BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

The British Columbia Federationist Feb 5, 1915

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcfed-1.0345045.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcfed-1.0345045.json
JSON-LD: bcfed-1.0345045-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcfed-1.0345045-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcfed-1.0345045-rdf.json
Turtle: bcfed-1.0345045-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcfed-1.0345045-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcfed-1.0345045-source.json
Full Text
bcfed-1.0345045-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcfed-1.0345045.ris

Full Text

Array ^^
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA
tNnusTRtAr.   •*   rr, stbenoth. .a^. OFFICIAL PAPEE: VANCOUVEB TBADBS AND LABOH Ool'NCIL AND B.C. I
^INDUSTRIAL .•"*   fT: 8TBENOTH,
OFFICIAL PAPEB t VANCOUVEB TBADBS AND LABOB COUNCIL AND B. 0. FEDERATION OF LABOB
► POLITICAL OOTTT: VIOTOITI
3EVENT//EAR.  No. 6.
VANVOUVER, B; C, FRIPAY, PEBRUA RY 5,1915.
(__*\~)     fLM PER YEA$
[Fraternal Delegate Miss H.
Gutteridge Reports to
B. C. F.ofL
lOlympia Convention Washington State Federation
as a Woman Sees It
TROLLEY MS
Mminrti
Street Rallwaymen's Scribe
Indulges in "Spare"
__m      Momenta.
Bull-pen Philosophy as Expounded to Motormen
and Conductors.
Miss Helens Outterldge, secretary-
treasurer of Vancouver Tradea and Labor council, a delegate from the Journeymen Tailors' union to the New
Westminster convention of the B. 0.
Federation ot Labor a year ago, tnd
jwho was then unanimously eleoted to
attend this year's convention of the
Washington State Federation of Labor
tt Olympia, reported to the Nanaimo
convention of tne B. 0. Federation of
Labor, held last week, as follows:
To tke Delegates ot the Fifth Annual
Convention Of the British Columbia
Federation of Labort
Mr. Chairman and Delegates,—Tour
(fraternal delegato to the fourteenth an*
knual eonvention of Washington State
j Federation of Labor begs to report as
follows:
The convention assembled at Olympia, Washington, on Monday, January
18, 1915, asd waa called1 to order by
President Foretell of the Olympia
Trades and Labor council, who, after
addresses of welcome were delivered by
itke governor of tke state tnd the mayor
of Olympia, Installed President E. P.
Marsh ae presiding officer of the contention.
The mtny delegates present waa suffl
■stent evidence of the fact of thorough
organisation throughout the state, one
,very pleasing fetture being the number of Women delegates present, many
of the Utter being delegates from the
{Women's Label league, both local and
etate organisations being well represented. Theee women, the wives and
relatives of trade unionists, doing their
part in the organised labor movement
by creating t demand for union label
good, and by refusing' to purchase
goods without the label attached, and
eo forcing the merchant to atock them
to rettin custom.
Alter the usual preliminaries, such aa
tppotnting committees, ete, the convention settled down to business. The
president's retort covered very thor-
ouhgty tke propaganda tnd legislative
•edt initiated tt tke previous eonven-
Met tad otrted out deritg the patt
l«g advantage of the recently acquired
right ot Initiative, submitted to the people Ave pieces ot legislation, known ts
Ike "live sisters."
Of the Ive, one only, received t ma
jority of votes in its favor, that being
i bill to prohibit, under penalty, em
iloyment agencies.
I One of the "live sisters," the first
aid amendment to the Workmen's Ci
pensatlon act, was defeated by the scion of the governor of the state, who
>y means of. the press, called upon the
leople to vote against the First Aid
tet, aa drafted and submitted by or*
Kited ltbor, saying he would then
olnt a commission tb draft t first
amendment to the Compensation
tet that would be satisfactory to both
nnployert end employees. As a result
if this tctlon on the part ot tht* govern-
ir the tmendment wis not carried.
! Tour delegate had the privilege ot
being preeent tt t meeting of the legit*
Ittlve committee of the federation,
where the commissioners appointed by
tke governor ot the atate, submitted t
draft of t flrat aid tmendment thtt waa
diametrically opposed to the principles
laid down by organlted labor, Inasmuch
es it celled for t contribution from the
-worker, to be deducted trom hie wagee,
mud also called for t waiting period of
alt daya before tty benefit would be
received by the injured worker.
Three medical men also tppetred be-
fore tbe commititee tt tke ssme time
Rand after a discussion biting several
hours, during which Ex-commissioner
Wallace most skillfully dissected the
Workmen's Compensation tet tnd its
administration, also the proposed first
aid tmendment, showing its weakness
tnd defects from the point ot view of
organised ltbor, proving beyond the
shadow of t doubt thtt ht it labor's ei-
Jert on Workmen's Compensation acts,
nd one wkom it would be impossible
to surpass. Tour delegate wit tbsolute*
ly convinced, and urgently suggests,
net tny compensation aet endorsed by
tke British Columbia Federation of Labor must bave incorporated in it provision for first aid to Injured workers,
without tny waiting period, tnd to
Which the worker who betrs tht pain
ltd oft times it permanently disabled,
lhall not be called to contribute finan*
sitlly.
( In regard to the establishment of
[overnment bureaux, the legislative
lonunlttee recommended and the convention went on record, ae in ftvor ot
li bill drafted by Commissioner of Lt-
lor Olson, so long ss it contained pro-
rision for its administration by t
joard, composed of three employers of
abor, and three employees, an inde-
icndent person to be appointed by the
ix, to be chairman, also thtt it con-
tin provision making it compuliory
hit all workers applying for work at
he government bureaux be informed If
hire ia a atrlke on in any locality or
adustry, before being sett to any inch
tcelity to work.
I Ot Spedtl Interest to B. 0.
[ It would be impossible to report on
111, or even touch on many ot the in-
■resting subjects discussed in convention, but with regard io a tew it Is very
■uportant that the B, 0. Federation of
ltbor delegates take note of them. Very
Irtefiy: They were such matters ss un-
pployment tnd its possible solution tt
le present time by the establishment
I s tour-hour working day, the un-
■rabted value of a labor press is t
■stilt of keeping Workers in consttnt
Inch with all matters concerning them
■[tbout the tisual embellishments eon-
lined 1ft the capitalist press, tnd the
Bed. tt (he present time tor t more to-
^icted immigration.
(Continued on Page Three.)
B.C. F. OF L EXECUTIVE MEETS
GOVERNMENT MINISTERS AT VICTORIA
Questions Referred By Nanalmo Convention to Executive Ably
Presented.
WAND
Cabinet Promises Careful Attention
To Demands of Labor
The bull-pen sage says:
THAT—The recent invasion of the
"jitney" autos, on the Pacific coast, is
a serious menace to the employment of
street railway men. In this city our
occupations are threatened tnd jeopardised.
THAT—President Tates of-Westminster division and President J. H. Mc*
Vety of Trades and Labor oounoil, took
up the question at the right time tnd
place,   ■ , .'.
THAT—Our continned support of the
B. C. Fi of L. is essential tnd our re-
affiliation with that body should be
considered afresh,
THAT—The revenue from taxi
licenses ia of large proportions.
THAT—It will be oil-set by the enormous loss to the city in percentage dues
from'the operating company, which deficit will in turn come out of the taxpayers' pockets.
THAT — Fair competition stimulates
business, but the unfairness ot the
"jitney" competitor is, in many ways,
beyond question.
THAT—From the latest., aspect a
franchise is a mere."scrap of paper."
THAT—The invaders came Uke the
Germans into Belgium.
THAT—The business grew like a
mushroom.
1 THAT—A mushroom's life is shortlived.
THAT-rThe novelty of a "joy-ride'
for five cents "caught on."
THAT—To be packed like fowl in a
crate, to freeze, get wet, chance lite
and limb, are t few of the joys.
THAT—Perpetual kickers tnd knock*
ers are in high glee, ahd' have increased
the weight of their hammers.
THAT—The "jitney" eigne, as tn
Imitation of- ours, is the slncerest form
bf flattery.
THAT—It it an ill wind that blows,
etc., for whilst street car receipts went
aero, the takings by peddlers of gasoline and otker essentials soared aloft.
THAT—lip-town restaurants ktve
[lost mtny noontime patrons. The suburban butcher tnd green grocer, however, smiled t emole is ke added up tha
ntu heliitistsai* wilt' >-- <->-'.- -
THAT—Already some ownen tnd
passengers trt wiser but sadder indi-
viduils.
THAT—A devotee of the gtsoline
wagon recently sought t quick ride to
Westminster, but suffered bud luck,
ohtnged can three times tnd arrived
in time for a christening instead of a
wedding.
THAT—A few chauffeurs wear a
smirk, whilst their gearings snd tires
wear—n-way.
THAT—The policemen on "point"
duty are being overworked and bewildered.
THAT—To keep in touch with the
erase, a "jitney" rag, or a "jitney"
break-down is in order.
THAT—He of tke fetrful ftce,
chummed up with she of the tireless
tongue, on a "jitney" jaunt
THAT—The junk shops tnd scrap
heaps htve been raked over, parts resurrected tnd put out on tke streets in
the merry chtse for the nimble nickel,
Therefore, do not trust it, gentle ladle.
THAT—A slump in the vtlue of
autoe it imminent.
THAT—If the law, at it now is, requiring autos to stop In rear of a ear,
etc., was rigidly enforced, they would
So out of business, or is sufficient Miners to leave eome of ue a living,
THAT—Fair, competition with us
means the ssme speed—8.1 miles per
hour) issuance of transfere; safety
stops; percentage of earnings to the
city; repain to roads; a regular ache
dule; proper wages; membership in a
union, including garage repair, etc., tnd
a thousand other things which any com-
ken-sensed, impartial individual must
realise. —T. 0.
LABOR
A
Parliamentary   Committee
Favors   Independent
Political Action.
DELEGATE DENNING
HAS RETURNED TO
PRINCE RUPERT
W. E. Denning, board member for the
Pacific district of the International
Longshoremen's Association,'and a delegate to the recent Nanalmo conven
tion of theh B. 0. Federation of Labor,
was a Lsbor Temple visitor on Wednesday, leaving the sue -evening for his
home at Prince Bupert. Mr. Denning
was elected by the B. 0. T. ot L. ae
vice-president for the Prince Bupert
district. In convenstion with The Federationist Mr, Denning emphasised the
fact that the trade unionists of Prince
Bupert had succeeded in electing no
lets than four'union men aa aldermen
at the recent municipal election in the
northern metropolis, and'were already
learning the wisdom of their political
decision. Trade condltlona wore still
very dull, and relatively there were aa
many out-of-works at Prince Bupert ss
ln Vancouver.
Samuel's Solution.
Sandwiched between "hints on beauty culture," a quack ad. or two and t
group photo of real efficient nurses, and
Sam's "reminisenoes," .The Fed.'s
ofllce boy has discovered in the Ambitious City Ltbor Snooze, one part'
graph, evidently reproduced from retl
MBS.: "If men were billygoats and
would eat*, paper, the hungry unem-
eould. have a feast on   the
lengthy, 'and magnificent report the
■high cost of living commission' it
ready to present to the dominion government as soon as parliament opens at
Ottawa."
It Don't Apply.
The moratorium was never intended
to apply to labor paper subscription renewals.
The executive board of the British Columbia Federation of Labor met at Victoria, B. C, on Thursday, January S8th, when President Watchman announced that he had arranged lor the executive
to meet the government on Friday at noon. The different matters
referred to the executive were then dealt with, »tad the following
were'taken up with the government on Friday:
Mines Regulation Act.—Amendment making provision for the
election of all mine inspectors by the miners in the locality in which
they performed their duties. Also to amend section of Act relating
to gas committees to read: "Competent person or persons," instead
of one or two of their number. Section. 37.—To provide for the payment of mine inspectors by the government. Section 40.—To amend
as follows: "The mine operator or owner shall engage a sufficient
number of miners, who shall constitute a corps duly qualified' to
apply flrst aid to any injured person-and, in order to facilitate work
of said corps, ambulance boxes, containing all necessary appliances,
shall be placed within the immediate vicinity of all working places."
Truck Act.—Amendment to Truck Act, in re men being compelled to live in company houses and to purchase (foods at company
stores. '■*.-*.,  3
Registration and Examination of Plumbers' and sanitary inspection and enforcement of sanitary conditions.   I
Masters and Servants Aot.—To amend this act to provide that
where thirty or more men wish to pay a certain doctor, said doctor's
money shall be deducted at company's office.
Ra Employment of Caucasian women by Orientals,
To provide for the proper inspection of all winches, derricks
and gear in all places where longshoremen are employed.
The enforcement of minimum wage of (3 on all relief work carried on by municipalities and cities, where money is provided, or
loaned by the government.
A law to oover the inspection of all construction, installation
and. maintenance of all electrical work, suoh as power stations, pole-
lines, etc.
Re printing of text books, etc., in government printing plant,
and desire for extension of this work being done by the government.
Municipal Clauses Act.—To amend act to provide for the giving
of cities and municipalities power to regulate the closing of barber
shops on legal holidays, and to regulate the hours of opening and
. ■ - '."To amend act to provide for cities'ind municipalities to invesf
their sinking funds in short-time debentures of their own.
Factories Aet.—To bring all factories under the act, irrespective of the number of employees.
The protection of the workers under proposed moratorium.
Workmen's Compensation Act'.
Unemployed problem.
Presentation by Offlcen.
Vice-presidents Carter and Guthrie dealt with the Mines Regulation act;; also Vice-president Graham of district 18, U. M. W. of A.,
who pointed'out that the matters referred to the government were
not new ones, and that the government had, on many occasions, been
requested to take these matters up, and therefore it was not necessary to go Into details.
The premier said the government were considering the matters
relating tb the act, but were not in a position to say that they would
be dealt with at this session. Also that they had had no complaints
about any of the mine inspectors, but the government would consider the matters referred to.
Vice-president Yates dealt with the Truck act, and instanced
condition* obtaining at Fraser Mills, where it was impossible to get
the act enforced, owing to the faot that the municipal officials (being also the company's officials) were the powers to prosecute for
the violation of the act.
Attorney-general Bowser referred to the act and the matter was
promised consideration.
Registration and examination of plumbers and sanitary inspection was dealt with by Vice-president Dunn, who pointed out that
the health of the community depended on proper sanitary inspection. This matter was promised consideration.
Vice-president Simmons dealt with the Masters and Servants
Act, instancing the situation at South Wellington, also near Cumberland, in the lumber camps. The premier promised consideration.
Vice-president MoVety dealt with the employment of white
women by Asiatics, and referred to the many dangers of young girls
in this respect.
Attorney-general Bowser stated that the supreme court of Saskatchewan had been upheld in the enforcement of the Saskatchewan
act by the privy council, and promised consideration.
The enforcement of a minimum wage was taken up by Vice-
president Denning, the premier stating that, in times like Ijte present, which were abnormal, it could not be dealt with as under normal conditions, and that the government in financing relief work,
had advised the municipalities to spread it over as large an area as
possible, in order to give relief to as many as possible, as he did not
consider that relief Work oould be looked upon as ordinary undertakings.
The inspection of electrical construction and apparatus was
taken up by Vice-president Dunn, who instanced the high rate of
mortality amongst electrical workers. The premier said that they
had appointed an assistant inspector, and that many improvements
had been made. Vice-president Dunn said that the work of the inspectors was satisfactory, but stated that they should have an aot
to guide them along definite lines,
Vioe-president McVety then dealt with the printing of text
books, etc., and the Factories aot, instancing in the latter that many
accidents were liable to occur in small factories, and that, owing to
hard times, many factories that had been under this act would, by
the reduction of staffs be exempt from the act. The premier promised to refer the matter of printing text books to the minister of
education, who was not present. Attorney-general Bowser said
that they were considering suggestions from the faotory inspector,
and the suggestion re small factories would also bo considered
Seoretary-treasurer Wells and Vice-president Yates dealt with the
amendments to the Municipal Glauses act. The one referring to the
closing of barber shops was favorably received, but the premier did
not hold out any hope for the one dealing with finance, but promised
consideration.
Vice-president MeVety dealt with the Workmen's Compensation aot, and said that we had hoped for muoh from the royal commission's report, but it seemed that there was not much done as yet,
and asked when copies of the aot eould be secured. The premier replied that he had promised President Watchman copies when they
were ready, and the promise would be carried out.
(Continued on Page Four.)
ILflOI
PROCI
LABORjOEPUTATfON WAI1S
UPON ML
mm
Executive Is Instructed to
Seek Regulation
of Jitneys.
A larger attendance thtn usual wat
present when the president called the
Trades and Labor couneil to order tt 8
o'clock'last night. A number of new
credentials were presented tnd the
delegates obligated.
The seoretary reported thtt the federal department of works had asked for
wage scale of, Vancouver district. City
Clerk McQueen had written stating
that the council's request for a grant
of (1,000 towards entertaining the
convention - of the Tradea and'-Labor
congress of Canada here next September would be referred to the city councU.
Committees Appointed.
Committees were appointed for the
coming six months as follows:
Parliamentary committee—B. P. Pettipiece, printers; W. F. Dunn, electrical
worken; J. Corley, brieklayera; 8. H.
Grant, barben; Bobt. Stevenson, paint-
en; T. Crombie, waiters; A. J. Crawford, sheet metal worken; F. Halg,
street railway employeea; Ot. Kilpatrick,
laborers;* A. B. Cook, letter-carriers; F.
Parsons, musicians; C. McDonald, tail-
on. This committee meets etch Wednesday- evening previous to the council
meetings.
Organisation "Committee—J. Sully, It*
borers; J. H. McVety, machinists; 0.
W. Curnock, bartenden.
Audit committee—C. McDonald, tailora; J. P. Hamilton, sheet metal workers; H. L, Cory, prlnten.
,/_*,mm_a.jiitm$,_ ,., .   ,.
A special»committee, consisting of
Delegates Miss Outterldge, J. Sully and
A. J. Crawford, will report to next
meeting of the executive on the question of a business agent for the councU.
Delegate Wind reported on the laet
meeting of the city council.
Parliamentary Oommlttee.
The parliamentary committee recommended that a delegation be sent to the
Sixt   meeting of the license   commit*
oners to protest against the employment of Orientals ln hotels.   This will
be done at the request of the culinary
Workers Here Still Wrestling with Problems of
Twenty Years Ago.
Too Few Business Agents
in Labor Temple and
Legislature.
An excerpt from Sunday's News-Ad,
under the eaptioh of. "Vincouver
Twenty Yeara Ago," mikes it somewhat difficult to believe that the workere learn by experience. It will be
noted from the clipping below that the
same problem wis being wrestled with
here in IBM.  It retds:
At a special   meeting   of   the,
Board of   Works, yesterday   the
question of relief work wu discussed and it was decided that the foreman be paid $8.80 per dty tnd
married men 41.75, tnd tingle men
*1.25.  Men wishing i to get work
on the gangs must apply to [the Al-
dehmtt tor the ward in which they
reside for ah order to the foreman
of the gang.   No man it to be allowed to work more   thtn   three
days in succession.   Men employed
will be paid weekly.
Theorietically aldermen are no longer
supposed to interfere with the heads of
department!  in  the choosing of employees, but some people  are  inclined,
even yet, to feel that very little progress haa been made in, that direction.
If, after twenty yean, the worken
are stiU content to remain victims of
their own political folly, upon whom
must be placed the responsibility but
the workers themselves) Ae a disorganized mob the worken are helpless.
Organised industrially they etn do
much to remedy their conditions. Organised politically victory ia certain.
There are too few business agents in
the Labor Temple. There tre altogether too few ot them on the payroll it
Victoria. The only, wty to Iecure
thlnga is to go tfter them. Each labor
organisation seems to be waiting for
the other to start something. How
about itt
Alberta Federation of Labot
Secures Co-operation of !
Civic Authorities.
Seek to Ameliorate Unemployment Through Public Works.
Independent Political Action.
Committee reported having discussed
the advisability of Independent action
by the ltbor organisations at the comini
provincial elections, and that it wouli
be taken up further at the next meeting. Delegate Kilpatrick said thtt the
committee was of the opinion, after
experience in the ncent municipal elections, that independent action should
be taken by the trade unionists of the
province at the text election for the
legislature. The report was adopted
without opposition.
Delegate Webh and thl president reported on the recent convention of the
B. C. Federation of Labor, and the
visit of the executive of that body to
the government.
Beports of Unions.
Letter-carriers will hold a concert in
Labor Temple next Wednesday evening. Bartenden reported having had
trouble with the proprietor of the Irving hotel, which resulted in the union
card being withdrawn, Matters had
been adjusted tnd the ctrd replaced,
Cooks and waiters reported the Paris
cafe as a union house. The typos,
asked all unions to carefully observe
that all printing done for them carried
the union label. Tailors have many out
of work, and still have trouble on at
Storry's. Street rallwaymen reported
that owing to the jitneys some of their
members were not as fully employed as
before.
New Basinets.
Delegate Mansell moved that it be
recorded that F. W. Welsh did not receive the endorsatlon of the Trades and
Labor council previous to his election
to the council of South Vancouver. An
amendment to lay the matter on the
table for twelve montha wu lost. The
motion also .was lost. It was then
moved thst' Councillor Welsh be en*
doned in his work as a counciUor in
South Vancouver up to date. An amend*
met to lay this on the table was made
and carried.
The council will credential one delegate to attend meetings of the city
council.
It was pointed out thtt the park
commissioners had eluded the *3 wage
by putting all men on relief work at $2
per day. A committee was tppointed
to protest against this before the park
board.
Jitney Bus Resolution.
Delegate F. A. Hoover, of the street
railway employees' union, moved the
following: "That the eiecutive of the
Trades and Labor council be authorised
to urge that the jitney bus traffic be regulated in the same precautionary way
as the electric street enr traffic, to tho
end that the welfare of the public may
conserved." The resolution was unanimously carried,
Labor makes books and libraries, but
reads penny newspapen.
BIG TUNNEL JOB
CLAIMS TWO MORE
WAGE-WORKERS
Two men, Evan Howell tad John
Ztebwi wen kJlki.whlta woikiittt
tke Wg 0. P. B. tunnel, Sogers'Km,
lut week, u t result of a powder explosion. The coroner's jury exonerated
tbe contractors from blame. The bodlei
of the victims were taken to Bevelstoke
for interment. The increasing number
of preventable "accidents" on this big
job indicate conditions which should be
carefully looked into by the authorities.
Beports show that the work is being
rushed at break-neck speed, that wages
are low and the straw-bosses given to
"driving" and "firing" upon the
slightest evidence of an employee s
serting any evidence of manhood.
STAY AWAT PROM ALASKA.
The Alberta Federation ot Libor
seems to be getting ution, Ineofar tl '
iti efforts to ameliorate unemployment
ere concerned. Some weeks ago it called
a special session it Calgary tnd Invited
the mayors, representatives of botrfi
of trad* tnd memben of tke provitetal
legislature tnd federal botes toatmot
They weeded to the request tad a Bv»
ly discussion ensued. Subsequently a
representative committee wu MM
to interview tke federal government,
with a view to securing assistance.
As t result Sir Bobert Borden, Ho*
Bobert Bogen, Hot. W. J. Beehe Ml
Hon. Arthur Meighet, on Motday lut
received t deputation it Ottawa, eon*
listing ot three Alberta mtyors tad
the preeldent of the Lethbrldge botrd
of trade.   The deputation hid t double
nuost to mike. They uked.thtt in
er to relieve the unemployment situation the construction of projected ptb-
lie buildings be proceeded with. A mon
important request wm thtt the government proceed with the irrigation
scheme in the Lethbrldge district. Thl
Dotal ia to irrigate 100,000 acres tf
at t cost of 818 per ten, slightly
less thin two million dollin.
Sir Bobert Borden, in t brief ttptf,
to tke request, promised consideration.
"BIG BUSINESS"
THRIVES; WORKERS
DO THE FIGHTING
~f4r— '•
Just now we live it a world ot wu.
There tre sixty-one thousand daily
newspapen in the world.' One-half ol
these tre printed in English, observes
the Philistine, tnd three-fourths of the
contents of til of thtm ii devoted ti
wir.
Moit conversation is war talk.    W» ,
talk wir; dream wtr) think war.
War it disturbing all business, til e»
terprise, tU vocations.
When the Titanic weat to the bottom ;
of the. set, tnd carried down sixteen
hundred people, we wen horrUed..
B»t for four monthi the daily-aaeri-
tee of Ute or the blood-drauhed ieldt .
j* a****? _h >at*aito'iiH?£W\
Titanic viettat., *■    '   •fl"        •'   ™.j-
More than that,
Alluring Publicity Campaign Victimises
Mtny Worktn to Mythical Jobs.
FAIRBANKS, Alaska, Jan. SS.—Industrial conditions kere are rotten,
with no immediate prospects of improvement. The coet of living ie ex*
ceedingly high, intensified by the transportation monopoly. Work ia out ot the
question. In no place in America do
the workera live on so low a plane aa
they do right hen in Alaska, subsisting
on beans and dap-jacks eight months of
the year. A lot of "oiyllne" is being
disseminated broadcast, proclaiming the
"prosperity" of Alaska, its possibilities, etc., and exhorting workingmen to
come here to help build the railroad tnd
Eartielpate generally in the good times,
luge joke were it not produetive of so
mtny ptthetic caaea of flimflam. And
to what nefarious schemes do the muter class resort to exploit the ignorant
toiler I Apropoa of the railroad: Thin
will be very Uttle doing in thtt direction this year, u only 15,000,0000 will
be expended during the preeent yetr.
Very little ltbor will 'be required tnd
there la aplenty here already. Htve
just returned from the litest discovery
and stampede—Tolovana—and despite
all reports to the contrary no gold has
been discovered In paying quantity;
just prospects tnd not very much of
that. Aluka la tbout til In and a poor
place for the migratory worker to oome
to, especlaUy tor tho checaeo.
OABPBNTBBS' MASS MEBTINO.
Decided to Maintain Preeent Schedule
tnd Work-day of Bight Hours.
At a crowded meeting of carpenters
held in Labor Temple on Monday last,
the following resolution was carried
unantmosly:
" Resolved—The we, as an organise,
tion, endorse the action of the other
branches of the buUding trades in re
ferring the schedule as submitted by
the Builders' Exchange to the Building Trades council, and that we instruct
our delegates to that body to oppose
any reduction from tho recognised wage
of $4.25 per day ot eight hours and 44
hours per week."
Considerable discussion ensued on tht
above qnestlon. Without one dissenting voice, and long before the qnsstlon
was pnt, it wu known where the car*
penters stood—to a man.
The meeting further affirmed its previous stand towards the central labor
body, by the narrow majority* of three
votes.
An excellent programme will delight
all those who are fortunate enough to
bo able to attend the letter-carriers'
concert, which will be held in tho Labor
Temple, on Wednesday, February 10th,
commencing at 8 p. m. Tho "Excelsior Entertainers" are guaranteed to
deliver the goods, so come along everybody, and treat yourselves to ono really
enjoyable evening. Admission is only
25 cents—by ticket or at tho door.
Come. W. A. S.
^^^^^^^^ . ttat' number of
young mea are disabled by disease or
wounded irreparably.
Militarism must go. Thit wtr It •
war against wtr. Jealousy, vengeance
and hate must abdicate.
Civilisation, ae a sentiment, hu die.
armed the individual; now it must disarm nations.
Every writer, every orator—every
reader and every listener—ahould thins
disarmament.
Until disarmament comes we eta
tever htve t world of friendi.
The manufacture of deadly weapons
by private corporations must ceut.
If murder machines an made, let thoea
be produced under tn international
license, with eo statesmen, ol* their
wivea, u stockholders.
Al long u private individuals tbrivl
by the miking of "Dreadnoughts,"
sophistical reasou wiU be given wt]
"Dreadnoughta" are a necessary ttl
lovely adjunct to peaee, progress ant
plenty.
Big business hu been to Heme in
this thing. And now thtt big buslaeet
ia being buffed, soaped and sandpapered
let it not escape thli truth—(hit nt
longer shaU individuals be allowed M
thrive through supplying murder machines to the mob.
JTOOMWT FOB 88,000.
fader Pro-Fuloai ot rtctoriet,
Jnnd Workmin Awarded 1
Justice Macdonald, on Monday'
gave judgment for (1.000 damagtj in
the personal injury claim otl. J.
Trapnell against the Canadian Kim-
peiu Investment Compiny tnd H. Mt-
Colum for the loss of his left hand In''
t planing fill at Sechelt lut July, tht
mill being operated under lease from'
the company by Mr. McCallum. The
court held that under the Factories
Act it wae incumbent to provide for aU
necessary protection to   machinery   to
Srevent iccident and he held that there
ad been negligence in this matter. •
DetectivH tt Ltbor Conference.
At the recent tnnutl conference ot
the Scottish Independent Labor party,
held in Glasgow, Mr. Keir Htrdie wu
still suffering from his breahdown, tnd
was not able to apeak from the platform. Instead ho hold an informal conference with various delegates in an
anteroom of the meeting hall. While
this informal gathering wu in progress,
tnd while Mr. Htrdie was speaking, it
waa reported that four detectives were
in an ousttide room listening. On this
being made known it wu agreed that
Mr. A. McBride, chairman of the
Brighton branch, should approach them,
and on their showing that they had no
authority or warrant he uhed them to
leave the premises. This they did, tnd
the incident pused off without anything further.
Mrs. Lucy Fanons, the popular socialist lecturer, is well known to
thousands' in Canada. An unprovoked
attack was made by Chicago police on
January 17th on a parade of uaom-
filoycd which followed an orderly meet-
ng at Hull House The exouse offered
for the assault was that the partdert
had no permit. About 22 arrests were
msde. Mrs. Lucy Parsons waa one of
those arrested. Iter alleged offense wu
carrying a banner on whioh the word
"Hunger" was inscribed. She is tht
widow of Albert Parsons, who wei
hanged in 1887 -tnd afterward shown
to have been oonvlcted without evi. :
dence of guilt. PAGE TWO
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
MOLSONS
BANK
Cspltsl ant Hesenra,    -    ss.800,000
85 Branches in Canada
A general banking business trans*
acted
Savings Department
Interest allowed at highest
Current Bats
BAST END BRANCH
150 Hastings Strset But
A. W. Jarris, Manager.
The Royal Bank
of Canada
INCORPORATED IN*
. | 11.MM*
Paid-up Capital
Reeerve 	
Total Auiti • •
WE ALLOW IN-
TIRIST ON DEPOSITS IN OUR
SAVINGS
DEPARTMENT
Ont Dollir will tptn
tht tccount, tnd yeur
business will bt wll-
ume  bt   It   Itrgt  or
THE B. C. FEDERATIONIST
Published every Friday morning by th*
B. C. FAdtratlonl.it, Ud.
B. Parm Pettlpleoe Manager
J. W. WUklaMtt..».^....» ......Editor
Directors:   Jae.    Campbell,    preildent;    3.
H. McVety,    lecretary-treaaui-er:    H.
Glbb; G. J. Kelly; B. P. Pettipiece
Offlee: Room 217, Labor Ttmplt
Ttl.  Exohangt Sty. 74W.
-Ir-
Subscription: 11.60 per year; In Vancouver
City. 12.00; to unions subscribing
ln a body, ,1.00
BEPBE8ENTATVE8
Mew Westminster.. ,W. E. Maiden, Boa .._
Prince Hupert W. E. Denning. Box 681
Victoria A. B. Walls, Bex 16SS
ASUIsted with tbe Western Labor Prase
Association.
"Unity of Labor; ths hope of the world."
FEIDAT.
...FEB8UABY 8,1915
THIRTSEN BRANCHES IN
VANCOUVEB
i
THE
mcoiroMTio
MK
BANK OF
TORONTO
Assttt.
.160,000,000
..8U.tN.8N
Workingmen
•il jrou etn live itch week
even t small amount you tre invited to open a Saving! Aeeonnt
Kith The Bank of Toronto.
Bmall depositors tre ta well
etred for ta large ones. A dollar
will atart t Btvings Aooount, tnd
interest ie added to Savings Bal-
ineei half yurly.
ttt hakohm itbebt wat
WHAT   DOBS.
THE "JITNEY"
BOS  MEAN?
THE "JITNEY" BUS, as a means
of urban transportation, seems,
for the time being at'least, to
hnve taken almost complete possession
of the cities of the Pacific coast. This has
given rise to a
riety of viewpoints,
expressed in letters
and articles in the
press. Some of these
fiercely assail the
new competitor of the street railway
companies, others welcome it as a
meana of retaliation against what are
deemed the abuses practioed upon the
public by those corporations. Some
suggest extermination, otheu favor en-
couragement of the "jitneys," while
the milder type of critic advocates regulations which will safe-guard those
who use them. None of these three deal
with the question from a labor standpoint. As we eee it, it appears to us
that, the problem has two salient features. One ie, tho influenco it will have
upon the jobs of the men who operate
the cars, he other is to discover
whether the "jitney" ie really an evidence of industrial evolution as it pertains to urban transportation.
British Columbia
LAND
Splendid opportnnitiee In Mixed
Firming, Dtirjinf, Stoek ui
roultry. Brltlih Oolumblt
Grmta Pre-emptions of WO tent
to Aetual Settlere—
Free
' T1BM8—Betldenee on tke land
for tt leut three yetrij Improvements to tht extent of 88 per
ierej bringing under cultivation
tt least Ive acree.
Wot totter Information apply te
DBPOTY IONIITBB OF
LAND!, VIOTOBIA, B.O.
UOBBTAET, BTTBBAU OF
PBOVINOIAL HffOBMATION,
VIOTOBIA, B.O.
A paid-up union etrt utilise
vou to all the trivlleiee of the
Liber Temple Club.   Try It
The main fact of the case as it
stands at present is this: The eompeti
tlon of the "jitney," has so far affected the receipts of the B. C. Electric
Bailway company from its street ears,
that the system is being worked at a
financial loss which increases dally. The
natural result is, that members of the
street rallwaymen's union are losing
their jobs, and being put on short time
as the outcome of the company's effort
to reduce its losses. Impartial philosophers, with no material issue tt sttke,
will airily assure the street railway-
men, that the day of the street car as
they have known it, is over. And that
they may ta well make up (heir minds
to submit to the course of industrial
evolution which ia consigning their jobs
to the discard. But to the atreet railwaymen, it is a very practical personal
matter of bread tnd butter, and if is
hot likely that they will be satisfied!
with abstract generalisations. Their
material interests are at stake, and by
t strange turn of the wheel of economic
fortune, they find themselves in the
same boat ts the company. It is plain
enough. If the company has no business,
the men have no jobs. No jobs, means
unemployment; possibly attrvation.
And it is only natural that they should
join hands with the company to prevent
both it and them from going dewn to
one common disaater. It. is economic determinism seen at work.
•      •      •      •
The plan suggested is regulation of
of the "jitneys" by legislarion, in the
same way that the operations of the
street railway tre regulated by law.
The city authorities mty attempt that,
but tt present it is a fact that they
have no legal authority for tny action
they may take in that direction. But
supposing that tho . provincial legislature passes a law for the regulation of
"jitney" traffic at the present session
of parliament. Among its principal
clauses will doubtless be one regulating
the nnmber of passengers allowed to
travel in each bus, according to its size.
Witt thnt take the profit out of the
jitney" business and cauae its disappearance! If so it will test the truth
of the belief, held by many, that the
jitney" is in any case only a transient thing to be succeeded by large motor busses specially designed for street
trafflc and capablo of carrying many
passengerst Now undoubtedly one of
the reasons which cause many people to
use the "jitneys," is the fact that
thoy travel muoh quicker than the
street cars. They are small, and once
having taken up their nine or twelve
passengers, they travel a long distance
at quick speed. But if the big busses
came, with a capacity almost as big as
the street cars, would they travel much
faster than the cars dot If not, it is
doubtful if they would get more patronage than the ears. And it may be taken
for granted that this aspect of the mo
tor bus question, would be carefully
considered by capitalists who contemplated putting money into a motor bus
business.
It may really be, as many believe,
that the "jitney" does mark a point in
the evolution of urban street traffic, and
that the street car is doomed to disappear and make way for a more mobile
method of travel, especially as the area
of paved streets increases. But even
so, the motor bus is still far from perfection. Motor busses have their own
funny little ways. On wet block paving, they "have a wonderful facility for
skidding round' at the back end, and
discharging their load through store
windows, or on the sidewalk—under the
bus—after knocking down such light
standards or other obstacles as may
happen to be in the way. Then again,
there is the question of motive power.
The choice is between gasoline and
electric storage batteries. The latter
are notoriously inefficient as yet, especially where the load to be driven is a
heavy one. And if the gasoline-driven
motor bus displaced the street car altogether, it is certain the Standard1 Oil
company would not overlook the price
of gasoline.
e      e      e      e
Both for those materially concerned,
and those not, it is an interesting problem in industrial evolution. As far as
most of the "jitney" drivers are concerned, their fate does not particularly
concern organized labor. Many of them
are( ex-real estate agents, and others
who made enough money out of some
one of the methods by whieh financial
sharps flourished in coast cities a few
yeara ago, and who, now that their occupation is gone, are glad to collect
nickels to avoid having to sell their
cars for a song, or have them seized because they cannot finish paying for
them. In any case, if the street car is
doomed, they too are doomed sooner or
later and ean be no more than a passing
phase of the problem. But if rules regulating the number of passengers are
passed into law to control the "jitney"
busses in the interests of public safety,
and if the street car company will repeal the foolieh move it made in raising
fares, and bring them back to six, or,
if need be, seven for twenty-five cents
it would make a big difference.
FBIDAY.. ... ...FEBBUABY «, 1818J
belief that the working class of all nations should be opposed to war.
-    •      ■ •        e        •
In doing so he was not saying anything outrageous, and moreover, relied
upon the pledge of secrecy which members of the United Mine Workers
take when they join the union, not
to reveal anything said in meeting.
But some member, who had lost respect
for his obligation, evidently went out
and reported what Elmer had said.
ThiB was the chance which the authorities had been waiting for. Elmer was
arrested and taken to Vernon gaol as
an alien enemy, where he has been interned ever since. The mine workers
have taken the matter up with the Department of Militia whioh has replied
that it sees no reason to advise the re*
lease of Elmer, but that one of the officials of the department is coming west
and will look further into the matter
then. •      •      •''';■•
Meanwhile the executive ^committee
of the B. 0 Federation of Labor, acting
under the instructions of the eonvention
of last week, will make representations
to the government with a view to securing the release of Elmer. This is
due to Elmer from the Federation, in
view of the faot that he was expressing
the international anti-militarist views
endorsed by the Federation since its
foundation. There seems no reason
other than the general one that he is
of German birth why he ahould be detained. No specific charge of attempting to dissuade anyone from joining
the Canadian contingents, or anything
definite like that is laid against him,
and he should be given his liberty at
least under the guarantee of the officers of the mine workers.
N'
AT THE
NANAIMO
CONVENTION.
THE HIGHEST
SAFE INCOME
For the purpose of the great majority of Investors the best
investment is ths Nit Investment with the highest income.
Investors seeking stfety, together with tn tttraetlve interest yield should investigate the merits of B. O. Municipal
Bonds, whieh yield from 6% te 7% and tht security is unquestioned.
Canadian Financiers Trust Company
HEAD OFFICE 839 HASTINGS ST. W.    . VANCOUVER, B.C.
Patrick Donnelly-General Hwjagew
ANAIMO CONVENTION of the
B. C. Federation of Labor must
have been a disappointment to
the pessimists, for without exception,
those who were there, including many
who have attended
previous   c o n v e n-
tiona-— agreed that
it   was    the   best
held   for   at   least
       three years. True it
only occupied three days. It is true also
that in that three daye more real bust,
ness was done than at tho two previous
conventions in five days. The' number
of delegates was much smaller, bnt in
the aggregate they were not less representative. ' From Fernle and Bevelstoke
east, to Prince Bupert nnd Vancouver
island north and west, they came re-
presenting workers in all the chief industries of the province. Nor did their
reduced numbers mark any falling interest of)'the unions ln the Federation
and its work. On the contrary it was
shewn that many organizations had
made a special effort to discharge their
financial liabilities to the Federation,
so that its continued existence should
not be endangered, and that having
done that, they were not nble to go to
the expense of being represented by
delegates.
•      •      •  '   •
When the convention was first called,
there were not lacking those whose
thoughts were probably fathered by
their wishes, and who airily prophesied
that this year would see the last of the
Federation for at least a while. It was
said that the appalling industrial conditions whioh prevail had knocked all
the vim out of the movement. It is true
that those conditions have been responsible for some of the more active spirits
of previous conventions not being at
this one. But it has proved what all
who have studied the labor movemont
long enough knew to be true—that it is
not in the laat analysis a movement of
persons, but the working class,
forced by economio pressure to
make an effort to ameliorate
their conditions of life. That pressure
was nevor keener in British Columbia
than now. It was reflected in the whole
ot the deliberations and in the spirit of
serious purpose which marked the debates from start to finish. There was
no place for acrimony or .personalities,
and short shrift would have been meted
out to any who had shewn an inclination to indulge in either. All this augurs well for the future of the Federation, and should do much to eventually
bring into it some -of those unions
which, for one reason or another, have
not yet affiliated. Both their moral and
financial help is needed, if the Federation is to accomplish the things it ean
if properly organized.
B
0BOE8US
CANDIDLY
INCLINED.
HEBMAN ELMEB is a well-known
member of the United Mine
Workers of America, and secretary of the Michel local union in British Columbia. Previous to the outbreak of the war he
was well-known in
the Crow's Nest
Pass district for his
anti -militarist
views. Not anti-
militarist insofar as it applies to any
one country, but In the international
sense. When the war broke out, he realized that being of German origin did
not make his situation any less deli*
cate, and from all report was careful
In his utterances. But at one of the
local union meetings he reiterated hia
HEBMAN
ELMEE'S
CASE.
IQ BUSINESS MEN DO NOT often say things whioh contribute
materially to the arguments of
those social and industrial organizations which are trying to raise the
status of working
men. At ordinary
times they are
equipped with
wealth of ingenious
Bophistry to combat
every argument tending in that direction. At the present time there is sit*
ting the United States Commission on
Industrial Belations. It is visiting the
principal centres and its hearings are
open to all who consider they have anything to say about the relatione between labor and capital, which is worth
listening to.
•      .    . .      .
Last week the commission held its
sittings in New York, when some of the
most promintent of the industrial kings
of the United States gave testimony.
Geo. W. Perkins, a director of the
Steel Trust, and notorious for his op*
position to organized labor/ did not
waste time or words when he said to
the commission!
"Any one approaching the earth
ln an airship, looking down on our
great broad fields and our mines,
seeing   our   comparatively   small
population with our great armies Of
unemployed, would think we were
living in a lunatic- asylum."
So they are, and Oeorge has a very
representative number of the afflicted
ones in his plants.  The balance is made
up of the free born Americans who believe the republican   and   democratic
political parties are the final word in
political wisdom.
e      •       •       •
But the chief interest of the sittings
centred round Henry Ford, the manufacturer, whose so-called "profit-sharing" plan has won him international
fame. He told briefly of the working*]
of the scheme. He said it was not so
much actual profit-sharing aa the giving
of a nearly universal minimum wage of
85 a day. When he stated that the
company, which has eight directors and
a capitalization of 88,000,000 did nn annual buelness amounting to between
880,000,000 and $90,000,000 and that
profits were from 828,000,000 to 828,-
000,000 annually, one understood that
was indeed a better interpretation of it.
He made the definite statement that in
his opinion the "current" rate of
wages was always IS per cent, below
that which was necessary to maintain
life decently.
While he stated thtt his plan was
priir.t.tlly Intended to benefit his employees it was plainly demonstrated by
his evidence that his company was not
making ruinous sacrifices for the sake
of altruism. The increased efficiency)
under the plan is from IS to 20 per
eent., with reference to the work produced, and is the result of an eight instead of a nine-hour day, as it was formerly. The daily absentees have decreased from 10 per cent, of the working force to three-tenths of 1 per cent,
under the $5 a day plan. Ford also
stated that in 1913 the .company had
discharged 1,276 men as against 188 in
1914, while 870 had quit in the former
year and only 116 in the latter.
a      e      e      e      o
Ford did not stop at the purely material aspect of the oase, but made some
observations on the sociological effects
of industrial conditions. He said that
he could take every prisoner in Sing
Sing and make a man of him, which
Indicates, it appears, that a criminal is
a criminal because society has kicked
him into revolt against some law or other and that if he isn't kicked he won't
get outside the pale. Ford himself has
about 100 ex-"criminals" working for
him, and they are just like other folks,
now that they have the same kind of
chance that other folks have. It must
have been a jolt for the academic old
fossils who regard the criminal ts t
necessarily permanent element in society. AU such evldenoe from those
who, like Ford, have aetual facts to
back their statements, Is valuable addi
tion to the steadily growing pile of
proof that the industrial system of our
time, is anti-social. The educational
value of such revelations, plus the ever
increasing economic pressure which is
making people think about these things
who never believed they would have to,
will complete the work of consigning to
the discard a system which surely attains the high water mark of organized
human stupidity.
B"
WHEBE THE
DIPLOMATS
OOME FBOM.
BITISH    AMBASSADOBS    and
those who make up the staffs of
British embassies are a very exclusive caste.   In   their   hands, along
with diplomats in London, largely rest
the chances .of peace
tnd war.  Their secret   schemings may
go on for years, gradually   leading*   to
armed   conflict" between nation and nation, and ln which
the working class of the countries in
volved are expected to sacrifice their
blood and lives, without knowing any*
thing about the reason for lt except
such as may be given them by as
cloak for the real truth.   The only time
the workers are considered fit to take
an interest in "foreign policy" is when
they are told to go an kill their kind in
some foreign country.   Then there is no
lack of high sounding but none the less
specious    reasons    forthcoming   from
these god-like arbiters of national destiny.   They aro a class by themselves,
utterly removed by all tradition and experience from the workers, whom they
despise at ordinary times, and flatter
when they want them to flght.
e       *       e       •       e
Much light is thrown on this question
by the recent publication of/the report
of the Civil Service Commission. Before
a man oan apply for entry into the diplomatic servioe he must have a private
income of two thousand dollars per
year—quite a comfortable sum in
England. The Foreign Secretary
must also approve of him before he is
allowed to appear before, the Board of
Selection, ub it is called. Between 1908
and 1913, thirty-seven persons successfully applied for attacheships to various embassies. Twenty-five of these
were educated at Eton, and the balance
at other expensive "public" schools.
All but one had been through Oxford
or Cambridge, the chief centres of cultured snobbery in England. All this
goes to the production Of a class highly
jealous of its caate privileges, and possessed of a lordly contempt for the
lower orders" who, to them, are ao
many pawns in the game they play.
To the machinations of their kind in
every country involved in the European
conflict, the war is largely due. Ahd it
the working class of that continent
really meana to strike at the causes of
Its present position, here is one of them,
and one of the worst too, Their work
eats Uke a cancer into the vitals ot international amity and goodwill, until
the day comes when otherwise peacefully disposed peoples are thrown into
mortal conflict with eaeh other.
MENTION THE B. O. FEDERATIONIST
Dr. Keeley's
New Quarters
Save Money on
Your Dental
Bill
In my new dental parlors
over the Birks old atore,
Granville and Hastings Sts.,
I have now better facilities
than ever for doing first-
class work at moderate
prices.
I want to get my new location known to all my old
patients and a great many
new ones, as I am doing the
very best work that oan be
turned out,/at prices whioh
will make a very substantial saving on any work you
need.
I make a specialty of porcelain and gold bridge-work.
A bridge to be perfectly satisfactory must .fit so well
that you never notice it, and
it should be bo strong that it
will last for years.
Of course, my methods are
absolutely painless. My patients do not experience the
slightest discomfort while
undergoing. any kind of
treatment in my office.
Come and see me and let me
give you an estimate on the
cost of your work. Tou will
be surprised at the lowness
of my price.
OBOWN AND BRIDOE
SPECIALIST
Up One Flight of Stairs-
Over the Birks' Old Store-
Granville and Hastings Sts.
Dr. M. F. Keeley
Absolutely Painless Extraction
DOR GREAT
FEBRUARY
Home
Furnishings
SALE
IS ON!
BUY NOW
AND SAVE
EVERYTHING IN
THE HOME - FURN- I
ISHING SECTIONS
IS REDUCED
IN PRICE
▼ANCOUVER UNIONS
TRADES AND LABOR COUNCU. —
Meett Drat ted third Thursdays. Exes
outlve board: Jaa. H. MoVety, presidents
F. L. Estlnghsusen, vlce-pre»ident; Geo.
Bartley, general aeoretary, 210 Labor1
Temple; Miss H. Outterldge, treasurer;
Fred A. Hoover, statistician; sergeant-
at-armi, John Sully; A. J. Crawford, Fred.
Knowles, W. R. Trotter, truatees.'
ALLIED   PRINTING "TRADES    COUN-j
CIL.—-Meets  sscond  Monday  In  tht:
month.    President, Oeo.  Mowat;  secre-
tsry, g. H. Noelandl, P. O. Boi 06. '
BARTENDERS' LOCAL No. «7«.-OS>
tlce, Room Ml Labor Temple. Meett
flrst Sundty of oaoh month.   President.
P. P. Lavlgne;. flnanolal secretary, Quo.
W. Curnook, Room 208, Labor Temple.    .
BRICKLAYERS' AND MASONS', NO. 1
—Meeta every 1st and Srd Tuesday,
8_ p.m.,   Room  107.    President,   James
Haalett; corresponding secreUry, W. S.
Dagnall, Box 63; financial secretary, F.
R. Brown; business agent,  VV. a. Dag-
nail,'.Room 216. ■
I BROTHERHOOD   Ot   BOILER
1       and Iron Ship   Builders   ei™
of America, Vanoouver   Lodlt   No
«— •-■ --*   ■"-  -inia;
.uunuui/v    vr    aui-lM     MAKE	
■nd Iron 8btp Bolldere and Helpenl
.. America, YenoooTer Lodge Mo, 191—j
Meeti flnt ud third Moadan, * P- *»]
Freildont, F. Buolir, 859 Cordova Eeetf
eeeretery, A. Fitter, 1151 How itrwt.
COOKS, WAITERS AND WAITRESSES-"1
Union—MeeU flnt Prldar In eaeh]
month, 8:90 p. m., Libor Temple. A. Qr»\
htm, baelneia repreientatlve. Offlce: '
905, Ltbor Temple. Honni 8:80 a. m. wj
10; 8 to fi p. m. Competent help furnfihedl
on ehort nottoe.   Phone Seymour 8414. j
|DISTRICT. OOUNOIL   OF   OABPINTlflj
Never was a better time
to furnish your home
than now
Hudson's Bay
Company
Granville and Georgia Streeta
_. -. —...... Hwom, .w. t. Taylor. .—-<
est Mo. SIT meete  Snt  aad  third   Hon-
day ef sack snath, eat Local IMT assets i
Aral and third Tuesday et seek »atb.	
ELECTRICAL WORKERS, LOCAL NO. tl»
—MHta room 101, Labor Ttmplt, mey
Monday, 8 p. m. Preildent, Sam. Cewker,
557 Templeton Drive; recording aeeretary
H. Hogan. Labor Templo; flnanolal secretary.
aad bueineie agent, E. H. Morrison, Room
SW, Later Teinpls. !
ELECTRICAL WORKERS, LOCAL NO. I
111 (Inside Men)—Meeti flrst and
third Mondays of etch month. Room 101,1
I p. m. President. H. R. Van Sickle; rt-
nordlng lecretary. 3. M. Campbell; butt-1
nesa agent, F. L. Estinghausen, Room WT.
DOARAEBB. BOTLDIN8 AND COMMON
Laborers' aalon, Ho. SI—Moots flnt aai
third Friday of each meats, Ubor Temple.,
Preeldent, E. C. Appleby, tilt Pendrlll
agent.
•iff
    .., ., v. Auuieoy, ten rendri
eecretary. Oeorge Herrlion; builneee
John  Sully, room 220, Labor Temple.
laborer! Invited to meeting. ,
MACHINISTS. MO. Ill—MEETS SECOND]
and fourth Mays at I p. II.   Preeldeit,,
 -idles   leentary,   3.
ilar?. 3. ll_MoVoty,
A.  ...
Brookes
R.    Towlor; '
"    lelal
flnaoel
MUSICIANS'    MUTUAL
Union, Looal No, Ml, ... ... .. -.-
Meett seeond Sundty   of   eaoh month.
FEWE;
„,.„_ mvH* ouiiuajr oi Hon montUt
SOI Labor Temple. Preeldent, J. Bowrar*
vlee*preeldeat, F. EniUih; atereUrr. H. *.
Braefield;    treiinnr,    W.    Fowler*    Fhoat
wswnti      an
Soymonr 7496,	
OPBBATIVg PLASTERERS' INTIRltt-
TIONAL ASSOCIATION, V*. 99 —,
MeeU erery flnt ud third Wedneadar
In the month la room 901* Later Temple.
Preeldent, A. Hunrj ooi*mpoe"
F. Bumpier, 1180 Twenw-IMr
tnanetal eeenterr, D. Soott,
———•"«—•     •vvivimj,     a,     DODII.     HTT
atroot; tnaaaror, L, Treea
PAINTERS',.   PAPBRHANOERB
AND
Phones:   Seymour 82S8 and 82S9
THB
Hose & Brooks Co, Ltd.
Wines, Llqnori tad Cigars
604 Main Street, Vancouver, B.O.
PANTAGES
Unequalled Vaudeville  Muni
PANTAQM VAUOaVILLI
THRU IHOWI DAILY
t.«, 7J0, 1.15    lesson's Prices!
Matinee, 1lt.| Ivenlngs, Me., ate.
aoco.
Printers and
PabMeis
Labor Tuple
Buildiof
' Phono Sey. 4410
Prlnten of The Pan.
T.B.OUTHBBETBON400.
Men's Hatters and Outfitters
Three Stores
tVNOPtll  OP  COAL   MINING  RIQU-
LATIONI
Coal mining rights of tho Dominion,
In Manitoba, Saskatchewan ud Alberta,
thl Yukon Territory, thi Northwest Territories ind In t portion of tha Provinoe
of Britlah Columbia, may be leaaed for
a term if twenty-one years tt tn annual
rental of 11 Ml tort. Nat mors thtn
1,110 tores will be Hand to ont tppll-
tint.
Applications for Istaa muat be mada by
the applicant In person to thl Agent or
Sub-Afsnt of thi dlitrlet In whloh the
Ightt
In a
applied for an situated.
surveyed territory tha Und muit hi
 rlbed by sections, or legal subdivisions of sectlona, and In unsurvayod ter.
described
H T,
thl tract
ritoiy
or legal subdlvls
 1 unsurvayod  ter-
tpplled   for shall   to
leant hlmielf.
must be acoomptnlad
Bach appljcal ,	
by t fee of II, whloh will be refunded if
staked by thl applicant himself,
tlon must "
by t fee of II, whloh w	
thl right! applied for Ira not available,
but not otherwise. A royalty thill he
paid on thi merchantable output of thi
mine at thi rata of five centa par ton.
The person operating thi mini shall
furnish thl Agent with sworn returns
accounting for tha full quantity of merchantable ooal mined and pay tha royalty thereon. If the ooal mining rlghta
ara not being operated, such returns
should be furnished tt lust once a year.
The leaae will Include thl coal mining
rlghta only, but thi lessee mty bs permitted to purchlte whatover available
surface rlghta may be considered necessary for tm working of the mini tt tin
rate of 111 tn tore.
For full Information application ahould
be made to thi Secretary of thi Department of thi Interior, Ottawa, or to tor
Agent or Sub-Agent of Dominion Landa
W. H. CORT.
 ., Mlnliter of thi Interior.
N. B.-Unau{horlsad publication ot thli
advertiaemew will not b. paid for-IMM.
iiumWi.   x-ArBinnANGHSRH'.   ANL
Decomtore', Loot) ill—Meet! every i
Thursday, 7.10 p.m. President, H. Orand;
flnanclal secretary, 3. Freckleton. Hit
Comox street; recording seoretary, R
Dowding, Ml Howi street, Busineu
tgent. James Train, Room 101, Labor
Temple.
PATTERN    MAKERS'     LEAGUE     OT?
NORTH AMERICA.—Vancouver and
vicinity. Branch meeta lit and Ird Fridays tt Ltbor Temple, room IM. Robert,
C. Sampson, Pru., 747 Dunlevy Ave.:
toe. Q. Lyon, flnanclal aeeretary. 1711
Grant atreet; J. Campbell, according aee-
retary, till Argyle atreet.	
BTERBOTTPERS' AND ELECTROTTP-I
in' Union, No. II, of Vancouver andl
Victoria—Meeta   aecond   Wedneaday ofl
aaeh month, 4 p. m., Ltbor Temple. Pretl-f
dint, Chit. Bayley; recording eecretary,
A. Birnle, co. "New! Advertiser,"
STREET' AMD ELECTRIC RAILWAY EM-i
PLOTEE8, Pioneer Dl-Hslon, No. 101—1
-MW.-.HB,  tmw ...vision,  no.   tWl—■
Meets Ubor Temple flnt ud third Wedaoe-0
dajra it StlO^aad I p^m.   President, ,Jos.|
Hubble; neordlag aeeretary, Jas. I. OrMllJ
flnanolal aeentary ud bislaees agent, Frsd.1
A. Hoover, 1400 Clark Drive.
■TBAM  ENGINEERS,   INTERNATION-1
ll LocU 117—Malta every Wedneaday!
I p. m., room 104, Ltbor Timple. Flnin-r
' ' aocratary, B, Prendergut, room IH.
mil
UNION   (IN-J
sttni
TAILORS'   INDUSTRIAL        .... _
ternatlonal). Local No. lis—Meetings!
held flnt Tuesday tn each month, I p. m _
Prstldant, Miss H. Qutterldim: recording!
Mcnttry, O. MoDonald. Box 141; ir~ "
clal we., K. Piteraon, P. O. Bon Ml.
THEATRICAL 8TASE EMPLOYEES. LO-1
OAL Ro. Ill—Meett aeooad Sender all
eaeh month al room 104, Labor TamplaS
Preeldent. H. Spears t wording aeeretaryM
Oeo. W. Allla, iVO. Bu 711, Var   m
TYPOGRAPHICAL ORION, RO. It- _
Meets lut Saada; et east month et M
p. m. Praaldeat, R. t. Pettlpleee: vtso-prestfl
dent, tt. 0. Molater: eeereteryti-eeemm, B.|
R. Nealands, P. 0. Boi M.
PROVINCIAL UNIONS |
B. C. FEDERATION OP LABOR—Meeta!
in annual convention in January. Eiee*l
utive offlcen, 1015*16; Preeldent, A. Watch-f
man; vice-presidents—Vancouver, W. F.l
Dunn. J. H. McVety; Victoria, B. Simmons; \
New Weatmlneter, W. Vatei; Prince Rupert, j
W. E. Denning; Revelitoke, J. Lyon; DU-f
Met 98, U. M. W. of A. (Vancouver leland), L
S. Outhrle; District 18, U. M. W. of A. I
(Crowe Neet Valley), A. J. Carte. Secretary-1
treaiurer, A. S. Welle, P. O. boi 1588; Vie* J
torla, B. O.
NIW WMTMINtTIR. B. O.
NEW WESTMINSTER TRADES AMD LABOR Council—MeeU every I       *
fourth Wedneaday It I p. SI. U L
Pneldent, H. Kindlon; flaanelal eeeretair.l
»      .      a. .      |tBfttMy|      ^,       R.-J
_. —  /! leneri
Maiden.   P.O.Bui
vlted to attend.
Tke pablie to la-1
PLUMBERS AND 8TBAMWTTERS' LOUL
No. «»5—Meete every seooad ud foertl j
Friday of month la Labor tall, TllO p. m. I
Preildent, D, Webster; eeoniarr. A. Ml-1
Uren.    P. O. Bu IM, Naw Weatmlutar, ]
VICTORIA, B. O.
VICTORIA TRADES AND LABOR COUN- ,
OIL—Meeti flnt ud third Wodiaiday, a
Labor hall, 711 Johnston atroot, al I p. m. I
Preaident A. 8. Walls; searalary, Thu. F.
MlthUon, Bu IN, Viotorli. B. O.
KIMBEBLET MINERS' UNION, NO. 10ft 1
Weetern Federation of Mlnen—Meata J
Sunday evening! la Union kail. Praaldant, 1
Alei. Wilion; aeentary-tniiinr, J. W.J
Stewart, Klmberley, B, O.
OBOANI-JED   LABOB   COMPANIES.]
LABOR TEMPLE COMPANY, LIMITED— I
Dlrecton: James Brown, preildent; R. P.I
Pettlplece, vice-president; Edward Lothian, I
Jamee Campbell, J. W. WUkinoon, Oeo. Wll-"
by, W. J. Nagle, P. Blumberg, H. H. Free.]
Managing dlnotor and eeoretary.tnasurer, i"
H. MeVety, room Sll, Labor Temple, Vai
B. C. FEDERATIONIST, LIMITED—Meetlfl
at call of preildent, Labor Temple, Van-f
couver, B. O. Dlrecton: Jamee Campbell,]
preaident; J. H. MoVety, aeonterr-treeounr;f
A Watchman, A. S. Weill. R. Parm. Pctti-4
piece, manager, S17 Labor Temple. Tele-fl
phone:    Seymour 7*95.	
WILLOW HOSPITAL
FOB
SICK CHILDREN
Corner Broadway asd Willow
Phone Fairmont filflS
Iflii HaU and Mlai  Weitley,
(hraduate Nann
FfiS^ IPRTOAT  .FEBBUABY 5,1915
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
PAGE THREE
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
Spencer's February
 ' *•*"—F
Furniture   Sale
Now in Progress
Complete Dining Suite $49.50
Comprises well-equipped buffet, fitted with
beveled plate mirror and ample, cupboard
and drawer accommodation; round pedestal
table with extension to six feet; set of six
chairs with genuine leather pad seats.
Choice of golden and fumed finishes. Sale
price..... $49.50
David Spencer Limited
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
""■or iU.J   "/>i'r
Braids
BfcST
CoKFEE
Did You Get Yours
This Morning?
BRAID'S
BEST
COFFEE
906 Granville St
Nm la lln Market
WM TURNER
-DEALER IN- «
New and second hand China, Crockery, Furniture,
Hardware and Stoves. Furniture moving and shipping. Telephone us when you have furniture for
sale. Highest prices paid.
TELEPHONE SEYMOUR 3745
SPECIAL LINES
Mini' Twnd snd Woritid Suits up to ISO tor $14.76. Blue snd
Black D.B. Suit! up to f 10 tor 17.85.   Ovorcoits up to f 10 tor $9.71
REDUCTIONS IN ALL DEPARTMENTS V
CLUBB   &  STEWART
*' 309-315 Hastings St. West      Phone Seymour 702
L CITY
Reports from Unions Show
Steady Increase of Unemployed Members.
Jitney Busses Cause Heated
Discussion Among the
Delegates.
NEW WESTMINSTER, Jan. 17.—
Vice-President C, Cropley presided over
the regular meeting of New Weatminster Tradea and Labor oouncll this evening, Frea. Knudson being in attendance
at the B, C. F. of L. convention at Nanalmo.
Communications
Thomson
Stationery Co., Ltd.
M. J. 0A8KBU,, Tm,
Stationery Printing and
Bookbinding
326 Halting! Strut Wut
VANCOUVEB, B. 0.
Office Furniture
Less Than Wholesale
Hastings Furniture Co., Ltd., 41 Hastings St. West
Wo in making * Olearince of
all present atock of Offla Furniture.
Conn iirly ud miki your
elude*.
TEMPTING PRICES FOR
High-Class DENTAL Operations
Bridge-work per tooth ...        $5.00
Gold crowns    -    - -     -       eseh  18.00
Porcelain erowni    - -      -     -  "    $5.00
Perfect fitting ptates ..."   $10.00
Amalgam fiUln*ii    - -     -     -  " $1.00 up
Enamel fillings       - -      -      -  "     $2.00
DISEASES Or THE GUMS, ineludlul Porrhos. TREATED.    PAINLESS
METHODS.      GAS GIVEN.
Dr. BRETT ANDERSON
Phone Swmoir S8J1
Officii  101 Buk of Ottawa Building
Named Shoes are frequently made ia Non-
Union Factories—Do Not Bay Any Shoe
no nutter whit Its nimi, unless It been t
plain ud rwdsble Imprisilon or this stamp.
All shoes without the Union Stamp are
always Non-Union.
BOOT 4 SHOE WORKERS' UNION
IM Summer Stnet, Boston, Hut.
J. r. Tobln, Free.    O. L. Blalni, Su.-Treee.
From A. W. Decker, re team for tug-
of-war contest. Delegates take, note
and any wishing to organize a team
may do so.' From B. C. Consumers'
League, re delegate to that organization, received, and Del. P. Paulsen
elected. From Ottawa, re Free Labor
Bureau bill. Secretary to comply with
the request.
Credentials
From Typos, for B. A. Stoney, W. E.
Maiden, W. Burnett and H. S. Walsh,
From Musicians, for E. W. Peck, Wm.
Sutherland and H. Mass, From Barten-
denr, for H. Schofleld, Daniel Stewart
and F. W. Jameson. From Cigarmakers,
for Bert Henry, vice W. Jardine. Be*
ceived and delegates present obligated
and seated,
Biports.
Financial Secretary Stoney said
while he had notified the chairman of
the auditing committee that the booka
were ready to be audited, it had not
been done; doubtless because the chairman was away. He made a statement
as to the finances, showing a balance
of (16.95 on hand. Beceived and ao*
cepted. For the campaign committee
Delegate Stoney asked and was granted
an extension of time.
<    Beports of Unloni.
Typos.—Nothing new. Bartenders-
Ten or twelve, men idle. Street Bail-
way Employees—From bad to worse;,
600 men about a year ago, little over
300 now, 33 men laid off in car shops
and other reductions in staffs may be
made as a result of the "jitney"
busses. Musicians—Fair. Hod Car
riere—Two men working. Electrical
Workers—Four men idle. Timber
Workers—Understood there had been
another reduction at Fraser Hills. Engineers—quiet as possible. Molders—
Not a man working.
Election ud Installation of Officers.
President—C. Cropley, Molders.
Vice-president—J. B. Flynn, Steam
and Operating Engineers.
General Secretary—W.  E.   Maiden,
Financial Seoretary—B. A. Stoney,
Typos.
Sergeant-at-arms—W. E. Ivlson, Timber Workeri.
Truatees—P. Paulsen, Bartenders; A.
Bowell, Street Bailway Employees; W.
Dodd, Street Bailway Employees.
All officers were Chosen without opposition. The general secretary was
authorized-to cast a ballot for the of*
leers, after which he obligated them
and was then himself obligated.
New Business.
Delegate Stoney brought up the matter of the "jitney" busses, saying that
the merchants were to blame for the
Present state of affairs, as they had
opt the B. C. E. B. from reducing the
fare by promising to give the company
their freight. They double-crossed tho
B. C. E. fi., whieh employs white labor
and union tabor only, unlike the C. P.
B. and other concerns, which have Chinese handling freight. Delegate Barnard
regretted men had been laid off, but it
Was the company's own fault and .the
jitneys were, not blame. He thought it
advisable to wait awhile before taking
any aetion. Delegate Paulsen laid he
couldn't see where Delegate Stoney got
that stuff, as the B. C. E. B. had cut
off thV. workingmen's tickets and all
the union ever got out of the company
they had to fight for. Delegate Dodd
said there were no regulations governing the jitney busses now, while there
were all kinds of regulations governing
traffic on the B. O. E. B., and he
thought that attention of the city council and the provincial government
should be drawn to the facts with a
view to placing the jitneys under proper traffic regulations and making tnem
responsible for those killed or injured.
Delegate Paulsen said the B. C. E. B.
probably killed or injured as many people as any road of similar length in the
oountry. Delegate Dodd said that the
percentage of claims against the B. C.
E. B. is smaller than in any other city
on the American continent. He wanted
to see the jitney busses made responsible. Delegate Maiden supported Delegate Dodd and pointed out that'jitney
drivers nowhero on the const had been
reported as affiliated with organized labor. Delegato Peck supported Delegate
Paulsen contending it was not up to the
Trades and Labor council to take any
action in the matter, but up to the
"Nature Teeth" are not only LUXURIOUS but—they
are NECESSARY for EFFICIENCY
THESE "Nature Taath" ol mine (entirelr different from
ordiaarr md    *       "
match tba onee that
BUILT
INT THB
MOUTH
Luxury
ordinary and oflr "Falaa Taath) which an made to
 the onea that »raw In -roar Jewi—In shape em"
and met Knt—-and to St Ilka tha ones Nature gave you.
Necessity
Efficiency
Bids*, niohards
rglHESB "Natara Taath" ara truly luiuiloua lucerne m
X    csn bite, chew and anile with tbem la perfect eonfl-
d»nee end comfort. .....     ...        _
a_OT thar an alao aeeeaaarr te health aad efielencr. Tha
M-0 old "raise Teeth" an trolr Mm, fer thar an bat
makeshlfta aad do aet perform tha fuoetloua af Nature'a in
teeth.
maatleatlon of tha food—-whieh meana atomaeh health ud
NATURE'S own teeth, then, or thalr worthy eueoeeeora
—my "Nature Taath"—an necessary te tha proper
central afleleney—and te the lemrloua ssnss ot weir-bciaf
whieh makes for that e«elency.
"tobsoma»o __• avj_vt—aa
I HEREBY GUARANTEE that all denial work
performed by me will he abeelatelr pelaleae. If tke
alllbteet twine of nail Is experienced V tbe patient ao money need be Mid to me. or U aay haa
been paid It will ba Inelaatly Melded by me.
 I SIS
I Phene Sep.
4.1.7.1
f farter nanatee that all erem or brldie #ors.
will remain la SM-elaas eoadltlei far ■
er fUlhu will remain la Int-elaae eoadltlei fer ■
period el TEN TEARS, tt w ef my wnk becomes
detective darlni that time I will replace It IbsoMoly
IRE! OP OHABOE
Dr. HALL, "The Modern Dentist"
authorities. Let them deal with it.
Delegate -Dodd said he was not asking
to have the jitneys put out of business,
but that they be compelled to furnish
similar accommodations and safety as
the street cars. Delegate Paulsen said
Delegate Dodd had never said a word
when the fares were raised. On motion
of Stoney-Maiden, the entire matter
was referred to the executive committee to report at the next meeting.
Vote was 8 to 3.
Good ud Welfare
Delegate Dodd thanked the Trades
and Labor Council and the workers
generally for the loyal support accorded
him in the recent oity election, and he
pointed out that there were many workers who were not on the voters' list
that should be there. Delegate Barnard, thanked those workers who supported him, but said it was not unanimous support, and the, President of the
Council fladftno business working for an
aldermanic candidate not endorsed by
the council.
SEES MERIT IN GOING
AFTER SPECIFIC
LEGISLATION
(Continued from Page One.)
COMPENSATION ACT
OF
M
Continuation of the Series
of Representative Acts
of Australia.
PRE5IDENT
5U5PENDER
nonl    ;n EASY
HADE IN CANADA
HARRON BROS.
FUNERAL   DIRECTORS AND
■MBALMIRS
Vancouver—omee   and   Chapel,
1014 Oranvllle St., Phone Sey. MM.
North   Vancouver — Offlce and
Chapel, 111—Sixth St West, Phone
t—iitef. 221
A notable feature was the unanl
moua opinion of the delegatea, speahing
as the representatiyes of their varloua
unlona, of the great value of thi
Mothers' Pension aot, and an assertion
that any attempt to repeal that aet
would be fought by organlied labor to
the laat ditch. Also any attempt to interfere with the Eight-hour Day Law
for Women tp the detriment of the
workers, would be fought in a similar
manner.
A eplendid report, also very pertinent
at the present time, was that of Harley
Hughes, legislative agent for the federation, and editor of the Labor World
of Spokane, on Vocational Training.
The report showed very clearly the
need and the right for every child to
receive an education along the vocational that it most inclined to, is tending to increase efficiency, and alao tending to awaken a better appreciation in
the child of the value of good! work intelligently instead of blindly done. Ur.
Hughes completely put to Sight that
old idea of the capitalist class, that a
number. of people are unable to get
work because of inefficiency, and that
if they were vocationally trained would
not be unemployed, the truth being
that at the present time efficiency, or
lack of it, has nothing to do with unemployment, the real trouble being
that for every hundred workers there
are only fifty jobs, md the tendenoy is
in the direction by means of ever increasing labor-saving devices to eliminate a few more jobs.
Several fraternal delegatee and visitors were present and addressed the
convention—of the latter the most interesting from the point of view of organlied labor, waa Hiss Howe of Seattle, who asked the delegates to endorse
and support an act to establish the offlce of public defender. The following ia
a synopsis of the proposal:
"Upon request W tbe defendent, or
upon the order of thl court, the public
defender shall defend1 without expense
to them, all penona who are not flnan-
cially able to employ counsel and who
are charged, in the superior court, with
commission of any contempt, misdemeanor, felony or other offense. He
ehall also on request, give counsel nnd
advice to such persons, in and about
any charge against them upon which he
is conducting the defense, and he shall
prosecute all appeals to a higher court
or courts of any person who haa been
convicted upon any such charge, where,
in his opinion, such appeal will, or
might reasonably be expected to result
in the reversal or modification ot the
judgment of conviction,.
He shall also, upon request, p'rosecute
actions for the collection of wagea and
of other demands of persons who are
not financially able to employ counsel,
in cases in which the sum involved does
not exceed 1100, and in whloh, in the
judgment of the public defender, the
claims urged are valid and enforceable
in the courts.
He shall also, upon request, defend
such persons in all civic litigation in
which proper evidence has been sub*
nutted that they are being persecuted
or unjustly harrassod."
Tbe committee most heartily endorsed the creating of such an office.
Owing to the necessity of keeping
the president in the field for organizing
or legislative purposes, the question of
finances was gono into .and in view of
the fact that hard times are causing a
slight falling off in capital and also because the passing of the prohibition
bill would mean, by the withdrawal of
the Brewery WorkerB, Bartenders, etc.,
from the Federation and a consequent
loss of very considerable per capita tax.
It was therefore resolved that no fraternal delegates be sent to either the
B. C. or Oregon State Federation of Labor, or the A. F. of L. during the next
year.
A great many minor resolutions were
passed, but the outstanding business of
the convention was .undoubtedly, The
First Aid Amendment to Workmen's
Compensation Act; Free Employment
Bureau; Unemployment, and Vocational
Training, all questions that ultimately
concern the workers of every stato and
province Irrespective of the so-called
boundary line dividing Canada from
the United States. And last, but not
least, the Interesting feature, the spirited determination of some two or three
hundred delegates to absolutely hold
that which they had won by concentrated effort for the workers by legislation, namely:
Mothers' Pensions.
Workmen 'a Compensation.
The eight-hour working day for women.
The minimum wage for women.
Free employment bureau.
Both President E. P. Marsh and Secretary Charles Perry Taylor, were reelected unanimously, also five out of
seven vice-presidents.
Tour delegate thanka the Federation
most heartily for the opportunity of
attending the Washington fltate Federation of Labor convention, the educational value of such a visit to one who
is comparatively young in the labor
movement, being most sincerely appro
elated.
In conclusion, your delegate, after
seeing what concentration on obtaining
one or two specific pieces of legislation,
together with an educational campaign,
can do, respectfully urges the B. C.
Federation of abor to consider working
along similar lines, that auch legislation
will be obtained for the people of this
province, and tho workera see the vilue
of organized effort.
HELEN  OUTTEBIDOE.
Readers  Should  Compare
Bowser's New Act
with These.
[In view sf thi prominence which
will bi given to tin subject of work-
om'i compensation In Brltlih Oolum-
Us, daring thi nut root, ar rssson of
thi new ut promlMd by Attorney-Oen-
•ral Bowser, Ths Federitioiilit Is publishing nunmsriii of compensation seti
of virions states sad cotmtrln which
in supposed to have had considerable
experience of legialltion of this Und.
Thi virions acts of Anitrslli ind Tumuli will be summarised fint, ind
•ppeir weekly. Following Is a summary
of thi' Wokmin'i Compensation sot of
thl stati of Vlotoria:]
Thl Victoria Act.
;   The  Workmen's. Compensation  act,
1914, in the definition of employer, includes "any body of persons corporate
or unincorporate."
Nature of work to which the act applies.—Manual, clerical or otherwise.
Workeri expressly excluded.— Those
other than manual receiving more than
£250 per year, casual workers not connected with employers' business, outworkers, police.
Employer not liable to pay compensation for.—Injury less than ope week.
In the event of insolvency maximum
of compensation admitted at firat
charge on assets per individual.—£200.
Compensation in case of death (where
dependents are left).—Three years'
wagea or £200, whichever' is larger.
Maximum, £500. Where no dependents
—maximum amount for medical attendance and funeral expenses.-—£60.
Compensation in case of incapacity.—
Weekly payment—half average weekly
earnings. Maximum 30s. Maximum total liability, £500.
Compensation to workers over 60
years of age who have not entererd into
an agreement.—On death (where there
are dependents), minimum £50. Incapacity—weekly minimum payment 5s.
after first week. Total liability—not
less than £50.
Compensation for infirm workera Who
have entered into an agreement.—On
death (minimum payment), £50. Incapacity—minimum weekly payment 5s.
after first week. Total liability-—not
less than £50.
Compensation for workers under 21
years of age earning less than 20s. per
week. — Weekly payment — average
earnings weekly; maximum 10s.
Period after which lump sum can be
substituted for weekly payment.—Six
months.
Tribunal, if olaias not settled by
agreement.—County court judge, or police magistrate at worker's option.
Regulation for Injured worker leaving the state.—If permanent incapacity
likely, quarterly substituted for weekly
payments.
Cooks, Walton and Waitresses.
At the weekly meeting of Cooks',
Waiters and Waitresses' union, local
No. 28, held in room No. 206, Labor
Temple, Friday evening, January 29th,
two more workers at the craft were
added to the fold, while one suspended
member was granted reinstatement, In
addition to which we have three applications for membership pending, so
that, taking it by a large, as sailors
say, we have no reason to grumble.
I would like to draw attention to the
fact, that the Hub cafe, corner of Car*
rol and Hastings streets, has changed
hands and will in future be known as
the Paris cafe. The place haa now been
reopened and the new management will
continue to run the establishment as a
union house. Reporting in his new role
a special organizer Business Agent
Graham gave a detailed account "of a
very creditable week's work. Apropos
of' this, I might state that Business
Agent Graham il appearing before the
various local unions at their meetings
in the Labor Temple, urging more con*
sistent support of our house card and
inviting criticism Rowing why our union houses do not reoelve a more liberal
measure of union patronage than they
do and pointing out that if the fault
lies with our union we want to know
it, so that we may reform.' We have
enlisted the able co-operation of Miss
Gutteridge and, with that energetic
lady's assistance, wo hope to secure the
active support of the various women's
organizations in the city ln our campaign for white labor in hotels.—J. C.
No Mon Babies.
Women should refuse to bear children
until the menace of war ts done away
with, says Mrs. F. W. Petbick-Law*
rence of London, England, before the
Woman's City club, Chicago.
Lawyer (fiercely)—Are you telling
the truthl
Badgered Witness (wearily) — Aa
much of it as you will let me.
CENTER & HANNA, Ud.
UNDERTAKERS
Refined Service
1041 QEOROIA STREET
One Block west of Court House.
Use of Modern Chapel and
Funeral Parlore free to all
patrona
DsrsrNliht
f HATFI ' WRPNT Absolutely Fireproof.   Looal and Loni-Dlatanoe
I HUIBL sVftUEiTIl  p),,,,, tn Bvary RoomCafe In Connection. Rates
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
IEMBALMERS
IM listsnU SL       VsKcner, B. C.
Young Man—I have called, sir, to re*
quest the hand of your daughter in
marriage.
Grumbella—Has she accepted youf
Young Man—Yes, sir.
Grumbella—Then whit do you want
to come around and bother me with
your troubles fort
Phone: Fairmont 110
Patterson* Chandler
Manufacturers of
MONUMENTS
Vaults, Curbing, Etc.
Offloe' md Worm:
Cor. 16th Ave. snd Main St.
Branoh Offlee: 40th A Fraier Area.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
TOU HATB A OOATO TO OR
TOUB DOLLARS 1A0K       .
Whin yon bny
British Colombia Made
Goods
Every dollar spent ia Ewtwu or
Foreign Goodi is goni fonvir
Leclde Boots are Made in
Vancourer
InjfM on fsttsf HMm snd in set
honest -nine for yon amy swqr
J. LECKIE CO, limited
Vancourer
RENN1ES SEEDS;
OUR 1915 CATALOGUE IS NOW READY
SS?ir Wm. Reanie Co., Ltd
1138 Homer St  Phone Sey. 8560 Vancouver, B. C.
ALSO AT TORONTO, MONTIEAL, AND WINNIPEG
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
Oipltil   »15,00C,000        Best UMOO.OOO
Main Offlce:  Corner Hutlngi sad Onn-rilli Struts Tineeavor
OITT BRANCHES LOCATION
ALHA ROAD........ Cor. Fourth Avenue and Alma Bead
COMMERCIAL DBIYE Cer. flnt Avenue and Commercial Drive
SAST IND... Cor. Pander and Main Streeta
IAJBVIIW Cor. Stalk Avenae aad Oranvllle Street
HASTINOS aad CAMBIE Cor. Haatlnfe aad Gamble Streeta
KITSILANO Cor. Fourth Avenue and Taw Street
HOONT PLEASANT Cer. Elfblh Ansae aad Mala Street
POWELL STREET Cor. Vletorle Drl» aad Powell Sine!
SOOTH HILL ,  Cor. rorty-lourtb Avenue and Fraaer Road
Alio North Vancouver Branch, Doner Losudali Annul snd Esplaaadi
MOUNT PLEASANT HEADQUARTERS
For Hardware, Stoves sad Wingw
■verything tot tba Zttehon
W. R. OWEN & MORRISON
Phone hir, 447 33S7 Main Street
ranker tha
far see*      ,. -
vane ud thi up-buidiaf at tke dtp.
aiusd Hunan auas
ma fas? erases? ?!■& B!J»tf8a»
BeekhUders' Oaten. rbete-eamtan-Oelsei
WOOD
BIST 184nch Fir Ooriwood at *3.00p« load. This is an
exceptionally good lot, and Just what 70a need thli oold
weather.
Phone Seymour 1936 for trial load.
JINGLE POT COAL
will save you money. Quality guaranteed.
This ii the only UNION KINSD Ooal in British Columbia.
McNEILL, WELCH & WILSON, Limited
formerly
VANCOUVER OOAL COMPANY
Phone Seymour 5408 *
PENDER HOTEL
SIS WDH STSBST WIS*
What does the B.C.
Electric mean to British Columbia in the
Field of Labor?
DESPITE THE CONDITIONS
NOW EXISTING, WHEN
EVERY EMPLOYER IS RETRENCHING TO THE UT-
MOST, THE B. C. ELECTRIC
IS NOW CARRYING ON ITS
PAYROLL
2408 Employees
During the "rush" construction period of 1912-1913 the B. C.
Electric was constantly carrying
over 5,000 employees on its payrolls as well as employing a large
number of men through private
contract work. The direct payment of wages by the Company
at that time meant a monthly
distribution of over $400,000 in
wages.
ARE NOT THE ABOVE
FACTS WORTHY OF THE ATTENTION AND CONSIDERA-
TION OF EVERY WORKING-
MAN?
V PAGE FOUR
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEI
PATRONIZE HO*
DEMAND
THE
LECKIE
SHOE
MADE IN
VANCOUVER
The Shoe that put Vancouver on the map in Europe. Thousands of out-of-door workmen in B. C.
can attest to their Wearing Value. Thousands of
fathers and mothers in B. C. have learned that there
is really no other Shoe so suited and durable for
school children as LECKIE'S. Ask your Shoe
Dealer for Leckie's.
J. LECKIE & Co., Limited
200 CAMBIE STREET
Phone Seymour 8920	
25% DISCOUNT
Why patronize trusts when you can
save 25% discount on all your Laundry?
The B. C. Clean Towel Supply, Limited, and
the
Home Laundry Company, Ltd.
are the only people allowing this discount
Look over your Laundry Bills and you will
be surprised to see what you have paid excess to the other Laundries.
*
Telephone Highland 1473
Telephone Seymour 156
Telephone Seymour 5060
Our wagons call all over Vancouver.
B.C. Clean Towel Supply Co.
Limited
KEEP YOUR MONEY IN CIR
THE MEMBERS OF OBUANIZED LABOB IN OBEATER VANCO
BRATIONIST ADVERTISERS ABE ENTITLED TO THI
THEIB FRIENDS AND SYMPATHIZERS.   LOOK OVER
WOODBURN
BELL
00JC
Vancouver   - B.C.
Ask for "DUX    Bnuld
Cigarettes and Tobacco
Something New and
Something GOOD
Cigarettes 10c. Packages
Tobacco - 2 ozs. for 2jSc.
MADEINB.C.
Rex Tobacco 10c is Fine
COOL and CLEAN
MADE IN B. C.
Success ii always assured with
NABOB JELLY POWDER
Juit follow direction! on the package—you will be
more than pleased
Bach package nukes a full pint of jelly
10c. 3 for 25c.
AT YOUB OBOOIBS
r
Mr. Union Man
Are you eating Union-made Bread, are you
helping to maintain the Union Standard of living by
using goods produced by Union Labor!
BREWER'S XL BREAD
has the Union Label on every loaf, and in quality
and flavor it is unexcelled.
Phone Highland 573 and we will call at your
house.
BREWER'S XL BAKERY,
Corner 4th Avenue and Commercial Street.
Red Seal Manufacturing Company
Nakata al lha OrUlnil
"NO DUST' SWEEPING COMPOUND
FLOOR OILS. rUftNltUIE POLISH, Etc.
PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY AND OIVE US A TBIAL
Factory snd S»le Boom:
JU OMNIA STIECT PHONE SCYNODI SOBS YANCOUVBt. B. C.
. Prompt Dallvarr
Patronize "FED." Advertisers
As to Ooal Mine Inspection.
Editor B. C. Federationist: With all
the tirade of abuse of certain individuals, published by the subsidized press
of this province, in the past two years,
trying to justify the laws of the provincial government relative to coal mining industries in this province, I quote
herewith tbe law as it now stands relative to inspection of mines by gas committees:
"The persons employed in a mine
may from time to time appoint one or
two of their number to inspect the mine
at their own cost, and the persons bo
appointed shall be allowed, onee or oft-
ener in every shift, day, week, or
month, accompanied, if the owner,
agent, or manager of the mine thinks
fit, by himself or one or more officers
of the mine, to go to every part of the
mine, and to inspect the shafts, levels,
planes, working-places, return airways,
ventilating apparatus, old workings,
and machinery, and shall be afforded by
the owner, agent, and manager, and all
persons in the mine, every facility for
the purpose, of snch inspection; and
shall make a true report of the result
of such inspection; and such report
Bhall be recorded in a book to be kept
at the mine for the purpose, and shall
be signed by the persons who made the
same. And if the report states the existence or apprehended existence of any
danger,"the person or persons making
the inspection shall forwith cause a
true copy of the report to be sent to
the inspector of mines for the district:
Provided always that where the miners
in any mine fail to appoint two of their
number to inspect the mine, the chief
inspector of mines shall select from the
men, in alphabetical orders where possible, two competent miners, who shall
comply with the provisions of this section and the said1 owner, agent, or manager, may withhold from the wages of
the underground employees a sufficient
sum pro rata to remunera
sons making such examinatn
A casual glance at this c
lead the inexperienced pers
lieve that .the miners had e\
for making an inspection o:
on behalf of their own snfet
one who knows the indire
and the unscrupulous raann.
the operators of this provin<
men who act on these comt
who perform their duty as
rects, know full welt that 1
solutely no protection wh
them. Suffice it is to say tl
ers of eastern British Oolun
fusing to act on these comm
ing as their reason, that it
ly impossible for them to di
as the law directs and ma:
employment with the con
there a sane man in this pi
understands the ease of Mr.
relative to gas committee v>
nection with the late Vance
strike, but what will agree
shaw was discharged becaus
tivities in performing his v
committee, man, and only 1
pidity of the petty understi
were running the mines at
made it possible to show to
public the indirect methods
nation that is practiced by
operator. If the minister ol
Bichard McBride, his colle
are acting as inspectors of
the members of parliament
ous of protecting the lives
in the mining industries w
advise and vote .against the
which has been offered to th
house for the last two years
cal member, Mr. Place, o:
constitutency, which specifi*
clause relative to gas con
changed1 from two of their
read that a competent pen
sons, thereby eliminating t
method of discrimination. A
be a humanitarian move, for
of mankind, if the general p
demand an investigation fi
pointment of mine inspectori
ing so ask these questions:
that the provincial governmc
er appointed a miner, from
the position of mine inspecti
contrary it has .always oeei
F. OF L. EXECUTIVE MEETS
GOVERNMENT MINISTERS AT VIC
B. C.
(Continued from Page One.)
Unemployment
President Watchman then dealt with the proposed mo
asked if it would only deal with realty, and asked for fullj
of the workers. He also dealt with the unemployed situs
asked what the government had to propose, and pointed ot
had made suggestions, but that they had not been adopted,
the executive were anxious to know if the government
The premier replied that they were doing all they coi
lieve the situation and that the matter was a very diffieu
handle; that the proposed moratorium waft not yet ready, b
would deal with realty, snd pointed out that it had been
the proposed measure would affect the credit of the prov
that he could see no other remedy for protection for the :
owned their homes against unscrupulous men.
Cabinet Members Present
The deputation wAs then promised that the matters s
would receive the consideration of the government. The
of the government present were Hon. Price Ellison, Hoi
Boss, the priemier and the attorney-general.
Other Kxeoutive Basinets.
Other matters referred to the executive were in re '
busses. This was left over to Monday, after the Street Rai
and Light, Power and Electrical-men's advisory board' 1
when the executive will oo-operate with the board.
Anti-militarist education was left to entire executive,
do what he considered best suited to his district.
Organizing of timber workers was left in the hands of
retary-treasurer to communicate with the Timber Workers'
tional union.      «*■•.
Activity of trades and labor councils on unemployed i
to be taken up with the different central bodies.
Information to locals as to picketing laws was left in the
Vice-president MeVety....
Special committee on Compensation act was appoints
lows: Vice-president McVety (chairman), W. Yates and Si
treasurer Wells.
He Election act.—Referred to president and secrets
urer.
Naturalisation laws.—Referred to delegates to oongi
secretary-treasurer, to communicate to Trades and Labor
of Canada subject matter of resolution.
It was decided that the executive should meet in Vl
prior to the Trades and Labor congress of Canada conve
September.
The executive were in session from Thursday* to Fridi
ing, and a policy was adopted that should be beneficial
movement, namely, that eaoh vice-president to report eoi
etc., in his district each month, and the secretary-treasurer
each vice-president a synopsis of the reports submitted, ant
ply any information that might be of interest,, to the local
vice-president for distribution.
BUY
Guaranteed Genuine South WeUli
Coal mined at South "Wellington,'
couver Island, B. C, and Sold by ua in Vanco
at practically Coat in order to keep our men
teams emyloyed.
OOAL.     Fer Ton.
Lump, screened  $6.00
Nut, No. 1    5.80
Nut, No. 2    5.00
Pea.,.    4.00
Slack    8.00
WOOD.   Per
Dry eordwood, stove lengtl
Inside flr 	
Fir bark	
Kiln-dried kindling	
Dry eordwood, stove lengt
(cord
Service ths best.   Satisfaction guaranteed.  Oompstttton Del
4th Ave
Granville
•StdJ.Hanbury&Co.,LtdK?"
26% OFF ALL TRUSSES THI8 MONTH
RED STAR DRUG STORE.
63 Cordova Street West Vancouver,!

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcfed.1-0345045/manifest

Comment

Related Items