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The British Columbia Federationist Feb 26, 1915

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Array PAGE TWO
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
INOORPOBTED 1855
THE
MOLSONS
Bank
CAPITAL and RESERVE
18,800,000
93 Branches In Canada
A general banking busineu transacted. Circular letters of credit,
Bank money orders.
Savings Department
Interest allowed at highest
current rate
The Royal Bank
of Canada
INCORPORATED 1M»
Paid-up Capital - - • I 11,M0tM
Reaerve     12*MMM
fatal Aeeete 11
WE ALLOW IN-
TEREIT ON DEPOSITS IN OUR
SAVINGS
DEPARTMENT
One Dollar will open
the account, and your
buelneea will ba welcome be It largo or
amall
THIRTEEN BRANCHES IN
VANOOOVBB
THE
INCORPORATED
1SSS
BANK OF
TORONTO
Aaaata 180,000,000
.. ..M1,M0,0M
Workingmen
If you eaa aa-ra each week
even a amall amount you are invited to open a Savings Account
with The Bank of Toronto.
Small depositors aro aa well
oared for as large ones. A dollar
will start a Savings Account, and
interest is added to Savings Balances half-yearly.
MS HASTWOS STREET WEST
Corner Hastings ind Carrall Sta.
British Columbia
LAND
Splendid opportunitloa In Mixed
Farming, Dairying, Stock aid
ronltry. Britlah Columbia
Grants Pre-emptions of 180 acres
to Actual Settlers—
THE B. C. FEDERATIONIST
Published every  Friday morning  by th*
B. C. Federatlonist, Ltd.
R. Parm Pettipiece Hunger
J. W. Wilkinson Editor
Office: Room 217, Labor Temple
Tel. Exchange Sey. 7495.
Subscription: $1.50 per year; in Vanoouver
City, $2.00; to unions subscribing
In a body, $1.00
REPHESENTATVES
New Weitmlmter.. .W. B. Maiden, Bex 014
Prince Rupert W. E. Denning, Box 681
Victoria A, S. Weill, Box 1MB
Affiliated with the Weitern Labor Preu
Association. _,
■Unity of Labor; the hope ef th* world.1
FRIDAY FEBRUARY 26, 1915
Free
TERMS—Eesldence on the land
for at least three years; Improvements to the extent of *5 per
aere; bringing under cultivation
at least live acree.
For turtner information apply to
DEPUTY lmnSTBB OP
LANDS, VICTORIA, B.O.
BEOEETARY, BUREAU OP
PBOVINOIAL INFORMATION,
VIOTOBIA, B.O.
A paid-up union oard entltloe
you to all the privileges of the
Labor Temple Club,   Try It
AT A LIBERAL MEETING hold
last week, it was reported by one
of our local contemporaries that
a Mr. John Oliver was ono of the speakers, that he dealt with tho question of
compensation for in*
A MR. OLIVER    jured workmen, and
OEM QUITE       ""■'     he    ,'"""Jly
OETS QUITE       roted   the MoBride
ANNOYED government for be
ing -*'woefully, re-
misB" in not passing into law a bom*
pensation act whieh would really give
compensation to those seeking and entitled to it. We can quite understand
him doing that, but the report goes on
to say: ,
He replied to criticism of the
editor of the B. C. Federatlonist,
stating that he had worked more
in his lifetime than the former ever
had in his.
Now just what place the latter part
of the statement has in a political discussion—which should be on an impersonal plane where men of any breadth
of caliber are concerned—we cannot
quite see.
....
Whatever the reason maybe for it we
are not annoyed, and certainly not dls*
turbed. It looks as though the speaker
was.upset about something,, and that he,
temporarily at least, forgot his platform etiquette so far as to lapse into
peevish and childlike attempts to
soothe his feelings. If he really -was
annoyed, it was silly to let it be seen
in that way. On a public platform it
is clumsy to betray the faot that any*
one has "got your goat." But perhaps Mr. Oliver has not had the experience whieh teaches: that, and we
would like to save him from a defect
in his style. Wo want to do him as
large a measure of justice as is commensurate* with saving him from himself, and to: discover, by diagnosis of
his symptoms what is the cause, of his
ailment. Thinking the matter over
carefully, we have come to the opinion
that possibly Mr. Oliver was angry
with us on account of an expression of
opinion regarding Liberalism, which appeared in these columns two weeks ago,
Ahd that he bus perhaps suspected from
it that wo do not feel that it would; be
any advantage or credit to labor to ally
itself with the Liberal party, in an
effort to secure legislation in the interests of the working class. If he has
gathered that impression, he is right.
And we will say plainly for Us benefit
—and that of any others who think
the workers should suppojjt the liberal
party—that we do not think that party
is any more use to tho working class
than the Conservatives.
•       *•     ; V
In various places, by various methods, there are various supporters' of the
Liberals who are hoping that when tho
time comes they will be able to swing
tho vote of organlied labor to the support of their party. For tho present
they need not oause any alarm, and
when the occasion arises will receive
appropriate attention. An additional
reason for Mr. Oliver's annoyance, per*
haps, lies in the fact that a draft
Workmen's Compensation act has been
published as- his production, in pamphlet form which includes an extract
from the platform of tho Liberal party,
and which he has tried to have adopted
by organized labor but failed because
it hi\s basic defects. The defects are
duo to the characteristic Liberal desire
to run with the hare and hunt with the
hounds. We understand Mr. Oliver is
a farmor, and we would suggest—with
overy sentiment of charity and goodwill—that it would be much more, appropriate for him to concentrate his
faculties on tho production of the perfect turnip, ond the solving of the problem of bow to moko a living nt farming
in British Columbia, than to try and
tell labor what kind of a compensation
act it wants, when it already knows
what it wants better than he does. Incidentally we would suggest to him not
to discount his platform influence by
such silly and peevish sayings as that
attributed to him. For our part, we
do not mind, and we make the suggestion entirely out of a desire for his
good.
B. C. MUNICIPAL BONDS
FOR SAFETY, STABILITY,
AND ATTRACTIVE INCOME
Municipal Bonds aro exposed to tho criticism of every
financial journal, yet it is noticeable that B. C. Municipal
Bonds, although tney yield large returns, havo never been
adversely criticised.
Buy from a responsible oompany that has carefully
scrutinized the investment.
We offer selected Bonds in amounts from $100 up to
yield 81-8% to 7% that are unquestioned and the prices
right.
Canadian Financiers Trust Company
H HEAD OFFICE 839 HASTINGS ST.W.     VANCOUVER.. B.C.
11 Patrick Donnelly -GcnersJ Mftna|c>? 	
EMPLOYMENT    AGENCIES,    are
something  which  Premier    McBride, according to his statement
in the Legislature last Friday, would
like to see abolished.   But at present,
he says, ,he cannot
• v.ii mt Bee how that can be
M BRIDE ,        „
done. For years, or-
MAKESAN ganized   labor   has
ADMISSION ben urging the gov
ernment to wipe out
the agencies, as one ot the worst of the
evils attendant on tbe industrial Ufe of
the province. On each occasion the
Premier has promised the. usual "earnest consideration"—but he never does
anything. He has not even expressed
an opinion as to the merits of the proposal before. So that his declaration
last week was really a very notable
performance—for him. We are certainly getting on, and it is to be earnestly
hoped that we shall not get bewildered
or lose our heads as the result of such
a magnanimous concession. But .there
iB no danger really. This kind of thing
is only one of the1 sops handed out now
and again for the purpose of keeping
alive the optimism of those, working
class asBes who think they will ever get
anything from the government as long
as the government Ib master inside the
Legiaature and the workers are on the
outside.
* #•        a a
If Premier McBride could be convinced that the workers were a political
menace to his party, he would speedily
find a way to abolish private employment agencies, and substitute in their
place either provincial or municipal
agencies, or both. The1 organized labor
movement, as far aB its-, industrial
power goes, never caused him less concern than it does to-day. Unions do
not worry him, but the votes of unionists would do. The way to tackle the
agencies would soon be found then, because political alarm would produce the
will to flnd it. It eould be found now
if the government was only one hun
dredth part as solicitous of the welfare
of working men as it is of the great
railway and other corporations which
are served by the employment agencies.
As1 a matter of fact, the only measure
of proteotion which has ever been given
against them, came not from the Provincial but the Dominion government.
Sifted down to-essentials this is the
situation. McBride admits the agencies
should be done away with. He will
never put them but of business voluntarily. The only way it will ever be
done is by the workers organizing their
political power to make the government abolish the private ■ employment
agencies.
FBIDAT..  ..  . .FEBRUARY 26, 1911
particular spot. We must have a job
as near it as maybe, and are usually
ready to tolerate oppression rather than
have to seek farther afield. The surroundings may havo become distasteful
but there we have to Btay. This in spite
of the fact that man is by nature nomadic. Indeed the severest punishment
society can inflict on a man is, to make
him stay in one place all the time.
Thousands of people in this city who
think they own their houses are really
no more than the prisoners of the loan
and mortgage companies.
SWEETLY
CHRISTIAN
TOLERANCE
TO  HEAR  HIM  TALK,   anyone
who did not know him, might
believe Premier MoBride when
he Bays, as he did last week, British
Columbia has a lot of good labor legislation on its statute
CONCERNING booka *Put there b*
___■_:.■-. . .„*„ his government dur-
THAT LABOR     ing   ^   ^   ^
LEGISLATION yearflt it may be
true, as, he also said,
that British Columbia has more labor
legislation on its books than any other
province in the Dominion. But that is
not the real point. The question is, of
what use ib that legislation to the working class of the province! Experience
has proved that in most oases it is no
use. And in others it is worse than no
use, because large sumB of money have
been expended by the workers through
legal channels to discover that fact.
• a a a
Broadly speaking, the labor legislation passed by this government may be
divided into two parts. One part con*
sists of those laws which will not work,
because they are either full of
"jokers,?' or so framed that the lawyer
gets the only advantage of any award
given under them. The other consists
of those laws whioh would work if the
government would set them in motion.
But that it will not do, so they are no
better than the others. As a typical
instance, if the government had been
willing to •carry out the provisions of
the Coal Mines Regulation,act, instead
of placing every quibble and technical
objection in the way of that course,
the late miner's strike would not have
taken place—or even if it had started,
it would not have developed the proportions and gravity which it did.
About the only one of these laws whloh
does work is the Factory act, and that
only to a limited degree. There are not
enough inspectors, and many breaches
of tho law are tolerated out of a desire
not to hamper business firms. In the
first place these laws were not made by
thoso who should benefit by them.
econdly the same people have not the
power to enforce the law even if it
might be of use. The moral from this
should be obvious.
OWN YOUR OWN HOUSE.   How
nice it sounds!   And   perhaps,
other things being favorable, it
would be alright.   But how often the
possession of a house -forces men to be
meek, and   tolerate
OWNING servitude they
would    otherwise
YOUR
never    dream    of.
OWN .HO0BB How many men in
British Columbia—
particularly in the cities—have been
literally forced to grovel for the. chance
to earn the payments, or even the interest on the payments, for their
house f Our own house I What sacrifices are made to get itl What meannesses are tolerated from the boss in
the effort to hold it. And what intellectual necessaries are denied in the
deBiro to hang on to the wretched
thingi
'»        t -'     *        «
To keep that roof over our heads we
often have to unroof our very manhood,
and sap the foundations of happiness
for thoae around ub.  We are glued to a
A LORD, ABOVE ALL OTHERS,
has in^these topsy turvy days,
to become the champion of the
constitutional right of the British subject to a trial by a jury of his equals,
What Ib   more,   he
THE LOBD        •->•'•'to dght the Lib*
eral government  in
18 0N Great Britain to get
OUR SIDE • it. The Liberal "fathers of liberty"
and "defenders of democracy." When
the new Defence of the Realm act waB
passed at the last session of the British parliament, it practically swept
away at one stroke all previous rights
of the civilian population insofar as
any offence against the act is concerned, and transferred the power of
the judiciary to courts martial. Where
were those far-sighted libertarians who
are supposed to be so numerous among
the 670 members of the House of Commons at that timef Were they all bo
engrossed in the liberty crushing proclivities of. the Oerman junkers that
they could not see what was being done
under their very noses? i
*        *.      * '     •
It looks like,a very apt illustration of
the saying that the danger which is
closest to the eye Ib the hardest to see,
Not since the days of A, D. 1215 when
the Magna Charta was wrung from
King John at Runnymede, has such a
subversive attempt been made,to curtail the civil rights of the common people. But there is real irony in a lord
coming to the rescue. Lord Parmoor,
in the House of Lords, protested so vigorously against thiB.act, that he has
forced the Liberal champions of Britain 's common liberties t» amend their
notion. Even at-that, they have only
done lh their usual compromise fashion,
and not because they like being forced
to back down, •*-A~ person charged under
the act now, can be tried by a jury, if
he decides to claim that right within
four days after he is arraigned.
'•       **'•«
And even that may be Buspended under suoh conditions as are deemed
"special emergency" by the government. It is a measure fraught with
grave significance to those who have
their doubts as to this war being followed by increased freedom for the
common people in any one of the countries involved. .And when the eyes of
the working folk of Britain are turned
to the problems which will undoubtedly
confront them when the war is onded,
they may find this act a weapon to be
used against them under circumstances
which in the excitement of to-day they
do not suspect. This may not be the
time to rub things in, but there iB nothing to be lost by remembering that the
present Liberal administration in Britain used military force against workmen twelve times in seven years. The
Defence of the Realm act should be repealed immediately after the close of
the war. That will be the only way
to protect the common people from the
junkers at home, both political and
military. They are there, and just as
ready as their kind anywhere to take
advantage of a situation favorable to
them.
DEAN INGE THE  GLOOMY  divine of St.    Pauls    seems    as
though he must have a periodical blow up or he would "buBt."   This
time it iB the Anti-Vaccination league
which   has brought
his bristles up. That
organization is conducting   an    agitation against the action of   the   army
authorities, in trying to compel all recruits—whether they are willing or not
—to be vaccinated.   This is the way
this jumpy cleric goes for the league;
Deanery, St. Paul's, E.C.
"Sir—X cannot imagine a more
disgraceful or unpatriotic agitation
than that in which you   are   engaged.   If I were at the head of
affairs, I should have   you   shot
summarily.—Yours faithfulyy,
W. R. Inge."
Thus this gentle disciple of the lowly,
Nazarene. He might at least have
said: "Father forgive them for they
know not what they do." But we oan
only take him at his word and believe
he would have them shot. Doubtless
if his Master oame on earth just now,
he would favor Mb crucifixion again,
for Christ would almost certainly
scourge him from the temple for owning shares in the armament firm of
Vickers &, Company. Oh, these parsons!
BJBNHABDI,   NEITZSCHE, Trelt
schke, and sundry others   of a
very choice aggregation of European militarist maniacs, have been very
much in the limelight of late.   To their
philosophy bf force,
A CLASSIC ana* gloriflication of
BRITISH w^r'    the    *Present
mmHKABiir       ho"OT   over   the"
BB3NHARDI       ^ bfl(m largely ^
tributod, and perusal of their literary efforts does not lead
one to disbelieve the charge. But it must
not be imagined that any one country
has an exclusive claim to men of their
type of mind. This is brought home
by the following extract from the presidential address of Professor W. Ridge-
way at the annual meeting of the Classical association held in London, England, January 8th.   It roads:
The history of Greece warned us
against giving a hasty credence to
the dream of perpetual peace when
military monarchies had fallen and
democracy was universal.    A modern world filled only with democratic states would be like a   stagnant pond in some shady spot in
which no   higher   animal   forms
eould live, but overflowing with all
the lower and baser forms of life.
In a world of perfect peace   humanity would perish from its own
physical and moral corruption.
Whatever other classical    qualifications the gentleman may have, he is
certainly a classic example of the pestiferous school to which his   German
prototypes belong.  It appears hopeless
to argue with such people, bemuse it is
so difficult to discover by wnat mental
process they arrive at suoh conclusions.
One would think to read them, that war
preserved   the  highest   animal   forms
instead of destroying them, and that
the constructive works of peace were
of no use to the progress of mankind as
compared with the destruction of war.
It almost seems useless to expect to influence such minds by   argument   or
practical example, and that they should
be treated as a form of mono-mania to
be placed under restraint In some institution for tho mentally unfit.
Arms for one half of the world, and
alms for the other half. This is progress.
In the Supreme Court last Friday, it
was decided that a man's wife was not
his relative. Perhaps that explains why
a married couple can sometimes live
together.
If someone of an inventive turn of
mind could devise a way of growing
square peas, he might make a fortune.
They would not roll off a knife like the
round ones do.
All in due time it looks as though
the militarist section of the Social Democratic party in Germany will be used
again. This time as a broom to help
clear up tho mess.  ,
Give a baby a rattle and it will keep
him quite and amused. Give the workers songs about the freedom that they
have not got, and the effect is much
the same. The world Is ruled more by
the applied symbolism of the ruling
class than by the applied sense of the
working class.
Westminster Trust Co.
HEAD OFFICE NEW WESTMINSTER, B. C.
J. J. JONES, Man. Director. J. A. RENNIE, Sec.-Treas.
ACTS AS ASSIGNEES, LIQUIDATORS AND RECEIVERS
INSURANCE IN ALL ITS BRANCHES
HOUSES, BUNGALOWS, STORES AND MODERN SUITES FOR RENT
,   ■ at a Big Reduction
Safety Deposit Boxes for Rent at 12.60 np
Wills Drawn Free of Charge
Deposits Accepted and Interest at Four Per Cent Allowed
on Dally Balances.
BUSINSSS AOBNT DIRECTORY
Ask for labor Tsmple '-Phone Bxefeuft,
Stymour .7495   (unless  otherwise  stated).
Bartenders—Oeo. W. Curnook, Room BOB.
Bricklayers—-Wm. S, Dagnall, Room 21S.
Cooki, ' Walten,    Waltreiiei—Room    308;
Andy Graham;  phone  Sey.  8414.
Electrical  Workers   (outside)—E. H.  Morrison, Room 207.
Electrical  Workers   (Inside)—P.  L.   Eating-
bauson, Room 207.
Engineer!  (steam)—Room 216; I, Prendsr-
gSSt
Laborers—John Sully, Room 220.
Longshoremen'•   Association —  Offlee,   145
Alexander street; F. Payne;  phons   Bey.
08B0.
Moving Pleture Operators—O. R. Hamilton;
room 100, Loo building; phono Sey. 1045.
Musicians—H. J. Brasfleld, Rooms lei-SOS,
Labor Temple.
Street Railway Employees—Pred. A. Hoonr;
phone Sey. BOS.      ,
Typographical—R, H. Neelands, Rooms 212-
18-14;     .
TRADI UNION  DIRECTORY
The Victoria Week positively gushed
with courtesy last Saturday, and
thanked us in the most charming manner possible for our previous week's
effort on its behalf. It is tqo bad it
cut us off its exchange Hat, for- it is obvious that we might become a source
of endless amenities to each other.'
In political life, a man can be criticised, and1 criticised very vigorously
too, for a long time, with results often
favorable to the critics. But if the
business is carried to the degree where
the general public gets the impression
that the criticism has degenerated into
personal persecution, then the result
work/ the opposite way, and sympathy
makes votes for him irrespective of his
political merits or demerits.
The relation of wheat to war is shewn
by a quotation from the Lincoln, England, corn market, February 6th.
Wheat then reached 60 shillings a quarter, and found active demand at that,
What the present prices mean is better realized when it is recalled that
during the famous Leiter corner in
wheat the highest figure reached at Lincoln, one of the most important of English grain markets, was 55s. a quarter,
and that was only maintained for one
day.
Mr. Hayward—M. L. A, for Cowichan—has developed a serious regard
(or the lot of railroad laborers and
others who pay 41.00 a month for medical service which they have to receive
at the hands of a sawbones chosen by
the companies, or not at all. This is a
new role for him. Up to now—as the
member for an agricultural constituency—he has been chiefly noted for his
advocacy of very cheap labor for clearing land. And if wo remember rightly
he is willing to use Orientals to attain
his object if white men are* not amenable to the terms he would offer.
Allied Printing Trades Connell—R. H. Neelands, Box ee.
Bakers—J, Blaok, Room 830, Labor
Tsmple.
Barbers—S. H. Orant, 081 Georgia street.
Bartenders—Geo. -W. Curnocn,-- Hoom
tot, Labor Temple.
Blacksmiths — Malcolm Porter, View
Hill P. O. ' •
Bookbinders.
BollermahHW—A. Frager, 1111 Howe St.
Brewery Workers—Frank Graham. Ltbor
Tomple. • ■ /
Brick lay ers—W| 111am S. Dagnall, Room
21B, Labor Temple.
Brotherhood of Carpenten Dlstriot Counoll—P. L. Barratt, Room 109, Leber Ton*
pla.
Clgarmakers—Can Knrti Cigar Factory, 72
Water Stnet.
Cooks, Walters, Waitresses—Andy Graham,
Room 206, Labor Temple. 1
Electrical Workon (outside)—B. S. Morrison, Room 907, Labor Templo.
Eloetrleal Workers (Inside)—Room 207; F.
L. Estinghausen.
Engineers—B. Prendergaat, Boob 916, Labor Tomple.
Granite Cutters—Edward Hurry, Columbia Hotel.
Garment Workon—Labor Temple.
Horseshoers — A. C.' MaoArthur, City
Heights, ao.
Letteroarrfers—Robt. .Wight, District 92.
Laborers—Oeorge Harrison, Room 290, Labor Temple.
Lathers—victor R. Midgley, Lsbor Tomple.
Locomotive Firemen and Engineers—C. Howard, 607 Davie street,'
Loco. Engineers—A. a Solloway, 1098
Pacific.   Tel. Sey. 9I71L.
Longshoremen—Geo. Thomas, 141 Alexander Btreet
Machinists—J. H. MoVety, Room 111,
Labor Tsmple.
Musicians—H. J. Brasfleld, Booms 804-805,
'  Labor Temple.
Marbleworkers—Frank Hall, Janes Road,
B.C.
Molden. •
Moving Picture Operators—L. a Goodman, Room 100, Loo Building.
Painters—J. ■ Train, Boom 808, Labor
Temple. ;'■'
Plumben—Room 208, Labor Temple.
Pressmen—P. D. Edward, Labor Temple.
Plasterers—John James Cornish, 1801
Eleventh Ave. East.
Pattern Makers—J. Campbell, 4809 Argyle Street.
Quarry Workera—James Hepburn, ear*
Columbia Hotel.
Railway Conductors—G. W. Hatch, 781
Beatty street.
Railroad Trainmen—A. a McCorvlllo,
Box 24S.
Railway Carmen—A, Robb, 420 Nelson
Street.
Seamen's Union.
Structural Iron Worken—Room 208, Labor
Temple.
, Stonecutters—James  Raybnrn,   P.   O.' Box
\*  1047.
Sheet Metal Workers—H. C. Dougan, No,
fi. Fifteenth Ave. West
Street Railway Employees—A. V.' Lofting, 2619 Trinity Strset
Stereotypers—W. Bayley, care Province,
City.
Telegraphers—a B. Peppln, Box 4tt.
Trades and Labor Council—Oeo. Bartley,
Room 110 Labor Temple.
Typographical—H. Neelands, Box 96.
Tailors—C. MoDonald, Box EOS.
Theatrical Stage Employees—Geo. .W. AMa,
Box TU.
Tllelayers and Helpers—Evan Thomas,
Labor Temple.
. WaU of Railway Official
Editor B. C. Federationist: I have
just noticed an item in the daily papers
that a United States railway official
complains because while the union employees' wages are increasing the officials' salaries are going down, and that
now a railway engineer gets bigger pay
than the man who "oversees" him. Besides being a good argument in favor
of the benefits of unionism, it also
strongly proves that while it takes a
good man to make an engineer, or any
other man who "does things," any old
fosBil can "oversee" him doing it—
hence his smaller value to the big push
higher up. READER.
Victoria, B. C, Feb. 25, 1915.
Tho new Labor Temple, the future
home of the San Francisco Labor council, being erected at Sixteenth And
Capp streets, at a cost of more than
(150,000, will be completed and ready
for occupancy the last of this month.
Phones:   Seymour 8258 and 8259
THE
Hose & Brooks Co., Ltd.
Wines, Liquors and bigars
504 Main Street, Vancouver, B.C.
T. B. CUTHBERTSON & Oo.
Men's Hatters and Outfitters
Three Stores
VANCOUVEB UNIONS
TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL -
Meets flnt and third Thursdays. Executive board; Jas, H. MoVety, president;
F. L. Estinghausen, vice-president; Geo,
Bartley, general secretary, 210 Labor
Temple; Miss H. Outterldge, treasurer;
Fred A. Hoover, statistician; sergeant-
at-arms, John Sully; A. J. Crawford, Fred.
Knowles, W. R. Trotter, truatees.
ALUBD   PRINTING   TRADES    COUN-
C1L.—Meets  second  Monday  In  the
month,    President,  Oeo.  Mowat;  seoreUry, R. H. Neelanda, P. O. Box 60.
BARTENDERS'   LOCAL   No.  874,-OF-
«co, Room 808 Labor Temple. Meets
flrst Sunday of each month. Preaident*
k\ F. Lavlgne; flnanclal seoretary, Ueo.
W. Curnock, Room 808, Labor Temple.
BlUCKLAVtfHfi' AND MAtiUNS', NO. 1
—Meeta every lot and 3rd Tuesday,
h p.m., itoom au7. President, Jaiuea
Haslett; corresponding secretary, VV. 6.
Dagnall, Box 6*; flnanclal aeoretary, K
tt. .brown; business agent, W. S. Dagnall, Room 215.
BROTHERHOOD   Of   BOILER    MAKERS
I and iron Ship. Balldera and Helpers
ot America,  Vancouver   iiodfo   No.   181—
I MeeU  first  snd   third  Mondaya,  I  p. a
Presidont, F. Barclay,   868   Cordova   Eaat;
aeoretary, A. Fraaer, 1161 Howo street.
COOKS,    WAITERS   AND    WAITRESSES
Union—Meoti   first   Friday   ia   eaeh
. month, 8:80 p. m., Labor Templo. A. Ore-,
ham, bnalaeaa representative.   Office:   Room
1208, Labor Tomple. Hours: 8:80 a. m. to
10; 2 to 6 p. m. Competent help furnished!
on abort notice.   Phono Seymour 8414,   '  J
I DISTRICT    OOUNOIL   OF   CARPENTERS'
meeta la room 809, Labor Temple, see*
.ond aad fourth Thuraday of sash month, •
p. m. Preaident, O. H. 'Hardy: aeeretary,
F. L. Barratt; treaiurer, W. T. Taylor.   Lo-,
i eal No. 317 meets firat and third Mob*
day of eaoh month, aad Looal 86*7 meats.
firat end third Tnoaday of eaoh month. 1
ELECTRICAL WORKERS, LOCAL NO. 318,1
—Meeta room 801, Labor Temple, everyi
Monday, 8 p. m. Pretident, Sam. Cawker,
657 Temple ton Drive; recording seoretary
H. Hogin, Labor Temple; financial secretory
snd  business  agent,  E,  H.  Morrison,  Room
807, Labor Temple.  -   _■ _^
ELECTRICAL WORKERS, LOCAL NO.,
621 (Inside Men)—MeeU flrst andl
third Mondays of each month. Room 206,i
9 p. m. President, H. R. Van Sickle; re-v
cording secretary. J. M. Campbell; bust
 .—■. M "   Estinghausen, Room 807
ness agent, F. L*
HOD0ARBIER8, BUILDING AND COMMONS
Laborera1 union. No. 65—Meets flret nnd]
third Friday of each month, Labor Templo.
Preeldent, E. C. Appleby, 1419 Pendrill St.; i
secretary. Oeorge Harrison; business agent,!
John Sully, room 220, Labor Templo. Alltl
laborera Invited to meeting.
MACHINISTS,   NO.   182—MEETS  SECOND!
and fourth Fridays at 8 p. m. Presidents
J. Mclvor; recording aeoretary, J. Brookes ;|
financial secretary, J. H. MoVety.
MUSICIANS'    MUTUAL   PROTECTIVE
Union, Local No, 145, A. F. of M.-I
Meete aeoond Sunday   of   each montl
803 Lsbor Tomple.   President,  J.  Bowyei
-*        '   F. English; aeeretary, H. i._
 v.m,    ..«aiorer,    W.    fowler.    Phoaofl
Seymour 7496.
PLASTERERS'     OPERATIVE     INTERNA
TIONAL ASSOCIATION, tfo. 89 -*
Meets every flrst and third Wednesday In that
month In room 301, Labor Temple. Presl-I
dent, A. Hurry; vice-president, A. Berontsenil
corresponding secretary, Joe Cornish, 1801.1
Eleventh avenue easti flnanclal secretary,!
George Montgomery; treasurer, Harold Reld.]
PAINTERS'.. PAPERHANOBRS;. ANnl
Decorators', Local 188—Meets everxl
Thursday, 7.80 p.m. President, H. Grand/I
flnanclal secretary, J. Freckleton, Itttl
Comox street; recording secretary, Rl
Dowding, 613 Howe street. BuMnesal
agent, James Train, Room 108, Laboil
Temple,
PANTAGES
Un.qu.IUd V.ud.vlll.   Mum
PANTAGES  VAUDIVILLI
THRU SHOWI DAILV
Md 7.S0, ).1l    Sunn'l   Prlc.l:
Mitlmt, 1le.| Iv.nlnga, \1i«., Bo.
WILLOW HOSPITAL
FOB
SICK CHILDREN
Corner Broadway and Willow
Phone Fairmont 8165
Miss Ball ahd Silas Woitlay,  ,
 QradtiaU Hnraaa        « *
Take that Watch to
APPLEBY
who will tell you what is tbe
matter, cost and guarantee aU
Repairs.   138 Richards Street
SYNOPSIS   OF   COAL   MINING   REGULATIONS
Coal mining rights of the Dominion,
In Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,
the Yukon Territory, the Northwest Territories and In a portion of the Provinoe
of British Columbia, may be leased for
a term of twenty-one years at an annual
rental of |l an aore. Not more than
2,660 acres will be leased te one applicant.
Applications for lease must be made by
the applicant tn person to the Agent or
Sub-Agent of the district ln whloh the
rights applied for are situated.
In surveyed territory tbe land must bo
described by seotlons, or legal subdivisions of sectlona, and In unsurveyad territory the tract applied for ahall be
ataked by the applicant himself,
Each application must be accompanied
by a fee of |S, which will be refunded If
the rights applied for are not available,
but not otherwise. A royalty shall bs
paid on the merchantable output of the
mine at the rate of five cents per ton.
The parson operating the mine shall
furnish the Agent with sworn returna
accounting for the fall quantity of merchantable eoal mined and pay the royalty thereon. If the coal mining lights
Se not being operated, suoh returna
ould be furnished at least once a year
The lease will Include the ooal mining
rlghu only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available
surfaoe rlghu may be considered necessary for the working of the mine at the
rate of 110 an aore.
For full Information application should
be made to the Seoretary of the Department of the Interior, Ottawa, or to any
Agent or Bub-Agent of Dominion Lands.
W   H   CORY
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N. B.—Unauthorised publication of this
advertisement will not be paid for—866N.
PATTERN    MAKERS'     LEAGUE     OF
NORTH AMERICA.-Vancouver and
, vicinity.   Branch meets 1st and Srd Frl
days at Labor Temple, room 865. Robenj
IC.   Sampson,   Pres.,  747  Duntevy Arm
Jos. Q. Lyon, flnanclal secretary, 172
Grant street; J, Campbell, according sec
retary, 4888 Argyle street.
STEREOTYPERS' AND ELECTROTYpB
ers' Union, No, 88, of Vancouver sn-fl
Vlotoria—MeeU second Wednesday ol
eaeh month, 4 p. m., Labor Temple. Presl ■
dent, Chaa. Bayley; recording secretary*
A. Birnle, o.o. f'News Advertiser."        \_\
I STREET AND ELECTRIC RAILWAY IMl
I PLOYEE8. Pioneer -Division, No. 101-1
Meets Labor Temple fint and third Wedaos-J
.daya at 8:80 and 8 p. m. Praaldant, Josl
Hubble: recording aeeretary, Jaa. B. Grind
flnanolal aeoretary and boslnasa agent, Fradl
I A. Hoover, 3408 Clark Drive. '"
STEAM   ENGINEERS,   INTERNATIONAL
al Local 8f7-M«oU every Wednesday!
t p. m„ room 804, Labor Temple. FlnanT
clal secretary, B. Prendergaat, room 816. if
TAILORS'   INDUSTRIAL   UNION   (IN-m
ternatlonal). Looal No. 178—Meetings!
held first Tueaday ln eaeh month, 8 p. m.|
President, Miss H. Gutteridge; recording!
seoretary,  O.  MoDonald,    Box   60S;   flnan-r
clal sec,, K. Paterson, P. 0. Box EOS.
THEATRICAL   STAGE   EMPLOYEES,  LO*|
*"* "-  ■" adsy «!
i«wvwi     aia-Jfl     —air AMI-Ett,
CAL No, 118—Meata seeond Swot, »*■
each month, at room 804,    Labor Tempje./
President, H, Spears; "nwrdlng'seorotary.C
Geo. W, Allln, P. 0. Box 711, Vancouver.
TYPOGRAPHICAL    UNION;    NO.    886—1
Meets last Sunday ef eaeh month at 81
S. m. Preeldent, R. P. PeMlpleee; vlee-pml-1
ent, W. 8. Mauser: seeretary-treaairer, R.1
H. Neelanda, P. 0. Box 96. Il
PBOVINOIAL UNION8
B.    C.    FEDERATION OF LABOR—Meets!
in annual convention In Jantisry. Exee-U
utlvo officers, 1916-18: President, A. Watch-iT
man; vice-presidents—Vancouver, W FA
Dunn, J. H. MoVety; Vlotoria, B. Simmons-II
Now Westminster W. Y.tcs; Prince Rum*!
W. E. Denning; Revelstoke, J. Lyon: TCI
trlct 28, U. it. W. of A. (Vsncouver Island?!
8. Outhrle; District 18, U M W. o'All
(Crow's Nest Valley), 'a. J. Carter; eecrti
^njtressuror, A. 8. Wells. P. 0. box 1688f
NBW WESTMINSTER, B.C.
NEW WESTMINSTER TRADES AND LA
,        BOR Couneil—Meets every second an
fourth Wednesday at 8 p. m. In Lsbor hat—
'Praaldant, H. Knudson; finanoial aeereUryl
1 R, A. Stoney; general   secreUry,   W.   ll
Maiden.   P.O. Box 884.   Tho public b ln|
PLUMBERS AND STEAMFITTERS' LOO
' No. 488—MaaU every aecond aad foal.
Friday of month In Lsoor hall, 7:80 p. a
President.  D.  Webster:  saoretary,  A.  Ml.
Lsren.   P. 0.. Box 856, New Weetmfnater|
VICTORIA, B, C.
VICTORIA  TRADES AND  LABOB OOD
CIL—Meets first and (bird WedoMdi
Ubor ball   781 Johnston etreet. «. «p. .
President A. 8. Walls: aeeretary. Tho*
Mathlson, Box 80S, V-fetori? iTo.
KIMBEBLEY MINERS' UNION, NO. 10 J
m Weston Federation of Mlnen—Mas F
Sunday evenings la Union hsU. tnS J
Alex. Wilson; seeroUry-treaearer, J.
Stewart, Klmberley, B. fl/™^"**'   *'
ORGANISED  LABOR  COMPANIES.
LABOR TEMPLE COMPANY, LIMITED-1
Directors: Jas. Brown, president; R. f
Pettlplece, vice-president; Edward Lotbtt
Jamea Campbell, J. W. Wllklnaon, Geo; Wu
bv, W, J. Nagle, F. Blumberg, H, H. FrJ
Managing director and secretary-treasurer, I
H. MoVety, room 211, Labor Temple,
B. 0. FEDERATIONIST, LIMITED—MeJ
at call of president, Labor Temple, VaT
couver, B, C. Directors: 'James CampbtJ
preaident; J. H. MoVety, secretary.treasures
A. Watchman, A. 8. Wells. R. Parm. Pell
pleoe, manager, 817 Labor Templo. T<|
phone:    Seymour 7496.
*-e*emV$i pmouL   papbi   vascouvbr
■I   AIO   LABOB   OOUNOIL
THE BRITISH COLUMilA FEDERATIONIST
EVENTHYEAR.  No. 9.
Regular
.00 Values
for 82c.
Not only are they of exceptional quality, but we
[show them in oak, block and tiling effect, in colors
[suitable for halls, kitchens, offices, etc.—anywhere
[foot traffic is heavy. Guaranteed to give service
I and satisfaction.  Special, yard 82c
(STOhpBudsonsBQU(fompanij. fijjl
___.   ■_) t_____m_t_t  lata     nwkwi saaaitw. ataaat aammaaw y J~*\ •
GRANVILLE AND GEORGIA STREETS
MAKE THE HOTEL LOTOS YOUR
HEADQUARTERS
VANCOUVER,    B.C.
160
BOOMS
100
lh Connecting Baths
nrgest and
it GATE ln
the Oity
Large Commodious Lounge
Rooms and
Parlon
auiiuuii
mtMh .X'*vi;,:j-;..".j-;
---WkiSMM
Tariff:
Without Bath
$1.00 np
With Bath
J1.60 np
Absolutely Fire-Proof
HOTEL LOTUS
Howard J.  Shecnan,  Manager
WRITE NOW FOR TOUR RESERVATIONS
fcROWN and BRIDGE WORK
Ir. Brett Anderson, dental expert and specialist ln Crown and Bridge
rork. Formerly lecturer and demonstrator of Crown and Bridge work,
follege of Dentistry, University of B. O,
OOLD AND FOBOBLAIH CROWNS, Bach..  .... t 5.00 UP
BRIDGE WORK, per Tooth     6.00 UP
PERFECT FITTING PLATES    10.00 UP
AMALOAM FILLINGS      1.00 UP
ENAMEL FILLINOS      2.00 UP
OOLD FILLINOS      2.00 UP
Painless methods,  Work guaranteed.
Dr. BRETT ANDERSON
hone Seymour SSS1 Offlce:  101 Buk of Ottawa Building
JRASP THE OPPORTUNITY
Nmr Men hen tn hid mch OBBAT BARGAINS h bow prevailing et our
ton.
W. ban durlni tb. put f.w tty, tow particularly fortnnat. In stearin*
» "dandy" loti.   W. wut yoa to com .long and Inspect th. good, thtt ar.
sV-»   n   T-*   A   T> 1-  O  T- -°- pon" 0r *""•VAlra
I   K   K A    I    Hoi   -0* VAMB" or ASSOBTMBHI
So mattw watt yon r^ulnnrat. may b., w. oaa aeunudat. yoa.
_    W. eaa nt In yonr Horn. Ib. Ban Oopn.t—Ih. Spu. Boom—or Tla
pompUto In .-rary detail.
mi    '•nTT-riTVT-E*.-. 206 GRANVILLE
rM. TURNER ___>_*__*■-■
Phone:   SET. 3746
VANCOUVER, B. C., FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26.191S.
THE NEW ZEALAND
Women Have Held the Franchise There for Last
21 Years
No Country Has Done More
for the Women and
Children
Boy's Department
SUITS THAT WEAR
Made with doable mti -ud douMa albowa ttaaaa «• "011114 to waar.1     	
matarlala ud honaat workmuihip ara combined to prodoca raalljr dnrabla ud
long livad mitt
Thay ooma tn P.B. ud Norfolk atylaa, at pricti from
$3.50 Up
CLUBB & STEWART, Limited
100*316 HASTINOS STBBBI WBST,  Plum, gtyaonr 7M
rhomson
Stationery Co., Ltd.
M. 3. OASKELL, Pros.
Stationery Printing and
Bookbinding
326 Hastings Street West
VANCOUVER, B, O.
Iffice Furniture
Less Than Wholesale
astings Furniture Ce., Ltd., 41 Hastings St. West
We are making a Clearance of
all present stock of Offlce'Fumi-
ture.
Oome early and nuke your
choice.
25% OFF ALL TRUSSES THIS MONTH
RED STAR DRUG STORE.     .
i Cordova Street West Vancouver, B. O.
[YTET. PEflENT Absolutely Fireproof.   Looal and Long-Dlstance
lit till XUlUCilll   ph0Ile |„ Every Boom.Cafe In Conneotlon. Rates
00 per day up.     Attractive Ratea to Permanent Quests.
Waibam A Beatty. Proprl.tori IN Button Stmt BUI
ENDER HOTEL
1 PEJCBBB STBBBI fill
New, Modem, ritt-OlMi
Steam Hosted, Eleotrle Llfhtrt
TaLphon. BMW MM
Bate. H.M per Pay and Pp
MOUNT PLEASANT HEADQUARTERS
For Hardware, Stovei and Rang-M—
Bveiything for the Kitchen *
W. R. OWEN & MORRISON
gong Fair. 447  2387 Main Street
By J. T. p«u
Woman ia the aggregate is very muoh
like man; what she haa least she often
desires most. To judge by the women's
agitation in Britain, for instance, her
most precious longing to-day ia for the
vote. When she geta it, as get it she
will, she knows not what ahe will do
with it. A glance at New Zealand's
experience may help to illuminate this
point. Anyhow, the glance ia interest-
ing, for on September 19th, laat, women's franchise attained its majority in
the pioneer eountry of women's franchise. New Zealand held the distinction
for a little over a year, South Australia
following on December 18th, 1894.
Twenty-one Tsar Teat
Twenty-one years! It ought to be
fairly possible always to estimate the
effect and influence of any social
change at the end of such a periol. The
agitation precedent to the winning
of woman fa suffrage ia intereating, but
even the barest historical resume would
occupy too much apace. Two outstanding events made women 'a suffrage possible in New Zealand at the moment
it came. Eighteen hundred and ninety
aaw a progressive wave overtake New
Zealand. For the flrst time labor appeared in Parliament, and Labor was
convinced of the justice of women'a
claim to the franchise.- Concurrently
the temperance sentiment, expressed
through the Prohibition Party, was turned in favor of an immediate granting
of the suffrage. The pioneers had done
their work. The time waa judged to be
ripe.
Principle Recognised
The House of Representatives firat
affirmed the principle in a Bill in 1891.
The Legislative Council refused affirmation by two votes. The reform
again passed the House in 1802. This
time the Council opposition weakened,
and .it was prepared to give women the
franchise—--if they voted by letter.
This wns obnoxious to the House. In
the following year, the House again
passed the meaaure, and thia time the
Council concurred by a majority of two
votes. The last despairing cry of the
Council minority ia an interesting historical document presented to the Governor praying that he should withhold
his assent to the Bill. On September
19th, 1893, the Governor signed the Bill,
and the women of New Zealand became
equal arbiters with men in matters political, except that the gentle sex were
not permitted to sit in either House of
Parliament, an embargo which exists today.
Question of Women M. P's.
It is interesting to digress here to say
that ihe prohibitory clause against women sitting in the Legislature haa just
been under review. The Legislative
Couneil is in progress of change from a
nominative body to an elective body.
The House of Representatives amended
the Legislative Council Bill by providing that women should be eligible for
election to the Council. The decision
was arrived at by a vote of 39 to 16.
A few days later, however, in another
Legislature Amendment Bill, the same
House declared by a vote ,of 29 to 27
against permitting women to become
candidates for the House of Representatives. Under auch circumstances the
Council refused to accept the amendment of the House, and insisted that
only when and so boob as women are
eligible to become candidates for the
House of Representatives shall they be
permitted to become candidates for the
House itself, women ahall not be permitted to become candidates for any
branch of the Legislature.
Experiment Justifies Itself
The prophecies of twenty-one years
ago are interesting. They were mostly
wrong. 'One declared that if our experiment succeeded modern politics
would be simply revolutionized all over
the planet. The greater political experiment haa succeeded, The test of its
success ia the meaaure of present-day
confidence in the experiment. No party
or interest has the temerity to suggest
in public that women's suffrage has
failed.
What have New Zealand women done
with the vote! They have certainly
used it, as witness the following table:
Proportion per Proportion per
cent, of Pfl.
malei on Rolls
who voted
...     85.16
...     76.44
,.,     75.70
...     74.52
...     82.23
...     78.26
...     82.57
Women and Temperance
The most visible sign of women's influence at tbe polls is shown   in   the
licensing question.   The early faith of
the Prohibition Party in women's antipathy against liquor has been amply
justified.     Political studenta generally
agree that the prohibition vote ia largely the women's vote.   Beyond this one
issue, however, it is difficult to gauge
women's special influence. Unquestionably the women's vote hastened old-age
pensions and much of the social legislation for which New Zealand became
famous.   At the same time that influence has not boen outwardly or specially apparent.  Its  potency  has   always
consisted more in the silent possession
of   power—the   vote—and too politician's knowledge that women are most
easily influenced by an appeal to sentiment.   And the astuto political leaders
have always been .quite alive to the
fact that nearly half the electors are
women.
opponents nor the early hopes of sup-
Sorters have been fulfilled. Homes
ave not been destroyed by women be*
coming obsessed with political ambition:
indeed there ia practically no club or ao-
ciety in any large centre for the political education of women,. True there are
amall groups, but tbey are mere phono-*
graphs of one or other of the poltical
parties, and quite .useless for improving
women's knowledge of aocial and political science.
Effect In Industry.
Women's influence on industrialism
-has not been remarkable. Many improvements have certainly taken place.
A minimum wage pf £1 per week haa
been secured for women in factories
and shops, and it is no longer possible
to employ young people without certain specified payment. But it is a little astonishing to know that New Zealand has not one fully-employed woman
factory inspector.
I would not wish to underestimate
either the value of the reform or the
benefits accruing from it. Much that'
has followed its' enactment ia unquestionably due to women's mere possession of the vote. The women's vote
has never been organized, but all the
time it has influenced political and social evolution. And if parliament is not
yet composed of angels it is equally1
certain that its moral standard has not
receded. Speaking at the recent "com-
ing-of-age" celebrations, Lady Stout
declared that no 'other country has done
more for the protection,of women and
children. That marks achievement of
the highest possible importance.
Made Women Individualists.
The position of women in the
scheme of civilization has so far made
her an individualist. It will take some
time to alter that and teach her the
benefits and advantages of co-operation.
The f rachise has done something in tha\
direction: the tendency will multiply
rapidly in the next decade. The moat
notable atep in New Zealand towards
the assumption of responsibility was
made at the last elections for the hospital and charitable aid boards. In
several centres women offered their services and secured places at the top of
the poll. That was a beginning in a
sphere where women must succeed.
"Women's Bights" Joke Dead.
The twenty-one yearB have seen the
disappearance of the stock jokes
against women in politics. Tho franchise has given woman a position of independence, dignity, and influence
which was impossible without it. All
things considered, the experiment haa
been more than justified. Which waa
only to be expected unless half mankind was destined to be the puppet and
plaything of the other half, and unless
we were prepared to keep half humanity permanently "tied to the starting
poat while the other half ran."
Dale ol
General
Election
eent. of Male
on Roll,
who voted
1893
....      60.61
1806
....     75.90
1899
....     79.06
1903
....     78.44
1905
      84.07
1908
....     81.11
1911
....     84.58
Nothing Dreadful Happened.
Looking backward over the franchise
period It is apparent that no revolutions
have taken place.  Neither the fears of
TEACH THE OHUDREN
School Principal Bays Tell Them Truth
About War
Suppose wars and battles were studied by our children as events affecting
concretely the lives of untold numbers;
women made .widows, children orphans,
families homeless; not men, women and
children in the abstract, but poBaibly
themselveB, their mothers, their fathera.
Suppoae wo told them of the numberless men lying on the battlefields,
of heavy artillery, under feet of marching Boldiera, under hoofs of galloping
horses. Suppose they were shown
survivors returning to their homes,
maimed, disfigured, shattered wrecks of
their former selves; and ruins of cities,
shelled and destroyed, the inhabitants
left penniless, shelterless, hopeless.
Suppose we showed them pictures of
ruins and battlefields strewn with the
mutilated bodies, agonies indescribable
on the faces of the dead and dying.
Suppoae throughout their school life
children were to bo shown war in its
awful reality, its sordidnesB and brutality, and1 not idealized, softened, sentimentalized. Suppose they were told
the truth, instead of tho monstrous lies
to which they are accustomed.
Do you BUpposo that if taught thus
they would become advocates of militarism, lovers of war!
There must be a thorough and complete change in all of our school work
that is related to war. We must pursue some such methods as suggested
here, if we want to feel in any degree
assured that when onr boya become
men they will not allow themaelves to
be carried away by jingoistic appeals
of self-seeking demagogues, but will
ponder long and deeply before assenting to war and all it means.—Alexander Fiehandler, principal Public School,
65, Brooklyn, in "The Public."
ECONOMIC LOSSES.
If Society Were to Do Its Duty Preventable Diseases Would Oease.
Preventable diseases to-day cause
huge economic losses under two general
groupings. Through illnegs they keep
expert workmen at homo, thereby robbing them and the world of a part of
their product. By death they out short
the careers of many persons who were
in their economic prime. Think what
tbe adding of but five years to the lives
of men wbo now die at 45, 50 or 56
would mean in additional service and
economic outputs—five more yours of
productivity without tbe loss and
waste involved in shifting their bur
dens to workers new and untraned. The
present financial logs in this country
through untimely deaths is only partly
indicated by tho five hundred million
dollara paid out in death claims, etc.,
every year on life insurance policies.
Dr. Allan J. McLaughlin, of the United
States Public Health service, recently
stated in an address before the Association of Life Inaurance Presidents,
that In tbe matter of typhoid fever
alone tho number of preventable cages
each veer in the United Sattea would
probably reach 175,000 and that the
deaths therefrom that could be avoided
would total 16.200. He estimated the
economic loss from this one disease at
not less than one hundred million dollars annually. The report of the National Conservation Commission on National Vitality statea that the economic
waste from preventable deathg every
year in tho United States is about, one
billion dollars and that the economic
waste from preventable illness is five
hundred million dollars every year-
making a total annual economic loss of
one and one-half billion dollars, or more
than onotigh to pay tho entire expense
of the federal government.
True Test of Organization
Depends upon Its  *
Resources.
High Union Dues and Low
Initiation Fee Are thie
Best Investment '
"Power i> necessary to Influence.
Power depends upon the resources.
This is true of tbe trade union as well
asevery other organisation. The labor
organizations that have the greatest
power to protect their'members and the
greatest Influence in furthering the
needs and the demands of their members ard the labor organizations provided with ample, substantial finanoial
resources," says President Oompers of
the American Federation of Labor.
"There is only one way to accumulate organization funds—payment of
adequate union dues. Organizations
have found it a wise polloy to increase
low dues aa soon as possible, beeause
increased finanoial resources at their
command give them increased prestige,
increased ability to secure better wages
and working conditions and increased
ability to provide agalnat threatened
dangers. There is no investment a wage-
earner ean make that will bring him
greater returns than his union dues.
If dues to the union are increased proportionately aa the union increases
wages, the power of the union to promote and safeguard the interests of its
members becomes increasingly effective.
"The financial organization of a
trade, union must be baded on sound
business principles. Wildcat finances
in trade unions will be no more reliable than wildcat banking investments. Honey will not get into the
union treasury by miraolo or by the
wishing process. The protection of
a well-filled treasury is possible only
for thoso who are willing to pay the
price in dues, management and foresight. The very existence of a sound
financial organization constitutes a
defence of its members.
"Power does not always have to be
aggressively used in order to be effective—reserve power is often the most
potent. Consciousness that' they possess power puts moral courage and confidence into the workers and it puts
fear into the hearts of those who would
wrong them. When power exists thero
is hesitancy to deny the possessors
their rights or fair demands. The existence of the power of /elf defense
prevents any industrial struggles while
the weak and helpless are wronged with
impunity.
"As union dues are"*increased it is
possible to extend the system of union
benefits. These benefits supplement
the wages earned and enable unionists
to live better and more comfortably.
"Labor organizations are constantly
preaching the gospel of higher wages.
What wages are to the individual, dues
are to the organization. The ideal of
the American Federation of Labor is to
have each organization strong, competent to manage its affairs and to solve
its own difficulties. While there It
wholesouled sympathy and willingness
to holp fellow-workers in their time of
need, yet the best results for all workers can be obtained when each organization is free to protect and promote
the rights and interests of its own mem*
bers and to organize the unorganized.
"But high dues should not be accompanied by high initiation fee., Indeed the initiation fee Bhould be small,
thereby inviting and making it possible
for the yet unorganized to join the
union and to make common welfare of
all. High dues regularly paid will inevitably lead to greater self-reliance
mutual independence, unity, solidarity,
fraternity and federation.''
nationalist Association Opens.
The American National nationalist
association has opened headquarters in
Los Angeles. The president is Mrs. L,
C. MacDonald, formerly of New Tork
city. The organization advocates freedom of thought, speech, press, assembly, science, are, education, literature
and religon.
FRUITS OF THE EARTH,
The things men heed most are given
them without charge. There are no public service corporations to send in bills
for sunshine, rain and air on the first
of overy month. These things are mentioned in the lease under which men
took up their residency on the earth.
"While the earth remalneth"—in
tho words of the eighth chapter of the
book of Genesis—"seed time and harvest, and cold and heat, and summer
and winter, and day and night, shall not
cease."
The race of man stands in the midst
of infinite riches, and scarcely knows
how to make use of thom. All that he
noods, or ever will need, is here for him
and his children, and not for a small
number in oaoh generation, but for all.
It seems strange—or ought to seem so—
that there should be want or poverty,
or that men should think themselves
obliged to be greedy and self-seeking.
People who hnve seen tho gruss and
grain springing spontaneously from the
the earth will talk of "hard timos" as
though their recurrence were one of the
fixed laws of the universe and not the
fault of our own childishness.—San
Francisco Bulletin.
The Labor Press.
"Ono of tho best tests of the loyalty
of a union man to the cause of the
workers, is his attitude toward tho labor press. When you hear the union
member knocking the labor paper, just
keep your eye open and you aro very
apt to flnd that he is not doing it for
good of organized labor. Tho labor
paper is just as vital a part of the labor
movoment as a labor council or a labor
tomple. It may mnke mistakes and it
may not suit ovory member of the organization it represents. "But what institution of labor is without mistakes
and just what every member of labor
would have it be."
The Labor Press
Tho Labor Press hns a very great
work to perform. Its businoss is to get
beforo tho pooplo tho real nows of life
—tho trutjs about living nnd working,
Tho metropolitan press is largoly a commercial undertaking—for it living and
working nro newspnpor materials for
stories thnt oppool to populor intorests.
For tho lnbor press tho point is to mako
truths about living and working known
to everyone These truths havo power
to movo men and governments.
SIX PAGES.
DAVID tPENCER, LTD.
$1.50 PER YEAR.
DAVID tPENCM, LTD.
Seed Potatoes That Are
Unsurpassed
25 lbs. for if 1.25, 50 lbs. for f Z25,100 lbs. for $4.00
W. have auunblad (nm various sennM what ». Mln. to h.
J"5 !!$" ***} **} ."•" "Kmmtativ. keolkellou .1 standard
•nd W«Ur P>UM ro-UIlM net shorn b*r my ulliaf ooneora In those
pan.. ...
Ol urn. T.riellt.'w. hav. aa'ampl. .took; ot othtr. only limit-
id qnaaUtlM M«au pntn quantitta wan aal availaat..   T*om
Sui?SM*^wl"' -"?" ■•*. m*B *>mii ***» «"• and Meond dole..
V.rl.tle. h.ra to-day Include:
Northern Star.
Qrwa Mountain.
Empire atat..
DnehM. of Cornwall. -
Carman So. 1. ■.
Plak*>y<?
Button'. R.UUM.
Be.nty of Hebron. '
Sallon'. gd-wlatlns.
Diliutmu.'      «-.'.*.
Bnrbuk Law.
Million Dollar.   .
Scotch Champloa.   "
Burpee'. Uoi.rs.knr. -
Prairie Flower—utra urir.
H.«OB Beuty—MrilMt.
Early Puritan.
Sural Blush,
■arly So...
Hyatt's Ishlut.
Irish Oobblor.
larlr P.I.WM.
Sharif She.
•flactr-fold. .  ,
MarQaNn. . I
Bolton's BatlifsMra.
Dakota B.d.
Moonllfht—wir.
wm Mourn ori
If You Have a Bad Tooth or a Mouth Full of Them
COME AND SEE ME
At race. Don't ba afraid. I will examine your month and tell you juit
what you need* Thli service will cost yon nothing and will oblltat* -ran
ta no way.
"YOU SUFFER NO PAIN" GUARANTEE
I HEREBY GUARANTEE that .11 dental work performed br m. will h.
•blolotelr psinlcu, both daring ud followln, th. .Itttaf.   tf t£ rtSlJi.
-\*__i_ a_\rs&_* "r °"" •• ---" v**™
L.?,!?F2E.0FAlulf5SF "i" *" ffV " ''''XL »<"» •» -mint win
remjln in Int dm condition lor a period of TEN YEARS.   If aarof ar
ifSER     ™" M,Mn ialia* """ P"i°i l *m ™P">» '» ABScll-OTELt
Dr. HALL
TBS MODERN DENTIST
STANDAID BANK BUUDING
 ROOM Ut	
PHONE SEY. 4679
opss svssnras, 7 to 1
Tl«0t   .''d?Y;   MAR*
BraTds
Best
Coffee
Did You Get Youn
This Morning?
BRAID'S
BEST
.   COFFEE
The 8,000 Members of Organized Labor in Vancouver, affiliated with 52 Unions, Are Earning: and
Spending $24,000 Every Work Day
Merchants, Manufacturers, Professional Men, Caterers and those who
desire a share of the above patronage can secure the most direot results
by using the columns of The
B.C. Federationist
Official paper of Vancouver Tradea and Labor Couneil and the B. O. Federation of Labor—issued every Friday morning from its offices in Organised Labor's Quarter-of-a-million-dollar Home, at the corner of
Homer and Dunsmuir Streets.
The Average Fare Received by the B.C.
Electric For Travel
Over Its Vancouver
and Suburban Tram
System Is Less Than
4 Cents
This drop of over one cent from
the company's five-cent fare is
due to the liberal policy of the
.company on
1. Transfers
2. Working-men's Tickets
3. School Children's Tickets
All these concessions are greatly
to the advantage of the general
public and are used to such an
extent as to cause the average
fare to drop over 20 per cent
below the regular 5-cent fare.
As a citizen of Vancouver, the
above statement should be of
interest to you. PAGE POUR
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FBIDAT..... .FEBBUABT tt,
DEMAND
THE
LECKIE
SHOE
MADE IN
VANCOUVER
The Shoe that put Vancouver on the map in Europe. Thousands -of out-of-door workmen in B. C.
can attest to their Wearing Value. Thousands of
fathers and mothers in B. C. have learned that there
is really no other Shoe so suited and durable for
school children as LECKIE'S. Ask* your Shoe
Dealer for Leckie's.
J. LECKIE & Co., Limited
200 CAMBIE STREET )
Phone Seymour 8920
WOODBURN
&
Ask lor "DUX" Bwnd
Cigarettes and Tobacco
Something New and
Something GOOD
Cigarettes 10c. Packages
Tobacco - 2ozs. for 25c.
MADE IN B. C.
Rex Tobacco 10c. is Fine
Vancouver   -   B. C.     COOL and CLEAN
BELL
-7L7X.
AN EGG SUBSTITUTE FOR
ALL BAKING PURPOSES
Use it Instead of
Expensive Eggs.
PUBE AND WHOLESOME
50e. Ttiu contain th* equivalent
of 6 dot. eggi.
28o. Tins contain the equivalent
of 2'/a dot. eggs.
SPECIAL LABOB HNS FOB**
BAKER'S USE
See Our Demonstration
in the Grocery Department of David Spencer
Limited.
Crown Broom Works, Ltd.
332 PBONT STREET EAST
VANCOUVER, B. C.
PHONE:   FAIRMONT 1148
Manufacturers of the
Mother Goose, Duchess, King, Janitor Special,
Peerless, Princess, Province, Ladies' Carpet Perfection, Favorite, Ceiling
Broom, Warehouse Brooms
SUPPORT HOME INDUSTRY
HOME INDUSTRIES
KEEP YOUR MONEY IN CIRCULATION AT HOME
THE MEMBERS OP OROANIZED LABOR IN OREATBR VANOOUVER ARE SPENDINO »20.000 PER DAT.
»    BRATIONIST ADVERTISERS ARE ENTITLED TO THE PATRONAGE  OP  TRADE   UNIONISTS
THEIR FRIENDS AND SYMPATHIZERS.   LOOK OVER THE LIST ON THIS PAOE:
FED-
AND
TO LURE LTI.
Plans Already Well Under
Way for Los Angeles
Convention
Lines it will pay you to buy
All of our pay-roll goes to support B. C. families.
When you buy one of these lines you are helping
B. C. industry. *   ■
EEOOMMENO OVB
WHITE LILT PUBE LARD V. P. R. PICNIC HAMS
OAK LEAF LARD COMPOUND V. P. K. BACON BACKS
V. P. B. HAMS V. P. R. BACON
Vancouver-Princejupert Meat Co.,
VANCOUVER
^WORKERS UNION
LIMITED
MEW   WESTMINSTER
OOQVXTLAH
UNIOJ^TAMPI
factory
Named Shoei arc frequently made in Non-
Union Factories—Do Not Buy Any Shoe
no matter what Its name, unless lt bears a
plainand readable Impression or this stamp.
AU shoes without tha Union Stamp ara
alwayi Non-Union.
BOOT A SHOE WORKERS' UNION
246 Summer Street, Boston, Mua.
J. P. Tobln, Pree.   O. L. Blaine, Seo/Treai.
San Francisco, San Diego
and Other Coast Unions
to Help Entertain
I. T. U. Journal Correspondent James
M. Byrne puts it this way: "Lob Angeles, America's Dreamland, 1915."
With many problems already overcome
by an able general committee, the work
of making the sixty-first International
Typographical union convention the
greatest in the history of international
union gatherings is well under way to
Hs goal. Details of progress will be
given from time to time and efforts
made to keep the membership at large
versed in pre-convention ''doings."
Those desiring special information
should address inquiries to James VL.
Byrne, chairman of the publicity committee, 406 East Sixty-sixth street. . . .
And while on the subject of an entertainment it is well to mention that intending visitors and delegates should
see to it that their tickets read "via
San Francisco to Los Angeles," for
word has been received from the Golden
Gate City by the general committee
that No. 21 will entertain all who stop
over on the way to the assembly here.
Also, from San Diego, comes information of an elaborate two-days' programme to immediately follow the closing day of the. convention. Included is
a trip on Sunday, August 15th, to Tia
Juana, which will afford a glimpse of
old Mexico, with its Latin-American
modes and famous bull ring, where a
genuine bull fight, will be staged. Monday, August 16th, will be known in San
Diego aB "International Typographical
Union Day," and will be guests of the
San Diego exposition committee.
Therefore, with splendid, entertainment
programmes being planned by three
cities, it is within reason to expect a
record-brealting number of travelers to
the "Land of Sunshine and Flowers,"
for who would be so unfortunate as to
forego the bounty certain to be offered
by hospitable San Francisco, Los Angeles and San Diego t
TUBERCULQS
SPEND YOUR MONEY
AT HOME FOR LABOR
AS WELL AS GOODS
The merchant who advertises, preaches and practices the slogan, "Try your
home merchant first," and does not
also practice the more important slogan, "Try your home workman first,"
is not only standing in his own light
but is assisting in making the practice
of the first slogan an impossibility
the part of the workers of his et
munlty. All business interests are more
or less dependent upon the patronage
of the laboring people of the community in which they are locaetd. The grocer, clothier, butcher, doctor, dentist,
etc., would nnd "slim pickin's" were
it not for the men who cash their pay
checks and distribute the proceeds
thereof among those who suply the necessities and the few luxuries falling
to the lot of the man who tolls.
It has long been conceded that payrolls are vital to the business sueeess
of a city. Vancouver aspires to be a
commercial centre. The welfare of the
laborer is of more vital importance to
existing business institutions than any
other one thing. The mechanic or artisan must of a necessity live in the
community in which he finds employment and as a rule spends the greater
part of his wages among those with
whom he comes in daily contact.
That a merchant can have his buildings erected, his store front remodeled
or his interior decorating done by "out-
of-tho-city" workmen and then expect,
the home mechanics to come to Ms
place of business and pour out their
shekels to swell Mb coffers is quite as
reasonable aB to expect a carpenter to
conduct a mail order business or a mason to lay a thousand /brick by parcel
post. Why a merchant will drain his
community of even a small portion -of
its circulating medium for'the benefit
of an outBide workman is the worst
kind of folly. In spending his money
outside of his own business circle for
printed matter, for instance, he is not
only placing it beyond his own reach
but sending it whore it is permanently
retired from circulation among those
who might ultimately return it to some
of his busincBB associates.
"Try your home workman first,"
last and all the time and the solution
of keeping business at home will be
found to be an easy problem.
JUSTICE IN HONGKONG
Bead This
A month's Imprisonment was the sentence imposed on a Japanese seaman
who stabbed the chief officer of the S.8.
Kiriu Maru, by Mr. Hazcland. at the
Police Court, this morning. A severe
punishment was asked for.
Then This
Passing out of the gate of the Taikoo
Sugar Refinery at Quarry Bay a Chinese
was found to have 1% lbs. of sugar
candy in his possesion- Ab a sequel, he
appeared at the Police Court, this morning,- charged with theft, and was sent
to prison for one month, with four
hours'   stocks.—Hongkong   Telegraph.
Miners and the B. O. F. of L.
Editor B.'C. Federationist: The convention of the British Columbia Federation of Labor waB held this year in
the city of Nanaimo, p There wero no
formalities, in the form of "speeches of
welcome," as the late strike had drawn
the line of dem&rkation between labor
and capital, and those commonly called
"the public," had to show where they
allied themselves. Nanaimo local, No.
2155, United Mine Workers of America,
soon made their presence felt by having, through their experience of the
strike and the lessons learned therefrom, drafted several important resolutions and had them down for discussion.
One of the most important was on the
?uestion of "picketing," and read as
ollows:  .
"Whereaa—In industrial conflicts between capital and labor it is becoming
increasingly necessary for labor to have
access to all available weapons In fighting the powerful combinations of modern capital, and
"Whereas—One of their most virile
weapons of the worker during the time
of a strike is the constitutional right
to peaceful picketing, and
"Whereas—During the recent Btrike
of the mine workors on Vancouver island an order-in-councll was supposed
to hove been issued denying the mine
workers thiB traditional right, and as a
result of the supposed order-in-councll
mon were taken from the picket line
and put in prison, and
"Whereas—During* the time the
Trades and Labor Congress of Canada
were in session and were discussing'a
resolution on this subject, it was proven
that in other parts of Canada strikes
were in operation and picketing resorted to, and
"Whereas—The right to picket was
fought by the British workers in the
early part of the century, and a law
passed in the British house of commons giving the unions the legal right
to picket; therefore be it
"BeBolved—Tbat the B. C. Federation of Labor, in convention assembled,
urge on the Trades and Labor congress
of Canada to see that no other supposed orders-in-council be put into operation to prevent picketing, thereby
-establishing a dangerous precedent in
Canada; nnd be it further
"Resolved—That the officers of the
TradeB and1 Labor congress insist on the
right to peaceful picketing, and. also insist on a law being passed in the dominion legislature on the same lines as the
British picketing law."
The reason this resolution was put on
the agenda was because, through some
cause or another, the right to picket
had been denied the striking miners in
the month of September, 1913, and this
denial continued to apply till the end
of the strike, and was to a large extent
responsible for the loss of the strike.
The mine workers were of the opinion
that if this was to be denied in the future then it was going to have its disastrous effect, whether those affected be
mine workers or other crafts. When
the supposed order-in-councll was spoken of, prohibiting peaceful picketing,
the miners wore of tne opinion that the
order had been given direct from England. The local magistrate who tried
the cases said it was in existence; the
defense lawyers said it waB in existence, yet without any of them seeing it,
an understanding was given by the
minors' union officials that there would
be no more picketing and no more men
would be supplied with legal defence
who were arrested for picketing. Considering that in England, and in other
British colonies, the right to picket prevailed, then Nanaimo local of the mine
workers had the foregoing resolution
placed to let the Trades and Labor congress get busy and have the supposed
order-in-council repealed. However, in
the discussion brought out on the resolution It was proven that no such order-
in-council had existed; that instructions
been given from Mr. Bowser, the
attorney-general of British Columbia;
that the local magistrate had given decisions without seeing it as a law; that
the defenao employed by the mine workers had taken the word of those men
without investigation; that the officers
of the union were apparently indifferent
ns to the effect it would have on the
Btrike situation or future strikes, owing
to it being claimed as a precedent.
However, oven though it dla have its
effect in the loss of the recent strike
and the deplorable conditions left the
men, as a result of such loss, we have
reason to bo glad to know it was only
a huge bluff imposed upon us, and the
workers of B. C. have the same liberties
as tho workers of England and else-
whore, and nre confident the foregoing
resolution will have the effect of educating tho workers, so that a similar
bluff will not be easily imposed on any
section when they have reason to
strike.
Othor Important resolutions will be
dealt with in the next and other issues
of this paper.
WM. WATSON, Secretary.
Nanaimo, B. C, Feb. 22,1015.
Causes Third of All Deaths
Among Workers Between 15 and 45.
Unions Must Educate Membership to Adequately
Stomp Out Plague
How He Lived.
So he died for his faith.   That is fine-
More than most of us do.
But stay!   Can you add to that line
'    That he lived for it; tool
It is easy to die.   Men have died
For a wish or a whim—
From bravado, passion or -pride;
Was it hard for Wmt
But to live;  every day to live out
All the truth, that he dreamt
While Mb friends met his conduct with
doubt
And tho world with contempt—
Was it thus thnt he plodded ahead,
Never turning aside?
Then we '11 talk of the life that he led—
Never mind how he died.
When one single disease, tuberculosis or consumption, causes one-third of
all deaths among workingmen between
15 and 45, and m certain dusty trades
as high as one-half, it seems tune that
organized labor aroused itself from its
apathy and proceeded to do something
to down this plague.
The original purpose of the labor
unions and its predecessor, the trade
guild, was protection from outside oppression and an endeavor through collective bargaining to lessen the grip
of the employer upon the working-man.
While a few unions, here and there,
have recognized that there were deadly
enemies within as well aa without the
union, moBt of the 2,000,000 and more
men and women in the ranks of organized labor have never recognized tuberculosis as such a foe.
It is true that increased wages and
improved working conditions have a
vital effect upon the home-life and thus
react favorably in the control of tuberculosis. It Ib also true that within tho
unions themselves, education and adequate care for every man or women
threatened with or attacked by thiB disease iB needed. Eight-hour days, minimum wages, and sanitary shops will
not of themselves control the spread
of tuberculosis.
Until the individual workman is
taught such lessons as not to spit promiscuously about the shop, to sleep with
his windows open, and to. guard himself
and his children by care of his body
against the entrance of infection, consumption will continue to be unduly
prevalent to the ranks of labor. Until
opportunity is afforded for every man
who thinks he has tuberculosis to get an
examination free or at a price within
tho reach of his means; and until hospital and sanatorium facilities are adequate to care for every afflicted ease,
tbe death rate from thiB disease will
continue to be abnormally high.
Right here, the labor unions ean
fight tho enemy within their ranks.
ThiB article and succeeding ones will
offer some suggestions as to methods.
The flrst suggestion is to study the
problem in your own ranks. Find out
about tuberculosis in your trade and in
your individual shop. For example,
ask these three questions of yourself or
your fellow workers and see what answers you get:
(1) How many deaths from tuberculosis and from all other causes were
there in your shop during thiB past year
1015 f
(2) How many members of your union are now on tho sick list as a result
of tuberculosis!
(8) What peculiar trade or shop
conditions, so far as you know, tend
to predispose members of your union
to tuberculosisf
Note such things as dust, gases,
fumes, dark rooms, bad ventilation, etc.
These questions will readily suggest
others. By answering them, you will
get Borne appreciation of the tuberculosis problem as it relates to you.
LATE  PORCUPINE   STRIKE.
Notorious Mines Fay Dividend of 59.55
Par Cent.
The events which transpired during
the Porcupine strike aro sufficiently
fresh in too public memory to make
Interesting the financial statement of
the Hollmer Gold Mines, Liinited, just
issued. The strugglo Ib one of the
most notorious in Canadian history.
Many men were jailed, the country
scoured for strike-breakers and armed
gunmen, and Thiel detectives hired to
force the men to accept reductions of
kages and conditions of employment.
The balance shoot now Bhows gross
profits of $1,786,679 for 1914, an increase of $158,566 over previous year,
or cIobo on 10 por cent. The capital
stock of the company is $3,000,000,
which shows that the profit is at the
rate of 50.55 per cent., and yet one
would look in vain at the financial
statement for 'any betterment in the
ci nditions oi the men who work for the
company and make these big profits
poBsible.
Assistance I Assistance!
The Vancouver correspondent of Solidarity, published at Cleveland, Ohio,
puts it this way: "The I. W. W. local
here is still in urgent need of a soap
boxer who can talk industrial unionism. We appeal to all live rebels who
are footloose, and have the welfare of
the I. W. W. at heart, to jump in here
and give us a hand to put these other
freak organizations whore they belong."
Andrew J. Gallagher Retires.
Andrew J. Gallagher, the well-known
president of San Francisco Labor council, has just retired from office and declined nomination for .re-election. He
has boon iu executive office as secretary
or president since 1007, performing his
duties at all times to the satisfaction
of the general membership of the
'Frisco labor unions.
IB.C
B.C.
Distillery
Co., Ltd.
Established 1903
B. C. Special
RYE
Whisky
Nine Years in Wood
UNSURPASSED
\        IN QUALITY
AND FLAVOR
ASK FOR SAMPLE
BOTTLE AT ANY
LIQUOR STORE
B.C. Whisky
Is a
HOME PRODUCT
Ask for «B. CSpecial"
"Satisfaction—ot Money Back, at Any Grocer's."
ESTABLISHED ISM.
B. C. VINEGAR WORKS
Manuf acturers of
'   Vinegar - Cider - Sauerkraut
BEARDS:
"Sunset" Malt and WMto Wine Vinegar, "Special" Malt and
Whits Wine Vinegar, "Mackensie's" Malt and White Wine Vinegar
Okanagan Older Vinegar, Okanagan Sweet Older, Boiled Older, B. O
Sauerkraut.
Manufactured in Bond under Inland Bevenue Supervision.
Factory:   136S POWELL ST., VANCOUVEB, B, O.
CAPACITY 15,000 GALLONS PBB MONTH
Manager:  James H. Falconer Phone:  Highland 28(
Healthfulness, combined with good flavor and taste, means real quality ln
Beer. These are Impossible without the
very best material and the highest order of treating, In
PREMIER BEER
we provide the public with a good palatable and wholesome Beer of the highest quality.
Order a case from your own dialer.
New Westminster Brewery
PREMIER
Pancake and Waffle Flour
Best Ever - Agreeable To All Sense
MADE IN VANCOUVER
How Can I Make a Success
Of the Poultry Business?
EASILY    ANBWEBEpI
V
IL1PP
Use an Essex Model Hotn
Air or Jubilee Hot Wa-,
ter Incubator, and an m-!
ternatlonal Sanitary Ho-j
ver.
SUCCESS WILL
FOLLOW
We specialise ln aid
kinds of Poultry Sup^f
piles.
MARK DRUMMOND
Hardware and McOormlck Farm Machinery
1018 MAIN STREET Write for Catalogue and Pricei **z*.
[FBIDAT FEBBUABY 26, 1915
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
'MADE IN B.C.
Success u always assured with
NABOB JELLY POWDER
Just fallow directions on the package—yoa will be
mon than pleased
Eaoh package makes a fall pint of jelly
10c. 3 for 25c.
AT YOUR OBOOERS
10c. Turf   Da-Cr VUT WC
APkt.     1Hii DUbl   YU1      APkti
RED ARROW
BISCUIT
When its Biscuits say "RED ARROW"
Manufactured by the
National Biscuit Co., Ltd.
Manufacturers of Red Arrow ud National Biscuits
Haida Confections
VANCOUVER       -       ■       B.C.
$YJR%
USE ONLY
SHAMROCK
LEAF
PUKE LARD
VANCOUVER
P. Burns & Co., Ltd. ____
HAMILTON CARHARTT
| The world'! largest Overall Manufacturer.
VANOOUVER, B. 0.
J Toronto, Qetrolt, Liverpool, Delia., Atlanta
Mr. UNION MAN
If yon believe ln British Columbia
ltt as stud together
My long years ot experience baa
made Carhartt's overalls perfection.
I have opened a factory in Vanoouver
to styply British Columbia trade.
The work Is done right here by union labor.
Mr. Union Man, if your dealer won't
supply you Carhartt *s overalls, send
me a postal with your waist and leg
measure, and I will see that you get
them.
Write me anyhow for a weekly time
book, engineer's time-book, or farmer's account book. These are free to
you* f
Mr. Union Man
Are you eating Union-made Bread, are you
helping to maintain the Union Standard of living by
using goods produced by Union Labor!
BREWER'S XL BREAD
has the Union Label on every loaf, and in quality
and flavor it is unexcelled. x
Phone Highland 573 and we will call at your
house.
BREWER'S XL BAKERY,
Corner 4th Avenue and Commercial Street.
UNION ** OFFICES
This Official List Of Allied Printing Offices
OAN SUPPLY TOD WITH THI ALLIED PHNTMO TRADES UNION LABEL
Phon. No.
BAOLEY * SONS, 151 Haotinc Street Seymour 316
BLOCHBEROER, F. R„ 310 Bro.dw.y E«.l Fairmont 208
BRAND a PERRT, 62» Pender Street, Wut  Seymour 2578
BURRARD PUBLISHING CO.,  TH Seymour Street   Seymour 8530
CHINOOK PRINTING CO., .601 Mein Street  ...Fairmont 1874
OLARKE * STUART, 820 Seymour Street   Seymour 8
COMMERCIAL PRINTING * PUBLISHING 00., . .World Building, Sey. 4616.87
COWAN * BROOKHOUSE, Labor Temple Buildlnt  Seymour 4420
EVANS i BASTINGS, Arts and Oralis Bldg., Seymour St Seymour 1660
GRANDVIEW PRINTERS, 1448 Park Drive Hlfhl.nd 741L
JEWELL, M. L., 841 Pender St Sayaiour 14.4
KERSHAW, J. A., 538 Howe Bt    Soymour 8674
LATTA, R P., 383 Gore Ave Seymour 1039
MAIN PRINTING CO., 3861 Meln St Fairmont 1988
MoLEAN S SHOEMAKER. North Vancouver N. Van. 68
MOORE PRINTING CO., Cor. Granville end Rob.on Sts. Seymour 4643
NEWS-ADVERTISER, 801 Pender.Bt ...Seymour 1028-41
NORTH SHORE PRESS, North Vanoouver N Ven. 80
PACIFIC FRUITERS, World Building Seymour 9692
ROEDDE, J. V, 616 Homer St Seymour 264
SCANDINAVIAN PUBLISHING CO., 317 Cambie St Seymour 65(19
TERMINAL CITV PRESS, 2406 Wntmlnitor Rosd Fairmont 1140
THOMSON STATIONERY, 826 Hooting. W Seymour 3520
TIMMS, A. H„ 230 Fourteenth Ave. E Fairmont 621R
WESTERN PRESS, 328 Cordova W Seymour 7566
WEBTERN SPECIALTY CO., 331 Donimnlr St Seymour 3526
WHITE * BINDON, 167-159 Cordova 81 Seymour 1216
Writ. "Union Lab.1" on Tour Oopy wh.n Tou Sand Xt to th. Printer
PAGEJIVE
COMPENSATION LAW
SPOILED BY
Administration of the New
Jersey Act Is a
Failure.
Three Years' Test Shows
Need of a Neutral
Commission.
When You Want a
First-Class Beer
-ONE THAT VOU CAN'T BEAT AT ANT PEIOB, W ART
OOUH-ntT, OUT BBffi WITH THU LABEL ON. PINTS, SIX
FOB n*PTT CENTS.
BREWED AND BOTTLED IN VANOOOTEB BT
VANCOUVER BREWERIES, Ltd.
That administration of workmen's
compensation laws by the courts is the
most unsatisfactory.system that could
be devised from the worker's point of
view is the conclusion formed by the
American Association for Labor Legislation which has just completed the
first thorough investigation made into
the operation of a state compensation
law in this country, *•
New Jersey lied the Way
New Jersey, in 1011, was the first
state to establish a system of accident
compensation, and the report just issued by the association covers three and
a half year's experience of its operation. Since New Jersey led the way, 23
more states have passed workmen's
compensation acts, and in the present
year the question is before the legislatures of 44 states. No'other single issue- it is stated, Ib the subject of so
much legislative activity.
Omitted Machinery
The New Jersey law, contrary to the
usual practice, created no special
ehinwy for the administration of the
act, but left cases to be settled between the injured worker and insurance company or employer, according
to the schedule prescribed, contested
cases to come before the courts of common pleas in the 21 counties of the
state.
Inquiry -Proves a Failure
In the course of. the investigation
not only were numerous officials, employers and workers interviewed, but
(ii>S eiiaes from court records were
studied and many were followed up to
the homes of the workers. It was
found that court proceedings seriously
handicapped the'workers in a number
of different ways. While the worker is
le.ii) well informed as to the law and
court procedure, he is at tbe same time,
owing to the expense involved, gener-
nlly unable to engage such expert lawyers or witnesses as are available for
tho employer- Under the New Jersey
law the court determines the amount to
be paid in fees by the claimant to his
counsel. As counsel's fee is customarily determined by the amount of the
award and not by the work done, attorneys can usually only be induced lo
take up cases involving larger claims
on a speculative basis. Thus very few
minor claims are brought to court. A
scrutiny of the settlements registered
with the department of labor showed
thnt though many of the settlements
were irregular, only seven per cent, of
the claims appeared in the courts. The
absence of machinery for administration of the act clearly allows less
scrupulous employers to repudiate minor
claims with Impunity. So frequently
does this occur that the association endorses the estimate of the National
Federation and the American Federation of Labor that 40 per cent, of the
amount due as compensation to the
workers of New Jersey is never paid at
all.
The Law's Delays .
A moBt swious deficiency following
from the court method is tne amount of
time consumed in making settlements.
In the settlement of claims arising from
72 fatal cases the average length of
time was 27% weeks, while in 150 nonfatal cases settlement took an average
of 33 weeks from the date of the injury. The report cites several typical
cases showing the extent of-ihe delay.
In one case a widow and dependent
children wero obliged to wait 53 weeks
for an award of $1,500 to be pnid
weokly in installments. ThiB obviously
meant that the family became either
public charges or the object of charitable aid, and one of the mnin purposes
of the workmen's compensation, the
prevention of destitution, wns thwarted.
Oost of Litigation
The association estimates) that the
annual cost of litigation "over compen-l
nation claims in New Jersey is between
$50,000 and $60,000. This nmount of
money, it iB pointed out, is spent in
litigation over the Beven per cent, of
the claims which are brought to the
county courts which tend to give different types of decisions creating uncertainty and instability in the whole
administration of the law. The. same
amount of money spent in equipping a
commission would give to the state the
advantage, of expert decisions on all
claims.
Advises Neutral Board
The Association for Labor Legislation strongly urges that all states adopt
for an administration of compensation
laws the commission or boiird rather
than the court system. The association
sains lip the case against the court system with special reference to New Jersey in the following terms:
Court System; Condemned
'' Administration of workmen's compensation laws' by the courts, a
number of separate and scattered tribunals each already overburdened by its
its ordinary business and all more or
less likely to be unfamiliar with the
laws, results harmfully in that (1) tremendous delays arise, defeating one
main purpose of a compensation law,
namely to care for the injured or his
dependents financially during the period
of no earnings; (2) fees necessarily
paid to attorneys eat up large portions
of the awards: (3) settlements ln violation of the. law are frequently sanctioned by the.courts or even ordered
by them ot their own initiative: (4)
conflicting opinions are handed down,
confusing and complicating the whole
system and making justice a matter of
location, not of law; and finally (5)
many meritorious claims are not pressed
because of a fear that court action will
result in dismissal from employment. A
more unsatisfactory system, from the
injured workers' point of view, would
be hard to devise. Much of the hostility between employer and employee, and
much of the waste and injustice that
existed under the old liability system,
remains in New' Jersey, because the
machinery whieh gave rise to the evil
practices under the old system has been
retained for administering the new.
Experience in other states has shown
that these evils can be eliminated by
the creation of a supervising board with
summary power in the settlement of
disputes."
CULINARY   CLIPPINGS.
All About the  Cooks,  Waiters  and
Waitresses.
, Our, meeting held on Friday night,
February 19, in Boom 206, Labor Temple, brought' out a fairly good attendance of members. Under the report of
our delegate to the Parliamentary committee of the Tradea and Labor council, the question of submitting names
for Parliamentary honors at the forthcoming provincial elections was discussed and laid over to next meeting,
when suitable action will be   taken.
If I may be permitted, I would like
to congratulate the parliamentary committee of the Trades and Labor Council
of having found the.only reaj. remedy
for most of the ills that labor is heir tola paSBing I wish to .point out that the
cafe at the corner of Cordova and Cambie streets, formerly the "TWar Cafe,"
has been re-opened under the style of
"Washington Cafe." Although white
waitreaaes are employed, the cafe is
is owned and operated by Asiatics, so
I trust that union men will govern
themaelves accordingly.
Bro. Graham's recent visit to New
Westminster will result in the signing
up this week of the Central and Strand
Hotels, thereby* adding about ten mem*
bers to our union rooster, New Westminster being under the jurisdiction of
thiB local. The officers of Local 28 will
journey to the Royal City on Thursday
night, when a special meeting will be
held for the purpose of initiating the
applicants.
CAPITAL CITY.10N
MEN DECIDE TO G(
INTO POLITICS
Parliamentary   Committee
to Devise Means to Elect
Labor Candidates
WiU Work Along Such Lines
as CouncU from Time
to Time Decides
'Forget the Things That Are Behind."
All faiures and mistakes fill a pur-
poge, but no real advancement in the
future can be made if they are hugged
to the heart and brooded over. Nor
can we do our best if aelf contented
over past achievements, The world
forgets past glories, our best must be
shown to-day. The world does not take
into account personal joys and sorrows.
It demands tbat today be our noblest
effort. The true attitude towardg the
future is faith, and to possess this attitude ia to forget disappointments and
discouragements. The present iB ours
to use affirmatively only. Success cannot to be created by living in the errors
of the past, nor can our souls be beautified by the disheartening indulgence
of living over again the Borrows of
days gone by. Tbe lessons leaned are
surely needed for the work of to-day,
but it is nn unprofitable pastime to
chain them to tho present for any other
purpose. We must be free to work out
to-day what to-day demands of ub.
CENTER & HANNA, Lti
,   UNDERTAKERS
Refined Service
104B QIORQIA  BTREET
One  Block west of Court  House;
Use  of Modern  Chapel  and
Funeral  Parlors  free   to  all
Patrons
Telephone Seymour 2426
Fktu Ssy. 221
Day sr Night
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
and EMBALMERS
520Ricbarf»St.        Vaacmtr, B.
Another Alberta Printer Mayor
Alderman Collier, president of Typo.
Union, No 451, has been appointed acting mayor of Medicine Hat during the
absence of Mayor Hawthorne in the
east. The council also npointed a deputation, composed of Mayor Hawthorne,
Alderman Cruikshnnk and Secretary
Bellamy of Medicine Hat Typographical union (representing the interests of
labor), to attend a conference with
similar delegations from other cities,
held at Calgary recently, to approach
the Dominion government with a view
to having numerous public works taken
up by the government in the province,
as well as presenting other schemes to
the government for alleviation of the
unemployed question.
"Backcappers" Are Cowards,
The place to aay things about fellow
members of a union is on the floor of
the union. None but skulking cowards
resort to the bar-room and street-corner
to unload their polluted imaginations
upon those willing or compelled to become parties to backcapping sessions.
In most cases the character assassins
in the union ranks are not men enough to meet those they accuse of
"graft" and whatnot and, of times, are
the first to attempt to win the esteem
of the boss even at the price of crawling. Come out in the open. Put up or
shut up.
Regine Labor Representation.
Regina Labor Representation league
waB formed last week and'provisional
officers elected: R. McLaren, secretary,
and G. Sturdy, treasurer. Anyone wishing information is advised to apply
at the Trades hall. It is proposed to
hold regular meetings to further the
organization. The next meeting will
be on Monday, March 15th.
Labor weaves flne vestments, but Is
clothed in rags.
VICTORIA, B. C, Feb. 17.—The re-
gular meeting of Victoria Trades and
Labor council was held this evening,
with President Wells in the chair. Credentials were received from the Stage
Employees'union. '
Reports of Committees.
Delegate Day reported on the meetings held under the Central Belief and
Employment bureau, stating the time
appeared to be wasted. The mayor,
who had been appointed chairman, refused consent to allow his name at
mayor to be used in a petition asking
for help from the public, and that it
should be sent out signed by the secretary.
President Wells concurred in the re-
marks, stating it wae best to be in attendance, if only to watch their actions. _■■*,:•■
President Wells reported on his Interviews with the manager of the Variety
theatre. A long debate followed on
this question. The council, through its
delegates,,had, it appeared, used every
effort to arrive at a settlement. Several schemes had been put before* the
Stage Employees, and although the
manager had stated1 that he was prepared to leave the matter in the hands
of the council and abide by any de-
ciaion they made, President Wells
stated that immediately a proposition
was agreed on the Stage Employees
turned it down.
Delegate Chetty stated that they
were determined to stick to the constitution.
Motion—"That till such time that
the Stage Employees oome with some
definite action, so that the council
could deal with it, the council would refuse to act.*'  Carried.
The question relating to the Princess
theatre being still on the unfair list
came up for discussion, and a motion
was put that the parties who had requested this should report at next
meeting-
Delegate McMurtrie, plumbers, reported that he had received a communication from Vancouver, and the aame
action was being taken there. It was
moved that the action of the plumbers
be endorsed, and that they have the
support of the Trades and Labor council.
Parliamentary Committee Organized.
The question came up for discussion
that the time had arrived when some
action should be taken, by the council
to improve conditions. The council had
no voice in the management of the affairs of the city, or of the provincial
legislature, that all they could do was
to go "hat in hand" and ask for favors. The council was the mouth piece
of the labor element, and should have
a voice in the way things were generally dealt with. They at least could make
conditions no worse.
Delegate Day moved:
"That a committee te formed to,
be known as the Parliamentary
committee, whose duty lit shall be
to devise ways and means for the
election of labor candidates to the
city council and to carry out such
work along those lines as the
council from time, to time Bhall decide. ''
Carried unanimously and committee
appointed. • '
Organisation Committee
The report of the Organization committee was given by Delegate Day. The
committee had dealt with the question
of non-union engineers working at the
theatres, hotels, etc. A meeting had
been arranged between the engineers,
stage employees, cooks and1 waiters,
asking for help to be given to enable
the engineers to get card men in these
positions or that men employed should
join tho locals.
Tho committee had also dealt with
tho question of organizing the civic
employees, and a motion was carried
that a suitable hall be taken to hold
a meeting on Fridny, February 26th,
and the same be left in the hands of
Delegate Day to arrange the meeting.
Meeting adjourned at 10:45, more interest having been taken under the
"good and welfare" of the council
than any previous meeting-
Conditions are giving food for
thought, when the reports of unions are
"nothing doing, ninety per cent, of
members loafing." The men are beginning to think. What is the cause
and iB there a remedyt	
Phone:  Fairmont 810
Patterson* Chandler
Manufacturer* of
MONUMENTS
Vaults, Curbing, Etc.
ome. and Work.:
Cor. 16th Ave. and Main Bt.
Branch Office: 40th A Fraaer Aves.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
HARRON BROS.
FUNERAL   DIRECTORS   AND
EMBALMERS
Vuncouver—Offlce ami Chapel,
1034 Oranvllle St., Phone Sey. 3484.
North Vancouver — Office ami
Chapel, 122—Sixth St. Weat, Phone
134.
RENNIES SEEDS
OUR 1915 CATALOGUE IS FREE
Write, Call or Phone for » Copy TO-DAY
Wm. RENNIE CO., Ltd
1138 Homer St Phone Sey 8550. Vancouver, £. C.
Aim at Toronto, Montreal and Winnlp*! .',*.
TOtJ HAVB A OHAHCB TO Mff
TOTO DOLLAM BAOK       t
Whan yon bnjr
British  Colombia Hade
Goodi
Every dollar ipent In Baatorna or
Foreign Goodi ia goat forever
Leckie Boots are Made ia
Vancouver
lulat on gating thorn, aat joa t"
honatt value for yonr money tony
Ume.
J. LECKIE CO, Limited
Vancouver
JINGLE POT COAL
UNION MINED AT NANAIMO
MORE HEAT-LASTS LONGER
THIS COAL WILL SAVE TOU MONEY-TRY A TOM   '_
Lump, $7.00; Nut, $5 50; Pes, $4.00; Slack, 1400; BriquetteaVoO
WOOD. Choieoat Dry Fir. $3.00 par load
McNEILL, WELCH & WILSON, limited
formerly ».
VANCOUVER OOAL COMPANY
' TELEPHONES : SEYMOUR MOB and 5W
-> VANCOUVER ♦>
CITY MARKET
MAIN STREET
A TT -P T T f\ "M  Are held every Tuesday and
A U V I 1U1V Friday at 10 '■_, M. Jg-Jai
q a T 1?0   iwD^' wish to
OALIiO cost of living, y
by attending; th
really wish to reduce the
*ou* can do so
-   1* AUCTION
SALES
Potatoes ■
At Market Prices; these are
the lowest prices in Vancouver. Stock always fresh
and in best condition
Vflrffl+a kl ao  All kinds at most reasonable
V egeta DleS prices; in quantities to suit
all buyers.
Apples- •
Large variety winter stock
at $1.00 and $1.25 per Box
Mow   Tg!J Are now arriving in large
li C W **" iidlu quantities. You can always
■ri rt rt q rely on Eggs which are sold
UlUuO as new laid
AT THE CITY MARKET
Nicholson's Gin
. is perfectly pure and palatable
IT'S REFRESHING
AND INVIGORATING
TRY IT FOR YOUR STOMACH'S SAKE.
WILL DO YOU GOOD.
ALL RELIABLE DEALERS SELL IT
ALL RED LINE, LIMITED
S.S. Selma-S.S. Santa-Maria
Leaves Johnson's wharf 0,80 a.m., Mon.,
Wed. and Friday, for Wisoo Creek, Sechelt,
Half Moon Bay, Rddroofe's, Welcome Pass,
Hardy Island, Notion Inland, Pender Harbor,
Stillwater, Myrtle Point and Powell River;
returning tho following daya,
Johnson's Wharf   Stymour 4180
Printers and
Uber Tt«plt
MsmT
theae ley. U00
PrimmotThn'.n PAGE SIX.
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FBIDAY ......frEBBUABY 2«, 19M
The Allies are advancing Steadily SB 7 " "* """" *
HOTEL IRVING GRILL
The Finest of Wines, Liquors and Cigars sold at buffet, with courteous Union mixologists to serve you. JOHN L. SULLIVAN, Proprietor
Corner Hastings Street and Columbia Avenue Phone:  Seymour 3380
SEND CLOTHING
AND BOOTS TO
FEDERATIONIST
Have you any left-off clothing
or boots which are still usahle?
If so please forward them to The
Tederationist office, 217 Lahor
Temple, Miss H. Gutteridge has
received numerous appeals from
working folk on Vancouver island telling of stories of destitution and want which would seem
to he almost incredible if lt were
not already known that they are
only too true. For the benefit of
any doubter the following quotation is given from just one of the
letters in The Federatlonist office: "... My eldest daughter
is sick in bed with asthma and
we cannot get right support for
her. Her father has not worked
now for two years and six
months, so1 we are pretty hard up
against it. I would be glad if
you could send me anything ln
the shape of bed clothes, as my
beds ate bare of everything, and
lt goeTpretty hard with tbe children this cold weather. I got a
box already from you, and I gave
them odt to the neighbors, as I
thought they were needing most,
so I will be glad if you can send
me anything, it does sot matter
what, food or anything at all, for
we are almost starving.','- All
parcels, large or small; will be
gladly received at The. Federationist offlce, and banded over to
Miss Outterldge.
PHONE SBTMOUB 9086
PLACE YOUR
Insurance
WITH US
IN GOOD BOARD
COMPANIES
DOW FRASER TRUST CO.
122 Hastings St. West.
Vancouver, and McKay Station,
Burnaby; B.C.
Cleee at 1 o'clock Saturday.
SAVING
MONEY
on tho purchase of a piano 1* an important item—a real saving when
overy quality thai you require In a
piano Is part of your purchase. In
tho
KOHLER & CAMPBELL
======PIANO-=========
We offer an Instrument of unusual
value—• Piano that Is favorably
known the world around, and tbat is
ln active everyday use throughout the
globe. Vou cannot do bettef than
compare tbe Kohler ft Campbell with
other pianos you know. See them
and you'll be convinced that tbey are
all tbat we represent them.. Yon 11 be
surprised at our low prices. Wit alwaya bave a large atock of used
pianos ranging ln prices from 1100.00
to 1300.00. Gome in and get oar
special prlcea and terms.
THE
KENT
PIANO CO. Ltd.
558 GRANVILLE ST.
TAILOR
IS
MOVING
Across tlie Boad .
from 640 to 617
BOBSONST.
It is with pleasure I announce SPRING and SUMMER STYLES for THE SEASON OP 1915.
These Patterns are specially designed to meet the requirements of all Customers
Those who appreciate GOOD STYLE should take tbe opportunity of inspecting
my Stock
Note New Address 617 Robson Street
NEST PASS IN
Annual Convention of District No. 18 Held at
Lethbridge
European War Denounced-
Protest Imprisonment
of H. Elmer
LETTERS TO
THEJFED
=$—
Letter-carriers' Half-holiday
Editor B. C. Federationist: Be half-
holiday to letter-carriers: In 1913, a
number of branches petitioned the department at Ottawa for a half-holiday,
and it was favorably received by our
ex-postmaster-gen oral (Hon. Louis P.
Pelletler), who desired tb grant same,
providing public opinion pointed that
way. The Vancouver branch, No. 12,
has received word from Federated Secretary A. McMordie, Toronto, that an
order-in-council has been -passed at Ottawa, granting to the letter-carriere of
the dominion, a half-holiday on Saturday afternoons during the months of
July and August in each year to every
letter-carrier whether permanent or
temporary, who, at the time of ita being
effective, are actually employed as such.
The Vancouver branch has authorized
me to thank all public bodies and citizens of Vancouver city and districts,
through the medium of our valuable
presB, for the hearty support given on
our. behalf last August, in subscribing
their names to our petition in favor of
granting a half-holiday to letter-carriers for the three hot summer months
in each year, which resulted in the concession of two months each year. Tho
thanks of the letter-carriers of the dominion are also due to the Hon. Louis
P. Pelletier for the many concessions
granted to them during his term as
postmaster-general, in which, the grant--
lug of this half-holiday is a fitting cli-
iriax to his abilities as an administrator. The service are Borry to learn of
his retirement through ill-health, and it
is to be hoped that he may have a
speedy recovery to good health once
more. Again thanking the cltizenB for
their support, and thanking you, Mr.
Editor, for your valuable space. On
behalf of branch, No. 12, Federated Association of Letter-carriers,
ROBERT WIGHT, ^Secretary, i
Vancouver, B. C, Feb. M. 1915.
Spokane Printers' New Scale.
Spokane Typo. Union has signed
fl%e years contract with tho Spokesman-Review and Chronicle, morning
and evening papers; the old rate of pa;
to prevail for the first year, after whicl
an increase of $1.50 per week will be
■fectivei making the .night scale 45.60
and the day scale $5.00.
Gas Not Necessary   :"*
the type of youth who indulges in
loud clothes and a hat forced baok
over his ears dropped into the dental
chair. V;"
' "I'm afraid to give him gas// said
the dentist to his assistant.
'Why!"
'How can I tell when he's unoon;
sciolist"
A Chicago restaurant is proud of:
"Small Steaks, 15c; extra Small steaks,
or." N
25.
A Cleveland calcimine artist says:
"White-washing Done Here in All Colors."
Dorothea   Nowroi—"Where   is pa-
Mrs. Newrox—"In the library,
INCREASE IN WAGES
Sailors and Firemen Given Advance by
Three Lines
The Allen, the Anchor and the Donaldson lines have conceded the demands made by the Seafarers' union
for nn advance, during the war, of one
shilling a day to sailors and firemen
standing by liners while at Glasgow.
The companies have, in fact, conceded
more than the men asked in that they
are willing to recognize the concession
us permanent providing such conditions
do not arise at the termination of the
war as to make it imperative for thom
to reopen negotiations. In regard to the
demand of the boiler scalers for an extra penny an hour increase the companies have expressed a readiness to
grant a halfpenny an hour, a proposal
which is now being considered by the
MEDICINE HAT T. AND L. C.
President Evads and Secretary Bellamy
Retire After Busy Term of Offlce.
Byron Vickorngo was last week elected president of Medicine Hat, Alberta,
Tropes and Labor council. It wbb the
annual election of officers. W. E. Evans,
retiring president, was tendered the
nomination but along with B. W. Bellamy, retiring secretary, declined. The
other officers elected were: W.' E, Evans, vice-president; E. M. Forbes, general secretary; P. Currie, financial secretary, and R. Collier, trensurer.
ELECTRICAL WORKERS WANT
GOVERNMENT TELEPHONES
The International Brotherhood of
Electrical Workers, with a membership
of 40,000, hnve issued a statement in
favor of government ownership of telephone and telegraph systems.
It says: "To be neutral would hold
us up to ridicule. Congressman David
J. Lewis, a union man, haB made the
best argument in congress., He said
that the public would be benefited by
the lower rates, and, besides, a saving
of $120,000 would be effected.
Would Reduce Miners' Wages
Great as is the demand for eoal in
England, bo that certain sections of the
owners are clamoring for the abrogation of the Eight Hours act, the Durham miners, nt the uarterly meeting of
the Durham Coal Trade Conciliation
board at Newcastle this month, had to
resist a proposal of the owners for a
3% per cent, reduction of wages, following a similar reduction already made
last November.
Ultimately the owners stated that,
desiring'to avoid controversy at present, they would defer the request for
three months.
War and Peaee
Tho utmost powers of the human
mind, exerted on military science, have
succeeded only in making wars longer,
more costly and less decisive. The more
scientific war becomes the less it serves
its, purpose; This is not true of industry, agriculture and commerce, imperfect as is our way of carrying tbem on.
Human* effort in them only partially
blunts itself against other human effort; in so far as the element of co-operation, that is to say, peace, enters in
all intelligence, all strength and all devotion multiplies itself.—Snn Francisco
Bulletin.
The convention of District 18, United
Mine Workers of America—Crow's
Nest valley—which m£t in session on
tho 15tb inst., at Lethbridge, Alta,, was
among tho most successful held by the
district.
Tho secretary-treasurer's report was
discussed and the matter of loans due
to the district* fund and still,out standing taken up. One particularly referred
to was $20,000 due front Fernio local,
borrowed for erecting the miner's opera
louse with buildings there. This was
stated to have proved a white elephant
and it was submitted that means should
bo taken for disposing of it, to liquidate as far as possible the sum owin^l
The executive board was directed to appoint two members to go into the accounts of Fornie local to see what could
bo done regarding the loan-
Discussed Paper Costs.
It was decided that the question of
making all contracts expire at one time,
be submitted to the international board.
Means for outing down expenses on the
District Ledger were debated. It was
stated that too much was paid to correspondents and too much space occupied
in their correspondence on social events-
instead of on matters which were of
educational, interest to the readers of
the journal.
They Abhor the War.
The convention went On record as do-
crying in no uncertain manner the European war without commenting on
same, the members expressing their abhorrence, and demonstrating to the
workers at large, especially in view of
the cosmopolitan make-up of the
miners' organization, that they had no
quarrel whatsoever with one another.
Time Not Opportune.
The policy of tho organization as a'
whole taking up the scheme of establishing co-operative stores throughout
the district was debated on Saturday
afternoon. It was decided that while
the convention held to the principles
of co-operation, the present time with
its financial depression, and the instability of tho mining industry, was
not opportune for launching the
scheme.
District officiers were requested to
collect the data necessary for instituting a general sick and accident society,
with uniform fees; in place of the different local societies aa at present.
The Case of Elmer
The case of Herman Elmer, lato secretary of the Michel local, who is at
present detained in the military detention camp at Vernon, B. C, was taken
up. A strongly worded protest was
drawn up against the action of the
military authorities, and against the
manner of laying information described
as sinister and despicable. The daily
actions of Herman Elmer were stated
to be peaceable and law-abiding, and
copies of the protect were ordered to be
forwarded to Premier McBride and to
the dominion authorities with a view
to obtaining his release.
NEED ORGANIZATION
WHEN BUSINESS IS PULL
A trade union is a good thing,for
the workers when times are good. It
is generally easy to get men to join
when work is plentiful. When business is dull the membership falls off.
This Bhould not be so, because there
is much greater need for organization
and mutual help  than  at  any other
ORGANIZED LABOR TO
HAVE CO-OPERATIVE
MAIL ORDER HOUSE
About n year ago there was organized in New York city a co-operative
association-of union men and women,
known as the Union Label Products
Trading association, which has in view
the finding of a larger market for the
sale of union label goods. The general
plan is to establish in all large cities
retail sot res where only union label
goods will be Bold, Also to Bell goods
by tho mail order method, made possible by the introduction of the parcels
post.
"On September 12, 1914, an office and
salesroom was oponed in the Wprid
building, New York city. A large stock
of men's furnishings, cigars and cigarettes, pocket knives, household articles and many special lines of women's wear has been assembled. An
illustrated mail order catalogue has
been issued and Bent to trades unionists
and sympathisers whose names could be
secured. The results thus far have been
very satisfactory, enough ordors have
been received to encourage the association to enlarge its lines and increase its
stock of goods- The goods handled are
tho best that can bo obtained from the
most reliable union manufacturers. No
attempt is made to have customers pay
extra for the union label, the prices being no higher than are paid for non-
label goods.
The enterprise has the. endorsement
of the officers of the Amorican labor
movement, men prominent in its councils being members of the association.
Official recognition was given to the
association by permitting Mr, George
Stein, its vice-presidont to address the
last A. F. of L. convention in Philadelphia, and by being listed in the official
directory of the the Union Labels department of the A. F. of L.
The association is organized under
the laws of tho State of Now York,
with a capital stock of $50,000. Shares
are sold at $10 each, and no one can
own more than fifteen shares- There
are at present 75 shareholders and the
list is increasing rapidly. It is the intention to secure mombors in all parts
of the country. These members becoming active boosters, salesmen and customers. Members of all crafts are welcome.
The certificate of organization provides that the association has the right
to sell at retail,,to become wholesalers
and jobbers, and to engage in manufacture. A plan that comprises all the
features of the large and successful cooperative enterprises which have for so
many years been profitably conducted
by the workers of Europe.
Literature, details and catalogue can
be secured by writing to Union Label
Products Trading Association, 527
World building, Now York city.
Engineers Would Return
Some stationary engineers wrote to
Calgary board of trade this week, asking to be assisted to return to England.
Their letter was filed.
Are Tou on the Voters' List
Do you really know whether you are
on the oters' list of tne jfrovinco, or
nott If you don't, go to, the court
house, Georgia and Howe, and flnd out.
Don't wait till election day and get
left. '
Sell
HJOHES
«3 n oobacoo.
Union
MADE
6«r
•Ale
AND
Porter
*&&> of America  .-Oxf
__m__x __xi21_____m____ no*
SAFEST and QUICKEST
To and From
New Westminster
Blue Funnel
MOTOR CARS
Ltm 410 SEYMOUR STREET, (on*
door Off Hustings Bt.) dally st 8.30
». ni. and every 15 minutes thereafter
until 7.30 p. in., after which ws run
■ car erery 30 minutes. We bave
large roomy can going DIREOT TO
WESTMINSTER without parading yon
up and down the streeta, thereby giving a service yoa are sura to appreciate.
PHONE SEY. 1615
Reduced Wages on O. T. P.
The proposed reduotion of wages on
the Grand Trunk and Grand Trunk Pacific railways has not yet been officially
drawn to the attention of the department of labor. It is learned tbat the
matter is still the subject of negotiation between the representatives of the
various labor organizations and the
railways.
Until these negotiations have definitely failed and a state of deadlock
bas been brought about it is not likely
that the matter will come formally before the labor department.
Seattle Unionist Again Honored
Soi-tli- Bookbinders havo placed in
nomination for international secretary-
treasurer of thoir organization the present incumbent, Walter N. Roddick, a
member of the Seattle local and for
somo timo business agout and secretary,
Rcilii'k is vory likely to be successful,
•says  hts Seattle friends.
Typo. Meeting Sunday.
Members of Typogrnphicol union, No.
226, are reminded that the February
meeting will take place on Sunday next,
at 2 p. m, sharp. As there are a number of important matters coming up for
discussion, every member should be
present.
Hallelujah! Property Safe.
"Tho disturbance wbb accompanied
by a regrettable loss of life. Eight officers woro among the total of 25 persons killed, wliilo others were wounded
All is now quiet in Singapore nnd there
has been no destruction of property.'*
Short of Labor ln Britain
Everywhere, just now, there is a
shortage of labor, says the Federationist, the official paper of British trade
unions. So many men have joined the
army that the employers are compelled
to work short-handed. Docks are congested, factory owners are unable to
complete their orders. ' This shortage
has led, in a great many eases, to
breakdown of trade union conditions,
and hours of overtime are being
worked which, under normal circumstances, would be considered unthinkable. If over there was a time when
the trade unions should make a critical
examination of the industrial position
it is ut the present-
Less Goal Mining
Tho Grand Trunk Pacific railway hfls
announced that contracts have been let
and other arrangements made for the
installation of crudo oil as locomotive
fuel on their paasenger engines to be
operated between Prince Rupert, B, C,
nnd Jasper, Alta., a distnnce of 718
miles. It is expected that this installation will'be complete by next June.
The announcement dooit not cover the
use qf oil-burners on freight engines;
it is understood that these will continue to use coal, at least for the pre-
sent.
Shame to Take It     •
The Granby Smelter company announced officially last week that the
wages of their employees at the Grand
Porks smelter and Phoenix mines
would bo increased 10 per cent., dating
from February 1st.
Longshoremen Elect Officers.
Officers of the Great Lakes District
of the International Longshoremen's
association were elected here as follows: A. J. Chlopek, Toledo, president;
William H. Mayer, Erie; S- P. O'Brien,
Buffalo, and Peter Warner, Cleveland,
vice-presidents; John J. Joyce, secretary.
25% DISCOUNT
„ Why patronize trusts when you can
save 26% discount on all your Laundry?
The B. C. Clean Towel Supply, Limited, and
the
Home Laundry Company, Ltd.
are the only people allowing this, discount.
Look over your Laundry Bills and you will
be surprised to see what you have paid excess to the other Laundries.   .     ,
Telephone Highland 1473
Telephone Seymour 156
Telephone Seymour 5060
.Our wagons call all over Vancouver.
B.C. Clean Towel Supply Co.
? Limited
Five Thousand Labor
Temple Shares at Par
The Vancouver Labor Temple Co., Ltd., is still on a paying
basis, despite the general unemployment and industrial depression.
During the past fiscal year its earnings have exceeded all
expenses by nearly $100 per month, placing it among the few
businesses in Vancouver which have a balance on the credit
side of the ledger at this time.
With the completion of the Georgia-Harris street viaduct
very shortly, another step towards this section becoming
"newspaper row," Labor Templo stores will soon be in demand, which should result in dividends at the close of next
year.
Vanoouver Labor Temple Co. shares are a good investment
—conservatively, estimated the property is worth three times
the par value of the shares.
The executive board have authorized thq sale of five thousand shares at the par value of $1.00 each.
Every union man in Vancouver should own at least ten of
them. «
Call at Boom 211, Labor Temple, for particulars.
VANCOUVER LABOR TEMPLE CO., Ltd.
Every Union Man Oan Help
The merchant who does not advertise
at all may or may not be friendly to organized labor, but it is a certainty that
the merchant who patronizes other papers liberally yet refuses to advertise
in your paper, does not care much for
your trade. Patronize those who show
a desire to get your custom by advertising in The Federationist.
 !	
B; O. Distillery Co., Ltd.
Tho above firm has,been established
in New Westminster since 1003. Particular attention Ib drawn to their B, C.
Special Rye Whiskey, guaranteed to be
matured in wood for nine years. The
connoaBeur will find it unsurpassed in
flavor and quality. Owing to this fact,
it lias been strongly recommended for
medicinal use. The whiskey is distilled
and bottled in bond under government
supervision and stocked in even temperature, which ensures quality at all
times. Your liquor store has it. When
next ordering ask for a sample bottle,
It is also served at all union hotel bars.
Say "B. C. Special'* every time. We-
member it's a home product. The company are members of the Manufacturers ' Association of British Columbia.
The Frenchman loves his native wine,
Tho Dutchman drinks his beer,
The Englishman is f( 'arf and 'nrf"
Becauso it brings him cheer;
The Yankee drinks his whiskey straight
Because it makes him frisky,
But the Canadian takes the choice of
all
And drinks his B. C. Whiiikey..
Portland Emulates Vancouver
By a vote of 3 to 1, with one absent,
the Portland, Oro.,. city commission
passed an ordinance on Wednesday fixing $3 as the minimum wage for laborers engaged in city work in that city,
and provided that eight hours shall constitute a day's work in the city service.
Fewer Jobs
U. S. Secretary of the TrenBury Mc-
Adoo last week asked congroBs to appropriate $12,000, |25,000 and $50,000,
respectively, for labor-saving mail-carrying machinery at tho Chicago, Indianapolis and Philadelphia post-offices.
—i	
Quoth tlie Labor News: "Ho, hot
Another jurisdiction fight! Both tho
TcamfctorB and Street Railwaymen's International unions now claim jurisdiction over 'jitney' bus drivers."
Crown Broom Works, Ltd.
Every busy house-wife knows the
usefulness of a new broom that sweeps
clean—but tho "Crown" broom sweepB
cleaner and neater tban all others, because it is made of the best and right
kind of materials tb give instant and
durable satisfaction. It is mode at their
works, 332 Front street, Vancouver, under ideal conditions,by congenial workpeople who aro the best paid of their
kind in the. trade, no ,wondor the
"Crown" brooms are having an increasing demand. Imitators are buBv
guessing the reason why tho "Crown"
products are growing in'populnrity. No
mnttor for what purpose you next want
a broom, insist upon the "Crown"
brand. All sorts and sizes are made,
Inrgo and tall, short and small. Support borne industry, support tho oldest
established broom firm—tho Crown
Broom Works. ###
Wanted-900 Men
Continuous  Employment to all
'  Colonists    ■—   Shareholder,-!.
Men and Women of nearly
every Useful Occupation in
Demand.
The Western Comrade tells the
story of the great co-operative
colony at Llano del Rio In the
Antelope, valley, Lob Angeles
county, California.
Each Isaue of this magazine, devoted to the cause of the workers,
tells of tho progress made on the
colony where scores of men and
their families have found the gateway to freedom; where thousands
1 of acres of land and an abundance
of jvater are being put to the cooperative use of mankind.
The brightest, snappiest Illustrated working class publication tn
America.
If you are tired of the struggle
ln the cut-throat, competitive
world, where dlsemployment and
discouragement await suoh vast
numbers, write for sample copy of
The Western Comrade and say
you saw the advertisement In the
B. C. Federatlonist.
Better atlll—Send us one dollar
for a year's subscription and ask
us to begin wtth the July nhmber
telling about the colony.
The Western Comrade
924 Hlgglna Bulfdfng
LOS ANGELES, CAL
Residence 2838 Birch Street
Phone Bayvlew 1306B
Office 1st Floor Birks Building
Phone Seymour 7075
Vancouver, B. O.
Dr. A. McKay Jordan
20 YEARS A SPECIALIST
EYES EXAMINED GLASSES FITTED
CONSULTATIONS FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
EACH WEEK
LABOR TEMPLE CLUB, POOL
AND READING ROOM OPEN
SEVEN DATS A WEEK.
SPEND TOUR SPARE TIME IN
THB LABOR TEMPLE FREE
READINO  ROOM.
RTTY Guaranteed Genuine South Wellington
° U,* Coal mined at South"Weffington, Vancouver IslanJTB. C, and Sold by us in Vancouver
at practically Cost in order to keep our men and
teams employed.
OOAL.      Per Ton.
Lump, screened $6.50
Nut, No. 1..    5.50
Nut, No. 2..    5.00
Slack    3.00
PEA SPECIAL     4.00
WOOD.   Per Load.
Dry eordwood, novo l'gth. (2.75
Insidoflr f    3.00
Fir bark....     8.50
Kiln-dried kindling    3.50
Dty eordwood, stove length
 ..(cord)   550
Service the best.   Satisfaction guaranteed.  Competition Deled.
^'.t J.Hanbury & Co., Ltd *T™«-7
Superior
Printing I
AT MODERATE
PRICES
Telephone:
Sey. 7495
LABOR TEMPLE
The FEDERATIONIST
can supply all your Printing
needs. No Job too large or
too small. First-class workmanship, good ink and high-
grade stock have given our
Printers a reputation for
SUPERIOR PRINTING
Union Work a Specialty.
Our Prices are right and we
deliver when wanted.
'

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