Named Shoes ue frequently made in Not
Union Factories-Do Not Buy Any Sho
no matter what lta nam*, unless lt bears i
plain and readable Impression or thl* stamt
AU shoes without th* Union Stamp ar
alwaya Non-Union.
BOOT A SHOE WORKERS' UNION
246 Bummer Strut, Boston, Mu*.
J. F. Tobln, Pre*.   C. L. Blaine, 8*o.-Tr*ai
Brown Bros. & Co. Ltd.
Florists and Nursery Men
a Httiimi st.
THRU •TOM* IN VANCOUVER
a-htnt *ty. N* 4*1 GiuvlUt St
TM Ortnvlllt It.    Phont My. NI*
Phtnt tty. WW
VICTOIU. STORB, 111 VMW IT,
Hammtn*, 1,0,
Abbotsford  Hotel
921 Pender St. West Phone Sey. 5860
Fireproof Vancouver, B. C. European
Rates $1.00 a day up
J, M. McLUCKIE, Proprlstor.
Flrtt-elatt Brill In connection
EVERY  UNION  MAN   IN   VANCOUVER  (SHOULD    PATRONIZE
LABOR TEMPLE CLUB AND POOL ROOM
iTMahes'TheJvtou
Phone Seymour 9288
WESTERN CANADA LIQUOR CO.
Lee R. Barkley, Agent
137 WATER STREET m——mwmm~l
omcuL pAin VANCouvn
TIADES AND LABOR COUNCIL
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
omcuL PAfta samjH os*>
SIXTH YEAB. No. 176.
VANCOUVER, B. C, FRIDAY, AUGUST 21, 1914.
SIX PAGES
(_Veaatatte\
\ OtrTttM )
$1.50 PER YEAR
GREAT SALE
OF AMERICAN SHOES
FOR WOMEN NOW ON
Offering Standard $5
and $6 Values at the
Quick Selling Price..
$3.25
—every shoe it sold to our customers, giving the same care as to fit and
guarantee of wear as though they were paying the regular prices of
$5.00 and $"6.00 for them.
Judging by the crowds that have thronged the shoe section the
last few days, past selling records will be broken—and that's what we
expected. The values are the best this store has ever offered. The
shoes are what every woman has to buy, and we show them in all sizes
in stylet for dress and for street wear. They were made by America's
leading shoe manufacturers and are perfect in fashion, in finish and fit.
There is a clear saving of $1.75 to $2.75 on every pair of shoes in this
sale—an economizing event no woman can afford to let slip by, without
taking full advantage of.
A
WOMEN'S BOOTS, as illustrated, with upper* ot gunmetal
calf, oravenette and dull kid,
made In button atyle, with
Goodyear welt soles. Regular
16.00 value for  *3.25
WOMEN'S BOOTS, as illustrated, with uppers of patent colt,
dull kid and oravenette, with
hand turned or Goodyear welt
soles and French, Spanish and
Cuban heels. Regular 16.00
value for >  $3.26
Xlj^C ji—irr-ss-r    ■sSJSsSis^tMiP     trtammt.umamTmtaa —tmi**fsmt ^    \
GEORGIA AND GRANVILLE STREETS
THL CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
rspltsl    ,   , „■■■ si«,at«,na«      Rut |1S,IOS,MO
Main Offloe: Corner Halting* ind Oranvlll* Streeta, Vanoouver.
CITY BRANCHES
HASTINOS an* CAMBIE....,
EXIT END .
COMMERCIAL DRIVE .
PAIRVIEW .
MOUNT PLEASANT .
KITSILANO	
POWELL STREET „..
SOUTH HILL _. ...
LOCATION .
...Cor. Hes'lnss aad Gambia Strtttt.
...Cor. Ptndtr and Main Strtttt.
....Cor. Flrtt Avtnut and Commtrelal Drlvt.
...Cor. Sixth Avtnut aad Oranvlllt Stmt.
...Cor. Elitith Avtnut and Main Strut
...Cor, Fourth Avtnut and Ttw Stmt
...Cor. Vlotoria Drlvt and Powtll Stmt
..Cer. Forty-fourth Avtnut and Frutr Road.
Alto North Vaneouvar Branoh, eor.  Lonsdale  Av*.   and   Etplanadt.
J. LECKIE CO., LIMITED
'SHOE
MANUFACTURERS
W« manufacture every kind sf
work sho*. ud specialize ia lints
'er miners, railroad construction,
logging, etc.
VANCOUVER
JOHNSTON & SALSBURY
The Hardwaremen
SUCCESSORS TO
McTAGGART & MOSCROP
We carry a complete line of MECHANICS' GOODS, including SANDS' LEVELS, FRISCO MASONS' TAPE.
STANLEY'S PLANES. LEVELS, etc.. STAR-
RETT'S FINE TOOLS, SIMONDS' SAWS, CORBIN
f LOCKS. SETS.
46 HASTINGS ST, EAST
PHONE SEYMOUR IM
HI LABOR TEMPLE POOL
IN CENTOA,
Where the Wage Scale Is
the Lowest in the
. State
The Work of Organisation
of the Timber Workers
Involved
(By B. p, Marsh, President Washington State Federation ot Labor!
Centralla, "Wjash,, is just now the
scene ot a labor struggle which will
have an Important bearing on the
work ot organisation of the timber Industry. In that olty where the
shingle weavers' union has tried for
years to gain a foothold without success, where the wage scale has always
been lower than In other parts of the
state, where men have submitted to
petty Industrial tyrranles without protest, an undercurrent of discontent
has been fanned Into open flame by
the actions of one of the large mill
companies in cutting below cost of
actual subsistence the wages of Its
men.
Food prices are soaring sky high
and there la none who will predict to
wbat height the necessaries ot life
will climb before the European war Is
over. Yet In the face of that this
mill company, wblch had been paying
but lT/2 cents per hour, put Into effect a reduotlon from that figure to 10
per cent. The munificent sum of f 1.75
a day for a man to feed, clothe and
school his ohlldren. Imagine If you
can .the kind of rations, the kind of
clothing, the kind ot furniture, )1.75
a day will provide at tbe cost of living where lt was prior to the outbreak of tbe war. With war prices ln
effect for foodstuffs aotual hunger
would be their portion.
These strikers are not foreigners.
They are pure-blooded American
stook. Most of them came from old
Missouri, and they have the Missouri
phrasing In their, speech. They lived,
most of them, in Centralla for many
years and have worked ln the same
plant They are slow to action, but
when they get started don't get in
their way. That's the history ot Mis-
sourlans.
It was the writer's pleasure to visit
Centralla last Sunday ln company
with President Brown, of the Timber-
workers' union, and speak ln the open
air to those strikers and their families. They sat with eager, upturned
faoes ln a semi-circle before the
sneakers' stand. There was dealy
earnestness, grim determination,
stamped upon every face. These were
the descendants of the men who
fought for their homes against'the invading armies of both North and
South, for Missouri was the battleground of both armies. It was pathetic
to look Into the faces of the women,
faces lined with the battle of Industrial existence. Only they knew how
they kept their children In clothing
so that they might attend school.
Only they knew of the midnight
hours spent sewing and planning, the
mother love weaving Itself into et'ory
stitch of the needle. They with their
man were on Btrike. They were willing to undergo more hardships If lt
meant In the end that their children
would be given more opportunity for
self advancement. No man could face
the audience without being thrilled
with lbe tonsclousiiras thai in all the
ages theie has been just one movement worth while, that in all the ages
yet to oome there will bo but one
struggle worth tbe fighting, and that
Is the upward movement of the work-
.ng people.
They may win in Centralla, thev
mal lose. Win or lose they will bo
all the Letter men and wor.eu ' fir
having made the fight anil the cause
or human progess will have advanced
another milestone along tin road because of their sacrifice.
ALASKA MINES
Closed Down on Account of
the War
A large number ot men who hid
been employed In quart* mine* in the
Juneau, Alaska, dlstriot, have
reached Vancouver and Seattle recently at a result of the present
European war. Quite,» number among them are men who were former
ly members ot the United Mine
Workers and who had worked In
mines ln this province. According to a
story from on* of these a large number of mine* around Juneau are
owned by English capitalist* and on
account of th* war have ordered their
mines to be closed down. These men
were forced into idleness on account
of the war, and perhaps muy hundreds, if not thousands, will follow
them shortly; and of course will
land in the coast cities, competing tor
the lobs other* now hold and further
swell the army of the unemployed.
An American View on th* War
As certainly as the sun will set tonight the end of the great war ln
Europe, whether lt comes ln a few
weeks, or whether lt comes in a few
months, will leave millions of poor
people In destitution. The governments will not be able to help them,
because every cent ln sight will have
gone for war. Their crops will be
ruined, their cities burned, tbelr Jobs
taken from them.—Bulletin, San
Francisco.
Baltimore, Md., Nov. 11, 1S03.
Mlnard's Liniment Co., Limited.
SlrH—I came acrOHS a bottle of your
MINAHD'S LINIMENT In the hands of
orte of the students at the University of
Maryland, and lie being so kind as to let
me use it for a very bad sprain, which 1
obtained In training for foot races, and to
say that It helped tne would be putting It1
very mildly, and I therefore ask If you
would let me know of one of your agents
that Is closest to Baltimore so that I
may obtain some of lt. Thanking you ln
advance, I remain,
Yours truly,
., =.  „    ,   . W. C. MoCUEAN.
14 St. Paul street,
Care Oliver Typewriter Co.
P. S.—Kindly answer at once.
In ihe heart of ihe retail JistricL Al
fireproof and modem in eveiy respect, vumim
unexcelled. European plan, $1 lo $3 per day.
FREE *UI0 BUS MEETS All TRAINS. CM .nd
operated b. The PioviiMil Hmdi Crnipiny, liniud.
HOWARD) SHftHWP~l~
IL RECALL JUDGE
NO SET FREE
ii
BOILERMAKERS
Brotherhood Soon Will Be
Strongly Situated
Vice-President Louis Weyand, of
Cleveland, haa returned to thit city
from the Pacific Coaat In enthusiastic
spirits at the outcome ot tbe Brotherhood's convention. He declare* that
the membership has grown and Is
now the highest ln the union'* history, and that the flnanolal condition
Is also greatly Improved: The |l-a-
month proposition has carried tn the
referendum vote,, and ln the future
the funds will be safe. Under tbe new
per capita arrangement 40 per cent
will go Into the strike fund, 40 per
cent. Into the general fund and for
organizing purposes and tb* balance
/ill be used tor benefits. A big spurt
forward Is looked for and praotlcally
certain during the next couple ot
years, after which lt Is figured the
Brotherhood will be so strongly entrenched that no more strikes will be
necessary,
OUT FOB OFFICE
Union Aspirants Under the
Various Parties
[Special Correspondence]
SEATTLE, Wa, Aug. 19.—A large
number of union men are already aspirants for public office ln the state
ot Washington. Several have filed for
ofllce on the various tickets for the
fall primaries, J. A. Tappendorf of
the Typographical union filed for senator from the forty-third district; Q.
M, Welty, electrical workers, justice
of the peace, and Oeorge Leslie Coe,
electrical workers, constable. Fred
Brown of the Barbers' union, tor
years justice of the peace, has filed
for tbe republican nomination for prosecuting attorney, and P. Johnson of
the palntera has flled tor. th* progressive nomination for constable.
OTTAWA TRADES COUNCIL.
Election   of  Officers—Report*   Show
Progress, and New Unions
Formed..
Election of officers for the ensuing
six months by the Trades and Labor
Council of Ottawa was held lait
week and resulted ln the return of
the majority of the old officers, In
each case the choice waa unanimous,
and no balloting waa necessary.
The president, J. Cameron, of the
Stoneworkers union, waa re-elected
for the balance of the year and Jas.
Ussher of the Carpentera' union was
chosen as vice-president Wm. Lodge,
of the Typographical union was re.
elected corresponding secretary. Wm,
Lodge was elected delegate to the
convention ot the Trades and Labor
Congress ot Canada at St. John, N.B.,
September 21st next.
Report was made showing that progress haa been made by the labor organizations in Ottawa. In the last
three months, not a man has been
derelict In his duties as a member of
the unions, and three new unions, the
horseshoers, bartenders and musicians
have been formed. The upholsterers
union Is now being organised.
Resignation of Judge Mc-
Hendrie Is Demanded
by Socialists
Machinery Set in Motion to
Punish Tool of the
Operators
[Special Correspondence]
TRINIDAD, Colo., Aug, 11.—The recall from offloe of District Judge A.
W. McHendrle 1* demanded ln resolutions passed recently by the socialists
of Trinidad county, on the grounds
that he haa set free on bill the notorious gunmen, Walter Belle, professional killer for the Baldwin-Felts detective agency, and refused ball to Bob
Uhllch, International organizer tor
the United Mine Worken of America,
who ha* been imprisoned without
trial In the Trinidad county jail tor
over seven months. It wa* thl* aame
Belk that with his partner, Belcher,
killed crippled Llapplatt, organiser
fortheU.M.W,A. and riddled the help-
lea* man with bullet* aa he lay gasping out bis lit* on the streetcar track
in Trinidad. Petitions formulated
under Colorado's recall law will he
Immediately circulated throughout tbe
four counties comprising this judicial
district, the dlstriot which is now
held under martial law by the United
States regular troops.
IRON WORKERS' STRIKE
About Seven Thousand Inside Msn
Demsnd Increase of Wages
A New York dispatch says that
about 7000 members of the Inside
Iron Workers' union ln that city went
on strike recently, demanding a
wage Increase of 20 per cent, a 53-
hour week Instead of (0 or 65 hours,
recognition of the union and more
sanitary shop conditions. About 250
places where structural Iron work Is
turned out were affected. The union
Is affiliated with the International Association of Bridge and Structural
Ironworkers. Organizers of the
strike pledged that If peace were not
declared within a fortnight conditions
would place a large number of outside Ironworkers ln a state of unemployment
Rumor Unfounded
The machinists, particularly of the
west, have received a good deal of
chaffing since the publication of a
dispatch from Winnipeg announcing
that at a special meeting ln that city
nine hundred machinists had offered
their services to Col. Steele. Apart
from the fact that there Is not 900
machinists ln Winnipeg; that the
question of enlisting has never been
considered, and tbe Winnipeg machinists knew nothing of the story until lt was published, the Btory Is about as reliable as the most of the
war news,
New Machine Shop*
The cement piers for two of the
large machine shops ot the Dominion
Shipbuilding, Engineering and Dry-
dock company, on the foreshore of
district lot 272, have been constructed and a start has been made on the
third and fourth buildings. There
are seventy-eight men employed on
the job now and this place at North
Vanoouver presents a very active appearance.
One of the richest of labor organisations Is the English Bootmakers'
Federation, whloh has 1800,000 on
hand.
Peace Upon Earth
Peace upon earth; the scratching of
a pen;
The long roll beats, the armies march,
and then,
The roar ot battle, and the reek of
blood;
Peace upon earth, Almighty God, but
when.
Peace    upon   earth, with   contrite
hearts we kneel,
Peace ln our time, O Lord; the clash
of steel,
The cannons' boom, the din of mus
ketry,
Joins In the chaunt and swells the
organ peal -
-.
Peace, upon earth, the harvest ripen-
eth,
The sower's heart I* glad; and so a
breath,
A word; the harvest trodden in the
mire;
The sower's heart Is glad; and lo a
death.
Peace upon earth, too long her sons
bave fed
The fires of Moloch; Caesar nods his
head,
The ranks olose up, march on, the
order given,
Peaoe upon earth; how many thousands dead.
Peace upon earth, 0 Lord, we pray
Thee still;
Love thou thy brother; Caesar bids
us Ull,
And Thou hast said to render him his
due;
Peace upon earth, if it be Caesar's
will
Peace upon earth, 0 Lord;  whom
shall we give
Allegiance to?  We've no alternative.
The law  of Caesar,  or  the law of
Christ?
Peace upon earth; no peace while
Caesar lives.
—JACK DAVIDSON.
Vancouver, B. C,
August 18,1914.
Joseph Proebstle, Internatlonl sec.
retary of the Brewery Workers' union,
has arrived at Seattle from Cincinnati, and will work ln the state of
Washington for a short time ln the
Interests of his organization with
special reference to the prohibition
measure now before the voters.
Some ot the organizations tn be
formally entertained by the Vancouver Exhibition Association during the
Fair week are the Local Council of
Women, Vancouver's boasted organ),
zatlon ot women welfare workers; officers of tbe various regimentB stationed in and near Vancouver; officers of the American gunboat which
will visit Vancouver on American
Day, September 9.
Honor will be paid tbe Dairymen,
Stockbreeders, Poultry, Farmers,
Horticultural and Kennel Club societies through the officers of those
societies wbo will be entertained by
the Exhibition Association. Mr. J. J.
Miller, president of the Exhibition Association, Is already preparing an Interesting and entertaining programme
for these guests of honor.
The Fair opens on September 3rd
wltb elaborate ceremonies, and will
be continued until tbe evening of
September 12th, Entries close on
August 20th.    .
Arrangements have been completed
by Mr. H. S. Rolston, general manager of the Vancouver Exhibition, for
tbe addition of some forty or fifty
floats, which will take the form of
Children's and Fairy Tales, Tales
from the Arabian Nights and allegories, ln the Industrial parade.
The parade will ot course Include
the usual exhibition of business and
commercial floats. Besides these It
will contain features and attractions
from the Patterson shows, clowns,
comedians, bands, calliope* and all
tbe familiar features of a big parade.
The parade will be held on Labor
Day to the Exhibition grounds. It Is
already arousing a great deal of In-
torest by reason of the unusual con.
dltlons which are being arranged.
For Instance, after the parade Is
over It will not be disbursed in the
ordinary manner. One of the greatest objections raised to other parades
has been the fact tbat the floats are
seen only for an hour or two and
then are dismantled. Thla year tho
floats will be placed on the Exhibition grounds after the parade and until after the Fair Is over.
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What Everybody Should Know
MEN'S NEW NOBBY SUITS cn^b. bought at BRUMMITT'S from
110.00 up to 130.00        And th*y are worth mora
HATS, bearing the union label, at |2.00, I2.0O, |3.oo.
SHOES, all makes and prices, bearing the label, at "live and let Uv*
price*, |2.oo up to W.00
CHIPPEWA SHOES at 17.00, (U.00 and $10.00
w. b: brummitt
18-20  CORDOVA  ST. W.    ■
STOVES and RANGES
EVERYTHING FOR THE KITCHEN
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DR. BRETT ANDERSON, Dentist
Operates by the latest, most scitntjac ud painless methods
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HOURS 10 A. M. TO 4 P. M.
75 Per Cent, of your Summer Cooking can
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and with much greater comfort and convenience.
Electrlo Household Appliances are ready for operation, day or night
on an Instant'* attention to connecting the cord with the household
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They can do everything In the line of light cooking, preparing tea or
ooffee, making toast, preparing eggs, frying chops, etc. You don't
want heavy meal* during the hot weather and the appliances Juat
meet thla demud and make It unnecessary to have a hot fire going.
Electric Household Appliances cost only » few cent* per hour of continuous operation. To prepare an ordinary meal take* but a fraction
of an hour.  They are guaranteed by the manufacturers.
SEE OUR PULL LINE OF ELECTRICAL HOUSEHOLD
APPLIANCES
Cattail nd
HutinfiSlreel
B.C. ELECTRIC
M38C.Mrill.Si.
NurOsvi. PAGE FOUR
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MOLSONS
BANK
Capital and Reserve, - $8,800,000
II branches In Canada
A itn.nl basking business transacted.
Savings Department
Interest allowed at highest
current rate
East End Branch
110 HASTINGS STREET EAST
A. W. Jarvls, Manager
The Royal Bank
of Canada
INCORPORATED 18H
Paid-up Capital
Reserve 	
Tttal Assets - •
- I 11,1
WE ALLOW INTEREST ON DEPOSITS IN OUR
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DEPARTMENT
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th* account, and your
„ buslneee will be Weill earn* be It large *r
y amall
I POURTEEN BRANCHES
I      VANCOUVER
IN
THE
INCOirOMTED
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Capital and Reserve 111,178,178
WAGE-EARNERS
keep yeur savings In th* Bank
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bank grow to a moat desirable
tank balance. Th* flnanolal
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Depoelt* ..   841,000,000
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NORTH AMERICA
Bstablisha* In nil.   inowposated
by Royal Charter In 111*
Pall-up Capital    -    M.StS.ltt.ss
Reeerve Fund    ■    -   s.017,110.00
Head Office la Canada:
BT. JAMBS ST.. HONTRRAla
H. B. MACKENIK • Ciml Muent
•AVINOS  DEPARTMENT  AT
ALL BRANCHES
Special attention given ta Savings
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Ope* a Savlnge Account and add
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Repairs promptly encutad
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COTTON'S WEEKLY — Beet
Socialist propaganda paper la
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y**rj la club* of four, il cut*
for 40 weeks.
Addrsse, COWANSVILLB, P.Q.
sake that Watch to Appleby, MM
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THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
THE B.C. FEDERATIONIST
Publlehed every Frldey morning by the
B. c. Federations, Ltd.
R. Parm. Pettlplece   -
J. W. Wilkinson
Qeorge Bartley    -    -
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Associate Editor
-    -       News Editor
DIRECTORS
Jas. Campbell, president; J. H. MoVety, secretary-
treasurer; H. Olbb; a. 3. Kelly
and R. P. Pettlpleoe -^
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REPRESENTATIVES
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Affiliated   with Western Labor Press Association
Unity of Labor; the Hope of the World."
FRIDAY AUODST  21,  1914.
DR. KARL LIEBKNECHT, the fore-
most member of the socialist group in the
German parliament,  hai  been  put  to
death in Berlin, by order of the military authorities.   News reports to this effect have now
been   coming   through   for
KARL more   than a   week, without
LIEBKNECHT any contradiction. It was
MURDERED hoped when the news fint
'came that there wai. oo
truth in it; but there now appear! to be no doubt that Liebknecht hai paid
with hii life for daring to defy the military
bureaucracy of Germany. He refuted to take
active part in a war which he believed had
been itarted by military-mad emperor William
and hii war party. That'wai the chance they
had been waiting for. Of all the men in the
socialist party of Germany, they hated him the
most. For writing an anti-militarist pamphlet
in 1907 he was sentenced to 18 months impriionment for high treason. That, however,
was comparatively nothing to his scathing exposure of German militarist corruption, armament jobbery, and title selling, made during the
pait 12 monthi. He charged that the Krupp
gun-making firm had bribed army and naval officers by the score, to iecure secret itate information which would enable their firm to get
busineu.
subjected to repression ud persecution, which
have increased in severity as that political organization hai increased in efficiency. Everywhere in Germany, the military domination is
supreme, and the entire social Ufe of the itate
seems to be under the heel of the proverbial
drill sergeant. Added to that, is the fact that
Germany's rapid economic development hai
forced the powerful capitalists of that country
to seek new markets and territory for the sale
of their wares. And for that reason doubtless
many of them have encouraged the military
excesses and extravagance which have brought
thingi to the pass which they have now reached.
The consistent cultivation of the militarist spirit
during a long course of yean hai wrved two
purposes. It has promised a few great capitalists more markets, and hai gratified the monomania of the Kaiser to be the modem Ceiar
dominating the civilized world, rabre in hand,
through the medium of a perfect military
machine, And ai far ai we can iee, ai long
ai that machine remains in existence, the common people of Germany, both socialists and
non-socialists will be crushed under the weight
of its domination. Not only that, but ai long
ai it remains in existence there ii little chance
ot the peace policy of the socialists or anti-
militarists in any country making any real progreu.
*   *   *   *
*   *   *   *
He showed alio, that the same firm was
financing powerful French newspapen to agitate for increased armaments, so that the war
spirit would be inflamed in Germany, and
more orden for gum would result to Krupps.
The evidence' produced by him in court wai
io overwhelming that, despite the powerful influence of the military party, every one of the
officers implicated wai convicted. The lecret
workings of the war party were thoroughly exposed to public gaze. The conviction had to
be sanctioned, but we may be sure that revenge
wai sworn, and waited for, until a plausible
excuse should preient itself. Following close
on the heels of that episode, came the declaration that German army barracks were in many
cases little more than torture chambers where
outrages were the daily lot of the conscripts.
The government retorted by a prosecution. The
socialist party called for other witnesses to volunteer evidence in addition to that which they
already possessed. In answer to that, response
came from 30,000 ex-soldiers who expressed
their readiness to testify in support of Liebknecht, from their own personal experiences.
Upon that the government withdrew their prosecution on the ground that, as a member of the
Reichstag, Liebknecht wai a privileged penon.
Matters then had almost reached a breaking
point, but when the socialist memben refused
to cheer the Kaiser at the close of the lait session of the Reichstag, the government's'desire
for revenge must have been overflowing. That
revenge hai now been taken. It hai been taken
in full and irreparable fashion. And the voice
of the great socialist tribune ii itilled forever
by death, at the hands of military murderers
obeying the behest of their maniac master and
hit brood.
'. , ■   *.  *  •',-:.•
The two main facts of this wretched outrage
are theie. Liebknecht was murdered because
hii conscience would not allow him to be a
party to the war policy of the German military
bureaucracy. He believed, and publicly said,
that in hii opinion, the military bureaucracy of
Germany wai the greateit menace and enemy
which the international peace movement and
the working class of Europe had to face. For
that he has been murdered. And if the Kaiser
and hit military caite could find excuse to
serve every German socialist the same way,
they would gladly do it Now, what has the
labor and socialist movement to uy about it?
We have consistently opposed all preparation
for war and the cultivation of the war ipirit.
We have passed resounding resolutions by the
mile. We have denounced, protested, petitioned, and "ever humbly prayed" for years.
But all to no avail. The. worst war of all history ii now taking place. It hai ceated to be
a question of what ought to be, what might be,
or what ihould have been. It is now a question of what Is. The given quantity which
confronts all the' world—socialists and non-
socialists alike—is, that the war is an actual
fact and cannot be stopped by us. From that
given quantity or condition, no matter how
much we may dislike it, any solution of this
curie of militarism must come. It may not be
an agreeable business for ui to face, but our disapproval will not alter the nature of the problem one iota. If we find ourselves in a boat
along wilh a majority of reckless people or fools
who upset it, what are we to do when,we get
into the water? Should we draft a resolution
reciting in ponderous terms our conscientious
objection to the fact that the others have upset
the boat? Or should we take the fact that we
are in danger of being drowned as a given
quantity which cannot be eluded, and get out
as well as we can in response to our instinct for
self-preservation? Under such circumstances,
however much we might dislike our surroundings we should use the only available means of
getting out of the difficulty.
*   *   *   *
Now, studying the political conditions nf
Europe since the close of the Franco-Prussian
war forty years ago, it becomes plain that the
monarchical party in Germany has had a steady
and fixed policy, whereby it sought to establish a military caste and system which would
completely dominate the social and industrial
life of that country. During that time the
political organization of the workeri hai been
The common people of Germany are in the
ume predicament at the common people everywhere.   No one has  any quarrel with them.
They are just human and worken like ourselves.   But they have suffered much and long
from the iron heel of the military bureaucracy,
which has stamped .upon them and their common liberties for yean, and which hu now
capped iti tyranny with the deliberate murder
of Liebknecht, the foremost in the fight   for
working class freedom.   Those are the plain,
practical facts of the situation ai we see it The
Kaiser and hii brood,   the war-mad bureaucracy of Germany, are the obstacle which hai to
be   removed before   any further progress  in
human affairs can be made.   They have oppressed the common people of their own country, they would do the tame in other countries
if given free play, they would, if they could,
prevent all attempts at human progress even
along the most conservative lines. And it leemi
to us that, since this war it now an actual fact,
and no action of oun can prevent it taking place,
the bat with which the working clan of my
country can extend to the worken of Germany ii, that the military bureaucracy of Germany will be broken and humiliated, io thoroughly, that it can never rise again.     Facing
the proposition as it it, with war actually in
progress that seems the belt immediate result to
be got from an all round bad business.
¥     *     *     *
And then what? It would be folly to imagine that with the disappearance of the military caste the ultimate and fundamental problem of the working class either of Germany or
any other country would be solved. Labor
wiU still be labor. Capital will still be capital.
And the war which knows no end until the
common people possess the natural resourcei of
the earth, and the machinery of wealth production, will still be on. But there is some reason
to hope that by the time this war ii over, with
the appalling demonstration of human folly,
death, and devastation which is yet to come,
the workeri of the world will have received
iuch an object lesson that never again, while
men lay claim to possessing reason and intelligence, will war and its horrors be pouible on
the earth. The labor and socialist movements
have no regrets to make for opportunity waited
beforehand. But it seems as though the man
of men cannot be made to undentand a really
great truth by simple speech and argument; they
must see the facts actually demonstrated and
taking place before their eyes in order to realize
what it means. And this war will furnish realities dreadful and numeroui enough to condemn
war in the eyes of men as long as the record of
human history can be read.
*    ¥    ¥    ¥
With us, it is very much Uke being close to *
very big picture. We iee patches of black and
white, green and red and yellow and blue, and it
all seems to be without form or purpose. But
when we stand a distance from it we get an
idea of what it meant. And if we have imagination enough to grasp the significance of
what is happening today, we shall see that one
more of the great world epics ii being written
in termi of human blood and misery ai all its
predecesors have been. The worken'dead by
the millions, thrones, dynasties, empires, scepters, principalities and powers will go to build
luch a monument to human folly at will be *
landmark in the ages to those who follow ui
with a sanity bom of the fool fury of our time.
The destiny of so-called civilization it in the
melting pot, and none lay what will come out
of it until this calamity has run its coune. And
what a reflection it ii upon the advancement
and progreu which we are so fond of prating
about. The truth is, the advance of science
and invention have outstripped the evolution of
human nature. And the marvels of 20th century industry and economics are brought to a
standstill while the cave man strides across the
earth and demonstrate! to the nation! that their
boatted civilization ii but gilded savagery at
the belt The socialist movement of the world
for which Liebknecht hai given hii Ufe represent! the mental capacity which alone ii capable of correctly undemanding the social
changes necessitated by this economic development And when this war ii over, with it!
lessons written in the blood of the world's working clau, perhaps the working clan will lend
a more willing and chastened ear to its teachings by which alone can world peace be attained.     Perhapt.
ation—wherein the principle of the Ontario act
was strongly opposed in view of the possibility
of a similar act being introduced in British Columbia. Attention has alio been drawn to the
vicious opposition raised by the Canadian
Manufacturer!' association at the time the: Ontario act was being drawn up. We itated
then that the workeri of British Columbia must
look for similar opposition when the time comes.
As bearing out our prophecy we quote the following taken from the last issue of Industrial
Canada, the paper of the Canadian Manufacturers' asociation;
'A Workmen's Compensation act will
probably be introduced into the legislature
of British Columbia at its next session.
"The principles underlying the compensation of workmen are approved by manufacturers, who are wilUng to support nearly any system which will free them from
the uncertainty of litigation and transmit
almost the entire turns paid direct to their
workmen.
"We fear, however, that there will be a
tendency on the part of the British Columbia legislature to copy the Ontario
act, and, if other province! follow, the result may be that it will become the model
act of Canada,
"Those who are at all familiar with the
subject know that the Ontario'act it far
from being a model act, and that many of
iti clautes muit be amended before it will
become a practical piece of legislation.
"The incontiitenciet and contradiction!,
known only to the few who have ttudied
the act, will become painfully apparent to
many when it goes into operation.
"British Columbia and other province!
will benefit by waiting until practice modifies ihe Ontario act before fattening a similar measure upon lliemftlves."
The C. M. A. it a powerful aggregation of
Canadian finance and in iti fight against work-
men'i compensation in this province it will receive- the additional backing of the legal and
insurance interest! which itand to lose so
heavily by an act based on the same principal
ai that of Ontario. We again urge upon reader! the necessity for careful study of our
special articles dealing with this question. So
that when the time for action comei, the worken of this province will be well informed ai to
the merits of any act offered by the government. We realize the importance of this quution. For that reason we have made it a
specialty, and if it ii not properly understood
when the time arrives, it will not be due to lack
of foresight on the part of the B. C. Federationitt.
EMDAT ....AtJOnST 21,  19
weighty announcement recently iuued from a
convocation of thete godly old ladies. It is
rumored that they are even thinking of making
an addition to the thirty-nine articles, tpecific-
ally forbidding women to wear any of thete
i tubular temptations. ,Well, we"> bishops will
be bishops, we suppose, and it would perhaps
be too exacting and unreasonable to expect
them to be human, and we muit take these
quaint relics in their lawn sleeves for what they
are—or arc not. For our part, we are only
human, and cannot for the Ufe of us see that
putting an extra yard of sweat-shop made
skirt on a woman is going to lave the world.
And indeed there ii grave doubt if the world
want! to be saved by that method. Nor are
we able to treat seriously the idea that moral
perdition lurks in the anatomical ttructure of
the "female of the species." Of course, we
speak with becoming deference and only from
our knowledge and experience of thingi temporal. These good gentlemen of the ecclesiastical faculty perhaps have tome spiritual insight of the matter, which enable! them to detect a danger we do not iee. Anyhow, it won't
coit anything, to. Let ui Pray.
It ii feared that American children may
have to go short of toyi this coming Christmas
owing to the war in Europe, where moit of the
toyt are made. Their privation! will be nothing compared to that of thouiandi of European children who will have to go ihort of
fathers and food.
PHONE   SEYMOUR   MM
iilSi
YOUR BEST
FRIEND
when you are out of a Job Is
A Saving* Account
THE B. C. FEDERATIONIST, for
the past six months has been doing all in
its power to arouse the worker! of this
province to a sense of the importance which attaches to the statement of the government that
a new'workmen's compensa-
C NI A AND *'on act w'" ")e '"'reduced at
WORKMEN'S      I11? next '",ion °f *e !«P«-
compensationX,'.       K!0"'1 ^"l6*'
which have   been appearing
on the front page for several
weeks past, are a part of our plan for making
the paper valuable to the workeri in this respect. We have also dealt at various times, in
these columns wilh the new Workmen1! Com-
penution act of Ontario, and pointed out the
desirability of securing a similar act for British
Columbia. Some time ago, we called the attention of readers to a lengthy article in Industrial Progress and Commercial Record—the
magazine of the B. C. Manufacturer!* auoci-
POLAND IS PROMISED by the Czar
of Russia that, providing it does not take
advantage of the preient war to embarau
Ruuia, iti age-long oppressor, he will restore
to the Poles their ancient self-government along
with their former rights of re-
THECZAR'B 'won and language. If the
ddamibb Po'et l",ve my hmmry they
TO POLAND       proBije ., worth    ltwalbe
kept or broken, acording to
whether or not it suits the Russian bureaucracy.
For a century now, Poland has been held in
subjection by Ruuia at the point of the sword,
auiited by race hatred, carefully and system-
atically cultivated by Russian officialdom.
¥   *   ¥   ¥
The national independence of Poland wai
•tamped out by Ruuia in 1863, after a revolt
by' which the Polei sought to throw off the
yoke of oppression heaped Upon them by their
Muscovite masters. The entire administration
represented by the law office! chosen by the governor-general residing at Wariaw. Law ii
represented by the law office! chosen by the government of Ruuia at the recommendation of
the governor. After the revolt of 1863, all
their privilege, and Russian official! were
deprived of their municipal charters. Other
cities, which had previouily enjoyed a large
measure of self-government were deprived of
thit privilege, and Ruuian official! were
placed in charge of all municipal attain. The
prevailing religion ii Roman Catholic, to
which 75 per cent of the population are attached. The Ruuian itate church being the
Greek orthodox, after the revolt of 1863, measures were taken to reduce the number of
Roman Catholic bishoprics. Some were abolished and many priests of that religion lent
out of the country.
*    ¥    ¥    ¥
Education ii but partial, 40 per cent of
the population only being able to read ud
write. But whatever elte the people of Poland may or may not know, they do know that
Ruuia ii the destroyer of the large ...enure*
of civic freedom which they formerly possessed.
The crafty Czar ii not offering something for
nothing. He fears that the moment Ruuia
moves towards war, she will also move toward
internal strife and revolution, not only in Ruuia
itself, but, in Poland and Finland alio. If
he can induce thoie two countries to remain
quiet by promises, he will make any number
to them—and then decide afterwards about
keeping them. Poland'i hiitory ihould teach1
her how much they are worth.
Bishops of   England have
itarted  a  cruiade  against  a  baneful
enemy of national righteousness.   Think
you it ii against the slum property from which
the ecclesiastical commissioners of the church of
England derive a large part
BISHOPS "' '*" 'ncome °' •'" church)
«u -rue Think you it ii against iweat-
uiadTatu        -   labor wWch   i™** d"*
WARPATH fKft 0f fa ^j     Aggj,,,,
a social order which calmly
watches the bodies of women bought and told
like so much merchandise in the market place?
Agaimt war, that filli the earth with lorrow,
suffering, race hatred, ruin and all hellishness?
Against a civilization which doei the devil'i
work for him better and cheaper than he could
do it himself? No, dearly beloved brethren,
the bishops have started their holy war against
an evil greater—in their minds—than all theie.
They have iworn by shovel hat snd gaiten,
to rest not day nor night until they have
cleansed England of the Tight Skirt It appears that the tight skirt hai revealed to a
world which never suspected it, that women
actually have legs. Yei, "legi," two of 'em.
And what ii more they use them to stand on
and walk with, and the tight skirt so reveali
the contour of theie pedal appendangei of the
modem female that it amounts to nothing more
nor leu than a threat of national disaster.
*    ¥    *   ¥
So, at  least, we are assured   by a   very
Following ii an extract from a letter received
locally, from Berlin July 27th:
"Many socialists have been hoping—
in fact, we all do—that the German
Social Democratic party, with iti marvellous organization, will be the deciding factor in favor of European peace; but
apart from vigorous protein in public
meetings, I am afraid that not much can
be done. I do not think that the idea of
a general itrike can be put into execution
in a military itate, no matter how well organized the workeri are."
Europe hai slipped back into temporary barbarism. Every constructive busineu ind industry by which men live, hai been thruit into the
background to make way for lulling, destroying and laying watte. The diplomatic reatont
given are satisfactory to the diplomats. They
explain in their way why kings and emperors
wanted war. What they do not explain it
why whole nation! are wilUng to follow kings
and emperors into war. Or rather why they
are willing to go into war while emperors stay
at the back and wait to receive the spoils which
have coit the live! of millions of their hapleu
dupes.
The existence of such momtroui standing
armies as are maintained in Europe is a menace
to peace and a menace to the welfare of the
vast majority of the people of Europe. Armies
in Europe, where old race hatreds are carefully
nursed by the politicians, are Uke matches lying
around in a powder factory. They ue a
standing argument for war. They build up a
military caste which hopes and prayi for war.
Yet the doom of militarism ii sealed, for it hat
grown to iuch proportions that iti sustenance is
threatened. It is all that Europe's people can
do to pay for the support of armies in peace.
They cannot pay for a prolonged war.
"Montreal, Aug. 15,—Colonel Sam
Hughes, minister of militia, made one of
his characteristic speeches tonight on
Champ de Man after he had reviewed
5000 volunteer! of the Montreal garrison."
Sam is great at "characteristic speeches."
Don't forget what he laid at Fornham, Quebec, a Uttle over a year ago—
"We all know that war ii made by
capitalists, and by certain financiers who
manipulate the itock market.     War ii \
engineered by them and the poor soldier
hai to itep in and do the work."
Of coune, what wai true then might not
be true now. Circumstances alter cases, and
politicians are entitled to a different opinion for
each day in the year.
DOW FRASER TRUST CO.
atr-atl Gamble Mrtati Mlt Main
ttrssl, (betwaen 7th and (tn Avis.)
Vsncouvsr, an* McKay ttatlen,
Burnaby, B. tf.
Close at 1 o'clock Saturday.
Ti
City Auction aad Comaiuion C*
i pal* (or
nitur
_ • • — —     »™■«    SVI     IIUUIS*   (Mill    ■UltSBtJ
a.,',SIi!,''n " Auo"°" •***»-<«£
i____    B^t"*    mSbM
ARTHUR  R.  BRTOHLRV
Smyths an* Qranvllle (treats
Auctioneer  Ssy MM
Phone Yonr Printing Order
SEYMOUR 4490
Strike On
MINERS KEEP AWAY
THE itrike ia (till on st th*
1 Queen Mine snd Silver
Dollar, at Sheep Greek, B. C.
All working men urged to stay
away until the strike is settled
Order Ymir Miaen'Uaiea
It might have been thought that the Russian
authorities had long ago practised the most
atrocious crueltiei that could possibly be perpetrated in their dealing! with political prisoners; but the slow execution of a woman icvenly
yean old, it a still further refinement in outrage. At preient, Catherine Breihkoviky,' the
"grandmother of the Ruuian Revolution," ii
■hut up in a cell tt Irkoutik; but the government
hai decided to lend her to the polar deiert of
Nijnekolymsk, more than 1,000 miles from
Irkoutsk and 2,700 miles from St. Petersburg.
The only food there is fish, and every spring
famine is the rule. In winter there are dayi of
darkness. It ii astonishing that any human being! live in this arctic district; it ii impossible to
suppose that a woman of tevenly yean can tur-
vive iuch conditions long. Perhaps that it why
the Ruuian. government ii lending her there.
Former Senator Chauncey M. Depew lays:
"This wir is the crime of all centuries.
It ii a crime of ambition—the dream of a
mu who thinks himself mother Napoleon. Thii war will mean the greateit
impulse for socialism that hiitory records.
It will mean an end to all kingt with real
powers, and in end to all bullying bureaucracies."
We hope that for once a senator hai told
the truth. For our part, bearing in mind the
tendency of mankind to repeat iti follies, we
prefer to wait and see. Meantime there ii a
Napoleon of industry in the lenator'i country
by the name of Rockefeller, and a place called
Colorado. The crime'of the Kaiier doei not
differ in kind, but only in degree, .from the
crime of Rockefeller. The Kaiier, at anyrate
only profeuei to fire on armed men, and not at
all on women and children. But in the United
States—where, of coune, there ii no ''bullying bureaucracy"—the armed guardi of property lire on anyone. There are many; Uttle matter! of this kind in hit own country which the
lenator might very well devote hii attention to,
providing hii object in making a itatement to
the preu amount! to anything more than a
deiire for cheap advertisement. In any case,
when the trouble ii over the Kaiier need not be
at a loss for justification of himself. He can
repeat hii friend Rockefeller and lay "My
conidence acquit! me." Precedent! are alwayi handy.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS*
and EMBALMERS
neUthifcSl.        Vaacetmr, I. C.
HARRON BROS.
FUNERAL  DIRROTORS AND
EMBALMERS
Vanoouw—offloo and Chaps*.
I*M OraavlU* St, Phons SsiThK
North Vancouver — OOM aa*
shape), 11* Boson* St B. root*
its.
FURNITURE
By alt meant come and iee our
splendid large new stock of furniture. "Everything but the
girl" for your new home.
GET OUR PRICES AND
TERMS
Hastings Furniture Co.
Limit**
«1 HASTINOS STREET WEBT
CENTER & HANNA, Ud.
UNDERTAKERS
Refined Service
,  ■ -\
1041 QEOROIA STREET
One Blook west ot Court House.
Use of Modern Chapel an*
Funeral Parlors free to all
Patrons
JThnlt Whsat Braa*
tttS&NRtt,
wencs-asumnsw.
C*ks*L
BELYEA'S BAKERY
AU, KINDS OP   '
CAKES. PASTRY AND
CONFECTIONERY
PATENTS
Trs*s Marks, Dasl*na, Copyright* '
PBTHBRSTONHAUOH A CO.
The Ol* BsUMlaha* Firm st
PATENT ATTORNEY* ,
MM Ra«ere Bt**., Qranvlllt ttrstt
City. Phswe Ssymsur tn*.      |
DIXON ft MURRAY
oamnsmatna
Em aa* Bim Tlt—t.
»o»*tat
DuAMektCaBi
Phoai
FarianACkiMll
2j»tG~.rtn7Sri
ffUr.MJ
MACK BROS.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS and
EMBALMERS
British O
L ***^^^^^^^*m**^*m!!Q^mMm
DAT ATOCflT 81,  1914.
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
Capes for Fall Wear Direct
from Paris
A special display ot these fashionable garments Is now being held In
our Ready-to-wear Department These are very stylish, and are con
rect for street and afternoon wear, They are shown In satin, moire,
relour and broadcloth, In self colore, black, white, saxe, wine, cerise,
ecru, Faddy, rose, tan, and Copenhagen. Prices range from $12.80,
»1B,00, $19.60 up to $75.00.
A cape of fawn broadcloth, 36 Inches long, in circular shape, fastening
at neck with novelty buttons, I* priced at $12.60.
An effective garment of cerise material, 1* trimmed with three rows
of blaok military braid, and haa a black velvet collar. This model
fastens in strap effect across the front—$16.00.
A smart model of line broadcloth In black and prunelle two-tone effect,
Is made 46 Inches long with a velvet collar, and strap fastenings
across front.  This garment Is priced at $19.60.
A very stylish cane ot blaok satin features the shoulder frill, and Is
made ln circular effect. This Is lined throughout with rose colored
satin, and fastens across front with strap*. Price $46.00.
575 Granville St.   Vancouvtr, B. C.
Phone Seymour 3540
•tore Hours M0 to • p.m.
Saturdays Include*
IN I HANDS OF
War a Desirable Antidote to
Social Unrest and
Organisation
Unemployment and Poverty
in Austrian Centres
. Before the War
(By W. R. T.)
The working-class    population
of
Keep the Children Healthy
by aendlni thom out In tha frosh air those flne.daya. There's nothing batter (or kfaepln* them oxorolsad than wheeled foods.
OUT stock of WHEELBARROWS, AUTOMOBILES. EXPRESS WAGONS,
PERAMBULATORS, IRISH MAILS, ROWINO WAOONS, VELOCIPEDES,
SIDEWALK SULKIES, Is easily tho flnest and moat eomprahenslve In tho
olty and the prices aro rliht.
Thomson Stationery Co., Ltd.
ass  HAATINQa STRSiT \umm— ..»».—....—   -  -
W* HASTINGS STREET WEST
BEST IN THB WEST
VANCOUVER, B.C.
ESTABLISHED 1IM
Braids
Best
Coffee
Did You Get Yours
This Morning?
BRAIDS
BEST
COFFEE
WM. TURNER
906 Granville St
Next to tha Market
—DEALER IN—
I New and second-hand China, Crockery, Furniture,
Hardware and Stoves.  Furniture moving and ship-
, ping. Telephone us when you have furniture for
sale. Highest prices paid.
TELEPHONE SEYMOUR 3745
[ UNDERWEAR
MEN'S BALBRIOQAN UNDERWEAR
At SOo. and 7Be. per garment.
BRITANNIA
Light Woollen Underwear—Just right for this warm weather
LIGHT WEIOHT UNION SUIT*
From 013)0 per Suit up.
B. V. O. UNDERWEAR
With Short Sleeves and Knee Length Drawers, 75c. per garment.
CLUBB & STEWART, Ltd.
Tal. Sey. 70* MI-HI HA»TINO» *TR*ET W.
the Austro-Hungarlan empire haa ap
parently heen seething with discontent, which has been growing ln Intensity ln the last few years. This Is
the Internal condition of that country as made manifest by such particulars and statistics as are now avail-
aisle from the organised labor source*
of the dual kingdom. In Britain lt was
long ago recognised that one 61 tho
most effective antidotes for sooial unrest was to rig up a war scare and, if
the unrest was especially serious and
menacing, then actual war abroad
with all Its distracting Influences
might be counted as desirable by
those whose earnest hope and one desire In life Is to maintain the present
order and constitution of society.
That the arts of peace and the making of progress are not desirable to
certain classes of the people who for
the time being have control of the
destinies of nations, Is surely made
manifest by every item of news that
has any bearing on the present European situation. When Oeorge Bernard Shaw states that the present Is
not the time to Join the "Quakers,"
that does not necessarily place Q. <B.
3." In the same class as the featherbrained and thoughtless jingoes who
oan speak airily of conflicts which
others may be called to carry on. So
long as the so-called civilised nations
of the world are willing to carry the
burden and cost of huge armaments
and all the paraphernalia of. war, Including those humans whose meat
and sustenance Is directly found In
the expenditures thus made necessary; and so long as tbey are agreed
that the hand upon the switch to set
all the Infernal machinery ln motion
shall be the hand or hands over
which they refuse to exercise any
control, then Shaw Is right in stating
that "the people have made their own
bed and should be willing to lie upon
it" '■;.- X
People Not Wllllnj "~~~
It will probably be discovered, however, that while the people may in
Buch Instances be compelled to accept the consequences ot previous
apathy or lack of discernment, they
are very far from, being willing to do
so. There will be a quickening of
mental processes that such crises
have Induced on previous occasions,
and while the present burden may be
accepted as Inevitable and carried as
long as may be necessary, there will
be a silent registering of convictions
by the thousand that will create a
force to be felt ln the near future.
The clamor of the street Is no criterion. Froth and foam are most ln
evidence where the water Is shallow
and the frothy effervescence of olty
crowds Is no more an Indication of
the true feeling of a people than Is
the stupid stoning of an embassy by
a London mob.
Already the question haa been
asked where are now the German
socialists? Where Is the working-class
movement of continental Europe?
Juat where they always were. Just
where the working-class movement of
Britain is—in ihe hands of the Philistines. In none of these countries do
the workers hold the reins of power.
Nevertheless, in every country the
question Is being asked, "Who Is responsible?" Representatives ot the
powers that be ln every country have
been trying to answer the question
by blaming everybody else, with a
very manifest desire to get out from
under themselves so far aa responsibility Is concerned. It may be taken
for granted, however, that when the
noise of battle and the dust of conflict have passed away there will be
found ln every country a huge Increase In the number who will be
capable of clearly fixing the responsibility.
The last convention of the Trades
and Labor Congress of Canada, In
this connection, passed the following
resolution: "Resolved—That thlB congresB re-afflrms Its previous opinion
thot as the capitalists of the world
are responsible for all war they
should do their own lighting; and
further that It Is of the opinion that
newspaper writer* fostering the war
spirit should be among the flrst
called upon to take the field In the
event of war being declared."
membership of 9,838 ln 138 local
branches at the end of 1918, paid out
ln benefit* 133,750. More than half of
thla was unemployment benefit The
union publishes a paper in German,
Czech and Polish languages.
Conditions In tha Capltala
According to figures obtained in
connection with an Inquiry Instituted
by a trades union commission In
Vienna, which' covers 131,288 members, there were altogether unemployed 60,907, including 3,004 females,
in the year 1913. Over 26,300 unemployed received 1300,000 ln unemployment benefit, and the total accumulated working time loat ln 1918
amounted to 6,416 years. The result
of the enquiry revealed a steady Increase In unemployed over ths last
few year*.
In March of thl* year a municipal
census was carried out in Buda-Pesth,
the capital of Hungary, with the assistance of the trades unions, The
number of unemployed was found to
be 27,118, or 2.3 per cent, of the inhabitants. Of this number 5,253 belonged to the metal trades, 15,040 to
the building trades, 2,608 to the
wood workers, and 2,341 to the
olothing Industry. The number ot
unemployed for less than a week was
1,466, up to two weeks 834, from 15
to 30 days 1,997, one to three month's
6,606, three to six months 8,628, six
to twelve months 4,872, up to eighteen
months 1,500, and over that period
1,200. Thus 25 per oent. of the unemployed were out ot work over six
months. Some 3,276 persons received
municipal support and 3,098 were supported by th* trades unions. Of the
total unempolyed 9,796 belonged to
the tradea unions.
An indicative of other social conditions it may be stated that for the
year 1912, there were 4,765 children
still of school age,, employed In the
mines ot Hungary. In the salt-mines
of one district alone some 225 children
were working, forming 67 per eent of
the total ot employees. Snowing the
backwardness of the organized movement among the miners in that country, the flrst congress of Hungarian
miners was to have taken place from
August 20 to 22 of this year at Buda-
Pesth.   ThlB will now be prevented. |
PAtinfeii
VANCOUVER UNIONS
TRADES AMD LABOB COUNCIL —
Meata lint and third Thursdays. Executive board: Jaa. H. MoVety, president;
Frank Eatlnghauser, vice-president; Oeo.
Bartley. general aeeretary, 210 Labor
Temple; Mlsa H. Outterldge, treaaurer;
Fred A. Hoover, statistician: sergeant-
at-arms,   John   Sully;   O.  Curnock, F.
Knowles, W. B. Trotter, truatees.	
LABOB TBMPLB OOMPANY, LTD.—
Dlrecton: Fred A. Hoover 3. H.
MeVotr iunm Browa. Edward LeUta*.
Jamw CamphoU. 3. W. WllklMoa, B. P.
Pettlplaea. Joha MeMlllan. Murdock M«-
Konale, F. Slumber*. B. tL Fro* Maaaf
Ing director. J. H. McVety, Boom 111.
ALLIED PRINTING TBADES COUN-
CIL—Meats la* Monday III aoatk.
President, Oeo. Mowat; saentary, F. B.
Fleming. P.O. Box **.
BAKERS' AND CONFBCTIONBRS LO-
  .:      CAL No.  M-Meou see-
!. — '11"^' - ond and fourth Saturdays, 7.M p.m. Preaident,
H, O. Leeworthy; eorras-
pondlnc leerstary, R J.
Adams; biutneaa agent, J.
Black. Boom  II*.  Labor
 Temple.	
BARBERS'   LOCAL   No.    120.-MBETB
second Tueaday In each month 8.80
J. Bruce; reeoorder. c.
 »  ..miu. in eacn month 1
p. m.   President, J. Bruce; reeoorder, _
E. Herrltt; secretary-buelnesa agent, C
Rtirtrhar, . t» —    -"  ,r   temple
F.' Burkhart, *RoW*208r"Labor
Houra: 11 to 1: 6 to 7 p.m.
BARTENDERS' LOCAL No. I7I.-OF-
floe, Boom IN Labor Temple. Meett
drat Sunday of eaoh month. Preaident,
F. F. Lavlgne; financial saentary. Oeo.
W. Curnock" Boom Ml, Labor Temple.
BRICKLAYERS' AND MASONS', NO. .
—Meets every 1st and Ird Tueaday,
— ™.t—   *w*"UW.
Praaldant,   James
8 p.m., 'Room
Haslett;
2"
n. »>u..i uub
nail, Room 218,	
BOOKBINDERS'   LOCAL   UNION
Mi-Meets third Tuesday '
month, In room 801, Labor
dent, F. J. Milne; vioe-i „.__, 	
Bushman; aeoretary, Ed J. Cook, 1050
Robson Street; aecretary-treaaurer, H.
Perry,, 1180 Tenth Avenue Bait1
——M *v>. x-reaiueni, Jamea
ulett; corresponding aeeretary, W. s
ignall, Box 58; flnanclal aeeretary, F.
Brown; bualneaa agent, W. S. will, Room ill. ________
AL   ONION   No.
Puesday In even
ior Temple. Pwtf.
le-prealdant, Wm.
3d  J.   Cook,   1060
BROTHERHOOD OF BOI—UB MAKBR*
I an* Iron Ship Bullden an* Helpers
of Amerlea, Vaneouvar Lodge No. Ill-
Meets firat and third Mondays, I p. m.
[Praaldant, F, Barclay, III Cordova East
aeeretary. A. Fraaer, 1151 Howe street
COOKS, WAITERS AND WAITRESSM
Union—Meats fint Friday In each
month, 1:10 run.. Labor Temple, W. C
Walker, bullosa representative, Oflea:
Boom 801, Labhr Temple. Hours: I a.m.
to 10.10; 1 p.m. to 1.10 and I p.m. to I.M
p.m. Competent help furnlahed on abort
notice,   Phone Ssy. Mil.
It Is Intimated that there Is a movement oh foot ln Winnipeg to bring together the two electrical organisations. What Is known aB the McNulty
wing of the International Brotherhood
of Electrical Workers now has something more than a score ot locals ln
this country as follows: Alberta, 1;
British Columbia, 6; Manitoba, 2;
Nova Scotia, 3; Ontario, 7; Quebeo 4.
A local preacher has <Jult the
church temporarily and gone Into
the oil brokerage business, having
felt the call to help make of Alberta
one of the world's greatest oil producing centres. There's nothing like
an educated conscience.—Calgary
Herald.
DISTRICT COUNCIL OF CARPENTER*
meets second and fourth Thuraday of
eaoh month, I p, m. Saentary, J. Bltcon, 871 Hornby atreet: business agent,
. H. J. McEwen, room 800. Local 117 meats
flnt and third Monday of each month.
and Local 8M7 meeta flnt and third
Tuesday of eaeh month.
BLBCTRICAL WORKERS. LOCAL NO.
Ill—Meeta Room 101 every Monday
I p. m. President, Dave Fink; vtw-prast-
dant,   M.   Sander;  recordl—   —
_«..,   —.   a»aw; . recording
Roy Elgar, Labor Temple; flu-....- —»-
retary and bualneaa agent W. F. Dunn,
Boom 807, Labor Temple.
ELECTRICAL WORKERS, LOCAL NO.
621 (Inalde Men)—Meeta flnt and
third Mondaya of each month. Room 205,
8 p. m. President, II. R. Van Sickle; recording aeoretary, J. M, Campbell; bual-
nesa agent, F. L. Bstinghauaen, Room 207.
LONGSHOREMEN*'   INTBRNATIONAL
ASSOCIATION,    No.    Ilxll—Meets
...qr   Friday   evening,  141   Alexander
atreet, Preaident, J. Mahr'    	
H. Hannlng.
.hone; Seoretary,
MACHINISTS,   NO.   188-MBBTS  SBC-
' ond  and fourth Fridays,  I p.
MINARD'S  LINIMENT  RELIEVES
NEURALGIA.
PROVINCIAL UNIONS
_. O. FEDERATION OF LABOR—
Meets in annual convention ln January, Exeouttve officers, 1914-15: President, A. Watchman; vice-presidents, W.
, F. Dunn, Jas. H. McVety, G. H. Fraser,
1 J. W, Gray, H. Knudson, J. J. Taylor, B.
Simmons. Secretary-treasurer, A. S.
Wells, Box 1638, Victoria, B.C.	
NIW Wl STM IN STIR,  B.C.
NEW WESTMINSTER TRADES AND
Labor Counoll—Meats every seoond
and fourth Wednesday at 8 p. m. In Labor
; Hall. President. D. S. Cameron; flnanolal
seoratary, H. Gibb; general seoretary, W.
B. Maiden. P. O. Box 914. Tha publlo ft
Invited to attend.
Preeldent, A. R. Towler; recording secre-
taw, J. Brookes; ■----*-« *— - —
MoVety.
; flnanolal seoretary, J. R.
MOVING PICTURE OPERATORS, Lo-
cal 348 I.A.T.S.E.—Meets every seoond Sunday of eaoh month, Labor Temple, 8 p.m. President H. C. Roddan; seoretary-treasurer, L. E. Goodman; recording seoretary, A. O. Hansen; busineu agent, G. R. Hamilton. Ofllce,
Room 100, Loo Bldg. Tel. Bey. 8045.
MUSICIANS' MUTUAL PROTECTIVB
Union, Looal No. 146, A. F. of M.~
Meets seoond Sunday of eaoh month,
rooms 89-80, Williams Building, 413 Granville atreet. President, J. Bowyer; vice-
president, F. English; seoretary, H. J.
Brasfleld; treasurer, W. Fowler.
PLUMBERS* AND STBAMFITTERB LO
cal 495—Meets every aeoond and
fourth Friday of month In Labor Hall.
7.80 p. m. President, D. Webster: seoretary, A. McLaren.    P. O. Box 989, Nsw
Westminster, B. C.	
BARTBNDERSTOCAL 714— MEETS lE
Labor Temple, New Westminster,
corner Seventh stret and Royal avenue,
every seoond Sunday of eaoh month, at
1.90 p. m. President, F. 8. Hunt; secretary, F, W. Jameson. Visiting brothers
invited.
VICTORIA, B. C.
OPERATIVE PLASTERERS' INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION, No. 89-
Meets flrst and third Wednesday, O'Brien
Hall, 8 p.m. President A. Hurry; corresponding secretary, F. Sumpter, 1830—
23rd avenue east; flnanclal secretary, D.
Scott, 677 Richards street; treasurer, L.
Tyson, Meets every let and 3rd Wednesday ln the month In Room 301 Labor
Temple.
PAINTERS',. PAPERHANGERS'. AND
Decorators', Local 138—Meets every
Thursday, 7.30 p.m. President, H. Grand;
flnancla) secretary, J. Freckleton, 1023
Comox street; recording seoretary, R.
Dowding, 628 Howe street. Business
agent, James Train, **— "" "
Temple.
Room   303,   Labor
VICTORIA TRADES AND LABOR
Council—Meets flrst and third Wednesday, Labor Hall, 781 Johnston street,
at I p.m. President, George Dykeman;
lecretary, Thos. F. Mathlson, box 993,
Vlotoria, B.C.
MINERS' UNIONS
KIMBERLET MINERS' UNION, No. 199,
Western Federation of Miners—Meets
.Sunday evenings In Union Hall. President, Alex. Wilson; secretary-treasurer,
M. P. Vllleneuve, Klmberley, B.C.
JREWED AND BOTTLED IN VANCOUVER BY
VANCOUVER BREWERIES Limited
Austro-Hungarlan Unlont
According to the recently published
report of the Hungarian Trades Union Centre, there were thirty national
unions afflliated with over 900 local
union branches and a. total member
ship of 107.486 members. Owing to
the lack of employment throughout
the country the membership had
declined by live thousand ln the year
1913, While the dues of the unions
had produced an amount almost
double that of any previous year, this
had been done by "unemployment assessments" and had been disbursed In
that way. The largest union was the
Iron and Metal Workers, with a membership of 29,653, The building workers account for 11,963, and the woodworkers 10,336 members. The woodworkers paid out more tban Its regular contributions ln unemployed benefit, while ninety per cent, of the total
Income of the printers, bookbinders
and hatters unions was swallowed up
ln tbe aamo way. The report reads
that "the Hungarian trades unions
have survived a year of almost unparalleled economlo crises."
The Austrian bakers union, with   a
LADTSMITH MINERS' UNION, LOCAL
No. 3S89. U. M. W. of A.—Meets Wednesday, Union Hall, 7 p.m. President,
Sam Guthrie; secretary, Duncan McKen-
sle, Ladysmlth, B. C,
NANAIMO LOCAL UNION U. M. W. Of
A.—Meets every Monday at 7.30 p, m.
In the Athletic Club. Chapel etreet.   Arthur Jordan, Box 410, Nanalmo, B. C.
CUMBERLAND    LOCAL    UNION,    No
u    2299,  U. M. W. of A—Meets   every
&i*!?"&.J2?' £*yLor-. ■•"•tar/. James
Smith. Bor 84, Cumberland, B.C.
PATTERN MAKERS' .LEAGUE .OF
NORTH AMERICA.—Vancouver and
vicinity. Branch meets 1st and 3rd Fridays at Labor Temple, room 305. Robert
C. Sampson, Pres., 747 Dunlevy Ave.;
Jos, O. Lyon, flnanclal secretary, 1721
Grant-street; J. Campbell, secordlng seo-
retary, 4869 Argyle street.	
STEREOTYPERS' AND ELECTROTTP-
ers* Union, No. 88, of Vanoouver and
Victoria—Meets second Wednesday of
each month, 4 p. m., Labor Temple, President, Chaa. Bayley; recording seoretary,
A. Birnle, o.o. rtNows Advertiser."
STREET AND ELECTRIC RAILWAY
Employees, Pioneer Division No. 101
—Meets Labor Temple second und fourth
Wednemdays at 2 p.m., and first and
third Wednesdays, 8 p.m. President,
W. H. Cottrell; recording secretary,
Albert V. Lofting, _r>6i Trinity street;
financial secretary and business agent,
Fred. A. Hoover, 2409 Clark Drive,
*   ......   ...    .mmps,   *1«g   mm*    —TlVBi	
STEAM ENGINEERS, INTBRNATION-
al Looal 897—Meets every Wednesday
6 p. m„ room 204, Labor Temple. Financial secretary, B. Prendergaat, room 216.
TAILORS' INDUSTRIAL UNION (IN-
ternatlohal). Local No. 178—Meetings
held flrst Tuesday In each month, 8 p. m.
President, Miss H. GutterldRc: recording
secretary, C, McDonald, Box 608; flnan-
clal sec, K. Paterson, P. O. Box 503.
TRAIL MILL AND SMELTERMEN'S
Union, No. IOC, W. F. of M.—Meets
every Monday at 7.30 p. m. President,
James Dclgarnri; secretary, p. J, Uolam,
Box 2fl, Trail, B. C.
SANDON MINERS' UNION, No. 61,
Western Federation of Miners—Meets
every Saturday In the Miners' Union
ball. Address all communications to tbe
Seoretary, Drawer "K.," Sandon, B.C.
BUSINESS  AGENT   DIRECTORY
MINARD'S LINIMtNT POR SALE
EVERYWHERE.
  ni   i ni
Aek for Labor Temple 'Phone Exchange,
Seymour 7498  (unless otherwise stated).
Bartenders— Room 208: Geo. V, Curnook.
B. c. Federatlonist—Room 817; R P.
Pettlpleoe,
Bridge and Structural Iron Workere—W
L. Yule, Room 108.
Brotherhood of Carpenters—Room- 808;
Hugh McEwen,
Bricklayers—Room 211; Wm. S. Dagnall.
Barbers—Room 208; C. F, Burkhart;
phone Sey, 1771.
Hod Carriers, Builders and Coamoa La-
I    borers—Room 220: John Sully.
I Cooks, Walters, Waitresses—Room 899;
i    W. E. Walker; TeL Seymour 8414.
Electrical Workers (outside)—Room
207; W. F. Dunn.
Electrical Workers (lnslda)—Room 887;
F, L. Estinghausen.
Engineers (Steam)-Room 216; L. Dawson.
Labor Temple Co.—Room 111; J, H.
McVety.
Longshoremen's Association — Offloe,
145 Alexander street; H. Hannlng; tel.t
Seymour 6859.
Moving Picture Operators—0. R, Hamilton, Room 109, Loo Bldg.   Tel. Sey.
Musicians—H. J, Brasfleld, rooms 29-89,
Williams Building, 419 Granville Street
Seymour 8680.
Plasterers—Joe Hampton; Tel, Seymour 1814.
Street Railway Employees—Fred. A.
Hoover; Seymour 608.
Trades and Labor Counoll—Room 910;
i   Geo. Bartley.
Typographical—Rooms  911,
THEATRICAL STAGE EMPLOYEES,
Local No. 118—Meets second Sunday
of each month at Room 294, Labor Temple. President H, Spears; recording seoretary. Geo. W. Allln, P.O, Box 711, Vancouver.
TYPOGRAPHICAL UNION NO. 288—
Meets last Sunday each month, 8
p.m. President, R. P. Pettlpleoe; vice-
president, W. 8. Metsger, secretary-
treasurer, R. H. Neelanda. P. O. Box 96
SYNOPSIS  OP  COAL   MINING   REGULATIONS
Coal mining rights of the Dominion,
In Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,
the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Territories and in a portion of the Provinoe
i of British Columbia, may be lesaed for
a term of twenty-one years at an annual
I rental of 91 an acre. Not more than
8,660 acres will be leased te one applicant.
Applications for lease must be made by
the applicant In person to the Agent or
Sub-Agent of the dlstriot In whloh the
rights applied for are situated.
In surveyed territory the land must be
described by sections, or legal subdivisions of sections, and In unsurveyed territory the tract applied for shall be
staked by the applicant himself.
Each application must be accompanied
by a fee of 96, which will be refunded If
the rights applied for are not available,
but not otherwise. A royalty shall be
paid on the merchantable output of tbe
mine at the rate of Ave cents per ton.
The person operating the mine shall
furnish the Agent with sworn returns
accounting for the full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay the royalty thereon. If the coal mining rights
are not being operated, suoh returns
should be furnished at least once a year.
The lease will Include the coal mining
rights only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available
surface rights may be considered necessary for the working of the mine at the
rate of 810 an acre. _
For full Information application should
be made to the Secretary of the Department of the Interior, Ottawa, or to any
Agent or Sub-Agent of Dominion Lands.
W.H..COJRY,
i*,  n.  -uum,
. Deputy Minister of the Interior.
118.    914;     N. B.—Unauthorised publication of this
I advertisement will not be paid for—80699-
Westminster Trust Company
0a**iai, fi*iwupffft** meoona wema. aattaaaM \
W* hart UONUT TO LOAN oa Improra* praptrtr.
Batata* mu*t*d tor out-oMowa tad ettr cltaata. Pajrmtat* *at-
l**tad and forward** or IntaaUd. Wa aet aa tnat* only tot tt*
»orch*aa aad tola ot ml aatata.
Dtpoatt* accepted ud Interact at 4% allawad oa dally balue*.
•AFETY OIPOIIT ■OXM FOR HINT
BM-O-m;
Celumbl* and *Mgbla Mr***, Haw Waatmlmtw, I. C.
THE S. BOWELL COMPANY
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
Do You Know
Good Beer
among the numerous brandt found on the market
ii in clan A; it'i flavor appcab to tb* man or
woman who knows
GOOD BEEB
Aik our diitributor for a cate lent to your home.
A. E. Suckling ft Co., Vucouver dittributort.
WESTMINSTER BREWERY, NEW WESTMIMSTER, B. C
" ™ * f PHONE No. I>7B   .
UNION HATS AND OVERALLS at
J. E. BRO WN & CO.
618 COLUMBIA STREET
NEW WEmf-lsTEli B.C.
THE POPULAR PRICED, EUROPEAN PLAN
HOTEL RITZ
VICTORIA, B.C.
FORT ST., AT DOUGLAS
RATES 76c, $1.00, $1.26, $1.60, $8.00
0. J. LOVEJOY, MOR.    PREE AUTO BUS
BE TRUE TO YOURSELVES
■Y (MOKINQ THI OLD HBLIABLI
Kurtz's "Pioneer" Cigars
YOU  HILP YOUR  PILLOW  UNION  MIN ANO   BMIDIt, YOU OUT
THI VIRV  BUT  VALUI  POR YOUR  MONIV
Komagata
Maru!
WE DONT WANT
ANYMORE
ASIATICS
We want only good loyal citizens who believe In buying goods
made In British Columbia.   Our products are
BAPCO PURE PAINT
BAPCO OIL SHINGLE STAIN
BAPCO PURE COPPER PAINT
BAPCO KAL80MINE
BAPCO WHITE LEAD
BAPCO VARNISHES
and they are all guaranteed.
MADE BY
BRITISH AMERICA
PAINT COMPANY, Ltd.
Victoria   Vancouver   Calgary
Edmonton PAGE SIX
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA PEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY...,
.. AUGUST  21,  1»U
WHAT CUSTOMERS SAY OF
BUCK
Ladner, B. C, June Bth, 1914.
Meun). McMaster A Sons, Ltd.,
Vancouver, B. C,
Dear Sire,—We bave bandied your "Mac's Mogul" Overall* and
Jacket* ever since you put them on tbe market, and tnd them* very
satisfactory, both to customers and ourselyes, and iuperlor to American line* we bad been handling previously.
Your* truly,
(Signed)      LANNING, PAWCBTT ft WILSON, LTD.
From Lannlng, Fawcett ft Wilson, Ltd.
Importers and Dealers In General
Merchandise and Agricultural Produce.
(Copy)
WM. J. BIoMABTIE * SONS, LTD.
W. B. THOMAS, Manager Director!
New West Manufacturing Co., Ltd.
MANUFACTURERS OF
FURNACES, STOVES -»«■ RANGES
Opposed to General Strike
in Support of Striking
Miners
ATTENTION, UNION MINI
. Now Is the time to put ln tbat furnace. We manufacture the beat
•Uvea and ranges. The only union place In this line ln DL C. Ask tor
our gooda.   Handle* everywhere.
2102—llth Avenue West      VANOOUVER, B. 0.
PHONE: BAYVIEW 248
"26% OFF ALL TRUSSES THIS MONTH
RED STAR DRUO STORE.
68 Cordova 8tw*t Wert Vancouver, B. 0.
Phone: Fairmont 810
Patterson-Chandler
Manufacturers of
MONUMENTS
Vaults, Curbing, Etc
Offlce and Works:
Cor. 16th Ave. 'and Main St.
Branch Offlce: loth a Fraaer Avet.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
1
TRAM ONION DIRECTORY
Allied "Prlntjiu Trade. Coundl—T. R
Fltmlnr, P. o. Box II.
Bajcers-J. Blank, Boom Ml, Ubor
Temple.
Butjera-O; F. Burkhart, Bonn IM, tabor Temple.
Barttnderg-Oeo. W. Cunweh. Room
tM, Labor Temple.
Blaclumiua - Maloolm Porter, view
Bill P. O.
Bookbinder!—Oeo. Mowat 111 Dunlevy
avanua,
Boilermakers—A. Fraaer. 11(1 Row* It
Brewery Workers-Frank Graham, till
llth Avenue West
Brieklayera—William a. DamaH, Boom
.tii, tabor Temple. ...
Brotherhood of Carpenten Dlstriot Coun.
ell—Jae. Bltcon, Boom tM, Labor
Temple,
Rod Carriers. Builders and Common Laborers—John Bully, Boom IM, Labor
Temple,   '
*" Kurts
If you are one
who doesn't know
the wonders of the Blue Amberol
played oo an Edison Cylinder
Phonograph. Let ut ihow you
what you are mining. . We've
been in buiineu a long time, Mr.
Reader. No one knowi the
talking machine line better than
wc do. We've watched the
Edison develop until to-day wc
unhesitatingly claim it to be the
umt perfect on th* market today. You'll not low anything
by hearing it We'll arrange
terms to suit
THE
KENT
PIANO CO. Ltd.
SS8 GRANVILLE ST.
_ - Labor Temple.
Electrloel   Workere   (ooteldel—W.   P.
Dunn, Room 107, Labor Temnle.
Electrical Worken  <lMl*.)-fc>om MT;
P. L. EaUnghausen.
Engineen—L. Dawson, Room Ml, Labor
Temple.
Granite Cutters—Edward Hurry, Columbia Hotel.
Garment Workem-HIn  McRae,  Labor
. Temple.
Oluewqrkers—Charles   Roberta,   Labor
Temple.
Groundmen's Union  (L  B. E,  W.l—R.
IteBaln, ean of a C. 0. B.
Hojseshoers — A. C. MaoArthur, Cltjp
_ Heights, "B.C.
Lottercairiers-Bobt Wight Dlstriot II.
Lathere-Vlotor R. Mdflty, Box IMS.
L_!u^'rWJP_,l»a  Bn«lneer.-J*m*a
Patrlek, nil Homer street
Loco. Englneere-A. E. Bollewar, loll
. Paelfle.   Tel. tty. II71L.
Longshoremen-Geo. Thomaa, HI Alexander Itreet
Mjchlnlst;—3. H. McVety.   Room  111,
„Labor Temple,
Miners, w. f\ ot M.—B. P. Pettlpleoe,
Boom 117, Labor Temple,    -
Muslolans-H. J. Brasfleld, Booms tl-10,
Williams Bldgj, 411 Oranvllle itreet
Uarbteworkere-Frank Hall, Jane. Road,
B. C.
Molders—D. Brown, III Broadway Weet
Moving Picture Operators—L.  B. dood-
man, Boom IM, Loo Building.
Photo  Kn*ravers—A.  Kraft  Dominion
Engraving Co., Empire Block.
Palntera—J.   Train,   Boom   IM,   Labor
Temple.
Plumbers-Room Itl Labor Temple.
Premmen-P. D. Edward, Labor Temple.
Plasterers—John  Jamee Cornish,  1101
Eleventh Ave. Eaat
Pattern Makers—J. Campbell, 4111 Argyle Street. \
quarry Workers—Jama* Hepburn, care
Columbia Hotel.
Railway Conduotore—O. W. Hatch, 711
Beatty street
Railroad Trainmen—A.  B.   McCorvllle,
_Box 111. .,.::'.
Railway Carmen—A. Robb,  410 Nelson
Street.
Seamen's Unlon-Cor. Main and Hastings.
Structural Iron Worken-W.  L.  Tulo,
Room 101, -Labor Temple,
btonecutters—Jemes Rayburn, P. O. Box
Sheet Metel Workers—H. C. Douian, No.
I, Fifteenth Ave. West
Street Railway Employees—A. T. Loft-
_ Ing, ill! Trinity Street
Stereotypere—w. Bayley, oare Province,
City.
Telegraphers—B. B. Pippin, Box III.
Trades and Lahor Counoll-Oeo. Bartley,
Boom llo Lahor Temple.
Typographical—H. Neelanda, Box M.
Tlllor»-C. McDonald, Box Ml.
Theatrical    Stage    Employees—Gordon
Martin, 117 Prior street
Tllelayers   and   Helpers—Even Thomas,
Labor Temple.
Dphototerere—A. Duthle. 1011 Homer It
Reports of Unions re State
of Trade—Important
Business
NBW WESTMINSTER, Aug. 13.—
Lut evening tbe regular meeting of
the1 New Westmlnater Trade* and
Labor oounoil waa held, with Preaident H. Knudsen In the chair. Credential* were presented tor T. Kelly,
electrical workers; James F. Pe'eney,
clgarmaker*, and T, A. Barnard,
steam and operating englneera. Delegatea were obligated and anted, ns
alao was Delegate Parr, of the aheet
metal workers.
Credential! were also reoelved from
the B. C. P. of L. for Chris. Pattlnson,
who waa given the floor, and who delivered an address of aome twenty
minutes' duration, In whloh he ably
aet forth the cause of the Vancouver
Island minersj and appealed for *
general itrike in their behalf. At
the conclusion of his remarks, Mr.
Pattlnson waa accorded a unanimous
vote of thanks.
Communication*
From the Royal Columbian hospital
suggesting that a committee be appointed from -the Trades and Labor
counoll to meet the hospital board to
consider the wage question' of the
kitchen help, It having been contended that the present white help reoelved lower wages than their
Oriental predecessors. Received, and
on motion of Cameron-Maiden a committee ot three was selaoted, being
Delegates D. fi. Cameron, P. Paulsen
and A. Kocbel.
Pro'm the I. W. W„ Alberta, appealing for fund*.   Reoelved and filed.
From the B. C. Federation ot Labor
calling for a referendum Vote on the
Question of a strike in sympathy, withe Vanoouver Island miners. Yates-
Stoney, that communication be flled.
Cameron-Barnard, amendment, that
the council vote on the referendum.
Delegate Iveson rose to » point of order on the amendment, claiming lt
was out of order. Chair ruled against
him. Delegate Stoney appealed from
ruling of chair In vain, sustaining
vote being 13 to 8.
Delegates Cameron, Maiden and
several others spoke against a general
strike. Delegate Tates was In favor
ot it Delegate Cropley was undecided
whether or not he should vote, as hii
un|0n had not dealt with the queatlon.
He represented his union In the
oounoil, and would like to vote the
Tty his organisation wished. Personally he was opposed to a general
Btrike at this time. Finally the council turned down the proposal for a
general strike by a vote of 20 to 8.
From socialist party of Canada re
literature condemning the war and its
cause*. Cameron-Faeney moved that
lt be laid on the table. Maiden-
Stoney moved In amendment that It
be thrown In the waste basket The
motion waa withdrawn and the amendment a* a motion was carried,
Reports
Auditing committee, received and
Iliad.
Executive oommlttee, submitted
following as their selection* for the
regular standing committees of the
council;
Audit committee—W. Tatea, P.
Paulsen, Jaa. Mackle.
Organisation—«. A, Stoney, J. R,
Flynn, C. Cropley.
Grievance—H, Olbb, W. Esklns, W.
Dodd.
Munlolpal—D. 8. Cameron, D. Ma-
goire, 3. McLean, Chu. Sell, W. —
Ivlson.
Parliamentary—W. E. Maiden, A.
Kochel, H. Jacobson, T. Moore, W. B.
Parlett
Report reoelved and selections approved by the council,
'Building Trades committee—Delegate Esklns said he had been unable
to get a quorum of that committee to-,
gether. He announced that the committee met on the second and fourth
Tuesdays of tbe month at No. 84 Begbie street   Received.
Parliamentary committee—No attempt had yet been mad* to get
Phillip Snowden to deliver an address here, Matter left in hands of
committee to act
THIS LABEL
I* A GUARANTEE   THAT
LEATHER
GOOD*  ARE
MADE   UNDER
PAIR  CONDITION*
arbitration committee, the company
acceeded to the demands of the men.
Hod carriers—Little doing.
Unfinished business—The convention call of the Trades and Labor congress of Canada was received and
Sled, as the council could not see it*
way clear to send a delegate to tbe
convention.
Reports of the various unions gave
Uttle encouragement to the proposition of putting a business agent In the
field, so on motion of Delegates Dodd
and Lewis the matter was dropped.
Delegates Cameron and Barnard
moved to amend section 2, article 4,
by adding the words after offices:
"This clause shall not prevent an
officer from being a member of a
oommlttee."   Carried. i
(Election of a delegate to the Progressive association resulted in the
selection of Delegate C. Cropley by
12 votes over Delegate D. S. Cameron, 11 vote*.
Moved by Delegates Cameron and
Tates—Tbat the general seoretary of
the council be that body's official correspondent to the B. C. Federatlonist.
Carried.
Moved By Delegates Barnard and
Flynn—That the secretary be In
structed to uk the Royal Columbian
hospital board It if would not be possible for the Trades and Labor counoll to have one or more representatives on that body.   Carried.
Delegate Esklns explained that tbe
electrical workerB were not to blame
for what an alderman had termed an
impertinent letter, for, while the secretary's letter to the city council regarding a proposed meeting of the
light committee had been pretty
strongly worded, It was not meant
that way, and now a meeting had
been arranged at which the expired
agreement with the city will be considered.
On motion ot Delegates Cameron
and _iklns, the time of the meeting
was extended IS minutes.
Delegate Dodd stated that he had
examined a list given to the chairman of the municipal committee by
Delegate Cropley, who, he said, at
one time claimed that out of about
160,000 worth of stuff bought by tbe
harbor committee only about $1800 of
it had gone to local Arms, and Delegate Dodd said he found that about
140,000 went to local firms.
Delegate Cropley pointed to the
brief time left to bis to reply and
asked that the matter be laid over to
the next meeting.  Granted.
President Knudsen asserted that the
olty wu, employing two men on
twelve-hour shift* at Ihe regular
price of 13 a day, which Is the stipend
for eight hours of work and he wanted the matter Investigated.
Delegate Dodd said lt waa a cue
dealt with by.the mayor tnd the
chairman of an Important committee,
On motion of Delegatea Maiden and
Stoney lt was referred to the municipal committee: >
Child Libor In Britain
Oovernment figures recently published In Oreat Britain gave some interesting Information concerning
child labor. For example, there are
21,300 boys employed between the
ages of 10 and 13, the largest number
being ln the textile trade, 84,000,
whilst 60,000 earn t living u messenger and van' boys.
Of other male children employed,
there are 76,800 of 13 yeara; 222,800 ot
14; and 278,300 of 15 years.
So far u girls are concerned 10,100
are at work between the ages of ten
and thirteen, of whom 8,900 are tn
the textile trade, 30,200 are employed
at the age of 13, 13,320 at 14, and
193,830 at 16.
In all occupations it Is Interesting
to note that 10.6 per cent of all male
workers are under 18, while 17.7 of all
female workera are below the same
*«*.
In the textile trades the full time
ohlldren, aged 13, may be employed
for 60 hours, a week (exclusive of
meal hours) tnd for five houra con-
meal hours) land for five houra continuously without a break.
For the whole country it is calculated that one child ln every six between the age of ten and thirteen Is
employed, and that their wages amount to $16,000,000 per annum..
Southern Alberta crops are not going to make any millionaires this fall
There is no use denying the fact that
the early June drought hit ub rather
hard. Acknowledgment of the fact
and preparation Ib merely common
senee.—Lethbrldge, Herald.
Bill*
Columbian oompany $12.50 and
$2,26; B. C. Federation of Ltbor per
capita tax, $6; S, 0. Tidy, $6, All ordered paid excepting that of Tidy,
which wu held over for Investigation.
Reports from Unlona
Typos—All available men working
except thoae doing military duty.
Plumbers—About the same as
usual—dull.
Barbers—Quiet.
Bartenders—Pretty quiet
Clgarmakers—'Not one man working.
Amalgamated carpenters—Bad as
can be; most members out ot town.
Sheet metel workers—lAbout three
men working half time.
Moulders—Quiet; again laying off
men.
Retail clerks—Conditions not very
satisfactory; want 6 o'clock closing
ordinance.
Shingle weavers—All working; nonunion men at Fraser Mills had wages
out
Engineers—Slack, but union men
working,
Blectrloal workers—All men In
town working.
Street rallwaymen—At lowest ebb.
Mechanical department holding up;
shop men laid off; wages of some men
out, one old man being cut from $80
to $40. As the result of mus meetings held In Westminster, Vancouver
and Victoria, at which the men decided to strike unless the compiny
agreed'to abide by the term* of the
When labor votes for itself Instead
of Its friends, there'll be something
doing.
BUY
BONDS
Put your money into
high-class bonds paying
7 per cent, per annum.
We will sell bonds—par*
value $100.00 each—on
terms.   ;
$10 Cash and
$ 10 Monthly
Royal Financial
Corporation, Ltd.
Paid up   Capital and   Surplus
over $800,000.00
708-714 ROGERS BUILDING
Vancouver, B. C.
LABOR PRINTING PRESB
Toronto Trade Unionists Buy a Plant
for Themselves
The Industrial Banner, the official
labor newspaper of Toronto, has
made another step forward by acquiring a printing plant of Its own. The
name of the new offlce is "The Banner Press." Organized labor in Toronto thus make*, another progressive
move.
Its flrst achievement ln the line of
ownership was the formation ot the
Labor Temple company, which hu
turned out bo successfully that the
labor headquartera are now entirely
dear of debt and are valued In the
neighborhood of ninety thousand dollars. Then oame the establishment
In the city of t weekly labor paper,
The Industrial Banner, owned and
controlled entirely by organised labor,
and it also has proved a successful
venture."
The Union ^abel Stores company Is
another project that hu meant a
great deal for the popularising of the
union label, and lt too bids fair to
make good, and now the ownership
of a complete Job printing establishment Is right along the line of continued advancement and progreas and
1* tn evidence of the fact that wben
they really make up their minds
trades unionists have the brains to
get there.
SOUTH  WELLINGTON  FIRE
Committee Appointed to Relieve Distrait
The following have been appointed
a committee to receive and distribute
relief for those who are homeless or
otherwise suffering u the result of
the terrible Are which completely
wiped out the little town of Sou-
Wellington on Vancouver Island .last
week;. J. Ovlngton, W. Evans, O.
Taylor, Corporal Meeban, W. Richards, D. J. Thomas and Jamea Bateman, who Is the seoretary, to whom
all contributions and communications
should be addressed at South Wellington,
The Are destroyed 80 homes, rendering 147 children, 70 women, and
125 men destitute. These poor people
are left with no more thtn the
clothes they stand up in. Any contributions of clothes, food, shoes,
bedding and money will be gratefully
accepted and apreclated. Remember
the address—Jas. Bateman, South
Wellington.
Montreal carpentera have won their
flght for a minimum wage ot 45
cents per hour. The standard houra
of labor will be eight ln the summer
seuon and nine In the winter, The
craft was never ao strongly organized as at the present time.
MINARD'S LINIMENT
CURES DANDRUFF
Stock Dinnerware
We have a flne selection of open
stock dinnerware patterns. You
oan purchase these ae you require.
Sold by the dosen or by the piece.
DOUR k COE    12* Has-ts St. W.
$400.00 in Cash
Given Away
TO THE ONE WHO DRAWS
THE LUCKY NUMBER
1 Chance for Erery $5 Purchase
Made fa Either of Oct Stow
"WHAT CAN I GET FOR *25»
Tou may have an Imported English Wonted Bult, or
An Imported Irish Homespun
Suit, or
An Imported Scotch Tweed Suit,
or
An Imported English Cheviot
Bult or
A Genuine Imported Blue Serge
Suit
And you will get—no matter
which kind of suit you select—the
finest tailoring, the most perfect
fitting garments, and the soundest
values In alt Canada.
This Is what you will get for
f26 when you buy your suit here,
HT REFORM
WARDROBES
US HASTINGS ST. aai ROCEKS
BLOC, CHANVIIU ST.
SPEND TOUR SPARE TIME IN
THB LABOR TEMPLB FREE
READING ROOM.
The Unlimited Life
of the
Corporate Trustee
It will save anxiety to appoint a Corporate Trustee rather
than an Individual'Trustee when undertaking the paramount
duty of making yoyr will.
> Supposing you appoint your most reliable friend, and he is
willing to accept the trust; yet If he dies before completing his
duties as trustee his successor may be a man of whom you
would not approve. But if you appoint this Company you will
be certain of a permanent trustee.
Canadian Financiers Trust company
I HEAD OFFICE 839 HASTINOS ST. W.     VANCOUVER, B.C.
Patrick Donnelly-General Man&fet-
Summer RACE
MEETING
MTNORU
PARK
Races every Day!   Rain or Shine!
Special Trains Leave New,
Granville St. Station at 12,12.30
and every 15 minutes until 2 p.m.
Admission $1.25
Including Grand Stand and Transportation
AN UNPARALLELED RECORD
WE HAVE BEEN MAKING SOAP IN VICTORIA ■ FOR tt
YEARS AND HAVE NEVER EMPLOYED ANY ASIATICS. NOTHING BUT SKILLED HELP AND PUREST MATERIALS ARE
USED IN THE MANUFACTURE OP
WHITE
W. J. PENDRAY * SONS
Limit**.
VICTORIA
VANCOUVER
G O WITH THE BUNCH to the
BRUNSWICK POOL ROOMS *
THE BIG LABOR DAY
PARADE
ON MONDAY, SEPT. 7, THE VANCOU-
VER EXHIBITION WILL HOLD A     .
GIGANTIC INDUSTRIAL AND LA-
BOR DAY PARADE.
See the Big Exhibits. The
Dominion and the Provincial
Governments will both have
big displays.  Asd there will
be thousands of Commercial,
Industrial,  Artistic, Educational and other miscellaneous Exhibits.
See the Big Attractions-
Range Days, the Patterson
Shows, Harness Horse Races,
an Automobile and a Horse
Show.  Show your Babies in
the Better Babies Contest.
Every day a big day—Every
night a big night,   Bigger
.,  than before.
Vancouver Exhibition Association, 424 Pacific Building
H. S. BOLSTON, General Manager.

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