BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

The British Columbia Federationist Jul 2, 1915

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcfed-1.0345048.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcfed-1.0345048.json
JSON-LD: bcfed-1.0345048-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcfed-1.0345048-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcfed-1.0345048-rdf.json
Turtle: bcfed-1.0345048-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcfed-1.0345048-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcfed-1.0345048-source.json
Full Text
bcfed-1.0345048-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcfed-1.0345048.ris

Full Text

 ■
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA
INDUSTBIAL DNIf 0^ 3TBBNOTH.«
OFFICIAL PAPEB 1 VANCOUVEB TBADBS AND *LABOB COUNCIL AND B. 0. FEDEBATION OF LABOB
SEVENTH;/tR. NO. 27.
VANCOUVER, B. C, FRIDAY, JULY, 2, 1915.
(__tf\%_)    SLTOPBRtBAB
SEPT. 20
JAMES 0. WATTBM, ■
President of Tradea ud Labor Congress of Canada, who ia now en route weat
in the interests of tbe Congress nnd tbe Vancouver Convention, whieh
commences on Monday, September 20.
II
1916 CONGRESS
Extreme  East and West
Have Had TJieir Innings;
Now for the Centre
Local Committee Working
Ready for Big Event-
In Twelve Weeks
As tho time for the big Trades and
Labor Congress of Canada eonvention
in Vancouver draws nearer t*.e usual
erop of propheoies and near*rumors are
everywhere current. Thoae range from
presidential declinations and nspira*
K tlons to ridiculous stories of the proposed deposition of the aeretary-treas*
urer, hatched, no doubt, ln various
places by partlea interested in someway
or other. Hero and tbere locally alleged
mysterious, designs of others are being
uncorked for the edification and, guidance of prospccti-ve delegates. All of
whieh is mostly piffle. But, meantime,
the central labor body convention committee is quietly arranging details for
the entertainment of delegates and
nothing will be left undone to care for
the arrivals on and about Monday, September 20, now' only twelve weeks
away.
Toronto Wants 1916 Convention.
That Toronto unionists aro ont for
the 1916 convention ia evidenced by
the following from tbe Banner:
Ab was intimated in tho Banner several weeks ago, the Toronto District Labor council will endeavor to have the
1010 convention of the {Trades and Labor Congress of Canada meet in this
oity.
In taking this atop the local central
body ia of the opinion that it is acting
in the best interests or the Canadian labor movement at large, and that the
Queen City is the logical place in which
said convention ahould convene.
Laat year the congresB met at St.
John, N. B., ln the extreme, eastern section of the Dominion, and this year it
will meet in Vancouver, B. C, in the
extreme west. Therefore, it would seem
tbat it would be most desirable that
next year the congress should be held'
in as central a location aa.possible.
Last year tho western organizations
had to cross an entire continent to arrive at the plaoe of meeting, ond this
year the eastern organizations will have
to follow suit.
There Ib no denying that the country
has been passing through a period of industrial depression that -nan forced upon
the various trades organizations the
necessity of, aa far aa possible, oonserv'
ing their funds, and they bave rightly
retrenched in their financing in every
possible manner in order to the better
weather the storm. -- —*■
For that reason it is desirable that
the convention city for 1916 shall be
selected in a location where the largest
number of central organizations and local trades * unlona may conveniently
meet at the least possible outlay, and
we.may venture the opinion that the
Queen City is eminently fitted for the
choice.
Not, only is it as advantageously
situated in the centre of the Province
of Ontario,-the most strongly organized
section of the Dominion, but it would
be a point between which the organizations both east and west would be fairly well balanced. i
If tbe greatest good to the largest
number is a safe trades union axiom,
then the least expense to tbe said largest number in tbe holding of a convention at this time ought to be an equally
good one, for at a time like this the
ALD. B. A. BIOO,
Secretary-Treasurer Winnipeg Trades
and Labor Council, a familiar figure
at Trades and Labor Congress of
Canada Conventions.
Trades wd Labor Congress of Canada
Convention Call
Office of the Secretary-Treasurer, 112 Florence Street,
Ottawa. Ont., July 2nd, 1915.
To the Offlcen and Members of Provincial Federations of Labor, Trades .and Labor Councils,        '■>
National Trades Unions, Federal Labor Union^and International Local Tradea Unions,
in the Dominion of Canada, Greeting: '
Fellow Labor Unionists and Brothers:
The Thirty-first annual session of the Tradea add Labor Congress of Canada will convene in the Labor Temple Building, City of Vancouver, Province, of British Columbia, beginning at 10 o'clock Monday morning, September 20th, 1915, and will continue in session from day to day until the business of
the Convention has been completed. ,;■
The annual nieeting of the Congress, held) laat year in the City of St. John, N. B., can be considered
as one of the most successful in the history of its eireer. It was in the centre of the Maritime Provinces and afforded opportunities for those who live along the Atlantic coast to become better acquainted with the progress and work of the Congress. This year it is the turn of the Pacific coast and,
consequently, the City of Vanoouver, B. C, has been selected as the nieeting plaoe for the convention
of 1915. Thus in the two years the labor interests at the two' extremities of the Dominion find ventilation for their requirements and interests through the ever expanding influence of the Trades and Labor Congress of Canada.
The particular attention of affiliated organizations is called to Artiole III, Section 2, governing
the introduction of Resolutions, which reads:-*- •;
"Sec. 2.—That all resolutions for the consideration.of the Congress shall be reoeived by
the Secretary-Treasurer not later than ten days prior to-the opening of the Convention, the
same to be printed and issued at the opening session of the Congress. Resolutions submitted
contrary to this section can only be introduced and dealt with by the Congress, on a two-
thirds vote of the delegates present. The Executive shall appoint a Committee on Resolutions, from the Credentialed Delegates and said Committee shall meet at least one day prior
to the opening of the. Convention for the purpose of considering all business submitted to
them."",
The forthcoming Convention will be perhaps the most important in the history of the Congress,
Many legislative questions of vital interest to labor in Canada will be discussed and decisions* arrived
at. In addition a great number of pressing difficulties arising out of the gigantic struggle in Europe
will face the delegates for consideration and decision. The industrial situation in Canada is much
different at the time of issuing this Call than when our last Convention waa held. At this Convention
polieies of great moment to- the working class U Canada will have to be outlined. Among the many
subjects for consideration whioh need our continued attention are :
1. ' The conditions arising from Unemployment in the industrial centres in Canada.       •'
2. Dominion and Provincial Legislation affecting labor interests.
3. Enforcement of the misrepresentation and monetary clauses of the Immigration Laws all the
year round. ,
The proposed 8-hour Labor Bill.       "    .
Workmen's Compensation Acts in various Provinces. '., *
Amendments to the Industrial Disputes and Investigation Act.; f
Fortnightly payment of wages on all railways. ". .
....   Proposed amendments to Dominion Elections Act, including:
(a) the abolition of the $200 deposit now exacted; * '{
(b) the making election day a public holiday. - .      ,
9.   Old Age Pensions and all the issues that are therewith connected.
Repeatedly the attention of organized labor haB been drawn to the faot, that year by year  the
opponents of labor in this Dominion increase steadily their efforts. Labor must put forth greater efforts
not-only to conserve what has already been'obtained, but to Obtain that which is desirable. Greater
efforts, closer application, stronger organization js absolutely necessary to meet the ever growing activities of our opponents: This difficult period is the time when Laber should make greater efforts
than ever in the interests of those who toil. >
The time to elect your delegates is now at hand. Do not delay. Needless to say that the very
deepest inteifests of the workers demand that the most intelligent V and business-like members be
chosen as delegates. Never before was the oause of Labor in greater need of the concentration of all
it has of brains and intellect to look after its interests, The IMMEDIATE selection of delegates and
the election of the most EFFICIENT, will be a real service to the International Trades Union Movement.
Fraternally Yours,
JAMES C. WATTERS, President,
FRED. BANCROFT, Vice-President,
P. M. DRAPER, Secretary-Treasurer,
Executive Oounoil, Trades and Labor Congres of Canada.
expense of holding a eonvention should
be a matter of flrst consideration.
We believe it will be conceded that if
the 1916 convention is held ln Toronto,
it will be attended by a larger number
of delegates than if held in any other
location. Moreover, that the cost of
holding tho convention in this city will
be relatively less than if held at any
other point, and these nre two main
considerations that the delegates to the
convention whioh meets in Vancouver
thia coming September cannot afford to
ignore.
It Ib for these reasons largely that
the District Labor .council decided to,
if possible, havo the 1916 convention
eome to Toronto. It la therefore up to
tho local body to nut forward its best
efforts to Beeure the consummation of
its desires, and it should send aa strong
a delegation to Vancouver aa possible.
Mot only ahould the District oounoil
have their representatives in Vancouver
to show that it is in earnest in its endeavors to secure what ao many look on
as a prize, but the various local unions
that are in a position to bear the  ex*
Sense should also be represented and
o their utmost to strengthen the hands
of the Central body.
It will not do to take it for granted
that the eonvention will oome to this
city simply because it is the most logical point at which it could meet next
year, for other places are prepared to
put up a fight for it, places that have
nowhere the advantages that Toronto
possesses, and could not attract anywhere as large a number of delegates.
If the movement in Toronto is after
the 1916 eonvention it is up to it to get
real busy right away, and after all is
said and done, its the way the Central
Labor body and the 'various local
unions get on the job now that is going
to count.
Tbere are hundreds of local trades
unions, and even central bodies, that
would prefer that Toronto should be the
choice, that will not be able to afford
the expense of sending a delegate to
represent them in Vancouver, whilo the
western organizations will, no doubt,
be largely in evidence. It is necessary
to show the said western organizations
why it is desired that the convention
for 1916 should be held in Toronto. If
the matter is plainly put then Toronto
will be selected; if not, it is liable that
the convention may be held in a location that may mean a far smaller attendance of delegates at the very time
when every effort should be put forth
to make the atendance at the 1916
meeting the largest of any that has
been. That's about the way to size up
the situation right.  It's up to Toronto.
Between tag-days ' and tax sales
'round Vancouver these days there is no
eiid of indoor sports.
4.
5.
6.
7,
UNEMPLOYMENT
Mr. G. N. Barnes Comments
On Way Immigrants
Have Been Deceived
Will TeU What He Has Seen
At The Right Time In
Right Place
"My outstanding impression of the
working claaa situation in Canadaiathat
I have never, in all my experience ln
England or elsewhere, seen such widespread and genoral unemployment.''
| This statement was made by Mr. G. N.
Barnes last Tuesday evening to Mr. J.
H. McVety and Mr. J. Brooks, ln an in.
terview which they had with him.
Mr. Barnos further stated that he was
profoundly impressed by the tremendous and varied natural resources of
| Canada, and that he oelieved it was a
country eminently suited to settlement
by Old Country working folk. "But,"
ihe said, "my observations and inquiries
| of the past few weeks have convinced
me that the country has been grossly
I mismanaged, and mercilessly plundered
by political sharpers working hand in
band with financial Interests in Britain
and other countries."
I Continuing be said: "It seems to
me u shame and a scandal the way
working'men and women in Britain
have been induced to come to thla coun*
try without any provision being previously made for them to maintain
themsel.ves when they got here. I am
taking advantage of my visit to gather
facts and data bearing on this aspect
oi working clasa life out here, and I
can assure you that at proper time and
[in the right place I shall give voice to
[the things I nave learned."
Several thousand applications from
mechanics desirous of going to Britain
I have been received and dealt with by
| Mr. Barnes. They have been sorted into
groups which, it is undestood, will be
i dealt with by experts who are coming
[from the British arsenals and dockyards to conduct examinations of applicants. ,
"IBLANDEB" IS TOPAIE.
Northwestern Typo. Conference Places
.   It on the Unfair List.
Sec.-Treas. Philo. Howard of the
Northwestern Typographical Conference, Seattle, under date of June 24,
says:
"Beginning July 1, all locals are
earnestly requested to see that the data
blanka arc properly filM out and that1
the desired information is forwarded to
tho conference seoretary. This will give
us accurate information regarding the
amount of work in each town and the
number of printers showing up for
same.
"The 'Islander,' a. paper published
at Cumberland, B. C, under jurisdiction
.of Nanaimo, attempted to force a reduction in the scale. Besult: Office is
now unfair to our members."
y
Eutern Machinlsta Vary Busy.
President J. 0. Watters of the Trades
and Labor Congress of Canada in
Winnipeg last week, confirmed the reports whieh have not been gi'ven much
credence heretofore that all the metal
trades wero going at full blast ln tho
east now. Machinists, particularly, are
getting all the work that they can accept. On tbe other hand he eould hardly credit the information ln reference
to the lack of employment in these
trades in the weBt. But the fnct was
recognized on the spot and it will be
plainer as he continues his tour through
the western towns and cities.
Japs Coming to A. p. of L.
At the meeting of the American Federation of Labor in San Francisco on
the second Monday of next Novembor,
Bunji Suzuki and Voshe Matsu, of To-
kio, Japan, will be received as fraternal delegates from the workingmen of
Japan to the workingmen of America.
The event will make the second Mon-
day in November a red-letter day in
the history of the American labor movement. It will signify that American
workingmen are actively promoting cordial relations between America and
Japan.
BesignB to Oo to War.
Mr. J. V. Johnston, a member of the
Letter Carriers' association, resigned
from the presidency of Winnipeg
Trades and Lnbor council last week.
He has enlisted in the 61st battalion
for war service. He. haa been actively
connected with tho council for seven
years. His successor in office is H. 0.
Veitoh of the Printing Pressmen's
onion. Mr. Johnston, previous to coming to Canada, had completed a full
term of service in the Scote Fusiliers,
and although his reserve time had expired, he decided to enlist again, t
TYPO. UNION HELD
Election of Delegates, Committees and Labor Candidates
V. M. DBAPEB,
Secretary-Treasurer of the Trade* and Labor Congreaa of Canada, who wfll
reaeh Vancouver a few daya prior to the big Convention on Sept. 20 to
complete Beports and compile Besolutions, as required by tha legislation
of last year.
FBBD. BANOBOPT,
Vice-President of Trades   and   Labor
1 Congress of Canada, who will be
present at the Vancouver Contention which meets on Sept. 20.
Assessment of 7 per Cent
Levied on Working
Members
A large amount of business waB disposed of at tho last regular meeting of
Vancouver Typographical union held
Sunday, June 27, President Pettipiece
in the chair. Voting for delegates, appointing committees and selecting labor
candidntos for the coming provincial
election occupied considerable time and
wero responsible for a two-and-a-half
hour session, instead of the usual time
of about one hour or less.
One journeyman member nnd two ay-
prentice members were initiated.
Mr. J. E, Wilton waB reelected delegato to the Trades and Labor council,
along with Mr. B. G. Marshall, who was
elected to succeed Mr. C. Grassie, and
the following committes were named,
viz.: examining committee, Messrs. W.
Westell, W. Armstrong, C. Evans, H.
Mountstephen and C. Tulidge; sanitary
committee, Messrs. H. Herrick, B. G.
Marshall and J. Munro.
The referendum vote for selecting labor candidates resulted as follows: For
Vnncouver city, W. B. Trotter, 71 j J.
W. Wilkinson, 52; J. H. McVety, 43;
Geo. H. Hardy, 24; Fr*. Hooivor, 38;
H. C. Benson, 81; J. Lyon, 5; J. Smith,
13; H. Schol«eldr 17; F. Williams, 15;
F. Mansell, 11; F. Haigh, 15; J. A. Koy,
4. For Point Grey: J. E. Wilton, 95.
For South YsncouvcrBurnaby: H. Noo.
lands, 93; F. W. Welsh, 4
There were no arrivals during the
month and two departures.
Special Assessment Levied.
Upon the recommendation of the executive committee a special assessment
of 7 per cent, was authorized to bo
levied upon mombers working more
thn**u five days a week, the amount so
raised to be oxpendod at the discretion
of the executive. H. B. H,
WHY SOME ENLIST.
Esttsm Journal oa Unemployment sad
Recruiting.
"Unemployment and its relation to
enlistment," should form an interesting subject for study ln labor circles.
Last week the Toronto Street Bailway
reduced its servioe, one result of the reduction being that many of the lower
grade employees were on-short time.
A day or bo after the reduction came
Into effect, a recruiting sergeant appeared at the King Eaat barns, and
succeeded in demonstrating to about
thirty-six short time men that they
would be better off in the army. No
ono knows who sent the recruiting sergeant at such an opportune time, and
no one knows why the reduction of service was made without the sanction of
the Ontario Bailway and Municipal
Board; apparently there ia Borne remarkable connection between these
facta. There is more here than meets
the eye.
The street railway service la not the
only occupation in whloh unemployment
meana enlistment, as the following
blunt admission shows:
"There is a proposal on foot to form
a company composed entirely of lumberjacks. Men familiar with the employment situation in thia line of work state
that they think a company of two
hundred and fifty men could easily be
raised of lumbermen. They point out
that most of the men going to the
woods come in after June 15 to arrange
for fall employment and with little activity in the lumbering business, a
large proportion of these men would,
it is expected, be ready to volunteer
for the front. "—Ottawa Citizen.
FEDERAL BOARD OF
INVESTIGATI
IS
J.
H. McVety Will Represent The Street
Railwaymen
Another 'Frisco Delegate Here.
George Hibbard, locnl 107, Bnrten-
ders' league, Hamilton, Ont., was a Labor Tomple visitor this week, en route
home from the international convention
nt San Francisco, where he was a delegate. Mr, Hibbard has been commissioned by the international executive
to spend three months in organisation
work in Canada prior to the convention, and he will also put in another
two months while on his way enst.
From hero Mr. Hibbard will pay Al-j
berta a visit, and take a hand in the I
"dry" campaign which closes July 21.
N. 8. W. Want* No Carpenters.
Carpenters and joiners in British Columbia, eays our special correspondent',
Mr. F. Ahern, will please noto that
there are many men out of work in Australia, in this industry. In the city of
Melbourne, Victoria, it is estimated
that there are over SOO men idle, some
of whom are doing laboring work.
Typos Agreement to Expire.
Tho working agreement which the
typos of New Westminster have with
the newspaper offices over there, expires about three months from now.
Reports nro to the effect thnt the union
will not agree to any reduction in its
wage scale.
No Board Is Yet-Appointed
In Electrical Workers'
Negotiations
The telegram following is self-explanatory. The difference in point of
view between the officials of tke B. C. .
Electric Bailway company and tho
members of Division No. 101 of tha
Street Bnilwny Employees association,
arise largely out of the question of
wages. The oompany thinka an all-
round reduction of about 10 per cent,
would be the proper caper, while, of
course, tho employees feel that they
have already assumed enough of the
burdens of unemployment, war times,
etc.   The telegram roads:
Ottawa, Ont, Jnne 88, 1MB.
Junta B. McVety,
Ltbor Temple, Vancoutver, B. 0.
Bo Industrial Disputes Invoetjgi-
tion wt ind differences batmen
B. 0. Eltctrlc and employees, minuter has, on employees' recommendation, appointed yoa member tf
board of conciliation md invoatif a-
Uon, established is thla matttr.
Company's recommendation expected ihortly.
r. A. AOLAMD
Deputy Minister ot Liter Md
Btgiatrar,
On Wednesday word was received
from the department of labor tt Ottawa that Mr. A. 0. MeCandleas had
been selected aa the representative of
the company. The two board membera
will hold a meeting this afternoon to
agree, if possible, upon a ehfirman.
Failing an, agreement it becomea tht
duty of tho minister of labor to make
the appointment. It is therefore probable that the board will begin its work
some time during tho next week.
The old agreement expired on June
30th.
Under tho provisions of the federal
disputes act old conditions must obtain
ponding the decision of the new board.
Thore seems to be a genuine wish on
both sides to rench an amicable agreement.
All lines of B. C. E. B. aro affected
Including tbo suburban lines, New,
Westminster and Victoria, with over
two thousand men involved.
The Electrical Workers, too, are negotiating a new agreement and are not   '
included within the scope of tbe above
provisions.
TJ. B. Carpenter Dead.
Thomaa Denton, .one of the oldest
members of local union 617, United
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners,
died at hia home, 32nd avenue ana
Fraser street, last Sunday night at 9
o 'clock. Tho cause of death waa acuta
dilation of the heart. He leaves t
widow to mourn his loss.
Smokers, Listen!
All those who would like to see onr
home Industries thrive can do their
little mite by smoking the following
local made cigars: Kurtz's "Pioneers," "Torminus," "Booth's Bouquet," "P. nnd B." Why procrastinate.
Oaiette Editor Promoted.
Robert H. Contes, B. A., editor of tht
Labor Oasette and member of the oost
of living committoe, hus been appointed
to succeed the late Archibald Blue.
While Mr. Contes succeeds Mr. Blue ht
gets practically a new post and will be
known ns Dominion statistician tnd
controller of censuB in tho department
of trade and commerce. PAGE TWO
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FBIDAT ...I.,.....;., JULY 2, 1016!
INOOBPOBTED 1885
MOLSONS
Bank
CAPITAL ud BESEBVB
»8,80O,0OO
93 Branches In Cuadt
A general banking bustntu trans-
acted. Circular letters of crtdlt.
Bank money orders.
Savings Department
lntereat allowed it highest
current rite
The Royal Bank
of Canada
INCORPORATED IMt
Paid-up Capital
111.1
12,M0,NS
Tttal Atatta <
WE ALLOW INTEREST ON DE-
POSITS IN OUR
SAVINGS
DEPARTMENT
Ont Dollar will tptn
tht tmount, and your
bualneaa will bt wtl-
tamt   bt   It   largo  tr
THIBTBEN BBANOHES IN
VANCOUVEB
THE
HCORFOIATED
MU
BANK OF
TORONTO
Attttt.
.   ..M0,000,000
.111,080.000   .
Out of Every
Wage
some portion ahould be banked
regularly, either aa security
against the proverbial rainy day
or aa t foundation to future prosperity. Sl.00 will open tn to-
count in Tht Btnk of Toronto,
tnd interest la tdded half-yearly
to tbe balance* on deposit.
Paid-up Capital 18,000,000
Reserved runds »8,307,a7a
Corner Hastings wd Cambie Sts.
ud
Corner Hastings ud Ctrrill •«•*
British Columbia
UND
Splendid opportunities tn Mlxtd
Farming, Dairying, Stock ud
Poultry. British Columbia
Grants Preemptions of IM acres
to Aetual Settler*-
Free
TEBMB—Betldtnce on tht land
for it leut thrtt yetre) improve*
meaU ta tht tittnt of W ptr
acre; bringing under cultivation
it leaat dvt ttrtt.
For further information apply to
DEPUTT MUniTEB OF
LANDS, VIOTOBIA, B.O.
II      SEOBBTABT, BUIBAV OF
PBOVINOIAL INFOBMATIOM,
VIOTOBIA. BO.
II
IMPORTANT
Night Rates on Long
Distance Calls
Ovtr lines entirely within Britlah
Colombia, From 7 p.m. to 8 a m.
Three tlmea a day period ia allowed for the regular diy rate.
"Long Distance" wlU make appointments tt lay tlmt for con-
vtraatlona it Night Rates,
i. o. tolbphoni COMPACT,
LIMITED
TBADES
OONOBESS
CONVENTION
THE B. C. FEDERATIONIST
Published every Friday morning by the
B. C. Federatlenlat, Ltd.
R. Parm Pettlpioee.... Musftr
3. W. WUktaaet.... ....,,,. ...     '-
Office: Room 217, Lsbor Temple
 Tel, Exchange Say. 7485;
W. Ot Barker Advertising Manager
Subscription: 11.60 per year; in Vancouver
City, 12.00: to unions subscribing
In a body, 11.00
" REPHESENTATVI8
Hew Weatminater.. ,W. E. MaMea, Ben Mt
Prince Rupert W. E. Denning. Box 881
Vlotoria A. 8. Weill, Box 1888
AlBllated with the Western, Labor Press
Aeiqpletlon.
'Unity of Labor; the hope of the world."
FBIDAY JULY 2, 1915
Printers aad
Publishers
Labor Ttaplt
Pheae ley. 4410
printers of The Fan.
THB CONTENTION of tht Trades
and Labor Congress of Canada
will meet in this city Monday,
September 20th next. The official call
for delegates Is now in the hands of
most of tho unlona,
and no time ahould
be lost by them in
selecting^their men
and making preparations to be represented. It is quite true thtt til unions
nre feeling the financial pinch very
keenly. But in thia respect tt any
rate, Vancouver will be mora fortunate
than other localities in not having to
consider the matter of traveling expenses. For that reason, if no other, it
should be represented by the maximum
number of delegates to which it ie entitled.
e • • •
The coming of the Congreaa will give
many an opportunity of realizing its
purpose and work who htve hitherto
not seen it in convention. Undoubtedly one of the main questions to be considered will be the terrible condltlona
among the working class population of
the Dominion, as the result of the general condition of unemployment whioh
prevails. Also the measures which will
be best taken by the organized workera
to meet the situation which will arise
after tho war when, it ia expected,
there will be a systematic endeavor to
ship thousands of workera from Britain
via the medium of the Salvation Army
and other immigration ngenciea.
e e * •
For some years paat it has boen urged
by a section of the workers tbat the
exexeutive of the Congress should be
enlarged from three to at least five.
These to be elected in convention, and
to be repreaentatlve of various territorial divisions across the Dominion, and
to be responsible for tho fwork of organisation in their respective districts.
The plan has much to recommend it.
But it ia doubtful if its adoption, at
the present time would give the opportunity of proving its worth or otherwise, v
With the labor market in its present
condition, tho chances for successful organizing work are at the lowest ebb,
instead of being tho opposite aa they
ahould be in order to give the proposed
policy a fair trial. Ia addition to that,
it ia more than likely that the financial
report of the Congress will show a considerable depletion of revenue ta tht
result of the industrial depression of
the paat year. If such'should prove to
be the caae it would seem wise to bus*
band the resources of the Congreu until
such time aa conditions offer t chance
of better results.
•      •      •      #
During the time the war is on, both
tho legislative work as well aa the or*
ganiaing endeavors of tbe Congress
must of necessity be hampered. But
once the .struggle is over, working class
problems will oome thick tnd f aat, re*
quiring all the finance tnd executive
ability which can be mustered to deal
with them. For that reason also it
would seem advisable to conaerve fi*
nance, at the same time considering
plans for tho future. To launch out too
aoon, and to spend money ahead of the
time when it might be reasonably ox*
pected to produce the results lt waa in*
tended to, might only serve to put t
damper on a policy from whioh much
is expected by those who advocate it.
die in our streets.   It would be a
black eye to the city, and I am not
sure it won't happen, but it seems
to be the only thing likely to make
a serious impression upon the government and the large corporations
who 'have   been   responsible   for
bringing these men into the country, both by their propaganda and
their bonusing, and to-day   dump
these men on the cities,
Mr. Ireland knows whereof he speaks.'
From the very nature of his office his
opinion must be based on actual knowledge.
•        •        •        •
So much for the general situation.
Now read the following letter, dealing
with the workingman's side of the cut
in city workmen's wages. It is from
"A Distracted Mother," and any
akeptic—sneering, superior or otherwise—can Bee the original in The Federatlonist office.   She says:
I   read   with    great    interest
" Worklngman 'b Side of the Wage
Cut," and I could not help bnt feel
there are some in Vancouver tbat
aro in sympathy with the working
folks who have to auSer.   I am a
mother of four children, and I have
found it utterly impossible to give
my children what they should havo
to nourish their little bodies, out of
half time wages.   Now it Ib worse,
and I feel that I   can   never   go
through this winter unless the city
council can be open like men, tnd
not hold secret meetings.   I would
not Uke to see any of our oity coun-
oilmen's children look Uke mine aro
doing now. They are white tnd tbin
looking.   No one at present   will
give credit, and if I have not   a
nickel to get a pint of milk for my
baby, my baby muat Buffer,   The
ages of my boys are 12, 8 and 7,
and an infant of 8 months.   If any
of my children, were old enough, I
could leave them and* try to   do
something myself.   But I must be
contented with not half t dinner
pail,   and   see   my    poor    children   go   hungry.   That   is   how
the poor workingmen's wives   nre
affected now.  Wo are nobody, only
when the election cornea on.  If tho
worst comes I suppose it will be no
harm to steal a loaf   of   bread.
Thoy can only run me in for that.
And perhaps then some other poor
woman that has a lot of children
hungry will get aome benefit.
That document ia too   human   and
plain even for a stupid poUtlcian   to
miss the meaning of it.   k*at it is only
one cry out of the terrible   abyss of
hunger and destitution whioh Ues.be*
low the surface of social Ufe, not only
in Vancouver, but every city of any
site in British Columbia—and for that
matter the small ones too.   It is part
of the writing on the wall warning the
authorities, that the strain is nearing
the breaking point.   If they wiU mot
accept warning and act in time, tbere
wiU Ukely be scenes witnessed in the
streeta of the cities which will make
them, wish they had.
habit. They will boast by the hour factory to them. The chUd is the cor-
how many doors they can hang in a ner stone of their fabric, and laid right
day, and how many lscis they ean put as they look upon it, thoy have no fear
on in a day and so forth. Other trades- as to the superstructure. This question
men are just aa bad. We only mention of the influence of established things is
the carpenters aa an instance. Why do the keynote to aU working class atrug-
they find pleasure in telUng of how gle for freedom. Some think it is suffi*
much they can give master for hia cient to attack only the top in theshape
moneyt If the same men went into of the matured mind of man. Others
business for themselves, tbey would not think the assault must be delivered
find pleasure in devoting their minds to from the tap and bottom, in the man
devising how they could give their cue- and the child. The ohild is the most
tomers more for a dollar than others hopeful venture. But let him beware
did. They would most likely consider who would start at that point. He will
such a man a very eligible candidate find the enemy there in his strongest
for the bankruptcy court or tbe insane force. The Institution wiU confront
asylum. What holds good in this him with its foundations firmly planted
reapect, holdji equally good with on the rock of past privilege and igno*
regard to these slaves who take such ranee. It will be weU for him to re-
delight in advertising what' good slaves member that, whoso shall faU upon that
they are, and how they Uke their stone shall be broken; but upon whom-
ahaokles. soever it shall fall he shall be ground
—————— into powder.
THB LIB.-LAB. MIND   has   been,
on of the tragedies of   British i
poUtiea since 1906, wben labor I
representation ae such became   recog-1
WO JAPANESE WILL come from
Japan to attend the convention
of the American Federation   of
nixed as a distinct quantity dn Bnttish Labor, when it meets in San Franolsco
poUtics.  It is not a '" November, as the first represents-
new growth. Bather | Uvea of tht   orgs-
is it a survival   of FBATBENITY      ***** WOTke*" °' J»*
the laat decade   of -_.„ -BB P»» to meet in com-
^^^^^      the Victorian era— „-_„_ mon   C*"""!U   w,a
1 a period which gave DWBNT workmen    of    the
birth to moro genuinely vulgar tnd in* whits   •*•»■>•    T*"****
artistic standards than any beforo or I00"-''** wlU be the   most   significant
sinco.   It is all ot a piece wink   anti- jthing -**•<-•*•* »» international   working
THEY KNOW
NOT WHAT
TBEY DO
GIVE US
THIS DAY
OUE PROFITS
BBEAKINO
POINT
DESPEBATION    WILL    FOBOE
some of the working class   of
British Columbia into the   ox*
tremity where they will hnve to steal
in order to get bread for themselves,
their    wlvea    tnd
NBABINOTHB    MU,m Mxl   ,rin'
ter,   unless   either
the   provincial
federal   government
  establishes     ■ o
comprehensive meaaure of reUef before
then. This is no wild irresponsible
talk, but tho conclusion to which many
hundreds of observant people aro com:
ing who are watching tbe trend of
conditions.
• -        • e
Wo have exceptional opportunities
for knowing how serious the situation
is. But lest it should ne said we are
biassed in our viewpoint, we would call
attention to the statement of Mr. 0,
Ireland, the civic reUef officer, mode
before tbe civic relief committee. The
newspapers of this city are not prone
to exaggerating in this matter. On the
other hand they deUberatoly minimise
it. Yet they reported Mr. Ireland as
saying:
I have been dumbfounded at the
coldbloodness with which some organizations and the provincial and
Dominion governments regard this'
question of reUef, with the total
repudiation of their responsibilities, and in order to attach that responsibility where it belongs, it.
■ty bt neeesary that t ftw an
THEIE   ANTICS    are    distinctly
amusing to thoee   who   understand the economic urge   which
lies at the back of the action of certain
members of the local Manufacturers'
asBoeiatlon  .  They
went up   to   interview   Mr.    0.   N.
Barnes, and almost
pleaded   with   him
         not to take mechanics capable of working on war   munitions ont ot Vancouver.   They assured
him that most of the talk about unemployment here was exaggeration; and
that although It waa true   that some
men were ont of work, yet that condition was only temporary and would disappear in the course of the next week
or two.
• • ■      •        o
These employers are typical and representative of the element whieh has
all along been fighting the unemployed
relief plana of the oity council. They
advised that reUef ahould not bo given,
so that workless men would be driven
to leave the city. But now that they
see a ohance of making a profit out of
somo of them, they all at once discover
that the unemployed problem ia of a
very temporary nature. Of course tbey
are reaUy super-patriotic, and wilUng
to drop some of their previous convictions in order to BBsiat the Empire by
making shells.
•      •      •      •
If sheila have to be made, the best
place to make them ia aB cloae to where
they are needed as possible. Concentration and organization of production
should be the flrst consideration. The
mechanics should be taken to the ma
terlal; not the material to the mechan*
les, when it means transporting the
material 7,000 miles Just for the sake
of enabUng a few would-be profiteers
to "get in on the velvet." Mechanics
will only require transporting once.
But every piece of metal will have to
be brought here as long as any more is
needed, So if these employers are as
enthusiastic in their desire to facilitate
the plans of the British government aa
they profess to be, the best thing they
can do ia to facilitate tho passage of
mechanics to Britain.
macassars,, the Crystal Palace, wax
fruit, framed "In Memoriam". cards,
and women's bustles. Like those things,
it is an outward desire of tho working
Mass to be "respectable" no matter
what else happens. Jt sprang from the
aspiration to ape a type whieh would
not have been fit to black jita boots, if
auch things had not been a superfluity
with it by reason of the fact tbat it
chose to move on its knees. It began
by causing fear, and haa ended in It
deluge of contempt at the idea that
such a false alarm should ever have
causod any uneasiness in the poUtlcal
strongholds'of privilege and ancient
proprietary rights. It has shown itself
so eminently reasonable and consider
at'e, that its teeth could have been
drawn and its claws cut, without the
eUghtest risk to the operator—if it had
ever had any.
«       »'      •       •
The Lib.-Lab. mind is stIU pretty
thickly strewn in British politics. It is
due in a large measure to the nature of
the route by which many of tho labor
membera finally arrived at the bouse
of commons. Many of them praotloed
their initial oratorical efforts In the tin
bethel and the band of hope. Local
preaching and prohibitionist advocacy
were in many cases tho first mile-
Stones on their journey to the mother
of parliaments. No wonder they are
suoh snuffling Stiggenses. Music, paint*
ing, drama, sculpture, literature, and all
the universal arts -which would turn the
working class into rebels really worth
while, if they as a class knew anything
about such things, are beyond the comprehension of these pitiful travesties of
what working class representatives
should be. To the huge delight of tho
lower house, and tbe contemptuous
amusement of the hereditary ohamber,
they took their non-conformist consciences along with their baggy trousers
when they went into the "best club in
"Europe." They showed suoh an anxious willingness to "get the atmosphere" as quickly aa possible, that
their measure was taken by the rest of
the house before they themselves had
taken tho oath. That part of them
whloh was not a f aroo became i tragedy
from that moment, tnd haa remained ao
to thia day. Aa an episode thoy are
distinctly instructive. Aa tn experiment tbey aro as ghastly t failure aa
any whloh bestrew tht path of the
working class, in its painfully tedious
journey to the day wben its poUtlcal
representation will cause any serious
alarm to thoae who ha-ve real reason to
fear it.
H"
INSTITUTIONS
MEN AND
PBOOBESS
APECULIAB HABIT which aome
workmen everywhere seem to
have—and it applies aB much to
union men as to non-union—is that
of boasting to each other about
what good slaves
they are. The flood
tide of their pride]
ia' usually due about
tke noon-time meal
hour. After tkey
have eaten their modest fare, they then
plunge into thtlr favorite theme.   Oar- _____^___
pentera ln particular are prone tt thijditnte are right the result will bt eatlt*
HAVE YOU
MET ONE
OF THEM
UMAN PBOOBESS is only   another name for the endless battles between men tnd   institutions.   Institutions are the product of
the paat.   The desire for progress and
improvement   arises
from   a  reaUzation
of the   defects   in
that whieh has gone
before.  AU  human
inatitutlona tre te*
cumulations of the errors of the put,
mixed with a little wisdom which   has
managed to survive the patient endea*
vor of each age to hand its follies on
to the next.  But men are born with bu
innate   conservatism   which   disposes
them to accept thtt which la u that
which ahould be; and the majority are
not incUned to exert   the   neceuary
mental energy which wonld 'reveal to
them tho way in whieh they eould secure for themselves a better Ufe than
their forebears lived.
t       •       •*     •
That ia why aU thoae who would reform the world have a pretty hard time
of it. They have to fight the trained
cunning which, for one reason or another, wishes to perpetuate the ignorance which enables it to exercise material power over men. Most human
institutions are in a large measure the
practical extension of historic ignorance. Mon are subjected to, and
moulded by, institutions long before
they aro old enough to have the critical sense which enables them to see the
defects in them, Every ohild accepts
naturally the outlook of lta mother, and
develops a bias ln favor of that outlook;
That Is why some of the most strongly
estabUshed institutions on earth pay
far more attention to the instruction of
tht child than they do to the man. To
them, the child is Ukt concrete In the
mixing.   They know thtt if tht ingre*
clasB standpoint whloh has happened on
the Pacific coast for a long time. It
contains much greater possibilities than
fifty expositions; and Inviting them
over strikes us as one of the really intelligent things the American Federation of Labor haa done.
«       •       .       . '
It is good in face of the increasing
talk of war between the United States
and Japan. It ia alao a very definite
and ooncrote proof of the fast developing industrialism of the Orient—a
whole world problem in itself,-and one
fraught with far-reaching consequences
to the entire white working class of the
world. We venture to aay that these
men will be the all-interesting feature
of the convention, and that when-they
rise to deliver tbeir menage from* their
feUowa in Japan, there will be no quick
retreat to tbe lobbies or tbe outside of
the convention hall, aa ia the case when,
aome of the so-called orators of those
conventions commence to spout. .These
men will havo real things to say. And
it is to be hoped they will have sufficient commnnd ot the English language
to make themselves perfectly understood. Their addresses should be printed in pamphlet form and a copy put
into the hands of every member of organized labor on the American continent.
Westminster Trust Co.
HEAD OFFICE
3. J. JONES, Man. Dirtctor.
NEW WESTMINSTER, B.C.
J. A. EENNIE. Sec-Treat.
ACTS AS ASSIGNEES, LIQUTDATOBS AND BEOEIVEBS
INBUBANOE IN ALL ITS BBANOHES
HOUSES, BUNGALOWS, STOBES AND MODEBN SUITES FOB BENT
it t Big Reduction
Safety Deposit Boxtt for Bent tt $2.00 up
Willi Drawn Frtt of Oharge
Deposits Accepted tnd Interest it Four Ptr Out Allowed
on Daily Balances.
TRADE UNION  DIRECTORY
One of the chief difficulites of social
intercourse is tbe continual puzzle of
trying to catch the view-point of the
mob-mind which only looks at lite and
does not see it.
Vancouver Dally Province saya that
the war ia to be fought out ln the
workshops. Is that not where most
wars start nowadays! At bottom is it
not generally a question of struggling
to find markets for tbe disposition of
the prdduots of the workshops, which
do not belong to the workers who produce themt Their share of the transaction Ib the working and the fighting. -
When a prominent member of the
social democratic party in Oermany
publicly uses hia influence to advocate
peace, the British press gives plenty of
space to his utterances, and speaks of
him as the true friend of his oountry.
When a prominent member of the labor
party in Oreat Britain advocates peace
there, he is caUed a traitor tnd suchlike pleasant names by the same press.
If a commission to enquire into just
one alleged poUtical scandal in Manitoba can manage to dig up aU the corruption whieh it hu done, wbat would
a commission to enquire into the general administration of British Columbia
during tbe past ten years reveal! We
believo lt would knock the record of
Manitoba and all the rest of the provinces in the Dominion into a cocked
hat before it had been at work t week.
Our advice to any workman who
wants to go to Britain to work is to
raise the necessary $100 neoeaaary by
hook or orook, and not wait tround to
be examined and tioketed and docketed
and labelled and otherwise fooled with
either by British government represen*
tatlves or anyone else. It looks ai
though those who finally do go will be
in a sort of semi-bondage Uke China*
men going through in bond.
Allied Printing Trades Council—K. H. See-
, lends, Bos 00.
Barben—8. B. Grant, 888 Georgia etreet.
Bartenders—H. Davis, Box ttt.
Blackamltha - Malcolm    Porter,    View
Hill P. O.
Bookbinders—W. H. Cowderoy, 1815 Thirty.
fourth aveaae east.
Boilermakers—a. Fraser, 1181 Howe St.
Brewery   Worktn—Frank   Graham,  laber
Tempi*.
Brieklayera—William 8. Dagnall, Room
311, Labor Temple.
Brotherhood of Carpentera District Council—P. L. Barratt, Boom 108, labor Tost-
Clgarmaken—Care Kurts Cigar Factory, 78
water Strsst.
Cooki,  Waiters, Wsttreiies—Andy Graham,
Boom 80S, Labor Timple.
Electrical Workers (oatildi)—I. R. Harrietts, Boom 807, Labor Temple.
Eleetriesl Workers (iaaldo)—Boom 807; I.
L. EatUghauson.
Englneera—E. Prendergut, Boom lit, La-
Dor Timple.
Granite Cuttora—Edward Hurry, Columbia Hotel.
Garment Workert—Lsbor Temple.
Heneihoers—Lsbor Timple.
LetlerearrlerB—Bobt. Wight,  District II.
Laborers—George Harrison, Room 380, La-
bor Temple.
Lstkers—Victor R. Mldgley, Labor Tsmple.
Locomotive Firemen and Engineers—C Bow*
srd, 807 Davie etreet.
Low Engineers—L. T. Sollowsy, 1187 Her-
wood.   Tel. Sey. 1S48R.
Longshoremen—J. G Kelly, 10 Powell Stmt
Machinists—J. a MoVety.   Room  lu,
Labor Temple.
Musicians—H. 3. Bra.fl.ld. Bmsss 104-808,
Labor Timple.
Marbleworkirs—Prank   Hsll   Jsaes   Bond,
B. 0.
Molders.
Moving Picture Operators—L, B. Goodman, Labor Temple.
Fslotirs—Room 80s, Labor Temple  *
Ptnmbers—Boom 300 1*8, Labor Tempi*.
Pressmen—P. D. Edward, Labor Temnle.
Plasterers—John   Junes   Cornish,   1808
Eleventh Ave, But
Pattern Maxers-J. Campbell, 4118 Ar-
lyle Streot.
Quarry  Workors—Jamas Hspburn, care
Columbia Hotel. .
Railroad Trainman—A  B.   McCorvlllo,
B« 841.
Railway carmen—A. Robb.  488 Nelson
Street
8eamen's Union.
Structural Iron Workers—Room 908, Lsbor
Tempi*.
Stonecuttera—Jamai  Barbara,   P.  0.   Box
1047.
Bheet Metel Workers.
Street Railway Employees   Jaawe S. GrlSa,
188 Twentyflfth avanu out.
Stereotypers—W. Ba/ley, car* Province,
City.
Telegraphers—E. B. Peppln, Box 488.
Trades and Labor Council—Geo. Bartley,
Room 110 Labor Temple.
Typographical—H. Neelanda, Box 88.
Tailors-*. MoDonald, Box MS.
Theatrical Stag* Emplayeee—*Geo. W. Allln,
Box 7U. __
Tllelayere   and   Helpers—Evan Thomaa,
libor Temple.
■UtINIII  AOINT  DIRECTORY
'Phone.
Exchange,
■  stated).
Ask fer labor Temple
Stymour .7485  (anlsss
Bricklayers—Wm. 8. Dagnall, Room 815.
Cooka,    Walton,    Wattreieee—Room    808;
Andy Graham; phone Sey. 8414.
Eleotrleal Workera  (ontilde)—E. H. Morriion. Room 807.
Engineers (ateam)—Room 111; I. Prouder*
last.
Longshoreman's  Association — OBs*.  145
Alexander street; G. J. Kelly; phone Bey.
8888.
Muilclena—H. J. BraaflsU, Rooms 104.105,
Labor Tempi*.
Street Railway Employ***—Fred. A. Hoovu;
phon* Bay. BOB.
Typographical—R. H. Neelanda, Rooms 813*
The literary boarder fastened hia eyes
upon the hash. "Kindly pus the Be*
view of Beviews," hi said.
VANCOUVEB UNIONS
TRADES AND LABOB COUNCIL -
Meets firat and third Thursdays. Executive board: Jas. 11. MoVety, preeldent;
F. JU Bitinghsuun, viie-prpldeat; Gio,
Hartley, general secretary/ 510 Labor
Temple; Miss H. Uutteruige, traaauror;
"~J   '   w^ 3*5- «ant-
Fred.
lT*d  A.   Hoover, *taUanciao':  aeraaani
Knowles. W. B. Trotter, trustees.
AWED  PRINTING  TRADES
    -._ -   .™w.»    COUN-
CIL.—Meets second Monday In tht
month.    President, H. 3. Bothel
R. H. Bsslandi, P, 0, Box 68.
sscretary,
BARTENDERS' LOCAL No. 478.-OF-
flot, Room 808 Labor Tomple. Mutt
first Sunday of saeh month. President,
F. F. Lavlgne; finanoial aeerstary, Geo.
W. Curnook, Room 808, Labor Temple.
BRICKLAYERS' AND MASONS', NO. 1
—Ueeti avtry 1st and Srd Tueaday,
8 p.m.. Room 807. Presldsnt, Jamas
Haslett: corresponding secretary, W. 8.
Dagnall, Box 88j financial seoretary, »,
R. Brown; business agent, W. 8. Dag-
null, Itootn S16.
BROTHERHOOD
OF   BOILER
and Iron Ship   Balldera
_ —, ....   ...   Helpers
of America,   Vancouver  Lodge  No.   194—
    *  Moniayi    *
H«*te first and third Mondaya, I p. m.
Preeldent, A, Campbell, 78 S*v*nt**nth anna* wut; secreUry, A. Frsser, 1151 How*
street.
WAITERS.
COOKS,     	
Onion—Meet*
AMD    WAITRESSES
        tat   Friday   la   each
month, 8:80 p. tn., Labor Tempi*. A Grs*
ham, bnaineee representative. OBee: Room
308, Labor Tompl*. Hours: 8:80 a. m. to
10: 8 to 5 p. m. Competent help furnished
on short nous*.   Phon* Seymour 8414.
DISTRICT COUNCIL OF OARPENTIRI,
inlets In room 808, Lsbor Temple, eecond aad fourth Thunder of eseh moath, I
p. aa. Preeldent, 0. H. Hardy: searetary,
F. L. Barratt; tresenrer, W. T. Taylor. Laos! Na. 117 amis tret snd third Mea-
dsy ot eaek month, and Looal 9847 assets
tat and third Tneadar of eaeh meatk.
ELECTRICAL WORKERS, LOOAL NO. 918
—MeaU room 801, Labor Temple, every
Monday, S p. m. Preaident, Sam. Cawker,
557 Templeton Drive; recording uontary
H. Hogsn, Lsbor Tirnpli; dnanefal eecretary
and boalneia agent, E. H. Morrison, Room
907, Labor Temple. 	
HUUOARRIERB, BUILDING AND COMMON
Laborera' anion. No. 85—MeeU firat nnd
third Friday of eaeh month, Labor Tempi*.,
President, E. 0. Appleby,.1410 PendrlllySt.:
eecretary, Oeorge Harmon: bneinees sgent.
John Sully, room 280, Lsbor Temple. All
laborers Invited to meeting.
MACHINISTS, NO. 188—MEETS SEOOND
and fourth Fridays st 8 p. m. President,
J. Mclvor; recording secretary, J. Brook**; \
financial seeretsry, J. H, MoVety.
MUSICIANS' MUTUAL PROTBCTIVB
Union, Looal No. 145, A. P. of M—
Masts sound Sunday of each month,
808 Labor Temple. Preaident, 3. B*wy*r:
vl**.prealdent, > F. English; sserstary, H. 3. I
Bresleld; treasurer, W. Fewler. Phon*
Seymour 7485.
PLASTERERS'  OPERATIVE INTEBNA- !
TIOMAL ASSOCIATION, No. 80 —
Meete every tat snd third Wedneadsy In th* J
month In room 801, Libor Temple. Presl-1
dent, A. Hurry: vice-president. A. BerenUen; '
corresponding secreUry, Joe Cornieb, 1809 I
Eleventh avenue esst: flnsnela! eeoretary,
Oeorge Montgomery; treaiurer, Harold Beld. ]
Every time you boost the Ulon Label
you are helping aome Union man to
hold a job.
J. W. Carruthers
HIGH CLASS TAILOR
2S2 Broadway Esst
T. B. CUTHBERTSON A Oo.
Men's Hatters and Outfitters
Three Storm
It wss "Bose Day" in Vanoouver
laat Saturday when, in the name of
sweet charity, ladies of t|)t "better
class" sold paper roses to a lot of people whose sense of fitness waa not die*
gusted by the incongruity of buying
paper roses in the merry month of June.
Nothing but the vile taste of our local
real-eatateooraoy would attempt to per*
petrate auch an outrage,
Whenever you onn consistently do so,
when you require anything you see advertised in The Federatlonist, be sure
and explain tbat you aaw hie ad. in The
Federationist, and that it was becav.se
of that that he la patronised. Dou't
forgot this. •"
B.C. Special "—best rye whisky-
distilled in B. 0. by competent workmen and dispensed nt all leading bars.
Ask for "B.O. Special." ""••
PANTAGES
Un*sualls*l Vaudeville  Meana
PANTAOBS  VAUDBVILLI
THHSB SHOWS DAILY
IM, 7J», 8.11    leaten'a Prtttst
Mltlnet, 110.1 Bvealnis, tie., tf.
SYNOPSIS  OP  COAL  MINING  RI«U-
LATION1
Coal mining rlghu of the Dominion,
ln Manitoba. Saskatchewan and Alberta,
the Yukon Territory, the NorthwMt Territories and In a portion of the Provlnee
of Britlah Columbia, may bo hated for
a term ef twenty-one yeara at an annual
rental of tl an acn. Not mora than
I,III acres will bs leased te one appll
cant.
v Applications for least must bo mads b]
the applicant In person to the Agent or
Sub-Agant of the district In whieh the
rlghu applied for an situated.
In ar * —'— "-- ■—
PAINTERS',. PAPERHANGERS'. AND I
Decorators', Local 138—Meets every ,
Thursday, 7.80 p.m. President. H. Grand: 1
flnanolal secreUry, J. Freckleton, 1088
Comox atreet; recording seoretary, R. i
Dowding, 8SS Howe street. Business 1
agent. James Train, Room SOS,  Labor
Temple.	
PATTERN MAKERS' LEAGUE OP
NORTH AMERICA.—Vancouver and*
vicinity. Branoh meeu let and Srd Prl-
daya at Labor Temple, room 805. H. Night*
sealu, president, 978 Fifty-sixth avanna
eaat; Joa. G. Lyon, flnanclal secretary, 1791
Grant street; J. Campbell, recording see-!
retary, 4888 Argyle etreet
STREET AND "ELECTRIC RAILWAY EM- \
PLOTEES, Pioneer Slvlsion, No. 101— ■
Meeta Labor Temple, eecond snd fourth W*d>.
needays st 9:80 and 8 p.m. Preaident. Jos.,
Hubble; recording eecretary, Jss. B. Grlfla; I
166. Twenty-flfth avenue esst; flaanelal aeo* I
retary snd buelneai agent, Fred. A. Hoover,]
9409 Clark Drive. I
STB All   ENGINEERS,   INTEBNATION-l
al Looal 887-MteU every Wednesday I
8 p. m„ room 884, Lahor Tempi*. Pinan- \
clal asorttaor. B. Prendergaat. room 818.
TAILORS'   INDUSTRIAL   rNION   (Df-
ternattonal). Local No. 178—Meetinga ,
held first Tuesday In each month. 8 p.*m. ,
President, Miss H*. Outterldge; recording
aeeretary,  0.  MoDonald,   Box   508;  flnsn-
clal sec, K. Paterson, P. 0. Box 508.
TYPOGRAPHICAL    UNION,    NO.    116*-
MeaU last Sundsy « oath month al I i
p. m.   Preeldent, B. P, Pettlplece: vtee-pmel- '
PBOVINOIAL UNIONS
0.    FEDERATION OF LABOR—MeeU i
in annual convention In January.   Exeoutlve ofleera, 1815*16:   Preeldent. A. Watchman;     vlce-preildenti—Vancouver,   W.   F.
*. H.. MeVety; Vleloria. B. 8'
DiniuI, H. MeVety; Victoria, B. I
New_Weitminster^ W. Yates ;s Prince Rupert,
Met 98, U. ji. W. of A. (Vancouver Island),
8. Outhrle; Dlatrlct 18, U. M. W. of A.
(Crow's Nest Vslley), A. J. Carter; score-
tarytreaaurar, A 8. Walls, P. 0. box 1588,
Victoria, B, 0.^
NBW WllTMINtTlW, l.C.
NEW WESTMINSTER TRADES ABD LA.   '
BOB Ooancll-MHU «•» mad and
-   - -   - -     >. (n r "
foarth Wedseodsy si 8 p. _. _
Preaident, 0.   Cropley:   flnanclal
&'4.?top:'<s.w,4.
vllci to attend.
icrcUry,
tki'pa'blie is la*
surveyed territory ths land mutt be
  r legal subf* *
unsurvayod
described by seotlons, or legal subdlvls
 ' saotlons, tnd In unsurvayod  '
ths trtot   applied   for ahall
ions of seotlons, and I:
ritory   ------
Bach application musYbe accompanied
by a fo* of 55, which will be rtfundtd.lf
staked by the applicant himtelf.
"    ion must '
by l :.. ::::. .:*_:.: 	
th* rights applied for an not available,
hut not otherwise. A royalty ahall he
paid on the merchantable output of th*
mine at tbe nte of five cents per ton.
The person opentlng tht mine shall
furnish the Agent with aworn returns
accounting for the full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay the royalty thereon. If tho ooal mining rights
are not being operated, saeh nturns
should be furnished at least once a year.
The lease will Include the ooal mining
rights only, but tha lessee may he permitted to purchase whatever available
curiae* rights may ba considered necessary for the working of the mine at the
nt* of 818 an aor*.
Por full Information application ahould
be made to tho Secretary of the Department of the Interior, Ottawa, or to any
Agent or Sub-Agent of Dominion Lands.
,      W H  CORY
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N. B.—Unauthorised publication of this
advertisement will not b* paid for-SNN.
Ask you favorite mixologist for "B.
C. Special." Oovernment inspected and
absolutely pure. •*•
HARRON BROS.
VllNKRAL   DIRICTOR1 AND
■MBALMRRS
Vancouver—Offlce   and    Chapel,
1014 Granville St., Phone Sey, liil.
North  Vancouver — Olllce and
Chapel, ISS-Slxth St. Watt, Phont
184.
 VICTORIA, ■■ C.	
VICTORIA TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL—Meete tat sad third Wednesday.
Labor hall, 1484 Government street, at 8
6 m.   Presldsnt, A, 8. Wells; secretary, P,
oldridge, Box 803, Victoria, B. 0.	
OBSAjmag LABOB COMPANIES.
LABOR TEMPLE COMPANY, LIMITED—
Dlncton: Jss. Brown, president; B. P.
Pettipiece, vice-president: Edward Lothian,
Janus Campbell, 3. W. Wllklnaon, Geo, Wllby, W. J. Nagle, F, Blumberg, H. H. Free.
Managing director and eecretary.treaiurer, J.
H. McVety, room 811, Lsbor Tsmple.
B. C. FEDERATIONIST, LIMITED—MaeU
at cell of preildent, Labor Timpli, Vanoouver, B. C. Directors: Jamas Campbell,
president; J. H. MeVety. secretary-treasurer;
A. Watchman, A. S. Welle. R. Parm. Pettlplece, manager, 317 Labor Temple. Tale*
phone:    Seymour 7481
Union
pIBvlDBl
HADE
HEa^ Of America Jt}*r
aamg aiotoo^aeam^Z..
Voti agalnat prohibition I    Demsnd  per-
sonsl liberty la csooalst whst you will drink. .
Ask for this Lsbel when purchasing Bear, I
Ala or Porter, u a guarantee that It Is Ua- J
lea Made. this Zs Oar Label
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
sad EMBALMERS
ltt lister* St.       TsMsns
I.C. ItBIDAV JDLT 2, IBIS
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
I 6Cki6*Log«rs
* ITAMXOJtD heavy, hoots
sal stoet havo tee* aaat
by LBOZia.   no* dialers,
adnata, lofgtn, (arasos—
aU whs kaow toot h*avy
boots .hav* nnlvewally ao-
kaowtodgod UKnaaiioce
at ttilin *BAT OAM
rom>LT aa »OD«ram.
in*
tktt wkttkn lt ts tt* kean
boot or tht fssMtui-i
stntt walking shoe, avary
LSOXSa tke* u mad* of
aowara lauu-sown*
workmasshlp—BOBaST sea-
total tkmfktm
Toirtoalatwmbegladto
anew yon uosa Soots
aaautoaa. AM Urn today.
Mak in British Columbia
World Shoe Co.
St Hsstings St, W.,'Phons Sey. 1TO
Best Shoe Repairing "While You Walt'
Work cTUid for and delivered
Loggers' Miners' Cripples' and any hind
of special Shoae made to ordsr	
r-Mfi
vWdRKERS UNION/
iio^kr.*
facrory
Naaed Shoes sre frequently made ia Nob-
Union Fadoriei—Do Not Boy Any Shoe
no matter what ltt ntmt, nnltsa lt bttn a
plain tad readable impression or thto tttmp.
All ahow without tht Union Stamp in
alwaya Non-Union.
BOOT * SHOE WORKERS' UNION
IM Summer Stntt, Boston, Man.
J, F. Toblt, Prat.   0. L. Bltlnt. Sec.-Trtaa
Ask for
"NABOB    Products
TBA SPICES
0O*******SB IOTKOS
JELLY POWDEB PUDDINGS
PLAVOBLNO BXTBAOTS BAB3N0 POWDEB
AT YOUR X3R0CER
Get and use "NABOB" everytime
Jingle Pot Coal
ONLY UNION MINED OOAL ON THE PA01TI0 COAST
More heat. No Clinkers'
WOOD
Millwood and Kindling $8.50 load
, ' Choice 16 inch Rr ',. *3.00 load    .
CARTAGE
Qeneral Cartage, Baggage and Furniture Moved and Stored
McNEILL, WELCH & WILSON, United
Phont: Seymour 1036
___m___s^sasmmi-_,\\\ ■ mi \_b_______2_____— ,i„^ ■' ,    ■riM,  ,.x—
rr^——       '""' "' "    '"" "-    —*——mm—■~
Two Stores and Three Offices To Let,
At Low Rentals, in the
labor Temple
Cor. Homer and Dunsmuir Streets
Tht completion of tht Georgia-Harris Stmt Vltduct hu placed
the Ubor Ttmplt ln tht flour ol down-town traffic
II interested call on or phont
BUILDING MANAGER
Seymour 7495
ROOM 211
1
£ TO
THE WAR
Fundamental   Instinct   of
Maternity Comes Out
Strong as Ever
Women's Ancient Resignation Modified by Later
Experiences
[By Mist Helena >Outteridge;]
With almost the whole world ot men
gone cruelly, bloodthirsty mad and almost all women trying to patch up the
injured, a few women, who, during the
lut tew years, htve fought for tbe re*
cognition of woman aa a complete hu*
man entity, are enduring the pangs of
witnessing what appears to bo a aet*
back in their cause.
Back to Flnt Things.
No ont oan havt failed to notice,
particularly in the Old Country, a somewhat primitive state of affairs exists at
the preeent time. Men are fighting,
women are nursing, knitting and enduring. Women are working for no pay
as though they had never heard of the
ultimate evils of voluntary labor. And
what praise thoy are winning. In faot
women nre on the old lines, patiently
and adorably fulfilling the function at
the help-meet of warriors, and great is
the satisfaction of the average male in
that "the war has given ub back women"; women whose whole duty, according to a writer of the last century,
should bo "to minister unto the needs
of tbe male and to please and comfort
him."
Hon Imaginary This Betl.
This apparent set-back to the wo
man's movement Is moro surface than
real, and those who havo followed the
trend of the movement for the last few
years have no real cause for dissatisfaction.
John D. Barry, writing on "Women
and War," stated tbat, "The war start-
lingly emphasises the changed position
of women. Not long ago it was taken
for granted that women should accept
war .and have nothing to do with it,
save as they could be of service in succoring the wounded and sick and in
helping out in such small ways aa they
could. Of all the silences of history
there is none so pathetic as the silence
of women in their attitude toward
war.
Their Aga-Old Outlook.
"Back through the generations there
it hradly a protest. Such clamoring as
the women have made, has expressed
their grief over the .wounds in their
own hearts, reflected from tho wounds
on the bodies of those near and dear to
them. War as a masculine institution,
they woro taught to revere. It was
even made a reproach to them that they
could not go out and fight themselves,
inferior creatures that they were, incapacitated for thia high service by
their weakness. Tho best they could
do was to bear male children and send
them with noble courage to the field of
battle."
Tht Bock of Maternity.
While there is a radical change in the
position of the modern woman, the fundamental instinct, the motherhood in
all women, is an ever abiding factor in
the make-up of women, the difference
is that in a vast majority of women
Camping Tents and all Camp Supplies
Whew I Hot! Get Outdoors and
Live in a "Pioneer" Tent.
Lin cool and healthy, under canvas, during
the summer months.
Wt carry and make tentt of all aiies and
atylea-big tentt, Uttle tents, light silk tents
ud heavy canvaa tents.
Alao wc cany all camp supplies, camp cote,
stools, stoves, cushions, pack sacks, etc., etc.
Call in TODAY and aee our line or write for
illuatrated catalogue.
C. H. JONES & SON., Ltd
110 Alexander Straet       (Opposite North Vsncouvsr fsrry)        then, Seymour 740
SS Yttrt In tht Business, Hence tht Nemo—"Pioneer".
Your home decanter should be filled
with "B.C. Special." One trial will
convince. For sale at all leading retail
liquor stores.
Secure the best whisky—"B.C. Special "—for the least money. Made in
B. C. for particular people. Sold everywhere.   Aak for it. "-•"■
PHONE:  SETMOUB 9086
^x   *!___+__%
There's no Job to Settled
to ignore saving
Make a Beginning To-day
Wa par 4fpar Cant, burnt oo Oaposlta
subject to rour ohaaaa,
CREDITED MONTHLY
DOW FRASER
Trust Company
122 Hastings St. West*
Vaneouvar. and McKay Station,
Burnaby! ■• C.
References:    Don't,  Bradstrcets   or   any
Financial Honae of repute la Vancouver.
rut 9newtRv6
OWN BOTTLING
matwmmmmmmii
VANCOUVER  0 C
Tbat la on •very bottla ot CASCADE BEER.    Every purchase of this leading
brew, adda substantially to tho payroll of B. 0.
Aak for OA80ADE and accept no othor brand.   Browed and bottled   by
CANADIAN UNION WORKMEN at
CENTER & HANNAp Ltd.
UNDERTAKERS
Refined Senrice
1048 GEORGIA STRSST
Ont Block west of Court House.
Dst ot Modern Chapel and
Funeral Parlors tree to all
Patrons
Telephone Stymour 8425
Phone:  Fairmont 810
Patt er son & Chandler
Manufacturer! of
MONUMENTS
Vaults, Curbing, Etc.
Offloe and Worka:
Cor. 16th Avt. ud Main* St.
Branoh Olllce: 4tth * Fraser Avet.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
this instinct manifests itself aa of old,
in succoring and relieving the men wbo
go forth to fght.
In the more progressive woman that
same instinct to conserve life tends
more and more in the direction of the
prevention of war and its attendant
evils, than in patching up of the males
of different nations, who have been
grievously wounded, because the diplomats of the respective nations failed to
agree.
That Congress Again.
The International Congress of Women, held recently, has been much criticised by those who are war mad and
who saw in the conference an attempt
to stop the war'before the blood lust of
either side had been satisfied, or satiated to disgust.
What many people failed to see was
the faet that a'number of women were
sane and balanced enough to keep their
heads cool even in the very midst of
war hysteria and showing by the wording of their protest that, far from being
unfeminine, their very womanhood and
mothering instinct was calling for
better expression than by meana of
nursing, recruiting and Sed Cross work.
Seeing Through It
In addition to tke humane instinct
expressed, the resolutions passed show
a very keen appreciation on the part
of tho women of the fact that modern,
warfare ie essentially commercial and
brought about by groups representing
particular interests apd not by tbe will
of the mass of the people, aa the following list of resolutions will show:
1.  Women tod War.
1. Protett.—Wt women, in international congress aasembled, protest
against the madness and tbe horror of
war, .involving,as it does a reckless
sacrifice of human life and the destruction of so much that humanity has labored through centuries to build up.
2. Women's Sufferings in War.—-
Thia International Congress of Women
opposes the assumption that women can
be protected under the conditions of
modern warfare. ' It protests vehemently agalnat tbe odious wrongs of which
women are the victims in time of war,
and especially against the horrible violation of women which attends all war,
n.  Action Towards Peace.
3. The Peace Settlement.—This International Congress of Women of different nations, classes, creeds and parties, is united in expressing sympathy
with the suffering of all, whatever their
nationality, who are 'fighting for their
country or laboring under the burden
of war.
Since the mass of the people in each
of tbe countries now at war believe
themselves to bo fighting not as aggressors but in self-defence and for
their national existence, there can be
no irreconciliable difference between
them, and their common ideals afford
a basis upon which a magnanimous and
honorable peaee might be established.
The Congress therefore urges the governments of the world to put and end
to this bloodshed, and to begin peace
negotiations. It demand!* that the
peace which followa shall be permanent
and therefore based on principles of
justice, including those laid down in the
(resolutions adopted by this Congress,
namely:
Position of Small Nations.
That no territory should be transferred without the consent of the men
and women in it, and that the right of
conquest should not be recognized.
That autonomy and a democratic government should not be refused to any
people.
That the governments of nil nations
should come to an agreement to refer
future international disputes to arbitration or conciliation and to bring social,
moral and economic pressure to bear
upon any country which resorts to
arms instead of referring its ease to
arbitration or conciliation.
That foreign politics should be subject to democratic'control.
That women should be granted equal
political rights with men.
Principles of a Permanent Peace,
Bespeot for Nationality!—Thia International Congress of Women, recognizing the right of the people to self-government, affirms that there should be
no transference of territory without
the consent of the men and women re*
elding therein, and urges that autonomy and a democratic parliament should
not be refused to any people.
Dlsarmamtnt.
General Disarmament.—This International Congress of Women, advocating
universal disarmament and realizing
that it can only be secured by interna*
tlonal agreement, urges, as a step to
this end, that all countries should, by
such an international agreement, .take
over the manufacture of arms and
munitions of war and ahould control all
international trafflc in the same, It
in the private profits accruing
from the great armament factories a
powerful hindrance to tho abolition of
war.
Trade And Finance.
Commerce and Investments. — (a.)
Tbe Congress urges that in all countries
there shall be liberty of commerce, that
the seas shall be free, nnd the trade
routes open on equal terms to tho shipping of all nations.
(b.) Inasmuch ns the Investment by
capitalists of one country in the resources of nnother and the claims arising therefrom, are a fertile source of
international complications, this Congress urges the widest possible acceptance of the principle that such investments shall be made at the risk of the
investor, without claim to the official
protection of his government.
Stent TrtatitB.
National Foreign Policy—(a) Thla
International Congress of Women demands that all secret treaties shall be
void, and that for the ratification of
future treaties the participation of at
least the legislature of every government shall be necessary.
Foreign Policy.
Democratic Control of Foreign PoUcy.
—Since war is commonly brought about
not by the mass of the people, who do
not desire it, but by groups representing particular interests, this International Congress of Women urges that
Foreign Politics shnll be subject to
Democratic Control; and declares that
it can only recognize ns democratic s
Bystem which includes the equal representation of men and women.
In view of the many calls being made
upon women at the present time they
will be a force, when the war ceases,
that will have to be reckoned with, by
governments that have called upon
them in the hour of need, and everlasting shame will be upon those politicians
who will attempt to relegate women to
tbt company of "paupers, criminals,
lunatics nnd infants."
PAGE THREE
EMPLOYMENT IN
Our Special Correspondent
Sends Information That
Can be Retted Upon
Some Industries Busy But
Coal  Minera   Are   in
Great Distress
[Special Australian Correspondence.]
SYDNEY, N. B. W., June 11^-1
have to lay beforo readers of Tht Federationist my latest report of tbo conditions of the Australian labor market.
Being authentio, thit information
ahould bt invaluable to thoae wishing
to eome to our shorts.
In tht Building Trades.
The demand for labor generally in
theae trades wat greater than laat reported. In the painting motion it waa
reported that considerable employment
wat offering, chiefly upon renovation of
buildings, and, consequently, but few
tradesmen were unemployed. In the
bricklaying, stonemaaonry and plastering branches a alight improvement was
recorded during the month, bnt tbe approaching completion of worka in progreu will release considerable numbers
of men. At tbe Commonwealth naval
works the carpentery trade was fairly J
brisk during the past month.
Machinists, Boilermakers, Electricians.
Every return I have ao far received
indicates that the demand for labor
continues to be good. A further increase in the number employed on rail*
way*car and wagon building ia re*
eorded, and iron tradea generally are
busy. Secretaries of all unions say that
demand (or labor is good, and that in
tho bollermaking and electrical trades
tbere are no unemployed.
Bakers An Buy.
In the bakery section many placea
are working overtime. In the flour-
milling section there are many ont of
work, owing to short supplies of wheat.
It ia thought that next month there will
be yet more out of work'.
Matt Packers Slack.
There has been an increase In the
number of persons employed as compared with last report, but unions have
still many men out of work. As regards cold storage, the difficulty of getting ship space causes many men to be
unemployed.
State Prlnten on Overtime.
There is very little change to report
ainee last advice. Secretaries^ of unions
report short demand for labor, but at
the government printing works, overtime ie being worked.
Ships, Furnlturt md Bricks.
In the shipbuilding and repairing, the
demand   for   labor   continues   good.
Secretaries of unions in thiB branch report no unemployed.
In the furniture trade conditions aro
better than last report, the demand for
labor being fair, but in the wood turning, machinery and mattress making
branches there ie little demand for labor. Conditions are not expected to
brighten for some time to come in this
branch of trade.
Brickmaking, conditions here are still
bad, part work being the general thing.
Many yards have closed down awaiting
orders.
On tht Docks and Wharves.
There is still considerable unemployment in wharf-laboring and coal-lumping industries.   This is mainly due to
an absence of shipping.
In the country districts there is Uttle
or no improvement, while in some cases
conditions are a little worse than before reported. Especially ia thia true
in the coal mining districts of Newcastle and Ifaitland, where loss of time
is due to lack of trade, owing to scarcity of shipping.
Distress of the Ooal Miners
Conditions, as regards work, are very
bad in the Newcastle and Muitland coal
fields. There are approximately 2,300
men out of work as the result of loss of
trade, owing to the war. So bad is the
state of affairs that many children are
forced to go to school without their
breakfasts in tho mine districts, and
the teachers, where possible, are trying
to do the necessary in the way of providing tbem with food. It is hoped that
the government will be able to do something to alleviate the distress now
existing in the coal centres. It Is
thought the government will eome to
the assistance of the people by opening
relief works in the dlstricta affected.
General Survty Is Bettor.
On the whole tbe evidence to hand
with regard ttnemployment and demand
for labor during the month indicates
that the more buoyant trend of matters
still persists. A definite reaction from
the depressed conditions of early and
midsummer (that is, in Australia—from
October to Fobrunry) is clearly die*
cernable. This is, no doubt, largely due
to heavy withdrawal from the labor
markets of the most aotlve type of employees for military and naval purposes.
I have made elaborate arrangements
for securing full particulars of, the
trend of the labor market, nnd will forward my next report in n month's time.
W. FBANCIS AHEBN.
Women Are Enlisting
Mon An Notdtd to Uts
Thoust&da of womtn an making washing easier by lttttng BOYAL OBOWIT
NAPTHA SOAP do Ol hud part of t»t
washing for thtm. Try » ctkt aad job
wlU Ittt no tlaw tnllsttof.
•
Mnny n man who inBtals electric I
light in his house is content to illumine ]
his mind with a slush lamp.
W. B. Trotter doing Bast
W. B. Trotter will make a trip
through the west in the interest of the
Trades Congress in August and will
likeiy reach Winnipeg somewhere about
Labor Day.—The Voice, Winnipeg,
June 25th,
The Terminal Steam
Navigation Co., Ltd.
TAKE A TR1R
On one of the Company's steamers to
BOWEN ISLAND and HOWE SOUND
Eoints. Three palatial steamers leave the
Inion Dock dally at 9-15 a.m... Sunday at
10:30 a.m. This trip affords passengers a
magnificent view ot the scenery among the
islands aud glaciers all day.
ROUND   TRIP
Good Tor Day of Issue Only
$1
Phone Seymour tfHO
Sunday Summer Sailings.
Enjoy the Sunday on the water by tailing
a trip to Gibson's Landing, Robert's Greek
and Sechelt by the fast pleasure steamer
SANTA MARIA.
Leave Johnson's Wharf at ..,. 9:80 a, m.
Arrives Gibson's Landing .... 11:80 a, m.
Robert'a Creek ..    ..12:15 p. m.
1       Sechelt     1:00 p.m.
Retaining leaves Beehelt at,,.    5:00 p. m.
Arriving Vaneouvar about ....    8:15 p. m,
FARE >OR ROUND  TRIP ONE  DOLLAR,
roll particulars Phone Sey. 4280.
SPECIAL
Hanging Baskets and Tubs
Regular Price $1.00 each
Now 2 for $1.00
BROWN BROS. & CO. Ltd.
Seedsmen, Florists and Nurserymen
VANCOUVER -  HAMMOND - VICTORIA
High Class Dental Services at
very Moderate Prices
OOLD AMD FOBOELAIK OKOWM. Bach * M0
BEIDOEWOEK, par Tooth  ...    SM
PEBPEOTIITTINOPIATHI..    10.00
akaloamrax-nrai     MO
otamel-raj-mo*...            ...... .....    140
Diseases ef tht guma, Including Pyorrhea, anrctssftlly tnattl.
AU work gunnttad.
Dr. BRETT ANDERSON
Phont itymoir MSI Oflct: 101 Bank tf Ottawa 1
M2 Haatinga Stnet West
BOYS'  SHIRT WAISTS
For Ages 6 to 16 years
from 50c. up
CLUBB & STEWART, Limited
808-818 HAMIXai M1HX WW Fheae
To England Under Neutral Flag
American Line from New York-Liverpool
Fiftt   sa. a a        La'ge fast American Steamers under American Bag
Class $95.00 "St Paul"............ July 17th
Second W,MV   *C   "Ne* York" July24th
Clui $55.00 _\. J. "Philadelphia".. Juiy31tt
▼ Vi Ws „st Louis. Aug*.7th
f lass   S40 00 *"""■ weelt'y tbtreafter.
Company's Oflioea: 619 SECOND AVENUE, SEATTLE, WN.
OK LOOAL BAIL AND STEAMSHIP AOENTS.
Furniture
largest ud most select stock In Waiters Canada. Easy Tanna and decent
treatment, tt war ttma pricts.
Hastings Furniture Co., Ltd., 41 Hastings St. West
HOTEL REGENT Absolutely Fireproof.   Local and Uras-Ulsuuiue
nuiBLnnuuu  Phone In Every RooiaCafe In Conneotloi   ~
$1.00 per day up.   Attractive Br*" *"   	
Ootttnibssa a Beatty. Ptoprtststa
ion. Rates
 nione in Every » ... w
$1.00 per day up.   Attractive Rates to Permanent Quests.
_^_i._ .. —..  jm___a_wem Bast
You Can Save Money
BT usmo
Tango Street Car Tickets
8.¥25 Cents
THIS IS HOW IT WORKS OUT
3)1 Bides at 32 Bides on
A S Cent Fare Tango Tickets
Tour Saving; On
•1 Investment
$1.60    $1.00     60c.
Tango Tickets Are Now On Sale
Thoy are sold by conductor* on tht can, at the B.O. Electric Salesrooms,
Carrall and Hastings streets and 1136 Granville street; the Company's
Interurban Terminals at Hastings and Carrall streets and south end of
Oranvllle street bridge; Depotmaster's Offlce at Main and Prior streets;
Mount Pleasant Car Barn, Main street tnd Thirteenth avenue, and at the
places of business of the following firms throughout the elty:
HASTINOS STREET—
Woodward's   Dept.   Stores    (Drug
Dept.) Abbott Btreet Corner.
Spencer's Sept.   Store    (Cashier's
offloe,  Information Bttroio  nnd Ex*
change Desks), near Richards.
Wood's Pharmacy— Seymour Street
Campbell's Phanracy — Oranvllle
Street corner.
Owl Drugetore—Main Street corner.
Harrison's Drag Store—Near Car*
rail street
 TRBBT—
MAIN STB
Browne    *    Beaton,     Druggists,
Pender street corner.
Law's   Drugstore — Harris street
corner.    -
CORDOVA STREET—
Owl    Drugstore — Abbott atreet
corner
POWELL STREET—
Owl    Drugstore — Dunlevy street
corner.
DENMAM STREET—
(English Bay)
Torrence Drugstore — Davie street
corner.
ORANVILLE   STREET—
Hudson's Bay Oo. All departments
Georgia street corner.
Oordon Drysdale's  (Notion    Counter) near Dunsmuir.
Owl Drugstore — Dunsmuir street.
Harrison's   Drugstore —   Robson
stnet corner.
Browne * Beaton, druggists, Davie
street corner.
Pill Bos Drugstore — Nelson street
corner
Law's Drugstore — Davie    street
corner
Harrison's      Drugstore — Pender
street corner.
FAIBVIEW—
Harrison's   Drugstore — Granville
street   and   Seventh   avenue.
MOUNT PLEASANT—
Law's Drugstore — Near Broadway
ORANDVIEW—
Campbell's Drugstore — Broadway
and Commercial Drive,
STANLEY PARK—
MitcheU's  Confectionery— Georgia
street entrance.
B.C. ELECTRIC
Carrall and Hastings Sts.
1138 Granville St
Near Davie PAGE POUR
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FBIDAY ■...„..... JULY t, Ull
Our July Clear-
anpe Sale Starts
on Friday, the 2nd,
with Everything in
the Store Reduced.
Buyers Now Save
\^7V imwuni  »r»     mmmarttammt-laraaaa aamtaaaam.
GRANVILLE AND GEORGIA STREETS
Consumers Buy Direct
from Producers
The Vancouver City Market
Main Street Bridge
There will be an abundance of all varieties of Food Products on sale at the VANCOUVER CITY MARKET this
Saturday.
It will certainly be to your interest to visit the market
and buy direct.
Fresh Fruits andVegetables
Selling at Wholesale Prices
Boost the Market
for your own interests
Strauss w^ks
Ladles Hals Classed, dyed, rosewed ar
^^Issatd lata ths Utest stories.
ALL WORK GUARANTEED
135 Hastings W., Vancouver
HOYT'S
10 Cent Cakes
"ALWAYS FRESH"
ASK YOUR GROCER
HOTEL IRVING
101 Hastings Street East
—as the only all-union hotel of its kind in Vancouver, has been designated as
OFFICIAL HEADQUARTERS for UNION MEN
The Finest of Wines, Liquors and Cigars sold at
buffet, with courteous Union mixologists to serve
you.
JOHN L SULLIVAN, Proprietor.
Phone: Seymour 3380.
^_\p__&___ttll
*"/   1            —    \
Hj
r
N
icholson's G
is perfectly pure and palatable
IT'S REFRESHING
AND INVIGORATING
TRY IT FOR YOUR STOMACH'S SAKE
.    WILL DO YOU GOOD.
ALL RELIABLE DEALERS SELL IT
in
Our Polite Contributor in
One of His Best
Human Society Under The
Lens Shew Germs of
Its Maladies
The"open shop"that elysium of tbe
employing class, does not fill tke bill
quite so well after all, where they have
been able to enforce it. Walter Drew,
counsel for "open shop" employers,
speaking before the United Statea Commission on Industrial Relations, said,
"We are not at all proud of the use,of
the "open shop" in Los Angeles. The
very abuses we complain of in the
"closed shop," we find exemplified in
the "open shop" in Los Angeles."
The abuses complained of in the
"closed shop" were that it "leads to
combinations of employers and labor
unions to swindle the public. The unions
also combine with employers against
other employers."
True In Fart.
There is a certain amount of truth in
the statements here made. That it always occurs in the closed shop is only
about one per cent, true; but that the
open shop, so-called, enables the employers to swindle the public and workers alike, is self-evident. These abuses
can only'occur in a closed shop when
the union membership is ignorant and
indifferent, thus lending themselves an
easy prey to the machinations of the
company through their "tools" in the
union. But in the open shop there is
no brake whatever to these abuses, and
many other abuses not mentioned. The
open shop is really a closed shop to
unionists, and the workers are consequently helpless in the employers'
bands.
"Fret" Worktr la a Jokt.
The "free" worker is a relic of the
age of "free" competition, a system
which exists only in name, in these
daya of trusts and combines. No more
does the old shibboleth hold good that
"Competition is the life of trade," Today, "Combination is the life of
trade." And by no manner of reasoning can it be proved that what is the
"Ufe" of the employers, is not also the
"life" of the employed.
Large Families Not Nttdtd.
It would be interesting to hear the
advocates of the raising of large families give a justification of the present
carnage in Europe in relation to their
theory. It is the rapidly incresaing
population in Germany which enables
the war party there to argue that they
must go out and "lick" somebody, In*
order to flnd a "place in the sun'/ for
them. And in the process the pick of
the breed find a "place in the grave."
The main ambition of these neurotics Is
to convert society into a human rabbit
warren. It would be the very pinnacle
of pleasure to them to have women in
travail every nine monts, as regular as
a clock.
Just for Kannonfutttr.
They have no more regard for humanity than to endeavor to establish
a society of brood-mares and studs. The
idea ia revolting to sensible parents,
who have an atom of regard for one
another. However, leaving the physical part of the question aside, why in
the'name of reason should parents, raise
a large family, strive and struggle during their childhood to feed, clothe and
educate them, only to aee them fed to
the cannon's maw, in the name of patriotism; or to the Moloch of Capital-
in the name of profits! We do
not'need more people in the world than
we already have. Many sections of the
earth are already over erowded. What
we do need is a more intelligent and
kindly form of society for those already
here, to live in.
Tht Wots of Royalty.
The following excerpt from the London "Daily Chronicle'' Bhould be of
much interest to all those concerned
with experimental atock farms and stud
stables: "It has long been a court
puzzle to flnd husbands of proper rank
and something approaching the proper
"igion, for our royal ladies.
We have fallen back on the German
atates for matrimonial alliances 'both
ways. But our royal market for husbands and wives will be sadly curtailed
for years to come. And it is not likely
that any from the German atates will
be invited to bed and toard with members of the English royal family. Fortunately, there has been a tendency to
assimilate home products in our special
pages of the 'almanach.' And1 if the
Scandinavian countries *ail us, we may
suddenly awake to flnd on American
Daughter of the Revolution on the steps
of the Throne!" Ain't It awful, Mabell
.   *   .   .
The following, taken from an official
report published in dear, dirty Dublin,
Ireland, gives a peep at some of the
working conditions: "In the last week
in December, for instance, a woman
was observed embroidering small dots
on cushion covers. There were 308
dots on each cushion; and for sewing
these by hand, she received the' sum of
one penny. She said that, for a day's
work of that kind, she would have difficulty in making sixpence.
The official report does not say how
many hours the old lady had to work
to lay title to this fortune; but we are
perfectly safe in assuming that it was
no 8-hour day—else why tho "difficulty." And this is taking place in
"the land of saints and scholars;" not
In fiarkest Africa; nor yet in Nanaimo.
We require another, Tom Hood to write
the "Song of the Sofa Cushion."
Bay Borne Shipping. Shares.
An interesting pamphlet—especially
interesting to the workers in the admissions mode—has just been sent the
rounds to certain selected investing Individuals, by the British, Foreign and
Colonial Corporations, Ltd., of London,
Eng., advising the buying of certain
"tramp" shipping shareB. Following
are a few excerpts:
Tht Happy Shipowner.
"The British shipowner is one of tho
few fortunate individuals to whom the;
war hns proved an unmixed blessing."
Again, "Should the presont rates of
freight be maintained for the next 12
months, there is no reason why the shipowner should not make   considerably
more than 50% per annum profit on the
actual value of'his setamer." Instances
aetual value of his steamer." Instances
are given; and freight contracts between April, 1914, and April, 1915,
showing in* some cases increases of over,
100%. A boat of 6,000 tons can make *
net profits of £12,000 in four months.
And again, "Allowing for all the increased expenditure (such as war-risk
insurance) steamers of the type here
dealt with art making net profits equal
to over 50% per annum of the present
selling value of £10 per ton dead weight
capacity . . . The longer the war
lasts, the longer is the present state of
affairs in the shipping world likely to
continue."
Pirates Who Benefit by Wu.
So that here we hav* another group
of pirates, other than the war-munition
manufacturers, who are deeply-interested in the prolongation of the war.
And they are no weak group either.
It was this same group, these patriotic
profiteering shipowners, who raised a
howl of indignant wrath against the
"lazy, skulking, unpatriotic" longshoremen, when they demanded a few
more cents**per hour to off-set the high
cost of living consequent on the. wr.
Who Pays for Wai?
As another phase of the question, regarding who bears the brunt of the war,
it would be interesting to know the
profits accruing to the international armament ring. Here ia an insight into
the workers' share, in a letter written
from "Somewhere in Sootlandi" "I
work still in the shell deportment of
the largest steel works in Scotland,
and the enormous wage paid there
ranges from 8%d to 8%d. per hour for
chippers testing shell bars, a very important part of the process, and work
under very rotten conditions, owing
to the fumes given off by the bars,
which are .treated with a strong solution of vitrol before being used. There
is no wor bonus being paid to us chaps,
who number about 150 altogether. . .
My wife con only bring in the value of
12s. when she ^spends my £1. . . .
A U hours' wttok, and your chance of
being ruined with fumes—and we are
told we are drunken and hot patriotic."
History's Weakness for Repetition.
The race for profits makes queer bed*
fellows. For example, the Crimean war
was fought to keep the Russians ont of
Constantinople. At that time it was
considered to be a terrible danger to
India and Egypt, Bhould the Russian
Bear set his pawB on the city of Constantino. The workers went off to the
wars—just as they are doing to-day—to
win liberty, freedom and honor, etc,
while the contractors stoyed at home
and garnered the profits—just as they
are doing to-day.
Onr Love-Feast With Russia.
And now, listen to the London
Globe:" "To-day we are all of ua
heartily wishing that the Russians may
get to Constantinople as quickly as they
can. ... So far from thinkink that
Russia established ot Constantinople
would be a menaco to our route on India, we should regard it as on additional security. . . . And to-day
the Allies are bombarding the narrows
to secure it for her. The truth is, we
(Russia ond Britain) hnve ot length
learned to understand one another.
. The outward soul of Russia
. became Prussianized. . . .
Years ago Russian thrust this domination aside, but it was not easy for her
to convince a great liberal-power like
England (no mention of Scotland or
Ireland!) that ahe had done so." Three
rousing cheers from the Socialist members of the Duma (in jail); from Bour*
tzeff (in Siberia); from the Persian
parliament, and from the Bund!
"Now the Russian Ond the English:
man understand one another very well,
and seenre in the knowledge that the
two great nations will never quarrel, no
one more heartily than England will
felicitate the Czar when he ascends the
throne of the Satsan of Byzantine."
Oh, joy!
Tha Oonsumate Vampirt.
Of all the parasites that prey upon
society the banking interests are the
most virulent. They prey alike upon
manufacturers, farmers, workers, exploiters and exploited, without distinction. All is grist that comes to their
mill. In the guise of benefactors they
take the workers savings and hire them
out, at a profit, to further exploit them.
They squeeze out their cent-per-centum
from the sweating pores of society; and
the greater the flow, and the larger the
size of the sweat-drops, the louder they
trumpet the glad tidings of prosperity.
They are the be-all and end-all of the
capitalistic form of soolety, its prime
product—and its climax. When future
generations sift out the causes of the
present carnage in Europe they will
have little difficulty in discovering that
it was merely a family quarrel among
the world-wide flnanclal interests.
For the trifling services rendered by
the banka of the United States to the
notion last year, they took, in round
figures, the equal of the total cotton
and wheat crop in the largest crop year
in history. All this wealth rolled into
their laps for the mere matter of a little
bookkeeping. What a strange form of
society, that runs its business for the
benefit of the book-keeperl
 W. M. O.
Among tht Culinary Trades.
^ice-President John Cumming presided over a well attended meeting of
local 28, Cooks, Wolters and Waitresses'
union, held in room 206, Labor Temple,
Friday night, June 25th. After the
usual routine business had been disposed of the referendum vote for candidates at the forthcoming election was
taken up with the following result: H.
C. Benson, J. H. MoVety, J. C. Lyons,
F. A. Hoover, J. W. Wilkinson, W. B.
Trotter South Vancouver, H. Neelands. Richmond, J. E. Wilton. Trade
conditions are still very quiet, the closing down of the Marlboro' cafe, where
the bulk of the relief workers were fed,
adding considerably to the culinary
workors' idle list,
E
Fin.-Sec. Notman of Central
Labor Body Sizes Up
Situation
Spontaneous Action of Or*
ganized Labor Springs
■ From Common Cause
"Under the circumstances I don't
see where the trades unionists of Vancouver could consistently do anything
else than what they are doing in the
matter of political action,'' said Mr. J,
Notman, financial secretary of Nelson,
B. O.j Trades and Labor council, who
has been in Vancouver during the past
week, in connection with the enlistment
of mechanics for the Old , Country.
"The Socialist Party of Canada hav
eliminated the clause in its platform
covering what they term 'palliatives/
and have decided to stick witfc the revolutionary position of demanding the
abolition of the wage system, even if
only an educational campaign is possible, a position that is plain enough, but
one that hardly fits in with the lineHof
action pursued by trade unionists who
are constantly striving io secure workmen 'b compensation acts, shorter hours,
better working conditions, etc. This, at
any rate, seems to be the view shared
by the majority of trades unionists in
Nelson, and at the forthcoming election they will place a candidate of their
own in the field. One of the names suggested is that of Mr. Bloomer, a mem*
ber of the Locomotive Engineers'
union, but nothing -definite has been
decided upon as yet. Certainly something must be done.
"The present deplorable' state of
affairs cannot be permitted to go on in*
definitely. We are looking forward
with interest to the result of the next
election. While the various central labor
bodies are acting independently this
time, such spontaneous action, reaching
from Prince Bupert in the north to Nelson in the east and south, indicates a
fundamental cause for it all, and I hope
after the election is over and we have
had an opportunity to size things up,
that a provincial convention will - be
called to thoroughly organize what will
be truly a political reflex of the organized labor mo-vement."
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
I
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
Omar Khayyam To Dots.
"A Book of   Verses   underneath the
Bough, ,
"B.C. Special,"a Loaf of Bread—and
Thou
Boslde me singing in the Wilderness—
Oh, Wilderness were Paradise enow!"
Edgetts
Tht Big Grocery Store
US Haatinga Stmt Wtat
Sensational Ont ln   Pricts   for
Saturday Dollar Day
TEA—Victor, famed blaok, 400 Ib.
breskfstt S lbs. 11.00
COFFEE—Moohs snd    Jars,    400
lb., freih ground .... 0 lbs. $1.00
SUGABy-18 Ib. sack    Pun Osno,
$1.50  vslue.    With  15.00 other
groceries tor $1.00
FLOUR—J4 lb. seek, but No. 1,
$1.35 vslue, hard wheat flour |1.00
BUTTER—Finest Creamery ln city,
"Edgewood"    8 lbs 11.00
CHEESE—Full   cream,   250  seller,
reduced 5 lbs $1.00
EGGS—Large white. 3-day old lo
oats 40o value .... 8 dosen $1.00
LIBBY'S CANNED SOUP—Regular
15c each, dosen cans  $1.00
LIBBY'S Large    Tins    Asparagus
Tips, rear 85o, 5 tins for .. $1.00
LIBBY'S—Large bottle Olives, ng.
—25o esob 6 for $1.00
JAMS—Kootenay Pun Fruit, 5 lb.
tins, reg. 76c eaoh .... 2 for $1.00
SAUCE—H. P. Sauce, extra special, SSo slse 5 for $1.00
RICE—Estra  Slam  quality.    Sne-
olal 26 lbs. for $1.00
CANNED   FRUITS — Del   Monte
celebrated, 850.values 4 tor $1.00
SOAP—Pun French  Castile,    85c
long ban 4 for $1.00
SALMON — Fancy   Rod    Sockeye
Brand. 25o values .... 8 for $1.00
Strawberries — Raspberries,     hslf
orates for    $1.00
Special Atentlon to Mall Ordtra
Tht Abort Pricts for Saturday,
Dollar Day, Only
Sty. 6868
PRESIDENT
SUSPENDER
NONE SO   EASY
^elbffeoli oobacco.
The DELMONICO
Jutt t whisper off Granville, 704 Robson Street
UNION  SHOP
VANCOUVER-SHEADING CAFE f
Harry Beckner.   Ervln Switzer.    Phont Sey. 8313.   VANCOUVEB, B.O.
TROUSER VALUES THAT
SHOULD INTEREST MEN*"
*—mmmm—*-*—*—(Bi^___>•_______
« This sossOn we sn showing a very' largo range of lion's Trousers, mads ta
Wool, Cottonado, Denim, Khaki ud Cotton Whipcords. A pries snd quality to
suit sll hoods.
MIXED TWEEDS—Ony and Bim Tweeds In strips patterns snd mlxtons.
Mads tb live pockets Prices $2.50 to $8.60
FAWN WHIPCORDS $2.25—A strong Cotton Whipcord.   Fvo pockets, halt loops,
self belt and cuffed buttons.   Price.  $2.25 ,
GRAY COTTONADE TROUSERS $1.26—Dark Gray Cottonsde ln six nsat strips
pattern.   A well stuped, good Ittlng Trouser.   Fivs pockets.   Prise ....$1.25
HAIRLINE TWEED TROUSERS $8.00—A atrong Dark any   Hslrllho    Tweed
Tronssr.   Ono of ths best wearing Tweed Trousers suds./ Ilvs pockets.
Pries $8.00
CORDUROY TROUSERS $8.50—A Fawn Corduroy Cloth In a good weight snd a
' medium wale. Five pockets, belt loops and cuffed buttons.   Price $8.60
KENTUCKY JEAN PANTS $1.50—This U tho Slag of all Overall Pants.   Made
of hesvy blsck Kentucky Jean.   Flv. pockets.   Price  $1.50 „
REINFORCED DUCK PANTS $1.76—Mad. of heavy brown Duck, doable stitched,
doable fronts and sssts.   Flv. pockets.   Price   $j.75
NAVY SERGE TROUSERS—Dork Navy Serge Trousers la   two   grades.   Ball
lops, five pockets and plain bottoms.   Prios ........? $8.60 sad $4,75
David Spencer Limited
DAVID SPENCER, LTD. |      •       DAVID tPENCED, LTD.
„
 , f 1	
"Things Cooked as You Like Them"
GOOD EATS CAFE
110 Cordova Stntt, Weat,      3 blocks east of 0. P. B. Station. s
Take home one ot our Chicken Loaves—half 76c, whole $1.60.
Trays delivered to" all parts of the eity at any hoar.
OPEN ALL NIGHT. Phont Seymour 3316.
E. Bi Perry p. _, Wood
Patronise tho Ufion label
by mlng
IDEAL (UNION-MADE) BROOMS
For Sale at All Dealers
IDEAL BROOM WORKS
295 Dafferin Street
CANADIAN
STANDARD FLOUB IS ****-& HIGHEST Df THB WOULD
OGILVEE'S
ROYAL HOUSEHOLD
IB
CANADA'S BEST FLOUR
TRY IT
UNION MEN
PENDER HOTEL
612 PENDER ITMBT WMT
Nsw, Modern, rirt-Osss
Slosm Healed, Electric Lighted
Telephone Seyncsr lata
Balsa $1.60 psr Dsy aad Pp
WHY
The Federationist Hits the
Bull's Eye Every Week
J THE FEDERATIONIST IS THE OFFICIAL PAPEB
OF THE B. C. FEDEBATION OF LABOB AND VANCOUVEB TBADES AND LABOB COUNCIL, EN-
DOB8ED BY NEW WESTMINSTER AND VIOTOBIA TBADES AND LABOB COUNCILS.
J PRINTS MOBE LOOAL LABOB NEWS THAN ANY
OTHEB PAPEB IN CANADA.
1GOES TO PBESS PROMPTLY EVERY FBIDAY
MORNING AND NEVER DISAPPOINTS ITS READERS.
1 BEEPS THE WORKERS INFORMED OF WHAT IS
GOING ON IN THE VARIOUS ORGANIZATIONS.
FURNISHES INFOBMATION OF VALUE THAT
NEVEB APPEARS IN THE DAILY PAPEBS.
§
S TELLS THE GOOD THINGS ABOUT UNIONS AND
MEMBERS.
D LOOKS UPON THB OPTIMISTTC-fllDE AND LETS
THE HAMMER BUST.
KEEPS BRITISH COLUMBIA LABOB ON THE
MAP BY BEING ONE OF THE MOST WIDELY
QUOTED LABOB PAPEBS PUBLISHED.
IJTFRESENTS LABOB'S SIDE OF INDUSTRIAL AND
•^POLITICAL ISSUES IN THEIB TBUE LIGHT, AND
WINS FRIENDS FOR LABOB.
GIVES BESULTS TO ADVERTISERS, BEOAUSE IT
GOES INTO HOME! OF THB BEST PAID CLASB
OF WORKERS, AND IS ACCEPTED AS A GUIDfc,
BY TBADES UNIONIST PURCHASERS.
J REFUSES TO ACCEPT ADVERTISING FROM ANY
CONCERN DECLARED UNFAIR BY VANCOUVEB
TBADES AND LABOB COUNCIL.
«
CF'
•*Jh
OU MUST HAVE THE FEDERATIONIST IN THE
HOME EACH WEEK TO KEEP IN TOUCH WITH
THB OITY, PROVINCIAL AND FEDERAL AND
INTERNATIONAL LABOB MOVEMENT.
^SUBSCRIPTION:   *L60 PEB YEAR- IN VANCOU-
*||VER CITY, «2.00;   TO UNIONS SUBSCRIBING IN
A BODY, 41.00,
The B.C. Federationist
Room 217, Labor Temple
Vancouver, B.C.
M_

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcfed.1-0345048/manifest

Comment

Related Items