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The British Columbia Federationist Feb 12, 1915

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« •^'^-^A^mmmmmmmmmimm^mafSfl^^
-     /       •'' '"^
f'X','        - «if5      ■''.'•'
B Fc3 1 **•
FEDERATIONS!
.B-   *:.     F"KUfcJlt..\'ri< )N   OF  LABOB
• POLITICAL UNITT: VIOTOBTI
iT    12,    1915.
(IncXrS')    $1.60 PER YEAR
p  SUPPRESS
5T FOR SEDITION
Editorial   Comment of The
shes    Important  Military
lfl«?  Official Retaliations.
W   Authorities Discipline the
jls also an Official Censor
tt  British Columbia.
; ition issued each Saturday, and de-
ia tlie Victoria Real Estate Exchange."
teemore." In last Saturday's issue ap-
^2s.otxld Be> Suppressed. * * The editorial
;a
atr to toleration, and while the Week
[*tio affairs tin-d believes in according
,_rwf3. the line at the point where free- %
npntion of the authorities is called to
&>-£ Friday, January 29th, in the edi-,
0i;pressed which undoubtedly militate
.■idicule the armed defence of one's
>rj>eci.o.lly in time of war, must he re-
in"t>le- 3S"o considerations should deter
*r* steps the law allows to suppress
Ajaa^era * * 3VTany   of  them   have joined
_\b- for the purpose of getting bread
fi» as for any over-enthusiastic love
1'ured l>y German bullets tipped -with
"plx-e following: * * One of the most
• -er last 3Priday, and which signalized
ms* scores of boys carrying rifles, in
IMb.xi.-d obviously heavier than they
yl ±3 jizst ** playing- at soldiers." To
jand oan use them, it means prepar-
ilgsters to repeat in after years the
« Europe. " *
"■to-o Federationist would not bave heen
■.on, from the   Week..   But-curiously
_\€L -tlie copy of the Issue from, which
tlb-tezr from a "Victoria correspondent, in
1 i. that tbe "Week should he suppressed
<^r^r to tbe regulations laid down hy the
i ^«d in the January 23, 1915, issue of
e Head     of   * * An    Open   Gateway,'' and
lity   of   overland  raids, there can be
=itish   Columbia  has been left practi-
l      sx.      defenceless    condition   that   at
uttack   by   any  craft  varying in cali-
\clx_    ...   What  would have happened
1    -other   Japanese  warships near our
once   the   German  fleet  -was sunk, off
eemed    to    think   that   there   was   no
iren    such   slight   precautions   as pru-
Ea\a_\   of   the   Admiralty,  some guns had
straits.       These   "were   promptly dis-
(;lr*er*x>a.aK.   cruisers   at large in the At-
Etnds   the   northern  approach to Van-
9     at     fortifications   at   any   point  in
r   tlua-t  there   may be at the moment
_to    face   the   facts  so  far as Victoria
,    which   are   in  good working order,
J-o,    if    brought   into   play  against  an
'.\xx£l1X   a   -unit   to   satisfy the naval ault should  have been increased.   Sub-
lC[a-s*e,    and    this   they   lack.     "We have
6    the    dominion   government  allowed
i-xxoixxi.tin.g'   them   last   year,   one  was
fc>e    fired,   and   a   single   gun hardly
Nation.       The   smaller   forts   are  too
Iw-eek    is    informed,   on   high   expert
tallest   gunboat  afloat. .  . . Victoria
be   -worst   of it.     IN"ot   only   are   our
Lt     even    against   a   sudden .raid   by
lation   for   the  fear that raids may
|lttn-American   citizens,   there   is  far
rflr   from  Puget Sound ports. There is
ir      on     the   mainland    adequate   pro-
sa how   the  cable    station   at   Bamfleld
td If only a corporal's guard of the
lu Hnk in the chain of communication,
li     Ijounger's"    column,   with   almost
3. movements of expeditionary forces
ietU9   collection, and communication or
ffice shows that, hy section 18 there-
llix-ity   collect,   record,  publish or com-
tion -with respect to the movements,
aon o* any of the forces ships,
r<       or    with   respect   to   the   plans  of
i.ny naval or military operations hy
'--EOT   TO   ANY  WOEKS or measures
ided fox* the fortification or defence
jtTION intended to be communicated
HLS3      XS     OAIjOTXI-ATBD    to   BE    OB
NDIRECTLY XJSBrrri- TO THE
Cihe provisions of this regulation, or
;ii±»  possession any document contain-
ihall   he  guilty of an offence against
ten- Blakemore is still the responsible
li.f Xk-Zx-. William Blakemore is one of
0:oncludes:
tfel-t hereinbefore cited directly con-
t> n. of information * of such a na-
t    V>e    directly   or  indirectly,  useful
—goi* to take action against the re-
iwithin his particular jurisdiction
l«tioris    promulgated   for   the  safety
VVVilliam Blakemore, official cen-
.j-ihed,   against   "M.T.  William Blake-
eek * * *
iO»mplained of, is merely an expres-
k)\ The extract from the Week con-
{does, is* a different matter. And
/eek may find the beam in its own
Loyance   it   felt  against The I*edera-
asported    on    the   surface   of  crowded
t-ets     hy    any    vehicle   faster   than   we
-,-e    to-day   and   havo  safety to life and
e>. Therefore    those    who   would   rc-
atte    the   street   car  to the  scrap in  fa-
S    of     a,     -"jitney,*"    because   to-day   it
res*   a.     little     faster,    in    places   only,
d ooxned    to   disappointment,   and   bos'      to     a    selfish    unthinking   class   who
Lid    >nako   life   a   misery  and  tyranny.
»s     speeding    should    be   stopped.      We
■    travelling    fast    enough.      Working
pie    have   the   power   in   this  instance.
T.  C.
ISLAND DISASTER
WAS NO SURPRISE
TO OLD RESIDENTS
Tha mining disaster at South
Wellington, whereby more thla
a score of men lost their lives by
Helng drowned, has been expected
for years by those who are familiar with the district. The property of the Pacific Ooaat Ooal
company where the disaster haa
occurred,, adjoins the old mines
worked by the Dunsmuir Interests
and closed down 20 years ago.
The reason given at the time for
the closing down was that lt had
to be done to avoid a strike. The
real reason, as believed by many,
was that the. Dunsmuir. people
had gone far beyond the bounds
of their survey, and had taken
coal out from under land held by
adjacent settlers.. There waa
good reaaon to believe that the
government waa about to Investigate the charge, and then the
mine was flooded. Old-tuners in
the district have alwaya held that
the official survey of the Paelfle
Coaat Ooal company's property wonld bring them into the old
Dunsmuir workings long before
they reached the place where
those workings were supposed to
commence. And it ts now believe
ed that this ia Juat wbat hia
happened. According to report,
water haa been seeping into the
Pacific Ooaat Ooal company's
mine for the laat week or two ln
much larger volume than formerly. But as they had not reached
the limits of the property they
apparently continued to take ont
coal,  with the result that thla
EOF
1K-WID
Practically No Assistance
for Small Farmers in
This Province
Farmer Correspondent Discusses the Subject from
Various Angles
TWENTY ISLAND
MINERS MEET AN
AWFUL DEATH
SOUTH WELLINGTON, B. 0, Feb.
10.—Twenty miners, twelve of whom
were members of our union, were
drowned in the mines of the Pacific
Coast Coal company here yesterday by
the Hooding of the mines with water
from the old Southfield mine, which
was abandoned many years ago. The
water was released by a shot fired by
Fire-boss David Nellis. All of the men
on shift, numbering nearly two hundred,
were in the mine, and escaped, with the
exception of the above number, who
were trapped in a section of the mine
by the inrush of water. Watson
and Anderson, two who had reached a
place of safety, returned to rescue their
partners nnd lost their lives. Manager
Foy, who accompanied Watson, lost his
life in the same way.
List of Dead.
Joseph Foy (manager), David Nellis,
Bobert Miller, Wm. Gilson, Wm. Anderson, Otto Lingren, John Hunter,
Frank Hunter, Samuel, Wardle, John
Stewart, Thos. Watson, Wm. Irving, J.
Fearon, Peter Fearon, G. H. Marvos, F.
Marvel, J. Bullich, John Cowder, J.
Hronis, V- Finn.
BOBEKT FOSTER,
President District 28, U. M. W. A.
CULINARY   WORKERS'   NEWS.
Trades Council Stand on Jitney Bus
Question Endorsed.
Vice-president John Gumming of Local No. 28, Cooks, Waiters' and Waitresses * Union, writes: The best attended meeting we havo had for somo
time wns held in Room 206, Labor Temple, Friday evening, February 5. Business conditions in our line continue
very quiet. Some of the down-town
restaurants where our members are employed are beginning to feel the effocts
of the jitney bus innovation—in reduced mid-day receipts.
Speaking on the jitney bus: We
adopted a resolution at our meeting on
Friday night endorsing the resolution
proposed by Business Agent F. A.
Hoover at the last meeting of the
Trades and Labor council.
Business Agent Graham of this union
was appointed a delegate to the Parliamentary committee of the Trades and
Labor council, where we expect him to
render a good account of himself.
To President J. H. McVety of the
Trades and Labor council I desire to
convey the thanks of this union for his
able efforts on our behalf at the recent
convention of the B. C. F- of L. and
also before the powers that be in Victoria.
ALLIED  PRINTING TEADEB.
Election of Officers Took Place and
Label Campaign Planned.
The regular meeting of the Allied
Printing TradeB council was held on
Monday evening, February 8th. President Bothel occupied tho chair and Secretary Neelands was in his place. Credentials were received for delegates
from several organizations affiliated as
follows: Typographical union—Messrs.
G. Bartloy, H. Neelands an 0. Uren;
Pressmen's union—Messrs. E. Waterman, J. Munro and H. Wheatland;
Stereotypers' union—Mr. M, Woodbury.
Election of officers resulted as follows: President, H. Bothel; vice-president, E. Waterman; secretary-treasurer,
H. Neelands; executive committee—C.
Uren, M. Woodbury, W. Bushman and
G. Pfaff; auditors—G. Bartley, J. McKinnon and J. Monro.
It was decided to institute an active
label campaign, to be carried on during
the year, and for this purpose a committee was appointed to tako charge of
the work. Considerable enthusiasm was
manifest on this subject and good results   are  anticipated.
SEEKS  .DAMAGES  .FROM .TYPOS.
First Case of Its Kind Ever Heard ln
Canada Set Down for April 12.
''Todd vs. Pettipiece, ot al.—Stood
over one day.'' Such was the daily
press record of local court proceedings
during tho past week. But to the members of Vancouver Typographical union
the announcement has more than ordinary significance. It means that the
long-standing suit for $10,000 damages,
instituted by Robert Todd against tho
local Typo, union is under way. At tho
preliminary hoaring on Wednesday
morning the case was set down for
April 12th, to bo heard before a jury.
Mr. J. W. DeB. Farris will act as counsel for the Typographical union, while
Mr. Charles Wilson will appear for
Todd.
W. H. Hayward M. P., proposes to
aid the rancher by depriving him of the
road work. Depression of all kinds has
been the only aid offered to tho rancher
so far, and we were hoping for a change
of policy.
Mr. Hayward said: "One of the
greatest curses of the agricultural situation in this province is the road
work,"
I can Understand what he means, -because I heard of a man who had lived
long years in a certain district, bnt preferred road work to farming. One year
road work stopped suddenly, and ths
man and1 his sons had to return home,
when it waB just too late to put in the
crops, so they had neither the one nor
the other.
The obvious cure for cases of this sort
_, not to curse the road work but to
distribute it according to necessity, instead of politics.
The road is not only a great blessing
j the man with an uncleared ranch
and no capital,, but it is his only hope.
Without it he must abandon his land
and drift into the ranks, of the unemployed in the city.
Formerly those settlers without capital trusted to the fishing for a grubstake while they cleared their land and
made it productive. Now that the
fishing, despite our protests, has been
handed over to the Japanese, there remains nothing but the road work. If
enough road work was given to those
who really need it a man might make
enough in the summer to allow him to
stay at home all winter and prepare
the land for the spring crops. As it is
those men get the work who do not
need it and tho man who wants to cleat
his own land has to spend the winter
slashing othor people's ranches for a
mere pittance—not even a grub-stake.
At some of the contracts they make SO
cents a day by bard work, but when the
weather is bad thoy do not make 60
cents a week.
Of course government loans to farmers (if they ever materialize) would
help some of tbe ranchers, but they
would not holp those whose farms wore
not paid for or were already mortgaged,
What help has Mr. Haywnrd or his
government to offer to the man who is
making, a superhuman effort to buy his
ranch, to clear it, to stock it, to bay
seed add implements and to feed himself and his family and his chickens on
road work; and chance contracts for
slashing and grubbing, for which he has
to under-bid the Chinese and Japanese. •.
When the crop fails on the prairies
tho government provides seed for the
next crop if the farmer cannot. But
nothing is done for the British Columbia rancher, though B. C. land costs so
much to clear, it would be dear if we
got it for nothing.
A Langley rancher told me that a
man could make a better living by
teaming than by farming because the
land cost so much that farming would
not pay interest on the capital invested.
So there is even an excuse for the old-
timer and his sons who preferred road
work.
Many people who tried chicken farms
are selling out, becauso foed is getting
dearer and eggs cheaper every day.
One rancher says it is because they
have to compete with Chinese eggs
which be claims are used for cooking in
some hotels and restaurants, though
tbey have been pronounced unfit for
human food. And now we henr that
Japanese eggs have arrived in 'Frisco,
and no doubt will soon bo here also.
A prohibitive tax Bhould be imposed;
because farmers who feed a well-balanced ration cannot compete with Chinese who feed their hens on garbage.
Having then made ranching impossible, except to millionaires and asylum
farms, the government invites the poo-
ple to come back to the land-.
To scrnmble on their hands nnd knees
on nn onion patch in the blazing sun
of midsummer, and thon be undersold
by Ciiinnmen, To keep chickonB in order to fatten tho middlo men.
Ono rancher was offered twenty cents
n piece for eight-woeks-old broilers,
which bo paid fifteen cents apiece for
when they were ono day old. "Tou
must surely think I stole them," ho
said to tho would-be buyer, and he took
them home again in disgust.
When tho government, and the railways, and the real cotnto mon, and the
middle men, and tbo cut-worms, and all
the other parasites havo finished exploiting tho rancher, thero is nothing
left—not even the rancher.
I know of one who went to town to
be a street sweeper, after a struggle of
fifteen yoars. And his wife says if he
ever goes on another ranch he goes
alone.
But tbo men who live on bush
ranches alone aro rounded up periodically by a government agent and tenderly conveyed to tho asylum farm to
end their days.
The asylum farm is the result, and
tbo full fruition of ranching in British
Columbia. I. D. B.
Pettigrew to Speak,
Goo. Pettigrew, of Nanaimo, will address a mass meeting on Sunday evon-
ing next in tho Maple Leaf theatre, under tho auspices of tho Social Scionce
Club. Subject: "Unionism, Old and
Now.''
Building Decreases Again.
The number of building permits issued in Vancouver in January thia
year was 49, valued at $46,525. Last
year tho number waB 112, valued at
$211,517. PAGE TWO
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST..
MOLSONS
BANK
Capital ud Baser...    •    ,8,800,000
8S Branches In Canada
A general banking business trans*
acted
Savings Department
Interest allowed at  bljbsst
Current Bate
BAST END BRANCH
150 Bastings Street East
A. W. Jams, Manager.
The Royal Bank
of Canada
INCORPORATED 11
I 11.1
Paid-up Capital
Raaarva 	
fatal Aaaata • •
WE ALLOW INTEREST ON DEPOSIT* IN OUR
SAVINGS
DEPARTMENT
Ona Dollar will opan
tha account, and your
kualnaaa will ba wai-
coma bo It largo or
amall
TH-tRTEEN BRANCHES IK
VANOOUVER
THE
INCORPORATED
1S5S
BANK OF
TORONTO
Assets.
 160,000,000
..Ml.000.000
Workingmen^
If you can save each week
area a email amount you are invited to open a Savings Account
with The Bank of Toronto.
Small depositors are aa veil
eared for aa large onea. A dollar
will start a Savings Account, and
interest is added to Savings balances half-yearly.     '
«M HASTINOS STREET WEST
Ud
Corner Hastings and Canall Sta.
British Columbia
LAND
Splendid opportunities in llixed
Farming, Dairying, Stock and
Toultry. British Columbia
Grants Pre-emptions ot 100 acrea
to Actual Settlers—
Free
TUBUS—Residence on tho land
for at leaat three years; improvements to the extent of |S per
aore; bringing under cultivation
at leaat Ave acres.
For furtner information apply to
DEPUTY MINISTER OF
LANDS, VICTORIA, B.O.
SEORETARY, BUREAU OF
PBOVINOIAL INFORMATION,
VICTORIA, B.O.
A paid-up union  card  entitles
Bu to all tho privileges ot tho
.bor Temple Club.
lieges of
Try It
THE B. C. FEDERATIONIST
Published  every  Friday morning  by the
B. C. Federationist, Ltd.
R. Para Pettipiece Manager
J. W. Wilkinson Editor
Office: Room 217, Labor Temple
Tel.  Exchange Sey. 7496.
Subscription: $1.50 per year; in Vancouver
City, $2.00; to unions subscribing
in a body, fl.00
REPRE8ENTATVE8
New Weitmlmter.. .W. E. Maiden, Box 984
Prince Kupert W. E. Denning, Box 531
Victoria A. S. Weill, Box 158S
Affiliated with tbe Weitern Labor Preaa
Association.
THE WATERS
UNDER
THE EARTH.
>£
"Unity of Labor; the hope of the world.
FRIDAY FEBRUARY 12, 1915
SOUTH WELLINGTON DISASTER,
whether its drowned victims be
union or non-union, again demo-
stratus in tragically tangible fashion the
ovor-presont peril attendant upon the
calling of tho eoal
miner. Scarce does
the memory of one
disaster pass from
the public mind before another takes
its place. It is yet well under a year,
since the explosion of Hillcrest wiped
out nigh upon two hundred lives at one
deadly whiff, and transferred almost
the entire male population of that little
village from the ranks of the living to
the silent rows of the dead. There was
already gloom enough in South Wellington, So destitute are many of its people, that the government—little though
it relished the necessity—has had to extend to them relief in the shape of
bare necessities to keep body and soul
together. The attitude, too, of the Pacific Coast Coal company, at whose
mine the drowning has taken place, has
not improved matters. It Ib no secret
that most of the miners who went oat
in the recent strike, have been silently
but none the less effectually boycotted
by the management in a systematic
scheme to starve them out of the district. If the result of that has been
that most of the dead are non-union
miners—some of whom probably work
ed as strike breakers during the strike
—then it iB a somewhat ironic examplo
of the truth of the adage that it is an
ill-wind that blows nobody good. But
howsoever it may be, this disaster will
be marked by the same notable features
na others. , Sundry "eminent" persons
will voice ready-made expressions of
sympathy. It will be a good "news
story" for & day or two, and then-
then what! Just the living left with
the dead, and the world will forget.
DOMINION
TRUST AND
GOVERNMENT.
HE DOMINION TRUST smash
has evidently caused the McBride government more genuine
alarm than anything else has
done since it come into oflice. This is
apparent from the very lengthy and
carefully prepared
statement made by
Attorney ■ general
Bowser in the
Houso last week,
and just as carefully reproduced in some of the party papers. Bowser explaining, means Bowser worried, as all will concede who are
familiar with his methods. We have
conned the speech very carefully. We
have alao kept close watch on the criticisms voiced from time to time, since
the day when this ill-fated concern
blew up. The criticisms seem to come
chieflly from two quarters, and to be
animated by two separate motives. .One
of them iB political, and the other iB
financial. The first iB used by the Lib-
orals. For them, the smash was a political godsend, to be used as a substitute
for the mental ineptitude of the "leaders" of the party, and serves as an excellent menns of .distracting atention
from the fact that Liberalism is politically bankrupt for the simple reason
that it has no place in British Columbia
politics. If it had, circumstances would
have forced its divergent elements to
fuse, in spite of the personal antagonisms which now keep them asunder.
•       *       *       *
We have nover been spnring in our
expressions of disgust nt the political
methods of Bowsor and the party of
which ho his tho ronl head and front.
But at that, we prefer him and his aggregation to tho snivelling devices of
the Liberals, who only want to replace
the present apology for a government
with one as bad, or infinitely worse, by
trying to cajole the working class into
voting for their candidates. Of the
two, wo choose a Conservative every
time. He will not concede anything to
the working-class, and makes that plain
enough for any workman to see who
wonts to Bee it, and has sufficient clarity of mind to know a political opponent
when he sees one. But the proverbial
hypocrlBy Mr. Facing-both-wnys attitude of the Liberal "friend of labor,"
confuses working  class   voters  whose
CHOOSE
VOTES
OR BREAD
B. C. MUNICIPAL BONDS
FOR SAFETY, STABILITY,
AND ATTRACTIVE INCOME
Municipal Bonds are exposed to the criticism of every
financial journal, yet it is noticeablo that B, C. Municipal
Bonds, although they yield largo returns, bave nevor been
adversely criticised.
Buy from a responsible company that hns carefully
scrutinized the investment.
We offer selected Bonds in amounts from $100 up to
yield 61-2% to 7% that are unquestioned and the prices
right.
Canadian Financiers Trust Company
HEAD OFFICE 839 HASTINGS ST. W.     VANCOUVER.. B.C.
 Patrick Donnelly- General Mana|ei?
knowledge of Liberal party history, and
whose own memory, is not of the best,
Tho Liberals are the Uriah Hceps of
politics—greasily obsequious, and craftily "umble," until they have got the
voto. Then thoy are consumately cunning tyrants, because their methods are
not so plainly antagonistic that they
can be recognized by those whose political judgment does not always enable
them to see the brick within the bo-
quet.
# •       *       *
And bo, aa far as they go, we are not
deceived into believing they are spilling over with any very real concern
about tho Dominion Trust victims- Political expediency explains their bellow
ings. Then there is the financial
crowd. Their outcry is the squealing
of Shylocks, bewailing the loss of usury
filched from them by a smarter member of their tribe than they ever believed could stand on two feet and bear
all the semblance of the human. They
thought they had a faithful confederate who would bo willing to share the
spoils in return for their ad mini
tion of his talont6. But they found a
Jabez Balfour, n Hooley, a Whittaker
Wright, who played their own game on
them—a game in whlcn one lost his
life, and they their Arabian Nights
dreams of "get rich quick." Now, ii
their savage disappointment, they turn
on Bowser and complain that he did
not devise legal protection against the
disaster which has come upon them.
There is no one in the whole govern
ment that wo find so much satisfaction
in flaying for his attitude towards the
reasonable demands of labor as Bowser.
But in the Dominion Trust affair we confess we have little sympathy for money
sharks who are howling like a pack of
jackals, that the Attorney-General did
not give them what they wanted. The
mistake in the whole business was made
at a time when the "easy money'
tribe was speculation mad. They did
not want any restriction placed upon
them and their methods. They wanted
a free field and all the license they
could get. And if Bowser had put his
foot on them then, they would have
been ready to rend him with all the
ferocity which the unbridled rapacity
of their kind can show when threatened with the prospect of being despoiled
of their prey.
• *       *       *
Under such circumstances they would
have been like tigers. They did not
want to consider the future. In fact
for such as they, there is no future.
Their whole mental purview is that of
the gambler—the ■ present. Evon the
coolest of them, the most cautious and
calculating were deceived by the outward appearances of things and duped
by a cleverer brain than theirs. Unlimited "per cent" bewildered and
dazzled them, while tho foundations of
their ruin were being laid. Their own
rapacity is the cause of their dilemma
and not Bowser. If there is nny element in the whole transaction for which
we feel symathy, it is the comparatively few working men and a sprink
ling of small depositors whose entire
material resources have ^been gobbled
up in the smash. But just why workmen—particularly union men—ahould
invest in such a concern, instead of in
one like the Labor Temple which offer
ed them every safety which a proposition under their own control could gh%
is amazing. We can only assume that
they too, in a milder way, caught the
financial fever. But as far as we can
see, judging the facts from the standpoint of those not materially involved,
it is no more Bowser's fault than
theirs. There is a time to give even
the devil his due. And this seems to
be one of them.
FBIDAY FEBRUARY 12, 1915
proof that unless they attend to this
business for themselves, none of their
"friends" will attend to it for themf
If so we are glad to see them awakening to the fuct that it is their votes,
and not their good looks or other personal attributes, which make them such
an object of interest to aspiring politicians.
THE LUNGS OF
L'SHOREMEN.
A BILL  REQUIRING  all cement
to be handled in dustproof containers has passed  the  senate
committee on Public Health and Quarantine in the Legislature of California,
with a  recommend-
OEMENT AND atiou that' ifc be
passed by the Senate. Representatives of cement
companies testified
that passage of the bill would cost the
cement industry in California $900,000
a year. On the other side arguments
were presented to show that the cement
dust was a serious detriment to the
health and life of men working it, particularly to longshoremen working in
the holds of ships.
This is an important piece of legislation, aad such as has been sought for a
long time past by the longshoremen of
British Columbia. If the recommendation becomes law in Californi, it should
be given added support to the efforts
of local water-front workers.
Are you also, anxious to come face
to face with the enemy? Then buy a
mirror and get acquainted.
How do the miners expect they are
going to get those laws they want for
the improvement of the conditions under which they workt
Do you suppose that when the war is
over your boss will choose you in preference to a German or any other fellow
that will work cheaper?
An "nd." in the Province last Monday read: "Chinese Christian wants
cooking." That is just about what his
native priests at home believe he will
get eventually.
What can be expected of a social
order where the possession of landed
property is regarded as the first and
most essential sign of fitness to take
official part in civic life?
If only some one would invent a new
speech for McBride t Or evon if that
"calm dignity" "courage and confidence" could- be Bet to a new tune he
would not seem so politically barren.
From tho News-Advertiser of February 1st, 1895 (20 years ago): "Mr. H.
A. Ball submitted an elaborate scheme
of a poor farm in the east end park
where the hungry could be < fed and
work found for them." This was part
of tho account of the board of works
meeting held that date. Beyond the
trifling fact that two decades have
gone by since then, conditions are not
any different to-day—except that there
are more destitute people In the city.
This is "progress" at work.
OUR JOB OR YOUR VOTE. That
is the policy  which  Alderman
Hepburn and Eirkpatrick would
adopt with respect to employees of the
city.    They do that bocause they are
afraid   that   aspirants  to  aldermanic
or  mayoral  honors,
who   may   promise
to maintain   or  increase the wages of
city workmen, may receive the Bupport
of those workers at election time. They
are afraid the city employees will be-
como an election machine for such candidates; an election machine financed
from tho city treasury.    And to pro-
vent that, they aro prepared to make
those inon either ronounce their citizenship, or surrender the job which is the
only thing betwoon them and thoirs and
starvation.
§       *       *       *       #
The proposal was defeated, it is true.
But it would be interesting to know
just how many of those aldermen who
voted it down did so becauso they believed it to be the thing for them to do,
and how many did so for politicnl reasons. Hepburn, Kirkpatrick and Mahon ore at leaBt to be admired for audacity in their shamelessly open support of such an impudent proposal. It
Ib good to have such men out in the
opon and to mark the length to which
they would go if they could. As long
as they represent wards in the city
largely mndo up of property ownora,
they never 'need fear to introduce such
proposals in the council. But if the
ward system wero abolished, it would
be the end of men of the mental caliber of Hepburn.
«      «      *      «      *
Thore was a time when to work for
the city waa synonimous with membership in the Orange lodge, or practically
Hepburn and Mb ilk did not make
any objection to that condition of
things, doubtless becauso it was usoful
to them. Why thlB Budden purist
streak in their political minds? Can it
be that tho civic employees have resolved to use their votoB to protect
their jobs, after   receiving   conclusive
The following advertisement appeared in the February 5th issue of the
Province:
"Will drive "jitney" bus, private auto or delivery car for $1-25
per day."
If thtf jitney industry is to be operat
ed by men to whom $1.25 per day, of
heaven only knows how many hours, iB
a wage, then the sooner it is "regulated '' out of existence altogether the better. No man possessed of the driving
skill roquiBite for public safety, and
enough self-respect to maintain that
skill at efficiency point, would or could
work for such a wage. But perhaps
this one figured on the faot that there
are no cash registers on jitneys.
SAFETY FOR LOGGERS.
A Few Suggestions for Precaution ln
Umber Industry.
Probably the moBt effective means of
preventing such logging accidents as
can be prevented is found ih constant
and close supervision by superintendents and foremen in the use of good
tnckle and apparatus, and in careful
and thorough inspection of all structures and equipment, says Safety and
Health. If work, generally, is done
with reasonable regard fur safety of
those near at hand, as well as thoso doing it, if adequate signal systems are
used where specially dangerous work
iB done in close proximity to n number
of men, if tools, tnckle nnd other appliances nro kept in good shape, if
chains nre nnnoalcd nt regular intervals, if explosives are properly handled,
if camps, railroads, rollways, etc., are
carefully constructed, tho majority of
preventable accidents will be reduced
to a minimum. Supervision, for instance, will prevent the use of old
cables as guy lines on gin polos or fastenings for lend blocks, a practice which
lias cnuaed many accidents. It is important to hnve a uniform Bystem of
signalling, ns men on the flame company's work often supplement Bignnls
of their own.
ALL RED LINE, LIMITED
S.S. Selma-S.S. Santa-Maria
Leaven ■lolitimm's wharf 9.80 a.m.. Mon.,
Wort, and Friday, for WIhoii Creek, Seohelt,
Half Monti Bay, Itodroofe's, Welcome Pass,
Harrty Island. Nelson Island, Pender Harbor,
Stillwater, Myrtle Point and Powell Biver;
returning tin- following days.
Johnson's Wharf    .....Seymour 4290
Take that Watch to
APPLEBY
who will tell you what is tho
matter, fust and guarantee all
Repairs.
WILLOW HOSPITAL
FOE
SICK CHILDREN
Conn Broadwty  and  Willow
Phono Fairmont 2165
Mill H.U and   Mill  WutlOT,
Graduate Norm
PHONE SEYMOUB 9086
*«<«#!■%,
- ^*-*f^
Jnr-rfi
XPi-'M
To Every
Worker
Money on deposit is your greatest Asset. You never know When
you may need it.   Sickness and
trouble Is common to all.
Make yourself secure.
4% On Deposits
Credited   Monthly,   subject   to
withdrawal at any time.
References:   Dunn's, Bradstreets
or any reputable Financial Institution in Vancouver.
DOW FRASER TRUST CO.
122 Hastings St. West.
Vaneouvar, and  McKay Station,
Burnaby, B. C.
Cloaa at 1 o'clock Saturday.
SAVING
MONEY
on the purchase of a piano li an important Horn—a real saving when
overy quality that yoa require In a
piano is part of your purchase. In
the
KOHLER & CAMPBELL
PIANO
We offer an instrument of unusual
value—a Piano that Ib favorably
known tho world around, and that is
in active everyday use throughout the
globe. Tou cannot do better than
compare the Kohler h Campbell with
other pianos you know. See tbem
and you'll bo convineed that they are
all tbat we represent them. You'll bo
surprised at our low prices. We alwayB have a large stock of used
[ilanos ranging in prices from $100.00
to $300.00. Gome in and get our
special prices and tonus.
THE
KENT
PIANO CO. Ltd.
SS8 GRANVILLE ST.
CENTER & HANNA, Ltd.
UNDERTAKERS
Refined Service
1048 GEORGIA STREET
One  Block  west of Court House.
Use  of Modern  Chapel and
Funeral' Parlors  free   to  all
Patrons
Telephone Seymour 2426
Phone:  Fairmont 810
Patterson& Chandler
Manufacturers of
MONUMENTS
Vaults, Curbing, Etc.
Offloe and Worka:
Cor. 16th Ave. and Main St.
Branoh Offlce: 40th & Fraaer Avea.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
HARRON BROS.
FUNERAL   DIRECTORS  AND
EMBALMERS
Vancouver—Office and Chapel,
1034 Qranvllle St., Phone Sey. 3486.
North Vancouver — Office and
Chapel, 122—Sixth St. West, Phone
iat.
Pkoat tt). 221
Dij or Nifhl
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
and EMBALMERS
520 Rick.rd. St.       Vaauirsr, B. C.
^gf*1^^
(Inlon
MADE
Beer
•Ale
AND
Porter
tiCQB
Of America JEbp
tarroytor stmoi mummnrtnio __a
Westminster Trust Co.
HEAD OFFICE NEW WESTMINSTER, B.C.
3. 3. JONES, Man. Director. J. A. EENNIE, Sec.-Treas.
ACTS AS ASSIGNEES, LIQUIDATORS AND RECEIVERS
INSURANCE IN ALL ITS BRANCHES
HOUSEB, BUNGALOWS, STORES AND MODERN SUITES FOR RENT
at a Big Reduction
Safety Deposit Boxes for Rent at $2.50 up
Wills Drawn Free of Charge
Deposits Accepted and Interest at Four Fer Cent. Allowed
on Daily Balances.
OUR GREAT
FEBRUARY
Home
Furnishings
SALE
IS ON!
BUY NOW
AND SAVE
EVERYTHING IN
THE  HOME-FURNISHING SECTIONS
IS REDUCED
IN PRICE
Never was a better time
to furnish your home
than now
Hudson's Bay
Company
Granville and Georgia Streets
Phones:   Seymour 8258 and 8259
THE
Hose & Brooks Co., Ltd.
Wines, Liquors and Cigars
504 Main Street, Vancouver, B.C.
PANTAGES
Unequalled Vaudeville  Meane
PANTAOES  VAUDEVILLE
THREE SHOWS DAILY
8.45, 7.20, 9.15    Seaion'i   Prlcea:
Matinee, 15c; Evenings, 15c, 85c
Labor Temple
Building
Phone Sey. 4450
Printers of Tlie Fan.
T. B. CUTHBERTSON & Oo.
Men's Hatters and Outfitters
Three Stores
SYNOPSIS  OF  COAL   MINING   REQU-
■■    , LATIONS
. C?.al n*!"*"! rlthlt of the Dominion,
in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,
the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Ter-
rnorlet and In a portion ,of the Province
of BrltlBh Columbia, may be leaeed for
a term of twenty-one years at an annual
rental of tl an aore. Not more than
2,550 acres will be leased to one applicant.
Applications for lease must bs made by
the applicant In person to the Asent or
Bub-Agent of the district In whloh the
rights applied for are altuated.
In surveyed territory the land must be
described by aections, or legal subdivisions of sections, and in unsurveyed territory the tract applied for shall be
staked by the applicant himself.
Each application must be accompanied
by a fee of 15, which will be refunded If
the rights applied for are not available,
but not otherwise. A royalty ahall be
paid on the merchantable output of the
mine at the rate of Ave cents per ton.
The person operating the mine shall
furnish the Agent with sworn returna
accounting for the full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay the royalty thereon. If the coal mining rlghu
are not being operated, such returns
ahould be furnished at least once a year.
The lease will Include the ooal mining
lights only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available
surface rights may be considered necessary for the working of the mine at the
rate of 110 an aore.
For full Information application should
be made to the Secretary of the Department of the Interior, Ottawa, or to any
Agent or Sub-Agent of Dominion Lands.
W. H. COP.Y,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N. B.—Unauthorised publication of this
advertisement will not be paid for—HIM
VANCOUVER UNIONS
TRADES   AND   LABOR   COUNCIL -
Meets flrst and third Thursdays Bin.
FUUL6 'SKUift H ""Vety Prasldmt
Bartbv S™T"'    vl«"P«"l<l™t;    Geo
MSZSSk fi!nor?i   secretary,   210   Laborl
Temple; files H. Outterldge,  treasurer:
Fred A. Hoover, statistician:  senreanfc
Kn™iiaJ°W   l"X: f J'  °"Wffi*W
Knowles, W. R. Trotter, trustees.
piErD  SB'NT'NO   TRADES    COUN-
™™CiL'"l?Iae,t''  '""'•°nd  Monday  In  tha
'ary, H. H. Neelsndi, P. 0. Box ae!
M^S"SXUr. WCAL No. 676 -OF.
flrat S;-,£Sm,81" ^bor Temple Meet;
F"e __nl' TJ1 i"?""1' Preside™
w (tiSafi' flnanolal seoretary, Oeo!
W. Curnook, Room tog, Labor Tempi*
BRICKLAYERS' AND MASONS'   NO.  1
of Amerlea, Vanoouver Lodge No iff"
secretary, A. Fraeer, *il51 H.SS .,"'■•.'""
W°tIn'l™Wv'r?8'1. A1,u    WAITRESSES
»cn»K,-a,&4l
_______&_ZSti&Si$
J;.  »B*?Kti "•Hnror, W. T. Taylor    l£
cal No. 217 mees   (nt   ,nj   |!C3   «„
day of eaeh month, aid U— 2817 JSSm
M and third TaShJ __$ __^m"\
1LEOTRIOAL WoHKEKH, LOCAL NO  Sis'
brJ 2?'    . ?• mi.  President, Sam   Cswk.r
557  Templetoa Drive:  rooortlnF.ooJXE'
BE^TRpL-#pttKEnrTSCAirNO*
HODOARRIERS. BUILDiNO"AN*D*OMlHo»
MAOHINISTS.  NO.  182—MEETS BKOoSB
and fourth Frldy. at 8 p"_ "pSSSSJ?
ni™?'   T.°w,w,:. »«»rdlng   licnteS    I
_^u_______iKB._>7„;r:
S£BWWent, f. EngllJhr.,eretiryB°H^
OrKRATIYE    PLASTERERS? JStfrvT
TIONAL ASSOCIATION. ™|i
K .'!. I"".*. ",m **"1 "■•rd Wedneiday
In   the  month In room 501. Labor TVmnl.
«;.&'"' M"0 ™f»>jr*thlrd avenuiTeaJT
nnanclal secretary, D. Scott ett pi.hVNii
■treet: trearmrer, L. Ty.on Richards
PAINTERS'..   PAPWKHANORRS'.   AND
Decorators',   LoM|  iSj_m;V,,'   *""
5*3?' 7'30.pro' President H7aS3K
flnanclal eecretary, j, Froekletnn tn?i
g»„/'rest:   recordlng7So"nnrv.,0i'
STBRBOTYPERS' AND ELECTROTYP:
ers' Un on. No. ts, of Vancouver .nj
Vlctorla-Meeta second Wedneidav af
each month, 4 p. m„ Labor Temnle S*.l
dent. Chat Bayley:TepordlnTse'orJSS"
A. Birnle. co. "News AdverHae*_   I"T'
""IiStISS li'110""*' RAILWAY EM-
PLOYEES, Pioneer Blvliion, No. 101—
S;tS.".J'*»<'J»TMnJ'1". *m ""- *« Wednso-
mv.-m.i*' '"><>**« > P* "■■ Preeldent. Joe,
Hobble: recording eecretary. Jas. E. Orlfla;
flnanclal secretary and buelnua agent, Fred.
A. Hoover, 2400 Olark Drive.
STEAM  ENGINEERS,   INTERNATION-
al Local 897—Meets every Wednesday
ii.1 Ihjy0"1 2-S4'„1'ab?r Temple. Flnan-
clal aeeretary, E. Prendereae^room 216.
TAILORS'   INDUSTRIAL   UNION   (IN-
k„ijlc.rnVtena",- L9ca' No- 178-Meetlngs
held flrst Tuesday ln each month, 8 p. m.
President, Miss H. Qutterltlge; recording
secretory, O. McDonald, Box 508; flnan"
clal sec., K. Paterson, P. O. Box 503.
THEATRICAL STAGE EMPLbYEESTXa
OAL No. 118—Meete second Sunder of
each month st room 204, Labor Temple.
President, H. Speare: recording secretary,
Oeo. w. Allln, P. O. Boi 711, Vanoouver.
TYPOGRAPHICAL    UNION,    NO.    116—
Meete last Sunday or eaeh month at I
S' "!' Jr"1*1;,*"! R* t- Pettlpleet* vlce-pnol-
dent, W, 8. afetsser: seeretarytreaiarer. I.
PROVINCIAL UNIONS
B.    C.    FEDERATION  OP LABOR—MeeU
in annual convontton in January. Exec*
utivo officers, 1915-lfl; President, A. Watchman; vice-presidents—V(.ncouvor, W. F.
Dunn, J. H. McVety; Victoria, B. Simmons;
Now Westminster, W. Vates; Prince Rupert,
W. B. Denning; Revelstoke, J. Lyon; District 28, U. M. W. of A. (Vancouver island),
8. Guthrie District 18, U. M. W. of A.
(Crow's Nost Valley), A. J. Carter; secretary-treasurer, A. 8. Wells, P. O. box Ifi
Victoria, B. O.
NEW WESTMINSTER.  B.C.
NBW WESTMINSTER TRADES AND LABOR Council—iMeots ever/ tecond ud
fourth Wedneaday at 8 p. ro. In Labor faalL
President, H. Knudson; flnanolal aeoreUry,
R. A, Stoney; general   aeeretary,   W.    ft.
___jne*f,   (tou
Maiden.   P. O. Box 034.
vited to attend.
The publto la In*
PLUMBERS AND STEAHFITTERS' LOOAL
No, 495—Meeta every aecond and fourth
Friday of month In Latwr hall, 7:80 p. m.
President, D. Webster: eecrotary, A. McLaren. P. O. Box 056, New Weitmlnater.
B. O.
VICTORIA, B. C.
VICTORIA TRADES AND LABOR OOUNOIL—Meeta flrat and third Wedneaday,
Labor hall, 781 Johnaton atreet, at 8 p, m.
Preeldent A. S. Wells: aeeretary, Thoa, F.
Mathlson, Box 803, Victoria, B. O,
KIMBERLET MINERS' UNION, NO. 100,
Western Federation of Minora—Meata
Sunday evenings ln Union hall, Preaident.
Alex. Wilson; sooretary-treasurer, J. W.
Stewart, Klmberley, B, 0.
ORGANIZED  LABOR  COMPANIES.
LABOR TEMPLE COMPANY, LIMITED—
Directors: Jas, Brown, preaident; R. P.
Pettipioce, vice-president; Edward Lothian,
Jamea Campbell, J. W. Wllklnaon, Geo. Wllby, W. J. Nagle, F. Blumberg, H. H. Free.
Managing director and eecretary-treasurer, j.
H. MoVety, room 211, Labor Temple,
B. 0. FEDERATIONIST, LIMITED—MeeU
at call of president, Labor Temple, Vanoouver, B. C. Directors: James Campbell,
president; J. H. McVety, seorotarytrcaRurer;
A. Watchman, A. S. Wells. R. Parm. Petti*
piece, manager, 217 Labor Templo. Tele*
phone:    Seymour 7405, ■M^BBHHBM
BIDAT FBBETTABT 12, 1915
BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
PAGE THREE
DAVID 8PENCER, LTD.
DAVID SPENCER, LTD
Have You Read These ?
Nelson's Classics
Pocket Size, Clear Type, Cloth Bound;
15c. Volume
Scott:
Ivanhoe.
The Bride of Lamermoor,
Keniiworth.
Bob Roy.
Quentio Durward.
Waverley.
Guy Mannorlng.
Dickens:
David Copperfleld (2 vole.).
Child's History of England.
The Old Curiosity Shop.
Martin Chuwlewit  (2  vols.),
Nicholas Niokleby  (2 vols.).
Pickwick Papera (2 vols.).
Ainswortb:
Windsor Castle.
Okl St. Paul'a
Jack Sheppard.
Black more; ■ -
Lorna Doone (2 vols.)
Hugo:
Lea Hiserablea (2 vole.).
Dunun:
Count of Monte Crlato (2 vols.).
Three Muaketeers.
Twenty Years After,
Tolttol:
Anna Karenir.
Other Titles:
Adam Bode,
Mill on the Floss.
Woman ta WUl*.
Tales of thu   nest.
Andersen's Tales,
Westward Ho.
Tales from Shakespeare.
Lays of Ancient Rome,
Last Days of Pompeii.
Vicar of Wakefield.    -
David Spencer Limited
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
BraTd's
Best
Coffee
„,^l HHAiua'0..,
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
Did You Get Yours
This Morning?
BRAID'S
BEST
COFFEE
Thomson
Stationery Co., Ltd.
M. 3. BASKED*., PlM.
Stationery Printing and
Bookbinding
326 Hastings Stnet West
VANCOUVER, B. 0.
We are making a Clearance of
all present stock of Office Furniture.
Oome  early  and  make yonr
Office Furniture
Less Than Wholesale
Hastings Furniture Co., Ltd., 41 Hastings St. West
TEMPTING PRICES FOR
High-Class DENTAL Operations
Bridge-work per tooth
Gold crowns    -    -
Porcelain crowns    -
Perfect fitting plates
Amalgam fillings     -
Enamel fillings
- -      -          $6.00
each  $5.00
- -     -   "     15.00
- -     -  "   $10.00
- -     -  "$1.00 up
- -      -   **,    $2.00
DISEASES OF THE GUM5. Includl
ii Porrhea. TREATED.     PAINLESS
Dr. BRETT ANDERSON
j Phone Seymour SS31
Offlce:  101 Bank of Ottawa Building
Jt&Sl
WORKERS UNION
UNIOI^TAMP
Faciory
Named Shoes are frequently made in Non-
Union Factories—Do Not Buy Any Shoe
no matter what lta name, unless lt bears a
plain and readable Impression or this stamp.
All shoes without the Union Stamp are
always Non-Union.
BOOT A SHOE WORKERS' UNION
246 Bummer Street, Boston, Mase.
J. F. Tobin, Pres.   C. L. Blaine, Sec.-Treas.
UNION «*■ OFFICES
This Official List Of Allied Printing Offices
OAN SUPPLY TOU WITH THB ALLIED PBINTINO TBADBS UNION LABEL
Phone No.
BAQLBY Ss 80NS, 151 Hmtlngj Street Seymour 810
ULUL'IIHKKOKH, F. li., 1119 Broadway Eaat Fairmont 203
MUNI) & I'KKUY. 029 Pender Street, Weat  Seymour 2578
BURRARD  PUBLISHING  CO.,  711  Seymour Street    Seymour  8580
CHINOOK  PRINTING CO., 4801 Main Street  Fairmont 1874
CL.ARKB & STUART,  820 Soymour Street 8eymour 8
COMMERCIAL PRINTING Si PUBLISHING CO., ..World Building, Soy. 4638-87
COWAN & BROOKHOUSE, Labor Templo Building Seymour 4400
EVANS & HASTINGS, Aria and Crafta Bldg., Seymour St Soymour 5050
GRANOVIEW PRINTERS, 1443 Park Drive Highland 741L
JEWELL, M. L., 841 Pender St.. Seymour 1441
KERSHAW, 3. A., 539 Howe St.>. Soymour 8874
LATTA, R P.. 883 Gore Ave Seymour 1039
MAIN PRINTING CO., 3851 Main St Fairmont 1088
McI.EAN 4 SHOEMAKER, North Vanoouver N. Van. 53
MOORE PRINTING CO., Cer. Granville and Robaon Sta Seymour 4543
NEWS-ADVERTISER. 301 Pender St Seymour 1028-41
NORTH SHORE PRESS, North Vancouver N Van. 80
PACIFIC PRINTERS, World Building Soymour 9592
ROEDDE. J. A., 616 Homer St Soymour 264
SCANDINAVIAN PUBLISHING CO., 317 Cambie 8t Seymour 0509
TERMINAL CITY PRESS, 2408 Weatmlnater Rend Fairmont 1140
THOMSON STATIONERY. 825 Haatinga W Seymour 3520
TIMMS. A. II., 230 Fourteenth Ave. E Fairmont 62IR
WESTERN PRESS. 323 Cordova W Seymour 7506
WESTERN SPECIALTY CO., 331 Dunamulr SI Seymour 8526
WHITE & BINDON, 157-159 Cordova St Seymour 1215
Write "Union Label" on Your Oopy when You Send It to thi Printer
If You Have a Bad Tooth or a Mouth Full of Them
COME AND SEE ME
At once. Don't be afraid. I will examine your mouth and tell you Just
1 what you need* This service will cost you nothing and will obligate you
j ln no way.
"YOU SUFFER NO PAIN"  GUARANTEE
I HEREBY GUARANTEE that all dental work performed by me -will be
absolutely painless, both during and following tho sitting. If tho slightest
twinge of pain Ib experienced at any timo an the result of my opertlons I
will refund all money paid me.       , , .
I FURTHER GUARANTEE that all crown or bridge work or fllling will
remain In first class condition for a period of TEN YEARB. If any of my
work bocomes defective during that period I will replace it ABSOLUTELY
FREE.
Dr. HALL
■ THE MODERN DENTIST
STANDARD BANK BUILDING
 ROOM 212	
PHONE SEY. 4679
OPEN EVENINOS, 7 to S
I PATRONISE THE "FED" ADVERTISERS
26% OFF ALL TRUSSES THIS MONTH
BED STAB DRUG STOBE.
|53 Cordova Street West Vancouver, B. O.
Recent Report Shows Gains
Both Industrially and
Politically.
Railwaymen and Laborers
Press for Industrial
Unionism
[Special Australian Correspondence.]
SYDNEY, N. S. W., Jan. 20,—A
completed review of the labor
movement of Australia, to the end of
1913, and just published, shows that
since 1912,> when the last report was
published in these columns, the number
of unions has increased from 621. to 710
in 1913. At the same time the membership has increased from 433.224 to 497,-
925.
Men and Women Members.
Of the 497,925 unionists, 477,721 are
males and 20,204 females. The percentage of male unionists on the estimated
total number of male employees 20 years
of age and over is 49.2, which means
that just on half of the workers of the
whole Commonwealth of Australia are
registered unionists. The percentage
of female workers in unions is, however, only 9.3, and it would seem that
there .is much work to be done in the
enrolling of female unionists. The tendency towards closer unionism is shown
in the fact, that nine unions have over
10,000 members each. The total membership of theBe nine unions is 176,188
or 35.4 per cent, of the total number of
unionists. '
Labor in Politics,
When we look at the political side, of
the question we find that the unionist
loadstone haB many more adherents
than disclosed by the trades union returns. At the last federal election no
less than 1,052, 614 votes were cast for
the political party of the trades union
movement in Australia, while but 941,-
140 votes were cast for the conservative
party. This means that 111,474 more
votes were cnBt for the labor party
than for the conservatives. This will
give you some idea of labor's magnificent win at the last federal elections.
As the iaBue was "preference or no preference to unionists" wo may safely
say that Australia has given an eloquent answer in favor of the trades union movement.
Industrial Unionism Growing.
At the annual conference of the Bail-
way Workers and General Laborers' association, comprising over 56,000 unionists, the matter of amalgamation with
the huge Australian Workers' union,
came on for discussion. The conference
decided to affirm the desirability. of
amalgamation with the A. W. U, and to
appoint a committee to meet the executive of that organization and formulate a scheme of coming together, and
at the same time conserve the interests
of the new members. The conference
finished on January 13th. It is the
largest and most representative gathering of the union yet held.
The matter of amalgamation with the
A. W. U. now depends on the general
conforenco of nil unions, which tnkos
place nest Easter. As this is the most
important conference of unionists in
Australia, I shall be present as a representative of The B. C. Federationist and
exchange fraternal greetings.
Unemployment Slightly Less.
The enquiries sent out by me to various Stntes of Australia, concerning the
labor outlook in Australia, bring replies
from all quarters that inattera are commencing, despite the war, to look on
the bright sido. This ia due in the
main to the federal government'a (labor) good fortune in securing £18,000,-
000 from the imperial government for
loan works, nnd also by tho increase of
the note circulation, the act of the federal lnbor party. Besides securing £18,-
000,000 for the federal parliament, the
federal government ndvancod a like
amount out of tho note account to the
vnrious states, and this has all been put
into government public works, which ia
beginning to make things look up down
south.
Conditions ln N. S. Wales.
In New South Wnles we have it on
tho authority of the government labor
bureau that matters are in a fairly
healthy state. That department is to be
congratulated on the way it haB
handled the unemployment quostion. As
an instance, I might mention that out
of a total of 5,600 unemployed at Broken Hill, the groat silver mines, but 900
are out of work now, and the government hopes to place those men shortly.
There is still a fair amount of unemployment on tho water fronts—I aup-
pose aB bad ns at any timo of the war.
In the building industry matters generally nre better, nnd nlthough tho government reports say that only 4 per
cent, nre out of work, I have it from
Mr. McEwen, lato of Vancouvor, B. C-,
who is connected with the carpenters
hero nt present, that thero is about 8 to
10 per cont, out of work in that body.
Still it could bo worse. Ironworkers
and allied trades nro busy, mainly on
account of government works at tho
dockyardB. W. F. A.
BRITISH FOOD DEARER.
War Increases Price of Working-class
Living.
Commenting on the sharp manner in
which tho wur has nffectcd the household budget of the laboring man, the
Daily Citizen makes tho following comparison between the average English
workmon'a food expenditures on July
1st and January lBt. Tho figures are
for a family ot Ave:
July 1.
Meat, 7% lbs $1.01
Milk 87
Bread 41
Flour 06
Tea, % lb 25
Sugar, 7 lbs 34
BiBeuits, % lb 07
Rice  : 00
Golden syrup 13
Prepared oats 11
Cheese, 1 lb 15
Eggs, Va doz., storage 12
Butter, lb 31
Potatoes, 12 lbs 18
Cabbage 08
Fruit 48
Coal, 250 lbs 04
Matches 03
REN NIES SEEDS
OUR 1915 CATALOGUE IS NOW READY
Write, Call ot Phone for a Oopy TO-DAY
Wm. RENNIE CO., Ltd
1138 Homer St. Phone Sey 8550. Vancouver, B. C.
Also at Toronto, Montreal,anil Winnipeg
Jan. 1,
$1.87
.87
.48
.08
.27
.51
.08
.08
.15
.12
.18
.18
.36
.18
.08
.48
.77
.04
Totals J5.00      $0.78
WHICH DO YOU WANT?
SELL=
=0R=
Ton would not knowingly throw away a dollar. Ton would not
knowingly neglect an opportunity to savo a dollar.
IT wlU- he true economy, to Tray or sell at onr (tore anything ln the
way of Furniture, China, Crockery,, Hardware, Stows, Ranges, and every
description of household goods,   NEW ADD SECOND-HAND.
Tim*    T-TT-nivr-r-ra 206 GRANVILLE
WM. TURNER g-jBrW
Boy's Department
SUITS THAT WEAR
Hide wits doable a»ti end double elbow. Mum tre "bum te w," Honeit
tutorials ud bonelt workmanship ue combined ta proline, mil? durable and
long lind suite .
They came ln D.B. ud Norfolk stylos, >t price, from
$3.50 Up
CLUBB & STEWART, Limited
309*316 HA8II1I08 BTBEET WEST Phon, Seymour 70*
VANCOUVER
City Market
MAIN STREET
*
APPLES—Large variety of winter stock at $1.00
and $1.25 per Box.
POTATOES—At Market Prices; these are the lowest prices in Vancouver. Stock always fresh
and in best condition.
NEW LAID EGGS—Are now arriving in larger
quantities. You can always rely on Eggs which
are sold as new laid at the City Market.
VEGETABLES—All kinds at most reasonable
prices; in quantities to suit all buyers.
AUCTION SALES are held every Tuesday and
Friday at 10 A. M. If you really wish to reduce
the cost of living, you can do so by attending the
AUCTION SALES.
VANCOUVER
City Market
MAIN STREET
25% DISCOUNT
Why patronize trusts when you can
save 25% discount on all your Laundry?
The B. C. Clean Towel Supply, Limited, and
the
Home Laundry Company, Ltd.
are the only people allowing this discount.
Look over your Laundry Bills and you will
be surprised to see what you have paid excess to the other Laundries.
Telephone Highland 1473
Telephone Seymour 156
Telephone Seymour 5060
Our wagons call all over Vancouver.
B.C. Clean Towel Supply Co.
Limited
eneweo apeciALLt rot
Itoret ar.MHV roaoe
tmrt'SorruNa       "" '"" mrl""" ' "'"
VANCOUVER   B C
When You Want a
First-Class Beer
-ONE THAI TOU CAN'T BEAT AT ANT PRICE, IN ANT
OOUNTBT, OET BEEB WITH THIS LABEL ON. PINTS, SIX
FOB HTTY CENTS. "~
BREWED AND BOTTLED IN VANCOUVEB BT
VANCOUVER BREWERIES, Ltd.
Queen's Own Dairy Milk
Aa this is our introduction to you through the eolumni ot your oft-
cial organ, we take the opportunity to aay a word about ourselves—a
word about the things that most intimately concern the principals
on which our success is founded—a word, in short, from behind tho
scenes. And what is perhaps most important, a word as to our standing and the quality of milk delivered to patrons.
We believe in the fair play business system that haa advanced
us in the face of unprecedented hard times.' We are willing for you
to judge us by what we are doing, and if tbe verdict is favorable
phone in a trial order.
The queen's Own Dairy has never put a dollar of Vancouver's
good money into imported milk. Our entire supply comes direct
from Fraser Valley Dairy Farms.
The Queen's Own Dairy employs no Oriental labor.
The quean's Own Dally employees are paid on an average
, $82.60 per month.   Married men in addition have a quart of milk
delivered daily at their homes free and on Sundays a bottle of cream
goes with it.
The Queen's Own Daily was established tour years ago. With
two exceptions our men have been with us from oae to three years.
We never take advantage of labor conditions to cut a good man's
pay.
The Queen's Own Dairy Approvad MUk (bottled at the farm).—
A special milk for babies is sold at a special price, 1214c. per quart.
Your family doctor can advise about this milk
The Queen's Own Dairy Pasteurised Milk, tested weekly at the
laboratory of the Medical Association Milk Commission, established
a purity record for Vancouver during the past year.   The signed   *
official reports are here—open to any one.   The milk is delivered at
10c. per quart.
The queen's Own Dairy wagons also carry table cream, whipping cream and buttermilk. The best of everything and a most ell-
cent service.   An order will bo very much appreciated.
TELEPHONE;   BATVTEW 1387.
THE QUEEN'S OWN DAIRY
TOU HAVE A CHANCE TO OBT
TOOB DOLLARS BACK
When you buy
British  Columbia Made
Goods
Every dollar spent in Easteran or
Foreign Ooods is gone forever
Leckie Boots are Made in
Vancouver
Insist on gating thtm, and yon gat
honest value for yonr money ovary
time.
J. LECKIE CO., Limited
Vancouver
MOUNT PLEASANT HEADQUARTERS
For Hardware, Stoves and Banges—
Everything for the Kitohen
W. R. OWEN & MORRISON
Phone Fair. 447 2337 Main Street
WOOD
BEST 16-inch Fir Oordwood at $3.00 per load. This is an
exceptionally good lot, and jut what yoa need this oold
weather.
Phone Seymour 1936 for trial load.
JINGLE POT COAL
will save you money. Quality guaranteed.
This is the only UNION HONED Ooal in British Columbia.
McNEILL, WELCH & WILSON, Limited
formerly
VANCOUVEB OOAL COMPANY
Phone Seymour 6408
HfiTFT RPRITMT Absolutely Fireproof.   Local and Long-Dlstance
n\tICiii niibam   phme i„'Every Room.Ca<e In Connection. Rates
11.00 per day up.    Attractive Rotes to Permanent Quests.
Ootttaibam A Butty, Proprietors ** Hsitlap street Bast
PENDER HOTEL
012 PBKDEB STBBBT WEST
Keir, Modern, HrtOlSM
Stum Heated, Electric Lighted
Telephone Stymour 1SH
Rates I1.S0 per Dey and Dp
What does the B.
C. Electric mean
to the "Dinner
Pail" of British
Columbia?
DURING THE LAST THREE
YEARS THE COMPANY HAS
PAID OUT AS WAGES TO EMPLOYEES WORKING DIRECTLY FOR THE COMPANY A TOTAL OF
$13,200,000
In addition to this total,
other large sums have been paid
by the Company for work done
by private contract, the greater
part of Which was distributed in
the form of wages.
IS NOT SUCH A DISTRIBU-
TION OF WAGES WORTHY
OF YOUR ATTENTION AND
CONSIDERATION?
A.
i0H__w
m PAGE FOUR
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY FEBBUABY 18,11
Support HOME Industries
DEMAND
THE
LECKIE
SHOE
tmataammmaimmmmmmmaam
MADE IN
VANCOUVER
The Shoe that put Vancouver on the map in Europe. Thousands of out-of-door workmen in B. C.
can attest to their Wearing Value. Thousands of
fathers and mothers in B. C. have learned that there
is really no other Shoe so suited and durable for
school children as LECKIE'S. Ask your Shoe
Dealer for Leckie's.
J. LECKIE & Co., Limited
200 CAMBIE STREET
Phone Seymour 8920
WOODBURN
BELL
-9LVX.
Vancouver   -  B. C.
•>«!
••»»
Ask for   'DUX    ""md
Cigarettes and Tobacco
Something New and
Something GOOD
Cigarettes  10c. Packages
Tobacco - 2ozs. for 25c.
MADEINB.C.
Rex Tobacco 10c. is Fine
COOL and CLEAN
An Egg
Substitute
For All Baking Purposes
Use it Instead of
Expensive Eggs.
PUBE AND WHOLESOME
50c. Tina contain tlie equivalent
of 6 doi. eggs.
SSe. Tins contain tha equivalent
of 2</a doi. egga.
SPECIAL LABOB TUTS FOB
BAKBB'S USE
See our demonstration in the
Grocery Department of
David Spencer, Limited
Crown Broom Works, Ltd.
332 FRONT STBBBT EAST
VANCOUVER, B. C.
PBONE:   rAIBMONT 1148
Manufacturers of tbe
Mother Goose, Duchess, King, Janitor Special,
Peerless, Princess, Province, Ladies' Carpet Perfection, Favorite, Ceiling
Broom, Warehouse Brooms
SUPPORT HOME INDUSTRY
Mr. Union Man
Are you eating Union-made Bread, are you
helping to maintain, the Union Standard of living by
using goods produced by Union Labor?
BREWER'S X-L BREAD
has the Union Label on every loaf, and in quality
and flavor it is unexcelled.
Phone Highland 573 and we will call at your
house.
BREWER'S XL BAKERY,
Corner 4th Avenue and Commercial Street.
KEEP YOUR MONEY IN CIRCULATION AT HOME
THE MEMBERS OP ORGANIZED LABOR IN GREATER VANCOUVEB ARE SPENDING $20,000 PER DAY. FEDERATIONIST ADVERTISERS ARE ENTITLED TO THE PATRONAGE OP TRADE UNIONISTS AND
THEIR FRIENDS AND SYMPATHIZERS.   LOOK OVER THE LIST ON THIS PAGE:
COMMONWEALTH VICTORIA TRADES GIVE B.C. PRODUCTS
EMPLOYEE ACT
OF
Compensation for Seamen
Out of Australian
Seaports
Completion of Summarized
Series Published fn
Federationist
Carpenters Re-affiliate with
Council—Elect Watchman as Delegate
Patronize "FED." Advertisers
[In view of the prominence which
will he given to the subject of workmen's compensation in British Columbia, during the next year, by reason of
the new act promised by Attorney-General Bowser, The Federationist has published summaries of compensation acts
qf the various Australian states which
are supposed to have bad considerable
experience of legislation of this kind.
The two following summarised .acts
complete the series.]
COMMONWEALTH   GOVERNMENT
(EMPLOYEES)
The Commonwealth Government (Employees) Workmen'a Compensation
Act, 1912, applies to workers, manual,
clerical, or otherwise.
Workers expressly excluded.—Persons not employed in manual labor earning over £500 a year, outworkers, naval and military forces on active service.
Compensation in case of death
where there are dependents—Three
years' earnings or £200, whichever iB
larger. Maximum, £500. If no dependents—maximum amount for medical attendance and funeral expenses; £30.
Compensation in case of. incapacity.—
Weekly payment—half average weekly
earnings. Maximum, £2. (No maximum total liability.)
Compensation for workers under 21
years of age earning less than 20s.
weekly. Weekly payment — average
weekly earnings; maximum 10s.
Period after which lump sum can be
substituted for weekly payment.—Six
months-
Tribunal, if chum not settled by
agreement. — Arbitrator or county
court.
Regulation for injured worker leaving tbe commonwealth.—If permanent
incapacity likely, quarterly substituted
for weekly payments.
Commonwealth Seamen's Compensation Act.
The Commonwealth Seamen's Compensation act, 1911, in the definition of
employers, includes "any body of persons corporate or unincoporate."
-Nature of work to which the act applies.—Navigation or working of ships
registered in Australia. Seamen shipped
under articles of agreement in Australia
while under Commonwealth law are included.
Workers expressly excluded. — Sea*
mon on vessels ordinarily propelled by
oars and those in naval and military
service.
Employer not liable to pay compensation for.—First week of injury if worked disabled for less than two weeks.
In the event of employer's insolvency,
the full amount of compensation must
be admitted as a first charge on assets.
Compensation in case, of death
(where dependents left).—Three years'
earnings or £200, whichever is larger.
Maximum, £500.
Compensation in case of incapacity.—
Weekly payment—half average weeklv
earnings. Maximum 30s. (No maximum total liability.)
Compensation to workors over 60
years of age whe have entered into an
agreement.—If seamen entitled to Commonwealth old age pension, amount of
compensation and pension together not
to exceed 20s. weekly.
Compensation for workers under 21
years of age earning less than 20s.
weekly. — Weekly payment — average
weokly earnings.   Maximum 10s.
Period after which lump sum can be
substituted for weekly payment.    Six
months-
Tribunal, if claim   not   settled   by
agreement.—Arbitrator or county court.
Rogultion for injured worker leaving
the Commonwealth.—If permanent incapacity likely, quarterly substituted
for weekly payments.
TO DISPLACE BOGS.
Vancouver Firm Solving the Bakers',
Restauranters, Housewives' Task.
Equal-Egg is an article which Ib employed instead of eggs in the baking of
cakes, puddings, muffins and other
pastry, and contain the same nourishing
properties as hen eggs. Tet it is not
made of dessicuted eggs, nor are any
used in its manufacture. It is absolutely guaranteed under the pure food
laws of Canada and the United States,
while it is used and endorsed by hospitals, sanitariums, and thousands of Canadian homos in which purity is the first
cpnsideration. An important factor
usually in household economics, and
especially in these days, is the question
of cost, By using a 60-cent can of
Equal-Egg instead of eggs at 50 cents
per dozen tho cost is brought down to
tho equivalent of eggs at eight cents
per dozen, a saving, therefore, of 42
cents per dozen. Those in the bakery
or restaurant business can save money
by UBing tbo largo bokors' tin of Equnl-
Egg. Telephone Seymour 3742 and the
union demonstrator will call.
Officers Elected for Ensuing;
Term—Federation Delegates Report
VICTORIA, Feb. 3.—The Capital
City Trades and Labor council met in
regular session this evening. The following officers and committeess were
elected:
President—Del. Wells.
Vice-president—Del. Turner.
Recording Secretary—Del. Haldridge
(unanjmosly.)
Secretary-treasurer—Two names were
submittod, Del. Day, ex-secretary-treas*
urer, and Del. Philbrooke. Del D^ay
scored 19 and Del. Philbrooke 7n
Statistician—Del. Sivertz.
Sergeant-at-arms—Del. Beckett.
Finance committee — Delegates
Scholes,' Sivertz, McMurtey, Turner,
Phillbrooke.
Executive committee — Delegates
Garbell, Singer, Scholes, Day.
Legislature — Delegates Philbrooke,
Amer, Irvine, Miller.
Press committee — Delegates Hold-
ridge, Milter, Nunn, Singor, Norry.
Organization — Delegates Day,
Phillbroke, Marsh, Hamer, Becket.
Hall committee — Delegates Garbett,
Phillbrooke, McMurtrie.
Credentials were received from the
Brotherhood of Carpenters for Delegate
Watchman, this local having decided to
come back to the council and help forward its good work. Also from the
Bookbinders, Steam Engineers and
Barbers.
The secretary was recently instructed
to write to the Trades and Labor congress of Canada regarding a letter received from Miss L. St. John Wile-
man relating to ft proposed labor bureau. The secretary of the TradeB and
Labor congress, in his reply, stated
thnt from information received, these
bureaux were not satisfactory
Britain, nnd suggested that the Trades
and Labor council do not endorse the
action requested by Miss L, St. John
Wilemnn, ns congress had not done so.
The secretary was instructed to write
Miss L. St. John Wilemnn "that from
information received her letter was
very misleading, and wns not aB she
stated, bucked up by tho Tradea and
Labor congress-
B. C. Federation of Lahor.
Delegate Wells gave a very lucid report of the convention, dealing with
each question fully and stating that he
wished to emphasize the general feeling that it waa one of the best ever
held in this province; the number of
delegates were small, but more business
was done and he believed greater results would acrue,
Delegate Day reported that he had
passed through a pleasant experience
at tho convention. Thia was his flrat
appearance as a delegate. He had read
the previous reports of past conventions, and instead of the passing of
compliments and flowery language,
mixed with long arguments, the one at
Nanaimo had immediately got down to
real business. If the executive carried
out and fought for the wishes of the
delegates waB- small, but more business
ing class, as a whole, would benefit and
he was satisfied that the B. C. Federation of Labor should have the support
of all locals.
Stage Employees.
The Stage Employees' union having
had trouble with one of the managers
of the local theatres, the Trades and
Some Nimrod.
"Do any shooting during   tho   season?"
"Yes; shot a brace of ducks."
"Woro they wildT"
"No; but tho farmer was."
I PREFERENCE
Widespread Unemployment
Would also Be Somewhat Lessened.
To Put This City on Payroll
Basis Workers Must Do
It Themselves.
What Vancouver needs is an industrial payroll. The quickest way to secure payrolls for Vancouver is for the
workers themselves to purchase the pro-
ilftct of British Columbia manufacturers- The question of whether such products are produced by union labor or
not ia also a matter that must be left
to the workers themselvos. In this respect B. C. manufacturers will at least
not bo worse offenders than those of the
oast. With unemployment on every
hand some united effort must be made
to create a demand for B. C. products.
If tftris is done, and it should be, local
industrial conditions would soon be
somewhat ameliorated. Quite true, the
mtUnion and1 cnnnerics are. not doing
their full duty towards the citizen
workers of this province in the way
of employment, inasmuch as Orientals
are. given the preference; but this
should not be any excuse for the workers being likewise blind to their own
interests. Demand B. C. products. Demand the union label, if you will, but
demand B. C. goods, as against the
eastern aweat-shop variety. Consult
the advertisers on thia page of The
Federationiat.
Labor council wero called in to deal
with tho dispute,
A committee had been dealing with
the question, and soveral meetings had
been held, but it had been found necessary to put those houses on the unfair list. President Wells reported that
he had seen the manager and lie hnd
agreed to leave it in the hands of the
Trades and Labor council, and would
abide by its decision.
Organizer Clarke of the Stage Em
ployees and Oporators union, having
been given" permission of tho floor,
dealt fully with the question, stating
that there could be no arbitration if it
clashed with their international laws-
The mau in question had been dealt
with by the local.
Tho question was fully debated by
the delegates, after which the following motion was moved Delegate Sivertz: "That the matter bo left in the
hands of the committee appointed.'
An amendment was proposed by the
LongBhoremen's delegate: "That 48
hours' notice be given by the secretary
to the manager to carry out the wishes
of the operators, after which the
houses would be unfair."
An amendment to the amendment
was proposed by Delegate Day: "That
a committee of throe be appointed—one'
appointed by the council, one appointed by the operators from the council,
and the two appoint -their chairman;
Organizer Clarke to be, at the meeting."
The amendment was carried.
The various trades reported and all
complained of the majority of their
members being out of employment.
Matters were becoming serious, and unless tho government took some measures to relieve these conditions terrible
suffering would ensue.
Steam Engineers complained that
many non-union men were employed at
theatres, and nothing was being done
to remedy this by the operators and
musicians. The matter was referred to
the Organization committee.
Delegate Watchman stated that
something should be done towards organizing the laborers of the city and
getting them together. ThiB matter
was also referred to the Organization
committee.
PREMIER
PANCAKE FLOUR
Best Ever - Once Tried Always Used
MADE IN VANCOUVER
The Best Yet
RED ARROW
BISCUIT
When its Biscuits say "ARROW"
Manufactured by the
National Biscuit Co., Ltd.
anufacturers  of Red   '
Haid
VANCOUVER
Manufacturers  of Red Arrow and National Biscuits
Haida Confection!
B. C.
Co., Ltd.
Established 1903
B.C. Special
RYE
Whisky
Nine Years in Wood
UNSURPASSED
IN QUALITY
AND FLAVOR
ASK FOR SAMPLE
BOTTLE AT ANY
LIQUOR STORE
B.C. Whisky
Is a
HOME PRODUCT
Ask for **B.C. Special"
"Satisfaction—or Money Back, at Any Grocer's."
ESTABLISHED 1904.
B. C. VINEGAR WORKS
Manufacturers of
Vinegar - Cider - Sauerkraut
BEANOS:
"Sunset" Malt and White Wine Vinegar, "Special"  Malt and
White Wine Vinegar, "Mackenzie's" Malt and White Wine Vinegar,
Okanagan Cider Vinegar, Okanagan Sweet Cider, Boiled Cider, B. O,
Sauerkraut.
Manufactured in Bond under Inland Bevenuo Supervision.
Factory:   1365 POWELL ST., VANCOUVEB, B. O.
CAPACITY 15,000 GALLONS PER MONTH
Manager:   James H. Falconer Phone:   Highland 285  |
MADE IN B. C.
Success is always assured with
NABOB JELLY POWDER
Just follow directions on the package—you will be
more than pleased
Eaoh package makes a full pint of Jelly
10c. 3 for 25c.
AT YOUR GROCERS
Healthfulness, combined with good flavor and taste, means real quality in
Beer. These are impossible without the
very best material and the highest or-
, , der of treating.  In
PREMIER BEER
we provide the public with a good palatable and wholesome Beer of the highest quality.
Order a case from yonr own dealer.
New Westminster Brewery
RTTY Guaran*eed Genuine South Wellington
•PU l Coal mined at South"Weffington, Van-
couver Island, B. C, and Sold by us in Vancouver
at practically Cost in order to keep our men and
teams employed.
COAL,      Fer Ton.
Lump, screened $0.50
Nut, No. 1  B.B0
Nut, No. 2  5.00
Slock  3.00
PEA SPECIAL   4.00
WOOD.   Fer Load.
Dry eordwood, stovo l'gth. $2.75
Inside fir    8.00
Flrbnrk    8.50
Kiln-dried kindling    3.50
Dry eordwood, stovo length
 (cord)   550 I
Service the best,   Satisfaction guaranteed,   Competition Defied.
S,a J.Hanbury & Co., Ltd £$fe*i
m

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