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The British Columbia Federationist Jul 17, 1914

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THE  BRITISH COLUMBIA
INDUSTRIAL UNITY:  STF
fclXTHYEAR.,Nv S*
OFFICIAL PAPER: VANCOUVER TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL AND B. C. FEDERATION OF LABOR.
POLITICAL UNITY: VICTOR!!
.*>■
VANCOUVER, B. C, FRIDAY, JULY 17, 1914
EIGHT PAGES
(^KJSS")   $1.50 PER YEAR
abor m
i*airly Satisfactory So Far
as Wage Earners.are
Concerned
'he  Political  Situation-
People Tired of the Provincial Oovernment
IAt Sandon, B.C., there are two un-
ins of the Western Federation of
liners and a local of the Socialist
arty of Canada. This Is a 100 per
snt. organised town where everything
s satisfactory so fsr as lahor Is con-
erned, excepting the election of a
rorking-class representative to the
eglslature. It may be stated, how-
ver, that some years ago W. David-
on was elected as a labor member on
he platform of the now defunct
'rovlncial Progressive party that was
ormed at Kamloops in 1903, and tt Is
he Intention of the workers to again
ut forward a labor candidate at the
ext general election. Since the town
egan a straight working-class can-
Mate has been nominated to contest
a* riding. Also there Is a live social-
it local at NakuSp. A. Shilland, who
raa a delegate at the special conven-
ion ot the B. C. Federation of Labor,
eld ln this cltw this week, saya that
ae future promises a safe constit-
qncy for a parliamentary labor repre-
entative at Sandon. Also there Is a
tlr prospect of obtaining an eight-
our day there for the mlllmen. Hoarding the outlook for mining he
tates that three promising prospects
re being opened up ln the Payne
roup.
H. Elsmore, Phoenix, also another
elegate at the convention, says that
ie working people ot his town are
sry tired of the MoBrlde-Bowser out-
t, and will put up an opposition can-
(date at the next elections. He did
ot think, however, that it would be
asslble to elect a straight social-
indldate. The Finlanders had a
rang Social Democratic- local, and
lere were also quite a few English
leaking socialists, but they were not
rong enough alone to win an elec-
on. The Idea seemed to prevail
lere that the strongest oppositionist
tndidate, though be may not be a
ralght laborlte, would receive
ipport to defeat a straight govern-
tent candidate. A strong effort
ould be made,, however, to nominate
working-class representative, but
ie would not be nominated without
good chance ot winning. He hewed that at this Juncture the only
Ing to do was to defeat McBride
id Bpwsor ln order to relieve the
lners on Vancouver Island and to
it justice. Where labor cannot .elect
candidate of Its own, the next best
Ing to do was to support one who
raid vote to put tbe government out
business and support the miners
their strike. And labor could do
at much In the electoral riding of
•and Forks, which Included Poulson
ad Phoenix. In the lstter town the
estern Federation of IMners had a
od local union, wtth about 500 mem-
rs. Including transients, there were
1 told about 800 men ln this mining
imp. At present the state of trade
as normal, with not many Idle.
COUNCIL Special Convention of
B. C. Federation of Labor
ELECTION LAST
1
Vice-president Bancroft of
the Trades Congress
Addressed Council
President A. Watchman and
Secretary A. Wells of .
Federation Spoke
The state of trade at Oreenwood Is
jrmal. The B. C. Copper company Ib
jlng considerable development work
Voight's qamp In the Slmllkameen.
utslde this there are no new pros-
sets being opened up, excepting that
tunnel la being driven by local men
nd is now in over 800 feet.   The ore
a high grade silver galena, and
romlses well. This camp Is strictly
lion, with favorable working condl
ons. Regarding the political sltua-
lou, W. Phillips, wbo was a delegate
t this week's convention of the B. C.
'ederatlon of Lahor, saya that the
rorkers of Oreenwood realise that
tbor cannot accomplish very much In
lie way ot legislation unless lt has
tree and power behind it ln the legls-
tture.    The wageearners were a unit
opposition to the Vlotoria govern-
lent for the way lt has treated the
rlklng miners on Vancouver Island,
id on this Issue alone could elect
opposition representative. A
ralght labor candidate would be
ominated If his election were at all
nslble; but If not, an opposition
an of some kind would be supported
he would support the miners of
analmo.
TAILORS MEET
lection of Officers—Trade Reported
Vary Quiet—Ths Agreements
At the last regular meeting. of
Sllors Industrial (International)
pal union, No, 178, the following of-
ers were eleoted for ensuing term:
esldent Miss H. Outterldge; vice-
esldent, A. Beamish; secretary, C.
BDonald; treasurer, K. Patterson;
rgeant-at-arms, Oscar Oren; out-
le guard, Dan Lee; label custodian,
Nordlund; local organiser, C. Mc-
nald.' Executive . committee—Mtb.
Ik, Miss Morton, Miss Thornton, 8,
banks.
t was reported that S. McPherson,
I Main street, the oldest-estab-
led merchant tailor tn Vancouver,
i signed the union wage-scale
eement. It may be ststed that the
lors agreements all expire on Sep-
iber 30th next
.braham's shop, Pender street, was
orted unfair.
'rade in general was reported aa
y quiet.
Vancouver Tradea and Labor council convened In regular session laat
night. A circular from the new miners' union ln Butte, stating their side
of the recent trouble there was flled.
Credentials were reoelved and delegates seated as follows: Sheet Metal
Workers, A. J. Crawford, O. Freeman,
and A, Fisher; Tailors, H, Outterldge;' Cooks and Walters, J. Cummlngs; Builders Laborers, J. Sully,
Q. Harrison, O. Klrkpatrick; Painters,
W. McGilllvray; Brieklayera, R.'
Norrls; Musloians, J. T. Rundle; Bartenders; P. O'Keefe; Cigarmakers, H.
Rhodes, A. P. Teltjen; Street Railwayman, J. Wl O'Connor, F. A. Hoover, R. Rigby; Plumbers, A. Holmes.
The oommlttee appointed' to deal
with the question of Labor Day celebration had decided that no parade
waa desirable, but were ln favor of
holding a huge union picnic. A motion to take a referendum of the
unlona on the question of holding a
parade or picnic be taken, was lost ln
favor of an amendment that the council favored the Idea of holding a picnic. Del. Dunn, as one of the council's delegates to this week's convention of the B. C. Federation of
Lahor reported on the convention.
HS recounted the Incidents ot the
convention and Bald that ln hla opinion the referendum calling for a general strike would be regarded as a
joke ln view of present labor conditions. Del. F. A. Hoover, also a delegate to the convention, reported and
dealt with the proceedings of the convention, which are fuly-reported elsewhere In our columns. The special
committee appointed to secure the
convention of the Trades and Labor
Congress of Canada for Vancouver In
1915, reported that they were considering a special number of The Federatlonist, setting forth the reasons
why the congress should come here.
More complete plans would be submitted at a later date. ' Barbers reported new members. Tailors bad
settled their trouble with McPherson
on Main street Bartenders had put
cards ln the Metropole and Windsor
hotels. Inside electricians had received a visit from Vice-president
Bancroft and electricians would most
likely affiliate with the Trades congress. Del. Dunn, ln view of the
that visitors were present in the persons of President Watchman and Sec
retary Wells, of the B, C. Federation
of Labor, also Vice-president Bancroft of the Trades Congress, suggested that election of officers be laid
over till next meeting. The suggestion
was not adopted.
Delegates Walker and MoVety were
nominated for the office of president.
The election resulted in Walker 19,
McVety 31. McVety elected. For
vice-president, Dels. Dunn, Walker,
Pipes and Estinghausen were nominated. All declined save F. L. Estinghausen, who was elected by acclamation. Secretary Q. Bartley was reelected by acclamation. Miss H.
Outterldge was reelected by acclamation. For Statistician, Dels. Hoover
and Herrltt were nominated. Result
of the election was F. A. Hoover 43,
J. Herrltt. Del. Sully was re-elected
sergeant-at-arms by acclamation,
Dels. Trotter, Curnock and Knowles
were reelected by acclamation. The
officers were then Installed by ex-
Presldent Walker.
Vice-president Bancroft, of the
Trades and Labor Congress of Canada, was called upon to address the
oouncll. He reviewed the new Workmen's Compensation act of Ontario
and other legislation In working class
Interest which has been passed ln that
province recently. His address was
listened to with close Interest from
start to finish and was accorded a
genuine measure of applause at tbe
termination, President Watchman of
the B. C. Federation then addressed
the meeting. -He sppealed for. the
loyal support of all unions for the
federation at this period of stress and
unemployment. Vice-president Bancroft had shown what had been accomplished In Ontario, and It would
be necessary for the workers in B, C.
to flght for lt.
Secretary-treasurer Wells, of the
federation, was then called upon. He
spoke of the better relations now existing among the officers of the organised labor movement. He also expressed satisfaction that the federation now had a larger voice ln the stairs of The O. C, Federatlonist. The
paper was the'best of Its kind that he
knew of In this country and deserved
the support of the labor movement
He appealed to the carpenters to reconsider their position and affiliate
again with the federation. He hoped
to see the movement here strive to
attain legislation similar to that
which had been obtained ln Ontario.
It was necessary that the workers
should establish means to secure the
election of workers  to  parliament
Counoll adjourned at 10.45,
Very few white salmon fishermen
are out so far this season. Boats only
average about fifteen a night
T. V. Johnston, painter, and family
have arrived from Winnipeg, and will
reside In future In this city.
in'w
IN NEW SI
The call for a special convention of organized labor of British Columbia, to be
held under the auspices ofHhe B. 0. Federation of Labor, was responded to, more
than a hundred delegates from all^parts of the province who gathered in Vancouver
Labor Temple last Monday morning. The atmosphere of seriousness which pervaded the gathering from its opening moment to the gravity of the working class
situation throughout the province, No time was wasted on plausible platitudes
pleasantly told by local notables. The convention plunged at once into the business
for which it had gathered. The brief opening address of President Watchman expressed the feeling general throughout the convention, that it was one of the most
important gatherings of labor which hag ever taken place in British Columbia.
The outstanding problem, overshadowing all else the convention had to deal with
was the situation of the miners on Vancouver island.. The tenacious and heroic
struggle made by them for the past twol^ears, despite every measure of deceit
and repression used by the McBride-Bo*vwer government has brought them the admiration and sympathy of all sections of the movement from the Atlantic to the
Pacific coast. Their struggle, present situation, and future hopes, were laid by
them before the convention in fullest detail. In its desire to stretch its resources
to the limit, ihe convention was placed between its sympathy for the miners and the
appalling condition of unemployment throughout the province. As a practical way
out Of the dilemma, various proposals were made. These culminated in a decision
to take a referendum vote of organized laber throughout British Columbia as to the
advisability and posibility.of calling a general strike to force more equitable terms
of settlement for the miners than that contained in the wretched offer of the operators recently received through Premier McBride. The vote was in the affirmitive
by 48 for to 36 against. Four organizers are also to be sent out into various parts of
the province to address local unions infavor of a general suspension of work.
The mockery of McBride's '^White B. C." was condemned at the Wednesday evening session by resolution demanding total exclusion of all Asiatics.' The convention
was tense with interest during every moment of its three days' sitting, and those
who watched and listened carefully believe the future will prove that tms gathering
is destined to mark an epoch in the struggles of of labor in British Columbia.
(Continued;on page 3)
BARBERS MEET
G. W. Isaacs Elected Delegate to Indianapolis
Barbers local union, No, 120, met on
Tuesday night, a fair attendance of
members being present. After disposing of routine business two applications for membership were received
and two candidates elected as members. President J. Wl Green submitted his resignation, which was received, and J. Bruce elected to fill the
vacancy for the balance of the term.
G. W. Isaacs was elected as delegate
to attend Indianapolis, Ind., convention of the Journeymen Barbers International Union of America, which convenes in that olty on October 6th
next C. Herrltt was elected as an
alternate delegate. The members of
the local union were much elated over
the masterly address of Vice-president
Frei", Bancroft of the Trades and
Labor congress of Canada, who was
tendered a hearty vote of thanks for
same.
J. Riley, Wm. Blair and F. Johnston,
well-known local teamsters, have left
the city for south eastern Oregon,
where they will go Into business as
dealers In horses. Mr. Blair graduated when a young man as veterinary
surgeon ln Vermont
THE  VANCOUVER WAY
In most of the larger cities,
where corporationa own public
utilities such aa street railways,
the management expand thoussnds of dollara annually In an
endeavor to educate tha psople
to ride In street cars. In Vancouver the management of the
B. C. Electric Railway, by rale-
Ing the fares recently spent, or
lost, thousands of dollars in a
successful effort to teach ths
people to walk.
Vice-president Bancroft
Vice-president Fred. Bancroft, of
the TradeB and Labor Congress of
Canada, who addressed last night's
meeting of. the local Trades and
Labor council, will leave for Vancouver Island on Monday. He la due to
arrive at New Westminster on Wednesday, July 29th. He will deliver
several addresses on the Workmen's
Compensation act of Ontario while
sojourning ln British Columbia, He
Is an excellent speaker and thoroughly understands his subject.
Harry Slbble, the well-known vendor of socialist literature, has left the
city on a trip to Vancouver Island,
thence he will go through the state
of Washington, and will not return
till, the fall.
EARLY CLOSING
By-laws Comes Into Effect
July 25th
The early closing bylaw, which had
been passed to apply generally to all
stores not exempted by the Shops
Regulation act was amended at Tuesday's special meeting of the city
oouncll by specifying the retail trades
to which lt shall apply. The trades
specified are men's furnishers and
clothiers, grocers, boot and shoe
dealers, butchers, drygoods, furniture
and hardware dealers. Protests
against early dosing were made mostly, as pointed out by men belonging
to one race, the Hebrew. Bach trade
was voted on separately and when the
flrst vote waa taken, although the
men's clothiers and furnishers had requested early closing, lt was granted
by only eight votes to seven. Gradually the voting swung more ln favor
of the exercise of the bylaw. The
vote was nine to six when the case of
the shoe dealers was considered and
It was eight to three when the last
trades Included ln the provisions of
the bylaw were reached. The bylaw
will come Into effect on July 26.
Russians working as longshoremen
on the Great Northern docks only re
celve 25 cents an hour.
BOWSERISrt.
THE WORKERS THEMSELVES MUST APPLY THE REMEDY
Federation of Labor Levies
175,000 Members Two
Pence Each
Labor Minister of Mines Is
Powerless to Aid the -
Strikers
[Special Australian Correspondence]
SYDNEY, N. S. W., June 27.—There
Is little or no change In the strike that
has broken out In the coal -Industry
of New South Wales. One mine has
broken away from the other bosses
and haa done away with the. afternoon shift That ms the crux of the
whole matter. The men have gone
baok to work at this mine, anl It Is
thought that now a start has been
made the others will gradually back
down and give way to the men. Naturally the men are highly elated at the
turn ot events and claim a distinct
win over the proprietors. Ths large
federation of labor haa taken a hand
In the matter and haa struck a levy
of Od. psr week on its 175,000 members. This will mean about (8,650
per week without any other contribution from the other states. It Is
thought when aU funds are coming
ln the men will be able to atand out
Indefinitely If required. A deputation
went to tbe state minister for mines
to see If he could do anything In the
matter. Some surprise haa been occasioned by his answer that he Is
powerless to Interfere In tha whole
business. But the whole, matter Is
clear as far as he Is concerned. Under
the existing law he can only do as
the law of the land decides, He may
try to alter the law by special act of
parliament but this has been tried
without success so far. The fact of
the matter . Is the labor government
here have to face a hostile conservative upper house, which Is a life-
membership chamber, and tbls chamber throws out any bill that Is likely
to Interfere with the capitalist The
wonder Is that labor haa done so well
agalnat lt It cannot be abolished unless a sufficient number ot men are
elected to lt to out-vote Its existence,
andvthls task the labor government
are at present engaged In. Thus, under the circumstances the labor minister of mines could do nothing. Yet
It Is well worth noting thst he has
not done what tory governments have
done, Buch ss passing a coerclan act,
making strikes criminal and jailing
the strikers. He has taken the sens.
Ible stand, under the circumstances,
of not Interfering.
TAILORS' PICNIC
Next  Tuesday  at Bowen
Island
The TallorB' Industrial (International) local union, No. 178, will hold
its annual picnic at Bowen Island on
Tuesday next, July 21st. The steamer Bowena will leave the Union dock
at 9.15 a.m., returning at 7.30 p.m.
There will be sports, music, etc.
Tickets, il, may be had from the committee or at the boat from any of the
committee,   namely,     C.
''ASK INCREASE
IN
Oovernment Board of Conciliation Has Concluded
Its Negotiations
Rumored There Will Be
Both Majority and Minority Reports
Oa Monday sfternoon at Ottawa
tha board of conciliation on tha earn
ot the C. P. B. employees concluded
negotiations. The board comprises
D. Campbell of Winnipeg, representing the men, and Isaac Pltblado, K.O.,
of Winnipeg, acting tor the O. P. R.
western division, and presided over
by K. O. Ounn. Tha members left
Ottawa on Tuesday for tb* purpose
of preparing a report The C. P. B.
conductors, trainmen, and yardman
on tha western division, which em-
braces the territory from Fort Wll-
lam to the Paelfle, uked for an Increase In pay and a. revision ot ths
schedule of working ratal In August
1913. The proposition was presented
to the labor department of tha railway ud was considered, bnt at the
end ot March, 1913, lt wai found tint
the representatives of the man and
tha company were unable to agree,
and tha men applied for a conciliation
board tinder the Lemleux. act At the
department ot labor lt la expected
that the report will be presented In a
tew days. It la rumored that the members of the board have failed to agree
and that there will be both majority
and minority reports.
PRINTING TRADES
WUl Hold Picnic Saturday,
August 16th
The Allied Printing Trades counoll
decided at Its lut meeting In Lahor
Temple to hold tha annual picnic at
West Vancouver and appointed a
committee to make the arrangements
as follows: Oeo. Mowat H. P. Alien
and H. Neelands. Secretary Hoy
Fleming reported that the atate of
trade waa very quiet Vice-president
C. Oray resigned and hla ofllce will
be filled next meeting. Praaldant H.
NePage occupied the chair and there
waB a full attendance of delegates.
"PAIR" WAGES
Included in Contracts for
University Buildings
C. E. Tlsdall, M.L.A., Is authority
for the statement that "fair wage"
clauses will be Inserted In contracts
for the erection of university of British Columbia buildings, and that
none but British subjects would be
employed thereon. Mr. Tlsdall said
assurance to this effect had been
given him by Premier McBride.
"PICTORIAL PAGENT"
The official pictorial record of the
flrst Vancouver pageant Is most attractively gotten up, and Is not only
an Interesting and artistic souvenir,
 but is a directory of the citys' chief
_„ „    ,._ Jt     „,    McDonald industries and an evidence of its mar-
(chalrman), Frank Dolk, A. Beamish,' vellous growth. A copy of this record
T. Woods, Dan Lee, Mrs. Dolk, Miss [sent "down-eact" or to the old country
McKinnon, Miss N. Alexander, Miss would do more to show the old people
B. Mitchell, Miss B. Wilkin, or Miss the marvellous vim of the "queen of
H. Gutteridge,   the president of the I 'be coast" than reams of note paper.
union.
UNION COAL
H. P. Butler, who did much hard work
for the pageant committee, Is responsible for this admirable production,
and whatever could be done by photographic process he has done faithfully and well, The printing was
done by the News-Advertiser job de-
partmene.  On sale at 35 cents a copy.
Preferred by South Vancouver School Board
Chairman C. M. Whelpton presided! ~*
at Tuesdsy night's   meeting  of   thej Printers' Bosrd of Trade
South Vancouver school board over a I   The annual picnic of the Vancou-
full attendance of trustees.   The chief ver Printers board of trade (employ-
business transacted was the calling
for tenders for coal and the erection
of  an  addition  to  the  high  school
ers) will take place to Bowen Island
on Saturday next. An excellent programme of sports has been arranged,
building on Farris road. It was intl-, including several events for ladles
mated that the 153 tons of coal must and children. Prizes will be dlstrlb-
be mined at the Jingle Pot mine on uted and light refreshments provided.
Vancouver Island. ,      Tickets entitling  holders  to  special
  privileges may be obtained from the
Union Organized 'secretary,   Mr.   T. J.   Corley, 'phone
H.   Knudson,   New     Westminster, So?- 3*M. or from members  of the
Trades and Labor  council,  received j committee   ot the   SS.   Bowena   on
Instructions   from   the   International Saturday  morning. .Boat leaves at
Glove Workers' union to try and organize the workers In the B. C
Grinnell Olove company of Coquitlam,
9.15 a.m,
Murray Reed, an old-time B. C car-
B. C He was successful in his mis-: penter, has returned from Fort
slon, and now the glove makers In George, He said when he left there
that Institution have formed a union.', two weeks ago there was talk of a
An agreement with the firm to use
the union label has heen entered Into,
which expires on July 4, 1915. All
working gloves and mittens manufactured In that Institution are recommended for purchase by all working
men and worklngwomen. This Is the
only union factory In this provlnnce.
new gold discovery   nbout   50 miles *
south of the town on the Fraser river.
Trade conditions were extremely poor,
there being plenty of Idle men.
Among those who attended this
week's special convention of tho B.
C. Federation of Labor was Rev, A.
K. Cooke, pastor of the Congregational church ln this city,
Gordon Kelly, president of the
local longshoremen's union, Is at present attending the Milwaukee convention of the International Longshoremen's Association. He and G. A.
Lane of San Francisco, Cal., are delegates elected by Pacific coast district,
No. 38, I. L. A.
C. A. Mitchell, telegraph operator
Charley Foster, member of horse- at Hole In-the Wall, on the Skeena
river, was In the city on a holiday
for a few days, and returned on
Tuesday for his northern home. He
has been ln the government service
as telegrapher for the past two years.
shoors union, recently arrived from
Chicago, will open a shop here next
week. He loft Vancouver seven years
ago.
Tho bartenders report that the
Windsor hotel, 750 Granville street,
has become unionised and employs
only union bartenders.
Tom Mssters, old-time carpenter In
B. C, left Nelson this week on a
visit to the old country. PAGE TWO
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY JULY 17, 19lJ
UNION MEN!
EAT UNION MADE BREAD
BREWER'S X-L BREAD
is made by Union Labor, and  is  unsurpassed in
Quality and Flour
Phone Highland 573
ABBOTSFORD HOTEL
FIREPROOF Vaneouvar, B. C. EUROPEAN
Sll Pander St. Waat       RATES 11.00 A DAV UP      Phona Stymour 5860
F.  L. WALLINOFORD,  Manager Flrat-claaa Drill  In connection
Latest Addition to Vancouver's Up-to-Date Hotels
Hotel Regent
Absolutely Fireproof.   Local and Long-
Distance Phone in Every
Room.
Abundance of Light and Heat. Cafe in Connection
RATES $1.00 PER DAY UP
Attractive Rates to Permanent COTTINGHAM ft BEATTY
Guests Proprietors
Lrle L'.MUU. proprietor EUROPEAN PLAN        Frederick A. EnsUA, Manager
HOTEL EMPRESS
lcwf-usSS!;   235 Hutingt St. E., Vanconer, B. C. Ab-wiuteiy FireprS-f
1 Hot and Cold Water in
Every Room. 150 Rooms
Connected with Baths.
PENDER HOTEL H&SQSS"
Ratea 11.10 par Day aad Up.
THE NEW ENGLAND HOaTL*™^™'™^'™"
Tie. up; weakly, IS up,    SSS SEYMOUR STREET , tranalanta
Free Sua to and from all Tralna and Boata.
Electric Elevator
UnTCI       ID\/IMa*^    Cm. ColomWa Am.aad Haathaa Street
UU 1 CtLl   1I\ V 111 VB   McPHAIL * MACKENZIE, Proprietor
European Plan.
Hot and Cold Water and Telephone In every room.   Rooms with baths,
slnste or en aulte.
THE CITY MARKET
II
Cherries in Demand—Over-
Supply of Other Small
Fruits
Okanagan Peaches Arrive—
B. C. E. R. Train From
Chilliwack Popular
538 Cambie Street
Phone Sey. 2542
HOPPS&DUKERi
GI/-IUC     BUM* fOR WUR
OlVlHIO f>ARTICUlARPURPOSE
Vaneouvar, B. C, July 17, 1914.
Salsa at tbe city market tbls week
were very satisfactory. Tbe attendance was not so large as usual, but
the buying was quite up to the average.
Preserving cherries were In keen
demand and made (1.75 per orate.
Sweet cherries were slower and
made 11.50 per crate. Raspberries
were over supply and only brought
$1.-20 per halt orate. Black currants
are still in keen demand notwithstanding tbe full Bupply coming ln,
price $2.50 per orate. Red and white
are not bo popular and only made
(11.60 per crate.
Kelowna Tomatoes
Tomatoes are In full supply and
likely to remain so, as word hss been
received at the market that a carload
will be dispatched from Kelowna next
week. The supply yesterday was
ample, a specially flne lot being received from Duncan, Vancouver
Island. Cobble Hill, Mount Lehman
and Mayne Island also had their
quota. Prices, No. 1, $2.00; No. 2,
$1.80; No. 3, $1.60. Outdoor grown,
$1.50 to $1.75.
Okanagan Peaches
Peaohes, the first of the season
from Okanagan, arrived on Tuesday.
These were shipped by Mr. Tait, of
Summerland, and were ln flne shape,
well packed and showing good color.
They made $1.10 per crate. Apricots
have also started and they, together
with peaches, should be ln good supply during the next two weeks. Rhubarb Is still selling slowly at 60 cents
per box. -
Poultry are ln short supply and
making Improved prices. Broilers of
two-pound weight and pullets are ln
strong demand.
Finds Favor with Farmers
The B. C. B. R. No. 1 train from
Chilllwack, which runs direct Into the
market, Is now finding favor with tho
farmers and increasing quantities of
produce are now being shipped by this
train. This concession on the part
of the B. C. E. R. was -granted only
after a good deal of negotiating by
the chairman of the market committee, Alderman Trimble, and lt is gratifying to the committee that the arrangement has the approval of the
farmers as well as their support.
A belated shipment of plants was
on Bale yesterday trom Hammond.
The prices of these were rather low,
but considering the lateness of the
season lt was satisfactory to
grower to have them cleared.
BRITISH COLUMBIA LAND
Splendid opportunities in Mixed Farming, Dairying,
Stock and Poultry.   British Columbia Grants Preemptions of 160 acres to Actual Settlers
FREE
TERMS—Residence on the
land for at least three years;
improvements to the extent
of $5 per acre; bringing under cultivation at least five
.  i        acres.	
For further information apply to
Deputy Minister of Lands, Victoria, B.C.
Secretary, Bureau of Provincial Information,
The Quality of Our Service, the Quality of
Our Goods, Is Always the Best
The reuon our busineu Is Increasing la due to ths faot that our buslneas polloy li correct We adopted the policy of Informing the publlo
through the medium of the press aa to what our charges would be for a
complete funeral. Including Hearse. Carriage for Family, Care of Remains,
Wagon Service, and all our personal servioe for
$65.00
Complete Funeral
$65.00
We are living up to our advertisement to ths letter. This has established confidence with the publlo ln us, and for that reason alone we are successful, and we Intend to continue aa we ara doing now.
Mount Pleasant Undertaking Co.
Cor. Eighth Ave. and Main Straet Phone Fairmont 189
Commodious Chapel Free to All Patrons
Formerly Center A Henna's Branoh
A. C. Millar, Proa. P. H. Qrote, Manager
| McNeill, Welch & Wilson, Limited
80 Pender Street, E. Phone Seymour 5408
ALL KIND8 OF
MILL WOOD
At Reduced Rates
AGENTS JINGLE POT COAL
the
EGG LAYING-
Results of Third International Contest
The report from October 28,1913, to
June 27, 1914, ot the third International egg-laying contest, held under
the supervision of the provincial department of agriculture at the exhibition grounds, Victoria, Is as follows:
Among non-weight varieties, six birds
to a pen, the Rangtllru egg ranch,
O'takl, New Zealand, appears flrst,
with 980 eggs laid by white Leghorns; second, A. Kaston, Duncan, B.
C, 929 eggs, white Leghorns: third,
R. W. Chalmers, Thrums, West Kootenay, 846 eggs, white Leghorns. In
olass 2, weight varieties, six birds to
a pen, Mr, E. D. Reed of Duncan, B.C.,
stands first, whose white Wyandottes
laid 909 eggs; second, Tom Barron of
Catforth, Lane, Eng., white Wyandottes, 894 eggs; third, Dean Brothers
of Keatlngs P. O., V. I., white Wyandottes, 890 eggs.
1 ■'.■■
OEORGE HEATHERTON
Ex-presldent Dlatrlct No. 6, Western Fed'
eratlon of Hlnere, Greenwood, who Ib
aerloUBly 111 at the General Hospital of
thla city.
LABOR LEGISLATION
IN
Look   Good for
Election of Workers-
Representatives
Government Against Labor
Only Exists on One of
a Majority
A Manly Appeal
Editor B. C. Federationist: Having
read some press cuttings, letters snd
circulars that I have reoelved giving
accounts of the strike, which has
been going on for some considerable
time at the collieries ln and about
Nanaimo, I learn from theBe circulars
that there are some men that formerly belonged to this county black-legging, or scabbing, in the mines where
the men are on strike. Without going into the merits or demerits of the
strike I would like the Cumberland
(England) men that are doing this to
accept this message from me:
That I regret to see that so many
who were good members of our association have so far forgotten their
principles as to do anything ot the
kind as mentioned above.
I felt inclined, when I read of the
men belonging to this county that had
been Imprisoned and compelled to
leave meetings at the point of the
bayonet, to have said something very
strong, as I know a good many of
them are men of sterling character
and were always looked upon sb
good, reasonable and conscientious
workmen, and I think, without taking anj broader views of the Issue,
that In Itself ought to have restrained
these men from blacklegglng or doing
anything that would give countenance to their own men being subjected to such treatment, but I want the
men to take a broader view than that
alone, and to understand that the
grievance of one worker to-day may
tomorrow be the grievance of many
and that we, as workers, ought to at
all times recognise that whether we
be -In Vancouver or ln England we
have the selfsame'class work still
going no, and I strongly appeal to
these men to.decline to blackleg further, but take their stand with their
fellows In trying to establish tbe
right to organize and to gain recognition. Hoping you will Insert this
in your next issue and thanking you
in anticipation.
THOMAS CAPE,
Miners' Agent.
Miners' offices, 12 Oxford street,
Workington, Cumberland, England,
June 20, 1914.
[Special Australian Correspondence]
SYDNEY, N. S. W., June 27.—Early
In Sept. there will be a general federal election ln Australia. At the
last election labor suffered defeat by
the narrow majority of 318 votes, thus
a tory government got in the federal
parliament of 76 members with one
majority. When they elected the
speaker, their majority vanished.
They have tried to struggle along for
the past fourteen months without
passing a single measure or repealing
any of the labor legislation. The
senate has a labor majority and
turned down every bill they sent up.
Now they are forced to the country
over a measure they tried hard to
repeal. The prospects look good for
lahor this time, and the federal labor
party will have the help of the state
labor party of New South Wales that
swept the polls for labor In the last
state elections. Judging by prospects
the federal labor party will get home
an easy winner.
Dogs and. Holidays
"When the holidays begin so does
the barking, whining and howling of
dogs, proving a cruel thoughtlessness
In the people who keep them," writes
a friend of animals to The Federatlonist. He continues: "It Is a gross
cruelty to leave a chained dog to
chance, or attention at the end of the
day Instead of before the family go
out to enjoy themselves. Often, too,
the poor dogs are left from Saturday
to Monday to bark themselves hoarse
and drive the neighbors frantic. Will
the S. P. C. A. Issue a warning,"
To make fruit syrups, boll tbe frlut
till soft and let It drip through a jelly
bag. Put the juice In a preserving
kettle, boll and skim It, add a pint of
sugar to each quart of juice, boll lt
five minutes, and skim. Have ready
bottles sterilized by putting them In
cool water brought to a boll. Fill them
with the syrup and stand them ln
pans of water in the over for ten minutes. Have some boiling juice erady,
All the bottles, put In corks that have
been ln boiling water, and coat the
corks with parafflne. Stand the bottles where no draft can strike them
till cool; keep them ln a cool, dark
place.
Noxious Weeds
Department of Agriculture,
Victoria, B.C., July 6, 1914.
Editor B. C. Federationist: I would
be obliged if you would kindly afford
me space, through the medium of
your paper, to call the attention ot
fanners and land owners generally ln
your district, to the necessity for
waging a vigorous campaign against
noxious weeds, which are becoming so
prevalent ln many of our best farming districts throughout the province.
All provincial constables and forest
guards have been again appointed as
agents for this department towards
the enforcement of the provisions of
the Noxious Weeds act. In addition,
noxious weed inspectors have been
appointed In different districts of the
province, whose duties will be to carefully go over their districts, see that
farmers and land owners are taking
the necessary steps to destroy the
weeds growing on their lands, and In
the event of noncompliance with
notices served oh them to institute
proceedings against them. The department is determined to use every
legitimate effort to have the provisions of the act strictly enforced,
and we look for the wholehearted cooperation of the farmers themselves
in this most important matter,
would also draw your attention to the
attached statement, which has been
drawn up In the department with regard to the noxious weeds which are
listed ln the act. Methods of destruction are outlined, and I think
that the publication of same would be
of material benefit to the agriculturists of the province.
WM. E. SCOTT,
Deputy Minister.
Department of Agriculture, Victoria,
C, July 6, 1914.
VOTES FOR WOMEN
By MRS. J. A.  CLARKE
In an address before the Mount
Pleasant Equal Suffrage league, Mr.
Thomas said that though most of the
right thinking people of the state of
Washington gradually realized the
necessity of the vote of the women
In order to make conditions better,
there was one person who never became convinced on this point and up
to the last maintained that woman
suffrage was all wrong,
ThlB was the Rev. Dr. Matthews, a
man of academic training, one who Is
able to hold great audiences, and who
was endeavoring to work for the good
and uplift of humanity.
However, any minister ot the gospel can be against women using their
Influence in the political world Is past
understanding.
They should be the flrst ln trying
to assist In working out the problem
of votes for women. Why should not
every minister say, "I know the
women of my congregation well
enough to know they should vote,
come, let's flght for It?" If this were
done the question would be settled
before very long, and Sir MoBrlde
and Mr. Bowser would not be turning
the women who are petitioning, to
possess their own children, away. The
ministers surely have a responsibility
upon them.
But ln the case of the Rev. Dr. not
only did he not do this, but threw his
weight against the women, and as he
was a man of wide Influence he helped
to make the battle much harder.
He put himself as a stumbling block
ln the way of the women and yet he
was willing to accept a large salary
that was gotten together mainly by
the efforts of those women. He was
also very glad to have them sit In the
pews that he might have a great audience to listen to his oratory. They
could go out of the home to collect
bis salary or to listen to his sermons,
but to go out of the home to vote for
purity that the boy or girl might be
protected was all wrong.
The Inconsistency of the thing
should make every woman think.
Does the minister whom you listen
to twice a day on Sunday believe ln
votes for women? If you do not know,
flnd out
PROVINCIAL UNIONS
B. C. FEDERATION OF LABOR—
Meets in annual convention ln January. Executive officers, 1914-15: President, A. Watchman; vice-presidents, W.
F. punn, Jaa. H. McVety, Q. H. Fraser,
J. W. Gray, H. Knudson, J. J, Taylor, B.
Simmons. Secretary-treaaurer, A. S.
Wells, Box 1538, Victoria, B. C.
NEW WESTMINSTER, B.C.
NEW WESTMINSTER TRADES AND
Labor Counoll—Meeta every aacond
and fourth Wednesday at I p. m. In Labor
Hall Preaident, D. 8. Cameron; nnanclal
saoretary, H. Olbb; general aeoretary, W.
E. Maiden. P. O. Box III. Tba publlo la
Invited to attend.
PLUMBERS' AND STEAMFITTERS LO-
' cal III—Meets every aeoond and
fourth Friday of month In Labor Ball
7.10 p. m. Praaldant, D. Webster: aeoretary, A. McLaren. P. O. Box III, New
Westmlnater, B. C.
BARTENDERS' LOCAL 714—MEETS IN
Labor Temple, Nsw Westmlnater,
corner Seventh atrat and Royal avenue,
svsry second Sunday of each month, at
1.10 p. m. President, F. B. Runt; secretary, F, W. Jameson. Waiting brothers
Invited.
VICTORIA, B. O,
VICTORIA TRADES AND LABOR
Council—Meata flrat and third Wednesday, Labor Hall, 711 Johnston street,
at I p. m, President, George Dykeman;
lecretary, Thoa. F. Mathlson, box III,
Vlotoria, B. C.
MINERS' UNIONS
BARTENDERS' LOCAL No. I7I.-OF1
flee, Room 801 Labor Templo, Meats
flrat Sunday of each month. Presidents
F. F. LSvlsne;'flnanclal secretary, GecfJ
W. Curnock, Room 208, Labor Temple.
KIMBERLET MINERS' UNION, No. IN,
Western Federation of Mtaers—Meeta
Sunday evenlnga In Union Hall. Preaident, Alex. Wilson; eeoretary-troaaurar,
M. P. Villeneuve, Klmberley, B. C.
LADT8MITH MINERS' UNION, LOCAL
No. till, U. M. W. of A.—Meets Wedneaday, Union Hall, 7 p.m. President,
Sam Guthrie; secretary, Duncan McKenzle, Ladysmlth, B. C.
NANAIMO LOCAL UNION U. M. W. ol
A.—Meeta every Monday at 7.10 p. m
ln the Athletlo Club, Chapel atreet   Ar
thur Jordan, Box 410, Nanaimo, B. C.
CUMBERLAND LOCAL UNION, No.
Ull, tl. M. W. of A.-Meeta every
Sunday 7 p.m. In U. H. W. of A. hall.
Preaident, Joe. Naylor; aeeretary, Jamee
Smith, Box 14, Cumberland, B. C.
TRAIL MILL AND SMELTBRMEN'S
Union, No. 105, W. F. of M.—Meets
every Monday at 7.30 p. m. President,
James Dclgarns; secretary, P. J. Bolam,
Box 26, Trail, B. C.
SANDON MINERS' UNION, No. II,
Western Federation of Minera—Meeta
every Saturday in the Miners' Union
hall. Addreaa all communications to the
Seoretary, Drawer "K.," Sandon, B.C.
BUSINEU  AGENT  DIRECTORY
Aak for Labor Temple 'Phone Exchange,
Seymour 74W (unleu otherwlee etated).
Bartenders—Room 201; Geo. W. Curnock.
B. C. Federationlit—Boom III; R. P,
Pettlplece.
Bridge and Structural Iron Workera—W.
L. Tula, Room 201.
Brotherhood of Carpentera—Room 100;
Hugh MoEwen.
Brieklayera—Room 111; Wm. 8. Dagnall
Barbara—Room 201; C. F. Burkhart;
phone Sey. 1771.
Hod Carriers, Bulldora and Common Laborers—Room 220; John Sully.
Cooks, Walters, Waltreaaes—Room 211
W. E. Walker; Tel Stymour 1414.
Electrical Workers (outside)—Room
207: W. F. Dunn.
Electrical Worktn (Inside)—Room 117;
F. L. Ettlnghauien.
Engineers (Steam)-Room 216; L. Dawson.
Labor Templt' Co.—Room 111; J. H.
McVety.
Lnngahoremen'a Aaaoelatlon — Ofllce,
146 Alexander atreet; H. Hannlng; tal:
Seymour 6860.
Moving Picture Operaton—O. R. Hamilton, Room IM, Loo Bldg, TH Sey.
1041.
Musicians—H. J. Brasfleld, rooms 11-10,
Wllllama Building, 411 Granville Strait
Seymour 2680.
Plasterers—Jot Hampton; Tal. Seymour 1114.
Street Railway Employeea—Fred. A.
Hoover; Seymour 608.
Tradea and Labor Council—Room 211;
Geo. Bartley.
Typographical—Rooms 811, 111, 214:
ft H. Neelanda;
eral questions In a very straightforward manner, but showed his appreciation ot the cause by becoming s
member of the Mount Pleasant Suffrage league.
Miss Mabel Brooks, who has been
Interested ln the woman suffrage
movement In New York, spoke of the
movement In that city.
Mrs. M. Robertson also spoke for a
while showing the necessity of the
vote,
The next meeting will be held on
July 24th In the IA. O. F. hall, corner
Main street and Tenth avenue. TheBe
meetings are for the public and all
are Invited.
An executive meeting of the Mount
Pleasant Equal Suffrage league will
be held at the home of Mrs. Parr, 566
Fifth avenue east, on Wednesday,
July 22nd, at 2.30 p.m.
B.
Another Deserter .
Editor B. C. Federationist: Kindly
publish the following In your valuable paper: Expelled for scabbing—
John Wright, formerly a member of
this local, has been expelled from
membership. This man has drawn
In strike pay a total of 2811.75 and
haB now gone back to work amongst
creatures of the same calibre aB himself.
DUNCAN McKENZIE,
Secretary.
Ladysmith, B.C., July 8, 1914.
.in ihe hearl ol ihe retail dislricL. Absolutely
fireproof and modem in every reapect. Cuisine
unexcelled. European'plan, $1 lo $3 per day,
FREE AUTO BUS MEETS ALL TRAINS. Owned ud
operated by Hie Provincial Hotel* Company. Limited.
HOWARD 1 SHF.EH*N, PmAtf
Strike Settled
Editor B. C. Federatlonist: We
beg to advise that the dispute with
Sweeney & McConnell, printers, 1012
Langley street, which arose some
time ago, has been satisfactorily adjusted, and we bespeak for them the
confidence and patronage that they
enjoyed with your good selves prior
to the controversy. Yours very truly,
VICTORIA TYPOGRAPHICAL
UNION No. 201.
Victoria, B. C, July 13, 1914. '
Mount Pleassnt Suffrage League
The meeting of the Mount Pleasant
Suffrage league, held ln A. O. F. hall,
cor. of Main street and Tenth aven.,
was addressed by Mr. Thomas, a
member of the executive of ward 5
liberal association. He said he felt
he had been a suffragist ever since
he was six years old. His father
having died his mother was left to
run the business of the farm, paying
taxes and obeying man-made laws
and at the same time caring for a
large family. The laborers on the
farm, whom she had to direct, had a
vote while she could not express herself politically. The Injustice of this
condition made such a strong Impression upon him that though he Is a
liberal he would vote for the man
who stood for women suffrage, Irrespective of party. He had lived ln
the Btate of Washington for fifteen
years, and that previous to the
women's gaining the vote lt was not
safe for a decent man to walk out
after dark ln a great many parts of
Seattle. He likened tbe evil condition to a great rock under which the
vermin was creeping with the good
men of the community on the end of
a pole trying to pry up the rock that
the sunlight of purity ralght reach
and cause the evil creeping things to
disappear. However, the men did not
accomplish much until the women got
the vote and threw their weight on
the end with the men. Then tn a
very short time conditions were made
much better and to-day the city of
Seattle is a much cleaner city on account of the Influence of the women
In political matters. He also declared
that lt was by the women keeping
everlastingly at lt that finally gained
for them the vote, and the only way
in British Columbia was to keep on
working, using every fair means,
making every candidate pledge himself to suffrage, and to keep out of
politics. It was not necesary to ask
a man whether he was a liberal,
socialist or conservative. The question Bhould be, "Are you for woman
suffrage? Will you give a written
promise* to support woman suffrage?"
Mr. Thomas not only answered sev-
VANCOUVER UNIOK8,
TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL -I
. Meet* flint ud third ThursdayJ
Exeeutlre board: W. B. Walker, preall
dent: J. H. MoVety, vice-president; Geel
Bartley, general secretary, 110 Labol
Temple; Mia* H. Outterldge, treasurer!
Ml** P. Brisbane, statistician; sergeant*
at-arms, John Sully; O. Curnook, !■
Knowles, W. R, Trotter, trust*—.
LABOH TBMPZjB COMPANY, LTD.-M
Directors: Fred A. Hoover, J. £■
MoVety, James Brown, Edward Lothlaafl
James Campbell, J. W. Wilkinson, R. t_T
Pettlpleoe, John MeMlllan, Murdook llSL
Kens!*, F. Blumberg, H. R. Free. Managfl
Ing director, J. H* McVety, Room 11JT
ALLIED PRINTING   TRADES   COUIffl
CIL—Meete tnd Monday ln montl
President, Geo. Mowat; secretary, F. f
Fleming, P.O. Boi 44.
BAKERS' AND CONFECTIONERS LO*
        CAL No.  48-Ueets seel
ond and fourth Baturfl
day*. 7.10 p.m. President"
H, O. Leeworthy; corre-"
ponding seoretary, R. <iU
Adam*; business agent JH
i     Black,   Room  220,   Labor
Tempi*. L
BARBERS' LOCAL No. 120-MBETfl
second and fourth Thursdays, 1.8
m. President, J. W. Green; recorder, C
m,, Herrltt; secretary-business agent, Ca
F. Burkhart, Room 208, Labor Temple!
Hours; 11 to 1; 5 to 7 p.m.
BRICKLAYERS' AND MASONS', NO. I
—Meets every 1st and 3rd Tuesday*
8 p.m., Room 307. President, Jamel
Haslett; corresponding secretary, W. tf
Dagnall, Box S3; financial secretary, Vm
B. Brown; business agent, W, S. Dagfl
nail, Room 215. m
BOOKBINDERS' LOCAL UNION Nc
100—Meat* third Tuesday ln *T*r
month, In room SOS, Labor Temple. Presl
dent, F. J. Milne; vice-president, Wm
Bushman; secretary, Qeorge Mowat
Hazelwood hotel, 344 Hastings Steet E.
secretary-treaaurer, H. Perry, 1130 TeMl
Avenue East. _^
BROTHERHOOD OF BOILER MAKER
and Iron Ship Builder* and Helper
of America, Vancouver Lodge No. Ill-
Meet* flrat and third Mondays, t p. m
President, F. Barolay, 303 Cordova But
secretary, A. Fraaer, 1161 Howe street
^-    ..  ■.„,—..    ..rm.~*,    M'ua   HVIT»   ■HSJUH*     1
COOKS. WAITERS AND WAITRESSES
i Union—Meet* flnt Friday ln caei
month, 1:10 p.m., Labor Temple. W. EL
Walker, bust-nee representative. OBeefl
Room SOI, Labor Tempi*. Houra; I a.ml
to 10.10; 1 p.m. to 1.80 and 6 p.m. to «.*■
i p.m. Competent help furnished on ahorf
1 notloe.   Phon* Bey. 1414.
I DISTRICT COUNCIL "OF CARPENTERS
I meeta aecond and fourth Thursday oT
eaoh month, I p. m. Secretary, J, Bltl
con, 871 Hornby street; business agend
H. J. MoEwen, room 209. Local 017 meetu
flrst and third Monday of eaoh montlJJ
and Local 2047 meets flrst and thlrtfj
Tueaday of eaoh month.
BLBCTRICAL WORKERS, LOCAL NQu
Sll—Meet* Room 101 every Mondafl
I p. m. Preaident, Dave Fink; vtee-preatu
dent, M. Sander; recording seoretarn
Roy Elgar, Labor Temple; flnanolal •*«■
retary and bualneaa agent, W. F. Dunifl
Room 807, Labor Temple.
ELECTRICAL WORKERS, LOCAL NOa
621 (Inside Men)—Meets flrst anl
third Mondays of each month. Room 2011
8 p. m, President, H. R. Van Sickle; re|
cording secretary, J. M. Campbell; buslj
ness agent, F. L. Estinghausen. Room 20if
LON08HOREMBNS' INTERNATIONA^
ASSOCIATION, No. SBxII-Mee]
every Friday evening, 141 Ateiandel
atreet, Preaident, S. J. Kelly; Secretary
H. Hunlng.
MACHINISTS, NO. 1M-MBET8 SbJ
ond and fourth Fridays, 8 p. nf
President, A. R. Towler; recording secre!
tary, j. Brooke*; flnanolal secretary, J. If
MeVety. ^
MOVING   PICTURE   OPERATORS,   L__\
cal 233, I.A.T.S.E.—Meets every roSJ
ond Sunday of each month, Labor Tem^
pie, 8 p.m.   President H. C. Roddan; :
retary-treasurer,   L.   E.   Goodman;    >•*-■
cording secretary, A. O. Hansen;  busl
ness  agent,   G.   R,   Hamilton.       Offlcl
Room 100, Loo Bldg.    Tel. Sey. 3045.     1
MUSICIANS'    MUTUAL   PROTECTIVE
Union, Local No. 145, A. F. of M.M
Meets second Sunday   of   each montlT
rooms 29-30, Williams Building, 418 Gran
vllle street.    President, J. Bowyer; vice]	
president,  F.  English;  seoretary,  H.  fl
Brasfleld; treasurer, w. Fowler. ■
OPERATIVE PLASTERERS' INTBH
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, No. IS™
Meeta flrst ud third Wedneaday, O'Brl
Hall, 8 p.m. Preaident, G. Dean; corn
ponding aeeretary, F. Sumpter; flnanol
secretary, D. Scott; tnasunr, I. Tysoi
business agent, Joe Hampton. Phoi
Sey. 1514.
PAINTERS',. PAPERHANGERS'. ANJ
Decorators', Local 188—Meets even
Thuraday, 7.30 p.m. President, H. Granl
flnanclal secretary, J. Freckleton, 1ft
Comox street; recording secretary, ■
Dowding, 622 Howe street. Bustnei
agent, Jamea Train, Room 303, Lab
Temple.
PATTERN    MAKERS'    .LEAGUE    .«
NORTH  AMERICA.—Vancouver  a_m
vicinity.   Branch meeta 1st and 3rd FrM
days at Labor Temple, room 205. Rober
C.   Sampson,   Pres.,   747  Dunlevy Ave!
Jos.  G.   Lyon,   flnanolal  secretary,   1711
Grant street; J. Campbell, secording seJ
retary, 4869 Argyle street.
MINARD'S LINIMENT CURES
BURN8, ETC.
DISEASES OF MEN
We Issue a written guarantee
that ZIT will cure or your money
back.
Differs from all othsr remedies.
Price Sl.00, Post Paid.
McDUFFEE BROS.
THI   OBUOINO   DRUGGISTS
112 Cordova tt W.
Vancouver, B. C.
PANTAGEQ
Unequalled Vaudeville
Meant
PANTAGES VAUDEVILLE
THREE SHOWS DAILY
2.46, 7.20, (.16
Season's Prices—
Matinee 16c, Evenings IBo,'lie.
DIXON & MURRAY
oamramtama, mto.
Mat and Store gutter.  Otatnl
Jobbing
OOoa aad «hoji
ion miasMtiia si
Day AtlUht Calk
Phone Bar. 843
MACK BROS.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS and
EMBALMERS
Vancouver Brili.h Columbia
Parlor.* Chapel
23BSCra»UlaSt.
P.... S.J. 221
Day er Hl^l
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
and EMBALMERS
S20 Richard, SL        Vaacoanr, I. C.
______    ___\_[   <"*>"   BUBB1. 1
BTONECOTTBBS'. VANCOUVbJ
Branch—Meets aecond Tueaday, 1.1
p. m. Preaident, J. Marshall; correaponj
Ing aeoretary, win. Rowan, Box 10<7; fll
anclal aecreiary, K. MoKenale.
STBRBOTTPBRB' AND BLBCTROT..
era' Union, No. II, of Vancouver an
Victoria—Meeta    aeoond    Wedneaday L
eaoh month, i p. m., Labor Temple. Preafl
dent, Chaa. Bayley; recording aecrete
A. Birnle, o.o. ''Newt Advertiser."
STREET   AND   ELECTRIC   RAILWAJ
Employeea, Pioneer Division No. v
—Meett Labor Temple, aecond fourt.
Wedneadaya at I p. m., and flrst anL
third Wedneadaya, I p. m. Prealdeni
Adam Taylor; recording aeeretary, Alhtif
V. Lofting, 1511 Trinity street; financial
secretary, Fred. A. Hoover, 2409 Clarf
Drive.
STEAM- ENOINBHRS.   INTBRNATIOnI
al Looal 117—Meets every Wedneadr
I p. m„ room 104, Labor Temple. PlnaL_
clal eecretary, B. Prendergaat, room 111.1
TAILORS' INDUSTRIAL UNION (IN]
ternatlonal), Local No. 171—MtttlngB.
held flrat Tueaday In eaoh month, I p. nfl
Preaident, H. Nordlund; recording aaertV
tary, C. McDonald, Bos 60S; flnanolaT
secretary, L. Wakley. P. O. Bon 801.
THEATRICAL STAGS EMPLOYEE!
Local No. US—Meata aeoond BundtL
ot eaeh month at Room 114, Labor Teml
pie. President, R, Spears; recording seal
retary, Geo. W. Allln, P.O. Box 711, Van!
oouvtr.
TYPOGRAPHICAL   UNION   NO.   Ill-
Meata laat  Sunday each  month,
p.m.   Pretident, R. P. Pettlplece;   vlet.
preaident,   W.   B.    Metsger,   seorttaryl
treasurer, R. H. Neelanda, P. O. Box t_
SYNOPSIS  OP  COAL   MININQ  RSQUl
LATIONS
Coal mining rlghta of tha Domlnlod
In Manitoba, Saskatchewan and AlbartT
the Tukon Territory, 'tht Northwest Ttl,
rltorlet and In a portion of tht Provlnol
of Britlah Columbia, may be leaaed fo]
a term of twenty-one yean at an annul
rental of |1 an aore. Net more tha_
1,610 aorea will ba leaaed to one applfl
oant.
Application! tor leaae muat be made I
the applicant In parson to tht Agtnt <
Sub-Agent  of  tht  dlatrlct In which
rlghta applied for are altuated.
in turveyed territory the land mutt
described by aeotlont, or legal aubdlvl
iona of aaotlons, and In unsurveyed   ttl
rltory  tht tract  applied  for ihall
staked by the applicant himself. _
Bach application muat be accompanlJ
by a fee of IS, whloh will be refunded 1
the rights applied (or are not avallabll
but not otherwise.   A royalty shall
paid on tht merchantable output of t
mine at tht rata of Ave centa per ton.
The person operating the mine ah!
furnlah the Agent with aworn returi
accounting for the full quantity of md
ohantable ooal mined and pay the roysL
ty thereon. It the coal mining righl
are not being operated, auoh retur"
ahould be furnished at least once a yet.
The lease will Include the coal mlnlg
rlghta only, but the lesaee may be '
mltted to purchase whatever   avallal
aurface rights may be considered need
aary for the working of the mine at f
rate of 110 an aore.
For full Information application shod
bt made to the Seoretary of the Dept
ment of the Interior, Ottawa, or to i__
Agent or Sub-Agent of Dominion Lani
W. H. CORY, 1
Deputy Mlnlattr of the Inter)!
N. B.—Unauthorised publication of tfl
advertisement will not be paid for—IMS mm
0IT1CIAL PAPER VANCOUVER
TRADES AND LABOR COUNCU.
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
omcuL pamr sstniH eou
UMUAPEDtRA-nONOfLAK*
SIXTH YEAB.  No. 171.
VANCOUVER, B. C, FRIDAY, JULY 17, 1914.
EIGHT PAGES
Cn Vaacauvar\
City, 11.11   )
$1.50 PER YEAR
The July
Clearance  Sale
Continues
with the
Greatest Bargains
this Store
ever Offered
EVERYTHING IN THE STORE REDUCED
WITH THp EXCEPTION OF LIQUORS
AND CONTRACT LINES
BUY NOW AND SAVE
V.7 _J   fr_ maatommta »n    wmmr %.sam-\t\, vaan wHrim-ni I
GEORGIA AND GRANVILLE STREETS
REMOVAL SALE
Until AUGUST 1st
LANG SALES CO.
Will give a discount of 25% on all union-made clothing, Boots and Shoes, Hats, Caps, etc.
NEW ADDRESS:    624 MAIN
OLD ADDRESS:   626 MAIN
J. LECKIE CO., LIMITED
SHOE
MANUFACTURERS
We manufacture every land of
work ihoe, and ipecitlize in line*
'or minen, railroad construction,
logging, etc
VANCOUVER
B.C
SPECIAL CONVENTION OF
B.C. FEDERATION OF LABOR
(Continued from page 1)
The special convention ol the British Columbia Federation ot Labor was
called to order at 10 o'clock last Monday morning, ln the Labor Temple
by Jas. H. McVety, vice-president of
the Trades and Labor council. The
executive officers of the Federation
and 110 delegates were present. This
attendance was higher than had been
expected, especially ln view ot the
fact that the basis of representation
was changed at the last convention,
reducing the number of delegates
each union Is entitled to send.
Mr. McVety, In opening the convention and welcoming the delegates,
ssld: "On behalf of the Trades and
Labor Council It gives me much pleasure to welcome you to this convention. We have not arranged for the
mayor or Premier MoBrlde or any
.other 'eminent persons' to greet you,
as we feel tbat the most appropriate
and sincere welcome we can extend
to you is that ot the Trades and Labor
council. We welcome you also to our
Labor Temple, which, after examination, we think you will agree, Is no
disgrace to the local labor movement
It Is an open house to you during your
stay, and we trust you will not be
slow to avail yourselves of Its many
conveniences. I shsll not attempt to
anticipate or deal with any of the
business which Is likely to come before your convention. Neither shall
I detain you by making one of those
speeches which are the dread of delegates used to attending conventions.
If I understand the reasons which
have brought you here, your business
Is serious, and the sooner you get to
lt the better you will be pleased."
President A. Watchman, In taking
the chair, said: "On behalf of the
B. C. Federation of Labor I thank
Vancouver Trades and Labor' council
for the welcome extended us, and for
the preparations made for the convention and our comfort. This is
probably the most Important convention ot organized labor' which has
ever been held In British Columbia, or
any other province in this dominion.
We are here chiefly to give consideration to the situation and affairs of the
miners of Vancouver Island and the
strike In which they are engaged.
The whole matter, ln all Its phases,
will be placed before you by the
delegates of the miners, and I trust
that you will give lt your calmest and
most sincere judgment."
Ths Delegates
Messrs.  Slvertz,  Shilland, Hoover,
Naylor and Tates were appointed as
committee on credentials.   Following
are the delegates sested:
New Westminster
Steam Engineers—J. R. Flynn,
Street Railway Employees—A. F.
Duncan, W. Yates.
Trades and Labor Council—H.
Knudson, H. Olbb.
International Electrical Workers—
W. Eskln.
Victoria
United Brotherhood of Carpenters
—A. Watchman, G. L. Dykeman.
A. S. Section U. B. of C—IA. S.
Wells, T. F. Mathleson.
Protective Laborers—J. L. Martin.
Street Railway Employees—W. H.
Gibson.
Steam Engineers—J. E. Peacock.
Brotherhood of Painters—F. Harvey.
Plumbers and Steam Fitters—Anderson.
Theatrical Stage Employees—B.
Day.
Trades and Labor Counoll—P. Fisher, Christian Siverts.
Longshoremen—G. Paget.
Cigar Makers—Alex. Ross.
Machinists—A. Herberger.
Vancouver
Steam Engineers—J. J. Taylor.
Moulders—C. Cropley.
Journeymen Tailors—C. McDonald.
Street Railway Employees—W. H.
Cottrell, W. Murray, W. Klrby, A. V.
Lofting, J. James, R. Rlgby.
United Brotherhood of Carpenters
—J. H. McEwen, C. Howe, Wl Fox-
oroft, G. H. Hardy, J, Davidson, A.
McDonald.
International Marble Workers—
J. F. McManus.
Brotherhood of Painters—H. Grand.
Building Laborers—0. Kllpatrlck.
Operative Plasterers — Alfred
Hurry.
Plumbers,   Steamfltters—W,   Mun- ] of our men are seen standing together
dell. on the street In Nanalmo when the
Trades Council—W. F. Dunn, F. A. strikebreakers   are  returning   from
Family Shoe Store
823 Granville Street
GREAT  SALE  OF   BOOTS AND
SHOES NOW ON
Men's Shoes, Regular $6.00 for $3.95
Men's Shoes, Regular $5.00, for $3.45
Men's Shoes, Regular $4.50, for $2.95
SEE THB WINDOWS
FRANK NEWTON
CENTER &HANNA,Ud.
UNDERTAKERS
Refined Service
1049 GEORGIA  STREET
One  Block weat of Court House,
Use  of Modern  Chapel  and
Funeral   Parlors   free   to  all
Patrons
HARRON BROS.
FUNIRAL  DIRICTORt AND
■MIALMIRS
Vaneouvar—Offlca and Chaptl,
IMS Oranvllle St., Phont Sty. HIS.
North Vancouver —Offlet and
chapel, 111 Seeond St. B. Phont
IM.
IpeoUttleal
While Wheat Bread
Choice Family Bread
Wtddlng and Birthday Cakta.
Ws Vet Unloa Time,
BELYEA'S BAKERY
ALL KIND! OP
CAKES. PASTRY AND
CONFECTIONERY
Bot Drlnka and Lunchea
All Goods Freel Dally,
sm nunuist,
IH, nay. not,
Hoover.
International Longshoremen — H.
Manning, O. Thomas.
Letter Carriers—J. B. Metoalf, F.
Knowles.
Electrical Workers, Outside Men —
H. A. Jones, H. Hogan.
Electrical Workers, Inside Men—T.
L. Estinghausen.
Journeymen Barbers—*. F. Burkhart.
Typographical—R. H, Neelands, J.
Wilton, Oeo, Bartley.
Photo Engravers—A. F. Porter.
Marble Cutters' Helpers—F, H.
Cassels.
Pattern Makers—R. C. Samson. '
International Machinists-^!. H. MeVety, V
Bartenders—O. W. Curnook, A.
Lees, H, Davles!
Sheet Metal Workers—J. P. Hamilton.
Moving Picture Operators—F. B.
Ooodman,
News Writers' Union—O. P. Merrill
South Wellington
United Mine Workers—D. Todd, H.
0. Connell, W. Head.
Cumberland
Dlstriot 28 United Mine Workers—
J. Naylor, A. Goodwin, R. Foster, D.
McAllister.  .
Ladysmlth
District 28 United Mine Workers—
G. Pettigrew, W. Bauld, W. Brown, D.
McKensle, Jas, Currle, Thos. Doherty.
Nanalmo
Typographical-^. Gilbert
United Brotheerhood of Carpenters
—J. Kerr.
United Mine Workers—J, Coon-
ralne, J. 8. Robertson, W. A, Rose, F.
John, T. J. Shenton, R. Moffat, C.
Pattlnson.
Hedley, B. C.
Western Federation of Miners—D.
Sanders.
Sointula
United Mine Workers—B. Karrlo.
Fernle
District 18 United Mine Workers—
W. Hilton, H. Martin, D. Rees.
Oreenwood
Western Federation of Miners—W.
Philips.
Sandon
Western Federation of Miners—A.
Shilland.
District 6, Western Federation ot
Miners—H. Elsmore.
Frsternal  Greetings
The following telegram from E. P.
Marsh,  president  Washington  State
Federation of Labor, was read:
"Washington     unionists   send
fraternal greetings   and  earnest
wish that your convention will be
tbe means In some way of bringing success to courageous miners
in your province who have battled
so long."—E. p. Marsh.
The Miners' Situation
President Robt. Foster ot District
28, United Mine Workers of America
—whloh Is the Vancouver Island district—was then called upon to lay the
miners' situation before the conven
tlon. He said in part: "As the miners
of District 28 are chiefly responsible
for this convention being called, I will
endeavor to give you a few of the reasons why we made the request. I
shall not take up your time by recounting all the efforts to" bring this
Btrike to a successful termination.
After having tried all tbe methods
within our power we realized, two
montbs ago, that lt would be well to
have a conference of all our locals to
consider the situation. This we did.
We have made n flght for the miners
of tbe Island such as no other union
on this continent could have done, and
we were of the opinion that If we met
with reverse It would have a very disastrous effect on the entire labor
movement of ths province. We came
to the conclusion tbat a special convention of this federation should be
called, In order that the whole, matter
might be laid before you so that you
could consider in what way you could
best help both yourselves and us. If
we could secure tho enforcement of
the law of this province, we could win
this strike. But Premier McBride, as
minister of mines, has consistently
failed and refused to move In that
direction. The coal mines act distinctly says that men working in the
mines shall ho ahlo to read English, so
that they may understand the notices
posted at the pit mouth by inspectors
for the safety of those working therein. At this time the mines are full of
Asiatics and non-English-speaking
men, who connot, road a word of
those Instructions. You may not
realize the danger of men of that kind
being in the mines, but, as an experienced miner, I can say that a large
Share of the explosions which occur
In mines, like tbe one at Hlllcrest A
few weeks ago, are due to just such
non-enforcement of the law. As the
government will not enforce the law
we are of the opinion that a more
aggressive policy Is needed. Strikebreakers on the Island are even now
carrying arms and ammunition, although the houses of union men have
been searched and all weapons taken
away by the police. When we protested to Mr. Bowser on this matter,
he replied that If the strikebreakers
needed the guns for their safety they
would be permitted to retain them,
and he would not Interfere with them
Many of our men who were Bent to
gaol have already served their terms,
according to the Judgment passed upon them by Judge Morrison. He said
their sentences would date from the
time of their arrest, but Mr. Bowser
Is causing thom to be detained as
though they were sentenced from the
date of sentence. We have repeatedly brought this to the attention of
Attorney-general Bowser, but he refuses to more In the matter.   It two
work, they are arrested for unlawful
picketing. Bowser says he Is Justified in taking any action he thinks
fit ln view of what he calls an unusual
situation. The treatment we ara
getting now Is In store for all of you
at some future time when you are on
strike. The mines are full ot Asiatics, and there Is not one white fireman working at the mines on the
Island,
'I will not launch Into the political
aspect of this matter Just now," continued Mr. Foster, "but lt does seem
a foolish thing for the. workmen of
this provinoe to be quarreling - over
slight differences In politics, Instead
of combining all their forces to fight
McBride and his corrupt government.
The miners have tried all the methods
which Industrial action alone can furnish, but still have not bsen able to
produce the desired results. If the
laws we now have cannot be enforced
then what is the use of laws and striving for more laws? These things
should be put up plainly and squarely
to the membership of the various
unions, so that they may reallzo the
situation ln which the whole working
class of this province Is.placed, and
thereby devise a solution."
Monday Afternoon Session  '
With the opening of the session
President Watchman called on Chris.
Pattlnson of the miners, who said:
"The fight on the Island Is a tight for
the right to protect the lives and Jobs
of the miners. We have met with
every opposition from the government
who have been the willing servants of
the mine-owners. This will continue
unless the labor movement of this
province will take a stand and do
something practical. The International ofllce "of the U. M. W, of A. has given us magnificent assistance. Men
have been shipped to the Island from
all parte of Canada, United States and
England, and tn one single night no
lesB thsn 90 Chinamen were given
miners' certificates In violation of the
Coal Mines Regulation act Picketing
has been stopped, and I want you to
realize that ln every, country in the
world but Canada picketing Is a recognised right of the workers. This
matter Is a vital one and concerns
every union man ln this country. If
the U. M. W. of A. does not win this
fight, what chance do you think any
other unton has against the combined
onslaught of capitalists and government? This 1b not only the fight of
the miners, but of all labor ln British
Columbia. Tou men cannot afford to
stand Idly by and see other workers
beaten and driven back to servile and
nonunion conditions. It may be your
turn next, and If you have courage
and principle you will get behind the
miners and help them both for their
protection and your own"
Delegate Thomas of the Longshoremen asked what remedy the miners
had to suggest.
Del. Martin moved that the executive of the federation send out a pamphlet at the next provincial election
Informing the public of the action of
the p vernment in the strike.
Del. Siverts thought some method
should be adopted which would bring
more Immediate relief.
Del. Samson said he believed it
would be best to hear all views and
(Continued on Page Seven)
St. Isidore, P. Q., Aug. 18, 1904.
Mlnard's Liniment Co., Limited.
Gentlemen,—I have frequently used
MINARD'S LINIMENT and also prescribe lt for my patients always with
the most gratifying results, and I consider it the best all-round Liniment
extant.
Yours truly,
DR. JOS. AUG. SIR01S.
wiwiui= I
Here isYourAnswer; in ]
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NEW INTERNATIONAL!
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Even m you rend this publication you
likely question tlio mauntn-x ot sume i
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400,000 Words and Phrases Defined.
0000 Illustrations.
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2700 Fagee.
Tbo only dictionary with
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What Everybody Should Know
MEN'S NEW NOBBY 8UIT8 can be bought at BRUMMITT'S from
♦10.00 up to $30.00 And they are worth more
HATS, bearing the union label, at $2.00, $2.50, $3.00.
SHOES, all makes and prlceB, bearing the label, at "live and let live
prices, $2.00 up to $6.00
CHIPPEWA SHOES at $7.00, $8.00 and $10.00 \
W. B. BRUMM-ITT
18-20  CORDOVA  ST. W.
STOVES and RANGES
EVERYTHING FOR THE KITCHEN
Mount Pleasant headquarters for Caipenters' Tools ud all
kinds of Builders' ud Contractors' Supplies
W.R OWEN & MORRISON
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602 Haitingi Street Weat
DR. BRETT ANDERSON, Dentist
Operates by the latest, most scientific ud painless methods
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75 Per Cent, of your Summer Cooking can
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and with much greater comfort and convenience.    .
Electric Household Appliances are ready for operation, day or night,
on an Instant's attention to connecting the cord with the household
socket.
They can do everything ln the line of light cooking, preparing tea or
coffee, making toast, preparing eggs, frying chops, etc. You don't
want heavy meals during the hot weather and the appliances just
meet this demand and make lt unnecessary to have a hot fire going.
Electric Household Appliances cost only a few cents per hour ot continuous operation. To prepare an ordinary meal takes but a fraction
of an hour.  They are guaranteed by the manufacturers.
SEE OUR FULL LINE OF ELECTRICAL HOUSEHOLD
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ttftt   B.C. ELECTRIC   "%±s" pf
PAGE FOUR
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FBIDAT ,. .JULY 17, 191
THE
MOLSONS
BANK
Capital and Reserve,  .. 91,700,000
IK branchea In Canada
▲ lenerti backing bualneaa trans-
T       acted.
Savings Department
Interest allowed at highest
II current rate
I East End Branch
I   IM HASTINGS STREET EAST
I A. W. Jarvls, Manager
The Royal Bank
of Canada
INCORPORATED 111*
Paid-up Capital
Rtstrvt	
Total Aaaata • •
■•11,
WE ALLOW IN'
TEREST ON DE-
POSITS IN OUR
SAVINGS
DEPARTMENT
On* Dollar will span
th* secount, and your
buslnss* will bt wsl-
cam* bs It large or
small
FOURTEEN    BRANCHES    IN
VANCOUVER
THE
INCORPORATED
1S55
BANK OF
TORONTO
Capital ind Rtttrvt »11>17*,»**S
WAGE-EARNERS
kaep your ssvlngs In ths Bank
of Toronto, and watch your deposits and Interut added by the
bank grow to a moat dsslrsble
bank balanea. Th* flnanclal
strength of thl* long-estab-
llshsd, well-conducttd Inititutlon ensurtt safety fer your
money, and you will receive
•very courtesy, and your account cartful atttntlon.
Asttts ..
Dsposlta
•60,000,000
•41.000,000
Main Offlee—
4$$ HASTINOS ST. WEST
(N*tr Rloharda)
Branches—
Cor. Haatinga and Carrall St*.
New Westminster
Vletorl*
.. Merritt
the;bank of British
north america
Batabllthea In 1IM.   Incorporated
'   by Royal Charter In 1840.
Paid-up Capital     •     14,811,111.11
Rtttrvt Fund    -     -    1,017,110.00
Read Offlce In Canada:
ST. JAMES ST., MONTREAL
H.:i. MACKENZIE - Gaatal Manatai
SAVINGS  DEPARTMENT  AT
ALL BRANCH ■•
Spatial atttntlon stvan to Savlnia
Aocountt on widen Inttreat It al-
lowtd from data ot dapotlt.
Optn t Savlngt Account and add
to It tvtry pay day.
Drafts snd Monty Ordtrt aold
VANCOUVER BRANCH
W. Godfrey, Manaitr.
NORTH   VANCOUVER   BRANCH
3. R. Chapman, ManSftr.
KBRRISDALB BRANCH
D. Nail,	
Traders Trust
company
LIMITED
ROOERS BUILDINO
VANCOUVER      • B.C.
FIRE, UFE and ACCIDENT
INSURANCE
Four per cent. lntereat
allowed on all deposits
in car savings department, subject to cheque.
Agrtamtntt For til* purohtMd
•at* Deposit Vaults
WO a yttr
Ousrsntttd Investment tf Fund*
for Clltntt
THE B.C. FEDERATIONIST
Publlahed tvary Friday morning by tht
B. C. Fadtratlonlat, Ltd.
R. Farm. Pettipiece   -
J. W. Wilkinson
Qeorge Bartley    -
Managing Editor
. Associate Editor
News Editor
DIRECTORS
Jas. Campbell, preaident; J. H. McVety, secretary-
treasurer; H. Olbb; O. J. Kelly
and R. P. Pettlplece
Offlce: Room 217, Labor Ttmplt.
Ttl. Exchange Sty. 7480.
- M. C. Bhrader
Advertising Manager
"subscription
11.50 per year; ln Vancouver city, 12.00; to unlona
"■■ ', 11.00
subscribing In a body,'
'     REPRESENTATIVES
New Westminster -     -     -     -     H. Olbb, Box 934
Prince Rupert     -     -     - W. E. Denning, Box 631
Vlotoria -    -    -    -    -    - A. S. Wells, Box 1638
Affiliated   with  Western Labor Preaa Association
"Unity of Labor; the Hope of the World."
FRIDAY JULY 17, 1914.
THE SPECIAL CONVENTION of the
B. C. Federation of Labor, which
gathered this week in Vancouver, will
not likely be forgotten by those who attended it.
There was no very clear idea beforehand, as to
what would happen. It was
B. C. F. OF L. "e." "'"''"•''xx' horn the of-
SPECIAL ' ''c'a! ca"' t'la' u<le position of
CONVENTION **'e '!'anc' minen would be
the main question to be dealt
with., But there was a feeling of uncertainty and perplexity, as to how
the problem could be tackled in such a way as
would produce practical good for the miners
in their trouble. That was the feeling which
dominated the whole of the first day's proceedings. Every organization, except the miners,
seemed to be at a loss as to what might best
be done. As the result of that, there was very
little expression of opinion from those organizations during-the early stages of the convention.
That fact was noticed and commented upon
several times by various speakers. The executive of the Federation were in no position lo
make any definite recommendation to the convention. When the miners officials met the
executive of the Federation in Victoria on June
25th, they were not in a position to ask for any
special line of action, as they had no instructions
from the miners. They felt that the convention
should be called, and the business of deciding
upon any particular policy left to the delegates
when they met. With the object of helping
the miners to the limit of their power, the, executive called the convention, although having no
clear idea as to how good results could be got
from it. So it was not to be wondered at,
that everyone felt a little baffled as to how to go
about die job of deciding upon something which
would benefit the miners, and which at the same
time lay within the bounds of practical possibility.
*   ¥   ¥   *
Finally it was decided, by a vote of 48 for
to 36 against, to take a referendum vote of the
unions as to whether or not they were willing
to come out on a general strike to assist the
miners to secure an equitable settlement of their
trouble. Before that action was decided upon,
the merits of the proposal were very thoroughly
discussed by the convention. Again it was
noticeable that, with the exception of the miners
delegates and a few others, the idea did not
meet with enthusiastic support. That was not
due to any lack of desire to help the miners in
any way that seemed practical. But in face
of the industrial situation throughout the province, dozens of men in the convention who were
willing and ready to do everything which offered the slightest hope of success, had to reluctantly admit that they did not consider a
general strike either practical or possible, That
feeling wat reflected in the vote. Out of the
48 votes in favor, about 20 were miners votes,
leaving the votes of the other organizations
standing at about 28 for to 36 against. The
total vole polled being 84, and with well over
100 delegates in attendance, there must have
been about 20 votes which were not polled at
all. For those who voted against, it was a
painful duty imposed upon them by sheer
weight of die facts as they appealed to them.
They could see that it was no use allowing sentiment to overbalance their judgment, however
bitter the conclusion which that judgment had
brought them to, might be. It would only be
leading the miners to expect results which were
not possible. Political action, as an ultimate
solution of the difficulty, was obviously in the
minds of many of the delegates, but the one
resolution involving any step of that kind, met
with a rapid and untimely end. It was felt that
it amounted to nothing more nor less than a
proposal to help the Liberals defeat the McBride
government at the next provincial election.
¥     ¥     ¥     ¥
The speech delivered by Frank Farrington at
the Tuesday afternoon session, gave the delegates a comprehensive idea of the lavish way
in which the tremendous financial resources of
the United Mine Workers of America had been
used to help the Island miners. After learning that $1,250,000 had been spent in weekly
sums of $16,500, and that a higher rale of
strike relief had been paid than ever before in
the history of the U. M. W. A, no delegate
felt that the miners had failed up to the present
because of any lack of support from headquarters. Farrington made no disguise of his
opposition to the proposal for a general strike
at this time. He stated plainly that in face
of the number of men out of work in all trades,
it was folly to expect help from such a course.
On the policy of agreements between miners
and owners, he was equally emphatic, and said
that beyond auestion of doubt, their union had
only been able to reach the powerful position
which had enabled them to give such a huge sum
of money to the Island miners, as the result of
their agreement policy. For him it was no pleasant matter to have to admit such little progress in
spite of the titanic efforts which had been made,
and the princely sum which had been expended.
But like many others there, of long experience
and mature judgment, he had to admit the
general strike was in his opinion no proposal
which carried with it any promise of success.
¥    ¥    *    ¥
For our part we share the same views as
those delegates who were forced by the hard
cold facts of the situation lo vote against the
general strike proposal in opposition to the admiration which everyone must feel for the
magnificent spirit which has been displayed by
the miners from start to finish. It is easy
enough for the sake of popularity, or personal
satisfaction, to express a view which is not an
opinion.      But in face of the fact that the
province is filled from end to end with unemployed workers, we cannot see how a general
strike of the few who are working could benefit
the miners. The theory behind a strike is,
that those who strike shall be able to enforce
their demands by withdrawing and suspending
that economic power which a demand for their
labor places in their hands. For every man
who is working in British Columbia today, there
are ten men unemployed who would like to have
his job, and in many cases they are actually
starving. That was amply proved by the reports
of delegates from every part of the province.
Strikes are won not by sentiment, but by the reserve supply of bread in the cupboards of the
working class. It may be a bitter thing to face,
but the fact that it is, does not permit of it being
ignored. When men are starving they must
either eat or die, and their hunger cannot be appeased by expressions of sentiment, no matter
how altruistic'or exalted those expressions may
be.
The convention, by again going on record
in favor of the total exclusion of all Asiatics,
did no more than re-affirm. die position it has
taken up during the past twenty-five years. A
great deal bf oratory was expended on this topic,
but no proposal calculated to produce the practical result desired was adopted. Labor has
been "resoluting" on this question for a quarter
of a century, and may continue to do so for
another quarter, but as long as nothing but that
is done, neither the provincial nor federal governments will do anything to keep Asiatics out
of Canada. They regard resolutions as an inexpensive safety valve. The only thing they are
afraid of is political effort, when it assumes
such shape as to ultimately threaten their control of the power of the state.
DELEGATE FISHER,   who came   to
this week's convention from Victoria
Trades and Labor Council, has been
done a rank injustice by the News-Advertiser.
He is a longshoreman and said in convention
that . his   organization   were
WHAT ready to   do   anything   they
.„ _„.--        could to help the miners ex-
DELEGATE t j    •»       TL
FISHER MID.    Z?     ZB ^   k'
News-Ad.   reported   him as
being willing "to do open
murder," and that report has been copied and
made capital of by the Nanimo Herald, which
is ever ready to seize on anything which can
be construed as discreditable to organized
labor. Delegate Fisher made it his business
to point out in convention the morning the report appeared, that the report wat false, and
condemned the News-Ad. in warm terms for
its careless mistake. Things like that gather
volume if allowed to pass unchallenged, and for
our part we do not intend that Delegate Fisher
shall be saddled with the responsibility for such
a statement. Such lies do harm both to the
man and the movement, and should be nailed
down from the start.
THE   FEDERATIONIST   of a few
weeks ago, dealing with the question of
including Sex Hygiene in the curriculum
of the public schools, has brought several letters from readers.   They are practically   all
agreed as to the need of chil-
u.„, ..„  '     dren being taught sex facts in
?*C'N,t„. a sane and healthy way. But
SEX HYQIENE  ^ ^ fM,   fa{   fan ;,
BE TAUGHT con8yerable difficulty attendant on the' giving of instruction of that kind. The matter involved is so
essentially delicate and personal, that it is obvious it cannot be handled in the same slapdash fashion that a lesson in geography might
be given, But if, after careful thought and
consideration, the conclusion is reached that
children are entitled to be taught these thingi,
then it is obvious that a way must be devised
of imparting the knowledge in a manner which
will bring the desired result, and no more. The
result desired, is to impart to the young a
knowledge of certain definite facts concerning
their development, with a view to enabling them
to avoid the evil possibilities which beset the
path of ignorant adolescence. Care is needed
not to overshoot the mark. Older people will
remember that at that period of life when the
essential phenomena of sex begin to make their
appearance in the growing boy and girl, they
bring with them a piquant and lively curiosity
as to the meaning of the new experiences. And
instruction given in any undignified or clumsy
manner, instead of giving better balance and
control, Would be more likely to end in the
production, of precocity which might bring results directly opposite to those desired. ' The
happy medium required is, to preserve all the
charm and freshness of youth, and at the same
time to fortify it with knowledge which will
guide it to healthy and self-reliant maturity. .
¥     ¥     ¥     ¥
If it be granted that sex instruction is desirable, the question arises: Who is to give the
instruction? The first thought, of course is the
parents, who have the greatest responsibility at
stake. But when we face the present-day
fads of the case, we cannot believe that the
solution of the problem lies wholly with the
parents. It would seem that few parents give
any such instruction to their children, though
an increasing number are using some of the
excellent little books which have been written
in this connection for both parents and children. The education authorities in charge of
the public schools of London, England, are
printing 100,000 such books to be given to
girls leaving school. Many parents who feel
their responsibility keenly, are too shy themselves to be of much actual use to their children in this respecL Moreover, the personal
aspect of. the case arises too obtrusively in a
boy's mind when his father speaks to him on
the lubject of sex. In ideal conditions, no
doubt, sex-instruction should be given at home;
but as things are, it also seems certain that it
must also be attempted in school. And that it
should be linked on to such subjects as nature
study and biology, human physiology and domestic icience—the connection being left to the
wisdom and discretion of the teacher. The gift
of speaking effectively about such an essentially delicate matter as sex, is probably rare, and it
is perhaps an open question whether the instruction can be best given by the head master
or mistress, the class teacher, the teacher of
biology, the school physician, or by the loan of
books and pamphlets. In either case it is a
fact that there are teachers—both men and
women—who are giving such instruction very
successfully,
¥    ¥    ¥   *
While' agreeing to' respect the natural instinct of reserve in regard to sex, teachers will
probably admit that it is not a very dignified
action to fight shy of the facts when they present themselves in the course of nature studies
and the like. Without spoiling good botany
and natural history, much may be done to lift
the facts of sex from their human and personal
setting. Most teachers who are able to give
instruction in the life of plants and animals are
agreed that the study puts an end to morbid
curiosity, and lets the fresh air into the subject. Beyond clearing up the mystery through
the medium of botany and zoology, many at
present decline to advance. Others, who are
perhaps more fully acquainted with the facts
associated with youth, are convinced that, for
boys in particular, it is necessary to go further.
¥    ¥     ¥     ¥
Medical inspection of school children, though
not yet in practice everywhere, has shown how
much good can be accomplished, and the idea
is growing—apart altogether from special
economic reasons—that the child has a right to
the maximum chance of attaining to bodily fitness. Whatever direct instruction is given, must
be carefully differentiated according to die
special circumstances of cases. In some of the
shameful conditions, arising out of the present
day industrial system, the children have nothing to team of the seamy side of sex. In
their case it is necesary to show them that there
is another side. In all cases, nothing should be
said which will have to be contradicted or unlearned afterwards, for no one can do a child
much greater harm than telling it something
which it will afterwards discover to be untrue.
While there may be good reason for silence or
postponement of an answer, there should be no
shirking or beating about the bush once an
answer has been started upon.
¥     ¥     ¥     ¥
In dealing with this whole question! we realize
that the more thought and study which is given
to it, the more does the need for care and caution become obvious. But we do believ that an
attempt should be made to give children a
frank, candid, and serious outlook on the
main facts concerning the perpetuation of their
kind. There is a time to speak, and a time to
keep silence, and all instruction must be governed by consummate. discretion and concern
for each particular case. It would seem, however, that whether sex instruction is given by
direct or indirect method, through hygiene or
nature study, whether by parent or teacher, care
must be taken not to anticipate interest, not to
excite, or say what is untrue. It should not be
done with a long face to frighten children, but
with that gracious wisdom which prompts the
desire of the older to help the younger to pass
some of life's awkward places. Above all, it
should be remembered not to say too much.
IN RUSSIA, at this moment, there is going
on one of the most interesting political conflicts of modem times. The Duma has
thrown out the imperial budget; and the Czar
finds himself with the choice1 either of tearing
up the constitution or of accepting a ministry which has
THE LITTLE fa ^fac,. 0f fa chamber.
FATHER DIES Relum to naked abjo'utism is
VERY HARD ou[ „f fa q^^on, both because of the blow it would
give to Russian state credit and because it
would revive revolutionary activities on a scale
the government could not cope with. Apparently the only course is to fulfil the constitution.
Behind this situation there is a vivid history.
Goremykine, the Russian Premier, is the reactionary who was chosen to dissolve the first
Duma and to prosecute the majority of deputies
who afterwards at Viborg, in Finland, issued
the famous Viborg manifesto of protest. In
the present Duma Ihe two great groups, the
Cadet Party and the Octobrisls, command a
majority. Goremykine, therefore, entered upon
a policy of undermining the parliament's conceded rights.
¥    ¥     ¥     ¥
To begin with he refused to answer
questions on the acts of the government,
thus denying the Duma's right of control. Next,
he denied the right of the Duma to initiate legislation. Next, he attacked the right of free
speech. A Social-Democratic deputy named
Tschaidze was suspended for saying that that
group stood for a republic. The twenty-one
members of the group who supported Tscheidze,
were suspended. Refusing to leave they were
driven from the chamber by soldiery at the
point of the bayonet. By way of protest
100,000 workmen in St. Petersburg at once
struck. At the end of five days the strike was
called off because meanwhile the twenty-one
deputies had come to an understanding with the
Cadets     and     Octobrisls. It     is     a
curious commentary on the ways of
the working class. In Russia they are facing
Siberia and death in their struggle for political
power. In British Columbia they already have
it, and it is their delight to surrender it to their
delight to surrender it to their masters to be
used against them. It illusrates the saying that
what the workers get for nothing, they usually
value at that figure.
MODERN MACHINERY, and ma-
chine methods of production have
made it possible for more people to
live upon the earth in greater comfort than could
have been before the beginning of the 19th
century. Luxuries of that
MEN ARE THE **a'f' e 'MCOnie necessities,
CHILDREN OF J,ntl **& on1ce u,ed «& by
THE MACHINE wealthy classes nave come
into general use. The earth
can support several times more
people than it could before the advent of the
steam engine. Yet the old countries of Europe
have been crowded, in most parts, for centuries.
Their population has increased because the inhabitants have become cleverer in getting food.
More food is raited per inhabitant, and, consequently, there are more inhabitants. When,
this continent was discovered, there were only
a few million Indians, at the very most, scattered over the vast territory of North America.
Yet, according to the historian Fiske, the continent was, even at that time, crowded. Under
the methods of obtaining food then known to the
Indians, this continent was then supporting as
many persons as it could. If it were possible
to deprive the population of North America of
every machine and mechanical method known
to them, but which was not known to the Indians
of A. D. 1500, the population would swiftly
reduce itself to about the population of A. D.
1500. The significance of that is somewhat
interesting. Steam, coal, steel, electricity, and
the specialized uses to which ihey have been put,
are regarded as servants. But they are really
masters. We have grown so used to them
that we cannot do without them, under penalty
of destruction.     We are, in cold fact, the
descendants not of the persons who gave us physical birth, but of Watt, Faraday, Hertz, Edison, and scores of other inventors. Without
the inventions of such men we could never have
been born, because there would have been nothing for us to eat. Population goes on, if
allowed to proceed naturally, until no more can
be comfortably supported, Then the incubus
of the machine will be heavier thsn ever. Nor
will it be machines alone which will bind us.
They are but symbols of an intricate organization of production and distribution which holds
us all in its web. We are the slaves of the
organization we have built up. These are
some of the reasons which make if impossible
for society to revert to the simple economic forms
of earlier times. They are also the reasons
why legislation to stop the evolution of the
principles dynamic in modern capitalism, are
useless. The days of a generation ago have
gone, never to return. Capitalism of today
will explain itself to the people of tomorrow
when it has passed like its predecessors into the
limbo of discarded economic systems.
Speaking of flags.   What about the trades
union jack?
PHONE   SEYMOUR   SOSS
The height of statesmanship is represented
in England by forcing food upon women who
do not want to eat, and by resisting proposals
to feed thousands of school children who come
to their studies every moming either insufficiently
fed or not fed at all.
Joe Martin says the liberals in England are
a disgrace, an opinion which he has formed as
the liberal member in th* house of commons
for St. Pancras division. His revised opinion
of F. C. Wade, Ralph Smith et al should be
pretty nigh unprintable.
Yet another miner killed in the Britannia
mines. This time an electrician ground to
shreds in the pinion wheel of the ore bucket
shaft. Usual "intelligent" jury. Accidental
death. These mines are eating up men at the
rate of about one a week now. The name Britannia is eminently suitable, as the enterprise is a
purely American one.
The city council gave the Catholic Children's
Aid society permission to hold's tag day to
get funds to defray the cost of the children's
keep. They held the tag day; spent the money
on buildings; now want a grant from the city
at the rate of $1.50 per child per week,
amounting to $2000 per year. Cute, eh?
And worthy of their best traditions.
McBride knows now that he is not going to
step into the shoes vacated by Stratheona in London. The present industrial condition of the
province is prophetic of what the future will be
like as the result of his policy of handing everything over to financiers during the last ten years.
As a politician he would like to get away, but
vanity will keep him here till the day of disaster,
unless some- job suited to his Bamum-like talent
can be found for him.
The pageant, with its bluster and vulgarity,
has gone. The committee want the city to pay
the deficit of $1759, The lumber men, whose
profits chiefly come from Oriental labor, also
have a deficit of $1100. They want to unload
on the city, too. Both these bodies at pageant
time bellowed that citizens should be prepared
to make sacrifices to ensure the success of the
enterprise. This is where they themselves get
their chance to make good.
A news item says that some of the miners on
Vancouver island are organizing themselves into
squads and drilling in military fashion. We have
no idea of what their intention may be. But
if if is permissible for Carson and his ilk to drill
and arm 10,000 men in one part of the empire,
why is it not permissible for miners in another
part to drill themselves if they so wish? The
law will doubtless settle the point with its customary "impartiality and fairness."
Speaking of the damning evidence given by
F. Aspinall, inspector of mines, at Hlllcrest inquiry, the Nanaimo Herald says:
Unless the direct statements he has
made can be contradicted, a serious responsibility is fastened upon the company
and upon the mines inspection department.
If the Herald had a shred of sincerity with
regard to mine inspection and safety, it would
not need to go to Hillcrest to exercise it. The
Coal Mines Regulation act of this province has
been reduced to a dead letter in Vancouver
island by Premier McBride as minister of
mines, during the present itrike over^here. It
was due to hii failure and refusal to apply the
act that the strike itarted. Since then hit policy
hai been "to hell with the law, ai long at I can
help the operator! to break the itrike." But,
through Sam Mation, he hai the Herald bought
up, body, boots and breeches, so little wonder
they can see nothing wrong with the Bowser-
McBride administration of the mines department. One thing at least can be said about
Hillcrest. The explosion wai not due to
Chinese who cannot pan the language test, of
which there are 1500 working in the mines of
the island and right under the Herald's noie.
"George Nathaniel Curzon
Ii a very superior person."
So the strain used to run, when the noble
Lord Curzon was at Oxford. When the undergraduates at that center of "class" and
"calchar"—don't you know—feel constrained
to dub one of their tribe a "mperior penon,"
then verily he muit indeed be a giant of conceit He has done quite a lot of funny thingi,
besides marrying the daughter of a Chicago
slum landlord. Recently he presided at
the anti-suffragette meeting in London, and confided to the assembled stupidities that "the anti-
women's suffrage cause is in a stronger position
to-day than it has been for twenty years." His
reasnn for that opinion was that the public are
condemning the."votes for women" agitation.
By "the public," he means males of the "knut"
type, with forty-five degree foreheads and tani
chin, whose garbage minds are the hope of
the Liberal government, and the foundation of
the "popular" newipaper publishers' fortune.
Men to whom every women is "a piece of
skirt" and a potential pleasure-ground for their
prurient sport. In a word, the ignorant mob
that George despises in hit heart, but which,
like all hit kind, he doei not scorn to flatter
and uie for hii political purpoiei. He welcomed a woman'i money ai manure for hii
family tree. Perhaps he ii afraid women's
votei might want to inspect ill roots.
£
*Afi^*i
ARE YOU INSURED
AGAINST FIRE?
If not, you should see about
it without delay..
WE   WRITE   FIRE   INSURANCE.
fawiMEfclS*  -*+
SAFETY DEPOSIT I
TOES FOR. RENT J
DOW FRASER TRUST CO.
S17-SSI Gambia Street; Ml) Main
Strait, (bttwaan 7th tnd 8th Avtt.)
Vaneouvar, and McKay Station,
Burnaby, B. C.
Cloat tt 1 o'olock Stturday.
City Auction and Commission Co.
Cash paid for houits and sultat
of furniture or Auetlon arranftd.
Batlafaotlon tuarantttd, proaapt
ttttlamtnta.
ARTHUR  E.  BBTCHLEV
Smytha and Granville Streeta
Auotloneer ' Say SITS
Phone Your Printing Order
 TO :	
SEYMOUR 4490
of the City of Vancouver, respectfully request
Merchants,   Manufacturers,   Lawyers,   Fraternal   Societies,   Clubs,
Unions, Etc., to have the
UNION LABEL
Put on their Printing, auob aa Circulars, Briefs, Records, Books,
Posters. It Is a guarantee of superior workmanship, This label la
endorsed by all tradss and labor
unions In vaneouvar and vicinity.
VANCOUVER ALLIED PRINTING TRADES COUNCIL
F. R. Fleming, Sscretary,
Room 218 Labor Tempi*
WHENORDERMGASUIT
Strike On
MINERS KEEP AWAY
THE strike is still on at the
* Queen Mine snd Silver
Dollar, at Sheep Creek, B. C.
All working men urged to ttay
away until the itrike il settled
Order Ysrir Miners' Unien
By sll meani eome and iee our
splendid large new stock of furniture. "Everything but the
girl" for your new home.
GET OUR PRICES AND
TERMS
Hastings Furniture Co.
Limited
41 HASTINOS STRUT WUT
A. W. Woodard
Mgr. CANADA NATIONAL
FIRE INSURANCE CO*
Phont Seymour 3537
Robots' Bulldhs    470 Gruvills Street
PATENTS
^Ba-ott.-sro**-
Tht Old lattbllthid Firm of
FATINT ATTORNEYS
'•"a** "•StrtSldg., Ortnvlllt strut
City. Mitni Stymour tits.
K^iwrttai
Union
MADE
5ew
L?lb .0/Annua *Jt-*r IB
FRIDAY IDLY 17,* 1914.
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
PAGIOTI
An Exceptionally Fine Showing of
tyew Middy Waists
THE PRICES ARE INTERESTING
The new models will appeal strongly to those who want style
and quality in waists of this kind. The showing embraces some
entirely new effects, and offers values that will interest the careful buyer.   Note these:
Middy waists ln white cotton-crepe, with elastic at waist These
bave fancy collars and cuffs, ln shades of buff, sky or mauve. The
sleeves are short   Special at SI eaoh.
Straight crepe middy waists, In white, with mercerised sailor collars
and cuffs.  Fine value at II eaoh.
Fancy pique middy waists with Raglan sleeves, sailor collar and
laced front with pocket Splendid style and excellent value at $1.75
each.
Middy waists ln fancy white vesting, with Raglan shoulder and sailor
oollar, In light and dark grey, cadet, navy or sky.   Special at $1.50,
575 Granville St.   Vancouver, B. C.
Phene Seymour 3540
..   .   sttrt Houie MO tt S p.m.
Saturday, Intludad
/Braids
Best
Coffee
Did You Get Yours
This Morning?
BRAID'S
BEST
COFFEE
1
EDWARD LIPSETT
FISHING SUPPLIES
MANUFACTURER OF
TENT5    -
FLAC5 SAILS >no DHE BAGS
DTTDM DUCK. ALL WEIGHTS—WIDTHS j
ARTHUR JAWE5'FISH HD0K5. ETC
Phontt Stymour
6031 and 6032
68 WATER ST.
WM TURNER
906 Granville St.
Next to tht Market
-DEALER IN-
New and second-hand China, Crockery, Furniture,
Hardware and Stoves. Furniture moving and shipping. Telephone us when you have furniture for
sale. Highest prices paid.
TELEPHONE SEYMOUR 3745
ROYAL CITY TRADES
General Conditions of Labor
Reported Worse—Union
Glove Factory
Employing "Scabs"—Nominations of Officers—Elec
tion Next Meeting
UNDERWEAR
MEN'S BALBRIGGAN  UNDERWEAR
At No. and 75c. per garment.
BRITANNIA
Light Woollen Underwear—juat right for this warm weather
LIGHT WEIGHT UNION SUITS
From 9140 per Suit up.
B. V. D. UNDERWEAR
With Short Sleevei and Knee Length Drawers, 76c. per garment,
CLUBB & STEWART, Ltd.
Ttl. sty. ns   - ste-sii hastinos strsst w.
NEW- WESTMINSTER, July 14.-
The attendance at last meeting ot the
Trades and Labor oounoil was very
muoh below what lt should have been,
and ln order to wake the unions up
a resolution was Introduced by Delegate Tates that the members present
should bring to the attention of their
various locals the fact that many
delegates were not attending to their
duties, and If they were unable to attend the meetings of the council
others should be eleoted ln their
plaoe.
The general condition ot the unions,
the faot that many organizations were
In bad shape, several having gone defunct, together with a belief that
something might he accomplished
wtth an energetic organizer ln the
field, led Delegate Flynn of the
stationary engineers to lay the matter before the council, with the result
that the delegates present were requested to bring the matter up ln
their unions and ascertain to what
extent such a movement could be financed. The question wlll.be further
considered at the flrst meeting ln
August.
Credentials were received from the
Clgarmakers tor Abe. Kochel, H,
Knudsen, W. Wolz and Oeo. Dalley.
President Cameron reported -that
Mayor Oray called the mass meeting
to protest against tbe landing of the
Hindoos, as requested by the council,
which wsb a success.
Delegate Knudsen reported for the
organisation committee that he had
interviewed the painters' union and
had been Informed that they had
never contemplated withdrawing. He
also reported, acting under Instructions from the exeouttve of the B. C.
Federation, having visited the Grin-
nel glove factory at Coquitlam and
organized the eligible employees Into
a glove makers' union. The factory
was now a union houee and entitled
to use the label. He urged the members present to report the matter to
their unions and those needing gloves
to patronize the products ot the factory whenever possible. The B. C.
Orlnnell glove factory Is a union firm
and Is entitled to the support of organized labor.
The municipal committee reported
they had the matter of harbor work
and building of the dredge under consideration and asked for further time
which was granted. •
The city clerk acknowledged the
receipt of the request of the council
for the employment of day labor on
the Sapperton sewer, and it had been
filed for further reference.
A letter was read from Vice-president Fred Bancroft, of the Trades and
Lahor congress ot Canada, stating he
would be ln the olty this month.
The convention call of the Trades
and Labor congress of Canada was
read. The convention will be held beginning Monday, September 21, 1914.
On motion action was deferred until
the flrst meeting In August.
A letter was read from Jingle Pot
Local, No. 2824, U. M. W. of A., conveying their appreciation .of the
council's action and heartily endorsing the same, In sending a protest to
the Nanalmo city oouncll ln Ulllng
that city with mllltla and hired thugs
on May 1st to Intimidate the miners
ln holding their May-day celebration.
—Filed.
Trade conditions were reported by
the delegates to be In about the same
or, If anything, a little worse. The
Barbers delegates requested that the
council take some action ln regard to
the Japanese and other Orientals who
kept open until sll "hours of the night,
and were a great detriment to their
business. On motion the question of
bringing an early closing by-law to
the attention ot the city council was
referred to the municipal committee.
The matter of Japanese running elevators tn buildings ln the city was
brought up by Delegate. Lee of the
stationary engineers, and It was also
referred to the municipal committee
to look Into and report
The plumbers brought to the attention of the counoll the matter of the
employment of scab labor by subcontractors on plumbing work In the
buildings being erected by the Dom-
lon Trust and Royal Bank of Canada.
The building trades committee was
Instructed to investigate and report.
Nominations of officers for the ensuing six months were made as follows: :
President—Delegate Tates ot Street
Railwaymen and Delegate Knudson ot
the Clgarmakers.
Vice-president—Delegate Cropley ot
the Moulders and Delegate McLean ot
the Street Railwaymen.
General secretary—Delegate Maiden
of the Typographical union.
Treasurer—Delegate Olbb of the
Typographical union.
Sergeant-at-arms—Delegate Jacob
son of tho Brewery Workers.
Trustees—Delegate Cameron, Rotall
Clerks; Delegate Knudson, Delegate
Tates, Delegate Iverso'n of the Timber Workers; Delegate Flynn ot the
Stationary Engineers.
. Tho nominations will be closed at
the next meeting, when tbe officers
will be elected and Installed.
On motion the election of the various committees was made the flrst
order of business after the installation
of officers.
The oall tor the special convention
ot the B. C. Federation, to be held In
Vancouver on Monday, July 13, 1914,
was read and Delegates Olbb and
Knudson were elected to represent the
council by acclamation.
Delegate Magulre inquired as to the
houts of employment on city work and
was informed by President Cameron'
that all civic contracts contained a
olause for eight hours being a day's
work,
Delegate Maiden enquired as to'
whether outtlng brush for government
work on the river was being done by
piece work or day labor. Delegate
McLean promised the desired information in a day or two.
Delegate Mackie enquired lt it was
possible for the council to take up the
question of a girl being compelled to
work fourteen hours a day in a
HcenBed house. On motion the grievance committee was Instructed' to investigate and report
MINARD'S LINIMENT RELIEVES
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JREWED AND BOTTLED IN VANCOUVER BY
VANCOUVER BREWERIES Limited
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S58 GRANVILLE ST.
LECTURE
Next Tuesday Evening in
Labor Temple
The entertainment and lecture before the Caxton apprentice club next
Tuesday evening ln hall 401 Labor
Temple, promises to be one ot unusual interest. F. J. Burslll (Felix
Penne) will give his Illustrated lecture, "The Printing Press from Caxton to William Morris," with some
kindred lantern slides, which Is
alone worth tbe small price of admission. This lecture on the might-
test force ln our modern civilization
should be heard to be appreciated,
for wtth the printing press and the
cheapening of books, and the establishment of newspapers and magazines, with its corollary—the worldwide deslmlnation of the ideas of the
world's best thinkers—has glverJ
with it that giant—public opinion—
before whom all must bow or bend.
ThlB lecture will be of interest to
all who wish to see a record of the
history of our own tlmeB in the making. Both' before and after the main
event a programme ot music and
song will be staged by well known
local talent friendly to the club and
its aspirations. Taking it all In all,
one can not afford to miss this
evening's entertainment. i
DARE
"II nousataut de l'andace, et encore
de l'andace, et toujours de l'andace."
—Danton.
Tho' all the kings of Christendom
unite,
To quench ln blood the torch of
liberty,
Not ours to count the odds; that we
must flght,
For fight we must, no matter what
they be;
Let cowards   preach   the   gospel of
despair,
Our part is "now to dare."
What tho' today the tide of battle
flows
Against us and our lines are sore
beset,
Let us but come to death grips with
our foest
Tbe tide must turn, and we will
triumph yet!
But be that sb lt will, our course Is
plain-
To dare, "and dare again."
Witness our blood on every field,
Hath written   there   the   doom ot
kings and powers,
Lo through eddying cannon smoke's
revealed,
Beyond their   gunn,   their palaces
and towers,
Our mission Is to plant our banners
there.
Till then, 'forever dare."
—JACK DAVIDSON.
Vancouver, B. C, July 2, 1914.
LABOR PARLIAMENT
AT
MEETS
New Delegatea — Hospital
Board re "Fair Wage"—
The Unemployed
British Subjects vs. Foreigners—Trade Very Quiet
—Strike Settled
VICTORIA, B. C„ July 15.—President Dykeman occupied the chair at
the last meeting of the Trades and
Labor council, when there was a
good attendance* of delegates. Credentials were received and accepted
as follows; Longshoremen — P.
Fisher, J. Wlrm, Albert Nelson and
A. C. Moores; Amalgamated Carpenters — F. Turner; Painters —A.
Dobbs, F. Barbour and J. Beckett.
Under officers' reports Delegate
Slvertz, statistician, gave his report
which showed an improvement ln the
attendance ot delegates during the
quarter ending June 30th. Report
adopted, the president thanking
Delegate Slvertz for his efforts.
Delegate Martin reported for legislative committee that May 24th
celebration committee had let their
printing to the nine Arms and that
some of tbe work went to Sweeney
& McConnell.   Adopted.
Secretary Slvertz, chairman of the
special committee on public meeting
at which J. B. Osborne spoke, reported that in absence of the president, Delegate Wells occupied the
chair and that a good meeting was
held.   Report adopted.
Delegate Slvertz reported the special committee that Interviewed the
hospital board re "fair wage" clause
and that dominion "fair wage" clause
was inserted ln the contract. Report was adopted.
Special committee on the question
of unemployment reported that the
city council and provincial government had been Interviewed regarding what steps they would take.
Premier McBride admitted the importance of this question and pointed
out the'amount ot public works being carried out in the.city. He alBo
pointed out that there was a considerable amount to be spent on the
Indian reserve ln the very near future. The mayor had said that they
realized the situation but pointed out
that when the present council took
office they were faced by the present
flnanclal stringency, and that they
had to be guided by these things and
that the elty council would do the
best possible to alleviate the distress.
Delegate Day Bald the premier had
stated that the work on the Indian
reserve would be commenced at once.
The mayor waa going to adopt the
method of seeing lt the employees
on city work were on the voters' list
to prove that they were British subjects. A special committee had been
appointed by the city council to look
into the question.
Considerable discussion took place
on this question, specially regarding
British subjects and foreigners, In
which 'several delegates said they did
not consider the question of nationality Bhould enter into the matter ot
men securing work on civic works,
but that men resident in Victoria and
vicinity should be employed before
others are brought from the mainland.
The report was adopted aB progress and the committee instructed
to take further action.
A letter from the Machinists' union disapproving the action of the
council for demanding the resignation of the financial secretary was received and a committee appointed to
explain the council's reasons for so
doing. Committee — Delegates
Wells, Slvertz and Matbieson. Other
letters received on the same question were dealt with ln a similar
manner.
All trades reported trade very
quiet.
Typos reported that the trouble
with Sweeney & McConnell had been
settled.
Delegates C. Slvertz and P. Fisher
were elected to attend the special
convention of the B. C. Federation
of Labor. Delegates Matbieson and
Hardy, alternates.
Adjourned at 11.45 p. m.
He Preferred Savagea
A convention of the North Western Federation ot Indians met ln
Taeoma last week. Philip Howell,
an educated red man, severely con
demned civilization ln a speech today, referring to "crime running
rampant."
"The struggle between capital and
labor," "the 26,000 women following
an Immoral life," and tbe "sweatshop," and "child labor" conditions.
"If these be civilization, give me
back my savagery," he asserted.
Stranger (to young lady behind the
counter of general store ln small Inland town): "Have you silk underwear?" She (shifting her gum to
other side of her mouth): "On $4 a
week, In this dead hole? I should say
not! Do you think this Is New
Tork?"
$400.00 in Cash
Given Away
TO THE ONE WHO DRAWS
THE LUCKY NUMBER
1 Chases fer Every $5 Purchase
Msde in Either of Onr Stores
BLUES
Blues never lose their favor,
no matter what other shades or
colors are ln vogue.
Blues are just as popular as
they have ever been—and as
UBUal, we are showing the correct things ln Blue Suits for
spring and summer.
Rich Blue 8erges, In 2 and 3
Button atylss.
Blus Worsteds, In pin stripes
and novelty effects.
Blue Flannels, plain end with
stripes.
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BLDG., GSANVIUE ST.
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flaps tal asfioojwkjoo.
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Estate* maoagtd tor out-of-town aad olty sUastSi Bsyaaats eot-
lsetod sad forwardtd or invested. Wt act aa beats oNjr for tk*
purchatt sad sal* ot real estate.
Deposits accepted and Interest at 4% alltwtd oa dally Sslsaos.
SAFETY DEPOSIT BOXES FOR HINT
Head Offlo*:
Columbia and Btgblt Street, New Westminster, B. C.
"Just foolin'" like, young Hogtoff I
said to Deacon Orubbs:  "Cheer up, |
deac, there's no hell."    He replied:
"You're pop'U find   there   Is   next!
election."
THE S. BOWELL COMPANY
atattiettt tt Otataa a maaaa, AAA.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
Men who earn their living "by  I
ths sweat of the brow" need soms-   I
thing to keep their bodies supplied   ■
with moisture.    A little beer during the day it a real necessity with
the worklngman,
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is popular with aU classes.
Ask your dealer, or phone 76L.
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PHONE No. L.7B
A. E. SUCKLING * CO, VANCOUVER DISTRIBUTERS    ,
UNION HATS AND OVERALLS at
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618 COLUMBIA STREET
NEW WESTMINSTER, B.C.
THE POPULAR PRICED, EUROPEAN PLAN
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IS
little paint will make a '
Big Difference in the,
Appearance .of,your
House
Tbe value pf your house—your own
standing in the community—are often
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And a few dollars spent in painting your
house at regular intervals will go a long
way towards enhancing the value of.your
property and gaining added standing for
yourself.
Bapco Pure Paint
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paints—and far more lasting, and durable in
the long run.
BRITISH AMERICA PAINT CO.
LIMITED
VICTORIA
VANCOUVER PAGE SIX
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY.
.JULY 17, 1
Summer Race Meeting
ATMINORUPARK
OPENS
Saturday, July 11 th
Special Trains Will Leave New Granville St. Station at
r     12,12:30 -and every 15 minutes until 2 p.m. §§§§
Admission, $1.25
INCLUDING GRANDSTAND AND TRANSPORTATION TODAY , .JULY 17, 1914.
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
PAGE SETHI
VANCOUVER
City Market
MAIN STREET
i
PRESERVING CHERRIES ARE NOW
ARRIVING IN LARGE QUANTITIES,
ALSO RASPBERRIES, BLACK AND
RED CURRANTS, GOOSEBERRIES,
TOMATOES, RHUBARB, NEW LAID
EGGS, DAIRY BUTTER, NEW AND
OLD POTATOES.
Auction Sales Every Tuesday and Friday
OUR SALESMEN ARE AT YOUR SERVICE
DAILY FROM 7 AM. TILL 6 P.M.
SATURDAY IS OUR SPECIAL PRODUCERS' DAY
JOHN McMILLAN, Manager
-HSS
TMrfc^.
WORKERS UNION/
UNIO
JlsrAMP
licl
9UJ
Named Shoes ue frequently made in Non-
Union Factories—Do Not Buy Any Shoe
no matter whtt Its name, unless It bears a
plain anl readable Impression or this stamp.
AH shoes without the Union Stamp art
always Non-Union.
BOOT * SHOE WORKERS' UNION
IM Summer Street, Boston, Hut.
J. F. Tobln, Prat.   C, L. Bltine, Sso.-Trsas.
Brown Bros. & Co. Ltd.
Florists and Nursery Men
THRU STORIS IN VANCOUVER
N Haatinga at.      Phone aay. NS 401 GiaaviBa St       Rhans a»y. 17V
7t» Oranvllle at    Rhone aay. Nil
VICTORIA STOM, UI VIBW BT.
ORnmiouaia
Mat Ave..ana Main at Vlotoria, B.C.
none Fairmont IN.
Hammond, I.e.
I Dlstanao Phone IT
Ten Acre Farms at $30 Per Acre
Payable $5.00 Down and $5.00 Par Month, Without lntereat
Open meadow land situated In the fertile Bella Coola District, on
river ml lake tnd olose to two new railroads. Wagon road, telegraph
and telephone lines to property. Rich soil, spltndtd climate. Especially adapted (or mixed farming, chicken or hog ranching, Call or
wilt* for full particulars before all tracts are sold.
J. I. Eakin & Co.
SM Boldea aaiMlar
. lt Saatlafs atraot Beet
Tixooirram, a. a
Without  obligation,   plaaaa  mall
particulars of your tan-aero farma.
Nam.  ...
Addraaa
EVERY  UNION   MAN   IN  (VANCOUVER   -SHOULD    PATRONIZE
LABOR TEMPLE CLUB AND POOL ROOM
SPECIAL CONVENTION B.C.FEDERA-
TI0N0F LABOR
(Continued from page 3)
arguments first, then try to form a
plan of action,
On motion of Del. Rees, the motion
was laid on the table.
DeL Dykeman nfoved that a committee of five be appointed to bring In
some definite proposal on which convention could act.
DeL Pettigrew was of the opinion
that the matter should be thoroughly
discussed first so that the committee
would have something to guide them.
Del. Thomas said that he considered
a general strike was needed so that
the men who handled the coal on the
waterfront could be called out
Farrington Invited to 8peak
At this time. Frank Farrington, International board member In oharge
ot the strike, was Invited to speak. He
said, In part: "Three years ago the
miners of Vancouver Island began to
take steps to seoure the assistance oil
onr organisation. I was sent to look
over the situation and on my return
recommended that the U. M. W. of A.
should accede to their request,, and
that course was adopted. But the
powers that be determined otherwise.
As soon sb it was known that the
Island miners were, a part of the International labor, movement tbe companies began a settled policy of discrimination against them. This came
to a head when the men got together
to form plans for their protection.
Owing to them working on various
shifts lt was not possible for them
to all meet at one time unless they
took a day off, for that purpose, which
tbey did. When they went back to
work the following day they were told
to take their tools out of the mines
and were locked out. That policy Was
pursued ln aU' camps. The U. M. W.
of A. did not start the trouble. As a
matter of fact they were not prepared
at that time to make a move. They
wanted bigger membership before doing so. Notwithstanding that, the
International offlce of our union came
to their help financially and hss paid
a higher rate ot relief on the island
than has ever been given to any district before by the U. M. W. of A.
Afterwards a general Btrike of all
miners was called. It has been ssld
by Mr. Crothers, federal minister of
labor, that we did not ask the use of
the Industrial Disputes Investigation
act. That Is not true, and If Mr.
Crothers had been sincere he could
have used his powerful ofllce to prevent the strike continuing, but it has
since become plain why he did not At
the last session of the dominion parliament a telegram was produced from
Mr, Coulson, who was at that tune a
mine manager on the Island. That
telegram says that a board of Inquiry
would not be necessary as the men
could not secure the support of the
U. M. W. of A., and would have to
return to work, and that their appeal
for the Inquiry was only a desperate
move. The miners have Invoked
every Influence which might be expected to bring an equitable settlement, but without result Every influence of the coal companies, backed
up by the provincial and dominion
governments had used ln the effort to
defeat the miners.. Up to the present
they have been, defeated by political
power. If It were not for Chinese
labor and the prevention of picketing
the strike would be won by now. You
can and should proflt by their experience, to meet similar contingencies In
the future. We have nothing to be
ashamed of or to apologize for In this
strike. The U. M. W. of A. has paid
out $16,600 every week In relief to
the miners ot the island. If you feel
that you are In a position to bring
"IT MaKer The MouRtom
RAINIER BEER AGENCY
137 WATER STREET
LEE R. BARKLEY, Agent PHONE SEYMOUR 9288
SEAimiBREWING &MALTING CO.
Pitt Meadows Oa Wells, Ltd
—i--^—eammMmaemaaaaaaaaaaammmmmmaammmmmmmmmaaaamaaaaaamaaaaaamaam
SECURE A FEW SHARES IN THIS COMPANY
BEFORE IT IS TOO LATE
MORE THAN THREE HUNDRED PEOPLE VISITED THE WELL LAST WEES AND SAW A
SHALL AMOUNT OF OIL AND GAS COMING UP IN THE BAILER AS THE WELL WAS BEING
REAMED OUT FOR THE NEW STEEL CASING.
THE NEW CASING IS NOW* AT THE WELL AND IS BEING PLACED IN POSITION TO MAKE
THE WELL DRY,
REMEMBER THE DRILL IN WELL NO. 2 IS ONLY A SHORT DISTANCE OFF THE OIL
STRATA FOUND IN WELL NO. 1.
Dominion Stock and Bond Corporation
WINCH BUILDING
VANCOUVER, B.G
DOMINION BUILDING
this trouble to a satisfactory Issue for
the miners, do It But do not do anything to place yourselves In a similar
position."
General Discussion
Del. Foxcroft advocated a general
strike, wblch he said he had always
belteved was the right move to end
the trouble.
The motion to appoint the commit
tee was laid on the table.
Del. Fisher moved that a referendum, calling a general strike should
be submitted to the unions.
Del. Davidson seconded, not because he felt much good could oome
from It, but because he wanted to see
the oonventlon do something definite.
At this time the convention went
Into committee of the whole.
Del. Wilton said his experience ln
Australia had taught him that political action was necessary, that being
the method adopted there after the
general strike of some years ago had
proved a miserable failure.
Del. Slvertz did not think political
action alone, without Industrial organ
lsatlon, would solve the problem, but
felt that the miners had been right
ln wishing to take common council
with the rest of the movement
David Irvine, the treasurer in
charge ot the strike funds, was Invited
to take the floor and did so. During
the course of his speech he corroborated the statements of both Mr. Farrington and President Foster.
Letter from Imprisoned Miners
Seoretary-treasurer Wells at this
time read a letter from the miners
now ln Jail, calling attention to the
fact that their sentences had already
expired.
On. motion the secretary was Instructed to wire the minister of justice at Ottawa, calling his attention
to the position of the men tn jail, also
to wire Attorney-general Bowser requesting that action be at once taken
to release them.
The convention then adjourned to
meet at 9 o'clock Tuesday morning.
The whole of the miners' delegates
present arranged to hold a conference
among themselves on Monday evening.
Tuesday Morning Session
Upon the opening of the convention
Delegate Pettigrew said that the
miners had decided that they would
hold no meetings outside the session
of the convention. The convention
then went Into committee ot the
whole.
Delegate Thomas—The miners have
told us what is happening on the
island. We know that men, women
and children have been shot recently
ln Colorado, and the same class power
which Is responsible for that, will do
tbe same here. In my opinion we
have to choose between a general
strike, or, by our refusal to call tt, we
shall endorse the miners going back
beaten.
Del. Todd—This strike has failed ln
spite ot the splendid backing we have
had. It has been a strike of a section
of the workers, and has proved that
the sectional.method of striking is a
failure. Unionists are fighting unionists. Carpenters from Victoria are
building the new tipple at South Wellington. But If anyone here thinks
the miners are beaten, I want them
to know that we are not beaten by any
means.
Del. Naylor—Three weeks after his
election as president of the union,
the company commenced to discriminate against him. He was put In a
"place" in the mine where he could
not make wages. His case was only
one of many. When the strike started
the Chinese camo out also, but were
told by special police that they could
either go back to work or get out of
Cumberland. Tho chief of police told
him he would arrest all men found
ploketttng. He replied that It was
privilege of all British workers to
picket. Later, other excuses were
found by the police to stop plckettlng.
Strikebreakers were brougbt Into
Cumberland, and the union shipped CO
per cent, of them out again. He
could say, without tear of contradiction; that there were not more than
three white miners working ln Cumberland mines to-day. Referring to hts
arrest he said he was' not in Cumberland when the disturbance took place,
but pleaded guilty on the advice of his
lawyer because he was given to understand that by so doing, men who
wero charged with more serious offences would be treated wtth greater
leniency. He was of the opinion that.j
a general strike of all workers In
B, C. was necessary.   If It failed lt
MINARD'S LINIMENT FOR SALE
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COTTON'S WEEKLY — Best
Socialist propaganda paper ln
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yearj In clubs of four, 26 cents
for 40 weeks.
Address, COWANSVILLB, P.Q.
would   show   the   need   of   other
methods,
Del. Shenton submitted tbe following statement to show the approximately correct state of affairs In the
Island mines: '
Total number of men employed by the Western
Fuel Co, before the strike
for the year 1912. .,.     1,351
Employed ln and around the
mine at present        746
Total tonnage for the year
ot 1912 ,.".'.:  676,797
Tonnage to-day at the rate of
746 tons per day at the rate
of 301 days to the year  224,546
The Canadian Collieries during year 1912, normal ton- J
nage per day ..        2,898
At Cumberland at highest
point since the strike ....      1,200
At Extension .. ..........       300
Loss to the company per
day ts  ....*.  tons      1,398
At South Wellington mines 364 men
were employed before the strike, and
the tonnage per year waB 139,000.
The highest point reached since the
strike Is 211 men per day with 376
tons output. In concluding his statement lie made an Impassioned appeal for a general strike.
Del. Cropley, of the Vancouver
Molders, said that If any member of
their union was working as a strikebreaker, he would either have to stop
doing so or be expelled from their organization.
Del. Robertson said that the offer
received recently from the mine owners, through Premier McBride, meant
unconditional surrender, and was an
Insult to the common Intelligence of
any labor community. Like the preceding speakers he favored a general
strike.
Del. B. Kaarlo, from Squamlsh, said
no,white men were working there
now, but Chinese were.       '
Del. Moffat was of the opinion that
more effective measures were needed,
and said that the miners would light
without finance If necessary. He had
seen many strikes, bnt never one in
which suoh high relief pay had been
given. The miners of the United
States had behaved magnificently to
them. This strike had shown that
long strikes were no use. Other
methods were needed,
Del. Dykeman said that last fall the
United Brotherhood of Carpenters ln
Victoria' had offered to go on strike
any time to help the miners. They
had voted for that by 154 votes to
four.
Del. Johns said he was working at
Jingle Pot mlne< under the agreement
which the company had signed with
the miners. He was convinced Premier MoBrlde wished to defeat the
miners so that he could drive all
socialists off the Island. The men at
Jingle Pot were ready any time to
throw up their agreement and come
out with the rest of the miners.
Del. Pettigrew during the course of
a comprehensive speech ln which he
traced the course ot the strike since
Its commencement made a strong appeal for a general Btrike.
President R. Foster said that the
men who had broken away from the
union, to go strike-breaking, were
chiefly English-speaking men.
Del. Robertson pointed out that the
miners had dealt fully with the situation and he felt that more expression
of opinion was due from delegates of
other unions.
Dels. Fisher and Thomas, of the
Longshoremen, spoke against the
practice of unions having agreements
and again favored general strike.
The committee of the whole then
rose and reported.
Credentials were received for W. 10.
Walker,  of   Vancouver   Cooks    and
Walters, and for V. R. Mldgley,   of
Vancouver Lathers.
Convention adjourned until 2 p.m.
Tuesday  Afternoon  Session
With the opening of the session,
Del. Fisher Introduced the following
motion:
Whereas—It Is contended by this
convention that the failure of the
miners to win this strike would mean
the downfall or organized labor In
B. C.; therefore be lt
Resolved—That the executive of
the federation take a referendum vote of all organized labor
In this province at as early a
date as possible for the calling of a
general strike."
It was decided on motion that the
vote should be taken by roll-call.
Del. Fisher, speaking to his motion,
said he had listened attentively to
opinions of miners and gathered that
ln order to win their strike they needed more help. Conditions were very
bad, he knew. In Victoria men were
living on one meal a day. He added,
tn parenthesis, and with a very significant glance at the press table—"I
said one meal per day, not three." It
was practically Impossible now to get
a Job In Victoria unless you belong to
the mllltla or the conservative party.
Del. Davidson, who seconded tho
motion, said he did bo with a mental
Follow the Lead of the
International Investor
There Is no more enterprising capitalist than the Brltlih Investor. His country is the one free market of the world, and
lt has largely educated him out of financial prejudices. He Is
always ready to buy Bound Oovernment and Municipal Bonds
anywhere. And the French Investor, while said to be more
conservative ln his operations, follows the same course.
The local Investor can hardly do better than follow the lead
of these successful financiers.
B. C. Municipal Seeurltes are growing In favor. We have
the exclusive control of Selected Bonds yielding up to seven
per cent.   Consult the Manager of our Bond Department.
Canadian Financiers Trust Commny
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reservation, and more because he
wanted to hear the motion discussed
then anything else. The motion was
not good enough. It was only like
whipping the devil round a post. Delegates should speak and vote as they
were prepared to do in their unions.
If they thought a general strike was
expedient and necessary then let
them go to their unions and say bo.
Del, Rees, International executive
board member for the Crows Nest dls-
trlct, believed In the principle of a
referendum vote. But he felt that the
question should be thrashed out In
convention. He had been through the
strike In the Crows Nest pass, which
lasted eight months. He had also seen
other long strikes, but never any good
that came out ot them. Was this talk
of general strike the last straw? Was
there not another method more effective? In his district while the miners
had every sympathy for the men of
the Island, yet the Industrial conditions prevailing would not permit of
them striking. He did not believe
that the unemployed and the unorganised could be relied upon to help.
And at the present time they were far
more numerous In B. C. than union
men with Jobs. The fact that they
were not organized proved their
apathy, and he did not think men on
one meal a day could be expected to
win any strike. He considered the
workers would have as much chance
against drilled and armed mllltla ns
lie woud In the fight ring with Jack
Johnson. He concluded by saying it
was not a question of what they
wanted to do or would like to do, but
a question of facing- the Industrial
condition of the province as It Is today and In his opinion It made a general strike Impossible.
Del. Slvertz at this point introduced
a lengthy amendment, which In substance was: That the unions should
be sppealed to for funds, also that the
Trades and Labor congress of Canada
should be asked for (2000. The money
to be used to carry on a campaign ot
education and organisation which
would be entrusted to four members
elected by the convention, and they
wbuld work under the direction of the
executive board.
Del. Pattlnson opposed the amendment and wanted more Immediate
action.
Del. Slvertz said the federstlon was
only a voluntary organization and had
no power to call a strike. Ho pointed
out that unions had agreements and
policies which made their constitutions such ss would take years of
educational work to change. No
matter how desirable It might be a
general strike at this time waa not
possible owing to the Industrial con
dltlons prevailing In the province.
Del, Oray said tho miners of the
Crows Nest pass had on agreement
which was not very effective, and ln
many cases their executive board had
'found it best to let local unions have
little strikes of their own from time
to time to bring them the results
which their agreement sometimes delayed. The time for agreements bad
gone by. Many men in bis district
owed more money to the stores tban
' they had drawn in wages. He wanted
a general strike.
Del. Martin of Fernle said the general strike was the last desperate resort and he did not think lt could
Bucoeed.
Del. Mldgeiey was surprised the
executive of the federation had not
come out with some definite proposal.
It the call for a general strike which
was Issued lsst October had been allowed to go to the membership without opposition from miners' officials
he thought It would have brought
better results. In his opinion conditions were more favorable then, but
as they are now lt would be useless
to attempt a general strike. Delegate SIverts's proposal was the only
practical one. We needed more education to get to the roota of such
trouble as this. He would tike to see
the trades congress contribute the
money asked ss he felt It was n
shame they Bhould bave so much In
the treasury. The miners were Influenced too much by mere sentiment.
What had to be faced was hard, cold
fact, unpleasant though It might be.
The only general strike which bad
been successful was In Belgium, and
that took a whole year to prepare.
Frank Farrington was given tha
floor and during the course of a
lengthy speech reviewed the strike
and the policy ot the IT. M. W. A. ln
general. He said their strength had
been built up by the policy of having
agreements, and he was opposed to
the general strike ss he always had
been. The Isws of his organisation
were not made by officers, or any one
part of tbe members, but by the whole
400,000, Any section of the union
which was willing to abide by the
decisions and laws laid down by the
majority would be welcome as a part
ot their union and would receive their
financial support. But no part would
be permitted to break their laws and
still enjoy the support of their International treasury.
Convention adjourned till 9 o'clock
Wednesday morning.
Wednesday Morning Session
Dol. Cropley roso at the opening to
again announco that molders would
not allow any of their members to
work as strikebreakers on the Island.
Del. Naylor said that in spite ot
all which had been said, the miners
had more than a fighting chance. Ha
quoted figures from the Canadian
Mall ot last April llth containing an
account of the meeting In London of
(Continued on pais i) PAGE EIGHT
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FRIDAY. JULY 17, 191
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(Continued from page 7)
PATRONE LABOR TEMPLE IPOOL ROOM
the  Canadian Collieries   (Dunsmuir)
Ltd.
Tbe report ot June 30, 1913, said,
"Owing to the strike on the company's property we have been unable
to earn more than working expenses
and have a debit balance for the year
of $843,100."
Del. Wells said the miners position
was due to apathy ot workers. The
executive could not go further than
the unions could go. There were 70
per cent, unemployed in the building
trades. In a general strike It was
very necessary to have the support
of all men in the transport Industry.
Railroad brotherhoods had shown no
Interest or taken any active part in
the movement of the province. It
was no use depending on the unem<
ployed. A strike was only effective
by men stopping work, but unemployed were not working. He moved
an amendment: That the executive of
the federation be Instructed to take
a referendum vote ou the question of
a general strike, and that they be
further instructed to raise funds ln
suoh manner as they deem best to
carry on an education campaign be
fore and during the time the referen
dum Is being taken. And this convention to elect three members of
unions affiliated with the federation,
to carry on the educational campaign
under the direction of the executive.
The executive to call the Btrike, if
adopted by the referendum vote, at
such time as they consider advisable.
Del. Pattlnson made the following
amendment: Whereas, the mine workers on Vancouver island for 21 months
and 14 months, respectively, have
been striking for the right of organisation, and Whereas the government
has assisted the coal operators to help
defeat the miners by various means,
such as non-enforcement of the Coal
Mines Regulation act, the Deception
of Workmen act, and the new order-in-
councll, and by sending special police
and militia to act aa scab herders,
and whereas the miners have been
backed by a powerful organisation,
and if they should suiter defeat there
is no other organization that can
stand against the combined efforts of
capital and the government. There
fore be It resolved that this convention assembled advise labor in the
province of fi. C. to engage in a general strike, and further that four men
be sent out by convention to propagate the idea of a general strike and
on an educational tour.
Del. 1-attlnson made an emphatic
speech ln-support ot his resolution.
Credentials were received for Carl
Jofgensen from New Westminster
painters.
Del. Foster said only four or five
delegates outside the miners had
spoken on the question. The information which Mr. Farrington had of the
state of affairs on the island was given
to him by tbe speaker, and he characterised as false any contradictions of
the information given to the convention by Bro. Farrington. " I am on
the Island all the time and not one
act have, I performed which has not
been endorsed by the miners," said
the speaker. "I am aware," he continued, "that the whole membership
on Vancouver island is in favor of
this proposition —tbe taking of a
referendum vote on a general strike
in B. C."
Delegate Foster then turned to the
necessity of drastic action to help the
miners on Vancouver Island. It was
not to drag down others that the
miners advocated a general strike, but
tb help the situation and the movement sb a whole.
Bro. Farrington'was given the privilege of the floor for fifteen minutes to
answer statements whioh had been
made which he claimed reflected upon
his Integrity. "It has been said," he
commenced, "that this difference of
opinion ean be settled on Vancouver
island. It cannot be settled on Vancouver island," he claimed. "The
statements have been made here before delegates who will carry the Information back throughout the pro
vince and must be answered here."
It has been said that I didn't say to
the miners at the Nanalmo convention what I have said here. It Isn't
true. I told the miners sb frankly
what I have told you. It has been said
that the Information about the condition of affairs is not correct. I
stand on that Information again this
morning."
Del. McEwen again urged, as far as
he waa personally concerned lt did
not matter which way the vote went,
as he expected to leave the country
In three weeks.
Del. Knudsen, one of the vice-presidents of the federation, said that,
much as he would like to see lt otherwise, he did not think the call for
general strike could be of any sue
cesB.
The question then being put, the
substitute motion of Del. Pattlnson,
calling tor a referendum vote to be
taken on the question.ot a general
strike, was carried by 48 ln favor to
36 against. somewhere around
twenty delegates did not poll their
votes owing to absence from the convention or other reasons.
Del. Wilton's resolution was then
taken up as follows:
"That the B. C. Federation ot Labor pledges Itself to do all ln Its power
to defeat the McBride Bowser administration at the next provincial election, and that lt organize and carry
on an educational campaign to secure
the defeat of every conservative candidate put ln the Held and thus strike
an effective blow at those who have
proved themselves to be the enemies
of labor,
Wednesdsy Afternoon Session
Upon opening of the session Del.
Fisher asked lt the Wilton resolution
was ln order.
President Watchman ruled that it
was.
Del. Rees moved to table the resolution, and upon vote lt was-thus
disposed of by 44 ln favor to 18
against.
Upon motion of Del. Davidson convention went Into committee of the
whole to consider ways and means of
putting the decisions of convention
Into practice.
Del. Ellesmore moved that the four
organizers sent out to address unions
on the general strike proposal should
be members of the U. M. W. .A.
Del. Samson moved that one be
elected from each of four districts.
Del. Martin moved that they be
elected from the whole convention.
Del. Martin's proposal was carried.
The following were nominated to
go out as organizers: O. Pettigrew, C.
Pattlnson, J. Reece, R. Foster, C.
Slvertz, J. L. Martin, O. Dykeman, J.
Goodwin, J. Robertson, J. T. Shenton, J. Naylor, H. Knudsen, 1. Fisher,
A. S. Wells, A. Watchman, W. Sy
monds and O. Thomas.
Dels Watchman, Wells, Foster, Slvertz, Symonds, Naylor and Knudsen
declined nomination.
Ont the ballot being taken the voting was as follows: Dykeman 48,
Fisher 23, Pattlnson 45, Martin 20,
Goodwin 30, Shenton 41, Robertson
36, Thomas 28.
O. Dykeman, C. Pattlnson, J. T.
Shenton and J. Robertson were
elected.
A motion was made and lost tbat
[.delegates be assessed (2 each to defray preliminary expenses of organising.
Vice-president Bancroft ot the
TradeB and Labor congress of Canada, was asked what financial assistance might be given by the congress.
He was not prepared to make any
statement or promise until he had
consulted the rest of his colleagues
on the congress executive.
Del, Thomas moved that the
Trades and Ikbor congress be asked
to donate 81,000.
'Del. Foster moved that the Miners'
Defence committee ln Nanalmo be
asked for a loan of (500. This being
added to, the motion the joint proposal was carried.
Del. Foster moved tbat the .organizers be paid bare expenses. The
motion carried.
Del. Burkhart took the floor and
made an earnest appeal to the delegates to patronize the union label
and the four organizers were. instructed to bring this to the attention
of the unions they visited. The control of the organizers was vested In
the executive of the federation.
Vice-president Bancroft was called
up to speak and delivered a splendid
address dealing with the new Workmen's Compensation act in Ontario,
which has become law largely
through his efforts. In Ontario the
workers deolded four years ago to
devote all their efforts to securing the
act. A commission waB appointed, at
the request of the organized labor
movement, to go fully Into the whole
question. After four years the bill
became law. It was based on the
principle that Industry should bear
the cost of compensation. The chief
opposition came trom the private in
Burance companies, and British Columbia workers would flnd that they
would meet with same opposition.
Vice-president Bancroft left no part
of his subject untouched and at the
conclusion of his address a standing
vote of thanks was extended to him
by the whole convention.
Wednesday Evening Session
President Watchman called the
convention to order at 7.45 and announced that the question of unemployment and Asiatic immigration
had still to be disposed of.
Several resolutions were submitted
reviewing and emphasizing the deplorable conditions prevalent throughout British Columbia, and asking for
various schemes for the alleviation of
the unemployed problem.
Delegate Goodwin, Cumberland, deprecated palliative measures and said
the workers must wage war against
the wage system.
Del. Naylor, Cumberland, said if re
solutions would solve the labor problem, with unemployment lt would
have been solved long ago.
Del. Pettigrew, Nanaimo, said tbe
sooial ownership of the means of life
was the real solution, but meantime
something must be done if the present
standard of life were to be even
maintained. He advocated more agitation and protest meetings.
Del. Robertson, Nanalmo, referred
to the government Immigration policy
which had flooded the labor market to
its present deplorable state. Unemployment could not be solved under
capitalism. The workers must organize flrst, lessen the hours of labor
and make ready for mass action.
The motion submitted by Del. Martin, Victoria, carried,
Asiatic Immigration
Del. Sampson, Vancouver, dealt
with the question of Asiatics, scored
the Inconsistencies ot the labor press
and unionists themselves. Even the
Vancouver Island miners themselves,
ln days gone by, had assisted ln the
introduction of Orientals.
DeL Naylor, Cumberland, had been
Instructed by his local to vote for
Asiatic exclusion.
(Del. Pettigrew, Nanalmo, said lt was
the business men who were now
anxious to see the Hindoos and Asiatics excluded.
Del. Head, Wellington, looked upon
the Asiatics as a menace to working
men In British Columbia.
Del, O'Connell, South Wellington,
submitted a resolution asking the government to place a tax upon the employers of Asiatics.
Del. Wilton, Vanoouver, reviewed
the attempts ln the. past to have the
government pass exclusion laws dealing with Asiatics and charged the
legislators with hypocrisy. If the
workers really want to effectively deal
with the question, unionists themselveB must be disciplined. No use
ssklng the government to do anything.
IA flne should be Imposed by unions
upon members patronizing Orientals.
Del. Fisher, Victoria, pointed out
that Chinese owned a large number
of hotels and boarding houses, though
operated by whites. If the fines could
be collected the Federation would
soon be a wealthy institution.
Del, Martin, Fernle, felt no headway was being made and thought discussion should cease.
Del. Foster, Nanalmo, expressed
himself as being in favor of the
workers telling Premier McBride to
go to blazes, and that they themselves take such action as would contribute to that end.
Del Rees, Fernle, urged that no
matter where the orientals resided
the problem remained the same. The
co-operative commonwealth would
not come to Canada alone. Orientals
Bhould be taken Into our unions and
the same pay demanded for them.
Del. Davidson,   Vancouver,   said
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Q. W. ISAACS
Ex-presldent G. W. Isaacs, of the local
Barbers' Union, eleoted delegate to the
Indianapolis convention of the Journeymen Barbers' International Union oi
America, which convenea on October
6th next.
the question must be dealt with politically, and that the Federation had
refused to do so.
Del.   Dykeman,   Victoria,   said
Chinaman was not to blame for being
a Chinaman.
Dels. Paget and Slvertz, Victoria,
spoke, the latter referring to the fact
that 2132 Chinese had been admitted
into this province since the passing
of the federal order-in-councll (Dec. 8,
1913), a further contribution to McBride's boasted "White B. C." The
next move must be emigration of
whites from fi. C. in search of jobs,
Which, indeed, was already taking
place.
Del. Martin, Victoria, felt that the
unions must soon make a more progressive move to meet present-day
conditions. Exclusion would not
solve the labor problem.
Del. Robertson, Nanalmo, said the
Orientals should be organized. They
were of use to the employers because
they were cheap; they were of service to the government because they
had no vote.
DeL Cochrane, Nanaimo, said the
Orientals were non-assimilative.
DeL Thomas, Vancouver, saw nothing the convention could do ln the
premises.
Del. Pattlnson, Nanaimo, moved
that the convention go on record as
lh favor of total exclusion of the
Asiatics. This was seconded in many
places. In support ot his motion,
Del, Pattlnson said tbe employers had
Introduced them; they had no vote;
and they were lowering our standard
of living. The motion of reaffirmation
of organized labor's many such do
clarations during the past twenty-five
years, was carried almost unanimously.
A motion prevailed Instructing the
secretary to publish a record of the
roll-call vote taken during the day In
The B. C. Federatlonist and the District (Fernie) Ledger.
Secretary-treasurer' Wells urged
the delegates to press for further affiliations and support for the federation.
Vice-president McVety said the federation should at once begin an agitation and campaign for a new workmen's compensation act ln B. C.
fashioned after that of the new act in
Quarto;
President Watchman took advantage of the closing moments of the
convention to review the proceedings
of the three days' sessions and urged
the delegates to carry out the expressed wishes of the majority. He
asked the unionists of B. G. to keep ln
touch with the secretary-treasurer, to
support their official paper, The Fed
eratlonlst, and whenever they had a
suggestion to offer to either, to assist
the workers ln the battle for industrial freedom, to do so unhesitatingly.
The business bf the convention being concluded adjournment sine die
took place at 10 o'clock.
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EMPLOYMENT WANTED
-BY-
A Big Healthy, Hearty, Happy Able-bodied Three-
pound Package of
Royal Crown
WASHING
POWDER
COMPETENT TO DO ALL KINDS OF CLEANING: WASHING DISHES A SPECIALTY; NEAT, PLEASANT AND OF
GOOD CHARACTER; CAN REFER TO EVERYBODY WHO
KNOWS ME. WILL NOT "SLEEP IN," CHEW GUM OR
"TALK BACK." WAGES NO OBJECT. I WANT A PLACE IN
YOUR HAPPY HOME. MEET ME AT THE GROCERY
STORE.

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