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The British Columbia Federationist Jun 12, 1915

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INDU8TBIAI, TJM'$\ BTRBNOTH.«
COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
OFFICIAL PAPER: VANCOUVER TRADEB AND LABOR OOUNOIL AND B.O. FEDERATION OP LABOB
►POLITICAL UMIT: VIOTORTI
SEVENTH ^AR.  No. 2if
[Compared With Conditions
and History in IT. S. A.
and Europe
| The Fight for Political Control is Now the Main -
Issue
VANCOUVER, B. C, FRIDAY, JUNE 12, 1915.
(In Vancouver\
V   Olty, W.OO /
$1.50 PER YEAR
B. C. £ R. OFFER TO
STREET RAILWAYMEN
[Special Australian Correspondence.]
SYDNEY, N. 8. W., May 23.—In no
[ place in the world   has   unionism at-
[ talned a stronghold, industrially   and
politically, as in Australia.  Indeed, the
noted publicists of the world make no
secret of the fact that on present   ap*
| pearances Australia promises to be. the
f very first of the socialist republics that
will in time come upon the earth.
Unionism lo Europe and U. S. A.
The history of unionism in various
! parts of the world is by no means pleasant reading. In Europe tho cause has
! been surrounded with difficulties, and
I in that land it has never in reality at*
' tained much more than a name.
In the United States, which ia sup-
I poaed to be one of the most democratic
] countries in the world, the unions have
[ had one constant and bitter fight
[ against a mighty organized power of
|,wealth and monopoly.
In that land every vested interest,
( every commander of capital has sworn
undying antagonism to the cause of
I unionism* They havo been able to
I fight unionism in the United Statea in
1 a way that would not be possible in
[ any other land, because of the wealth
l and monopoly at their hands.
I In Australia this power was not in
I the hands of the conservative body, for
| the simple reason that we have no mil*
llionaires in the way they are under*
| stood in the United States. Again, our
I larger interests aro not in the hands of
I private individuals, but are controlled
[by the governments, which makes the
I work of tho capitalists somewhat
I harder than in the United States.
A Power ln Australia.
Australia has proved a very fruitful
■ ground for the sowing of the unionistic
[spirit. Slowly but surely and steadily
[unionism haa advanced here, and to-day
[because of Its wonderful progress, it.
[ stands an unchallenged power in the
Iland.
There have been temporary set-backs,
Ibut tho position has alwaya been re-
I gained with something added to it, until
I to-day the cause is an assured success.
Unionism Supported Politics.
In no other country has the cause of
lunioniBm been identified with n political
■ power. Most people outsido of Australia do not understand how unionism haa
Igrown up in Australia alongside a po-
lllticnl party, but it must bo remembered
f hat the growth of unionism and the
Erowtli of tho labor party are on a
Parallel. Unionism supported labor po-
Kitics from its birth, it sent its first
■men to parliament, thnt formed the la*
■bor party that is to-day the strongest
■ weapon the people have politically.
Politics Helped Unionism.
The labor party has in return placed
unionism on its present secure basis
in Australia. Were there no labor party
there could not have been any unionistic strength such as we alone understand it in Australia. Had we continued government by a party naturally and inatinctively opposed to the
claims for betterment on the part of the
working masses, we would havo been
in the same position as other communities of unionism in other parts of the
world. Where the labor party had obtained control of the administration it
has identified itself with the cause of
unionism, and thia has culminated in
the unswerving aetifti of the present labor parties in Australia.
right for Political Control.
Our position became so strong then,
that at the last election we were able
to throw down tho gauntlet to the
rest of Australia and say "The fight
for political control in Australia will
be decided by oae question—preference
to unionists or preference to non-unionists." Thnt was the batle-cry of the
labor party in the last federal elections, and there was no attempt to hide
it or place it in the background.
The conservative party took It up
| with delight and kept it woll beforo
tho people, feoling sure that Australia
would not tolerate this piece of
"unionistic impertinence" as it wns
termed. The "as good as labor man"
would have none of it—tho conservative pronounced it anathema. On the
other hand the labor party frankly told
the people thot were it returned to
power It would unflinchingly and unswervingly adopt the policy and strictly apply it. Well, the issue wai fairly
put to the whole of Australia, *—
pronounced judgment.
Refund to Make War the Ooat.
Let the figures here speak for them-
1,052,614 voted for preference
unionists.
941,140 voted against preference
I unionists. ,
[ Who will dare deny, in faoo of those
Iflgures, the labor party's right to apply
Ithe principles of unionism thronghout
I Australia! Conservatism was shat-
Iterod in, the biggest fight that was
lever known in the political hiBtory of
lAustralia. Yet with a coolness that is
■amazing, the opposition in the federal
(parliament now asks -the labor party to
■regard the war as a loophole for prov-
llng false to the pledges and obligations
•of unionism.
It was pleaded that all political
Jdifferences should be forgotten at a
Elmo like this, and that the unionist
Ihould take the "scab'f to his bosom
■Ike a prodigal and permit the Bweater
lo work at his own sweet will. One
lould hardly expect anything else from
discredited conservative party, bnt it
General reduction in wages of ten per eent.
Method of this reduction to be discussed with the employees.
Working conditions to remain the same, except for the
necessary alterations in the wording of such clauses as cannot
properly be made to apply to the extended period.
The agreement to be for a period of two years.
These proposals made without prejudice and to be unconditionally withdrawn unless accepted without the intervention
of any outside party.
i
DETECTED BY
Contradictions, Conceits and
Complexities of the
Cosmic Scheme
Our RuminatingCritic Bubs
Raw Spots of the Self
Complacent
A mass meeting of members of the Street Bailway Men's union
in Vancouver waB held last Saturday midnight. Six hundred were
present. *
The purpose' of the meeting was to consider the offer made by
B. C. Blectric Bailway company of certain terms and conditions to
form the basis of a new agreement between the men and the company. The terms of the company's offer appear at the head of this
article.
General Manager Mr. George Kidd had previously expressed a
desire to address the meeting, and was present. In the course of
his speech he dealt with the financial position of the company, more
especially since the advent of the jitneys, and said in effect that
the company's offer was the best it could make wider present conditions.
A resolution was moved, and unanimously adopted, that the
offer of the company be not accepted. It was decided that the
Street Bailway Men would insist upon a renewal of the wage scale
and working agreement which expires on the 30th of this month.
The proposed alliance between the unions of the Electrical
Workers and the Street Bailway Men was endorsed, to form a joint
Light, Power and Transpor*ation council.
was as a voice erring in the -wilderness
—indeed, "Rachel wus not comforted."
The labor government refused to go
back on its pledges to the workers who
put it there.
Eight How Day ie Priied.
On the banners of Australian unionism are emblazoned a long and remarkable roll of vicotries. Our great 8-hour
principle, frankly and finely admired by
the rest of the whole world, was won
by the solid front of unionism. To-day,
throughout Australia, it is celebrated as
a national holiday by all classes, and
the principle is recognized as a sound
one throughout Australia. As a result
of the steady and never-ceasing crusade
of unionism, the Australian worker of
to-day lives in a degree of comfort unknown in any other country in the
world.
Compared With United States.
It is as well' to romembor. that our
triumph has been a bloodless one. In
America the cause of unionism has been
associated with bloodshed and outrage,
not on the pnrt of unionist, but on the
pnrt of thoso opposed to it.
The bitter opposition shown to unions
thore has been aided by the almost
boundless supply of cheap, foreign labor from tho pooror and more swented
countries of Europe.    This has led to
who
for
Reports No Improvement in
the  Employment
Situation
Royal City Unionists Hold
Picnic Despite Hard
Times
Regular meeting of New Westminster
Trades and Labor council held, with
Vice-President J. R. Flynn in the chair.
Communications from Carpenters,
Xous^on^ owin? to 4lack "J fJ»d>1
and capitalists, In which the latter have
invoked the aid of tho state, and even
in some cases, of the federal armed
forces.
Scenes that would have been impossr
ble in Australia have frequently oe-
cured in America, and the consequence
is thnt while high rates of wages prevail there for skilled -labor, the hours
are far longer, the conditions of work
more strenuous and health destroying,
nnd the worker is more completely at
the mercy of the capitalist.
There have been strikes in Australia
■some have been in our little way of
thinking very bitter ones. But by the
principle of picketing, we have done
much good, and despite what opponents
to labor may say there have been no
strikes worthy of the name, when we
compare ourselves with other countries,
and it is safe to say that in the future
we shall not have nny serious strikes.
State Servant of Capitalists.
But look at the Btate of affairs that
exist in the United States, if a union
dnre oppose the will of, say, the "oil
king," a state of war at once breaks
out like unto nothing save the present
strife in Europe. On the one side are
men rendered desperate by wrongs and
the prospect of starvation or slavery
for themselves and their families deter-
mined to make at least one grim struggle for exlsetnce.
On the other we see nil tho forces of
the state called in to aid the capitalists, as they always are in that land of
boasted freedom. Armed and ordered
to shoot down the workers like game,
they obey their orders and are not particular whether they shoot men or women or even children. Blood flows freely, homes are burned, and red terror is
everywhere.
Reply to American Orlltcs.
This Is the picture of Unionism as it
struggles in America, and, if perchance
some political refugee comes to Australia, goes back again and tells you
that we are an overgoverned country,
and that our industrial laws are impotent, remember we have, with our
faults, no such picture as that I have
painted above.-
We have been blamed by well-mean*
ing enthusiasts in America for assisting a political party, instead of following other lines of emancipation, but we
can safely say that our political arrangements have given    us what we
Recoived and secretary to notify them
that they aro still in good standing.
Committee Reports.
Delegate Knudsen reported that he
and Delegate Yates attended the meeting of the city council as members of
the special committee appointed to protest against street grading being done
aB relief work. No other members of
tho committee were present and there
was no communication read stating
that they would appear, so nothing was
done. Report received and committee
discharged.
Beports of Unions.
Typos — Slock. Bartenders — Slack,
Cigarmakers—Four working, two on
limit. Street Railway Employees—L'it-
tle flatter, blacksmiths and machinists
on Bhorter time..   Electrical Workers—
Slack.   Engineers Slack.    Brewery
Workers*—Everybody working.
New Business.
Delegate Knudsen wanted to know if
the council was willing to undertake
running a general picnic thiB year, as
he understood that the Bartenders were
not going to have their annual picnic
this year. Delegates Knudsen, Schofleld and Stoney were appointed a committee to consider the proposition and
report at the next meeting.
Factory Inspector Present.
Delegate Stoney said that Mr. C. R,
Oordon, factory inspector, was present
asking for information, and on his
motion that Mr. Gordon be given the
floor passing, that gentleman stated
tbat he sought information as to the
Comparative number of men engaged in
the various trades from 1013 to 1915.
He was referred to the financial secretary for his Information,
' Delegate Knudsen critized severely
members of the council who have not
been attending meetings lately and suggested thnt if they did not wish to attend they should resign and let men be
elected who would attend and eare for
the business of the organization, He
thought it would be well for the delegates present to report any absentees
of their union to the locals, so that there
would be a better attendance in the future.
Death of Union Bricklayer.
Thomas Townsend, bricklayer, died at
the General Hospital from pneumonia
have to-day—unionism, with strength,1 on Wednesday, June 10th. The deceased
aB it is not understood in any other part
of the world.
Compare Before Condemning.
It is not for me to order or direct
what other bodies of men should do in,
say. America, in the working out of
their emancipation. But I would urge
that the lesson of Australia be taken
seriously to heart. Study our history
of political and industrial progress. If
you find it wrong, do not adopt it.
But if you flnd it has done all I havo
claimed for it, and you think it possible that a like set of circumstances can
be instituted. in your own fair land,
then if .the working man's lot can be
.benefitted by the application of our
system, Australian unionists would, welcome your advancement along the same
lines. W. FRANCIS AHERN.
caught cold whilst working in the sewer
at Cedar Cottage and was taken to the
hospital on Saturday, June 5th. He
came to Canada about 14 years ago, residing several years in Montreal. At
first it was thought he had a good show
to pull through, but he gradually got
worse until Wednesday the doctor realized there was no hope for him. He
was conscious to the last. Deceased
had been a member of the B. M. and P.
I. U, for about 21 years and was well
known in Vancouver, having superintended the construction of several brick
buildings, among which wero the Alcazar Hotel. He was 48 years of age
and will be buried from Mount Pleasant Undertaking Parlors at 3 p. ra. or
Saturday, June 12th. Deceased loaves
a widow and two small children to
mourn his loss.
Bancroft, one of the foremost American historians, admitted to James Davie
Butler that, in speaking of felons perpetrated upon the early settlers of America, "He had been very economical
in dispensing the truths he had discovered." Thus Ib history manufactured, with all due consideration of the
"powers that prey,"
As to Hero Worship.
There is another phase of history—
especially that brand which is taught
in the scoola-to the plastic minds of the
young—which deserves the attention of
aU thinking working men and women,
and that is the gospel of praise and
worship accorded to "great" heroes
and sheroes, for lifting humanity out
of the mire and directing their faltering footsteps in the way they ought to
go, While the social life of workers,
the great bulk of the people, their
hopes, aspirations and struggles for a
fuller, freer life are entirely overlooked
—and the crimes eommitteed upon them
by "rampant profit" either glossed
over or told in a manner that places
these powers as saviors of humanity.
Showing China How It is Done.
And now China, the land of flowers
and dragons, and mutilated pigtails, is
becoming civilized also. In a recent interview, President Yuan Shi Kai said,
"I propose to survey extensively our
mining fields, and to develop the best
ones first, so that, with small investments, there will be large profits.'1
Shades of Confucius protect the "heathen Chinee" working plug!
Epidemic of Civilisation.
China is also learning the ethics of
"high and frenzied finance." A domestic loan of sixteen million dollars
was floated last August, for the first
time in the country's history. The next
thing we can expect to be floated—and
"floated" is a peculiarly expressive
term in regard to this business—will be
a penny savings bank, to corral the
stray coppers that the domestic loans
miss. - .* J.
' The Slit-Eyed Celestial Wakes.
And what about our standard of living—or, rather, standard of existence—
when the suplus products of the industrious millions of China begin to appear
upon the world's markets in sufficient
quantities to make themselves felt?*The
present standard of living of the average worker on the North American continent is certainly nothing to write
home- about; but compared with what
the average Chinee can scrape along on,
it looks like a St. Patrick's day banquet against a two-penny fish supper.
The surplus products created by the
American worker cannot possibly hold
their own in competition in the world's
market—either under free trade or protection—against tho surplus products
created by an industrially-developed
cheap Chinese labor. What then, Mr.
"B. C. white?" Class revolution, or
another fake world's war between
"whites" and "yellows?" Or will you
believe by then that the "workers of
the world should unite?"
Oracle of the Orient.
Japan, also, is a factor which le-
quires due consideration. Being refused
legitimate expansion towards the east
—other than what her oheap products
can obtain—she is industriously developing the Chinese market. This great
war—which is neither great nor is it
war—has given her the long-Bought opportunity, and she is taking full and
free advantage of it. Japanese labor,
in its present unprotected condition,
readily lends itself to the purposes of
the financial interests. Labor is cheap
in Japan, very cheap, and all phases of
it can be employed—men, women and
children—with few restrictions as to
hours, wages or ages.
Pooh!   Purely Psychological.
And the United States Department of
Labor states that 400,000 wage earners
in the city of New York, or sixteen per
cent, of all wage earners, were out of
work in the first half of February.
Also, more than half of this number
hnd been out of work for more than
two months. And President Wilson
diagnoses this'as a "psychological condition."
Fattening tbe Gobbler,      __
Many enquiring individuals hnve
been wondering how the "lazy and indolent" Turks managed to have the
Dardanelles so strongly fortified, and
how the British camd to have bo intimate a knowledge of the fort locations.
The following telegram, from Constantinople, in the London "TiraeB": of
December 3, 1013, may shed a ray of
light: "A contract was signed to-day
with the Armstrong-Vickers group for
the re-organization of the Turkish
naval dockyards. The government
hands over to the Armstrong-Vickers
group the arsenal and docks on the
Golden Horn, with nil the existing machinery and buildings. It likewise provides for a Bite for a naval base at
Ismid. The English group finds the
capital for the exploitation of the
works, and supplies the technical
knowledge and control essential to the
success of the undertaking." After
the British displaying their "technical
knowledge and control" in reconstructing these forts and naval bases for profits, they, with their allies, are now
busily engaged in displaying some more
of their "technical knowledge nnd control" in demolishing them, in the name
of patriotism—with the expectation of
more profits in rebuilding them. Such
is the system for which the workers are
giving their life's blood! After us the
deluge!
How It Works Out.
There is ono main difference between
the armament manufacturer and the
manufacturer of any ordinary   useful
SURVEY OF SITUATION
FROM COAST TO COAST
"Tho seriousness of the industrial situation throughout the
Dominion is beginning to be realized by the wage-workers," said
Mr. J. W. Bruce, general organizer of the United Association of
Plumbers and Steamfltters of North America, to The Federationist
yesterday. "The widespread and prevailing condition of unemployment is causing the workers serious concern, beeause of the faot
that there is no apparent relief in sight, and the federal government
and all governing bodies seem indifferent to finding any meana of
solving this pressing problem..
"The future holds a very dark picture, so far as the workers
are concerned, in view of the fact that it will be many years before
there oan be a return to even normal conditions. In this western
country cities and towns are over-developed and cannot, even under
the best of industrial conditions, return,to the same conditions ai
prevailed during the last few years.
. A Hopeful Outlook.
"The only satisfaction.I can take out of the present depression
is the determination of men and organizations to maintain, at all
costs, their present conditions. The trades union movement, while
suffering severely from lack of employment, with its subsequent
loss of membership, through the migration of its members, seeking
better economic conditions in other fields, has, with few exceptions,
been able to maintain itself in the position that it has fought for
and so dearly won.
Patriotic Employtn. fc
"I regret to see the conditions prevailing in many of the cities,
where employers of labor are shouting from the hilltops for men
to enlist in defense of the empire, which we are led to believe stands
for justice, freedom and! liberty, but there does not seem to be any
sense of justice among the great army of the employing classes, for
while thousands of trades unionists have given their services in defense of the empire and are at the front fighting this-fight of freedom, we find these selfsame employers robbing the rest of the workers of the conditions which previously obtained,
Need of Political Action. ]
"To-day we flnd the worker thoroughly realizing the" benefits
of an economic organisation, which now in itself is encouraging a
spirit of recognition of the great necessity of a political organization, and ih almost every town which I have visited, on my road
west, I have, found the spirit of revolt permeating the workers to
such a degree that there is a great unanimity of opinion regarding
the necessity of workers establishing a political working class
movement for themselves than ever before. And I am hopeful that
in view of the conditions prevailing that the workers will now Bee
the necessity of a change and lose all their old-time prejudices and
enter into the political field with the same determination as they
have displayed in the industrial movement.
The Congress Vancouver Convention.
"The thirty-first annual convention of the Trades and Labor
Congress of Canada, which is going to meet in your city on the third
Monday in September, in my opinion, should go down in history as
one of the most important conventions that has ever been held, for
the labor movement has never faced a crisis in this country like the
present one. The many problems whioh will be presented by the
delegates from all parts of Canada will demand the keenest scutiny
and most careful judgment of those present, because of the fact that
the labor movement has arrived at that stage when it must emphatically declare itself on all questions so vitally affecting the working
class.
Congress Should Assist. j
"In my judgment the timo has arrived1 when we must declare
ourselves from a political standpoint, and sock the election of men
to seats in the federal and local houses of government. There are
many constituencies throughout this Dominion which, with time
and attention, and clue regard to the calibre of men who may be
selected, could easily be won for labor, and I am hopeful that the
next session of the Trades and Labor Congress will take this matter
into consideration and try, if possible, to find a common basis of
understanding and provide ways and means of electing men from
its own ranks to these seats.
An Object Lesson.
"The workers have had an ample opportunity to study the
methods and means of the old-party politicians, who, during all
these trying times, have been interested in anything but the welfare
of the workers, and while they can find millions of money for expenditure in warfare, assisting railroads, banks and other financial
institutions, none of them have been willing to find a dollar to help
relievo the sorrow and suffering of the great industrial army who
are idle to-day through no fault of their own—except it be their political stupidity. So let us hope that the lessons being learned today will bear fruit in the near future. To this end the Congress can
play an important part and I trust the delegates will rise to the
occasion."
commodity, which is, that the latter
does not increase his home demand by
selling abroad, while tho former does.
It works ont thus: If a British firm
can boost orders for submarines and
destroyers from, say, Austria, this leads
to a demand for an increase in the British navyj If Krupps can work up
"scares" in tho Fronch papers, so that
tbo French government gets busy and
ordor moro munitions from Schneider,
then tho Germans counter-balance by
ordering from Krupps. Then Krupps*
Schneider-Maxim sit back nnd laugh
and garner the profits!
W. M. C.
"Jim" Roberts Back Again.
"Jim" Roborts, of Moyie, B. C, was
a welcomo visitor to Tho Fed. office last
Monday. Ho Is ono of the host known
members of the Western Federation of
Minors in the province, and was for
some timo an executive board member
of tho B. C. Federation of Labor. Never
in tho best of health, ho wont to England two yoars ago, under tho firm conviction that he had not long to livo,
as the doctor had told him ho could not.
But after a long and painful experience
of sick bed and operations, he is alivo
and back here, although not by a long
way feeling as vigorous ns ho ought to
and as ho would like to bo.
ALL WEBT FEELS FINCH.
Correspondent Says Prairie Country Is
Very (Jutet Industrially.
C. H. Lako writes The Fed. from
Stewart, B. 0., under date of Mey 28:
". . . Nothing but hard times all
along tho lino; jobless wage stiffs and
shivering business fry. From Winnipeg
to Edmonton saw only two now buildings, on the daylight run of O. T. P.
From Edmonton to Prince Euport thoie
is nothing doing, not even a coat of
paint. No jobs, no monoy, and Europo
in the melting pot!   .   .   •"
3. Kavanagh ln Beilingham.
,T. Kavanagh, a lntc member of the
Tile Layers and ex-dclegnto to tho
Trndes and Labor council, has gone to
Beilingham, where ho is now filling tho
position of a head chef and chief gas*
tronomic expert.
HAGUE CONFERENCE
IS
Difficulty in Securing Com*
plete International
Representation
Swiss Make Plans; Probable
Agenda Which WiD Be
Discussed
An international congress of socialists
is to be attempted at The Hague early
in July. All the neutral eountriet will
be represented, and delegations have already been selected to represnt England
and Germany, but it is not yet certain
that BusBia, France and Belgium will
participate. The Russian socialist lead-
era have accepted the invitation subject
to certain special condition!.
Mono tot Vanderrelde.
The Belgian leader, M. Vandervelde,
has refused point blank to have anything to do with any conference in
which Germany participates. Tha
French socialists and syndicalists also
declined the invitation in the flrst
place, but M. Ottorino Morgarl, leader
of the Italian neutralist party, has
gone to Paris in hopes of persuading
them to reconsider. Austria and Hungary will be represented if it is possible
for their delegates to get through Germany for this purpose.
The German Delegates.
The leading German delegates will
be Messrs. Scheidemann and Bernstein.
The English delegates, although already
chosen, have not been announced. They
include, however, representatives of
both pro-war and anti-war movements
in the British labor party.
The preliminary organization of tht
congress is in charge of the Swiss socialists. The tentative platform, which
is understood to have received the approval of committees in Germany, Austria, England, Italy and the Scandinavian countries, contains the following
demands relating to the European war:
Outline of tha Agenda.
Evacuation of Belgian and French
territory and indemnity to Belgium.
Immediate limitation of armaments
by all countries, with a view to ultimately abolishing altogether all armed
forces of individual states.
Obligatory arbitration and conciliation in cases of disputes between
staets.
Absolute right of air small nationalities to decide their future destiny; this
decision to bo made a matter of referendum in which nil adult males and females shall participate.
Active Against Party.
According to reports tho German government's attitude toward the party
has beon growing moro seven? during
the last two months. Socialist newspapers havo beon suppressed, and many
socialist meetings hnve been prohibited,
or allowed only under strict police supervision. At Duesseldorf, which is
said to bo tho centro of a pronounced
peace propaganda there havo been frequent police raids and searchos of socialist bouses.
Smoke Local Hade Cigars.
All you cigar smokers littteni The
local Cigar-makers' union is confident
that cigars made locally will compare
moro than favorably with cigars mado
either in the cast or anywhere else.
Cigars made locally moan less local
cigar makers out of work. Hero Ib a
list of local made cignrs:—Kurtz's
'' Pioneers,'' Kurtz's '' Boyal Honor,''
"Terminus," "Booth Bouquet/'
"British Lion," ''Mainlnnd," "P. ft
B," "Lovcllo."
Smoke them onco, and you will always smoke them. They are tho last
word in tho way of good value and good
smokes.
Bartenders' Big Convention.
Shall the bartenders and culinary
workers bo divided into separate international unions! This question will
be settled by tho 500 delegates to tbe
biennial convention of the Hotel and
BoBtaurant Employees' International
Alliance and Bartenders' International
League of America, which convenes in
San Francisco next Monday morning.
Officers of the International aro opposing tho plan.
Painters At Tbe War.
Mr. A. E. Scott, Gth vice-president
of the Brotherhood of Painters, Decorators and Paperhangers, located at
Winnipeg, was in Ottawa tho latter
part of last woek. His chief mission
was undertaken with tho department of
militia, making arrangements for tho
identification of the many Canadian
members now in the military service
who may suffer death or {Usability. AU
tho Canadian locals are keeping their
members in good standing and by tho
arrangements mado by vice-president
Scott, certificates from the militia department will be sufficient for headquarters to pay over any claims made.
From coast to coast tho chain of locals has moro than five hundred of the
members in tho enlisted ranks, Winnipeg hoading tho list with moro than
fifty.
TAILORS' PICNIC.
Knights of the Scissors and Their
Friends WlU Go to Bowen Island.
Tho annual picnic of tho Tailors'
union will take place on Tuesday, July
13th. Bowen Island is the place chosen, Tho boat leaves tbe Union steamship dock at 9.15 a.m. Tickets can bo
obtained from Miss Gutteridge, Labor
Temple, or membors of tho union.
Adults, $1.00; children, 50 conts. A
very enjoyable timo is looked for and
visitors are cordially invited.
Longshoremen's Wages.
Negotiations for a readjustment oi
wngos and conditions of labor at all
ports on tho Washington, California,
British Columbia and Alaska coasts
have bogun at a conference between
officials .of the International Longshore*
men's Association and representatives
of tho Waterfront Employers' union
held in Seattle this week.
A general increase in pay, a uniform
wage scnlo, or ono ns nearly uniform
bb possible, and improvements in tho
conditions under which tne men work
aro among the questions which will bo
placed before tho representatives of
employers.
Plumbers Organizer Here.
General Organizer Bruce, of tho
United Association of Plumbers and
Steamfltters, reports things vory bad in
his trado all through the Dominion and
not much relief in sight, Whilo in S.is-
katoon he was ablo to effect a settlement of too controversy in thtif. city,
which had Leon of six months duration.
He signed up a now agreement for u
closed shop with 60 conts an hour for
a period of two ycarB. Orgonlzor Bruco
has beon in Vancouver working in tho
interest! of Local 170, which has boen
on strike for tho past six months
against n wage reduction of a dollar
per day, but reports nothing definite ns
yet. Ho will leavo for Victoria on
Monday, to spend somo time there,
'where similar conditions obtain.
Mechanics For Britain.
Tho Ottawa Citizen says: "Messrs.
Barnes nnd Wyndhnm, the British delegation which has come out to secure
Canadian machinists for war munition
factories, aro facing n very difficult
task. Thore is a dearth of machinists
in the country.
According to tho advices of the
lnbor department all arc busy nnd
moro nro wanted. The Boss Biflo
company for instnnco wants a
thousand. Thero iB talk of importing
mnchiniBts from the United States. Ordinarily the alien labor law would operate against this, but tho present conditions nro exceptional with the factories busy alone on war munitions. The
British representatives do not wish to
engage any Canadians now employed
•", in view of tho ftomestic situation,
ind,
thore is small chance of securing any
largo number of mon. Thoy may endeavor to secure some in tho United
States. PAGE T#0
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THE B. C. FEDERATIONIST
Published  every  Friday morning  by th*
 B. c. Federationlit, Ltd.
R. Fann Pettlpleoe  ...Manager
J. W. Wilkinson Editor
Office: Room 217, Labor Tempi*
Tel. Exchange Sey. 74SS.
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Subscription: $1,50 per year; In Vancouver
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in a body, $1.00
REPBEBENTATVES
New Weitmlmter.. ,W. E. Maiden, Box 084
Prince Rupert W. E. Denning, Box 681
Victoria A. S. Weill, Box 1686
Affiliated with tbe Western Labor Preie
Association.
"Unity of Labor; the hope of the world."
FRIDAY   JUNE IL 1015
iindii    to    Great
on    cither    war
PLBNTT OP
MECHANICS
WAITING
IT IS DOUBTFUL if the Federal
government really wishes to see
skilled mechanics taken from Ca-
Britain to work
munitions or anything else, It paid,
in many thousands
o f cases, good
money to immigration concerns to
to bring mechanics
to Canada, and it figures that when industrial activity returns in the Dominion,
it will need them. Premier Borden
practically said so, to a deputation from
the Tradea and Labor Congress of Ca-
nad which recently appeared before him
on this very question,
ttt**
What is to happen to these men in
the meantime does not much concern
the government, as long as they can be
just kept alive and quiet. All thiB
talk from the east, about men being
hard to get, looks a good dead like '' inspired" newspaper stories. Mr. G. N.
Barnes will do well not to be influenced
by what he reads or what is told him
along such lines. When he gets right
out here into the far west he will bo
inundated with requests from mechanics—most of them old countrymen,
who are practically starving at the present time.
*        *        •        »
Not a day passes but a dozen or more
fresh faces come round to our office,
or tho office of the Trades and Labor
council inquiring as to ways and means
of getting into touch with those who
have been entrusted with the business
of geting mechanics for Britain. This
has been going on now for two months,
and our experience is absolutely the opposite of the assertions which we see in
the eastern press that men cannot be
got. Let Mr. Barnes wait until he has
seen the conditions out here. Then
there should be no more heard of possibly having to seek men in the United
States.
OF   THB
DESTITUTE
CITY ALDEBMEN of Vancouver
went lost Monday to "inspect
the calibre" of those seeking relief at the city relief office, where in return for eight hours work they get 50
cents worth of meal
and bed tickets.
After the review
some of the aldermen, in view of the
city's finances,
pressed the opinion that these men
would have to be "thrown on their own
resources,'' What a jewel of aldermanic
wisdom! What resources does any intelligent man think a fellow has who
will work eight hours for 50 cents
worth of bed and board f
•> .'•'■"■ "''•'.' ,*
We are of the opinion that he cannot
have any. But if the plan which some
of the aldermen recommend is put into
operation, it may not be long before
some of these unfortunates have more
resources, and some residents of the city
less. "Honesty" is very much a mat-
ter of economics when a man reaches
that point of desperation which we feel
he must have done, when he will do
eight hours work for 50 cents worth of
board and bunk.
FBIDAY JUNE 11, lpis'
the monster which the working class is
up against in municipal elections, and
all workmen would do well to remember the qualifications which are necessary before a man can even run for the
office of alderman—much more be
elected.
*      •       »       *
Under the new provisions of the city
charter, a man must have possessed property to the value of $500 free of all
encumbrance, for six months previous
to nomination day, if he wishes to run
for alderman; and to the value of
$1,000 for the same period if he intends
to contest the mayoralty. Workmen
should also Bee to it that they are on
the city voters' list, if qualified either
as owner or tenants. The list closes in
September. Go up to the city hall now,
and get this thing fixed. Don't leave
it till to-morrow. To-morrow, in these
matters, never comes until the day
after the last day for registering.
K1
KING CHARLES
HE WAS
ING CHABLES 1st is to be added
to the calendar of the saints
according to a recent decision of
the lower house of convocation of Canterbury. Poor old Charlie—as all tho
world knows—lost
his head because it
appeared to the re
formers of the sev-
KING CHABLES enteenth century
that his head was
a raennncc to the welfare of the
state,
*        •        •        e
But where in the name of goodness
did Charlie's saintliness come ini That
he took himself very seriously, and regarded himself as an able and impeccable ruler we know. It might also be allowed for the sake of peace and quietness that he was well meaning, and a
martyr to the truth as he saw it. But
thousands of better men have died in
the gutter, and will do again unless the
world gets a move on much quicker than
present signs would predict.
»•**.*
Charles believed in the divine right
of kings and his own infallibility—opinions which still continue to bring awkward results for those who hold them.
Quite conscientiously no doubt he perpetrated many acts of cruelty, injustice and vindictiveness. Even death
itself did not always satisfy his feelings.
•      *      *       •
For instance, when the son of Sir
John Eliot petitioned that his father's
body might be taken from the Tower
and buried in Cornwall, Charles got
quite nasty about it and said,*' Lett Sir
John Eliot's body be buried in the
churche of that parish where he dyed"
—the Tower. If this is the stuff of
which saints are made, the calendar
might be made a very long one.
ATTORNEY-
GENERAL
CARSON
TIME'S WHIRLIGIG makes some
strange turns. Sir Edward Carson is the Attorney-General in
the new coalition cabinet in the British
parliament. He- held that office some
years ago. But that
was before he raised
an armed force of
ten thousand Ulster-
men to start a rebellion in Ireland to
prevent the Home Rule act from being
put into practice. This time last year,
he wub in the position of threatening
to do tho most illegal thing a British
subject can do—that Ib    oppose    the
King's authority with armed force.
•  *..#**'••
tVt this moment he is in the position
of being the foremost law officer in the
British Empire, The secret which makes
such an amazing anomaly possible is,
that the ruling class never forget fundamentals even if some of them are sometimes a little estranged from each other
politically. The final touch to this instructive little comedy will come when
Attorney-General Carson again drops
tho "Attorney" part of his title.
MUNICIPAL ELECTIONS next
January scorn to bo a long way
off as yet. But tempus fugit.
And it was a timely move on tho part
of Vancouver Trades and Labor council last week tostart
out now to make
preparations to take
part in the elections, Elections are
not won by a short
spell of feverish activity indulged in a
few weeks before election day, but by
systematic preparation of ways and
means-long beforehand.    Property is
JANUARY
MUNICIPAL
ELECTIONS
WORKMEN IN BRITAIN have
been subjected to very strong
criticism by the press  of that
country for having gone on strike,   or
threatened to, while the country is at
war.   By their agitation   many   thousands   have   raised
their    wages    considerably since   the
war began. The war
is proving a veritable gold   mine for
manufacturers who supply any of the
things   needed,   and they are making
profit hand over fist.   Food prices, and
the cost of living generally, have gone
up absolutely foroing men to demand
more wages.
WAR
AND
STRIKES
mean limitless profits for the armament
trust and its shareholders in various
countries. But just at this point a faint
gleam of sanity seems to have illumined
the national mind. The hitherto revolutionary idea of limiting profits is a
consequence of that new and strange
light.
*        •        •      ■ •
That one half of the people of the
western world should be engaged in
the task of slaughtering each other,
while the other half toiled terribly to
provide the weapons of slaughter, must
have seemed to the armament trust an
absolutely beautiful and ideal arrangement. It was its millenium, the goal
for which it had worked for so many
years, "Der Tag" had come.
'  »        «        *        «
Signs of returning sanity will be s
sadly disturbing element from the armament maker's point of view. But to
those who still believe that civilization
is poBBible it will be ai gleam in tho
darkness. If the social consciousness
of the warring states could be brought
to the point of depriving the manufac
ture of armaments of the element of
profit, that would go further to promote peace than most of the peace resolutions passed at the international
working class gatherings in recent
years.
THE BALLOT TAKEN by tho Bail-
way Workers and General Laborers' Union of New South
Wales to decide whether the organization should amalgamate with the A. W.
U., resulted in a decisive triumph for
the one union idea,
the final figures being: For, 5,203
against ,1,541
works out at practically i
to 1 majority against the
patched-quilt variety of unionism. The
victory is all the more significant when
it is remembered that, for some queer
reason, the scheme was violently opposed by one or two of the incoming
union's officials. Also, sinister outside
influences whispered vaguely about the
tragedy of being "swallowed up.
However, the decision can be accepted
as an unmistakable indication of the
trend of modern unionist thought.
FORGING
WEAPON
which
3    1-2
Kaiser Bill always was strong on gas.
Charity uncovers a multitude of sins.
Put that mile-u-minute critic in office
-then listen to the brakes.
Virtue commands our respect, but the
other thing gets the best clothes to
wear.
Are you entitled to be on the city
voters'list? Are you on it J No. Well
then got busy.
Let us bo thankful these days that
there Ib such a thing as mud. Otherwise where would our Ideals be!
We hear altogether too much about
the length of the Law's arm, and altogether too little about the length of
its ears.
But if the profiteers could have chloroformed them into inactivity by talking loudly that particular brand of pa*
triotism which is such a useful business
asset to them, they would have slopped
over with unctious approval rendered
articulate by anticipated dividends.
The workers did not, however, fall for
the blandishments. So now they must
expect the spiteful results. War or no
war, they were wise to demand a higher
wage in face of the increased industrial
activity which prevails, and the phenomenal profits which are being made.
•        *        tt        »
Every cent they can get now, they
will need when the war is over. A
slump in the trades which are now active is almost sure to follow. Into the
bargain there will be two or three million men coming back into industrial
life from the army, and all signs point
to a period and a condition of unemployment absolutely without parallel in
the history of the country. Let them
make hay while the sun shines. Every
cent they get will havo to bo worked
for—which is moro than can bo Baid of
tho fabulous profits of their masters.
Our carpet-bag Premier is expected
back soon, Please try and keep your
face straight while he explains what he
has not been doing.
Probably why Orthodox Morality
isn't a regenerative power in the land
to-day is because it is too busy looking
at the bare leg to notice the barer cupboard.
The test of oratory nowadays is
whether the orator supplies a copy of
his speech to the press beforehand. The
average newspaper report would reduce
Demosthenes to a Demoniac.
There is no recruiting officer so sue-
cesful as poverty. Before the war two
thousands outcasts were taken nightly
into Salvation Army shelters in London, but the number has now dropped
to a hundred or two.
LESS
PROFITS
LESS  WAR
'HE MELTING POT iB claiming
some of the ancient clauses of
of the unwritten British constitution to-day, for some of tho most unexpected things have happened. Once,
the supremacy of
British trade, together with the exaltation of British
commercial profits,
were the sole end
and nim of British government. Now,
in the highest political circles tho state
limitation of profits is being propounded.
»       «        •        *
The great international armament
trust, in whoso hand in the ptiBt pressmen, politicians, statesmen and diplomats have been but puppets, has succeeded beyond its wildest expectations.
The western world has become one vast
suicide club whose mombers are bent
on mutual self destruction, and an entirely limitless demand for death dealing implements has sprung into existence.
»      •      «      «
Under an ordinary condition of
affairs this limitless    demand    would
There is plenty of room at the top,
And it will continue to be there so long
as falling down is easier than falling
up.
Diamonds may possibly be found in
dust bins. But those who succeed in
making such discoveries, usually become so begrimed in the process that
diamonds are about the last thing they
can appropriately wear. The next best
thing they can think of is to make
"ladies" and "gentlemen" of their
children, who, by the time they are
"finished," have only very limited ubo
for pa or ma, but are fully prepared to
take over the administration ' of the
dustman's treasure.
When one comes to consider the number of Bafe-guards against infectious
disease, and so on, which are deemed
necessary for the preservation of human life now-a-day, it causes a thinking
person to marvel how the race ever
managed to survive the cave age. Yet
if we are to judge by the deeds they
did, and the things they left behind
them, the early dwellers on the earth
managed to patch along without "twilight sleep" or sterlized milk. Can it
be that civilization itself Ib a disease?
Begarding the departure of one of
the union miners of Nanaimo for Britain, the following story is going the
rounds of that most dismal of towns.
One of his widest known and particularly vicious enemies was heard to gleefully remark that the individual referred to had gone taking with him his
wife and family. This drew forth the
following retort from a bystander;
"Yob, but he has taken his own wife;
not someone else's.'' This had a peculiar personal interest for the person to
whom the remak was addressed, inasmuch as it is understood that when
leaving Britain he was so confused as
not to be able to distinguish his own
family from other peoples', with the result that he left the country with another man's wife.
DO YOU  LIKE WORK?
Some people, notoriously Thomas Alva Edison, like to work, and some are
neutral, but most of us are openly prejudiced against the practice. A closer
analysis might show that even Edison
is not working; he is really playing.
He is that luckiest of mortals, that
blessed above kings and millionaires,
the man' who earns his living by doing
what he likes to do.
Ideally, all men's work would be what
each one liked to do best. A number
of Utopian commonwealths have been
laid out on this basis. Hard, disagreeable work, in such imaginary commonwealths, is done by machinery, or given
over to young men who love exercise,
But such communities never were, on
land or sea. For most modern men the
tasks, which require less muscular effort, but are probably less fun, also, than
the old-fashioned kinds of labor that the
machine displaced. Monday morning,
all over the civilized world, is a drear
day. It is possible that war itself has
been accorded a degree of welcome, because it breaks the hopeless monotony
of the individual's daily life.
The work problem may be solved by
cutting down the hours of labor, or,
contrarywise, it may be solved by turning real work into play. t It will be
settled in some fashion, or people will
begin to wonder what good there has
been exchanging the rude freedom of
savagery for the gilded cage of civilization.—-San Francisco Bulletin.
T
Westminster Trust Co.
HEAD OFFICE
J. J. JONES, Mas. Director.
NEW WESTMINSTER, B.C.
3. A. EBNNIE. Sec-Treaa.
ACTS AS ASSIGNEES, LIQUIDATOBS AND EEOEXVEES
INSURANCE IN ALL. IIS BRANCHES
HOUSES, BUNGALOWS, STOKES AND MODERN SUITES FOR RENT
at a Big Reduction
Safety Deposit Boxes for Beat at {2.60 np
. wills Drawn Free of Charge
Deposits Accepted and Interest at Four Per Cent. Allowed
on Dally Balances.
BUMNIM AOENT   DIRECTORY
Aak for labor T.mpl.   'Phone Exchange,
Seymour .74)1   (unless   otherwise  stated).
Bricklayers—Wm.  8. Dagnall, Room 215.   '
Cooka. Walton, Waitresses—Room 208;
Andy Graham; phon. Sey. 8414.
Eleotrleal Workera (outside)—E. H. Morrison, Room 207.
Englneera (etaam)—Room 210: E. Prendergaat.
Longshoremen', Asaooiatlon — Offloa, 148
Alexander Btreet; G. J. Kelly; phone Bey.
0812.
Mniiolana—H. J. Braafield, Booms 804*808,
Labor Templo.
Street Railway Employeea—Fred. A. Hoover J
phone Soy. 508.
)ographioal—R. H. Neelands, Rooms 212-
.8.14.
T*?B°*
TRAD!  UNION   DIRECTORY
Tho plausible liar is the darling of
every age. The only excuse for the age
is that it is dead before its folly Ib
generally known.
Timo hcnls many wounds. But if delay in bringing on the inquiry into the
South Wellington disaster causes tho
workers to forget Chief Mine Inspector
Graham's reported statement at the
inquest, let them never complain again.
But It won't.
Wonder if the real reason for postponing the inquest on tho victims of the
coal mine disaster at Nanaimo was that
the authorities thought that perhaps
another "accident" might take place,
and trouble and money might be saved
by holding two inquests together!
After all, it can be said that some of
the mining inspectors of this provinco
are a true reflection of the way in
which the office of minister of mines—
which iB in the hands of Premier McBride—hus been conducted during recent years.
Do you remember the days when it
all seemed so clear to you, that all
which seemed necessary was to climb
on the nearest housetop and tell the
rest of the world of the wonderful discovery you hud madef How long after
that wns it before you found out.that
lies And credence at first telling, while
the truth must he told and told again
before the world will even listen to it,
much less begin to suspect it may be
worth belie vingf
Boslyn Sends Sympathy.
Boslyn, Washington, local union of
the United Mine WorkerB of America,
writes The Fed. expressing sympathy
and condolence with all the sufferers
in the explosion which occurred recently in the Beservo mine at Nanaimo.
"B.C. Special"—best rye whisky—
distilled in B. C. by competent work*
men and dispensed at all leading bars.
ABk for "B.C. Special." , •"*
HOYT'S
10 Cent Cakes
"ALWAYS FRESH"
ASK YOUR GROCER
PANTAGES
Untquilltd Vaudeville  Mtans
PANTAOIS  VAUDEVILLE
THRU SHOWS DAILY
1.46, 7.20, 9.15   Season's Print!
Matlnto, 1Be.j Inning* He., Me.
Allied Printing Trodei Council—B. H. Nee*
1-indi, Box 80.
Barben—S. H. Orant, 688 Georgia start*!.
Bartenders—H. Davit,  Box 424,
Blacksmiths — Malcolm     Porter,     Vltw
Hill P. O.
Bookbinders—W. H. Oowderoy, 1886 Thirty-
fourth avenue east.
Boilermakers—A. Fraser, 1161 How* Bt.
Brewery   Worken—Frank   Graham,  Ltbor
Tempi*.
Brlckutyert—William S. Dagnall, Room
216, Labor Temple.
Brotherhood of Carpenten District Council—P. h. Barratt, Boom 900, Ltbor Tub-
pie.
OlRarmakeri—Care Kurti Cigar Faotory, 72
Water Street.
Cooka,  Walten,  Waitreasea—Andy Graham,
Room 206, Labor Temple,
Electrical Workers  (outalde)—E. H. Moral,
aon, Room 207, Ltbor Tempi*.
Electrical Worken  (laalde)—Room 207; F.
L. EatloghauBen.
Englneera—E. Prendergut,  Room 216,  Lt*
bor Temple.
Granite Cutters—Edward Hurry, Columbia Hotel.
Garment Worken—Labor Temple.
Honeaboen—Labor Temple.
Lettercanlen—Robt. Wight, Dlitrlet 22.
Laboren—George Harrison,  Room 220,  Lt'
bor -Temple.
Lathen—victor R. Mldgley, Ltbor Tempi*.
Locomotive Firemen and Enginetn—O. Howard, 607 Davie atreet.
Loco Engineers—L. T,  Solloway,  1157 Har-
wood.    Tel. Bey. 1848R.
Longshoremen—J, G Kelly, 10 Powell Street
Machinists—J. H.  McVety,    Room   211,
Labor Temple.
Musicians—H. J. Brasfleld, Rooms 804*806,
Labor Temple.
Marbleworken—Frank   Hall,   Janes   Road,
B.O.
Molden.
Moving Picture Operators—L.  E.  Goodman, Labor Tempi*.
Palnten—Room 803, Ltbor Temple
Plumbers—Room 206 1-2, Ltbor Tempi*.
Pressmen—P. D. Edward, Ltbor Temple.
Plasterers—John   Jamtt   Cornish,   1801
Eleventh Ave. East.
Pattern Makers—J.  Campbell,  4869 Argyle Street.
Quarry Workers—Jamtt Htpbum, ctrt
- Columbia Hotel.
Railroad Trainmen—A.   E.    McCorvlllt,
Box SIS.
Railway Carmen—A. Robb,   420  Nelson
Street.
Seamen's Unloa.
Structural Iron Worken—Room 208, Ltbor
Temple.
Stonecutter*—Jamea   Rtybnrn,   P.   O.   Box
1047.
Sheet Metal Workon.
Street Railway Employ***—James E. Grlffln,
166 Twenty-fifth tvenue cut.
Stereotypers—W. Bayley, ctrt Province.
City.
Telegraphers—E. B. Ptppln, Box 482.
Trades and Labor Council—Geo. Bartley,
Room 210 Labor Temple.
Typographical—H.  Neelanda, Box 66.
Taflort-C. McDonald, Box 60S.
Theatrical Stage Employees—Geo, W. Allln,
Tllelayers   and   Helpers—Evan Thomu,
Labor Temple.
VANCOUVER  .ginONg I
'RiniU       *«.»»%.   "^T!^*mmmmaaaaM^maf
Wrati   a    ui? "' Quttoridge, treasuw
^nP-M^TIN0 f»*oaa  coun:,
BROTHERHOOD
tnd Ih
of America,
OF
nue west, a-uimi.i.   .   «_""■'•■"'■■■■_eve-
_i\ tm P. m„ ubo*. ssa. "a a*
DISTRICT" COUNCIL   or   UABPEHTlni
J.W.Carruthers
HIGH CLASS TAILOR
2S2 Broadway Eaat
PRESIDENT
SUSPENDER
NONE SO-EASY
PHONE: SETMOUB BOSS
START THAT SAVINGS
ACCOUNT
now while you are able and make provisions for old age.
We pay 4$ Interest on Deposits subject
to your cheque, credited monthly.
DOW FRASER
Trust Company
122 Hastings St. West.
Vaneouvar, and McKay nation,
Burnaby, B.C.
Reference—Dunn's, Bradstreeta, or
any Financial   House of   repute   la
Vancouver.
T.B.O0THBE&TSON&OO.
Men's Hatters and Outfitters
Three Stores
\ Seal
1 Manufacturing Co.
pusMrnnus polish
r look oil
Swooping Compound.
819 Georgia Street
Vaneouvar
Phono Seymour 3089
gOT^Lebor Temple, tt M°"*»°n, Boom
UUDOARRIEKS, BUILDI.NU AND COMMnii
&_________&*&%
_^_    _._... Phone
PLASTERERS'     OPERATIVE—INTrn«r
TIONAL    ASSOCIATION   N™™,   il
nil i *,*"'7 *"" *"d ",|"> Wednesday ln tba
month in room 801, Labor Temol.    S™.i
•..nt. A. Hurry; vWpSltatTjuJX
eorreapondln, ..„.,.%, Joe * Corn,™ V.'Si
oZ'J"«"rn'   "■■"   «»•"•••*   .eereJaw
^^^^!2L______i^!!i
PAINTERS',.   PAPERHANaRRa*'—755
.Decorator,-,  uSr^™,* .*$£
id;
BS£i9BSi
DowdlngTlii'   Rowa*"*,'-'**...? «"•'.'   -*■
amnOanS tSX.* __*• .„.Bu»*neae
SOS,
R.
Labor
T*SnVunM "*__ _™
day. at Labor Tampl., room MB. H Klrt."
aealee, praaldant, 'are Kfiy.Ji,tb ' «.™*:
eaat; Joa. O. Lyon. Snanolal'eeeSffii***. VJSJ
Orant etreet; 5. Campbell ___i 1.721
retary, 4Mj Artylj alreat   *"°"b"   'eo-
BT8»?E.*i£2 Jy-Mn'Kio KAILWAT Ell.
:     PLOTEES, Pbaeer DI*rtV£i w» nS*
_%____*> m-.VJ!T_eVS
BT**il*I^.*S*?ffll^1<?-   INTBRNATIOS.
al Looal SI7—Meete every Wedneadu
dal eecretary, g. 5gderiMgn»mt|ffl
TAILORS' INDUSTRIAL UNION nte'
,_ , ternatlonal). Local nS. ire^».(iS;
$K?.iKS 'W'S •£«»?>»;•%
Preeldent, Mlaa ft. Qutteiidae; recordlnsr
i5H*!l7' S-  "oBonnM,   B«" SMTiBS
clal aee., K. Patereon, P. o. Box tils
TYPOORAMnOAL    UK10K,    SO.    ltt-1
um*2____h^u~z&
PBOVINOIAL UWIOKg|
B.    O.    FEDERATION or UBnii_»....
-,. ft FEDERATION OP LABOR—Meets
ln annual convention tn January. Eie"
utlva oncers, Mis-Mi Preaident, X Witefc
man; vlce-presldenta—VaaeouMr, w, I.
^""J- .H', *?v,,jy Victoria, B. Stamonf
New Waatmlnater, *»Yetoe; Prince R?pSt
Strauss wtks
Ladles Hata Cleaned, dyed, reaewed or
blocked Inte the latest styles,
ALL WORK GUARANTEED
135 Hastings W., Vancouver
SYNOPSIS  OP  COAL   MININO   RCQU*
LATIONt
Coal mlnlni rlghta of the Dominion,
In Manitoba, Saakatohawan and Alberta,
the Yukon Territory, the Northweat Ter-
rltorlea and In a portion ot the Province
of Britlah Columbia, may be leaaed for
a term of twenty-one yeara at an annual
rental of 11 an mere. Not mora than
2,680 acrea will ba leaaed to one appll
cant.
Applications for leaae muat be mad* hy
the applicant In person to the Agent or
Sub-Agent of tha dlatrlct In which the
rlghta applied for aro altuated.
In aurveyed territory tha land muat ba
deeorlbed by aeotlona, or legal eubdivle*
ione ot aectione, and In unaurveyed ter*
ritory the tract applied for ahall be
etaked by the applicant hlmaelf.
Eaoh application muat be accompanied
by a fee of IE, whloh will he refunded If
the rlghte applied (or are not available,
but not otherwise. A* royalty ahall be
paid on the merchantable output of tho
mine at the rate of five oenta per ton.
The peraon operating the mine ahall
furnlah the Agent with sworn returne
accounting for the full quantity of merchantable ooal mined and pay tbe royalty thereon. If the eoal raining rlghta
are not being operated, auch returna
ahould be furnlehed at leaat once a year,
The lease will Include the coal mining
rlghta only, but the leeaee may be permitted to purchase whatever available
aurfaoe rlghta may bo considered necessary for tne working of the mine at the
rate of 110 an aore.
For full Information application ahould
be made to the Seoretary of the Department of the Interior, Ottawa, or to any
Agent or Sub-Agent of Dominion Landa.
W. H. CORT,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N. B.—Unauthorised publication of thla
advertleement will not be paid for-IMM.
Aak you favorite mixologist for "B.
C. Speolal." Oovernment Inspected and
absolutely pure. *"
tricfivuTw „ ,,
a Outhrle; Dlatrlct IS, U."H.""W
<£»»'• Neat Valley), A. J. Oartir; .acre-
vi7tir7,"Tr6.    ■ *'"'•p* °-l"W
•^~-r-.   .St "•   wont   DL
w. of A. (Vanoouver Ialand),
"   '*   "*"   of A.
NBW WMTMINST1R. B.C.
NBW«^l5,™I?,8TIE TRADES AMD LA-
. -.?0„5 CoumU-Meete every eewad and
62ft *.'*?.-*!? t. 0 p. m. k Leber UU
Preeldant, O. Cropley: Inanclal aecretarf
R. A. Stoney; -general   aeeretary,   W.   I
VICTORIA, B. e,    	
VICTORIA TBADBS AND LABOR OOUM-
, ,. 0l,r:f"ii..t^f ni ,hlrd Wedneaday,
Labor hall,   1434  Government atreet,  at  1
6 m.   Preeldent, A. S. Wells I aeeretary, F.
oldrldn, Box aoa, Victoria, B. O.
OBOAMUBD LABOB COMPANIES,
LABOR TEMPLE COMPANY, LIMITEI*-
Dlrectors: Jaa. Brown, preaident; R. P.
Pettlpleoe, vlce-prealdent; Edward Lothian,
James Campbell, J. W. Wllklnaon, Oeo, Wll.
bv, W. J. Halle, F. Blumberg, H. H. Free.
Managing director and seoretary-treasurer, J.
H. MeVety, room ail, Labor Tomple.
B. O. FEDERATIONIST, LIMITED—Meeta
at call of president, Labor Temple, Van*
couver, B. O. Directors: Jamea Campbell,
preeldent; J. H. McVety, aecretary-treaaurer;
A. Watchman, A. S. Walla. R. Perm. Pettlpleoe, manager, 917 Labor Temple, Telephone:   Seymour T406,
Vote agalnat prohibition! Demand per-
aonal liberty in ohooaing what yen will drink.1
Aak tor thla Label when purohaelng Beer,
Ale or Porter, aa a guarantee that it la Union Made. Thla X, Our Label
PkeaeSey. 221
Day « Night
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
aad EMBALMERS
IMUckaritSt.        Vaaceaver, I. C. •^mm**m
I FRIDAY- JUNE 11, 1915
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
[ecki£)h
Vftailt for Wear, -Style      ^
IS A LIBERAL
M&de li\
British
lommDja                   1
vm_W\L
w2%_%Jjj
Do this
7-^frW
To-Day
//sJf/
Go to your shoe dealer and ask
to see a pair of LECKIE SHOES.
Try them on.
Note the comfort—the construction—the leather—the sewing.   Tour
' dealer knows nil about shoes—ask him what he   knows   about   the  ■
SUBSTANTIALITY of LECKIE SHOES.   Then wear a pair—you'll
find thom the best shoe investment you ever made.
Made for Men and Boys who ret
uire better shoes,
World Shoe Co.
64 Hasting*! St., W„ Phone Sey. 1770
Beit Shoo Repairing "While You Wait"
Work called for and dollrered
Loggers' Miners' Cripples' and any kind
of special Shoes mado to order
-J®
T«"S«S^
WORKERS UNION,
UNIO
^TAMP
fad
'•yj
Named Shoei ua frequently made in Non-
Union Factories—Do Not Boy Any Shoe
no matter what iti name, unless lt boara a
Plata and readable Impression or thla atamp.
All ahoea without tha Union Stamp ara
alwayi Non-Union.
BOOT A (HOE WORKER*' UNION
IM Summer Street, Boston, Mua.
J. T. Tobln, Fraa   0. L. Bl||pa, 8ao.*Traai.
Ask for
"NABOB"
Products
TEA SPICES
OOITEB ICINGS
JELLY POWDEB PUDDINGS
FLATOBWa EXTBAOTS BAKING POWDEB
AT YOUR GROCER
Get and use "NABOB" everytime
■i —*—■ ■■      —m-~m~—,^^——^—m-~^^^-^    -.- - -^Bssmsm
Jingle Pot Coal
ONLY UNION MINED OOAL ON THE PACIFIC COAST
More heat. No Clinkers
WOOD
Millwood and Kindling $2.50 load
Choice 16 inch Fir (3.00 load
CARTAGE
General Cartage, "baggage and Furniture Moved and Stored1
McNEILL, WELCH & WILSON, Limited
Phone Seymour 1038
EVERYMAN'S LIBRARY
Tbo mon important, tho mott wonderful and tbo moot popular library onr
lamed.   Sana hundred toIumo to ooloet from.
sum fob list
THOMSON STATIONERY CO., LIMITED
OaakeU Bock * Stationery Co., Ltd.
S86 Hatting Street Wort 679481 OnwUlo Street
Suffragettes   Should    Not
Forget the Record of
British Liberals
Women Did Spade Work for
Many Years; Were Then
Turned Down
[By Miss Helena Gutteridge.]
Tlie formation of a Liberal Women'a
Club in Vancouver is an instance of
how very easily the mistakes of past
generations are repeated. Tbe faot that
so many members of this adjunct to tbe
Liberal party are prominent suffragists,
shows that votes for women as a plank
in me party platform and tbe promise
of a Women's Suffrage measure in the
dim and distant future, in return for
services rendered in tbe present, Ib the
bait that haB been swallowed by those
women, wbo are either Liberals first
and suffragists after, or else are so
guileless as to think that the promises
of a party looking for assistance to
strengthen their desperate weakness,
can possibly mean anything.
Many years ago the women of England swallowed a similar bait and
formed the Liberal Women's Federation. For thirty years and more they
slaved at every election, doing all the
tiresome and monotonous - work of tbe
party, votes for women being tbe carrot
dangled before their nose.
, When, however, after twenty years
of Conservative government, the Liberal government was returned to power
with suoh an overwhelming majority
that it was known as the "strongest
government of modern times," the woman's suffrage plank proved a rotten
one.
It would be well if the members of
the Liberal Women's Club were to
read up the history of the Liberal government and the woman's suffrage
movement in the "old country" during
the past ten years and see how much
worth promises are, made during elections campaigns by those who are out
of power and seeking office.
The worst feature of the move is the
making of Women's Suffrage a party
question and particularly of a party out
of power. The unity of women of ell
parties and of no party has heretofore
been the strength of the suffrage movement in British Columbia, small though
it was. With the division that will
come, aB the nevitable result of the
linking up of any section of the women with Liberal party politics will
come lack of unity, that will justify the
atitude of the present government
the enfranchisement of women.
There Ib only one thing absolutely
sure and that is, the Liberal party will
accept all tbe work of tue womeitj
whilst almost as sure, is the impossibility of the party to deliver the goods
during tbe next decade at leaBt. Therefore why waste time and energy
working for the almost impossible when
the possible, if not the probable, is at
hand.
The policy of all political parties, is
to make ubo of anything and everything that will further the aims and objects of the variouB parties. The frantic
efforts of the Liberal party, in this respect, during the last few months have
boen positively indecent, and would almost appear to be the last despairing
efforts to rescue the party from oblivion.
one moment to turn tbem down wben
they have no further use for them.
Would Use Tho Women.
The value of the next move, the formation of a Liberal Women's Club, is
exceedingly doubtful, both to the party
and the women, the women being only
a handful of the suffragists of the city,
will not have the strength necessary to
give the Liberal party a great deal of
assistance, while the help the Liberal
party will give the women could be expressed by the mathematical X, an unknown quantity.
However, everything has a value and
the value here will be the proving to
the women whose feminine charm is to
be exploited, that "woman's influence is absolutely powerless to obtain
Votes for Women, so long as the influence is that of only a minority of women and is used for party interests and
not for the principle of woman's suffrage.
Women Lack Enthusiasm.
The backwardness of the suffrage
movement in British Columbia Ib not
due to the opposition of any party, or
to the desire of men to dominate their
women flk, but to the lack of interest
displayed by women themselves.
Naturally when a handful of women
have been working fruitlessly to educate tbeir sister women to a sense of
their own dignity and rights, it may
seem to some, especially those women
who are at heart keenly interested in
the Liberal party, the line of least resistance, to accept and believe the promise to give them suffrage in return for
assistance during the coming election.
Thli Is Tbe Reason.
The lesBon to be learned during the
next few years will be similar to that
learned by British women during the
last ten years, namely: That Liberal
promises made before election to office,
are about as binding aB the "scrap of
paper" the British are. fighting about,
was to tbe Germans when the neutrality
of Belgium was violated.
However, juBt as the workers did,
tbe women must flnd out by bitter experience that if you want a thing you
must get it for yourself, and only when
you want it so badly that tbat determination and organization result) will
the hearts desire be obtained.
LETTERS TO
Flirting With Labor.
First there was the attempt to induce
organized labor to co-operate with the
party and bolster up its weakness, an
attempt that proved a failure owing to
tbe fact that organized labor recognized
the fact tbat there is no difference
whatever (between either the Conservative or Liberal parties, except that of
one party being in power and exploiting the workers and tne other party being out of power, but wanting to get
into offlce and use tbe opportunity thus
afforded to exploit in their turn.
Organized labor made it perfectly
clear to the Liberal party on the occasion referred to, that it preferred to do
its own work in its own way and had
not the faintest desire to be made the
cat's paw to pull tbe chestnuts out of
the fire for the Liberal party.
The next step taken was the publishing of the "Crisis in B. C," an indirect emanation from the Liberal party
through the Ministerial Union of the
Lower Mainland. To issue such a pamphlet directly as a party production
would have looked too much like the
'' pot calling the kettle black,'' but no
doubt the Ministerial Union thought
that the publishing of a list of the delinquencies of the Conservative government, was u duty to humanity, while
the Liberal party chuckled gleefully at
getting the benefit of the exposure of
the governmont, without any direct
responsibility. Perhaps a libel suit or
two will not only keep the Ministerial
Union too busy to tako nny furthor part
in the election campaign, but may open
their eyes to tho fact that they have
boon made use of to further tho interests of a party that will not hesitate for
A. P. of L. at
Editor B. C. Federationist: You no
doubt are aware of the action of the
Philadelphia 1914 convention of the
American Federation of Labor directing that tbe A. F. of L. be represented
in the Panama-Pacific exposition which
Ib being held in Sah Francisco in celebration of the completion of the Panama canal.
All of the national and international
organizations were requested to cooperate and make an exhibit of their
history, work and achievements. Many
of tbem responded to the request and
prepared most helpful and instructive
charts and other materials showing
what their organizations had done in
promoting the welfare of the workerB.
In addition there were prepared at the
headquarters of the A. F. of L. numerous charts and illuminated inscriptions,
literature and other informational matter showing the aims, purposes, methods
and achievements of the organized labor movement. TheBe materials have
all been sent to San Francisco where
they have been established in a booth
artistically and beautifully designed
and constructed, which is in the Palace
of Education.
An A. F. of L. representative has
been put in charge of the exhibit. Descriptive information and photographs
have been sent me which show that the
exhibit is in every respect a great credit to the labor movement and cannot
help but impress all who see it with
the importance and the extent of the
work that the labor movement is doing.
The purpose of my writing to you iB
to urge you to help in giving publicity
to the A. F. of L. exhibit and to urge
ell visitors to the San Francisco exposition to visit labor's exhibit. Unless
you do your part many may visit San
Fancittco and not be aware of labor's
exhibit and thus miss a valuable opportunity to learn more of our movement
and to receive the inspiration that must
come from the tangible proofs of the
great successes that the trade union
movement hns won since the organization of the A. F. of L. In helping along
this movement for wider publicity for
labor's exhibit you will be rendering
a very helpful service to the cause of
labor and humanity.
Fraternally Yours, .
SAMUEL GOMPERS,
President American Federation of
Labor.
PAGE THREE
T
s
Supports Agitation Against
Oriental Labnr on Ex-
. ported Lumber
Will Assist Mechanics Who
Wish to Seek Work
in Britain
Begular meeting of Victoria Trades
and Labor council called to order by
President Wells.
Trades reports are still bad and Plumbers and Steamfltters still looked out,
Oriental Labor on Lumber.
Communications were received from
the Prime Minister's office, Wellington,
New Zealand, also from the Oity clerk
regarding the employment of Orientals
in' the lumber industry. This matter
had been sent to the city council from
the labor bureau asking for co-operation of tbe council in an effort to see
that white labor was employed. A request was made that the Trades and Labor council send delegates to a meeting
to be held at the city hall, also to the
Board of Trado and other organizations. The Trades and Labor council
having dealt with the matter in relation to using their efforts to ensure that
the colonies only receive lumber handled by white labor, Delegates Wells
Day and Sivettz were appointed to attend the meeting.
Miners' Resolution Endorsed.
Communication was received from
the Miners' unions signed by Mr. Foster and reported in the previous week's
B.C. Federationist. The council endorsed the resolution and sent the same
to the proper authorities.
Delegates from Street Bailway Employees reported that they had received
notice of cancelling of agreement and
that they had sent delegates to meet
the B. C. Electric at a meeting to be
held on Friday.
Mechanics For Britain.
Messrs. Barnes and Wyndhams's visit
to British Columbia for mechanics to
go back to the old country was next
dealt with. It .was moved and duly
carried that the matter be referred to
tue executive and ihe secretary be instructed to write to each local union.
Delegate Watchman stated that a re-
Suest had already been sent from the B.
. Federation of Labor to Mr, Barnes to
come to Victoria, informing him that
men could be found here who were willing to go back. Delegate Day complained strongly at the refusal of the
B.C. Federationist to publish a letter
of great importance to the council. He
stated that it was with the sanction of
Delegate Watchman and Wells that he
should send this letter, but it appeared
to him that Victoria could only have
what Vancouver wished. He was positive that Victoria locals would not give
the help they could unless this question
was taken up. The matter waa left in
the hands of Delegates Watchman and
Wells for tbem to report back to the
council.
CENTER & HANNA, Ltd.
UNDERTAKERS
i Refined Service
1041 OEOROIA STRUT
One Blook weit of Court Houie.
Uae ol Modern Chapel anl
Funeral Parlora free to all
Patrons
Telephone Seymoar 2425
Phone: Fairmont 810
Patterson& Chandler
Manufacturers of
MONUMENTS
Vaults, Curbing, Etc.
Offloe and Works:
Cor. 16th Ave. and Main St.
Branch Office: 40th ft Fraser Aves,
VANCOUVER. B.C.
Editor B. C. Federatlonist: Local
union, No. 2299, U. M. W. of A., Cumberland, met in regular session and
passed'the following resolution regarding the recent mining disasters on Vancouver Island. We do not forget that
the mining department of this province
did everything in their power to de-
feat the organizing of the minors on
this island. And ns we view the cause
of tho strike, ro discrimination of men
thnt wero fnithful enough to themselves
and their fellow workers to report tbo
true conditions of tlie mine, that one if
not both of these disasters would have
beon avoided, if the efforts of tho true
men had been accomplished there is no
doubt. Therefore, be it resolved, that
wo condemn the members of tho mining
department from the bottom up as men
unworthy and unfit for tho positions
tho now occupy. Also our heartfelt
sympathy and condolence to the relatives and friends of the men that have
lost their lives after lighting for months
to amend the conditions of which they
have met their denths. I
LOCAL UNION. NO. 2299, CUMBERLAND, B. C.
MECHANICS   FOB   BRITAIN.
Terms and Conditions Offered by the
Commission.
Information concerning the purpose
of the forthcoming visit to Vancouver
of the British mission of inquiry into
the armament labor supply, has been
received by Mr. W. A. Blair, secretary
of the board of trade, from Mr. W.
Windham, secretary of the commission.
The commissioners are making a tour
of Canada with a view to ascertaining
what supply of mechanics may be secured for work in England in munition
factories. The skilled workmen are expected to enter an, engagement for six
months at least.
The terms of the contract which the
workman is expected to sign are
follows:
1. Standard British rates, including
war bonus, etc.
2. Minimum engagement of six
montbs it suitable. If not required for
nny work in his trade on munitions of
war in any of tho principal centres and
he wishes to return at once, fare paid
back by government.
3. If government transport not
available, fares to be paid to the United
Kingdom. Faros in the United Kingdom in any case.
4. Fnres to be paid back if men
stay as long as wanted for government
work during the war.
5. Subsistence on authorized scale
from date of leaving home after selection to data ol starting work.
(i. No families will be brought at
government's or employer's expense.
7. Undertaking to stay for six
months if suitublo work is available.
Tho workmen required by tho Imperial government comprise tho following trndes: Machinists, including lit-
tors, tumors, millers, millwrights, etc.,
rivetters, drillers, shipwrights, including ship carpenters; boilermakers nnd
boilermakers helpers; sheet iron work-
coppersmiths, blncksmiths and
blacksmiths' helpers, moulders.
Answer for "O, V. 0."
Editor B. C. Federationist: I just
noticed "C. V. C.'s" enquiry in the
edition of 2lBt ulto. Sorry I overlooked
it, and for delay in answering. I don't
know whether to tako "C. V. C." in n
serious or a facetiously-philosophical
vien, but I may say that, so far as my
knowledge oxtends, tho "what" that
"determines the mode of production"
is also, nnd chiefly, a "whoj" viz,,
mankind, working in conjunction with
othor natural forces, in a desire for social betterment. This desire may be
conscious or unconscious—but it works
just the same. W. M. C,
Juno 8, 1915.
Your home decanter should be filled
with "B.C. Special." One trial will
convince. For sale at all leading retail
liquor stores.
Secure the best whisky—"B.C. Special"—for the least money. Made in
B. C. for particular people. Sold everywhere.   Ask for it. **••>
Whenever you can consistently do so,
when you requiro anything you see nd-
vortiBed in The Federationist, bo sure
and explain that you saw his ad. in The
FederationiBt, and that it was bccar.se
of thnt that ho is patronized. Don't
forgot thia.
^ell
Ibffeonwbc
acoo.
HARRON BROS.
FUNERAL   DIRECTORS  AND
EMBALMERS
Vancouver—Office and Chape],
1034 Qranvllle St., Phone Sey. 348«.
North Vancouver — Office and
Chapel, 122—Birth St. Weit, Phone
IM.
Women Are Enlisting
Mare An Needed to Un
Thotuindi cf woman sit nuking wanting earter If tottfif BOTAL OBOWlf
NAPTHA WAP do tht hud part (rf tht
waihlng tat thtm. Tit • cake and 70a
will low no Umt enliitlng.
PLANT NOW
Gladio«.Sgcjal Offer 15c. per ^OZ.
MONTBRETIA
Fine for Autumn OKn   Art*
Cutting **"" aoz»
BOYS' SUITS
from $3.50 up
CLUBB & STEWART, Limited
301-8H EASTDias STBBIT WSSI Plant Se
To England Under Neutral Flag
American Line from New York-Liverpool
Ejrit                          Large fast American Steamers aider American flag
Clui  $95.UU "Philadelphia" June Bth
S«««l*ccnn\  \   "stu^" -•J*,MlMh
Ckll  $55.00 |V A. "St. Paul" June 19th
_ .    **' w" "New York''  June 26th
Clau $40.00 *■*"• weeItly tam*t—'"
Company's Offioes: 619 SECOND AVENUE, SEATTLE, WN.
OK LOOAL BAIL AND STEAMSHIP AGENTS.
Office Furniture
Less Than Wholesale
Hastings Furniture Co., Ltd., 41 Hastings St West
Wt art making a Clearanoe of
SU preient stock of Offlce Fuial-
tut.
Oome  early  snd
choice.
your.
You Can Save Money
BT USING
Tango Street Car Tickets
8 T 25 Cents
THIS IS HOW IT WOBKS OUT
32 Bidca ut 32 Bides on Your Saving On
A 5 Cent Fare Tango Ticket* $1 Investment
$1.60    $1.00      60c
Tangojjckets Are Now On Sale
They are sold by conductors on tbe cars, at tbe B.O. Electric Salesrooms,
Carrall and Hastings streets and 1138 Granville street; tbe Company's
Interurban Terminals at Hastings and Carrall streets and south end of
Oranvllle street bridge; Oepotmaster's Offlce at Main and Prior streets;
Mount Pleasant Car Barn, Main street and Thirteenth avenue, and at the
places of business of tbe following firms throughout the city:
HASTINOS STREET—
Woodward's   Dept.   Stores     (Drug
Dept.) Abbott Street Corner.
' Spencer's  Dept.    Store    (Cashier's
offlee, Information Bureau and Exchange Desks), near Richards.
Wood's Pharmacy—Seymour Streot
corner.
Campbell's  Pbanrncy — Granville
Street corner,
Owl Drugstore—Mn in Street corner.
Harrison's  Drag  Store—Near Car-
rail street
MAIN STREET—
Browne    _    Beaton,      Druggists,
Fender street corner,
law'l    Drugstore — Harris street
corner.
CORDOVA STREET—
Owl    Drugstore  —  Abbott  strent
corner
POWELL STREET—
Owl    Drugstore — Dunlevy street
corner.
DENMAN_STBBET—
(English Bay)
Torrance Drugstore -
■ Davie street
ORANVILLE   STREET—
Hudson's Bay Co. All departments
Ooorgia street corner.
Gordon Drysdale's   (Notion    Counter) near Dunsmuir.
Owl Drugstore — Dunsmuir street.
Harrison's   Drugstore —   Robson
Htreet corner.
Browne ft Beaton, druggists, Davie
sirnet corner.
rill Box Drugstore — Nolson street
corner
Law's Drugstore — Davlo    street
corner
Harrison's     Drugstore — Pender
street corner.
PAIRVIEW—
Harrison's   Drugstore — Oranvllle
street   and   Seventh   avenue.
MOUNT PLEASANT—
Law's Drugstore — Near Broadway
QRANDVIEW—
Campbell's Drugstore — Broadway
and Commercial Drive.
STANLEY PARK—
Mitchell's Confectionery— Georgia
atreet entrance.
B.C. ELECTRIC
Carrall and Hastings Sts.
1138 Granville St
Near Davie
BROWN BROS. & CO. Ltd.
Seedsmen, Florists and Nurserymen
VANCOUVER -  HAMMOND .- VICTORIA
High Class Dental Services at
very Moderate, Prices   ,
GOLD AND PORCELAIN CROWNS, Each... $ 6.00
BRIDGE WORK, per Tooth     B.OO .
PBRTEOT mTIHQ PLATES    10.00
AMALGAM FILLINGS ,      IM
ENAMEL nLUNCW       1.00
DIimmi ot the gumi, Including Pyorrhea, toceeeetoily touted.
All work guaranteed.
Dr. BRETT ANDERSON
Phono Seymour 3331 Offico:  101 Buk of Ottawa BnUdJag
002 Hitting* Straet Went PAGE POUR
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
May Suit Sale Now On
Our entire stock is
selling at about
J_
2
Regular Selling Prices
$22.50 Suits for $11.98
$27.50 Suits for $14.98
$32.50 Suits for $19.98
*   etc.
hpfiudsonsBaB(fompanij. jm
_______ ttn    *____si^am_______tuo____tA 1 ^igaw
GRANVILLE AND GEORGIA STREETS
Technical Training Factory
for Manufacturing the
Workers
Contains Limited Good But
Needs Very Careful
Watching
From farm's
Potato Patch
-a "Pioneer"
tent always
comes in handy
Camping, boating, fishing, mountaineering, any out-door eport or work,
a "Pioneer" tent le juat the thing.
"Pioneer" tents are made strong ana
durable. Write or phone TODAY for
no. 1 Catalogue of all camp supplies.
C. H. JONES & SON, Ltd.
110 Alexander Street
Phone Seymour 740
Manufacturers
Canvas Goods of Every Description
Consumers  Buy  Direct
from Producers
The Vancouver City Market
Main Street Bridge
There will be an abundance of all varieties of Food Products on sale at the VANCOUVER CITY" MARKET ' this
Saturday.
It will certainly be to your interest to viBit the market
and buy direct.
FRESH HALIBUT at 60. per pound.
FRESH HOME MAlfe BUTTER 30c. per pound.
NEW LAID EGGS, 2 dozen for 55c.
Boost the Market
for your own interests
HOTEL IRVING
101 Hastings Street East
—as the only all-union hotel of its kind in Vancouver, has been designated as />
OFFICIAL HEADQUARTERS for UNION MEN
The Finest of Wines, Liquors and Cigars sold at
buffet, with courteous Union mixologists to serve
you.
i   JOHN L. SULLIVAN, Proprietor.
Phone: Seymour 3380.
UNION ^OFFICES
This Official List Of Allied Printing Offices
CAN SUPPLY TOtT WITH THB ALLIED PWNTIKO TRADES UNION LABEL
BAOLEY* SONS, 161 Hastings Street! Seymoar 810
BLOCHBEEOKR. F, R., 819 Broadway East Fairmont 208
BRAND * PERRY, 829 Pender Street, Wait   Seymour 2678
BURRARD  PUBLISHING  OO.,   711   Seymour   Street    Seymoar   8580
CHINOOK PRINTING CO., 4801 Main Street   Fairmont 1874
CLARKE k  STUART,  820  Seymour Street    Seymoar  8
COMMERCIAL PRINTING ft PUBLISHING CO.,  ..World Building, Sey. 4686-87
COWAN ft BROOKHOUSE, Labor Temple Building  Seymoar 4400
DUNSMUIR PRINTING CO., 4S7 Dammair Street.. Seymour 1106
EVANS ft HABTINGS, Art! and Crafts Bldg., Seymoar St Seymour 66S0
GRANDVIEW PRINTERS, 1448 Commercial. Highland 741L
JEWELL, M. L., 841 Pender St Seymour 144*
KERSHAW, J. A., 689 Howe St Seymour 8674
LATTA, R P., 883 Gore Ave Seymour 1039
MAIN PRINTING CO.. 8861 Main St Fairmont 1988
McLEAN ft SHOEMAKER, North Vancouver N. Van. 68
MOORE PRINTING CO., Cor. Granville and Robson Sta. Seymour 4648
NEWS-ADVERTISER, 801 Pender St Seymoar 1028:41
NORTH SHORE PRESS. North Vancouver    N Van. 80
PACIFIC PRINTEBB, World Building  Seymour 9592
PEARCE ft HODGSON. 618 Hamilton Stmt  ..Seymoar 2928
ROEDDE, G. A., 616 Homer Street  ' ....Seymoar 204
SCANDINAVIAN PUBLISHING CO., 817 Cambie St    ...... Seymour 6609
TERMINAL CITY PRESS, 2408 Westminster Road Fairmont 1140
THOMSON STATIONERY, 825 Haatinga W. Seymoar 8620
TIMMS, A. H., 280 Fourteenth Ave. E , Fairmont 621R
WESTERN PRESS, 823 Cordova W.. '.. -. .Seymoar 7568
WESTERN SPECIALTY CO., 881 Dunsmuir St Seymour 8526
WHITE ft BINDON, 167-159 Cordova St Seymour 1216
Write "Union Labal" on Yonr Oopy when Ton Send It to the Printer
There is a new system of education
which takes from the shoulders of in
dustry the burden of working over its
human raw material, says San Francis*
co Bulletin, It is in danger of becoming a kind of worker factory. When
it is perfected it will be possible to
feed all sorts of boys and girls into
its hopper, and have them come out, a
year or so later, accurately moulded to
fit definite grooves in the industrial
machine. Put in this way, the scheme
is pretty grim and repellant. Put in
other ways, it can lie made to sound
as reasonable as the multiplication
table. Approximately SO per cent, of
us must work with our hands. Should
it not be the flrst purpose of our education to teach us to do our work well!
Making Soles, and Seals.
The answer depends on whether or
not people have souls; that is, whether
they have souls that can be of any use
to them before they die. We can believe that the most important thing is
to get as much work as possible out of
every man, that he shall make as many
hundredth-parts of a shoe, or aB many
thouBandth-parts of an automobile, as
possible. Or we can believe that it is
still more important that he shall enjoy and reason and let his soul grow.
The former is "practical"; the latter
ia not.
State Apprenticeship.
It is possible to have altogether too
much practicality, to bow too low before industrialism. The state of Indiana lays down, as among the requirements of its new vocational schools,
"that pupils be trained, as far as possible, for the leading skilled occupations
of the community;, that pupils taking
the vocational courses be fitted specifically, each for hi» intended occupation.'*
The preparation for efficient and
profitable employment in the shop, in
the home or in the farm," says the report of the Indiana Board of Education, "requires instruction or training which is as specific and distinct in
its purpose and methods from the so-
called general or cultural education as
the instruction now given in our state
law and medical schools differs in method and aim from the work pursued in a
general college course."'
The Sheep and The Goats.
Culture" subjects have had their
evils, many and greivous, but where
they have been obligatory they have
not split the school children—as these
grimy rules do—into 80 per cent, who
will hnve to work with- their hands, and
consequently need to have their hands
but not their souls developed, and 20
per cent, who will not have to work
with their hands, and can be carefully
grown, like rare flowers in a garden.
Never until now have school children
been split into two classes—flowers and
vegetables.
Technical Training Needs Watching.
Some excellent ideas on thiB subject
may be found in a recent book by Edwin " Davies Schoonmaker on '' The
World-Storm—and Beyond." Another
stout defender of the rights of children
against the new experiment in stultification is Dr. John Dewey. Both these
men concede that children Bhould be
taught how to work, but believe that
they are good for something more than
to be trimmed, like old-fashioned Dutch
gardens, into shape for industrial ubo.
Vocational education has in it, germs
of great but limited good. It needs
watching. As practiced, it is altogether
too much in line with the tendency to
sacrifice the soul of the people to the
Moloch of industrial efficiency.
Omar Khayyam To Date.
A Book of   Verses   underneath the
Bough,
"B.C. Special,"a Loaf of Bread—and
Thou
Beside me singing in the Wilderness—
Oh, Wilderness were Paradise enow!"
"BOB"   OEAia   STILL   BOOSTING.
Now Claims Stettler, Alberta, as <us
Home.
Who, among the old-time trades
unionists of Vancouver, doesn't remember "Bob" Craigt Well, Bob is now
located at Stettler, Alberta, and reports
the cigar business flourishing in that
commercial metropolis of the foothill
province just east of the Rockies, Of
course, as a live union label booster and
an ardent unionist worker, Bob still has
to have The Fed. and, as of old, insists
that all his neighbors do likewise. Under date of June 7, Bob writes:
"Dear Parm: Enclosed flnd postal
note for $1.50, one year subscription to
The B. C. Federationist, tho best little
labor paper in the Canadian west. This
is union meeting night, so the message
will be short. There are 36 members in
thiB local of Cigarmakers and we are
all working steadily. Have not lost a
minute this year, except the 21th of
May. Turning out 40,000 Van Loo
cigars per week, That is more than the
entire city of Vancouver produce now.
Mike Nugent and I read the editorials
in The Fed. with delight; they suit ub
line. J. W. W. is there on the moral;
reformers and uplifters just right. We
have seven Vnncouver boys and three
Westminster boys wording here. Several fine dwelling houses are going up
and prospects are good for a crop,
which will make things hum. We have
a butter factory here turning out 2,000
pounds of butter daily. Some of it will
be on the Vancouver markets shortly,
You would be surprised at the number
of ex-Vancouverites Hying in Stettler.
We all hope to come back when B, C.
gets rid of the "Solid Five" prosperity
gang. It'B a faot, everybody ridicules
the McBride government, especially its
land deals. We vote on the wet or dry
question on July 21st. Hope it Btays
wet Feeding on mushrooms these days
and mallard duck later on, That's
better than B. C. coffee and sinkers,
ehf Hnve not had to join any orders
yet to hold down this job. Best regards
to Hackett and the rest of the old
guard."
Insect Life.
No one can have any idea of the wonders and diversities of life on this
planet without pausing occasionally to
contemplate the myriad varieties of insects that everywhere surround us. Entomology Ib one of the moat fascinating
of studies. So great are its intricacies
and so profound its mysteries, that the
amateur student can never be satiated,
but must ever flnd fresh food for
thought and fresh stimuli for the imagination.
In order to provide a basis upon
whieh to work in the pursuit of this
interesting study, one Bhould begin by
making a small collection. A very good
start in this direction may be made by
going to sleep in the shade of some
forest giant. Upon awakening, the first
thing that strikes one is that the idea
of collecting is not peculiarly human,
but is somewhat general among insectB
themselves, portions of the human
frame being highly prized among them.
I once had a very good collection of
hearty and virile insectB. There were
four ants up my left trouser leg and a
wasp up the right; my hair was full of
gnats and a mosquito had entered my
left ear. Great scientists have begun
thoir careers with smaller collections
than this. I may say, however, even at
the risk of being accounted immodest,
that they did not go as far as I went
with mine, nor did they accomplish the
same interesting things. Among other
feats, I may mention that of disrobing
while in full flight, until I might have
been seen sailing o'er the face of nature like the transit of Venus, wearing
nn harrassed appearance.
An insect that offers many opportunities for close observation, and one
that rouses many and varied emotions,
is the mosquito. To the delight of rural
life this winged lancer adds his gentle
hum. What camper or country-dweller
has not, after he has blown out the
lamp and forgotten where the matches
are, been lulled to slumber by the pleasant murmur of the mosquito's lullaby?
But mayhap he is a crabbed individual
with no musical soul. In which case he
will not immediately go to Bleep, but
will lead with his left and bash himself
in the eye. Then, making a wild swing
with the right, he will knock the lamp
off the table and send it crashing
against the wall. The hum will continue. Rising, he now decides to light
a match and pursue the thing until it
is slain or dies of exhauston. Heading
for where he thinks the matches are, he
loses his sense of direction and bangs
his shin against a chair. He utters an
exclamation, but decides to be cautious.
So he stands stock still and liBtens.
The hum approaches, describes several
evolutions, and then   ceases   near at,
hand. Hal it is on the wall—within
reach. Raising his hand, the disturbed
makes a fearful swipe and knocks into
oblivion his aunt's photograph that had
been enlarged at great expense. Now,
he almost loses control, but perceiving
the window gleaming dimly through
the darkness, he thinks there may be
matches on the ledge and starts for
there, forgetting the bed which is in
the way. Over, this he stumbles. Tired
nature now wards off madness by Bending him at last to sleep. The next day
is spent scratching a white spot which
he carries somewhere about his person.
VERDE.
Bumble at His Best.
It is stated in the correspondence columns of the New Statesman that the
Gateshead, England, Education Committee have decided to discontinue
school meals, although they admit that
182 of the children still, need them. At
the same time, they have agreed to set
aside a sum. for providing the children
with pamphlets on Patriotism.
Edgett's
Sensational Low Prices
for Friday and Saturday
SUGAR— 18-lb. sack Pure'Cane Sugar
with other purchases;  regular $1.50
for 91.25
FLOUR—49 lb. sack Royal Home-
hold, Robin Hood, Five Roses, Seal
of Alberta;    regular    prloea    92.26,
for 11.95
TEA—Our celebrated Edgett's    Tea,
40o value 25o
Our Fresh Ground Edgett's    Coffee,
40c value 25o
BUTTER—Alberta Creamery   Butter:
800 value, Special 4 lba. $1.00
CHEESE—Regular  25c for   ....
EGGS—Fresh    Rancb,   Regular    86a
for 80c
STRAWBERRIES— Fresh   Victorias,
Box 10c
Special Crate Price for Preserving $2
FRUIT  JARS—Pints,   dozen....  65c
Quarts, doien 85o
NEW RINGS—Dosen for 10a
Lime Juice, 85c values   25c
Grape Juice, 35c values 25c
Raspberry Vinegar, 86c values .. 25c
SOAP-—Fels Naptha, 4 ban for.. 25c
Royal Crown,  14 bars for   45c
JAM—Pure British Columbia Fresh
Fruit, 6 lb. tins, regular    75c;    for
only 65o
RAISINS..Seeded, 3 lbs. for....  25c
PRUNES—8  lbs.  for 25o
RICE—Regular 5c lb.; 7 lbs. for 25c
VINEGAR—Reg. 15c bottle, for 10c
CORN, PEAS, TOMATOES AND
BEANS. Special .... 8 tins for 25c
SODA    BISCUITS—2-lb.    tins,    reg.
80c; 2 tins for 46a
GINGER SNAPS—8 lbs. for ....  25c
LEMONS—85c values  for    20a
ORANGES—36c values for   ....  26c
Phone Orders Rushed—Sey. 5868
118 Hastings St. West
The DELMONICO
Just a whisper off Granville, 704 Robson Street
UNION  SHOP—
VANCOUVER'S LEADING CAFE
Harry Beckner. "Ervin Switzer.    Phone Sey. 8343.   VANCOUVER, B.O.
WHY
The Federationist Hits the
Bull's Eye Every Week
•«
J THE PEDEBATIONIST IS THE OFFICIAL PAPER
OF THE B. C. FEDERATION OF LABOB AND VANCOUVEB TBADES AND LABOB COUNCIL, ENDORSED BY NEW WESTMINSTER AND VICTORIA TRADES AND LABOB COUNCILS.
PBINTS MORE LOCAL LABOR NEWS THAN ANY
OTHER PAPER IN CANADA.
ITGOES TO PRESS PROMPTLY   EVERY   FRIDAY
II MORNING AND NEVER DISAPPOINTS ITS READ-
f
*t
s
KEEPS THE WORKERS INFORMED OF WHAT IS
GOING ON IN THE VARIOUS ORGANIZATIONS.
FURNISHES INFORMATION OF VALUE THAT
NEVER APPEARS IN THE DAILY PAPERS.
D TELLS THE GOOD THINGS ABOUT UNIONS AND
MEMBEBS.
LOOKS UPON THE OPTIMISTIC SIDE AND LETS
THE HAMMER BUST.
TTKEEPS BBITISH COLUMBIA LABOR   ON    THE
J|MAP BY BEING ONE OF THE MOST WIDELY
QUOTED LABOR PAPERS PUBLISHED.
1 PRESENTS LABOR'S SIDE OF INDUSTRIAL AND
POLITICAL ISSUES IN THEIR TRUE LIGHT, AND
WINS FRIENDS FOR LABOR.
I GIVES RESULTS TO ADVERTISERS, BECAUSE IT
GOES INTO HOMES OF THE BEST PAID CLASS
OF WORKERS, AND IS ACCEPTED AS A GUIDE
BY TRADES UNIONIST PURCHASERS.
REFUSES TO ACCEPT ADVERTISING FROM ANY
CONCERN DECLARED UNFAIR BY VANCOUVER
TRADES AND LABOB COUNCIL.
1YOU MUST HAVE THE FEDERATIONIST IN THE
HOME EACH WEEK TO KEEP IN TOUCH WITH
THE CITY, PROVINCIAL AND FEDERAL AND
INTERNATIONAL LABOR MOVEMENT.
J SUBSCRIPTION: $1.50 PER YEAR; IN VANCOUVER CITY, $2.00; TO UNIONS SUBSCRIBING IN
A BODY, $1.00.
The B.C. Federationist
Room 217, Labor Temple
Vancouver, B.C.
FRIDAY JUNE 11, mi
DAVIO SPENCER, LTD.
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
OUTING SHOES   FOR THE
WHOLE  FAMILY
NAVY BLUB CANVAS HOLIDAY OXFORDS ADD BOOTS—Very
best quality, with stout, nobby tread rubber soles. Tbey are specially
reinforced and give greater wearing satisfaction tban any otber rubber
outing shoe we know.
Lev
Infants', sizes 2 to 7 SSo.
Children's, sizes 8 to 10  65c.
Youths' and Misses, sizes 11 to 13 75o.
Boys', sizes 1 to 5 85c.
Women's, sizes 3 to 7  85c.
Men's, sizes 6 to 12 .* ". 95c.        -,*..&.
WHITE YACHTING AND TENNIS SHOES—Nobby tread soles, reinforced white bleached soles and uppers with leather insoles.
M
HUh
65c.
75c.
85c.
95c.
$1.00
$1.25
Low
Youths' and Misses  ,.$1.15
Boys'
Women's^
Men's'
$1.25
$1.25
$1.35
$1.35
$1.35
$1.45
WOMEN'S TANGO TENNIS SHOES—x-ow pump style, latest and nobbiest shoe for outing wear; extra heavy reinforced rubber Bole with
spring heel, leather insole and tailored silk bow to finish; white bleached Sea Island Duck.   Sizes 2 to 7.   Price   $1.85
MEN'S WHITE CANVAS OXFORDS with rubber soles and low spring
heels, suitable for business, sports or outing wear, $2.45.   Boots, $2.85
, —First Floor, East Wing
David, Spencer Limited
j      DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
CANADIAN
STANDARD FLOUR IS IHE HIGHEST IN THB WORLD
OGILVIE'S
ROYAL HOUSEHOLD
is
CANADA'S BEST FLOUR
9 TRY IT
UNION MEN
"Things Cooked as You Like Them"
GOOD EATS CAFE
110 Cordova Street, West,      3 blocks east of C. P. R. Station.
Take home one of onr Chicken Loaves—half 75c., whole $1.60.
Trays delivered to all parts of the city at any hour.
OPEN ALL NIGHT. Phone Seymour 3316.
E. B. Perry P. L. Wood
THE CANADIAN  BANK
OF COMMERCE
Capital $16,000,000        Rest $13,600,000
Main Olllce:  Corner Hastings and Granville Streets, Vancouver
CIT7 BRANCHES LOCATION
ALMA ROAD Cor. Fourth Avenue snd Alma Road
COMMERCIAL DRIVE Cor. First Avenue and Commercial Drive
EAST END Cor. Pender and Main Btreet.
FAIRVIEW Cor. Sixth Avente and Oranvllle Street
HASTINGS and CAMBIE Cor. Hastings and Gamble Streets
KITSILANO Cor. Fourth Avenue and Yew Street
MOUNT PLEASANT Cor. Eighth Avenue and Main Street
POWELL STREET Cor. Victoria Drive and Powell Street
SOUTH HILL Cor. Forty-fourth Avenue and Fraser Road
Also North Vancouver Branch, Corner Lonsdale Avenue and Esplanade
fMADE iNN^
B.C J
B.C.
Distillery
Co., Ltd.
Established 1903
B. C. Special
RYE
Whisky
Nine Years in Wood
UNSURPASSED
IN QUALITY     *
AND FLAVOR
ASK FOR SAMPLE
BOTTLE AT ANY
LIQUOR STORE
B.C. Whisky
Is a
HOME PRODUCT
Ask for "B.C. Special"

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