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The British Columbia Federationist Aug 28, 1914

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Array THE BRITISH
INDUSTRIAL UNITY':
SIXTH YEAE.
STRENGTH    y>.
■No. 171 tf
OFFICUL PAPER: VANCOUVER TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL AND B. C. FEDERATION OF LABOR.
FEDERATIONIST
TION OF i.annn
tf.
[A Story of Triumphant Pro
gress—Total Membership 433,224
■Labor in Throes of Election
—Takes Place September 5th
ST:
Vancouver Wants
Convention—Unpreced
ented Unemployment
VANCOUVER. B.C., FRIDAY, AUGUST 28, 1914.
POLITICAL UNITY!  VKJTOKTI
SIX PAGES
OF mfM CONGRESS OF M Governmental Conference at
[Special Australian Correspondence]
SYDNEY. N.S.W., Aug. 6—Before
the great maritime strike that extended from one end of the continent to
the other In 1891 trade unionism in
Australia was nearly at the zero
nark. After that strike lt suddenly
dawned on the few unionists of this
land that some move should be made
to further the movement. From that
Idate, trade unionism became part of
the living of the working man. In
1901 there were 97,174 bona fide
unionist* ln Australia. That number
rose to 175,000 ln 1906, and ln 1912
there were 433,224 enrolled as mem
bers of unions. To-day the number
la well over the half million mark,
ind, like the sun, we are still1 rising.
While trade unionism scarcely
loubled Itself between the years 1891
ind 1901 lt Increased four and one
lalf fold between 1901. and 1912. Wbat
vill a further. 10 years bring forth?
U the end of 1912, the last year of
ivailable records trade unionism was
epresented throughout Australia as
inder: New South Wales, 192,626
nembers; Victoria, 110,557; Queens-
and, 44,768; South Australia, 37,336;
Vest Australia, 33,282; Tasmania,
,656—making a grand total of
33,224 members.
Alongside of this lt Is as well to
lonslder the political advance of the
abor party ln Australia, since tbe
wo work band ln hand—the unions
h the Industrial field and the labor
iarty In the political field. In 1891,
s an outcome of the great strike, we
ot 40 members ln the various parlla-
tents ln Australia. In 1901 there were
5 labor members In the state parlla-
nents, and as federation was Just
ormed we got 24 ln the federal par-
lament. In 1914 we have 182 mem-
ers ln the state parliaments and 66
a the federal parliament The federal
•rllament was constituted ln 1900 as
, result of federation ot tbe states,
nd has a membership ot 111 mem-
ers—75 ln the house of represents-
Ives and 36 In the senate. In 1901
re got 24 In the lower house and none
i the senate. This year we have 29
sbor men ln the upper house out ot
f membership of 36, and 37 In the
!wer house out of a membership of
. One man short In the lower house
Bt ub tbe reins of government last
jiar, despite our overwhelming ma-
wlty ln the upper house,  which  Is
Iso elective.   This Is one ot the pe-
jdlarltles   of   the   distribution   of
Dundarles   In   Australia.     In   the
ate houses In 1891, after the strike
it two states had labor men—New
puth Wb'es and Victoria.     In 1901
re states   had labor   men ln their
irllaments—Tasmania    not   getting
id labor men till 1903.   Today there
■e 182 men of the labor party ln the
ate houses.   New South Wales   has
I, Victoria 36, Queensland 25, South
ustralla 17, West Australia 33   and
ismania 15.   Ever since labor heme a party ln 1891 lt has had the
stlnotlon of never going back. Each
sctlon had added to Its numbers—
uoh to the consternation of the tory
rtles and the Plute newspapers.
Today the great battle cry at   tbe
leral elections Is preference or no-
eference to unionists.     September
i next will tell us the result.   It Is
glorious achievement on the part of
9 Australian labor party to be able
assert Its strength over an entire
atineht after 20 short years on this
e great   point   of   "unionist   vs.
lb."   It Is something we are proud
-and lt represents the work of 23
ig years on the part of many   and
iny a brave advocate of the work-
! man.   And we have won through
1 through.   If ever crusted torylsm
doomed to any land lt la doomed
re ln Australia.   And since the lab-
ng man pays all the time In any
intry, surely lt Is not too much to
t that   he be allowed   to have a
ire In the legislating of that coun-
Labor Movement Reviewed
—The Classes Control
Governments
W. R. Trotter, executive member of
Vancouver Typographical union, left
for the east on Tuesday afternoon, as
representative of the Trades and
Labor congress ot Canada. Organiser Trotter will make his first stopover at Calgary. From there he will
proceed to Brandon and Winnipeg,
stopping for some ten days at the
latter point. While at the 'Peg he will
attend the International Maintenance-
of-way Employees' convention ln particular and visit the local unions on
behalf of the congress In general. J
From Winnipeg Mr. Trotter will go
to 9t John, N.B., and will assist In
representing Vancouver Trades and
Labor council at the annual convention which opens September 21st
Unprecedented unemployment
throughout Canada and the present
war crisis, although a hardship upon
the prospects and success of the coming convention, yet It will be the
most Important ln the history of
Canadian labor. That Vancouver will
secure the 1915 convention seems
certain. Winnipeg, Toronto and other
large Industrial centre unionists concede that Vancouver should have the
convention and they will work to
that end. In fact, to be in the fashion,
all labor bodies of International Import must come west next year. The
pace has been set by the Typos, and
that should help some, though local
"nut-splitters" will scarcely concede
the contention.
: Labor Movement
If ever there was a    time in the
history of the labor movement when
lt should   be   thoroughly   solidified
and unified lt Is now,   Any working
man or woman  if sense   will admit
this fact.   And all organised labor ot
the dominion should see to lt that the
approaching St. John's convention of
the Trades   and Labor congress   of
Canada shall be made the strongest
and the beat ever.   There Is no seeming end to the work which ought to
be done.   Among tbe numerous questions   that will   be discussed    and
aoted upon Is that of voluntary arbitration ln labor disputes, compulsory
voting, public ownership of all franchises, abolition of child labor, prohibition of prison labor ln competition with free labor, and a host more
of Important matters.   In pointing out
the huge load of responsibility that
unionists must   carry during   these
crises, they need only to look Into
history to learn that ln some form or
another regulation of labor, whether
by   kingly   authority,    ecclesiastical
laws, custom or down-to-date formal
legislation   In   the Interests of   the
community Ib no doubt aB old as the
most ancient form of civlllzaltlon.
In the Beginning      "
From the  very beginning ot  the
world   down   to the   present   time
mighty and opulent empires similar to
that of Germany, whloh Is now being
crushed by Its own fatal boomerang,
have risen and held sway over the
peoples of the earth and then have
fallen Into decay; but the transition
of the laborer—the "Drother to the
ox"—has not changed.    Men In all
ages were forced to band themselves
together for    self-protection, spiritually,   socially,   morally,    financially.
The masses of the people have never
been able to gain any protection for
themselves when   battling alone   ln
disunited or separate groups, as   lt
were.   Protection of home and country can   only be obtained   and sustained through a combination of the
without   unity—of   action-
tor offensive and defensive purposes
—the weak   fall before   tbe strong.
They are persecuted and driven from
their homes; the country becomes a
prey to the oonquerors.   In this age
of rapid development, neither kind-
A conference, called by Premier McBride, assembled in the parliament buildings,
Victoria, last Tuesday morning at 11 o'clock. The purpose of the conference was, to
discuss the deplorable industrial and business conditions which now prevail throughout British Columbia. About eighty persons were present, including the mayors of
Vancouver, Victoria, New Westminster and Nanaimo, with the reeves of the various
lower mainland municipalities, business men and merchants, a banker, editors and
managers of newspapers.     >
Officers of organized labor present were: President A. Watchman and Secretary-
treasurer A. S. Wells, of the B. C. Federation of Labor, and Jas. H. McVety, president
of Vancouver Trades and Labor council.
The scene in the executive chamber, when the premier called the gathering to
order, was not uninteresting. Fifty business men, each with his business in one
hand and a flag in the other, can be calculated at any time to furnish interesting matter for the observation of any one possessing a spark of the saving grace of humor,
and the scene did not fall short of expectation on this occasion.
Seated at the back of the premier, and in the shade, was the attorney-general,
W. J. Bowser, surveying the assembly with an expression of Machiavellian solemnity
on his face.    Most of the other members of the government were also present.
/In VancouverV
V   Clty.M.W  )
$1.50 PER TEAR
WUl Meet Next Tear in
August at Los Angeles
California
Ex-President   Lynch  Receives Ten Thonsartd Dollars—Resolution re War
Premier McBride, in opening   the
conference, said that his object   ln
calling lt was to give publlo officials,
representative citizens, business men
and others an opportunity of meeting
for the purpose of taking counsel together concerning the economic conditions   prevailing   throughout   the
province, as the result of the general
depression which   had   been further
aggravated by the   European   war.
There was no reason, In his opinion,
for any one to be unduly alarmed at
conditions .which, in view of all circumstances, were not so very   bad.
The main thing   necessary   was to
keep calm and have courage and con
fldence that the province of British
Columbia   would   pass   successfully
through this economic crisis   ln Its
history.   He regretted to report that
the war had had a very depressing
effect upon the metal mining Industry
which, with the    exception    of one
small mine, was entirely closed down.
The mines up coast and those of the
Boundary   and   Kootenay   districts,
along with the   smelters,   had shut
down, with tlje result that many men
had been thrown out of employment.
This was unfortunate, but we had the
comforting assurance that metal mining was no longer-a speculation, and
that lt was now definitely established
that British Columbia had real mines,
which could be worked when normal
conditions returned again.     It was
very regrettable that the lumber Industry was In such a slack condition,
and that lumber camps were   closing
down and th* loggers going Into the
cities.    However, he had bean   assured that work on the Pacific Oreat
Eastern was to be continued, and the
Canadian Northern railway   officials
hoped to have their line completed ln
the province this year.     Sir Donald
Mann was expected In Victoria   on
the morrow, although he bad not succeeded ln raising money ln London
whither he had been for that   purpose.   The fruit crop tbls year was
very good, but the government   had
not decided to buy 300,000 boxes   of
apples for the troops;   Indeed they
had not made up their minds as   to
what the province would do ln  that
respect, out his hearers could   rest
assured that the right thing would
be done In   due course.   , Although
this was an "oft" year, the salmon
catch was very   heavy   considering,
and lt might be that a present   of
canned salmon would oe offered to
the home government.   The premier
did not mention that the salmon Industry was In the hands of Orientals,
but there was so many matters to be
mentioned   that he   doubtless   overlooked the point. He remarked, however, that at times like this, lt was
the custom to abuse the government
first and then the banks.   But he felt
sure that the public spirit and patriotism of the bankers would rise to the
ocoaslon, and they would give every
assistance to enable the community
to tide over this period of depression.
Finally, he would again Impress upon
all classes ln the province to have
courage and confidence, and In the
end all would come out right.     He
then Invited expressions   of opinion
from those present.
Mayor Stewart of Victoria said he
considered lt very Important that all
public works now under way be continued, as ln his city they had a great
many unemployed and expected to
have still more as the winter came
on. He approved of the premier's
views, and hoped that every support
would be given to the government,
and every confidence placed In their
ability to pilot the province to ultimate prosperity.
Mjayor Baxter of Vancouver said
he had come there under the Impression that the government would have
some plan to offer to the meeting. He
was surprised and disappointed to
find that such was not the case. He
hoped that with care and rigid economy, Vancouver would be able to
look after at least the bare necessities
of Its residents, but the closing down
of mines and lumber camps was driving a great number of men into the
city who could not possibly be fed or
given work. In his opinion lt was
useless to talk to men ln such a plight
about "confidence,'' they were hungry
and they must eat, lt was hot advice
which was needed, but food. He had
hoped the government would have
submitted a plan for land clearing
and settlement, and If no money was
available that an issue of government
script would have been advised which
could have been redeemed when the
financial situation improved. Throughout bis speech it was plain that the
address of the premier had not made
any favorable impression on him.
Mayor Oray, of New Westminster,
spoke of the growing number of unemployed ln that olty, and said that
he could not see how they could provide work for all.their citizens during
the coming winter, much less the
large number yho had come ln from
outside sources.
Mayor Planta ot Nanalmo referred
to the exceptionally difficult situation
there, which In Ills opinion was due
to the recent strike, and generally
slack condition* He stated that the
miners could' not be all employed
again before Christmas at the earliest
as the strike had resulted ln some of
the mines having fallen Into a condition of neglect, which would take considerable time to set right He scored
the banks for what he considered
their grasping methods, and cited Instances where men carrying on business In a small way had been
strangled. He knew that befd)'e
the war broke out there was a general
tightening up on loans, but since the
war had started he had Been a letter
from the head offlce to a local bank
manager, telling him to call In all the
loans he possibly could, and to ab-l
solutely refuse any application for
new ones.
Mr. J. Rogers, president of Vancouver Board of Trade, considered that If
a policy of land settlement had been
laid down years ago, the provinoe
would now be more self-supporting
and distress would not be so acute.
Mr. Hayward, M.P.P. for Cowichan,
and chairman of the recent agricultural commission, wanted to see land
settlement carried out an extensive
scale, but he considered the greatest
obstacle ln the way of such a scheme
was the high wages required by work-
■"-"   to   British  Columbia.     Cheap
labor, and plenty of lt, Was ln bis estimation the first thing required, before land could be cleared. It Was
ridiculous to think of paying $2.50 or
(3 per day wages for land clearing,
Mr. Cope, president of th* B. C,
Manufacturers' association, also said
that high wages were responsible
for much of the present trouble In
the province. That, and the fact tbat
local publlo bodies and private per
sons would not Insist on buying good*
made ln British Columbia, was, ln bis
estimation the main cause of the depression. As long as manufacturers
here had to compete with the low
wages and sweat-shop prices of the
east no progress could be made.
Wages would have to some down and
merchants should be patriotic by
purchasing only goods made ln B. C.
Mr. Campbell Sweeney, president
of the Bankers' association, said that
the banks were not sqeezlng anybody, but they had to adopt a careful
policy to the Interests of customers
and shareholders. He made a notable
admission. Everybody knows that tf
a bank were called upon by all Its depositors at one time to repay their
deposits, it could not do lt. But lt is
not often that the president of a
bankers' association can be heard to
say, as Mr. Sweeney did, that no bank
tn the world could meet Its obligations if all depositors made their demand at one time. He did not think
a moratorium was needed, He had
listened to the address of the premier
with much pleasure and he hoped all
would adopt the advice given, to
have courage and confidence which
would carry the province safely over,
Premier MoBrlde then spoke a few
more words intended to comfort the
VANCOUVER ISLAND SETTLEMENT
Following Is the proposition accepted by the Vancouver Island
miners:
The cbmpanies will employ all men in their employ at beginning of the trouble, without discrimination and as rapidly as
physical conditions of the mines will permit.
The management further agree that so long as the best Interests of the properties under their control may he fully conserved
they will not employ any new men .until all of their former employees who desire work shall have been reinstated.
The miners Bhall have the right to belong to the United Mine
Workers of America If they so choose and the companies shall not
discriminate against any of the men because of their affiliation
therewith; this, however, Is not to be understood as a recognition
In any respect by the companies of the United Mine Workers ot
America.
In order that organized labor may understand the true status
of affairs on Vancouver Island respectfully request secretaries of
all unions to Inform their membership that on account of the conditions of the mines that hundreds ot our men are still unemployed,
and In all probability lt will be the.first of the year before all
former employees will be reinstated. Official notice will be published when men are all reinstated and organized labor will be
well advised to stay away trom Vancouver Island until same
appears ln the official labor, papers of this province.
ROBERT FOSTER,
JOHN  MCALLISTER,
Secretary-treasurer District 28, U. M. W. of A.
Nanalmo, August 25, 1914.
red, home or country Is Immune from
the ravaging Instincts of the classes.
Classes Control
Through the power of the government, which the classes control, Immense tracts of land (ln this province
alone over 5,000,000 acres have been
filched from the people), valuable deposits of Iron and coal, large sub
sidles and priceless franchises are
taken from the masses and handed
over to the classes. Through the
power of the law, which they have
subverted to tbelr own ends, it is im-
uosBlble to get Justice against them
ln the courts of the land. Through
the power of the church, large universities, colleges and schools, which
they have lavishly endowed, the
preachers and professors, and the
teachers of learning and culture teach
that which Is Inimical to the masses
and ln favor of the classes. Through;
the great power of the trusts—the
producer and consumer pay heavy
tolls levied on them by robbers, or, j
to be more polite, tbe "lords of fin- j
ance." Self help Is the keynote of
unionism.
Let organized labor In all western
Canada be fully represented at the
St. John's convention of the Trades
and Labor congress of Canada which
meets on September 21st next. ;
PRE8. R. FOSTER
AND CONDITIONS
ON THE I3LAND
Robert Foster,   president   of
District 28, United Mine Workers of America, was ln Vancouver this week.   He stated that
up to the present time, not more
than fifty of   the miners  who
have been on strike bave been
re-Instated.   It Is believed that
there are between   three hundred   and   four   hundred   nonunion miners, of Austrian and
German nationality,  who were
shipped   Into   the    mines   as
strlke-breaktrs by   the   operators during the course of the recent trouble.   No action, «■ tar
as Is known, Ib being taken to
remove them. Oreat delight was
given to the Nanalmo minera on
Monday night when during their
meeting at which 700 were present, J. J. Taylor, vice-president
of the district, and Sam Outhrle, president of Ladysmlth local unton, arrived   from   New
Westminster having been    released from prison that   day.
After a welcome marked by unbounded enthusiasm   they proceeded to their homes at Ladysmith, where on the following
night, a concert and dance were
held to celebrate their release.
At   South   Wellington   where,
owing to   the recent   fire, so
many of the miners and their
families   havo   been   rendered
homeless  and  destitute,  much
suffering Btlll prevails.      Very
few of the little homes of the
miners were covered by Insurance, and all their hopes of rebuilding   depend    upon assistance from outside sources.
Never once, during the whole course
of his remarks, did he mention the
working class or their condition. He
had the Impudence to ask for "no
publicity," and then straightaway
abused tbe confidence by delegating
the business of reporting the meeting
to the editor of ."The Week," one of
his conservative newspapers. It was
suspected by sundry of the shrewd
ones that the gathering was really
Intended to be the firat meeting of
the campaign for the next provincial
election. If so, It was a complete and
signal failure. Everybody, even conservatives, were disgruntled at tbat
farce of a conference,
GEORGE PATIENCE
An Employee of B. C. Electric Dies at Hospital
A sad case of suicide occurred on
Tuesday, 25th Inst, when Qeorge
Patience, 2243 Oxford street, s
patient at St. Paul's hospital, ob
tabled a razor from his suit case dur-
Ing the absence of his nurse and cut
his throat, dying almost Instantly.
He was suffering from typhoid fever,
and at times was very despondent
and became delirious, but, ln tbe
opinion of the attendants, his delirium
was not sufficiently grave for him to
be placed ln restraint for his own
protection. The late Mr. Patience
was about 35 years of age and unmarried. 'He had resided In the city
since 1909, and had been an employee
of the B. C. Electric Railway company for the past two years. He was
a member of the Electrical WorkerB'
union, No. 213, and was well-known
and popular with his fellow workmen.
The funeral will take place next
Tuesday.
A Puff
Anyone desiring to patronize a top-
notch hair and scalp specialist, or a
toupee and wig-maker, Is recommended to see Prof. Clemens, Seymour
street, corner Hastings (upstairs). An
expert chiropodist Is always In attendance.
The sixtieth annual convention of
the     International     Typographical
union, held at Providence, R. I.,  I*
now a matter of hlitory.   Th* attendance of delegatea numbered over 800,
with three time* that number, Including many of the pick ot America's
womanhood,   as visitors.     At   the
clambake, given  by the Providence
union, there were some 2200 seated
In the seashore pavilion.   A  great
deal of routine business wa* handled
by the convention having to do with
questions affecting the printing trade.
For  some years   the I. T. U. ha*
been paying from headquartera  the
per capita tax  upon  lt*   Canadian
membership   to   the    Trades   and
Labor congreBs of Canada.     Under
the provisions made by the congress
at the Ouelph convention every international union is entitled to one delegate at the annual conventions, provided the delegate be a member In
good   standing of a local   union in
Canada.   So far the I. T. U. had not
availed    itself of   this opportunity.
Through a resolution Introduced by
Delegate   Pettipiece   the   executive
council was empowered to appoint a
Canadian delegate to the congress for
the next two years, after which time
the representative Is to be elected by
the Canadian membership.    This to
correspond with   the  four delegates
always elected by the Typos, as delegates to the American Federation of
L,abor, for legislative and trade purposes.
Los Angeles won out for the 1915
convention city by a vote of 166 to 113
over Washington, D.C, much to the
satisfaction of western delegates.
The sum ot $10,000 was Voted practically unanimously by the convention
to ex-President Jas. M. Lynch aa
''compensation" for fifteen years'
service.
Probably no other labor organization bas had as many sessions upon
the question of "priority" as the I.
T. U., and the Providence convention
will help to keep up the average. The
laws committee finally submitted a
substitute for many resolutions which
will provide for local option ln thej
matter, the old law to remain and be
worked under where desired. But as
an additional safeguard against
hasty action the question will be submitted to a referendum vote of the
membership for final ratification or rejection.
President-elect Marsden O. Scott of
New York, who will asBume office as
the successor to President Duncan,
was a welcome visitor at the convention, while Vice-presidentelect Walter Barrett proved a popular mixer.
W. B. Prescott addressed the delegates, asking for continued support
of the membership In the development of technical education. First
Vice-president Charles Hertensteln,
St. Louis, was a busy officer and was
frequently called upon to officiate as
chairman.
Toronto and Montreal were the
only two eastern Canadian cities represented. Winnipeg contributed two
delegates, while Vancouver had the
only delegate from. Western Canada
west of Winnipeg.
The Providence local certainly did
Itself proud In the matter ot entertainment, and the Boston and New
York locals overlooked no opportunity to make lt pleasant for the
visitors and delegates.
It was a real convention.
Reiolutlon re European War
Whereas—There Is at present a
general war going on on the great
continent of Europe In which seven
of the countries of that continent
are engaged; and
Whereas—That war must result In
the loss of hundreds of thousands of
lives, and has up to the present time
resulted ln a great loss of life, not to
(Continued on page 8)
I
PRIEMNI
Oovernment Asked to Bava
Homes of the People
First
Delegation of Trades Congress Want Industrial
" Commission Appointed
Get on the Voters' List
Workers are reminded that the municipal voters' list In Vancouver city
closes for the year on September 30.
If there are any tenants or owners of
property who desire to get their
names on the list they should call at
the city hall and register at once.
On August 20th member* of th*
executive council of tha Tradee tnd
Labor congreu ot Cauda waited
upon th* Ottawa government to dl*-
ons* th* preient labor criils In Canada. It was pointed ont to Premier
Borden ud hi* cabinet that many
big Industries ot the country war*
shutting down, adding to a fearful on-,
employed problem: now existing. It
wa* suggested by the delegation thu
the government appoint an Induitrlal
commission to Immediately find ways
and mean* to deal with the unemployed problem, The premier in*
earnestly Interested In th* luggM-
tlon. Another conference will b* held
after the session I* over. Following
I* a copy of the full statement as presented by Messrs. Fred Bancroft
James Simpson, and P. M. Draper
which clearly sum* up th* situation
ln a practloal way, and will h* road
by everyone with Interest:
To the Hon. Premier ot the Dominion
of Canada, Sir R. L. Borden, and
Honorable Cabinet i Minister* of
the Dominion Oovernment:
Oentlemen: In behalf ot the Trades
and Labor congress of Canada, we
desire to bring to your attention, so
that you may   tak* action   at thla
special   session   of parliament,   th*
needs of the working class   of  thl*
country.
It I* useless to point out the serious
nature of the unemployed problem in
Canada at present aa you, we believe, are fully aware of It Tou ar*
also aware of the closing down of Industries, and restriction of operations, which makes a very bad situation an appalling one, throwing .
thousands of wage-earner* out ot employment.
Therefor*, on* of tha great questions, we believe, you ahould deal
with is the protection ot the Interests of the working class. The government has already taken iteps te,
protect the great flnanolal Interest*
of the Dominion of Canada. Ton
have made legal tender the note circulation of the banks, Legislation I*
proposed to extend the credit of the
banks enormously. You are about to
suspend the redemption of dominion
notes for gold.
Tbe maximum protection Is to be
given to the great financial Interests.
What About the Common Peoplef
A great many of the workera never
earned enough to obtain a chance to
purchase a home. Many, by struggles
tbey themselves could tell the best
have purchased homes, by a deposit
of cash and assumption of mortgages.
Their only means of revenue is tbe
selling of their labor power. They
pay Interest and principal out of ths
wages they earn. Now big Industries
are shutting down, adding to a fearful unemployed problem existing.
Failure of the workera. to be able to
sell their labor means tbey will be
unable to meet the payment* on
mortgages. The loss of the home Is
Inevitable If the great flnanclal Institutions and others take advantage
of legal rights.
Inasmuch as the government la
protecting the great Interests to an
enormous extent, we desire that the
protection of the government shall be
also extended to the common people
whose interests are as dear to them
as the Interests of the great corporations to the shareholders. We ask
that you afford that protection now
to the common people, at tbls session.
Or else does it not mean tbat tbe
protection of the government to the
great flnanclal Interests In this crisis,
Is a bulwark trom which unscrupulous ones can prey upon the common
people.
Already the press is rumoring foreclosures and commenting unfavorably
on  Buch actions, the credit of the
Continued    on Page 8,
"Billy" Armstrong, ex-presldent of
Vancouver Typographical union, has
returned to the city after a brief sojourn to Kamloops, B.C.
Women workers at Birmingham,
Eng., must sew 384 hooks and eyes
on a card to earn a cent.
The Trades and Labor council will
meet next Thursday evening. Important business.
Oreat Britain has 70 women paper-
hangers and four bricklayers.
THE PRICE OF WORKERS' STUPIDITY
It only needs a personal trip from the Atlantic to the Pacific
coast at this time to convince any one that the appeal made by
the executive council of the Trades and Labor congress of Canada
to the federal government Is Indeed timely. Not only bas tbe
serious problem of unemployment been Intensified by the unsettled
conditions consequent upon the declaration of war in Europe, but
the crops on the prairies of the Canadian west are anything but up
to the mark; especially is this true of tbe territory between Medicine Hat and Swift Current. What tbe farmers In that neotlon are
to do Is a problem that must lie met before the coming winter Is
over. With thousands of workmen being laid off In the Industrial
world and the Increased price of the necessities ot life, and the
prospects of these conditions being further aggravated It is small
wonder that thousands of men are ready and willing to enlist us
soldiers, aside altogether from patriotic grounds. They reason
that It Is safer to eat and fight than to stay home and probably
starve to death. Old Satan himself could not have conjured a
social system bettor destined to bring about conditions that would
make such n choice inevitable. War may be all that Is said of It,
but peace and the political stupidity of the workers for the last decade has also Its price—and the people of western Canada are
surely paying It. PAGE TWO
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY. AUGUST 28, 1914
New West Manufacturing Co., Ltd.
MANUFACTURERS OF
FURNACES, STOVES and RANGES
ATTENTION, UNION MEN!
Buy that new stove now.   It's such a satisfaction to a housewife
to have a good stove on which to cook.
We would like to have you examine our line.
All union made; remember tbat.
2102-llth Avenue WeBt     VANCOUVER, B. 0.
PHONE: BAYVIEW 248
Mr. Union Man
Are you eating Union-made Bread, are you
helping to maintain the Union Standard of living by
using goods produced by Union Labor?
BREWER'S XL BREAD
has the Union Label on every loaf, and in quality
U   and flavor it is unexcelled.
Phone Highland 573 and we will call at your
house.
BREWER'S XL BAKERY,
Corner 4th Avenue and Commercial Street.
Latest Addition to Vancouver'* Up-to-Date Hotels
Hotel Regent
Absolutely Fireproof.   Local and Long-
Distance Phone in Every
Room.
Abundance of Light and Heat Cafe in Connection
RATES $1.00 PER DAY UP
Attractive Rate* ft Pcnuicit
Gat***
COTTINGHAM k BEATTY
Proprietor*
L?U L.**MUb, Proprietor
EUROPEAN PLAN
HOTEL EMPRESS
IMBT W Hutu* St E, Vuc.v.r, B. C. BSaWStiS
I Hot ud Cold Water lo
Bvery Room, f 50 Rooms
Coutctai with Baths.
PENDER HOTEL ..-^3^*-
'   M nm> ammama waat rUtsailJ* ht Day eSttVa-
THE NEW ENGLAND HC—y"^^*™$«
Wc. uu'wmdy, ** u*.    IM SlYMfluw *TM1T I    trinslenta
Free Sua te an* from all Trains an* Beats.
IlfsTC I      IDVIMf* ° C"' <-*—- A... mi Kudus Strml
flUlJClLs   IKYlllU   MePHAIL A MACKENZIC. ProfriMm
European Plan.
Hot ant Col* Water an* Telephone In every room.   Rooms with bath*,
slnris or en suite.
BRITISH COLUMBIA LAND
l( rf   £ 1        '      *   \   '. ('   ' S      <   '   r    , ,,.    .      .,        .... .... .
Splendid opportunities in Mixed Farming, Dairying,
Stock and Poultry.   British Columbia Grants Preemptions of 160 acres to Actual Settlers
FREE
TERMS—Residence on the
land for at least three years;
improvements to the extent
of $5 per acre; bringing under cultivation at least five
acres. ■
For further information apply to
Deputy Minister of Lands, Victoria, B.C.
Secretary, Bureau of Provincial Information, Victoria
The Quality of Our Service, the Quality of
Our Goods, Is Always the Best
The reason our busineu Is Inornate* Is Sua to the faot that our bualneaa polloy la correct. Wa adopted tha poller of Informing tha publlo
through the medium of the preaa as to what our charm would be for a
aomplate funeral. Including Hearse. Carriage for Family, Cera of Remain.,
Waion Servioe, anl all our personal service for
$65.00
Oomplete Funeral
166.00
We are llvln* up to our advertisement to ths letter. Thla haa establlah-
ed confidence with tha public ln us, and for that reaaon alone wa ara aue-
oeaaful, an* wa Intend to continue aa we are doin* now.
Mount Pleasant Undertaking Co.
Cor. Eighth Av«. and Main Street Phone Fairmont 119
Commodious Chapel Free to All Patrona
Formerly Center A Hanna'a Branoh
A. C. Millar, r raa.
P. H. Orcle, Manager
BASEBALLrVancouver vs. Taeoma
Aug., 31, Sept., 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 7
WEEK DAYS. 4:00 p.m. SATURDAY, 3:00 p.m.
PRODUCE I SELLING
Bartlett Pears Arriving in
Large Quantities From
Gulf Islands
Good  Supply of  Peaches
Will Be on Sale Next
Week
At Wednesday's sale of fruits and
vegetables at the city market, Main
street, the prices remained low,
Bartlett pears are now coming on
the market In Increasing quantities
(rom the Gull' Islands principally.
Plum* are Just about finished and
prunes ue beginning to arrive. At
this time everybody Is asking for
peaches and a supply of this fruit, for
preserving, will be on the market in
about a week.
The prices obtained were as follows: Potatoes, 76c. to, 90c. per sack
of 100 lbs.; Okanagan onions $1.40
per crate or sack: Bartlett pears,
No. 1, 11.25 per crate, fer
preserving, $1.00 to SI.10; prunes,
65c. crate; damsons 80c; Victoria
plums, 60c; blackberries, |1.00;
Bradshaw plums, 60c; apples, per box
No. 1 Cranberry Pippins, |1.20, No. 2,
$1.10; 3, 85c; Duchess, 1, 95c; No. 2,
90c; No. 3, 85c; loose pack, 60c. to
75c; crab apples, half boxes, 60c. to
60c; boxes, $1.00; tomatoes, No. 1
hothouse, $1.00 per crate, No. 2 hothouse, 90c, outdoor 60c. to 75c; eggs,
40c. to 45c; buter, dairy, 30c, creamery, 36c; bay, $13.00.    ,
Moulders Out of Work
Some Idea of the depressed condition of business In the United States
and Canada in the iron trade Is found
|Jn the faot tbat the I. M. U. Issued
76,262 out-of-work stamps during the
first six months of 1914. This Is
19,074 more than were issued during
the entire year of 1913.
Frisco Bricklayers
Union bricklayers ln San Francisco,
Cal., are paid at the rate of «iy2 cents
per hour. That is the result of having an effective organisation at their
hack. Without the B. & M. U. to hold
them up, they would be drawing somewhere around 40 cents per hour.
That's where unionism comes in.
Now it is announced, by long-distance phone, the forest fires are
working havoc In the vicinity of
Parm's potato patch. Is there no
haven of rest tor him that would See
from the worries of financing a labor
paper or Joining the Irish Booslleers?
One-half the people of western Canada are busy trying to collect debts
from the other half, the former being
ably assisted by as unscrupulous a
bunch of patriotic shyster lawyers
and collectors aa ever went unhung.
The more extensively The Federatlonist is read the greater force lt
will become ln your olty for the good
ot the citlsens at large.
MINARD'S LINIMENT FOR SALE
EVERYWHERE.
TC     BUY ONLV
lo,     BREAD  STUM.
"•      INS THIt LABEL
The Allied Printing Trades
of th. City et Vancouver, raepttt-
fully request
Merehanta,   Manufaoturara,   Lawyers,   Fraternal   Societies,   Clubs,
.Unlona, Etc., to have lha
UNION LABEL
Put on thalr Printing, suoh as Or-
oulara, Briefs, Records, Books,
Posters. It la a guarantee of au-
perlor workmanship, This label la
endoraed by all trades and labor
unlona In vanoouver an* vicinity.
VANCOUVER    ALLIED    PRINTING TRADES COUNCIL
' F. R. Flaming, aeeretary,
Room 212        -        Labor
VOTES FOR WOMEN
By MRS. J. A. CLARKE
At the Exhibition
With the approach of the exhibition
the various suffrage leagues have
awakened to the opportunity of advertising their oause through this
tource. Space has been obtained at
the fair grounds for a booth from
which the different leagues will assist
in giving out literature. All friends
of the cause should visit this booth.
Will Help Local Council
The various societies affiliated with
the local council of women will assist
that body ia the lunch room run by
that organisation. Tuesday will be
the day allowed to the suffrage societies to aid. Friends of suffrage
Bhould see that they have their lunch
where they can be waited on by workers In the cause.
P. P. E. League
Two Important points were discussed last Friday by the Pioneer
Political Equality league at Its regular monthly meeting, namely, (1) the
league's work at the exhibition and
(2) what part the league should take
ln regard to alleviating distress
caused by.war.
The league decided to aid in the
distribution of literature from a booth
on the fair grounds. It also decided
that as the members were already
working along different UneB to relieve distress, that the league Would
put Its room tn the Empire blook at
the disposal of those engaged In relief
work. '
Mount Pleasant
A business meeting of the "Mount
Pleasant Suffrage league was held
at the home of Mrs. Robertson, on
Monday afternoon. The three most
Important matters discussed were (1)
the union of the leagues; (2) what
could the league as an organization
do to alleviate distress, and (3) the
arrangement of a new constitution.
Several cases of distress have come
to the notice of the league where justice and not charity was needed, and
by broadening the constitution the
league would have power to act After
the business was disposed of the hostess served tea.
The next meeting of the Mount
Pleasant league will be held ln A.O.F.
hall, corner of Main street and Tenth
avenue, on Friday evening, 'August
28th.    All welcome.
. Women Will Vote
One of the great arguments against
woman suffrage has been that women
would not vote If they were enfranchised. Even If thlB were true lt
should not be a reason for withholding
suffrage from women. In this city
last year not fifteen per cent, .of the
men voters went to the polls to vote
for mayor; also ln the last provincial
election less than fifty per cent, of
the men went to the polls. Of course
there are reasons why a great many
working men cannot get to the polls,
so are readily disfranchised, but there
are a great many men who do not
take enough Interest In public affairs
to vote; yet the law does not say that
they shall be disfranchised.
Message to Queen
The International Suffrage alliance
sent the following message to
Queen Wllhlimlna of Holland,
Which, unfortunately, arrived too late:
"As representing the women ot twenty-six countries, we appeal to your
majesty, as the woman ruler ln whose
country Is the centre of peace movements, to take steps to enable the
powers, now on the brink of a terrible
war, to settle their, differences by
peaceful methods. Ab guardians of
the race whose .homes must suffer,
whose children will be taken from us,
we appeal to your majesty, as a queen
and a mother, to give ub your help
ln averting this terrible war. Will
your majesty graciously be pleased to
receive a deputation to lay our case
before you!"
Allied   Printing  Tradea  Counoll—P. R.
Fleming, P. O. Box II.
Baken—j.   Blaok,   Room   tSf,   labor
Temple.
Barters—a F. Burkhart, Room 101, Labor Temple.
Bartendera—Oeo. W. Curnoch, Room
201. Labor Temple..
Blackamltha. — Malcolm Porto, View
HIU P. O.
Bookbinders—Oeo. Mowat, 111 Punlavy
avenue,
Boilermakers—A. Fraser, 1111 Bowa St
Brewery Workers—Frank Graham, 2211
12th Avenue West.
Brieklayera—William 8. Dagnall, Room
216, Labor Temple.
Brotherhood of Carpenters Dlatrlct Council—JM. Bltcon, Room 209, Labor
Temple.
Hod Carriers, Builders and Common Laborera—John Sully, Room 220, Labor
Temple.
Clgarmakers—Robt. J. Craig, oare Kurts
Cigar Factory, 72 Water Street
Cooka, Walten, Waltreaaea — W. E.
Walker, Room 202, Labor Tempi.,
Electrical Workers (outside)—W. V.
Dunn, Room 207, Labor Tempi.,
Electrical Workera (Inside)—Room 207;
P. L. Eatlnghauaen.
Englneera—L. Dawson, Room 216, Labor
Temple.
Granite Cutters—Edward Hurry, Columbia Hotel.
Garment Workera—Miss MoRao, Labor
Tempt..
Glaaaworkera—Charlee Roberta, Labor
Temple.
Groundtnen's  Union  (I.  B. E.  W.)—R.
1   McBaln, oare of B. C. B. R.
Horaeahoera — A. c MaoArthur, City
Heights, B.C.
Lotterosrrlera—Robt. Wight Dlstriot 91.
Lathers—Victor R. Mldgley, Box 1044.
Loco. Firemen and Engineer.—James
Patrick, Ills Homer atreet
Loco. Engineers—A. E. Solloway, 1092
Pacific.   Tel. Sey. II71L.
Longshoremen—Geo. Thomaa, 141 Alexander Street.
Machinists—J. H. MoVety, Room 211,
Labor Tomple.
Miners, W. F. of M.—R. P. Pettlplece,
Room 217, Labor Temple.
Musicians—H. J. Brasfleld, Rooms 29-20,
Williams Bldg., 411 Granville atreet.
Marbleworkers—Frank Hall, Janes Road,
B. C.
Moldera—D, Brown, 141 Broadway West.
Moving Ploture Operators—L. E, Goodman, Room 100, Loo Building.
Photo Engravers—A. Kraft, Dominion
Engraving Co., Empire Block.
Painters—J. Train, Room 103, Labor
Temple.
Plumbers—Room' 311 Labor Temple.
, Pressmen—P. D. Edward, Labor Tempi..
Plasterers—John   Jamea  Cornish,   1101
I    Eleventh Ave. East.
Pattern Makers—J. Campbell, 4210 Argyle Street.
Uuarry Workers—Jame. Hepburn, oar.
Columbia Hotel.
Railway Conductors—O. W. Hatch, 711
Beatty street,
Railroad Trainmen—A. E. MoCorvlll.,
Box 243.
Railway Carmen—A. Robb, 420 Nelson
Street.
Will Buy Street Railway
By a vote of 10,597 to 9,409 the
voters of Toledo, Ohio, declared ln
favor of Issuing bonds to the amount
of $8,000,000 for the purpose of taking over the local street car company's railway and. light and power
plants. The election was a spirited
one, and the trade union movement
led the fight for municipal ownership.
The British Trades Union congress
convention has been fixed for September 7, at Portsmouth, Instead of
Southampton, as originally Intended.
Canada will be represented this year
by Alphonse Verville, M.P., who was
elected delegate at the last convention of the Trades and Labor congress
of Canada, held In Montreal last Sep
tember.
Superior
Printing
AT MODERATE
PRICES
Telephone:
Sey. 7495
LABOR TEMPLE
The FEDERATIONIST
can supply all your Printing
needs. No Job too large or
too small. First-class workmanship, good ink and high-
grade stock have given our
Printers a reputation for
SUPERIOR PRINTING
Union Work a Specialty.
Our Prices are right and we
deliver when wanted.
TRADE UNION  DIRECTORY
OHBBl,
Seamen's Unton—Cor. Main and Haatln
L.  Tu:
s
uctimsii a u niun—t_or. MUD tUI
Structural  Iron   WorkerB—W
Room SOI, Ltbor Temple,
btonecutters—Jamea Rayburn, P. O. Box
1047.
Sheet Metal Worker*—B. C. Dougmn, No.
S, Fifteenth Ave. Weet
Street Railway Employees—A. V. Lofting. SIIS Trinity Street
Stereotypers—W> Bayley, care Provinoe,
City.
Telegraphers—B. B, Pepptn, Box 488.
Trades and Labor Counoll—Qeo. Bartley,
Room 110 Labor Temple..
Typographical—H. Neelands, Box II.
Tailors—C. McDonald, Box 608.
Theatrical    Stan    Bmpl
Martin, 1ST Prior street
Tllelayers   and   Helpers—Evan Thomas,
Labor Temple.
Upholsterers—A, Duthle. 1011 Homer St.
liBOX   OQS.
Employeea—Gordon
WHENORDERINGASUIT
tic* that
thlsTJn-
lon Label
I* Bew**
In the
Pookets.
It*tand*
for all
tbat
Union
Labor
Stands
for.
UNIOI^TAMPI
11*211
BOOT*
A*n>
VANCOUVER
City Market
MAIN STREET
OKANAGAN APBICOTS, PEACHES, PLUMS,
TABLE AND COOKING APPLES, NEW LAID
EGGS, DAIRY BUTTER, DRESSED POULTRY,
DUCKS, NEW POTATOES, VEGETABLES.
Auction Sales Every Tuesday and Friday
OUR SALESMEN ARE AT YOUR SERVICE
DAILY FROM 7 AM. TILL 6 P.M.
SATURDAY IS OUR SPECIAL PRODUCERS' DAY
JOHN McMILLAN, Manager
Named Shoe* are frequently nude ia Non-
Union Factories—Do Not Boy Any Shoe
no matter wbat It* nam*, unites lt bear* ■
plain and readable Impression or this stamp.
All shot* without th* Union Stamp are
alwaya Non-Union.
■OOT A SHOE WORKER*' UNION
]|| Summer Street, Boston, Mu*.
3. P. Tobln, Pr**.   0. L. Blaln*, lM.-Tr.aa.
Brown Bros. & Co. Ltd.
Florists and Nursery Men
THUI ITOM* IN VANCOUVER
« Hsetln*. It      Nasi t.y. ta 4*1 OnsnflU St
IN Oranvlll. *t.    ">h»n. My. NI*
Mien. ley. IW
ncrpau STona, lu vnw art..
__ list Ave. ea* Mala St
r*h.n. Fairmont IM.
OMBNHOUSM
VlotorU, a. a.
Abbotsford  Hotel
921 Pender St. West Phone Sey. 6860
Fireproof Vancouver, B. 0. European
Rates $1.00 a day up
J. M. McLUCKIE, Proprietor. First-class onu in connection __
EVERY  UNION   MAN   IN   VANCOUVER   (SHOULD   PATRONIZE]
LABOR  TEMPLE  CLUB  AND   POOL ROOM]
^^^^^M^w^^\
PHONE
Seymour
9288
"•*'*>*•*■ "">-'- **
WESTERN CANADA LIQUOR CO.
LEE R. BARKLEY, Agent
137 WATER STREET OmCIAL PATHI VANCOUVOt
T*ADfS AMD LA|OR COUNCU
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
omciH. ntv
|IXTHYEAR.   No. 177.
VANCOUVEB, B.C.,xmmAX> AUGUST 28, 193,4.
SIX PAGES
jTalTtSSr)  $1.50PB$YEAB
OF
FAU. BOOTS
FOR
WOMEN
$5.00 and $6*00
values to sell for
$3.25
There's a clear saving of $1.75 and $2.75 on
every pair you buy. Thetoots are American manufacture, and come in styles suitable for dress and
street wear. Every shoe is perfect, properly -made
and well finished, guaranteed to give the same satisfaction as though you were paying the regular prices
of $5.00 and $6.00 a pair for them, Choose from
Uppers of gunmetal calf,'oravenette, dull kid and
1 patent leather* with hand-turned and Goodyear welt
soles, and French, Cuban and Spanish heels. All
sizes. $5.00 and $6.00 values.   Special, $3.25.
[1^1 Oh^ButJsonsBauCompany.
r-Vj-ainii      m!TUa *"*  ■"■■'■■•-^■«'«'«««-'      ~n'
GEORGIA AND GRANVILLE STREETS
'_    "Work with the President and
the President works with yon"
J. LECKIE CO., LIMITED
'SHOE
MANUFACTURERS
DERBY DAY
SATURDAY, AUG. 29th
MINORU
PARK
The Biggest Race of the Meeting
A One Mile Handicap for three-year-olds
RACES START DAILY AT 2.30
Special Trains Leave New
Granville St. Station at 12,12.30
1,1.30 and 2 p.m.
W* manufacture tvtrjr kind *(
work shoe, tnd specialize in lines
'or miners, railroad contraction,
jogging, etc.
VANCOUVER  -   -   B.C.
Ladies free every day except Saturday
I EUROPEAN WAR
t
Then Will It Be the Death
Struggle of Modern
Oapitaflanj?
People's  Sympathies Are
With England and
Her Allies
[By Dr.. W. J. Curry]
Karl Marx told us that "capitalism
came In reeking with blood and
dirt" and lt appeara that the heist I*
about to go out ln the same condition.
Something over a year ago in the
"Sooial Democratic Items" I quoted
trom Pro*. Qeorge D. Heryon, who,
writing from Italy, stated than an
European war would Boon mark the
end of tjhe, present social era. At
that time, it appeared that,the International | revolutionary movement
would prevent this by calling a general strike; however, Geo. D. Her
ron's prediction has been verified.
This proyes tbe helplessness, ot the
majority when opposed by the men
who operate the powers ot state. A
doien m*n to-day, with a couple ol
maxima, j could conquer thousands
armed with primitive, weapons.
Reason and history should In time
sllenoe those Impetuous Individual*
who repudiate tbe need ol political'
action, and trust in what they call
"direct action," "economic organisation," "striking on the job," etc,, to
usher In .an Industrial republic. But
Herron's views are well worth reproducing, and the writer's comments
have a direct bearing on the titanic
struggle now on.
Soclsl Democratic Items
!  (Ju«e 12, 1913)
Qeorge D. Herron, writing ln the
Coming Nation of May 17tb ot last
year, predicted that Europe was not
tar from the bloodiest warfare, of the
ages. He believes that lt will, however merge into the social revolution
in which; capitalism and the ruling
classes will be overthrown and the
workera conquer the world. He says
"Germany holds the key to the present European situation. The rest of
Europe is waiting for Germany to
move amj, as a capitalist power, it is
necessary tor Germany to expand;
nothing else can save her from collapse. It is certain she will Boon put
heT strength to the task; it is impossible for her to draw hack or
muoh longer delay. Her dilemma
offers her the choice between war and
bankruptcy. Of course, as a socialist
republic, she would bave no auch
dilemma, but as a capitalist power
she is bound to ohoose between expansion and collapse of her military
and industrial Bystem. Germany's
first enemy Is France, as France Is
the banker of Europe and la determined to reduce Germany by economic pressure. Then there Is England, an axplolter of the world also;
England Is resolved that Germany
shall not expand, and Germany can
only expand by possessing some portions of the earth already accupled
by England. This struggle, with its
probable European catastrophe, Is
entirely unnecessary. We ahall have
done overestimating the capitalist
brain ln one day and Bhall begin marvelling at capitalist stupidity, just as
the dlplomaoy ot tbe world Is now ln
its tottering dotage, so Ib the capital-
let system approaching lta period of
senility. It Is only by a vast Imposture and hypnosis that we are led to
believe that the Industrial and political world Is being managed by
brain. The sympathy and hope of
the socialist oan only be with the
workera of all nations. We can only
hope that when the empires fall upon
one another the workers will rise
against them and sweep them away.
It Is the socialist alone that can save
the world from a new series of dark
ages. The day of opportunity approaches with alarming rapidity. Are
we socialists ready for the hour?"
[George D. Herron represents the
statesmanship of the new social order
which Is rapidly developing.]
The Bail* of Imperialism
"Even If the ruling class of today
are ln their dotage they know Instinctively that their rulerahlp rests
on fraud and brute force.. The great
masses of people are deluded through
a prostituted press, through Intellectual toola of the rulers.  When rulers
A Sensible Merchant
Bear Islsnd, An*. 21, 1903.
Mlnard's Liniment Co., Limited.
Dear Sirs,—Tour traveller Is here to.
day and we are getting a large quantity
ot your MINARD'S LINIMENT. We *nd
It the best Liniment on the market
making no exception. We have been In
business 13 years and have handled all
kinds, but have dropped all but yours;
that sells Itself; the others have to be
pushed to get rid of.
W. A. HAOBRMAN.
la ihe heart of ihe retail district.
firepmol and n*dem in tveiy respect.     „
unexcelled.   European plsn, $1 lo $3 ptr dty.
FREE AUTO'BUS MEETS AU. TRAINS. Ow*d -
tpmled ty   Tin Pmvinciil Holtli Cnnusr, Unfed.
HOWARD | SHCCH4K tmim
and empires and social systems can
only endure through fraud and force,
It proves that their days are numbered. We have only to review the
history of Home and those empires of
the past to realise that fact"
[Professor Herron apparently failed
to consider the for** which Is today
making for universal peace. Thla is
growing solidarity of the working
class, a clasa which does the fighting
and pays tbe coat]
"The rulers of to-day do not become
targets for Catling guns. They find It
safer and cheaper to hire Working
class patriots to .kill and be killed.
The fact is, however, that the worker, stupid a* he 1*. does not to-day
take to slaughtering his brother* on
this battle-field ln the Interest* of hi*
masters as cheerfully as he used to,
and tikis I* why wp see frantlo flag-
waving and why we hear so much
Of lmeprlallsm. In fact, war between
nations la becomlig more difficult
everyday. In 190 i, the worker* of
Norway and Swede i were ordered to
■boot one another to settle a dlapute
between the rulen of their nations,
but they refused to| fight."
Militarism Destroys Itstlf
The force* ot Gei mtny and Austria
are so nearly bah seed by England
and her allies that whatever happens
the powers of miltarism In Europe
iwlll be practically destroyed. The
countries engaged' vill be financially
ruined, In faot, be tore the war they
were staggering unler national debts
and threatened by revolution, and
this Is what precipitated the conflict,
and the social democrats were about
to capture tbe German government.
What will happen then when this war
fever has burned Itself out and the
Inevitable reaction takes place? And,
as Herron says, this, will be the opportunity ot the socialist, and the opportunity for a practical, constructive
statesmanship; ln fact, production for
us* must begin II civilisation la to be
saved. Starving men and women
and children cannot survive on bayonets and lead prescribed by militarism, or even on oharity, and production for use brought In by the workers Is socialism. The coming months
will mean a terrible struggle In practically all lands, bit history shows
that humanity haa not yet reached
the age of reason and can only learn
life's great lessons by bitter and
bloody experience.
Sympathy with England and Aide*
Our sympathies can only be with
England and her allies. Should Germany triumph a military despotism
would rule the world If that were possible, England, Belgium and France
sought no war, and, social democracy
was gaining ground ln those countries
every day. We cannot forget moreover, that while the leaders of social
democracy In Germany was shot for
not going to the front to slaughter the
men with whom he had no quarrel,
while - Vandervllle, leader of the
socialists In Belgium, was made
minister ot state,
' Rlfts Th'the Cloud
It does appear as If the European
tragedy now opening up is to be the
preliminary act ln the world-wide
social revolution which will usher in
sn era of peace and transform slaves
and their keepers Into free and useful citizens. This fact Is doubtless a
satisfaction to many of our comrades who have been forced to the
front In Germany and Austria, or who
fight as defenders In the army of the
allies. Although there wll be doubtless, thousands of men, who hate
capitalism and the mailed fist with
which It rules as Intensely as they
love the Ideals ot the socialist republic, who will go down in this revelry of carnage, yet It Ib, nevertheless,
a fact, that a majority of those now at
war are but the blind tools of their
economic, masters, having neither
mind to think or moral responsibility,
At the same time, thousands of men
who would be a menace and an Impediment to the building of the new
social order, would perish. It Is also
a fact, that, seeing war as tt Is, thousands, who today are the deluded
slaves of the system, will realise for
tbe flrst time the horrors of war and
the helllshnesB of those rulers and
tbe commercial and Industrial Jackals, buzzards and the like, who, In
the name of "patriotism," send
armies to slaughter one another, to
gratify their greed and pride and lust
of power! And then the children,
women and men left behind—think
what a mental and moral revolution
will take place among these and how
these will hate militarism and swell
the army of revolt against militarism
and the system lt supports I
Words of Eugene V. Dsbs
"What a madhouse the earth would
seem to-day ln this trended revelry
but for the light that socialists' philo
sophy sends upon Itl Wbat Alpine
peaks of wealth, wbat desert wastes
of poverty, despair and death! What
man, unless his heart be adamant,
can contemplate this awful scene and
be content! What man, unless his
brain be atrophied and his vision
blinded, can fall to percteve the impending crisis? In tbe presence of
this vast and terrifying phenomenon
how satisfying to be enlisted In the
socialistic movement, to understand
this doubt-dispelling socialist philosophy and to Interpret events.in tbe
light ot its science.
"The capitalist regime Is but »
passing phase of civilization, the product of social evolution. It bas attained Its full dimensions, executed
the mandate of history and yet with
all the evils with which lt may be
charged, lt has been of Inestimable
value to humanity. The capitalist era
will be monumental In history not
so much for Its achievements as tor
what lt has made possible after lt
has passed away."
Iron Moulders
Since January, 1896, the Iron Mould
ers' Union of North America haa paid
out to It* members In sick benefits
alone the enormous sum of $2,450,-
325.85. This Is one evidence of the
value whloh the organization has been
to those who through united effort
have worked to protect the Interests
of the oraft. These are pointers you
never hear mentioned in the public
press, and there's a reason why.
New Quarters for Council-
Two Unions Withdraw
Delegates
Nominations of Delegates
to T. and L. Congress
of Canada
Victoria, b,c„ Aug.' J7.—The
regular meeting of the Vlotoria.
Trades and Labor Counoll waa held
on Wednesday, August llth, President Wells in the chair. A. Morgan,
Brewery Workers, wa* seated aa a
delegate.
Delegate Siverts reported for special committee on new quarter* for
the council, and ln a lengthy report
went Into all the details of expenditure and Income for the present quarter. The committee recommended
that five rooms be taken In the, De
Cosmos block, and after a short discussion tbe recommendations of the
committee were adopted, the chug*,
to take place at. the end ot the
month, and the committee empowered
to make all the necessary arrangements!       ,
Communications were read trom
the painters' and carpenters' local
1848, withdrawing trom the counoll.
After some discussion, a' committee
consisting of Delegatea Siverts, Day
and Martin were appointed, to visit
these locals, and endeavor to induce
them to retain their affiliation. The
reasons given for the palntera' withdrawal was because of the question
of party'politics being brought into
the council. The carpentera withdrew, beoause of the aotlona of the
|-council in regard to the financial seoretary, and stated that they could not
receive the protection which they
were entitled to.
Delegate Siverts reported for tbe
special oommlttee on the securing ot
the 1915 convention of congress for
Vanoouver. He recommended that
the, council nominate delegates, to the
coming* convention, the nominees to
be submitted; to the locals to elect a
delegate, and that an appeal be made
to tbe locals to finance the sending
of a delgate to the St. John convention, which meets on September 21st
The candidates nominated were J,
Day, C. Slvertz and A. S. Wells,
Delegate J. H. Martin declining
nomination.
Delegate Tyson reported that the
white cooks and kitchen help lon the
hospital ship Prince Qeorge, had been
discharged and tbat Chinese were employed ln their stead, The matter
was referred to the executive committee and all delegates were asked to
cooperate ln getting the matter
fixed up.
The delegates of the carpenters
again brougbt up tbe matter re tbe
Princess theatre being on the unfair
list, and reported that they had been
advertising that this place was unfair
to organized labor; but as the stage
employees employed at tbls theatre
were union men they decided to again
bring the matter before the council.
The council on motion endorsed the
action taken by the district council
of carpenters after the president of
the district council, A. Watchman, bad
explained the position and the reason
for the action being taken.
The council then adjourned.
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The
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A dollar is the price that the majority of men
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i ' ■
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SPENCER'S SILK LISLE SOCKS-Double spliced
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Three pairs $1.00
What Everybody Should Know
MEN'S NEW NOBBY SUITS cu ba bought at BRUMMITT'S from
110.00 up to $30.00        And they ar* worth mor*
HATS, bearing the union label, at $2.00, 12.60, MM.
SHOES, all mukes and prices, bearing the label, at "live and let live
prices, 12.00 up to M.00
CHIPPEWA SHOES it $7.00, $8.00 and $10.00
W. B. BRUMMITT
18-20  CORDOVA  ST. W.
STOVES and RANGES
EVERYTHING FOR THE KITCHEN
Mount Pleasant headquarters for Carpenters' Tools ud ajl
kinds ef Builders* ud Contractors' Stgjplies
W.R OWEN & MORRISON
Phut Fair, 447. 23J7 Main Stmt
J. A. FLETT, LIMITED
Tool Specialist
Htrdwmud
Spot-tiif Cm**
101-4 BANK OF OTTAWA BUILDING
602 Hump Stmt Wot
DR. BRETT ANDERSON, Dentist
Operates by dw ktdt, nest scienbic ud painless methodi
Specialist ia Crowe, Bridge, Plate ud Gold Inlay Wuk
HOURS 10 A. M. TO 4 P. M.
75 Per Cent, of your Summer Cooking can
be done with Electric Household Appliances just as well as with-a kitchen range
and with much greater comfort and convenience.
Blectric Household Appliances are ready tor operation, day or night,
on an Instant's attention to connecting the cord with th* household
socket '
They can do everything la the line ot light cooking, preparing tea or
coffee, making tout, preparing eggs, trying chops, etc. Tou don't
want heavy meal* during the hot weather and the appliances Jutt
meet thla demand and make It unnecessary to have a hot Are going.
Electrlo Household Appliances cost only a tew centa per hour ot continuous operation. To prepare an ordinary meal takes but a traction
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SEE OUR FULL. LINE OP ELECTRICAL HOUSEHOLD
APPLIANCES
Ciiull „i
Hillings Stmt
B.C. ELECTRIC
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NwDtiJe >AGB FOUR
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY. AUGUST US,
THE
MOLSONS
BANK
Capital and Reserve, - $8,800,000
15 branches In Canada
A (eneral banking businsss transacted.
Savings Department
Interest allowed at highest
current rate
East End Branch
180 HASTINOS 8TREET EAST
A. W. Jarvls, Manager
The Royal Bank
of Canada
INCORPORATED 11*1
Paid-up Capital • ■ ■ $ 11,
Rsserv     ltMt,tM
Totsl Assets 180,000,0*0
WE ALLOW INTEREST ON DEPOSITS IN OUR
SAVINGS
DEPARTMENT
On* Dollar will open
th* account, and your
business will be welcome be It large or
amall
POURTEEN BRANCHES IN
VANCOUVER
INCORPORATED
185S
BANK OF
TORONTO
Capital and R*a*rv* $11,178,87$
WAGE-EARNERS
keep your living* In tb* Bank
Of Toronto, and watch your deposits and Interest added by tha
bank grow ta a moat desirable
bank balance. Th* flnanclal
otrongth ol thl* long-established, well-conducted Institution ensures safety for your
money, snd you will receive
•vary courtesy, and your account careful attention.
As**t* ..
Deposits
860,000,00*
•41.O0A0OO
Main Office—
4*8 HASTINGS ST.. WEST
(Ntir Richards)      .,
Branch**—
Car. Heating* aa* Carrall Sta.
New Weatminster
Victoria
Merritt
THE BANK OF BRITISH;
NORTH AMERICA
Established In JMfc   incorporate*!
„_   by Royal chmrba In isio.
Paid-up Capital.    .     K8JJ,JSI.8l.
Reserve Fund    -    .    sldlMMioJ
.-Hiii.SStli* '» Canada*
ST. Jambs St., montebm.
H. B. MACljSNZlE - Canllltem
•AVINW BIPARTMSNT AT
,   ALL BRANCHES
Speolal. attention given to Savings
Accounts on white Interest le allows*. from data of depoelt.
0*11* a (avian Aecount and ed*
to It every pey day.
Drafts aa* Money Orden sold
■VANCOUVER BRANCH
W. Godfrey, Manner.
NORTH   VANCOUVER   BRANCH.
J. R. Chapman, Manager.
KBRRISDALE BRANCH
D. Nell, "	
A. W. Woodard
Mgr. CANADA NATIONAL
FIRE INSURANCE CO.
Phon. Stsaeur 3537,
Roim' Buildini     470 GmuakSsr M
MROEDERAIMNBI
published every. Friday morning by the
B.C. Federatlonist, Ltd.	
R. Parm. Pettlplece   - Manasln* Editor
J. W. Wllklnaon - - - Aaeoclate Editor
George Bartley NewH Editor
~"      DIRECTORS
Jaa. Campbell, president; J, H. McVety, secretary-
treasurer; H. Olbb; a. 3. Kelly
and R, P. Pettlplece
Offlce: Room 817, Labor Temple.
Tel. Exchange Sey. 74W.  	
Advertising Manager    -    -    -    - M. C. Shrader
SUBSCRIPTION ~~
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subscribing In a body, 11.00
""Representatives     —-~~~~
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Victoria -     ■     -     ■     -   '• A.B. Wells, Box 1838
Afflliated   with Western Labor Press Association
"Unity of Labor; the Hope of the World."
FRIDAY »,.'.......AUGUST 28, 1914.
THE CONFERENCE of representatives
of public, semi-public and other bodies
throughout the province, which met in the
parliament buildings at Victoria, lait Tuesday
at the call of Premier McBride, will not be
easily forgotten by those who
THAT FARCE *«* *««• Out of the
0p a eighty   persons   who   were
CONFERENCE P"""1'- there were not more
than lii who did not consider the whole thing a farce
from beginning to end. Previous to the gathering, it was assumed that the government had
not asked a lot of people like that to go to the
expense and trouble of going to Victoria for
nothing, but that some plan or proposal would
be submitted whereby the 'appalling industrial
conditions which now prevail throughout the
province could be in some measure alleviated.
Instead of that, Premier McBride repeated hit
mumbo jumbo of stock-in-trade phrases about
railway development, and his usual string of
verbal suavity. He admitted that metal mining from one end of the province to the other
was at a standstill, the lumber campi and mills
are all closing down, business firms and individuals are going into bankruptcy, thousands of
men are unemployed with their numbers increasing daily, and thousands of other are
barely making enough wages to buy mere
bread. Yet the government had nothing to
suggest, and to cap all, at the end of a speech
absolutely barren of everything but the language
of * political twaddler, McBride had the
audacity to advise his hearers to have courage
and   confidence   in   the   future   of   British
Columbia.
¥    ¥    »    ¥
We bave never taken him for anything but
a politician, who would be helpless in the face
of a. problem which required an element of
real statesmanship to handle it But to advise
"confidence** to men and women who are
I practically starving ii either due to an absolute inability to realize the situation in the province, or to an impudent self-complacency
which is prepared to ignore facts which must
be known to him and hit government He
played his usual trick of appealing for "no
publicity" and at the same time aiked the editor
of the Victoria "Week" a conservative paper,
to prepare a statement for the press. That
statement wai "prepared" right enough and
appeared in the conservative papers. It is not
only/ a miselading and white-washed acount of
I the proceedings, but in some respects ii absolutely untrue. The News-Advertiser of lut
Wednesday says:
Following Ae address of the Premier,
brief addresses were delivered by a number of other gentlemen, the speakers without exception expresing approval of the
government's policy as outlined by the
premier.
Such a statement it not true.   For by the time
McBride had talked for thirty minutes without
saying anything, disgust   was   pretty genera!
throughout the gathering.
unless McBride it a fool he will iee to it that
something is done to relieve the conditions,
before the proverbial patience of the poor
reaches a breaking point There were men in
that conference able, anxious, and wilting to
take steps against the threat of the coming
winter now, before matten get worse. They
voiced their proposals, but at the end were
practically told they contained no merit
Summed up in a few words the result of the
conference might have been expressed by McBride thus: "Gentlemen, I have been Premier
of British Columbia for ten years. I have not
got an idea yet. and I am of the opinion, from
what hat been laid here to-day, that you have
not an idea either, but if anything ihould suggest itself to you, I ihould be glad to hear from
you about it."
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COTTON'S WEEKLY - BMt
Socialist prop»g«n<l* paper ta
Canada. Price 50 capt* Ptr
year! ln clubs of four, >( ernta
for 40 week*.
Address, COWANSVH.LE, P.Q.
Take that Watch to Appleby, 80*
render Weil, Cor. Pender and
- Richards, for nigh-class watch,
clock and lewollery repairs. All
cleaning and mainsprings Jobs
guaranteed for 12 monlhfl.
This was molt noticeable among die mayors
and reevei of the cities and municipalities.. Men
whose daily duties have exposed to them the
extent of the destitution and privation which
prevail 'everywhere.    Some of these had not
the callous   indifference   neceuary to allow
McBride's contemptible luavity to pass without
protest.    Mayor Baxter   of Vancouver   told
McBride it wai ail  nonsense  to advise confidence to men who were starving.     He laid
hundreds of cases were daily coming under hia
observation, and that for hii part he did not
intend to leave the conference without laying
in plain terms that the government's failure to
suggest some plan for dealing with the situation was a surprise to him. He said "have confidence" ww only » mockery of men who were
willing to work but were starving.      Similar
stories were: told by other officials from urban
centres, although some of them were obviously
too much under the thumb of the conservative
machine tn have the honesty to speak plainly
about what they knew.   At the same time that
McBrid t had no suggestions to offer, it would
be a  ijiistake to   think   he had not thought
things over a little before the meeting,     He
had   anticipated a general   complaint against
the 'fa«nks for the extra squeeze which they
have put on borrowers since the war itarted.
and which, ai everyone knows, has been te-
s'pontible for putting some business concerns
actually out of existence.   For that reason, Mr.
Campbell Sweeney, superintendent of branches
of the Bank of Montreal in British Columbia,
and president of Ihe Bankers' association, was
present.   He waited until the end of the meeting and then, obviously by arrangement with
McBride, he said he could agree with all the
premier had said.   To those who were watching carefully and who could iee below the surface, it was plain that Sweeney's presence and
his speech were part of the machine arrangement between him and McBride.
■aaa*
If Premier McBride had the intelligence
and imagination to fit him for his office at a
time like this, he would realize that the industrial situation which confronts us all is one that
cannot be dismissed by the vulgar tricks of' a
political dialectician. He may not know itand even if he does he may not care—but
unless his government does make tome practical provision to tide over this winter there
will be a condition, in the cities particularly,
the like of which hai never before been seen in
British Columbia. An army of hungry men,
with hungry women and children at the back
of them, are a pretty desperate quantity,  and
IN ENGLAND AND FRANCE and
Germany, as in moit other countries, there
are men who do not have to do any useful
work, because things have been arranged, by
custom and tradition, so that other men have
to work for them,   They are
on a kind of perpetual, legalized strike.    So, in limes of
tnfmsip. vm   Peace' FwR-lmie*-, and Eng-
THEMSELVES    MmiB ^ Qtmap,, who
have been born into the
world with much pain, and brought up with
infinite trouble and sacrifice, are quietly at their
talks. Each one of them doei part of the talk
of tomeone else who does not have to do any
useful work, and so the world,goes merrily on
and society is well satisfied with itself.
¥   *   a   a
But presently the commercial and feudal
rulers of the several nations fall out among themselves, because each fears that the other ii hindering him io that hit uselestness is not as profitable to him as it might be. Then, tome millions of the useful citizens of each nation are
taken from their tasks, and let to the business
of maiming and destroying each other and the
product of their labor. Left to themselves,
these workingmen would not think of fighting
in any more serious fashion than with their fists.
They would keep on working, producing enough
for' themielvei and that part of the community
which does not have to work because working-
men like to work for them. '
a   a   *   a
But, "at length after infinite effort" ai
Carlyle puts it in hii illustration of the thirty
Englishmen from an English "Dumdrudge,"
and the thirty Frenchmen from a French
"Dumdrudge" are brought face to face with
each other. Thirty stands fronting thirty, each
with a gun in his hand The word to fire is
given, and because they are told, they straightway proceed to blow the souls out of each
other; and in the place of sixty useful men, are
sixty dead bodies. In the preient war in
Europe, which exceeds any human folly that
Carlyle ever dreamed of, the sixty may be
taken to represent millions of useful men, with
no personal grudge against each other, because
they have never seen each other, or done each
other any harm. Their sufferings and the
agony of their families may not be deemed matters for consideration by those who are sending them to kill each other. Those who command generals, have no regard for iuch thingi.
¥   a   a   *
They will sacrifice whole regiments intentionally, if by so doing they can turn the tide
of a skirmish which will ultimately turn the tide
of a big battle, and lead to a victory which will
enable the commerce of a nation to expand, and
the commercial class to accumulate more wealth.
If warfare were carried on with weapons which
would stupefy but not kill, each nation at the
end of the war would have thousands of workingmen locked up in its prisons, and the fint cry
of the makers of the war would be to set those
workmen free so that they could get to work
again, earning an existence for themselves and
a living for their masters. But not all the king's
horses and all the king's men can put the breath
of life back into the body of the dead, once that
breath hat been driven forth by bullet or bayonet It ii a workingman lost, and he will
never work any more.
¥    ¥    ¥    ¥
Thus is made manifest the folly of those who
■are so. greedy for the product of other men's
labor that they set workers to killing each other
for it. They lose in their degree, ai their poor
dupes lose in their's. There is not, really, any
cunning, as Carlyle thought, in killing workmen,
for if only enough workmen were killed, some of
those who live off the labor of those workmen,
would themselves have to go to work; especially
if those who escaped death had learned such a
lesson that they could see through the deception
which had been practiced upon them. In the
day when they do that, the doom of kings who
would for the sake of power, see men sent to
death by the million, will be written on their
own palace walls.
being a debauch of blood thrust upon mankind by a military bureauerat, wai a more
than usually refined example of the habits of
a deity who moves in a mysterious way His
wonders to perform. We are assured that
divine purpose! are often very obscure ones, and
although the situation to-day in Europe may
not look Uke it yet:
"God has kindly plans for humanity-
Human life is not in an aimless cosmic
drift like seaweed on the ocean. It ii
being moved forward by the Heavenly
Father'a hands. Underneath are the everlasting arms. Cod hai shepherded humanity through its cycles and centuries,
and the Lord is our Shepherd, even to-day
when twenty million men are flying at each
other's throats. There is a real plan in
human history at truly ai there ii a plan
in Kitchener's brain for Britain's war.
Every century, every continent, every nation and every individual are in God's
programme. This is an inspiring thought
and keeps ui steady in tumultuous times
and cheery in dayi of disaster. God, the .
Father, is in all and over all. At every
point, here and now, His will it touching
me and touching all men seeking to constrain us unto Hii wise and merciful will
and way. No wonder the realization of
this set the psalmist's fingers to hii harp
to give thanks unto the Lord and ling
praises unto Thy name, O Most High.' It
led Shakespeare to uy: 'There is a divinity that shapes our ends.' This trust
created Browning'i optimism, 'God'i in
Hii heaven all's well with the world.' It
gave Tennyson the virion of 'one far off
divine event to which the whole creation
moves,' and Lowell ihe assurance of God
standing among the shadow keeping watch
over hii own, and Paul's outburst, 'Nothing can separate us from the love of God.'.
This confidence is the Christian's privilege
even in war times."
Or words to that effect; ai it were, to to speak.
¥ ¥ ¥ ¥
Perhaps the reverend gentleman and some of
his hearers found substantial satisfaction in the
foregoing. But we confess that to us it seems
to be nothing more than juggling with words
and stringing phrases together, to make a pleasing noise for people who enjoy that sort of thing.
It looks like mental bankruptcy hiding its ineptitude behind a mass of platitudes which have
not even the merit of being brilliant. And if
that ii the kind of thing intelligent thinking
working men and women are expected to enjoy
—well, then, there ii no need to wonder at the
modern cry that the workeri do not attend
church at they uied to. Life for the workers
now-a-days is intensely real. And anyone who
understands their daily lot, would not expect
them to derive much satisfaction from, or have
much patience with words which come from
pulpits wilh no more of the ring of reality in
them than those we have quoted.
SINCE THE OUTBREAK of war and
the murder of Liebknecht it is doubly
interesting to remember the detailed way
in which he exposed the international character
of the armament trust with its
THIS HELPED   **£***-' «f   «»*, '**
TO KILL anything policy for the sake of
LIEBKNECHT    Profi*''    He t*hoW<*<! th.at -J"
Krupp company was in the
combine with the Scoda works,
which was being conducted with English and
French capital. He further declared that Dr.
Hermann S. Paasche, vice-president of the
Reichstag, and the minister of interior. Count
Loebel, belong to the directorate of the Ehrhardt
works; that the Loewe Small Arms Company
embraces Belgian, French and Italian firms;
that an international powder trust also is in
existence, and that banks are involved. He
named the Deutsche Banke and Disconte-Ges-
ellschaft Similarly, he charged that the warship industry was international, and named
Vice-Admiral Von Sack as "go-between" for
the armaments industry and foreign countries.
He said that high itate, army and naval officers
were members of the directorate of a prominent
optical' instrument firm which overcharged the
army 150 marks for every field glass of a certain kind.
THE VANCOUVER SUN does not
publish a weekly comic supplement like
some newipapen do, but every Monday
morning it hai a page devoted to the lermoni
delivered the previoui day by varioui preacher!.     This   feature of   our
THUS esteemed    contemporary    ii
8AITH THE "*mp*e comPen,a,'on f°r iht
BBcaruca abience of the legitimate
PREACHER amu,em(!nt page,    /v^ by
week, wiie and otherwise of
the city's celestial protagonists disport
themselves for the edification of readers.
Sometimes their effusions are only amusing.
Sometimes ihey are only amusing drivel. While
sometimes they are just drivel without any
trimming* which might rescue them from the
dead level of plain humbug. We dislike making invidious distinctions, and unless subjected
to more than normal pressure on our patience,
would not select any one case for special mention. F,ut there are limits to the good-humored
tolerance of the most long-suffering of us. The
amount of piffle and platitude which can expect,
to he excused on grounds of piety also has its
limits. And we believe those limits were reached
by Rev. J. K. Uniworth, in a sermon preached
last Sunday night, and reported in the Sun.
♦   a   a   a
It would be impossible here to produce it in
its fnll beauty. It dealt with the war in
Europe, which is the greatest disturbance of
peace on earth that the world has ever seen, in
spite of the fact that Christianity ii two thousand years old. And in termi of muffling generality, it endeavored to disguise the failure nf
ils own philosophy to introduce sanity and
good-will into the methods whereby human
affairs are adjusted. To read the sermon,
one would think   that   this war, instead of
The most successful of all recruiting sergeants
is unemployment
Eat "Courage and Confidence,'' McBride's
new breakfast food. •
Premier McBride's latest gag, "Have confidence," is the bankrupt philosophy of a full
stomach under an empty head.
The Cranbrook Herald iayi the wu of
nations beggars tbe language. The beggary of
the language will be nothing to the beggary of
the nations when' the war is over.
Figures, published by the chief registrar of
friendly societies in Great Britain show an increase of membership for 1912 of a quarter of
WAR, AS A METHOD of distracting
attention from social evili or economic
depression, is well known.   From the
Japan Times the following is interesting at this
time.
"The prevailing business
WHY DID depression is making iti ef-
JAPAN 'ecl ■*'' on •arge anc*' "■"■"
JUMP IN? factories    throughout    the
land, and it would be a
marvel if the trying time
should pass without more or less clashing of
capital and labor. There it no fear, of
coune, of strikes on a large scale or of
sympathetic strikes ''as in England, not
only for the preient but for some time to
come, Strikes will, if they occur, be confined to individual establishments or even
to separate departments in them, for the
simple reason that labor ii not yet oi ganized in this country.
"Foreign observers and Japanese economists who are well versed in the labor
history of the West, but not so well in the
labor situation of their own country, seem
to agree in the belief that the ultimate
organization and federation of labor and
a labor-capital warfare are inevitable in
this country as in all the other advanced
countries."
Of course, Japan, like Germany, has had to go
to war for "honor's take," but from the foregoing there may be other reasons too.
$
PHONE   SEYMOUR   MM
~^£TLfa    *-
The man who thinks that all the efforti of
his toil and slavery ihould bring him no more
than hii bite to eat and a place to deep ii a
funny creature.   A dog gets more.
Europe has plunged beneath the crust of civilization back into tavagery. She hai taken
down with her in the plunge all the cunningly
deviled machines of the industrial era, and ii
using them at the cave man uied teeth and
clawi, to rend human bodies.
We have received the annual report of the
German social democratic party. In the year
under review (1912-13) the membership hai
increased by 12,738 to 982,850, women being
largely responsible for this increase. The average
increase of the seven previous years was 14.7
per cent
The Czar of Russia has promised the Poles
civic and national independence if they will help
him in the war. Just a few weeks before war
started eighty-two memben of the Polish revolutionary socialist party were sentenced to termi of
imprisonment ranging from 4 tb 15 yean by the
Russian government.
The fact that the premier did not mention
the working class during his addreu to the conference wai doubtless an oversight; and we can
afford to be charitable about it when we remember the "earnest consideration of my government" which has io often been given to the
requests of labor deputations which have visited
Victoria from time to time.
The very fact that there are to-day more men
under sentence of death in Canada than ever
before, far out of proportion to increaie in population or the uiual increaie in offences against
the law, should furnish food for thought among
those who hitherto have advocated capital punishment as an effective check on ihe growth of
crimes to which it is applicable.
During the Crimean war the greatest general
of all was Fever. The Germans evidently
leave nothing to chance and ihe kindly offices of
that gentleman, for the grimmest touch at
present is the statement that the German army
is accompanied by a corps of gravediggen who
have nothing else to do but to bury the dead.
What a picture that conjures up I
Modern industry, even in times of peace, is
carried on under conditions as dread as the
shambles of the battlefield. The British Board
of Trade recently issued statistics covering the
casualties of labor during twelve yean in London. In that space of lime no fewer than
1,786,657 worken were killed or injured in
industrial accidents. Bear in mind that moit of
those "accidents" were due to preventible causes;
that they were attributable to the greed that lusts
for gain, and recks nothing of human life in its
mad desire for profits. Bear that in mind, and
remember that such slaughter is going on in
every part of the earth, and some sense of the
essential bloodiness of our civilization will begin
to awaken within you.
DOW FRASER TRUST CI
117-181 Cambie atreet; 8811 Ma
•treet, (between 7th and Sth Aval
Vsnoouvsr, and McKay Statlor
Burnaby, B.C.
-Close at i o'clock Saturday.
City Auction and Commiiiion C
Cash pal* for houses an* suit
ef furniture or Auetlon arrange
Satisfaction guaranteed, mm
settlements.
ARTHUR  I. BETCHLIY
•myths an* Qranvllle (treats
Auctioneer toy *
Phone Your Printing Order
-10-
Ai * sidelight i on some of the reasons for
brisk recruiting—240 of those who joined the
Irish Fusilien were to hard up that they had
no underclothing or soap or comb or any of
those little things which each man has to provide himself. When asked their addresses
they had none to give. One poor fellow had
slept the previous night in the park, another at
English bay, another in a disused shack on
the waterfront, and so on. Colonel Sam Hughes
minister of militia, wai aiked to supply these
men with the thing* which they lacked because
of their destitution. He refused, so the city
footed a bill of $1,003 to pay for them. Ai
the Daily Province uid* a week or two ago,
"The army of the unemployed will now have
a chance to fight for a living."   <
Not one of the diplomats of Europe will admit the blame for the awful disaster which
together they have brought upon that unhappy
continent. Not one of them but maintains, with
the vision of thousands of slaughtered soldiers
before his eyes, that his forces moved to defend
and not to attack. Not one ruler, not one representative of any European government, has
admitted during forty yean of insane militaristic
expansion that any soldier or any ship wai intended for aggressive warfare. Europe has
presented the amazing spectacle of a continent
arming itself, at tremendous cost, to defend
itself against itself. Unless the diplomats lied,
Europe wanted peace, and its gigantic armies
were armed for peace.
*   ¥   ¥   *
Well, the diploma's did lie, European diplomacy has been a welter of lies, treasons and
betrayals, in which the common people have
always been Ihe sufferers, ever since' Charlemagne's sons split up his empire. (The diplomats of Europe have been preparing, deliberately, not for peace, but for war, and for just
such a war ai has now come upon them. They
are reaping and will reap the dreadful crop
ihey sowed. They are like fanners who plough
their land to thistles, and their harvest is the
lives of many men and the destruction of all
that is worth having in the civilization of
Europe.
Strike Oi
MINERS KEEP AWA1
THB itrike ii ttill on *t th
* Queen Mine and Silve
Dollar, at Sheep Creek, B. (
All working men urged to sta
away until the strike is settle
(MwYaiir Miner*'U*i*i
Domsom
FUNERAL DIRECTORS "
I EMBALMERS
Ut ticker* St.       Vsacemsr, i. C
III   l s wl_uttJ_u
HARRON BROS.
FUNERAL DIRECTOR* AND
■MBALMRR*
Vancouver—Offloe and Chapel
MM Qranvlll* It., Phone Bey. till
North Vanoouver — Offlee aM
chapel, US aeoond St B. ThvS
114. '
Material support is to be given whenever a
dispute has been in progress for some time, and
the cost of maintaining it is beyond the means of
the union or uniom involved. To enable
material assistance to be given levies to ihe
maximum amount of two cents per member for
six weeks may be imposed on affiliated societies.
The whole of the societies are now to be balloted on the details of the scheme, and, if approved, it will be put into operation as
early ai pouible. The British membership of
the Federation is over a quarter of a million.
a   a   a   a
The British section of the International Federation of Metal-working Trade Unions, which
represents 48 federations or countries, and
1,200,000 memben, affiliated bodies are being invited to approve of a icheme for international action in all disputes, where it is deemed
desirable. The action taken ii to be moral and
material. Moral support may take the form
of sympathetic strikes wherever desirable, but in
any case it binds unions of each country to give
mutual support in strikes or lock-outs by furnishing particular! regarding conditions of employment, branches of firmi involved, together
wilh warnings to workeri of other landi and
districts regarding migration to district! where
disputes are in progreu,      ;l
FURNITURE
By all means come snd see out
splendid large new stock of fur1
niture. "Everything but thl
girl" for your new home.
OET OUR PRICES AND
TERMS
Hastings Furniture Co;
Limited
tl HASTINU STREET WUT
CENTER &HANNA, Ltd
UNDERTAKERS
Refined Service
1048 GEORGIA (TREET
One Block west of Court House.
Use of Modem Chapel and
Funeral Parlors free to all
Patrons
Wbnle Wheat Bread
Choice Family Bras*
Wedding aad BlrtMay Cakes,,
Wa Ves train meu.
BELYEA'S BAKERY
ALL KIND* OF
CAKES. PASTRY AND
COOTECTICNERY
Bot Driaks aal 1
Alir   *  -■■ *
CsLSsy. HM
ATENTS
Trs*s Marks, Desline, Copyrights
PITHRR*TONHAUOH A CO.
The Ol* Established firm of
PATENT ATTORNEYS
188* Rs*ers ll**., Qranvllle (tree
City. Phene teymeur 8718.
DIXON & MURRAY
0*!e* aa* Bspi
D.t ANIektC.il.        ParienAC
PlHaoBar.M* UMCfeaV
MACK BROS.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS i
EMBALMERS
Vancouver
British Cob FRIDAY,.. AUGUST 28, 1814.
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
Swiss Rit Underwear in
Several Fall Styles
In view of the fact that it may be difficult to get this underwear in
the immediate future, ah early selection is advisable. We have just
placed in stock a shipment of moderately priced garments.
Medium weight cream mercerized vest's, with yokes prettily
trimmed with heavy crochet lace, in no sleeve style—81.89 and 8)1.70.
Also in short sleeve style—88.00.
China silk pleated vests, in sleeveless style and many other dainty
styles up to 86.00, at |3.00.
Mercerised union suits, yokes effectively trimmed with heavy
crochet lace, knee length, without sleeves, |1»8, $2.25 and KM; with
short sleeves 8.8.00.
Spun silk union suits, in low neck sleeveless, and knee length
style;  Special 13.78.
"^
LIMITED
575 Granville St.   Vancouver, B. C.
Phone Seymour 3540
•tors Hours M0 to • p.m.
•atuMaya Included
US HASTINO* STREET WEST
BEST IN THE WRIT
Braids
Best
Coffee
WM TURNER Hfcii*.
-DEALER IN-
New and second-hand China, Crockery, Furniture,
Hardware and Stoves. Furniture moving and shipping.. Telephone us when you have furniture, for
sale. Highest prices paid.
TELEPHONE SEYMOUR 3745
UNDERWEAR
MEN'* BALBRIOOAN UNDERWEAR
At 8*0, and 78e. per sarment
BRITANNIA
Li*ht Woollen Underwear—Just rliht (or this warm weather
LIGHT WEIOHT UNION IUITS
From 81.00 per Suit up.
B. V. D. UNDERWEAR
With Short Sleeves and Knee Len*th Drawers, 78o. per sarment.
CLUBS & STEWART, Ltd.
Tol, toy, 7**    ■ ' '      "■ '■'-■.      888-818 HAtTINM STREET W.
Keep the Children Healthy
by sendln* them out In the freeh air thoae flne days. There's nothing batter (or keepln* them exercised than wheeled *ooda.
Our stook o( WHEELBARROWS, AUTOMOBILES, EXPRESS WAOON*.
PERAMBULATORS, IRISH MAILS, ROWINO WAOONS, VELOCIPEDE*,
SIDEWALK SULKIES, Is easily tha flnast and most comprehensive In the
olty and the prloes an rliht.
Thomson Stationery Co., Ltd.
VANOOUVER, B. O.
BtTABLIIHED 1888
I "MOMI"
PROTECTS THE
WEALTHY
It Does Not Relieve the
Poor, Who Are the Seal
Sufferers
It Is New Up to the Government to Find a Good
Substitute
Did You Get Yours I
This Morning?
BRAID'S
BEST
COFFEE
JREWED AND BOTTLED IN VANCOUVER BY
VANCOUVER BREWERIES Limited
A correspondent points ou that
wars ln the past have been tor the
purpose ot territorial expansion, This
present war seems to be an exception. Exception or no exception, ln
the final resort, as ln the wars ot the
past, the common people, or artisans,
will be the only sufferers—ln the extreme sense. Men ot meana will have
daya ot worry over financial matters,
but actual suffering, such as hunger
or cold, will not be their portion. At
this early stage to Implement the possibility ot Canada adequately assisting the mother country, an enthusiasm is being furnished by the Industrial army that Is commendable. To
ensure .success ln the continuance ot
these efforts, this enthusiasm must be
permanent. Ih other words, the Industrial army must not teel too keenly
the horrors ot war. The Industrial
machinery must not be deranged.
The Moratorium
The flnanclal machinery may be
lubricated by a so-called moratorium.
The moratorium Is out ot flate—obsolete. Something else must be tound.
The Canadian government has found
a remedy tor balancing exchange between Europe and America, for which
they have been highly commended by
all, A substitution for the moratorium which will sustain the equilibrium ot the industrial army during
these troublous times may be as easily
tound lt the desire exists. In the past,
the line of least resistance haa been
followed. Germany followed that line
when she seised the savings of her
subjects. Those best able to lose have
no "savings" to be seized. To Insure
the success of the military army, the
lndustrlaj army must not be disturbed.
It was reported on the street that an
Industry employing over two thousand
men in the city of Toronto alone, was
about to shut down. This Is only one.
Many others may follow within a
short period. In this way the Industrial army will suffer to such an extent
that must Inevitably be reflected In
(he military army.
Hardship and Suffering
Much depends on enthusiasm and
unlmity for the early termination ot
this conflict If our enthusiasm wanes,
years of hardship'and suffering may
pass before peace Ib assured. Parliament should endeavor to flnd a
substitute tor the moratorium and the
"seizure of savings" methods', should
get out of the rut of following the
line ot least resistance. The moratorium protects the wealthy; It does
not relieve the poor. When the "savings" of the nation are Jeopardized,
only the poor suffer; their all Is
taken. The shareholder ln the wealthy
corporation and the property owner
are comparatively free. Industries at
present ln existence should continue
undisturbed. Corporations should be
patriotic enough to' cooperate In giving employment to aa many as possible. The present rate of wages per
hour should be maintained. The number of hours of labor per day could be
reduced to the minimum, consistent
with the procuring of the necessities
ot existence.
Up ts the Government
As the government found a means
of solving the system of exchange aa
between Britain and America, so also
oould they flnd a means of caring tor
so-called overproduction which might
occur ln the endeavor to preserve Intact the present Industrial machinery.
Redeemable currency could be Issued
by the government, guaranteeing the
carrying on of public works, even if
not of present necessity, but which
would be of benefit In the future, always bearing ln mind the absolute
necessity of present employment. The
great and lasting wonder Ib that the
commissariat of a large army on a
military expedition is comparatively
so much more easily arranged than
the keeping together of body and
soul of a large army of Industrial
workera. lAn opportunity for the display of statemanshlp has arisen which
lt Is hoped will be taken advantage of
by someone In a position to do something.
B. C. Co-operative Society
Editor B. C. Federatlonist: On behalf of the Co-operative Society ot
British Columbia, ln process ot formation, whose aim la to put two thousand people on certain lands In this
province, in a self-supporting community, to be worked and owned cooperatively, may we use your columns
to ask all thoae who are interested
(both sexes) and who can raise 8525,
to send In their names and addresses
to Secretary, the Cooperative Society
ot Britlah Columbia, 527 Dunsmuir
street
Vancouver, B. C, Aug. 27, 1914.
South Wellington Relief
Bdltor B. C. Federationist: We, the
South Wellington Relief committee,
beg to make an earneBt appeal to the
public on behalf of the victim* of the
bush Are on Tuesday, August 11,1914,
whioh wiped out the settlement of
South Wellington, leaving residents-
women, children and men—homeless
and destitute,' without sufficient
clothing or food, and, in many cases,
in intense suffering. Contributions
ln the shape ot money, clothing or
food will be gratefully received by
the relief committee, and should be
forwarded to the care of the lecretary. Following Is the relief committee appointed by Oovernment
Agent Qeorge Thomson: David J,
Thomas, Barry O'Connell, James
Bateman, D. W. Richards, Qeorge
Taylor, Wm, H, Evans.
JAMES BATEMANi Secretary,
•       GEORGE TIAYLOR, Treasurer,
Fire Relief Committee.
So. Wellington, B. C, Aug. 16,1914.
A Correction
Editor B. C. Federatlonist: In the
verses "Peace Upon Earth," to which
you were good enough to record space
ln your valuable paper, owing, I suppose to some accident In the printing
department the third verse has become, what might, without exaggeration, be called mixed, lt should have
read as follows:
"Peace   upon   earth,   the   harvest
rlpeneth;
The sower's heart Is glad, and lo
a breath,
A word; the  harvest trodden In
the mire,
The sower's heart forever still ln
death."
In the concluding line, "No peace
while Caesar live." The verses were
poor enough as it was without making
a bad matter worse. If you can flnd
space for this kick, I will give my
word not to trouble you again.
JACK DAVIDSON.
Vancouver, B.C., Aug. 26, 1914.
MINARD'S  LINIMENT RELIEVES
NEURALGIA.
PROVINCIAL UNIONS
B. C. FEDERATION OF * LABOR—
Meets In annual convention In January. Executive offlcen, 1814-15: President, A. Watohman; vice-presidents, W.
F. Dunn, Jas, H. McVetj, G. R, Fraser,
J. W. Gray, H. Knudion, J. J. Taylor, B.
Simmons. Secretary-treaaurer, A. S,
Wells, Box 1538, Victoria, B.C.
PAGnimr
VANCOUVER UNIONS
TRADES AND LABOB COUNCIL —
Meets first an* third Thursdays. Eiecutive hoard: Jas, H. MoVety, preeldent;
Frank Estinfbauser, vice-president; Oeo.
Bartley. general secretary, 210 Labor
Temple; Miss a. Gutteridge, treasurer;
Fred A. Hoover, statistician; aerseant-
at-arms, John Sully; G. Curnook, F.
Knowles. W. B. Trotter, trustees.
LABOR  TEMPLE  COMPANY,   LTD,—
Dlrecton:   Fro* A Hoover J. B.
UcVetr. Janes Browe, Uward LolhUf.
Kenale, F, Slumbers, H. H. Free. Maaa*-
lo* director 1. a MoVety. Room 111.
Flemln*. P.O. Box <*.
BAKER*' AND CONFECTIONERS LO
_. _ - CAL No. It-Meets aeo-
ond an* fourth Saturdays, 7.M p.m. President,
H. 0. Leeworthy; eorree-
-"-■"-- sserstary. B. 3.
 , business a*ant, J,
S     Blaok.   Room  IK,   Labor
Temple.
BAt*S55f nJ^{^,«o,_m-tdam
Houra: "fl'tol'"?' to 7 p.m.
RARTBNDBRB' LOCAL No. I7I.-OF-
flos. Room NI Labor Temple. Masts
first Sunday of eaoh month. President,
F. F. Lavljne; financial secretary, Oeo.
W. Curnook. Room sol, Labor Temple,
BRICKLArBRS'_AND MASONS', NO. 1
—Meets every 1st and Ird Tuesday,
8 p.m.. Boom 107.    President,   Jamas
b p.m., ttoom
Haalett; correal      — ., ... -
Dagnall, Box 52; finanoial secretary, F.
B. Brown; business agent, W. 8. Da»-
nalC'Boom Sll"
BROTHERHOOD OF BOILER MAKER*
an* Iran Ship Builders an* Holsen
of America, Vaneouvar Lodge Ns. 111-
Maeta flrst and third Mondays, I n. m.
President, F. Barclay, IM Cordova But;
sserstary, A. Fraaer, mi. Hows atreet
COOK*, WAITER* AND WAITBBME*
Union-Meats flrst Friday In eaeh
month, 1:11 p.m., Laker Temple. W. B.
Walker busfnos representative. Mee:
Room III,'Labor Tenuis. Hours: I a.m.
to M.M; 1 p.m. to 2.10 and • p.m. to I.M
p.m, Competent blip furnished oa short
ootloe.   Phono gey, MU,
DISTRICT COUNCIL OF CARPENTER*
mists seoond and fourth Thursday of
each month, t p. m. Secretary, J. Bit-
eon, 171 Hornby atreet; business scant,
H. J. McEwen, room 201. Looal 11? meeta
fint and third Monday of eaeh month,
and, Looal IM7 meats fint and third
| Tuesday of eaeh month.  '
ELECTRICAL WORKER*, LOCAL NO.
, 111—Mast* Boom 101 every Monday
I p. m. President, Dava Fink; rtee-preei-
dant, M. Sander; recording aecreury,
Roy Blear, Labor Temple; financial secretary and business asent, W. F. Dunn,
Room MT. Labor Temple.
ELECTRICAL WORKERS, LOCAL NO.
021 (Inside Men)—Meets flnt snd
third Mondays of each month. Room 205,
8 p. m. President, H. R, Van Sickle; recording secretary, J. M. Campbell; busl-
neas agent, F. L. Batlnghauaen, Room 107.
LONGSHOREMEN*'   INTERNATIONAL
ASSOCIATION.    No.    III M-Meets
every   Friday   evening,   MO   Alexander
atreet, President,   -   -   -
H. Hannlng.
enlng,
J, Mahi
lone; Secretary,
MACHINISTS, NO. 122—MBBTS EEC,
. ond' and fourth Fridays, I p. m
Praaldant, A. B. Towlar; recording aeon,
tary, J. Brookes; flnanolal aeeretary, J. H.
McVety.
MOVING PICTURE OPERATORS, Local Ml I.A.T.S.E.—Meeta every sec.
ond Sunday of each month, Labor Temple, 8 p.m. Preaident H. C. Roddan; aeo,
retary-treaaurer, L. E. Goodman; recording aeeretary, A. O. Hansen; buslneas agent, G. R, .Hamilton, Ofllce.
Room 100, Loo Bid*.   Tel. Spy. 2016,
MUSICIANS' MUTUAL PROTECTIVE
Union, Local No, Ml, A. F. of M.-
Meata aeoond Sunday of each month,
noma 81-20, Williams Building, 412 Oranvllle etreet. President, J, Bowyer; vice-
pruldent, F. English: secretary, H. J.
Braafialdi treuunr, w. Fowler.
NEW WESTMINSTER, E.C.
NBW WESTMINSTER TRADES AND
Labor Counoll—Meeta every aecond
and fourth Wednesday at I p. m. In Labor
Halt, Pruldent, D. B, Cameron; flnanolal
secretary, H. Olbb; general Saentary. W.
E. Maiden. P. 0. Box IM. Ths pubUo Is
Invited to attend.
PLUMBERS' AND STEAMFITTBRB LO-
cal 415—Meeta ovary aacond and
fourth Friday of month In Labor Hall,
T.N p, m. Pruldent, D. Webster; aeeretary. A MeUren. P. O. Bos III, Ntw
Westmlnater, B.C	
BARTENDERS' LOCAL 7I4-MBBTS1N
Labor Temple, New Wutmlnster,
ooraar Seventh atret an* Royal avanua,
every aacond Sunday of each month, at
LN p. m. President, F. S. Hunt; secretary, F. W. Jameaon. VlalUac brotbera
Invited. i
VICTORIA, E. C.
VICTORIA TRADES AMD LABOR
Counoll—Meeta flnt and third Wednesday, Labor Hall, 711 Johnaton strut,
et I p. m. Pruldent. Oeorie Dykeman:
lecretary, Thu. F. Mathlson, box NI,
Victoria, B. C.
MINERS' UNIONS
KTMBERLET MINERS' UNION, No. IN,
Weetern Federation of Mkiera—Meets
Sunday evenings In Union Hall. Pnsldent, Alex. Wilson: secretanr-treuurer,
M, P. Vllleneuve, Klmberley. B, C.
OPERATIVE PLASTERERS' INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION, No. 89—
Meeta flnt and third Wednesday, O'Brien
Halt, 8 p.m, President A. Hurry; corresponding secretary, F. Sumpter. 1830—
23rd avenue east; flnanclal secretary, D.
Soott, 577 Richards straet; treasurer, L.
Tyson. Meets every 1st and 3rd Wednesday ln the month In Room 801 Labor
Temple.	
PAINTERS'... PAPERHANGERS'. AND
Decorators', Looal 131—Meets every
Thuraday, 7.30 p.m. President, H. Grand;
finanoial eecretary, J. Freckleton, 1028
Comox stnet; recording secretary, R.
Dowding, 028 Howe street. Busineu
agent, James Train, Room 303, Labor
Temple.	
       .LEAGUE   .OF
NORTH AMERICA.—Vancouver and
vicinity. _ Branch meeta 1st and 3rd Frl
PATTERN    MAKERS'
....:::~\\i   ::... _	
days at Labor Temple, room 201. Robert
C. Sampson, Pres., 747 Dunlevy Ave.;
Joa. O. Lyon, flnanolal aeoretary, 1721
Grant etreet; J. Campbell eecordlng aeo-
retary. 4111 Argyle strut.
STBREOTTPBRS' AND BLBCTROTTP-
en" Union, Ne. 18, of Vaneouvar and
Victoria—Muts second Wednesday ef
eaoh month, 4 p. m., Labor Temple. Pnsldent, Chas. Bayley; recording aeeretary,
A. Birnle, co. "News Advertiser."        ■
STREET AND ELECTRIC RAILWAY
Employeea, Pioneer Division No. 101
—Meeta Labor Temple second and fourth
Wednesdays at 2 p.m., and first and
third Wednesdaya, 8 p.m. President,
W. H. ' Cottrell; reoordln* secretary,
Albert V. Lofting, 2501 Trinity street;
flnanclal secretary and business agent,
Fred. A. Hoover, 2409 Clark Drive.
STEAM ENGINEERS, INTBRNATION-
al Looal 117—MeeU every Wedneaday
I p, m„ room 104, Labor Temple. Flnan-
olal secretary. B. Pnndorsut. nom til,
LADYSMITH MINERS' UNION, LOCAL
No. 1221, U. M. W, of A.-Meeta Wednesday, Union Hall, 7 p.m. Pruldent,
Sam Guthrie; secretary, Duncan MoKen-
sle, Ladysmlth, B, C.
NANAIMO LOCAL UNION U. M. W. ol
A.—Meeta every Monday at 7.11 p. m
In the Athletic Club, Chapel atreet".
thur Jordan, Box 410, Nanalmo, B. C.
CUMBERLAND LOCAL UNION, No.
2211, U. M. W. of A.-Mooto every
Sunday 7 p.m. In U. M. W. of A. hall.
Pruldent, Jos. Naylor; secretary, James
Smith, Box II, Cumberland, B, C.
DETROIT MACHINISTS WIN
Board of Arbitration Hand Down
' Finding In Favor of Union
The International Association of
Machinists ln Detroit have finally won
out decisively In their four weeks'
strike against: several of the big over
all manufacturers ln tbat city. The
machines, without machinists to attend to them, get out of trim and become unworkable for the employers
found to their cost even though times
were dull lt was Impossible to secure
competent mechanics to act as strikebreakers. The engineers, firemen,
garment workers, and all others employed In the plants, also performed
their share. They were prepared to
come out also, If necessary to win a
victory. After the holding of several
conferences, the employers were finally compelled to do what the machinists askeil them to do before a strike
was called, namely, arbitrate. The
board ot arbitration Landed down r
finding ln favor of the union, and the
machinists went back to work at the
scale of wages and the conditions
demanded.
Wages Inereaasd
Reports for various International unions show that the wage earners of
the United States and Canada secured
over one hundred million dollars In
additional wages as the direct result
of trades union effort ln 1913.
TRAIL MILL AND SHELTERMEN'S
Union, No. 105, W. F. of M.—Meets
every Monday at 7.30 p. m. President,
James Delgarnfi; Aeeretary, P. J. Bolam,
BoxJI, Trail, B.C.	
SANDON MINERS' UNION, No. II
Western Federation of Miners-Meets
VIP .siLiurd*"',.In "a Minora' Union
hall. Address all communications to the
SecreUry. Drawer "K.," Sandon, B.C.
BUSINEU AGENT  DIRECTORY
200;
Dag-
Ask for Labor Temple 'Phone Exchange,
Seymour 7490 (unless otherwlu stated).
Bartenders—Room 208; Geo, W. Curnock.
B. C. Federatlonlat—Room 117; R, P.
Pettipiece.
Bridge and Structural tron Workera—W.
L, Yule, Room 201.
Brotherhood   of   Carpentera—Room
Hugh McEwen.
Brieklayera—Room 111; Wm.
nail.
Barbers—Room   201:   C.   F.   Burkhart;
phone Sey. 1771.
Hod Carriers," Builders and Commea Laborera—Boom 220; John Sully.
Cooka, Walters, Waltreaaee—Room 202;
W. a Walker: Tel. Seymour lilt.
Electrical    Workera     (outside)—Room
207: W. F. Dunn.
Electrical Worktn  (inside)—Room 107;
F, L. Eatlnghauien.
Engineers (Steam)-Boom 210; L. Dawson.
Labor Temple  Co.—Room  111;  J,    11.
MoVety.
Lonxahoremen'e    Association  — Offlee,
145 Alexander street; H. Hannlng; te!.:
Seymour 0851.
Moving Picture Operators—O. R. Hamilton, Room 100, Leo Bid*.   Tel. Sey,
Musicians—H. J. Brasfleld, rooms 11-10,
Williams Building, 111 Oranvllle Street.
Seymour 2630.
Plasterers—Joe Hampton; Tel. Seymour 1814.
Strut Railway Employees—Fred. A.
Hoover; Seymour 608.
Tradei and Labor Council—Room 210;
Geo. Bartley.
ypogrephlcal—Rooms  212,    111,    114;
TAILORS' INDUSTRIAL UNION (IN-
ternatlonal). Local No. 178—Meetings
held flnt Tuesday In each month, 8 p. m.
President, Mln H. Gutteridge; recording
secretary, C, MoDonald, Box 108; linen-
clal eec„.K. Paterson, P. O. Box 603.
THEATRICAL STAGE EMPLOYEES.
Local No. 118—MeeU second Sunday
of eaoh month at Room III, Labor Temple. Pruldent, H. Spun; recording aeo-
retary. Geo. W. Allln, P.O. Box TH, Vancouver.
TYPOGRAPHICAL UNION NO. Ill-
Mute loot Sundey eaoh mouth, I
p.m. Pruldent, R. P. Pettlplece: vtu-
presldent, W. 8. Metager, aoeretety-
treaaurer, R, H. Neelanda. P. O. Box II.
SYNOPSI*  OP   COAL   MINING   REGULATION*
Coat mining rlghta of the Dominion,
in Manitoba, Saakatchewan and Alberta,
the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Territories and ln a portion of the Province
of Brltlih Columbia, may be leased for
a term of twenty-one yeara at an annual
rental of |1 an aore. Not more than
2,660 acres will be leued te one applicant.
Applications for lease must be made by
the applicant In penon to the Agent or
Sub-Agent of the dlatrlct in which tbe
rlghu applied for ere situated.
In surveyed territory the land must be
described by sections, or legal subdivisions of iiectlons, and In unsurveyed territory the tract applied for shall be
staked by the applicant hlmaeif,
Eaoh application muat be accompanied
by a fee of 16, whloh will be refunded If
the rights applied for are not available,
but not otherwise. A royalty shall be
paid on the merchantable output of the
mine at the rate of five cenU per ton.
The person operating the mine shalt
furnish th& Agent with aworn returns
accounting Tor the full quantity of merchantable ooal mined and pay the royalty thereon. If the coal mining rlghu
are not being operated, suoh returns
should be furnished at leaat once a year.
The lease will Include the coal mining
rlghta only, but the tesau may be permitted to purchase whatever available
surface rlghu may be considered necessary for the working of the mine at the
rate of 110 an aore.
For full Information application should
be made to the Secretary of the Department of the Interior, Ottawa, or to any
Agent or Sub-Agent of Dominion Lands.
W, K( CORT,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
—Unauthorized publication   '
advertisement wtll not be paid for
N. B.-
lubilcation'of"thii
*      30090.
Arc you a subscriber?   If not, send
In your nams now.
Westminster Trust Comi
W* hav* MONET TO LOAN OB Improved property.
■■tat** managed for out-of-town aid dty ottwt*. Payauat* ttt-
lected and forwarded or invuted. W* aot as ageatt only for tk*
purchase nil aal* of real estate.
Depoelta accepted ud Interut at 4% allowed on dally balaaoe.
SAFETY DEPOSIT BOXES FOR RENT
. Head Offloe:
Columbia and Begbie Street, New WeetmlnsUr, E. C,
9. 4Te awMmWe ammammt\mamaf HNMI
*. A. aeaase, Beesetasf-neeeum
THE S, WWII_ COMPANY
FUNERAL^IRECTORS
Do You Know
Good Beer
among the numerous brands found on th* market
Is in class .A; it's flavor appeals to th* man or
woman who knows'
GOOD BEER
Ask our distributor for a ease sent to your house.
A. E. Suckling ft Co., Vancouver distributors.
WESTMINSTER BREWERY, NEW WESTMINSTER, & C
\___ PHONE No. Utm
UNION HATS AND OVERALLS of
J. E. BROWN & CO.
S18 COLUMBIA STREET
NEW WESTMINSTER, B.C.
THE POPULAR PRICED, EUROPEAN PLAN
HOTEL RITZ
VICTORIA, B.C.
FORT &?., AT DOUGLAS '
RATES 76o, $1.00, $1.26, $1.60, $2.00
0. J. LOVEJOY, MOR.    FREE AUTO BUI
BE TRUE TO YOURSELVES
'     BY tMOKINa THE OLD RELIABLE     »
Kurtz's "Pioneer" jpigars
VOU  HELP YOUR  FELLOW UNION  MEN AND   BED DE*, YOU  OET
THE VERY  BEST VALUE  FOR  YOUR  MONEY
Don't Blame
Hindu
For Sending His
Money Home
to India
You are as bad as he if you don't demand
goods made in British Columbia. Every
time you buy imported paints and varnishes you send your money out of British
Columbia.
Keep your money here and
give a brother workman
a job—he needs it!
Ask for Paints and Varnishes made by
BRITISH AMERICA
PAINT COMPANY, Ltd.
Victoria   Vancouver   Calgary
Edmonton PAGE SIX
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
WHAT CUSTOMERS SAY OF
BUCK
Steveston, B. C'June 4, 1914.
Messrs. Wm. J. McMaster & Sons, Ltd.,
Vancouver, B. C.
Dear Sirs: For a considerable time now I have handled your
overalls and have always found them satisfactory. _ I gave your
traveller an order for your "Mac's Mogul" line some little while ago,
and these goods are all I can desire. There is a good demand for
them, and the guarantee you give with your goods assure me of further confidence in selling them.
I looked at your line of "Master Shirts," and like the goods. At
the present time I am too heavily stocked, but intend to put some of
them in at a later date.
Yours truly,
(Signed)   0. K. AK1M0T0.
From 0. K. Aklmoto, Steveston, B.C.
(Copy)
WM. J. MoMABTER 4 SOMS, LTD.
W. B. THOMAS, Manager Director.
AWFUL UNEM-
,    PLOYED PROBLEM
NOW EXISTING
(Continued (rom page 1)
Vancouver Heights Grocery
3640 HASTINOS STREET EAST
THE POST OFFICE STORE
But of everything at lowest prices.
Groceries, Hems, Bacon, Garden Seeds, Freah Fruit and Vegetables, Tea Rose Tea, Reld & Millar's Sausagea and Head Cheese.
Every morning we receive a shipment ot berries trom Mo-
Donald's Ranch on Keata Island.   They are delicious.
Telephone your orders.   Our delight la to serve you,
W. R. McMURRAY
PHONE HIGHLAND 585L
I was the first man in Canada to use
the Journeymen Tailors' Union Label
in modern tailoring, i. e. weekly wage
time system—using power machines.
I am using it still, notwithstanding
the attempt made recently to deprive
me of it by a jealous bunch of has-
beens, known as the piece-workers.
Let it be known to all union workers
that I have always lived strictly up to
the letter of my agreement with the
union and I charge less for suits than
any tailor in Vancouver, quality and
general satisfaction considered.
S, McPherson, Sr.
432 Main St., Vancouver
common people should be extended
ln this direction at once, tbe credit
of the big Interests has already been
extended.
The government 's asked to save
the homes of the people first Foreclosures should be stopped right now
by this government.
It Is to be hoped that you already
have had. under consideration the
question of food supplies In Canada.
Surely there can be no sympathy
with food manipulators bent oh making huge profits at a time like this
out of the unfortunate position of the
people. Those who prate-about sacrifice, and then turn around and ex
plolt the helplessness of the oommon
people in this crisis, deserve no consideration. Is all the sacrifice to be
at tbe usual place? The workers ln
the armies, doing .the fighting, the
widows and children left to pay the
high cost of Inflated prices, the
homes to be lost because of Inability
to pay off the mortgages at maturity.
Surely theBe tblngs are of paramount Importance to a representative
government? So we suggest you Immediately take steps to control the
food supply, and prevent Inflation of
prices. You have the power and can
do It,
Again, the unemployed problem demands Immediate attention. The
government should take this matter
up now on national lines. All the
public work possible should be gone
on with. If the credit ot the government Is good enough for the great financial Institutions lt should be
good enough to do business with
for the people ln the Interests of
the people. Work should be commenced which will take Into consideration the future, next winter and
next year. The people of this country should be the first consideration
of parliament. Your legislation is
not yet before the house, though it
may be decided on.
We bring to you these requests now
with the hope that the government
will see the people's Interests, and
act accordingly. Parliament Is about
to give unlimited power to tbls government at the special session. It Is
for the government to decide what
treatment the great mass of people
ln this dominion shall have.
W*e assume, as representing the
workers, that the great assistance you
are giving to the financial Interests
Is to enable the people of this country to continue their commeolal and
Industrial activities, and not to enable these Interests to enrich themselveB at the expense of the nation.
This being so, we expect the government to see that this Idea Is carried
Into practice.
We suggest that you appoint an Industrial comtsslon to Immediately
find ways and means of dealing with
the unemployed problem, to find out
accurately Its extent, and suggest
public works In conjunction with
municipalities and the provinces to
be carried out.
In behalf of the Trades and Labor
congress of Canada,
FRED. BANCROFT.
JAMBS SIMPSON.
P. M. DRAPER.
For Executive Council.
Ottawa, Ont, Aug. 20, 1914.
FRIDAY AUGUST 28, 191
J. J. BUTLER
His Life  in
Accident
Fatal
While testing the electric plugs in
the switchboard of the new storage
plant being erected for the Vancouver-Prince   Rupert   Meat   company,
John Jas. Butler, living at 374 Fifth
avenue east,    an    employee   of the
Western   Canada   Power   company,
was electrocuted   shortly after four
o'olock Monday afternoon, 24th Inst.
Dr. Morley was   called   to attend to
the dying man, and worked with the
pulmotor for nearly an hour, but the
current had done   its deadly   work.
The body was removed to the Mount
Pleasant undertaking   rooms, where
an Inquest was held on Tuesday.   He
was     a   thoroughly       experienced
mechanic, having worked at his trade
for fourteen years, and had been employed by the Western Canada Power
oompany for the past year and a half,
and had been only about 20 minutes
on the fatal job making connections
for a transformer.    The work    he
was   doing   was   requisitioned
"cold" work, but there was a cable
there whloh was charged with 2300
volts, and while making a measurement with a wire, lt came ln contact
with the cable. At the Inquest which
was conducted by Dr. Jeffs, on Tuesday, the coroner's jury returned the
following verdict:    "Deceased   came
to bis death by the wire he was holding coming Into contact with a cable
charged with 2300 volts and we are
unanimously of the opinion that the
company be censured for allowing lt
to be possible for a man to come Into
contact with live wires."     The late
Mr. Butler leaves to mourn his loss a
wife and several small children.   He
was a member of the local Electrical
Workers' union, No. 213, and    was
well and favorably known.   The fun
eral takes plaoe next Tuesday.
I. T. U. CONVENTION
AT PROVIDENCE
A SUCCESS
(C ntlnued from page 1)
MINARD'S LINIMENT CURES
BURNS, ETC.
PAINE UBOR TEMPLE POOL ROOM
Are you a subscriber?   If not, send
In your name now.
OPENING OF FALL TERM
—IN—
Vancouver Business
Institute
SPROTT-SHAW
AUGUST 31st, 1914
Aifter the long holiday you may have neglected to figure on the next step
in the education of your boy or girl.
It is not too late to make arrangements for enrolment at the opening
of classes Monday Morning at 9.30.
There was never a time when a business training was as necessary to the
young folks as to-day.
Thorough practical courses along business lines; a staff of highly qualified, experienced teachers; a wide acquaintance with the business public to
help place our finished students; a reputation for honorable dealing—
THAT'S THE SPROTT-SHAW
Phone for Catalogue, or call, Seymour 1810—336 Hastings St. W.
R. J. 8PROTT, B.A.,
Preaident.
Big Exhibition Opens Next Frldsy
Sixteen big shows, together with a
number of smaller attractions, comprise the skid road, which will open
In full blast on Friday next, when the
big Vancouver exhibition really
opens. Other attractions to be seen
on the skid road are the Tango Way,
Nomla Musical Comedy, Jungleland,
Vanda, Autodrome, Penny Vaudeville, Maid-of-the-Mlst, Annex Lorlta,
Ischga-blbble, Elephant Top, Carousal. In addition to the skid road
there will be several free attractions,
which may be seen from the grandstand from time to time during the
fair.
mention the great Buffering entailed;
and
Whereas—The laboring men and
their families are the ones who are
forced to endure those hardships, and
who are giving their lives for their
respective countries, in a cause of
which they know little or nothing except that they have been ordered by
their respective rulers to go forth and
do the bidding of those rulers; and
WhereaB—This war may result In
the upsetting of the peace of the entire civilized world, which has taken
years to cement between the various
nations; therefore, be lt
Resolved—That the International
Typographical union, ln sixtieth convention assembled at Providence, R.I.,
does hereby go on record as believing
tbat this terrible conflict Is unnecessary and wholly unwarranted, and
that the great suffering and loss of
life entailed Is unjustified and without
precedent In the history of the civilised world; and be It-
Resolved—That the members of the
International Typographical union do
protest against the great suffering
and loss of life Involved ln this great
conflict and request that the president of the United States do all ln his
power to devise a means of preventing any further continuance of the
conflict and continue to offer the services of the United States, as mediator, to the various nations Involved,
to the end that peace may once more
reign on the European continent, and
Industrial conditions may be restored
to a normal status, families be reunited, men returned to their various
trades, and the great loss of life, Industrial unrest and terrible suffering
may thereby be stopped.
Cincinnati Carpentera Win
After a three months' struggle, the
Cincinnati carpenters' Btrike has been
settled, the men securing higher
wages and better working conditions.
Eight hours shall constitute a day's
work, and the minimum wage shall be
65 cents an hour from May 1st, 1914,
to October 30th, 1915, and 60 cents an
hour from November 1st, 1915, to
(April 30th, 1917, and the higher grade
of mechanics to receive a higher rate
of wages as agreed upon between the
agreement and the employee. The
agreement le to be tor a period of
three years. Arbitration Is agreed to
in case the workers and their employers fall to settle* any difference
that may arise.
Union Gains
Union baiters ln Los Angeles, Cal.,
are losing their grip, and the steady
advancemnt of the organised movement Is being noticed by those who, a
few months ago, were preaching the
end of trade unionism In this vicinity.
In the past several weeks three notable victories have been won. The
garment workers scored in their
strike against the P. A. Newmark
company after a seventeen months'
contest. The Ladles' Tailors' union
haa secured the eight-hour dsy ln a
large establishment The Boot and
Shoe Workers' union won an important strike.
Street Railwayman
"Does unionism pay?" Is answered
by officers ot the Amalgamated Association of Street and Blectric Railway
Employees of America, who announce;
"For the .first six months of the present year, our records show wage increases to 19,300 members of fifty-
four locals, equal to an annual aggregate of 11,410,000. During the six
months, through the International association, there were paid 211 death
and disability benefits In the sum
1102,888."
What about the voters' list?
BUY
BONDS
Put your money into
high-class bonds paying
7 per cent, per annum.
We will sell bonds—par
value $100.00 each—on
terms.
$10 Cash and
$10 Monthly
Salesmen Wanted
Royal Financial
Corporation, Ltd.
Paid up   Capital and   Surplus
over 1800,000.00
708-714 ROGERS BUILDING
Vancouver, B. C.
LOOK FOR THE CARD
Official Llet of Union Bara In the City
of Vancouver
Business Agent Curnock has supplied The Federatlonist with an official list of the union bars ln Vancouver, which should prove of special Interest to the union delegates who will
be ln tbe city from all over the province during the coming week, ln attendance at the special convention ot
the B. C. Federation of Labor. The
list reads:
Qranvllle Palace
Oreat Northern
Horseshoe
Imperial
Irving
Klondyke
Leland
London
Lotus
Main
Manitoba
Melbourne
Metropole
New Fountain
Palace
Patricia
Panama
Pender
Rainier
Regent
Royal Oeorge
Sherman
St. Francis
St Regis
Stanley
Stratford
Tourist
Waverley
West
Tale
Windsor
Alexandra
Alhambra
Astor
Atlantic
Austins'
Balmoral
Barnard CasUe
Barron
Blackburn
Bodega
Boulder
Burrard
Canada
Carlton
Cecil
City
Clarence
Columbia
Connaught
Cordova
Crown
Cunningham
Dominion
Dufferln
Edward
Empire
Europe
Fairmont
Qlobe
Grand
Grand Union
MINARD'S LINIMENT
CURES DANDRUFF
Stock Dinnerware
We have a fine selection of open
stock dinnerware patterns. Tou
can purchase theae as you requite.
Sold by the dosen or by the piece.
MILLAR A COE    120 Hut'ip'St. W.
SPEND TOUR SPARE TIME IN
THB LABOR TEMPLE FREE
READINO ROOM.
Phone: Fairmont 810
Patterson & Chandler
Manufacturers of
MONUMENTS
Vaults, Curbing, Etc.
Office and Works:
Cor. 16th Ave. and Main St.
Branch Offlce: 40th A Fraser Aves.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
The Advantage
of the
Corporate Trustee
Consider carefully the mistake of entrusting valuable funds
to the custody of an Individual trustee Instead of a Corporate
Trustee.
An  Individual   Trustee   might  speculate   with   the  Trust
?roperty for his own benefit or even for the benefit of the
'rust; thus the fund may be reduced or lost, the Trustee become bankrupt, and the beneficiaries left ln want.
This company Invests Trust funds only in accordance with
the provisions of the will or settlement, and only upon securities approved by the Board of Directors. All Trust Funds are
kept distinct from the Company's own funds, and the accounts
are checked by its auditors.
Onadian Financiers Trust company
HEAD OFFICE 839 HASTINGS ST. VV.     VANCOUVER., B.C.
Patrick Donnelly-General Hanajer	
25% OFF ALL TRUSSES THIS MONTH
BED STAB DBUO 8TOBE.
53 Cordova Street West Vancouver, B. 0.
Nicholson's Gin
is perfectly pure and palatable
IT'S REFRESHING
AND INVIGORATING
TRY IT FOR YOUR STOMACH'S SAKE.
WILL DO YOU GOOD.
ALL RELIABLE DEALERS SELL IT
EMPLOYMENT WANTED
-BY-
A Big Healthy, Hearty, Happy Able-bodied Three- \
pound Package of
Royal Crown
WASHING
POWDER
COMPETENT TO DO ALL KINDS OP CLEANING: WASHING DISHES A SPECIALTY; NEAT, PLEASANT AND OP
GOOD CHARACTER; CAN REPER TO EVERYBODY WHO
KNOWS ME. WILL NOT "SLEEP IN,*' CHEW GUM OR
"TALK BACK." WAGES NO OBJECT. I WANT A PLACE IN
YOUR HAPPY HOME. MEET ME AT THE GROCERY
STORE.
THE BIG LABOR DAY
D A D A T\17 Exhibition Opens Sept. 3rd
rAKAUL and Closes Sept. 12th
ON MONDAY, SEPT. 7, THE VANCOUVER EXHIBITION WILL HOLD A
GIGANTIC INDUSTRIAL AND LABOR DAY PARADE.
See the Big Exhibits. The
Dominion and the Provincial
Governments will both have
big displays.  And there will
be thousands of Commercial,
Industrial, Artistic, Educational and other miscellaneous Exhibits.
See the Big Attractions-
Range Days, the Patterson
Shows, Harness Horse Races,
an Automobile and a Horse
Show.   Show your Babies in
the Better Babies Contest.
Every day a big day—Every
night a big night.   Bigger
than before.
Vancouver Exhibition Association, 424 Pacific Building
H. S. ROLSTON, General Manager.

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