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The British Columbia Federationist Jul 24, 1914

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Array THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
INDUSTRIAL UNITY:   STRENGTH. *@» OFFICIAL PAPER:  VANCOUVER TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL AND B. C. FEDERATION OF LABOR.        ; rfp***t^* "*%> POLITICAL UNITY:  V1CTOBTI
■  '  ,-,-—'— '-  1     '        '-' "    ■' '     "  ' '    .  "~      "   , ,,      ,   —  ■■   ■ ■■■-        —■ ''     | ^ "*" '     """ ' ■-       ■
SIXTH YEAR./g£To. 172.
J*
VANCOUVEB, B. P., FRIDAY, JULY 24, 1914. SIX PAGES/M
EXECUTIVF/jF B.C.
FEDERAL OF
Holds Meetings at Victoria
—Workmen's Compensation Campaign
'To Secure Legislation Beneficial to Workers of
This Province
STREET RAILWAYMEN
Re
Sending  Delegate
Trades Congress
to
VICTORIA, B. C, July 22.—The
executive meeting of the B. C. Federation of Labor was held on the 12th
Inst. The only things taken Into consideration were the rules for the special convention. But at the meeting
held on the 16th, many things were
dealt with, amongst which were the
question of a policy for the federation
and also the question of the Workmen's Compensation act. This Is a
question which has engaged the attention of various conventions of the federation, bnt as yet little has been done
except that Investigations have been
made Into the various compensation
acts of the different provinces and in
the states. A special committee was,
.however, appointed to go into the
whole matter of workmen's compensation, and to take such steps as are
[necessary to carry on a campaign tor
a similar act in this province which
would compare favorably with that
of the Ontario act which is supposed
to be the best of Its kind ln existence
on this continent. The committee
(appointed Is as follows: Chairman,
H. McVety, W. J. Dunn and A. S.
Wells, and Vlce-prealdent Bancroft of
Trades and Labor congress consented
to act tn an advisory capacity on the
committee.
Other things dealt with at this
meeting were the routing of the men
appointed as organizers at the recent
special convention, T. J. Shenton be-1
Ing sent to the Boundary country, J.
Robertson to Vancouver island,
Chris. Pattlnson and C. L. Dykeman
jto Vancouver, New Westminster and
vicinity.
I Questions of finance were also dls-
■sussed, and the matter was taken up
with Vice-president Bancroft as to
krhat congress could do to aid the
{federation ln the present situation.
Local unions will greatly aid the
'federation by sending In the per capita
Jnow due, and locals unaffiliated will
[Assist by affiliating and swelling the
numbers up to enable the federation
jto secure legislation in the interests
Ibf the workers of the province.
NEW WESTMINSTER, July 20.-
There was a fair attendance at the
meeting ot the Street Railway Employees last Tuesday evening, and
many new and old faces were noticed ln the gathering.
The report of the auditors for the
past quarter Was received, showing
363 members ln good standing and a
healthy flnanclal condition.
The convention call of the Dominion Trades Congress was laid over till
the next regular meeting to ascertain
If it would be possible to send a delegate ln conjunction with some of the
other organlaztlons of the city.
Brothers Tates, Holmes, Geddes,
Duncan and Humphries were appointed as a parliamentary committee.
Bros. R. Coles and A, Porter were
granted three months' leave ot absence. The request of the Trades and
Labor council to place an assessment
of 20 cents per month on the membership for the purpose ot placing an
organizer in the field for a couple of
months to build up the trade union
movement ln the city was received
and the matter will be acted on at the
next meeting.
Mr. Stevens, M. P., says: "Thank
God for even a tin-pot navy."
THE MINERS' UNION
LCONTINUE
ns-raw
Men  Vote   to   Make  Ni
Change in Places—Strike
Pay Cut Off
British Federation of Miners Offer Assistance
Which Is Accepted
INI LAND OEM
The Annual Festival a Success—Midnight Baseball
Oame
Elections  in  August —
Brooks Socialist Candidate—Plenty Idle
J.
is
VOTE ON STRIKE
3y British Columbia Federation of Labor
To all organized labor In the province ot British Columbia:
At the request of the miners on Vancouver island the B. C. Federation ol
abor issued a call for a special convention, which convened in Vancouver
Em Monday, July 13th, and continued
In session until Wednesday, July 15th.
[The call was to all organized labor,
hether affiliated with the federation
|or not, and about 100 delegates were ln
attendance. The miners' situation was
(discussed from all view points, and,
fatter two days' debate, the following
[resolution was adopted:
_ "Whereas—The mine workers on
[Vancouver Island, for 21 and 14
Inonths respectively, have been strlk-
Hng for the right of organization; and
"Whereas—The miners have been
slsted the coal operators to help defeat the miners by various ways,
such as the non-enforcement of the
Soal Mines Regulation act, the De-
selved Workmen's act and the new
order-in-councll regarding the immigration Into B. C, and by sending
special police und militia to act as
scab herders; and
■ "Wheras—the miners have been
hacked by a powerful organization,
and if they should be defeated there
is no other organization that can
stand against the combined efforts of
oapital and the government; therefore be it
"Resolved—That this convention
assembled advise labor in the produce of British Columbia to engage
In a general strike, and that the executive be Instructed to take a refer-
mduui vote immediately, and as soon
is the vote is in, action be taken; and
urthermore, that four men be sent
mt by the convention to proagate
he Idea ot a general strike and on an
iducatlonal tour."
The B. C. Federation ot Labor la
irganlzed for legislative purposes and
ias neither power to raise funds for,
«• to oall, a general strike, so that
ny action taken by your organlzu-
lon is necessarily of a voluntary
ature. Central bodies and local
hlons are requested . to forward
inds for the purposes outlined above
y the secretary of the federation,
hlch will be used in carrying out
ie programme already outlined. In
rder that we can follow out the
irms of tbe resolution you are related to vote on the following
les tlon;
are you ln favor of a general strike
i support of   the   island   miners?
Dtes for Votes against	
ie result of the vote to be sent to
oretary-treasurer A. S. Wells. P, 0.
ix 1638, Victoria, B. C, not later
an August 18th, 1914.
(Seal)
A. S. WELLS,
Secretary-treasurer,
me and address of Secretary
FAIRBANKS, (Alaska, July 1.—On
June 22nd this town was en fete, the
occasion being the festival of the
"Midnight Sun." The midnight "son"
Is confined to temperate zones and is
himself generally Intemperate, but the
glorious, midnight .sun is indigenous
to the far north or south. Here In
Fairbanks we enjoyed twenty hours'
sunshine. From now on the days
grow shorter, the sun declining about
five minutes per day. On September
21st (tbe Equinox) we get an even
break with tho rest of the world-
twelve hours then being our just por
tlon. From then on, we are shortchanged. On December 21st we only
have four hours' sunshine—and, oh,
such long nights! On the evening of
the 21st waB played the midnight
baseball game. On the following afternoon the sons and daughters of the
golden north (juveniles) gave a flne
entertainment. In the evening was a
parade, some of the floats therein
being very original ln conception and
design, and typically suggestive of
Alaskan life and customs. A grand
free-for-all ball masque wound up the
proceedings.
The election of the Alaskan delegates to congress occurs next August
and the local political parties are now
busy "making medicine." The present incumbent, Wickersham, is a candidate for reelection on the progressive (sie) democratic ticket. The republican party have not announced
their champion as yet.' He will assuredly be a trusty and subservient
lackey of the capitalistic interests-
probably Gilmore, of Nome. The socialist party have agreed on G.
Brooks. Mrs. Morrow Lewis is assiduously campaigning on his behalf.
Mrs. Lewis intends visiting all the
voting precincts ln this* district,
may say that the socialist party here
is hardly making the progress to be
desired or commensurate with the valiant efforts of Mrs. LewlB. The delay
may be ascribed to factional rivalry
and particularly to the fact that the
majority of the workers here are foreigners not sufficiently familiar with
the language or customs and economic conditions prevailing to be at all
interested. In Nome the Miners' union, No. 240, W. F. M., practically
dominates politics there on Seward
peninsula, but this part of the country
containing the majority ot the voters,
is politically adrift and a prey to unscrupulous political high-binders.
The labor market is glutted. Work
is particularly scarce and pay decidedly doubtful. Half of the workers
here lose a portion—some all—of
their wages every season. The labor
lieq law affords no protection. 'Tls a
cruel joke, containing legal technicalities sufficient to protect at all times
the "worker," but not the worked.
The Alaskan railroad commission is
here busy on the preliminary survey.
Uncle Sam Is a "sweater" from afar,
reducing wages to $90 per month.
The miners ot Nanalmo held their
regular meeting on Monday night
When lt was over and the men were
coming out ot the hall they were surprised to see some fifty soldiers with
fixed bayonets lined up at the rear
of the building, and ln the bushes
across the road In front of the hall a
squad of special police also fully
armed. This is just about as low and
dirty a piece of business that the government Is responsible of doing. There
were about 1200 miners present at
the meeting and they are enthusiastically determined to continue their
strike policy, even though the relief
pay is cut off. Among the speakers
on the Vancouver island strike situation were Messrs. Shenton, Pattlnson,
Robertson, President Foster, Pettigrew and others. A letter was read
from Mr, Farrington tn which he stated that $16,000 was to be available
immediately for special relief ln the
strike zone on the island, and that
the regular strike pay, on account of
financial conditions in the international union, would not hereafter be
forthcoming until such financial conditions were changed. The miners accepted the situation ln the. spirit
which was to have been expected lu
view of the fact that the something of
this kind has been ln the wind ever
since the convention ln Nanaimo last
month, and in view ot the position
which Mr. Farrington took regarding
the general strike. The meeting,
however, unanimously determined to
continue its policy as in the past, and
the cessation of Btrike relief will have
no effect upon the continuation of the
President White of the U. M. W.
has been asked to continue the relief
until the 18th of August, when the
result of the referendum on the proposal to hold a general strike will be
known. Some time ago word was received from the British Federation of
miners that whenever the island
strikers needed their assistance it
would be forthcoming. At that time
this reserve was not drawn upon, but
in view of developments concerning
the International U. M. W., a letter
has now been sent to the British organization explaining the situation,
and stating that relief for a short time
from that source would be acceptable.
lty of the votes in the province in
their bands, and with the McBride
government recognized from the first
as hostile towards their Interests, the
labor men. on the coast have recorded
the magnificent achievement of allowing McBride to secure almost a unanimous legislature. ' This consummation has been brought about not by
any great astuteness upon McBride's
part, for he has but little, but by factional differences among the labor
men themselves. Socialists, syndicalists, straight-line labor men and radicals have so divided tbeir support that
with the exception of a couple of constituencies, the victory of the McBride
forces was made easy. ' If the experiences In the coal strikes on the island
bring the labor forces of British Columbia to a realisation that divisions
among themselveB over finespun philosophies cannot fall to defeat their
own ends, lt will at least have accomplished some good. When once they
realize this and get onto a basis of
some working arrangement with the
party which Is nearest to them, as the
labor men have done ln Oreat Britain,
they .will have no more difficulty with
the McBride government."
Left For Providence
R. P. Pettlplece, president of the
local Typographical union, left tbls
morning for Providence, R. I., to attend the I. T. ti. sixtieth convention,
which convenes in that city next
month.
'S
i
SAIN ACT
Vice-President Bancroft Addresses Large Meeting
at Victoria
SEVEN HUNDRED
SPEAKERS TAKE
THE HELD
A Free Speech Campaign is
Started in Land of the
Southern Cross
Three Men Arrested and
Speaking Is Still Going
Strong
Urges Workers; of B. C.
Secure a Similar Law
to Ontario
to
Of
LABOR'S LACK
Political   Sagacity
This Province
in
Wm. Macadams, an old-time news
paperman of British Columbia, who
is now editor of (he Edmonton Capital, has this to say on the political situation of this province in a recent
issue of that paper:
"Having failed to secure from the
McBride government in British Columbia the enforcement of the laws
enacted for the protection of coal miners, the Vancouver island miners are
now calling upon the members of
trades unions in the coast province to
to take political action to secure the
election of an administration which
will enforce those laws. The action
which they propose Is the nomination
and election of labor men to the British Columbia house, something which
they should be able to do were they
to vote solid, as, so It is claimed, 80
per cent, of the vote in B. C Is cast
by employees in one capacity or an
other. But before the labor men in
British Columbia can hope to succeed
politically they will have to apply a
little more common sense to the situation than they have ever done before.    With the overwhelming major-
VICTORIA, B.C., July 23.—Vlco-
president Bancroft, of the Trades and
Labor congress of Canada, addressed
a meeting of trades unionists on Monday evening. It was held under the
auspices of the local trades couhcll
ln the Alexandra club rooms, and ably
presided over by (V Slvertz. Mr.
Bancroft ln a clever and Interesting
address gave the history of the activities of the workers in Ontario in securing the present Workmen's Compensation act ln that province, and
showed its advantages over the previous act, pointing out that lt embodied the principle "so long sought for
by organized labor," namely, that the
industry should bear the cost of In
jury to the men engaged in the Indus
tries of a country. He also showed
that the idea of compensation acts
was not so much to provide compensation as it was to make accidents so
costly to the employers, as to prevent
them, by the adoption of all necessary
precautions and safeguards, and said
that if in the province of Alberta
where the recent Hillcrest accident
occurred, they had had a compensation aot which was based on the principles of that of Ontario, lt would
have been so costly to the employers
that they would have been compelled
to take all precautions to prevent such
a terrible catastrophy. In his opinion
these would have been sufficient to,
have prevented this loss of life, ' In
conclusion, he urged the workers in
British Columbia to bend their efforts
to securing the passage of a similar act ln this province, and to be
guided by the experience of the workers in Ontario, and, if possible, secure
an act on the same lines, but to better it if it were possible, as there
were points which could be improved
upon even in the law of Ontario. Tho
meeting closed with the passing of a
vote of thanks to the speaker.
The Laurler training' ship is now
become the Borden Navy.
[Special Australian Correspondence]
SYDNEY, N. S. W., July 3.-For
some time past workers ln the big In
dustrial waterside town of Port Plrle,
South Australia, have been meeting
with trouble. IA number of the members of the I. W. W. organization have
been Imprisoned because they tried
to promote the right of free speech.
But the I. W. W. is resolved that the
imprisonment will not deter them in
their efforts to bave free speech. The
I. W. W. here has a large reserve
force of healthy lunged speakers, and
from all parts of Australia members
are rushing to tbe town of Port Plrle
where a free speech campaign will be
Instituted. Already.over 200 have arrived there from Sydney and within
a week or two an additional 600 will
be there—making in all over 700
speakers ln the field. This Is the first
free sppech campaign that has taken
place on a large scale in Australia. A
prominent member of the body told
me before leaving Sydney, that if 700
were not enough thero were 1000 more
ready. Some will pay their passages
on the boats, others not having the
necessary wealth will get there somehow—If they have to beat it in true
hobo Btyle, When tho campaign
opens the speakers will follow one another in turn. If one is arrested, another will take his place until tho
gaols are full and the authorities are
beaten. A member said that such a
campaign was carried on in America
some time ago, and the fights at
Denver, Spokane; Portland, and other
places were it is claimed all won by
tbe indomitable spirit of the I. W. W.
The authorities, after filling the
gaols with the arrested men were confronted wltb demands for a jury trial.
They begged the offenders to leave the
prisons, but the speakers, true to their
claims for justice refused to go. That
Is what will happen ln Australia. The
men cannot be beaten. In addition to
the speakers, large numbers of men
of the organization are flocking to the
place to assist in other work, such as
union campaigning, etc. In I. W. W.
we have men who are not afraid to
spend their money to assist those who
have gone Into the firing line. Those
who have not gone to the town to
speak are giving some of their wages
to the fund for the campaign. One
man alone has given £100 ln one sum
to the fund.
Later—The free speech campaign
has opened. Three men have been
arrested, but tbe speaking is still
going strong. Each man arrested has
demanded a trial by jury.
/ In Vanoouver \
V.    City, MOO    )
$1.50 PER YEAR/
iw shops
OF
dertaking parlors of Messrs. Nunn and
Thompson, a verdict of accidental
death was returned. Mr. KeUy oame
from Glasgow to this country about
eight years ago, flnt settling in Toronto, where after building a home
for himself and family, a Sre destroyed everything, leaving them to
start all over again. About three
years ago be came to Vancouver, but
on account of the depression in the
building trades he bad not been able
to get much work. . The funeral took
place on Tuesday, under the auspices
of the local Bricklayers' union at
Mountain View cemetery, the Rev.
Mr. McKay conducting the services.
Tbe pallbearers were: Messrs. James
Haslett, W. Dagnall, A. Hughes, W.
Kerr, E. McCall, P. Esston. The obsequies were attended by- many friends
of the family, also many fellow-workmen, with whom he stood in high esteem. Deceased, who was 32 years
old, leaves a widow and three little
children, one a baby In arms, to face
the world alone.
AUSTRALIA AGAINST
Report of Miss O'Connor,
Oity Inspector Presented
to Health Committee
Some Stores Not Provided
With Seating Accommodation for Women
In Sympathy With Course
Adopted in British
Columbia
Canadians Must Keep the
Niggers Out of the
Country
Union Job
The South Vancouver school board
has awarded the tender for the annex
to the Ferris road high school to W.
J. Prout for $7,809.19. It Is stipulated tbat the union rate of wages
will be paid, and to be completed by
August 26th.
A. R. Hoerle, member of Voncouver
Typographical Union, No. 226, -will return to this city from Colorado
Springs, Col., next week. He has
been at tbe Printers' home for several
months and his many friends will be
pleased to learn that he has regained
his health.
J. Wright, the popular foreman of
the Province, returned last week from
a sojourn to the Okanagan country.
He is now at Bowen island, where his
family are camping for the summer.
An Interesting letter from T. A.
Barnard, of New Westminster, on the
subject of prohibition and temperance
Is held over to next week owing to
pressure on our space.
[Special Australian Correspondence j
SYDNEY, N. S. W., July 3—In Au
stralia we are anxiously watching tht
trend of affairs in connection wltb
tbe proposal to land Hindoos ln Brl
tish Columbia. All our leading newspapers—labor as well as capitalistic
—are with the Vancouver people In
tbeir efforts to keep the blacks out of
a white man's country. The proposal
to tow the vessel out of the harbour
and hand them over to the Japanese
guard outside the three mile limit has
been received here with general satisfaction. The presence of the Japan-
boats there have a sinister
appearance, even if it Is but a coincidence that they are there. The
Hindoo merchant who chartered the
immigrant ship probably went to the
Jap mercantile marine with the particular purpose of impressing his com-
patriots and the B. C. people by the
conjunction of such a flag and such
passengers, and to many It would
appear that the additional presence of
Jap warships In the vicinity Is disagreeably suggestive of Japan making a show of her naval power for
the benefit of the Hindoos. Meanwhile every development will be keenly watched by Australians since this
country is equally interested with
Canada in what may prove to be a
test case of deep empire concern.
Like Canada, we ln Australia bave a
"white" policy, and even at the point
of the sword we will keep lt white.
Every child is pledged from its
mother's knee to this policy—it is
born In tbelr blood. If a body of
Hindoos were to come to our shores
under like conditions ub those appertaining at Vancouver we would take
strong action. We in Australia wish
the B. C- people every success In their
efforts to keep the niggers out of tbo
country.
Members of the Barbers' union wish
to call attention to the'r shop card
and request that all workers look tor
lt when entering barber shops.
Union Cafes
The culinary crafts report that tho
London cafe, 438 Main street, and the
Delmonlco cafe,    708 Robson street,
have signed the union agreement.
Patronize the merchant that patronizes your paper.
The master printers plcknlcked at
Bowen Island last Saturday. There
was a good turnout.
The horse-shoers held their annual
outing at Bowen island last Saturday.
A most enjoyable time was spent by
those present.
Miss Teresa K. O'Connor, th* recently appointed woman Inspector for
the civic health department, had her
first report to Dr. Underhlll, medical
health officer, read to the civic health
committee Monday afternoon. Since
May 28, when she entered upon her
new duties, Miss O'Connor has visited
135 different places, consisting of
shops, factories, laundries, beaches,
parks and public buildings where fa-
male help is employed. Some of the
places have been visited twice and the
parks and stores at leaat once a week.
The places inspected by Miss O'Connor employ 2,283 females. Of this
number, 1,148 are employed in shops
and stores, 314 in corporations, 446 In
laundries, 276 in factories and the
remainder ln other activities of life.
Miss O'Connor states that she found
sanitary conditions ln the larger
places, generally speaking, satisfactory, but in regard to the smaller
shops, she very often did not flnd tbls
the case, "I have In mind at the present time," she said, "one sweat shop
ln particular, which Is thirty-nine feet
long by eight feet wide with only one
window at the front tor light and ventilation. In the same room there Is
a gas stove for heating Irons. Six females and five males are working in
the shop and there Is only one poorly
ventilated toilet at the back ot the
shop for the use of all"
No Seats Provided
Some departments of stores, It, was
stated, are not provided with any
seating accommodation for employees-
One store visited, wblch employs
nearly 100 girls, provides no seating
accommodation at all, and only three
seata were to be seen In the whole
store. The report continues that as
regards conditions ln factories, (trie
are generally seated when at work
when possible, but ln laundries the
work Is done standing. The building
is generally hot and on an average,.on
three days a week, the girls work
nine hours a day. In most cases hours
are satisfactory and always satisfactory in the 'larger stores.
Disgusting Practices
Miss O'Connor, in her report, states
that she finds a great nuisance prevailing throughout nearly all places
where females are employed in the
undesirable language Ib written on tho
walls of the toilet rooms. "I find this
the case at the bathing beaches and In
two ot tbe terminal waiting rooms. In
almost every case, however, the difficulty is being overcome by repainting
the walls."
On motion of Alderman Ramsay a
copy of tbe report will be sent to Mr.
Gordon, factory Inspector, and also
referred to the city solicitor, and the
medical health officer as to what
course the city should take to eliminate tbe conditions reported to exist
A Socialist Candidate
Reference waB made in the last
issue of this paper to the possibilities
of electing a labor representative at
Sandon, B. C. Mr. Shilland wishes to
correct this statement by explaining
that the workers In that riding will
only support a straight Socialist candidate.
The strike is Btlll on at the Queen
mine near Ymlr, British Columbia.
All miners are urged to stay away
until strike is won.
C. P. R. employees held a most enjoyable annual picnic at Ganges harbor last Saturday. There was a large
crowd present.
At Sidney Station, Vancouver Island,
orange trees imported from -lupan are
showing good growth.
JUDGE MORRISON
IS REWARDED FOR
VALUE  RECEIVED
Premier Mcllrldo has appointed Judges Morrison and
MacDonald us a commisison to
bring in recommendations on
which an uct can be based for
tho redistribution of parliamentary Beats in British Columbia.
The choice ot Judge Morrison
Is a curious one. Ho is a liberal, and tbo judge who presided over the speclul assize al
Westminster which dealt with
the miners' eases last winter.
Just why McBride and Bowser
should hnnd Morrison this plum
at this time, while lots of tory
lawyers and Jurists would have
liked it, is something which
time muy explain. The main
thing, however, which McBride
wisiics to accomplish in the
scheme of redistribution, is to
so arrange tilings as to put the
only two working-class members of tho house out of It. 'n
Homo way or another Morrison
can help to thnt end. That is
most likely why we see this
liberal judge with his feet ln
tho tory s^ush trough. PAGE TWO
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY,  JULY 24, 1811
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Telephone Stymou lilt.
Ratea H.SO par Day and Up.
THE NEW ENGLAND HOTEL"00™' T'T'JV?"'
 ______    classed with the best
78c. up; weekly, 93 up.     656 SEYMOUR STREET transient*
Free Bus to and from all Trains and Boats.
Electric Elevator
UfYTI? I       IRVINE     Cor* Co,u,n,,U Ave- ">« Hutins* Street
etlKJ I S_il_    IIVVIllVj    MePHAlL 4 MACKENZIE, Proprietor.
European Plan.
Hot and Cold Water and Telephone In every room.   Rooms with baths,
single or en suite.
538 Cambie Street
Phone Sey. 2542
H0PPS&DUKER,
91-VjnO mRITCULARPURPOSE
BRITISH COLUMBIA LAND
Splendid opportunities in Mixed Farming, Dairying,
Stock and Poultry.   British Columbia Grants Preemptions of 160 aores to Actual Settlers
FREE
TERMS—Residence on the
land for at least three years;
improvements to the extent
of $5 per acre; bringing under cultivation at least five
acres.
For further information apply to
Deputy Minister of Lands, Victoria, B.C.
Secretary, Bureau of Provincial Information, Victoria
The Quality of Our Service, tbe Quality of
Our Goods, Is Always the Best
The reason our business Is increasing is due to the faot that our business polloy Is correct. We adopted tne polloy of Informing the publlo
through the medium of the press aa to what our charges woutd be for a
complete funeral. Including Hearse, Carriage for Family, Care of Remains,
Wagon Service, and all our personal servioe for
$66.00
Complete Funeral
$56.00
Ws are living up to our advertisement to the letter. This has established confidence with the public in us, and for that reason alone ws are suc-
oessful, and we intend to continue aa ws aro doing now.
Mount Pleasant Undertaking Co.
Cor. Eighth Arc. and Main Street .Phone Fairmont 189
Commodious Chapel Free to All Patrons
Formerly Csnter A Hanns's Branoh
A. C. Millar, Pros.
P. H. Grots, Manager
Vancouver Heights Grocery
3040 HASTINGS STREET EAST
THE POST OFFICE STORE
Best of everything at lowest prices.
Groceries, Hams, Bacon, Garden Seeds, Fresh Fruit and Vegetables, Tea Rose Tea, Reld & Millar's Sausages and Head Cheese.
Every morning we receive a shipment of berries from McDonald's Ranch on Keats Island.   They are delicious.
Telephone your orders.  Our delight Is to serve you.
W. R. McMURRAY
PHONE MiQHLAND 685L
IIOI-
Election   of   Officers  and
Other  Business is
Transacted
J. S. Robertson of Nanaimo
Addressed Council on
General Strike
The regular meeting of Victoria
Trades and Labor Council was held on
Wednesday, July 22nd, In the absence
of Pres. Dykeman the chair was occupied by Vice-Pres. Martin.
There was a good attendance ot
delegates.
Credentials were received for: Stage
Employees, D. Day; Bartenders, W.
M. Tyson, B. J. Smith, F. Jewel; Carpenters, Theo. Crowl H. Garbutt, A,
Watchman D. J Milne; Sheet Metal
Workers, H. Brewster, T, Brooks; Barbers, Thos. Nicholson, Walter Slgnour
—and delegates seated. Minutes of
last meeting were then read and
adopted.
A letter was read from the Premier
of New South Wales introducing Miss
Harriet F. Powell to the Labor movement, and on motion Miss Powell was
asked to address the council. In a
brief speech she outlined the idea of
the identical interests of the workers
the world over, and spoke of the
movement in Australia, giving a short
history of the movement and how the
workers had entered into the political
fight as well as the industrial field ln
that country, and voiced the need for
both forms of organization before
Labor could stand free. Miss Powell
had only arrived in Victoria on Tuesday by the Niagara, and on finding
that the boat to 'FrlBco did not leave
until Thursday she had taken this opportunity to make the acquaintance of
the, workers in Victoria.
Del. Severtz moved a vote of thanks,
and that she be asked to convey the
good wishes of the workers in Victoria
to the workers in Australia on her return to that country; but Miss Powell
said she Intended to tour the U. S, A.
and Canada tt possible. She would
not be back in Australia for two years.
Del. Severtz said that he had attended the meeting of the Hospital
Board and witnessed the election of
officers, but did not appear deeply impressed.
Committee's report adopted.
, Dels. Severtz and Fisher, who attended the special convention of the
B. C. F. of L„ reported that they had
expected that the miners on the executive of the Federation would have put
some concrete proposals' before the
convention, and said that in their
opinion the failure to do this had resulted In the convention sitting for
three days. He went into details regarding the different resolutions suu-
mitted, and reported that F. Bancroft,
vice-president of fhe Trades Congress,
gave a very interesting address on
the Workmen's Compensation Act In
Ontario. Del. Fisher denied that he
had used the terms credited to him by
the president. Del. Watchman said
that the statement made by Del. Severtz regarding the executive of the
Federation not having made a cut-and-
drled polloy, and said the executive
were not leaders, and the executive
did not neither could they have Introduced a cut-and-dried policy under
such circumstances as prevailed at the
convention. Del. Severtz, in reply,
said that he had no wish to slap the
executive, but merely reported the
facts.
Report adopted.
Special committee on sending a
delegate to congress through Del.
Watchman reporting progress.
Report of committee on public meeting addressed by Vice-President Bancroft.
Committee reported meeting held In
Alexandra Club, but that meeting was
poorly attended by trades unionists.
Report adopted and bills ordered
paid. Committee "to give explanation
of council's action re financial secretary" to locals. Reporting progress,
.etter from bookbinders intimating
the were re-afflllating with the council
received and flled.
Letter from O. H. Barnard, M. P., re
unemployed read and filed. Letter
from Painters condemning council
for the action taken re financial secretary, was referred to special committee. All trades reported trade aB
bad with the excptlon of the Longshoremen, who reported a slight Improvement.
Stage Employees reported that nonunion men were on Majestic theatre.
Carpenters reported exceptionally bad
conditions.
Election of officers then took place
and resulted as follows:
President, A. S. Wells, Local 2651,
Carpenters (acclamation); vice- president, H. King, Street Railwaymen;
financial secretary, J. Day, Plumbers;
rec. secretary, T. F. Matbieson, Local
2651, Carpenters (acclamation); statistician, C. Severtz, Letter Carriers;
sergeant-at-arms, P. Fisher, Longshoremen.
Executive Committee: Dels. C. Severtz, F. Turner, R. W. Nunn, J. L.
Martin, with the president, vice-president and recording secretary.
Finance committee:   C. Severtz, A.
MINARD'S LINIMENT CURE8
BURNS, ETC.
of the City of Vanoouver, reapect-
fully request
Merchants,    Manufacturer.,   Law-
yera,   Fraternal   Socletlea,   cluba,
Unlona, Eto., to have tha
UNION LABEL
Put on their Printing, auch aa Circulars, Briefs, Records, Books,'
Posters. It Is a guarantee of iu-
perlor workmanship. This labal I.
endorsed by all tradea and labor
unions In Vancouver and vicinity.
VANCOUVEH    ALLIED    PRINTING TRADES COUNCIL
F. R. Fleming, Secretary,
Room 212 Labor. Temple
Watchman, W. M. Tyson, H. King, L.
S. Weston.
J. S. Robertson, who was elected at
tbe recent convention to lecture on
the general strike proposal, was then
given the floor, and said in part: The
workers on Vancouver Island are in a
death struggle with the capitalist class
and the battles of the class war are
continuous ln whatever country the
capitalistic system is developed. Outlining the situation on Vancouver
Island he referred to the U:*M. W. of
America in their efforts to build up an
organization, and gave a graphic outline of the struggles of the miners to
enforce the Coal Mines Regulation Act,
and Bald that the cutting off of the
relief from the miners would not
break the spirit of the miners on the
Island, and the flght had only just
begun. In an earnest and eloquent
appeal he asked for the support of the
miners to win their flght, giving examples of where the general Btrike bad
been successful and how opinion
amongst the workers had changed on
this idea. In conclusion be referred
to the need of organized labor making
a stand for self-protection, as the fight
on Vancouver Island was the fight ot
all, not only of the miners but tbe
organized labor movement for self-
preservation.
On the conclusion of J. S. Robertson, a motion was passed asking all
locals to arrange for meetings in order
that Bro. Robertson could have the
privilege of addressing them.
Meeting adjourned 11.30. *
COUNCIL ELECTS
Large Meeting — Hospital
Employees Work Very
Long Hours
Vice - president    Bancroft
Urges the Sending Delegates to St. John
NEW WESTMINSTER, July 23,
The hall of the Trades and Labor
council contained the largest number
of delegates that has been present for
many months, when President Cameron called the meeting to order last
night. The real reason for the gathering Is a matter of guess-work, prob-.
ably the election of officers, combined
with the visit of Vice-president Bancroft, contributing to the large turnout.
Many delegates who have not been
present for months, responded to their
names and those who could not come
sent substitutes. Credentials were
received as follows: J. W. Hunter
and J. Helmer were appointed additional delegates from Painters' local
No. 496; Chas. Sell, H. Jacobson and
A. Pearson, Brewery Workers; II.
Schofleld, substitute for E. Hunt, of
the Bartenders; Bert Chapman, substitute for E. L. Moran; H. Halvarson
and J. Yorkson, from the Barbers; A.
Michels, Robt. Lee, J. R. Flynn and
E. Gill with alternates Schaper, Robinson, Norrlson, from the Steam and
Operating Engineers.
A letter from Secretary Wells of
B. C. Federation of Labor explanatory
ot the reasons why communications
from his offlce had not been received
by the council was read, and ordered
filed.
Delegate Gibb reported from the
Grievance committee that the matter
of the girl working ln a licensed house
unreasonable hours had been taken
up with the president of the Bartenders' local, also with President Walker,
of the Cooks and Walters of Vancouver, who had promised to look Into
the matter.   -
Delegate Knudsen and Gibb, who
represented the council at the Federation convention, presented reports
touching on the matters acted on by
that body. The reports were accepted
and filed.
The reports of unions as to trade
conditions were the same as for
months past. With few exceptions
the delegates reported decreased
memberships and many of those remaining out ot work.
The election ot officers resulted as
follows: President—Herman Knudsen; vice-president, C, Cropley; general secretary, <W. E. Maiden; financial secretary and treasurer, R. A.
Stoney; sergeant-at-arms, H. Jacob-
son; trustees, D. S. Cameron, J. R.
Flynn, W. Yates.
The executive committee were Instructed by motion to prepare a list
of standing committees for the consideration of the counoll at Its next
meeting.
Delegate Cameron brought to the
attention of the council the fact that
the white employees who replaced the
Chinese formerly employed at the
Royal Columbia hospital, were receiving less wages and to work more
hours than the Chinese. As the
council with the local council of women were responsible In the main for
the change of help, he thought It Its
duty to lodge a protest with the hospital board and the secretary was so
Instructed.
Vice-president Bancroft of the Dominion Trades congress then addressed
the council, urging the members to
see that their organization was represented at the coming convention, if
for no other reason than that as the
trade union movement was judged by
the size of the various conventions of
their central bodies, It was their duty
to be present and swell, the number.
The bigger and better the convention
the greater the impression made on
the capitalistic class.
Bro. Bancroft also gave a brief but
Interesting address on the workings
Ot the Workmen's Compensation act
of Ontario, and In conclusion urged
upon organized labor In British Columbia to do their utmost to have as
good it not better, law placed on the
statute books of the province. At
the conclusion of Bro. Bancroft's ad
dross he was tendered a hearty vote
of thanks by a rising vote of all the
members present.
VICTORIA CHERRIES
A MARKET
E
Higher Prices Are Obtained
For These Than For
the Okanagan
Chilliwack Produce Small
Compared With Other
Places—Plenty Fruit
Vancouver, B. C, July 28,
The Vancouver city market, Main
street, was well supplied this week
with apples, consignments arriving
.from wjhonnock, Hatzlc, and Chilllwack. The variety Is yellow transparent and the quality first-class.
Prices ranged from 1.30 to |1.60 per
box. Preserving cherries are still arriving, although In smaller quantities;
Victoria lots are the most sought
after, and made the best price, $2.50
for 24-pound crate; while the Okanagan 16-pound crates made $1.50.
Sweet cherries are almost finished,
and these made $1.50. Peaches were
rather short In supply, price $1 a
crate. Apricots were eagerly sought
after, the supply being far below the
demand, price $1 per crate. Raspberries are in short supply and appearances point to the season closing
down on raspberries. There is still a
fair demand, and there was no difficulty in clearing at $1.20 per half
crate and $2 for full crates.
In Carload Lots
Currants did not show up so well in
quantity as last week. Blacks were
mostly in demand and sold at $2.10
per crate; reds, $1.75; and white,
$1.70. Blackberries in half crates,
$1.50. Tomatoes are still short, which
means that the outdoor variety from
the Okanagan and other districts' will
meet with a good reception. These
will be on the market in carload lots
at the end of this week or the beginning of next. Prices yesterday, hothouse No. 1, $1,25; No. 2, $2; No. 3,
$1.80. Outdoor grown, No. 1, $1.50 to
$1.60; No. 2, $1.20 for 20-pound crates.
Eggs made a further rlBe yesterday
morning of 1 cent per dozen on case
lots, and as the market is firm the
tendency is still upward. Present
price, 33 cents per dozen. Hens were
in fair supply, a nice lot of wyandottes
from the island taking flrst place.
They cleared at $9.60 per dozen, while
lighter hens made from $8 to $9 per
dozen. Ducks are still difficult to sell.
Broilers are in good demand, weighing l;/, to 2 pounds. These made
from $5 to $8 per dozen.
Chilllwack Beaten
What is wrong with the Fraser Valley farmers? One Is tempted to ask
that question when the Chilllwack No.
1 train arrives, at the city market
The farmers on this lino have the
best facilities in the province for marketing their produce, as this train
leaves Chilllwack daily, lifting produce all along the line and delivering
it right into the market. Yet the
quantities received are very meagre.
As a matter of fact, other districts
far outstrip Chilliwack in the quantities shipped. It Is hoped that the
farmers will give this matter their serious consideration, as this train may
be withdrawn at any time if there Is
noi business enough to warrant the
maintaining of such a service.
MINARD'S LINIMENT FOR 8ALE
EVERYWHERE.
VANCOUVER
City Market
MAIN STREET
PRESERVING CHERRIES ARE NOW
ARRIVING IN LARGE QUANTITIES,
ALSO RASPBERRIES, BLACK AND
RED CURRANTS, GOOSEBERRIES,
TOMATOES, RHUBARB, NEW LAID
EGGS, DAIRY BUTTER, NEW AND
OLD POTATOES.
Auction Sales Every Tuesday and Friday
OUR SALESMEN ARE AT YOUR SERVICE
DAILY FROM 7 AM. TILL 6 P.M.
SATURDAY IS OUR SPECIAL PRODUCERS' DAY
JOHN McMILLAN, Manager
Named Shoes are frequently made in Non-
Union Factories—Do Not Boy Any Shoe
no matter what Its name, unless It bears a
plain and readable Impression or this stsmp.
AU shoes without tha Union Stamp an
always Non-Union.
BOOT A SHOE WORKERS' UNION
246 Summer Strsst, Boston, Mass,
J. F. Tobin, Pres.    C. L. Blaine, Sec.-Trsas.
Brown Bros. & Co. Ltd.
Florists and Nursery Men
THRU STORES IN VANCOUVER
Si Hastlngi tt.       Phont ley. SU 401 CiunHIU St
rst Oranvllle si.    Phene Ssy. SS1S
Phont tty. S7S7
VICTORIA STORE, III VIEW BT.
Kit Avt. ind Main It.
Phont Fairmont 711.
GREENHOUSES
Victoria, B.C.
Hammond, ■. C,
Lonf Dlitanot Phont IT
Ten Acre Farms at $30 Per Acre
Payable $5.00 Down and $5.00 Per Month, Without Interest
Open meadow land situated In the fertile Bella Coola Dlstriot, on
river and lake and olose to two new railroads. Wagon road, telegraph
tnd telephone lines to property. Rich soil, splendid climate. Especially adapted for mixed farming, chicken or hog ranching. Call or
write for full particulars before all tracts are sold.
J. I. Eakin & Co.
Ml Moldtn BolMUv
lt Haitian Strut teat
YAVOOUTO, a. 0.
Without  obligation,  pltait mall mi
particular! of your ttn-aore farrai.
EVERY   UNION  MAN   IN  [VANCOUVER   'SHOULD    PATRONIZE
LABOR TEMPLE CLUB AND POOL ROOM
ITMaKes The Mountain vfmiie
RAINIER BEER AGENCY
137 WATER STREET
LEE R. BARKLEY, Agent PHONE SEYMOUR 9288
Seattle Brewing &Malting Co. wm
OFFICIAL PAPER VANCOUVER
TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
OFIWIAL PAPER BRRRW COLUMBIA PEDotATioN op uaoa
SIXTH YEAR.   No. 172
"V
VANCOUVER, B. C, FRIDAY, JULY 24, 1914.
SIX PAGES
Look at These Single Breasted
SUITS
FOR
*12!
You never saw the like of
them for value in all your
life. They are manufactured from pure wool, imported tweeds, in shades
of grey, lovat and brown.
Each suit is custom tailored and guaranteed to
retain its shape Makes an excellent suit for best
or business wear. AU sizes. Actual values to $25.
Special to readers of The Federationist for
$12.50
BRING THIS AD. WITH YOU
fit Mudson'sB&uCotnpan)!. fm
_1*.  _*     rt _jtt____  ttt*     mtat__________m aommatHtta*. ( ^jgr
GEORGIA AND GRANVILLE STREETS
REMOVAL SALE
Until AUGUST 1st
LANG SALES CO.
Will give a discount of 25% on all union-made clothing, Boots and Shoes, Hats, Caps, etc.
NEW ADDRESS:' 624 MAIN
OLD ADDRESS:   626 MAIN
J. LECKIE CO., LIMITED
SHOE
MANUFACTURERS
Wt manufacture troy kind ef
work shoe, ud specialize in lines
'or miners, railroad construction,
etlinf, tic
VANCOUVER   -  -   B.C
Family Shoe Store
823 Granville Street
GREAT SALE OF BOOTS AND
SHOES NOW ON
Men's Shoes, Regular $6,00 for $3.95
Men's Shoes, Regular $5.00, for $3.45
Men's Shoes, Regular $4.50, for   $2.95
8KB THE WINDOWS FRANK NEWTON
AND JOT
What Bodies the Flames
Did Not Consume the
BuuardsDid
'Murder and Plunder Was
All We Wanted" Says
Soldier i
The following letter (rom William
A. Loehrl, a first-class gunner on the
battleship Utah, describes the flght at
Vera Cruz. As an example of blood-
lust lt Is worthy of persual:
"We more than got peppered by the
Mexicans. All those beasts are good
for Ib pot shooting. By pot shooting
Is meant climbing up high buildings
and then firing down on us out ot
windows. We no sooner had our
battalion together than we started In.
It did not take long when—bang-
down goes one of our fellows with a
bullet clear through his head. Death
was Instantaneous. That worked us
fellows up to a savage mood. Kill?
Right and left. We put the field guns
ln the middle of the streets and let
fly. We had mercy on nobody, which
was proper. Nobody showed a bit of
cowardice. Murder and plunder was
all we wanted, and we more than gave
lt to them. For every one of our fellows killed we shot down like dogs
about ten Mexicans. It was rather
hard for me to kill at the start, but
when the fellow next to me was shot
through the chest I became as savage
as the rest. The fellow that was shot
next to me let out a pierolng cry and
died ln about thirty seconds . .
Firing ceased at about 10.15 p. m. oil
Tuesday. We had about 160 prisoners, of which we oourt-martlalled
about 80 and 3hot them the same
night. That's biz. Show no mercy
Is our policy now. You have no idea
how fast we kill them off. Perhaps
you would like to know what we do
with tbe dead ones? Wle take a horse
and wagon and fill the wagon with
bodies and drive to the outskirts ot
the city. There we go to an oil tank,
sprinkle crude oil on them and put a
match to the pile. Up goes the whole
works. What the flames do not consume the buzzards do."
(Wan  $1.50 PER YEAB
conference In resolutions deolded to
brand them is "Traitors to the American Federation of Labor," calling
upon all councils and local unions to
withdraw support and aid from those
included in the compact.
To Smash "Open Shop."
The Cleveland Citizen, commenting
on the alliance of the Bricklayers snd
Carpenters' international unions, says:
The membership will doubtless be
pleased to learn that the United Brotherhood recently entered Into an
agreement with the Bricklayers' Masons' and Plasterers' International
Union that will prove a powerful combination to maintain decent working
conditions. The agreement la ln every
respect an offensive and defensive alliance and will soon result in smashing open scabbery into smithereens.
It provides among other things that
both organisations pledge themselves
that locals will not permit members to
work with men in the two trades who
are not affiliated with the union of
their trade. Also all differences regarding, jurisdiction and working conditions that cannot be adjusted locally will be settled by the international representatives.
Union Scsle
The building committee of the Toronto, Ont, hoard of education unanimously decided, at a recent meeting,
that all specifications for work and
contracts must contain a clause that
the union scale of wages of the several trades must be paid by the different contractors. The trustees will
not trifle with "prevailing rate of
wages," or "fair wages," but state
plainly what must be done.
Resolution sf Thanks
Following resolution was adopted by
Nanalmo local union, No. 2155, U. M.
W. of A., at its last meeting:
Resolved—That we, the members
ot Nanalmo Local Union, No. 2165,
United Mine Workers of America,
take this opportunity of expressing to
our brothers on the American continent our hearty appreciation of the
loyal and noble manner ln which they
have supported the striking mine
workers on Vancouver Island. And
further, that we wish to assure our
brother mine workers that we men,
at present on strike, are determined
to use all the power at our command
to establish a militant organization of
the mine workers on Vancouver
island; be lt further
Resolved—That we request that a
copy of this resolution be printed In
the United Mine Workers' Journal
and other labor papers.
Signed on behalf of the union:
[Seal]
J. RATHLEF, President.
WM. WATSON, Secretary.
Demands Abrogation
The Omaha Western Laborer says:
Calling the action of the quarter million members of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of
America, the hundred thousand of
the International, Union of Steam
Engineers and several thousand of
the Journeymen Soft Stone Cutters In
forming an alliance with the Bricklayers' and Masons' International Union, whose membership is 80,000,
"nothing short of treason Intended to
discredit and bring into disrepute the
laws and prestige of the American
Federation of Labor" the building
trades department of the federation,
at the conclusion of a week's conference In Atlantic City, N. J., Issued a
statement demanding the abrogation
of the agreement. In the event of the
non-concurrence within sixty days the
DOESN'T UKE BIG
OF
Labor Officials Disagree
With Superintendent
of Immigration
President Watters Touring
Quebec and the Maritime Provinces
Hon. T. W. Crothers to Retire From Politics
Administration of His Department Distasteful to
Organized Labor
Says the Winnipeg Voice: Some
time ago lt was our melancholy duty
to announoe that no labor legislation
would be possible ln the session just
dosed on account ot the continued Ill-
health of Hon. T. W. Crothers, minister of labor. We are now informed
that he is to retire from politics altogether; the reason being Ill-health,
coupled with the fact that he has
found the administration of the portfolio of labor exceedingly distasteful.
If the honorable gentleman can flnd
any ease In the knowledge that his
distaste Is shared by others we can
assure him that the administration of
the labor department under hts guidance has heen uncommonly distasteful
to the whole body of organized labor
throughout Canada. His flrst great
chance to make good waB ln connection with the British Columbia coal
miners' strike. He went to the scene
of the trouble, had a conference with
the masters, gave some fatherly advice to the men, and then took a trip
to Europe. We do not expect much of
labor ministers of the old party
stripe, they lack the main essentials,
first hand knowledge and sympathy,
but lt is the rule to shake the legislative table cloth that we may par
take ot a few crumbs after Bill and
Dan et al have feasted, and In this
regard he signally failed.
CENTER &HANNA, Lid.
UNDERTAKERS
Refined Service
1049 QEORQIA STREET
One Block weat of Court House,
Use of Modern Chapel anil
Funeral Parlors free  to all
Patrons
HARRON BROS.
FUNERAL  DIRECTOR*  AND
■MBALMIRt
Vancouver—Olios   and   Chaps),
1M4 OmnvUlt St., Phons day. Ull.
North   Vansouvsr —OSes   and
chaps), US B.oond It B.    *~
IM.
Whole Wheat Bread
Chow. Stonily Bread
WedlUf aat Birthday Cases.
WtVteVaSmaUmt.
BELYEA'S BAKERY
ALL KINDS OF
CAKES, PASTRY AND
CONFECTIONERY
Hot Drinks ant Lunehaa
All deeds Prest Dally.
tn air. no*.
Liberty
Oh, Liberty! Essence of the gods!
Liberty—eternal and divine! The
Light whioh transcends all ages! The
goal towards which humanity ever
presses! The theme which inspires
artists, poets, musicians! The horizon of the scientist and the prophet!
The torch of the heralds of peace,
brotherhood and justice! The melody
of the singers of the new age! The
inarticulate cry of the dispossessed,
weary, downtrodden masses! The
battle-cry of the labor leaders! The
vision which has made woman rebellious! The hope of the Imprisoned
and tortured! The prayer of mother
hood! The gift ot childhood! The
dream of all!
Oh, Liberty! the longing for which
has lifted mankind above the beast!
The pasBion for which makes the
human blood flow red and warm! The
Impulse out of which Belt is forgotten
and man triumphs! The rock upon
which conscience, love and comradeship Is founded! The Ideal out of
which the brave, the true, the strong
new race is to be born! The race
which recognizes lta solidarity, Its unity, its Interdependence, its universal kinship!
If a sweetheart, scorn your lover if
he does not fight for liberty; if a
wife, rest not until your husband
espouses the cause of liberty; If a
mother, rear your children on the
milk of liberty and early Instil into
their minds and hearts the longing
for liberty and the hatred for tyranny
and subservience!
Liberty Ib life and light! Let liberty
then be our watchword, our goal, our
quest! Yea, our battle-cry and our
war song! Our dream by night, and
our inspiration by day! Socialism
alone can help usher In the glad day.
ROSE HENDERSON.
IA Montreal, p. Q., dispatch states
that labor officials In that city are not
at one with W. D. Scott, superintendent of immigration, Ottawa, who declared his Intention to deport unemployed immigrants that have been tn
Canadian eitles leBS than three years,
and have become public charges. J.
T. Foster, president of the Montreal
Trades and Labor couhcll, submits
tbat It la ridiculous to lure Immigrants to Canada with 'promises of
well-paid work, and a bounty, and
then take measures to deport them
If, as happened, many of them became
public charges through lack of work.
J. C. Watters, president of the
Trades and Labor congress of Canada,
on the other hand, takes Issue with
his colleague, and holds that deportation of inefficient immigrants is consistent with the federal regulations
and policy. Mr. Watters declares
that the) dominion government pays
bonuses only on farm laborers and
domestic servants, and that deportation has become necessary because
dishonest agents and the transportation companies have brought out immigrants who belong to neither class.
He considers that unemployment conditions ln Canada are worse than they
have ever been before, and that'matters are worse on the Pacific coast
than in the east.
President Watters is on an educational and organising tour through
Quebec and the Maritime provinces.
Last week he left Ottawa for Quebec
and will not return again until October 1st. He will remain lu St. John,
N. B„ until after the annual congress,
which begins on September 21st.
At Minora Park
The summer race meeting of the
British Columbia Thoroughbred association will be two weeks old on Saturday, and never since the Inception
of the course in 1909 have the lovers
of the thoroughbred been treated to
finer sport than that which has featured the opening weeks of racing
this season. That the present meeting has the good wishes of Vancouver's citizens Is shown every afternoon by the ever Increasing attend
ance. In the grandstand the attendance has been exceptionally large, no
doubt augmented by the excellent
service which Is being supplied this
season by the British Columbia
Electric railway. Special trains make
the run to the course from the city
In 25 minuntes, while the last race
train Ib back ln town before 6 o'clock.
From a racing standpoint it would be
hard to surpass the. sport as witnessed
so far at the Lulu Island course. Large
fields have been the order throughout,
but despite all this, public choices
have almost won 40 per cent, ot the
events," a wonderful percentage on any
course. That the judges have taken
a stand early ln the meeting for'clean,
upright racing was exemplified last
week when they disqualified "Jewel
ot Asia" after the latter had fouled
"Alto Maid." The former was a favorite, too, but lt made no difference
with the officials. This fact alone
speaks volumes for the men who have
charge of the racing end, for ln their
hands alone rest the future of tho
game here. Never has the racing at
Mlnoru park been of the high order as
has been shown to date this season
and the success of the meeting from a
racing standpoint at least has been
assured.
AT SPENCER'S
YOU WILL FIND
Rogers Bros.
1847 Flatware
Reduced
For the balance of the July Sale we will offer these
standard goods at substantial reductions. The designs
are in vintage (French grey), faneuil, Priscilla, also
plain and tipped. -
COFFEE SPOONS .^.^23
TEA SPOONS            .    Em
TEA SPOONS, plain '.    £.15
TEA SPOONS, small  tMO
TEA SPOONS, plain, small      ... 5.75
DESSERT SPOONS and. FORKS  M.S)
DESSERT SPOONS and FORKS, plain* price.... tf.7l
TABLE SPOONS  .  ..    $6.70
TABLE SPOONS, plain     £.40
SOUP SPOONS     M70
BOUILLON SPOONS    .'.'...  $7.w
BERRY SPOONS, each     $1.85
COLD MEAT FORKS, each  $1.40
SUGAR SHELLS  M
SOUP LADLES, each   '.'.'... $3.60
OYSTER LADLES, each £.10
GRAVY LADLES, each   $1.J0
CREAM LADLES, each  :,-,..,..... $1.00
CHEESE SERVERS      ... * M
PIE SERVERS  $1.10
CHILD'S KNIFE, FORK and SPOON combina-
hon   -. }  |i,gn
BREAD KNIVES  ;■  $1.70
TABLE KNIVES, hollow handles, dozen ...'..... $14.00
TABLE KNIVES, solid handles, dozen  $4.40
TABLE FORKS to match  ,UM
DESSERT KNIVES, hollow handles, dozen  $1^40
-DESSERT KNIVES, plain, solid, dozen    $M5
DESSERT FORKS, plain  $3.U
,*2R,*,Y!RHAL SALAD FORKS, set of 6 for .... $S.M
INDIVIDUAL OYSTER FORKS, set of 0 for .... $8.65
What Everybody Should Know
MEN'S NEW NOBBY 8UITS can be bought at BRUMMITT'8 from
$10.00 up to $30.00        And thty art worth more
HATS, bearing the union label, at $2,00, -$2.10 $3.00.
SHOES, all makes and prices, bearing the label, at "live and let live
prices, $2.00 up to $4.00
CHIPPEWA SHOES at $7.00, $8.00 and $10.00
W. B. BRUMMITT
18-20  CORDOVA  ST. W.
STOVES and RANGES
EVERYTHING FOR THE KITCHEN
Mount Pleasant headquarters for Carpenters' Tools ltd tl]
kinds of Builders' tnd Contractors' Supplies
W.R. OWEN & MORRISON
Phott Ftir. 447. 2337 Mtin StrttL
Notice to Secretaries
Secretaries of local unions are requested to send The Federationist
chango of addresses. It fs Important
that the directory be kept down to
date, and such changes will be made
cheerfully.
Machinists' Agreement
The threatened trouble between the
Ottawa Car company and Its machinists has been averted, and an agreement satisfactory to both parties has
been drawn up and signed by the company and local No. 412,1. A. of M. Tho
agreement Ib published in detail In
the July Issue of the Machinists'
Journal,
Mltianl'H Liniment Co., Limited.
pear Sirs: I hail a bleeding tumor on
my fnee tor a loin,' timo and tried a number ot remedies without any Kooil results.
I was advised to try MINARD'S 1.INI-
MI3NT, and after uhIiik several bottles It
made a complete cure, and It hoaled all
up and disappeared altogether.
DAVID   H15NDURSON.
Helllsle Station, Klntrs Co., N.U., Sept.
17, 1)104.
iEADqUMTEIty
BC
In the heart of ihe retail dislric|,_ Absolutely
fireprool and modem in evety rejpccl. luiiine
unexcelled. European plan, $1 lo $3 per day.
FREE AUTO 'BUS MEETS AU TRAINS. Omed and
operated by The Provincial Holds Company, [.united.
HOWARD I SHU1HAN, I'm.!-..
THE REXMERE ROOMS
Just opened. Strictly modeiti.
Hot and cold water In every
room. Hot water heat, nicely
furnished. Rates SO cents a day
snd up.  Special rates by week.
668 SEYMOUR STREET
J. A. FLETT, LIMITED
^ss2S________s^ssss Tool Specialist
B|   ^-*-rajfa*-fl|^^HJ| Hardwire ud
Phones Sey. 2327-2328
Sportjif Goods
111 Hatting* St.,W.
101-4 BANK OF OTTAWA BUILDING
602 Htitinii Street West
DR. BRETT ANDERSON, Dentist
Operates by the latest, most scientific and painless methods
Specialist in Crown, Bridie, Plate ud Gold Inlay Wtrk
HOURS 10 A.M. TO 4 P.M!
75 Per Cent, of your Summer Cooking can
be done with Electric Household Appliances just as well as with a kitchen range
and with much greater comfort and convenience^
Electric Household Appliances are ready for operation, day or night,
on an Instant's attention to connecting the cord with the household
socket.
They can do everything ln tho line of light cooking, preparing tea or
coffee, making toast, preparing eggs, frying chops, etc. You don't
want heavy meals during the hot weather and the appliances Just
meet this demand and make lt unnecessary to have a hot Sre going.
Electric Household Appliances cost only a few cents per hour ot continuous operation. To prepare an ordinary meal takes but a fraction
of an hour.   They are guaranteed by the manufacturers.
SEE OUR FULL LINE OF ELECTRICAL HOUSEHOLD
APPLIANCES
Carrall ud
Haitinfi StiKl
B.C. ELECTRIC
H38Ca.nll.Sl.
N.ai Davit PAGE FOUR
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY .JULY 24, 191
THE
MOLSONS
BANK
Capital and Reserve, - $8,800,000
SB branches In Canada
A reneral banking builneai transacted.
Savings Department
Interest allowed at highest
current rate
East End Branch
160 HA8TINQS 8TREET EAST
A. W. Jarvls, Manager
The Royal Bank
of Canada
INCORPORATED 1IM
Paid-up Capital ...... (J 11,1
Rsservt      12,1
Tttll Attett 180,000404
WE ALLOW INTEREST ON DEPOSITS IN OUR
SAVINGS
DEPARTMENT
Ont   Dollar will   open"
the account, and your
business  will   be  wtl-
corns  bt  It   Isrgt   or
until
FOURTEEN BRANCHES IN
VANCOUVER
I THE
B
INCORPORATED
185$
BANK OF
TORONTO
Ctplttl tnd Rtttrvt 111,171,171
WAGE-EARNERS
keep your livings In tht* Bank
tf Toronto, tnd watch your deposits and Interest tddsd by the
btnk grow to a most desirable
btnk balance. Tht financial
ttrength of thlt long-established, well-conducted Institution enturti ttfety for your
money, end you will receive
every courtesy, tnd your account careful attention.
Deposits
841,000,000
Mtln Office—
488 HA8TING8 ST. WEST
(Nttr Rlchsrds)
Branches—
Car. Hastings tnd Carrall ttt,
Ntw Westminster
Vlctorit
Herrltt
THE.BANK OF BRITISH
NORTH AMERICA
Established In 1831.   Incorporated
by Royal Charter in 1840.
Paid-up Capital     •     I4,US,(II.M
Betarve Fund     -     •    3.017,230.SO
Bead Ofllce In Canada:
ST. JAMES ST., MONTREAL
H. B. MACKENZIE • Ctn.r.l Muina
tAVINQS DEPARTMENT AT
ALL BRANCHES
Special attention given to Savings
Account* on which .Interest la allowed from date of deposit.
Open a Savlnge Account and add
to It every pay day.
Drafts and Money Orden aold
VANCOUVER BRANCH
W. Godfrey, Manager.
NORTH   VANCOUVER   BRANCH
J. R. Chapman, Manager.
KBRRISDALB BRANCH
D. Nell, Manager.
Traders Trust
company
LIMITED .
12*313 ROOERS BUILDING
VANCOUVER      - ■    -       B.C.
FIRE, UFE and ACCIDENT
INSURANCE
Four per cent. Interest
allowed on all deposits
in our savings department, subject to cheque.
Agreements Ftr tilt purchased
Saft Dtpoilt Vtultt
12.80 t yttr
Quinntetd Investmsnt tf Fundi
for Clients
THE B.C. FEDERATIONIST
Publlihed every Friday morning by the
- B. C. Federations, Ltd.
R. Parm. Pettlplece   •
J. W. Wilkinson
Qeorge Bartley    -
Managing Editor
Associate Editor
News Editor
DIRECTORS
Jas. Campbell, president; J. H. McVety, secretary-
treasurer; H. Glbb; G. J. Kelly
and R. P. Pettlplece
Offlce: Room 217, Labor Temple.
. Tel. Exchange Sey. 74S5.
Advertising Manager    -
• M. C. Shrader
SUBSCRIPTION
11.50 per year; ln Vancouver city, 82.00; to unlona
subscribing In a body, 11.00
REPRESENTATIVES
New Westminster -    -    -    -    H. Glbb, Box 934
Prince Rupert    -    -    - W. E. Denning, Box 631
Victoria A. S. Wells, Box 1538
Afflliated   with Western Labor Press Association
'Unity of Labor; the Hope of the World."
FRIDAY '..JULY 24, 1914.
LABOR  CONVENTIONS  in   British
Columbia have been chiefly remarkable
up to the present, for preparing   a  long
list of things ihey wanted—and none of which
they ever have  got   These  gatherings have
been a   riot of "resoluting,"
„_„__...,_    ending in a desert of resjilt
CENTRALIZE     A ^ fc,d o{ ,   i$u.
ON WORKMEN'S^ ha, htm cmm_ by fa
COMPEN8ATIONmemoria|, pttKate_ to fa
provincial government by the
B. C. Federation of Labor, on behalf of the
organized workers of the province during the
last four years. Each of the various items ha's
been of more or leas importance, otherwise it
would not have survived the debate and discussion which took place upon it in convention,
before it found its way on to the list But the
number and merit of the questions included in
the list, did not result in moving the McBride
government to action on all or any one of them.
The fact that a thing is right and necessary, is
no reason at all in the estimation of McBride
and Bowser why they should move, to carry it
out. The beginning and end of all their concern about the matter is: "What will be the
political effect of our refusing to do as these
people ask)" We realize about as well as
most that, with only two members of the working class inside the provincial legislature, McBride does not need to be sparing in his suave
contempt for the workers on the outside, .who
go to him from time to time as "your petitioners ever humbly praying." He has some sense
of humor, and we do not think he would lightly
surrender the exquisite amusement which he
must derive from those periodical pilgrimages
of the plaintive proletariat, to whose "ever
praying" he ever promises "the earnest consideration of my government."
V »    *    *    *
But we do believe the time has come when
the labor movement of British Columbia might
very well pick out one question, and concentrate all its time, finance and effort on trying
to make it law. The workers of Ontario for
years did the same as their fellows' in British
Columbia have done up to now. They too
had a long list, over which their finance was
spread and their efforts distributed. The result
was, that not one of the things they wanted was
emphasised strongly enough to impress its importance on the minds of the individual members of the unions. So tlgy got nothing and
nowhere until they abandoned that policy and
centralized all .their endeavors on one thing.
That one thing was a Workmen's Compensation act better than anything of its kind in the
world, and after four years' effort they have
got it And anyone who will study it with
judgment not encrusted with barnacles of prejudice, will have to admit that they' have produced something of practical use and benefit
to the workers in that province. Vice-president
F. Bancroft, of the Trades and Labor Congress of Canada, made that fact plain enough
in-the course of his address to the convention of
the B. C. Federation of Labor last week. It
was chiefly by his persistent and able work that
the Ontario act became law. The executive; of
the Federation was not slow in grasping the
significance of his statements before the convention. And at a meeting held by them last Friday—at which Bancroft was present—it was
decided to commence now to lay plans for
securing a Workmen's Compensation act for
this province, based on the same principle as
that obtained by the workers of Ontario. A
preliminary committee was selected, consisting
of Vice-president Bancroft, Secretary-treasurer,
A. S. Wells, who had valuable and practical
experience in the framing of the present compensation act in Saskatchewan, Vice-president
J. H. McVety, who has given much study to
legislation of this kind, and Vice-president W.
Dunn, whose business has given him a specialized knowledge of the compensation requirements of certain classes of workers.
* * * *
All workmen who have had reason to invoke the aid of the 'present Workmen's Compensation act of British Columbia—and many
who have not—realize that it is practically
useless. They know that by the time a workman or his dependents have finished fighting insurance companies and paying lawyers there is
nothing left—except a bill to pay. Those who
have given deeper study to this question than
mere sentiment would prompt, also know that
the principle upon which any such legislation is
based, must be very carefully scrutinized.
Schemes for insuring workmen against the ills
and accidents of industry afe broadly divided
into two kinds—contributory and non-contributory. In one case the workman contributes a
portion of his wages to the cost of the scheme.
In the other case the cost is borne entirely by
industry. It is an economic axiom, held to be
true by those who have made a scientific study
of a workman's position in modem industry, that
his wages express in money terms (he power
necessary to purchase commodities sufficient to
reproduce his bodily and mental fitness. So that
any scheme of compensation, to which he is required to make contribution, would result in his
wages being lowered beyond the point of maintenance, unless they were deliberately raised to
enable him to discharge his new obligation—a
thing which would not happen, as long as there
was anything he could be deprived of without
destroying his productive power. On the other
hand, since the value of the product of his labor,
over and above what he receives as wages, belongs to his employer, any scheme of insurance,
ihe cost of which has to be taken from that
surplus value, is a clear gain to the worker.
And any plan of workmen's insurance founded
on that principle, should be entitled to the support and approval of both those working men
who are economic students and those who are
not
* *   *    *
The Workmen's Compensation act of Ontario, is based upon the principle that industry
should be made to bear the burden of the
deaths and disabilities inflicted on workjnen by
it. The industries of the province are divided
into classes and sections. According to the
hazard or risk involved in them, so is the yearly
wage roll of the employer assessed. The money
thus derived will go into a central fund, collected by the state and administered by a state-
appointed commission of three, according to a
clearly defined scale laid down in the new act
No claimant will have to pay lawyers, or fight
insurance companies or go through the procedure
of the law courts, The compensation will be
paid regardless of whether the injury or death
of the workman was due to his negligence or
not In laying down the scales of compensation almost every exigency seems to have been
provided for. It is impossible to deal with
them all here, btu representative examples are as
follows: If a man dies from injuries received
at his work, burial expenses not exceeding $75
are paid. Where the widow or invalid husband
is the sole dependent they will receive $20 per
month as long as they remain unmarried. Where
the dependents are a widow, or an invalid husband, and one or more children, a monthly payment of $20 and $5 for each child under 16
years, the whole not to amount to more than
$40 per month. If a dependant widow
marries the monthly payments will cease, but
one rtlonth from the day of her marriage she
will get a lump sum equal to'two years' monthly payments at the rate of $20 monthly. In
other words she will get a wedding present of
$480, and she still continues to receive $5 per
month for each child by her previous husband.
Where permanent total disability results from
injury, the compensation will be weekly payment during the life of the workman equal to
55 per cent of his average weekly earnings
during the previous twelve months if he has
been so long employed, but if not, then for any
less period during which he has been employed.
For permanent partial disability the compensation for life is 55 per cent, of the difference
between his earning capacity before injury and
his earning capacity afterwards. Similar rates
and scales, too many to enumerate here, are
provided for well-nigh every contingency which
might arise.
* *   *   *
To some it might appear at first glance that
the law was chiefly intended to indemnify those
injured, or the dependents of those killed. That
is not the case. Underlying the whole act is
the idea and intent of making compensation for
injury and death of workers so expensive to
employers,, that every provision for reducing accidents to a minimum will be introduced into
industry. It is expected that the law will come
into force January I, 1915. A board of experts are now busy assessing industries according to risk, with the result that Ontario employers are rushing safety appliances of all kinds
into the factories and workshops so as to get as
low an assessment as possible. They realize
that their taxes will increase or decrease according to the number of accidents to their employees. It is estimated that the new legislation will
cost Ontario industries $3,000,000 per year
for about six years and more or less than that
afterwards according to the degree to which
accidents have been reduced. The most persistent and vicious opponents which organized
labor had to face in the fight were the lawyers
and the insurance companies, who could see
themselves deprived of the handsome pickings
which the old system gave them. Summed up
in a few words, the new law is the substitution
of publicly administered compensation, whereby
the injured parties receive the full amount of
the awards, in place of the old method whereby the awards were defeated by the insurance
companies, or consumed by litigation into which
.injured workers or their dependants were forced
to go. This question will be up before the British Columbia legislature next January. If
the workers can only realize the grave and
stupendous task which confronts the executive
of the Federation, they will give both individual
interest and financial support to them in the'
efforts to obtain for the workmen of this province, a similar compensation act to that attained
effort to obtain for the workmen of this province of Ontario.
THE BOY
SCOUT
MOVEMENT
Out of sheer egotism or naive simplicity, he
"put his foot in it" badly during the Mafeking
affair, by putting his own head on postage
stamps instead of the king's. Official red tape
was outraged by that, but Powell was a mob
hero, and to retire him from the active army list'
without making future provision for his talents
would not have been popular. So some bright
mind hit on the idea of capitalizing the glamor
surrounding his name, by making him the central point of the organization of an association
for the training of boys, who would, later on,
make recruits of adequate fitness for the regular
army. It was not necessary that the underlying
and ultimate object of the scheme should be
seen, lest some parents might become alarmed
and withhold their boys. The moving spirits
were too adroit for that but they had taken
careful note of the love which most boys have
for those things which make up the environment
of a soldier's life. They set to work to use
that by impressing upon the plastic mind of the
young lad, ideas and suggestions whch are calculated eventually to lead to him taking up
some form of military service, as a matter of
course growing out of the training he has been
used to.
¥   *   *   «
That is the chief reason why the Boy Scouts
are included in processions where the regular
military appear io semi-official capacity. The
very fact they are there, pleases the innocent
minds of the boys. It also plays upon their immature intelligence, by arousing through the insidious medium of suggestion, the desire to
emulate their elders. And they look forward to
the day when the subtle hint conveyed to.
them in the wooden staff they carry, shall
materialize in a real guii and membership in a
real military body. No one can deny that the
athletic exercises, the body-building discipline,
and the habits of self-reliance and mutual help,
which are part of the boy's training are, by
themselves alone, good for the boys. But
hovering over their drills and enthusiastic labors,
is the grim vulture of modern militarism, ever
watching and waiting for the day when their
fresh young bodies shall have matured to the
physique of manhood. Then to be used as
targets for the bullet and food for the cannon
in wars made by capitalists, whose real interest
in seeing them attain to efficient physical manhood lies in the fact that their mental blindness
is necessary to the continued enslavement of
the class from which they come. It is a scheme
conceived with Jesuitical shrewdness, to offset
the anti-militant propaganda of those who believe that boys' bodies deserve a better destiny
than death by a bayonet stab, or a bullet, at the
hands of one of their own kind.
THE BOY SCOUT movement is being
advertised just now in the city by a poster
of exceptional artistic merit It is skilfully designed to draw the attention of boys,
by showing them engaged in the hundred and
one outdoor sports and occupations which' boys delight in.
But there is practically no
open sign of the militarist object -which we believe to be at
the back of the scout movement That aspect of the venture has been
handled with Machiavellian cunning. Many
thousands of ordinary superficial thinking parents, allow their boys to join the scouts, not because they hope or expect that the military
spirit will be thereby fostered in their youthful
minds, but because they believe the exercises and
precepts which are the-nominal policy of the
movement will do the boys good. And if the
effect of the training stopped at that they would
be right. But it does not, and in the minds of
those who originated the idea it was never intended to. For years before Baden Powell
came into the public eye through ihe Mafeking
siege, the war office authorities in England had
been at their wits' end how to keep up the
quantity of recruits flowing into the army without lowering the physical standard required.
The effect of industrialism with its concentration of the youth of the nation in the large
cities, was reflected in the appalling number of
would-be recruits who were rejected for reasons of physical defect. In some of. the
urban centres the rejections reached as high as
60 per cent, and die shrewd minds of the military authorities were taxed to the limit to find a
remedy.
¥   *   *   *
It was obvious that the foundation of better
men must be laid in-better boys. A previous
attempt had been made in the form of an organization known as ihe Church Lads' Brigade,
which was made up of boys from the families
attached to the Church of England. But that
attempt, owing to the religious restriction, was
only a part remedy, and not sufficiently wide in
scope. It became plain that the basis of such
a body must be broader. Baden Powell's name
at that time was a household word in England.
Says the Daily Citizen, England: "The
motor car in this country has become one of the
dangers to which the common people have to
subject themselves humbly." A geographical
trifle of 6000 or so miles does not seem to make
any difference in this respect between Vancouver and London.
BAVARIAN WORKMEN, as part of
the Prussian empire are meeting with the
same vicious opposition as their fellows
who live nearer the roaring radiance of the
great William himself.    An edict has been
issued   against   the   unions
which,  in future are to be
0NE classed as "political organi-
WAY OF zations"  and such organiza-
DOING IT lions are forbidden to accept
members under the age of
18. The reason for putting
the union in that category is that the governing classes fear the effect of the propaganda of
the social democrats upon the mind of the youth
before he has to do his military service. To
offset this action the trade unionists have established night classes which are held by the hundred every night to give instruction to working
lads along anti-militarist lines. In their dilemma
the authorities are subsidising employers and
such capitalist organizations as teach imperialism, pot-house patriotism and the usual antidemocratic fetishes of the "man of blood and
iron."   They are in for a joyful time.
OUR
GLORIOUS
EMPIRE
BRITAIN'S GLORIOUS EMPIRE is
a some what mixed affair, according to
whatever angle it is viewed from. The
natives of India, have been generously bombarded by bureaucracy with assurances that it
is - an inestimable privilege
to be a unit in the greatest empire the sun has
ever shone on. It is like
membership in a union covering all towns' in countries
situated in every clime. It is only necessary to show your card wherever you go,
and you enter at once into full enjoyment
of all local privileges. But the Hindoos
must have realized the travesty of it all when
the British empire came forth last Tuesday to
drive them back with cold steel. If they did
nothing more, they at least succeeded in demonstrating just how much imperialism is worth.
Gurdit Singh is a real stage manager, and the
advertisement will eventually be worth the
money it has cost to the proletariat of India.
It must have been a revelation to them to come
here and find a brother Britisher ready with
bullet and bayonet welcome. At the very
moment the same kind of treatment was being
handed to the miners at Nanaimo. When
they gathered in their hall last Monday night,
brother Britisher was there outside, with fixed
bayonet ready to give them as much of it
as he was ordered. It must seem a
curious commentary on empire, for a Scotch
miner to come out here and be confronted
by a bare bayonet carried by a lad from his
own home town. For crude vindictiveness the
Bumbles of Nanaimo would be hard to beat,
and it will not be their fault if blood is not
spilled in that wretched travesty of a town
before the winter is over. Colorado has made
them envious, and it looks as though they will
not be happy till they get it.
'Tit a tragedy if a lady strays from the path
of righteousness "for his name's take.'"
In a somewhat wicked world, virtue has but
little exchange value—except in the market
places of the dull.
The new Workmen's Compensation act of
Ontario was assented to May 1st last A
somewhat significant date,
PHONE   SEYMOUR
The liberal party held their annual picnic
last Saturday. Special items o'f entertainment
were imported. Why it was necessary to go
outside to get amusements for the function we
do not know. With "Honest John" and F. C.
Wade, and the rest the party itself is an everlasting picnic.. It would be a shame to spoil it
by trying to take it into politics.
Los Angeles city has appointed a "public-
defender" to defend prisoners in the city police
court, just the same the public prosecutor prosecutes them. Many poor defendants have not
money to hire a lawyer, and providing the new
officer carries out his duties as they can be carried out, the experiment should be worth watching. We confess to a tinge of scepticism about
it     Lawyers are lawyers.
The real. reason for the appointment of a
federal commission to inquire into the cost of
living, probably lies in the fact that at next
session of the dominion parliament it is expected
a move will be made to raise the wages of
M. P.'s from the $2500, which they now get
ss sessional allowance, to a figure which will
enable them to keep their bodies together while
they sell their souls to railway promoters.
The demand for education is growing fast
The chief of the Berlin police has announced
that he will not grant any more licenses to taxi-
drivers unless they can speak fluent English.
One of these fine days we shall take the hint
and refuse to elect any members of parialment
unless they have at least a glimmering notion' of
the laws of political economy and a nodding
acquaintance with the art of decent and humane
government At present we grant political
licences to ignoramuses—and worse.
It is a common thing to hear people say that
after the lesson of the Boer war the people
could never be led into anything like it again.
To listen to the talk circulating through the
crowds watching the battle of Burrard inlet
last Tuesday, did not bear out any such
motion, "One week's newspaper agitation, and
three special editions will make any average
British community repeat all the follies they
ever committed in the matter of blood-spilling.
Profit-sharing must be a circle of delight to
Ford, the automobile manufacturer. Besides
regulating the physical and moral affairs of
his employees, he also runs a bank in connection with his factory, specially for their convenience. Deposits have increased enormously
during the past six months. The employees
put their "profits" into the bank. Ford puts
them into the running and extension of his
business, and pays four per cent interest to depositors. So it works out that the employees
exploit themselves for profits which they share
—with Mr. Ford.
The constitution of Germany is rather complicated for a foreigner to understand. Its
essential feature is, however, fairly easily
grasped. The Kaiser William is on top because he has the strongest army and has the
good old feudal manners which believe in brute
force. The German empire wat the fruit of
the Franco-German war. The rest of Germany gave, way to the successful soldier when
they crowned the first Emperor William at Versailles. He represented—and his present successor still represents—the uncivilized strength
of arms. The rest of Germany has made a
name for culture—music, drama, philosophy.
N^SCf/^
At a contemporary tayt, in contending for
the abolition of senates and "upper houses."
Experience has shown that democracy
is more temperate than the Fathers presumed; and the danger that the common
people will confiscate wealth, it at least no
greater than the danger   that wealth will
exploit the common people.    So, in the .
light of democratic experience, there it
no valid reason for an upper house with
with an absolute vehxon legislation.
Jutt to.   "The temperance of the democracy."
A more candid critic could eatily give it another and more appropriate name.
We have at various times expressed ourselves
with cheerful candour on the subject of the
Coal Mines Regulation act, but listen to the
Nanaimo Herald of last Tuesday, the ultra
British, Rdle Britannia organ of the American
capitalists of the Western Fuel company:
A man hat not to be an Englishman or
an English scholar either to get employment in a coal mine or secure a certificate
of competency as a coal miner.     If an
Asiatic can talk English so at to be understood and understand English when spoken
to, he is eligible to sit for a coal miner's
certificate.   The regulation! Were not de-
tigned to restrict employment in the mines
to Canadian bom, Britishers, or Americans.
Paul Bourget, is a member of the French
Academy, which consists of forty very exclusive persons who have agreed to regard themselves as the highest authorities on all matters
pertaining to literature and art in France.
Giving evidence latt Tuetday at the trial of
Madame Caillaux he wat confounded by her
lawyer Maitre Labori, by a quotation from one
of hit own books. His way, of evading the
difficulty wat by laying "Literature it not life."
The aniwer had to be given so quickly, that it
is evident he had no time to be dishonest.
Nothing could io thoroughly have defined the
attitude of the dilettante litterateur on iuch a
matter. Art, to iuch, it artifical and divorced
from real life. And that it why writer! like
Zola who wrote of real life in a real way,
never enter the ranki of the "Immortals," and
do themselves everlasting credit by never wanting to.
ARE YOU INSURED
AGAINST FIRE?
If not, you should see about
it without delay.
WE   WRITE   PIRE   INSURANCE.
When a Hindoo hits a policeman on the
head with a piece of coal, that policeman is a
hero. The newspapers say so, and that proves
it is right A matter of a year or so ago,
policeman were beating citizens over the head
every Sunday, to the glory of God by the
orders of Jamet Findlay—was mayor, never
will be again—for the dastardly crime of being
on their own verandahs and doorsteps, or oh
the street one mile away from a free speech
meeting. The policeman were the hitters in
that cate, but still the heroes just the same. We
would like to tee thit hero business mixed a
little more. Incidentally common decency does
not permit the giving of a full list of the things
which were used as ammunition by the Hindoos
latt Sunday night. Suffice it to lay that it
would give a substantial measure of satisfaction to sundry of the luckiest wights whole
heads were broken over the free speech light
SAFETY DEPOSIT !
10XESFOR.RENT|
DOW FRASER TRUST CO.
S17-S21 Cambie Street: 2318 Main
Strut, (batwean 7th and 8th Avaa.)
Vancouver, and  McKay Station,
Burnaby, B.C.
Cloaa at 1 o'clock Saturday.
City Auction tnd Commission Co.
Cash paid for houaea and suites
of furniture or Auction arranged.
Satisfaction guaranteed, ptoapt
aettlementa.
ARTHUR  E.  BETCHLEV
Irnythe and Oranvllle Streets
Auctioneer  Ssy SITS
Phone Yonr Printing Order
'-£. TO	
SEYMOUR 4490
Strike On
MINERS KEEP AWAY
THE strike it still on st the
1 Queen Mine snd Silver
Dollar, at Sheep Greek, B. C.
All working men urged to itay
away until the strike is settled
Order Ymir Miners' Units
FURNITURE
By all means come and iee our
splendid large new stock of furniture. "Everything but the
girl" for your new home.
GET OUR PRICES AND
TERMS
Hastings Furniture Co.
Limited
♦1 HASTINOS STREET WEST
A. W. Woodard
Mgr. CANADA NATIONAL
FIRE INSURANCE CO.
Phone Seymour 3837
Roiera' Buildlna    470 Granville Street
PATENTS
Trade Marks, Dailies, Copyrlghta.
FETHERtTONHAUDH  A  OO.
The Old IstaUlshsd Firm of
PATENT ATTORNEYS
ISM Rogera Bldg., Qranvllle ttreet
City. Phene Seymour iTtt.
DISEASES OF MEN
Wt Issue t written guarantee
thtt ZIT will ours or your money
back.
Differs (rom til othtr tome-
diss.
Pries H.00, Post Ptld,
McDUFFEE BROS.
THH   OBLIGUNG   DRUOOISTS
112 Ctrdtvt St W.
Vuetuvtr, B, C,
PANTAGEQ
Unequalled Vaudeville "^
Meant
PANTAOES VAUDEVILLE
THREE SHOWS DAILY
Me, 7.20, 8.15
Season's Prices—        '
Matinee 160, Evenings 15c, ttt.
DIXON & MURRAY
OAMaania, mra.
«HUt ant Stan Tltttag.
j   lohhUt
lttt DUSfSHim 8!
Der* Mail Cede
Phone Ber. MS
Perlon A Chapel
2398 Granville St.
MACK BROS.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS tnd
EMBALMERS
Vancouver Britlah Columbia
rvr.-H-ffff'ai^r.Tr.'^r mm
KIDAY.... ..JULY 24, WU.
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
PAOB*m
DECIDE TO ATTEND
The Mid-Summer
Clearance Sale
TO-DAY
The values that we are now offering will appeal
strongly to every woman who desires to purchase
and effect great saving.
Read our announcements in the daily papers
LIMITED
575 Granville St.   Vancouver, B. C.
Phone Stymour 3540
ttore Houra I.S0 to S p.m.
Saturdaya Included
EDWARD LIPSETT
FISHING SUPPLIES
MANUFACTURER OF
TENT5    -
FLAD5 5AIL5 *»■> ORE HAD5
DTTDN DUCK ALtWEIDHT5".WIDTH5 :
ARTHUR JAMES' FI5K HOOKS. ETC
Phonea Seymour
8031 and 8032
68 WATER ST.
LETTERS TO |
i
TH«0E   ''fi_)\ *V,*RK
Braids
- Best
Coffee
Did You Get Yours
This Morning?
BRAID'S
BEST
COFFEE
WM TURNER
-DEALER IN-
906 Granville St
Next to the Market
New and second-hand China, Crockery, Furniture,
Hardware and Stoves. Furniture moving and shipping. Telephone us when you have furniture for
sale. Highest prices paid.
TELEPHONE SEYMOUR 3745
UNDERWEAR
MEN'S  BALBRIGGAN  UNDERWEAR
At Mc. and 76c, per garment.
BRITANNIA
.   Light Woollen Underwear—Juit right for this warm weather
LIGHT WEIGHT UNION SUITS
From 11.00 per Suit up,
B. V. D. UNDERWEAR
With Short Sleeves and Knee Length Drawers, 75c. per garment.
CLUBB & STEWART, Ltd.
IREWED AND BOTTLED IN VANCOUVER BY
VANCOUVER BREWERIES Limited
Miners' Campaign
To tne working class of BrltlBh Columbia: Fellow workers: In the near future
a referendum vote will be submitted to
the organised labor bodies of British Columbia, Organizers are .in the field to
propagate the general strike. They will
get In touch with the unorganized, organized and unemployed. The convention just lately held under the auspices
of the B. C. Federation of Labor for the
purpose of devising ways and means of
assisting the Vancouver Island minera,
and to consider the unemployed problem
and Asiatic Immigration, voted In favor
of a general strike by a small majority.
There were several resolutions introduced proposing common action, and,
Ksslbly, the number of resolutions bear-
y along the same UneB, may have been
responsible for the small majority. Several arguments were put up for -and against
tne general strike. It was shown very
plainly that the sectional strike has outlined Its period of usefulness. The Vancouver Island strike Is a strlkeing example of the fact that finance will not
always win strikes. It Is well known that
the wage-slave only gets sufficient to
feed, clothe and shelter himself, and for
a small section of the workera to pit
their flnanclal strength against the
wealth of the minority who possess four-
fifths of the wealth wrung out of the
hides of the workers, Is suicidal. Therefore, It becomes necessary for the workers to adopt other means, and the majority of the delegates to the convention were in favor, of a strike extending
throughout British Columbia. The unemployed were held up as a menace; but
it was very plainly shown that the unemployed have not yet filled the mines
on Vancouver Island, and neither have
they joined the mllltla. It Ib a pretty
good guess that the most aggressive
union men are numbered in the ranks
of the unemployed. It Is a well known
fact, too, that when workers are to be
laid off, the most aggressive are the flrst
to be fired. Are the unemployed going
to stand for that Insult to their manhood? Unfortunately there are men ln
the labor movement who are more of a
menace than the unemployed, especially
those who are afraid of jeopardizing
their meal ticket. No man should starve
amidst plenty, and no law or code of
morality should stand in the way of a
man when he is hungry. If the unemployed are hungry, let them take some
of the good things that have been wrung
out of the hides of their fellow workers;
and perish the thought that they would
take the Jons of members of their own
class. That Is left for the mental degenerates who are discharged from the
militia or special police. We on Vancouver Island have seen the travels of the
spineless object that joins the mllltla or
special police when he goes ta work as a
scab, and many of the scabs on Vancouver island are ex-militiamen and ex-
policemen. Agreements were put forward as an argument against a general
strike, but it was shown very plainly
that the masters still stand by no agreement unlesB the workers are strong
enough to force them. The masters place
their own Interpretation on the agreements, and in the divided state In which
the workers now are, they either have to
stay by the masters' Interpretation of
the agreement or get out. How are the
B. C. Blectric Railway men fairing with
their agreement? And how are the miners of the Crow's Nest pass fairing with
their agreement when they had to call
a mass meeting at Fernie to devise ways
and means to protect their gas committee when they reported gas? If the
U. M. W. of A. are defeated on Vancou
ver Island, will the Jingle Pot company
keep their agreement? We tlflnk not. It
has come to our notice that some of the
wise guys ln the labor movement have
said that the time Is not propitious and
that the referendum will be treated as
a Joke. How long are the workers going
to allow a few self-seeking labor leaders
and office-seekers to pull the wool over
their eyes. These same gentlemen will
tetl you that the time is not propitious
when a wave of prosperity (?) strikes
the country. They will tell you that to
make a success of a general strike there
must be discontent, and at the present
time, when the province Is seething with
discontent, they say the time Ib not ripe,
Will some one tell us when lt will be
ripe7 Of course, the time is never ripe
for the the meal ticket seeker, because
it Is against his material Interests. The
solution Is up to the workers of the province and never mind about these gentlemen with their soft Jobs and comfortable homes. We on Vancouver island
have been on strike for 22 and 14 months
respectively, and the position of our
powerful International organization Ib
such that wo can expect out relief cut
off at any moment. So we are appealing
to the workers of BrltlBh Columbia to
help us ln our flght against the McBride
(mis)adminlstratlon. We have some of
our men In jail who have legally served
their sentences, but Bowser Is pleasing
himself about helping them to get out.
So what are you going to do about it,
fellow-workers? Are you going to have
any say about the way the province
should be run, or are you going to allow
the coal barons to own the government?
The mining act Is only enforced, subject
to their approval, and no law Is allowed
to stand ln their way. The residents of
the village of South Wellington are prevented from using the government sidewalk which they helped to build. The
strike-breakers have been armed by the
company with rifles and fifty rounds of
ammunition apiece. Mr, Bowser says
they are Justified. These same strikebreakers came up into the village a
short time ago, led by company officials,
with the avowed intention of driving the
strikers out, but there have been no
wholesale arrests for -unlawful assembly,
eto, Oh, not The scab has a different
legal status to tho union man. Vice-
president Bancroft, of the Trades and
Labor congress of Canada, stated before
the convention that since the strike had
been lost ln Nova Scotia, the conditions
there were deplorable, and a minister of
the gospel stated somo time ago that
people there wero eating dog. Do you
want the same state of affairs to prevail on Vancouver Island? If you do,
leave the mine-workers on Vancouver
laland to work out their own salvation,
and If you do not, como out in a body
and register your kick against the
powers that be, for tho time is rotten
ripe, the statements of some of the
labor fakirs to the contrary notwithstanding, At the same time you will be
striking a blow for yourselves. Do not
let the capitalist "rags" like the Daily
Herald, of Nanalmo, have the laugh on
you. Let thom see that tho workers
of British Columbia have got some sting,
they they aro not hanging on tho words of
the few self-seokorH who aro knocking
the gonerat strike. If yau want to listen
to the still small voice of the Herald and
tho meal ticket artists, do so and vote
iiynltint tho general strike. By so doing
you will throw the Vancouver Island
mlne-workors down and they will have
to flght to tho bitter end by themselves,
and the flght isn't knocked out of them
yet. Now is the time to put British Columbia on the map by following the
world-wide movement. • Don't bo afraid
of the unemployed scabbing on you—
when the mine owners of Vancouver
island havo scoured the world and
haven't got the men they want yet.
Yours ln the fight.
PRESS  COMMITTKR,
Local No. 872, tJ. M. W. of A.
South  Wellington.
(Signed)  Walter Head,   Tom Hayton,
John R.  Barkhouse, Fred H.  Shaw.
South Wellington, B.C., July. 18, 1914.
For "Offensive and Defensive" Under Certain
Conditions
BARBERS' LOCAL No. WO — MBBTS
second and fourth Thursdays, I.W
P. m. President, J. W. Green; mcotoVc.
s* geIT»tL,eoretVy-busines's agent. C.
F. Burkhart, Rooin M8, Labor¥empIe
Hours: 11 to 1; B to 7 p. m. **»"»p»»'
Union Restaurants and Cafes
Bergman's Cafe, Hastings Btreet'
weat,
Bluepolnt Cafe, 538 Main Btreet.
Boulder Cafe, 11 Cordova street
weBt.
English Kitchen, 30 Hastings street
east,
Cordova Cafe, 130 Cordova street
weBt.
Couver Cafe, 32 Hastings street
west,
Dominion cafe, Main street west,
Good Eats Cafe, 110 Cordova street
west.
Lincoln Cafe, 572 Richards street.
Rainier Hotel Cafe, oorner Cordova
and Carrall streets.
T. & H, Cafe, 151 Cordova street
west.
Oyster Bay Cafe, corner Carrall and
Cordova streets.
MINARD'S  LINIMENT  RELIEVES
NEURALGIA.
Members Will Not Work
With Unfair Men to
Either Unions
The Federatlonist has received Information to the effect that a Joint
agreement has been signed and entered Into between the officers of the
"Bricklayers', Masons' and Plasterers'
International Union of America," and
the "United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America." The
full text of the document Is as follows:
Agreement by and between the Brick-
lsjers, Masons and Plasterers' International Union of Aemerlca and the United
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners
of America:
First—We agree to a general "offensive and defensive" alliance under the
following conditions:
Second—That no member of either organization shall work on any operation
where workmen are employed other than
those who are In good standing In the
respective  International  unions.
Third—That in all "offensive and defensive" movements no subordinate local
of either International union shall be
permitted to take any local action whatsoever until the question requiring Joint
action shall have first been submitted to
and determined upon by the presidents of
the Bricklayers, *- Masons and Plasterers'
Union of America and the United
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners
of America,
Fourth—No movement of an "offensive
or defensive" character shall be counter
anced In cases where such would be i
violation of existing agreements that
have been submitted to and duly approved by the presidents of both International unions as is required by the
constitutional laws thereof.
Signing the agreement for the United
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners
of America are: James Klrby, general
president; Frank Duffy, general secretary.
For the Bricklayers, Masons and Plasterers' International Union of America:
W. J. Bowen, general president; Thos. R.
Preece, flrst general vice president; Wm.
Dobson, general secretary.
BARTHNDBRg' LOCAL No. «7«.-OF-
flee, Room SOS Labor Temple. MeeU
flrst Sunday of each month. President,
F. F. Lavlgne; flnanolal sscretary, Geo.
W. Curnook, Room SOS. Labor Tsmplfc
BRICKLAYERS' AND MASONS', NO. 1
« „™Me£ta *V6tvyBlBt -*A »rd Tuesday,
8 p.m.. Room S07. President, James
Haslett; corresponding secretory, W. &
Dagnall, Box 63; financial secretary F.
R. Brown; business agent, W. 8. Dag-
nail, Room 216, s
BOOKBIOTMBRB'   LOCAL   UNION   No.
105-Meeta  third  Tuesday  ln  even
SffV1 nJ* L*bor T*h1*- ™B
dent P. j, Milne; vtoe-pres dent, Wm.
B-ariman; secretary, dsorge llowS
Hase wood hotel, S44 Hastings Steet B.
^"U^u^urer.H. Perry, llS0T«,tll
3ROTHBRH0OD OF BOILBR HAKSRB
_   end Iron Ship  Builder* 4nd Httotn
tw£& 1"t *ad third Mondays, | p.«.
Presldsnt, F. Barclay, SIS Cordova But*
■wets*-*,, A. Fraaer. HM ^_______T'
SYNOPSIS   OP   COAL   MINING  REGULATIONS
Coal mining rights of the Dominion,
In Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,
the Tukon Territory, the Northwest Territories and In a portion of the Province
of British Columbia, may be leased for
a term of twenty-one years at an annual
rental of |1 an acre. Not more than
2,560 acres will be leased to one applicant.
Applications for lease must be made by
the applicant in person to the Agent or
Sub-Agent of the district In which the
rights applied for are situated.
In surveyed territory the land must b*
described by sections, or legal subdivisions of sections, and In unsurveyed territory the tract applied for shall be
staked by the applicant himself,
Bach application must be accompanied
by a fee of $5, which will be refunded If
the rights applied for are not available,
but not otherwise. A royalty ahall be
paid on the merchantable output of the
mine at the rate of Ave cents per ton.
The person operating the mine shall
furnish the Agent with .sworn returns
accounting for the full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay the royalty thereon. If the coal mining rights
are not being operated, auch returns
ahould be furnlahed at least once a year.
The lease will Include the coal mining
rlghta only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available
surface rights may be considered necessary for the werklng of the mine at the
rate of 110 an acre.
For full Information application should
be made to the Secretary of the Department of the Interior, Ottawa, or to any
Agent or Sub-Agent of Dominion Lands.
W. H. CORT,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N, B.—Unauthorized publication of this
advertisement will not be paid for—30830.
VANOOUVER UNIONS
TRADEB AND LABOR COUNCIL -
Meet, first and third (Thursday*.
Executive board: W. E. Walker, president; 3. H, MoVety, vice-president: Geo.
Bartley. general aeeretary, no Labor
Temple; Hiss H. Qutterldre, treasurer;
Mies P. Brisbane, statistician; sergeant-
at-arms, John Sully; <J. Curnook* F.
Knowles, W. R. Trotter, trustses.
LABOR TEMPLE COMPANY, LTD.—
Dlreetore: Fred A. Hoover, J. H.
McVety .lame. Brown, TOward Lothian.
Jamee Campbell, J, W. Wilkinson, R. P,
»' Mtlnl.c*. John McMillan, Murdock Me-
Keniie, F. Blumberg, H. H. Pree. Manas.
Ing director, J. H. McVety, Room 111.
ALLIED PRINTING TRAD,Efc COON-
_ flL—Meete 2nd Monday In month
President, Oeo. Mowat; secretary, K. R.
Fleming, P.O, Boi «S
BAKERS' AND CONFECTIONERS LO-
bhuBnf        CAL  No*  4*—Meata sse-
'C C-JLa 9 onA and fourth Satur-
•MtmxK-E     days, 7.S0 p.m. President,
H. a. Leeworthy; correo-
£r-«3v>"K Ponding aecreury, R. I.
P, HBO.?     Adams; business agent, J.
Black,   Room  220,   Labor
Temple.
COOKS, WAITERS AND WAITRESSES
month, 1:10 p.m„ Labor Tempts, W. I.
Walker, buslnes representative, oftce
Room »8 Labor Temple. Houn: iTbl
?»••;' * »■«*• to 2.10 and 5 p.m. to MS
p.m. Competent help furnished on short
notice.   Phona Sey. Mlt
I1UJTRICT COUNCIL OF CARPENTERS
«.-l.mI?".!ecSn', *u"! 'c""'"1 Thursday of
S™ S*?n'?' • P- *». Secretary, I. Bit-
S?BV H'Horaby strset; business agent,
"EV J™.,,hSS.M<""'»>' »' »«oh month,
and Local 1S4T meets first and third
Tuesday of each month,
ELECTRICAL WORKERS, LOCAL NO.
. *U~SE,*B a"x"n IM "try Monday
! t.m' «P™!",,,P,• D,'« ***'• woa-prSt*.
dent, M. Sander; recording secretary,
_y Elgar. Labor Temple; flnanclal eee-
iJ'ary and business agent, W. F. Dunn,
Room 207, Labor Temple,
ELECTRICAL WORKERS, LOCAL NO.
.... }2}. (I.nsldB Men)-Meets first and
third Mondays of each month. Room 205.
8 p. m. President, H. R. Von Sickle: recording secretary, J. M. Campbell; business agent, F. L, Estinghausen, Room 207
LON.0.8=y.U?EJH5N8'  international;
ASSOCIATION,    No.    IIzB-MmU
•W ™*W evening, IM Alexander
street, President, S. J. Kslly; Secretary,
H. Hannlng.
MACHINISTS,   NO.   112—MBBTS  8-&
ond   and   fourth   Fridays,   I   p.   m.
President, A. R. Towler; recording secretary. J. Brookes; financial sscretary, J, H.
MOVING PICTURE OPERATORS, Lo
ral 348 I.A.T.S.E.—Meets every sec
ond Sunday of each month, Labor Temple, 8 p.m. President H. C. Roddan; secretary-treasurer, L. E. Goodman; recording secretary, A. O. Hansen; business agent. G. R[ Hamilton. Offlce,
Room 100, Loo Bldg. Tel. Sey. 3M5,
"MUSICIANS' MUTUAL PROTECTIVE
Union, Local No. 145, A. F. of M.-
Meets second Sunday of each month,
rooms 29-80, Williams Building, 418 Granville street. President, J. Bbwyer; vlce-
§ resident. F. English: secretary, H. J.
irasfleld; trsasursr, W, Fowler
0H®AEKS.. PLASTERERS' INTER.
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, No. 89-
Meets first and third Wednesday, O'Brien
Hall, 8 p.m. President, G. Dean; corres-
ponding sscretary, F. Sumpter; flnanclal
secretary, D. Soott; treasurer, I. Tyson;
business agent, Joe Hampton. Phone
sey. 1514
PAINTERS',.- PAPERHANGERS'. AND
Decorators', Local 188—Meets every
Thursday, 7.30 p.m. President, H. Grand:
nnanclal seoretary, J, Freckleton, 1023
Comox street; recording secretary, R.
Dowding, 822 Howe street. Business
agent, James Train, Room 803, Labor
Temple.
PATTERN MAKERS' .LEAGUE .OF
NORTH AMERICA.—Vancouver and
vicinity. Branch meets 1st and 8rd Fridays at Labor Temple, room 205. Robert
C. Sampson, Pros., 747 Dunlevy Ave.;
Jos, G. Lyon, flnancla] seoretary, 1731
Grant street; J. Campbell, according secretary, 4869 Argyle Btreet.
STONECUTTERS',       VANCOUVER
Branch—Meets second   Tuesday, 8.00
fi. m. President, J. Marshall; correspond-
ng seoretary, Wm. Rowan, Box 1047; An-
anclal secretary, K. McKenzle.
STEREOTYPERS' AND ELECTROTYPE
era' Union, No. 88, of Vancouver and
Victoria—Meets second Wednesday of
each month, 4 p. m„ Labor Temple. Presl-
dent, Chas. Bayley: recording secretary,
A. Birnle, co. "News Advertiser."
STREET AND ELECTRIC RAILWAY
Employees, Pioneer Division No, 101
-Meets Labor Temple, second fourth
Wednesdays at 2 p.m., and flrst and
third Wednesdays, 8 p. m. President,
Adam Taylor: recording secretary, Albert
V. Lofting, 2581 Trinity street; flnanclal
secretary, Fred. A. Hoover, 2409 Clark
Drive.
STEAM  BNOINEER8,   INTERNATTON-
al Looal 897—Meets every Wednesday
I p. m„ room 204, Labor Temple. Financial sserstary, B. Prsndsrgaat, room 218,
TAILORS' INDUSTRIAL UNION (IN
ternatlonal), Local No. 178—Hsstings
held first Tuesday In each month, 8 p. m.
President, H. Nordlund; recording secretary, C. McDonald, Box 603; flnanolal
secretary, L. Wakley, P. O. Box 603.
THEATRICAL STAGE EMPLOYEES,
Local No. 118—Meets sscond Sunday
of each month at Room 294, Labor Temple. President. H. Spears; recording secretary, Oeo. W. Allln, P.O, Box 711, Vancouver.
TYPOGRAPHICAL UNION NO. 82«-
Meete last Sunday eaeh month, 1
p.m. President, R. P. Pettlpleoe; vice-
president, W. S. Metsger, secretary-
treasurer, R. H. Neelands, P. O. Box 88.
70 OFF ALL TRUSSES THIS MONTH
BED STAB DRUG STOBE.
63 Cordova Street WeBt Vancouver, B. 0.
THL CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE,
Capital  —.111,000,000        Rsst 813,600,000
Main Office: Corner Hsstings and Granville Street*, Vincouver.
CITY BRANCHES IvOCATION
HASTINGS-and CAMBIE Cor. Hastings and Cambls Strsets.
EAST END —Cor. Ponder snd Main Streets.
COMMERCIAL DRIVE Cor. First Avenue and Commercial Drive.
FAIRVIEW   .Cor. Sixth Avenue and Oranvllle Street.
MOUNT PLEASANT Cor, Eighth Avenue and Main Street
KITSILANO H Cor. Fourth Avenue and Yew Street.
POWELL STREET Cor. Victoria Drive and Powell atreet.
SOUTH HILL —.'. L.Cor. Forty-fourth Avenue and Fraaer Road,
Alio North Vancouver Branch, cor.   Lonsdale  Ave.   and   Esplanade.
JOHNSTON & SALSBURY
The Hardwaremen
SUCCESSORS TO
McTAGGART & MOSCROP
We carry a complete line of MECHANICS' GOODS, including SANDS' LEVELS. FRISCO MASONS' TAPE.
STANLEY'S PLANES. LEVELS, etc.. STAR-
RETT'S FINE TOOLS. SIMONDS' SAWS. CORBIN
LOCKS. SETS.
PHONE SEYMOUR tM 46  HASTINGS ST.  EAST
Westminster Trust, Limited
^^^**,"% WA^*m\rftmat\to*&. ^^ «M0<ja^9v W|  QBHfV^vOT
We —to MONET TO LOAN on Improved property.
-   Estates managed for out-of-town ud elty client*.   FartMnts «oI-
lactad and forwarded or invested.   We aet at agents onlj lor tke
purchase and uie of real estate.
Dopoelta accepted and lntereat at 4% allowed oa dally balance.
SAFETY DEPOSIT BOXES POR RENT
Head Offlce:
Columbia and Bogbhl StreM, New Westminster, B. C.
THE S. BOWELL COMPANY
funeraiTdirectors
NEW WESTMINSTER, B. C.
Men who earn their ltvlm "by  I
e sweat of the brow" need some-
the
thing to keep their bodies supplied
with moisture. A little beer dor-
Ins the day la a real necessity with
the worklngman.
WINEWEISER
BEER
la popular with all classes.
Ask your dealer, or phone 75L.
WESTMINSTER BREWERY, NEW WESTMINSTER, B.C.
PHONE No. *U7B
A. E. SUCKLING ft CO, VANCOUVER DISTRIBUTERS
UNION HATS AND OVERALLS at
J. E. BROWN & CO.
S18 COLUMBIA STREET NEW WESTMINSTER, B.C.
THE POPULAE PRICED, EUROPEAN PLAN
HOTEL RITZ
VICTORIA, B. C.
FORT ST., ,AT DOUGLAS
RATES 75c, $1.00, $1.26, $1.50, $2.00
0. J. LOVEJOY, MOR. FREE AUTO BUB
BE TRUE TO YOURSELVES
BY SMOKINO THI OLD RSLIABLI
Kurtz's "Pioneer" Cigars
YOU  HELP YOUR  FELLOW  UNION   MEN  AND   lltlDM, YOU  OET
THI  VIRY  BUT  VALUI  FOR  YOUR  MONEY
Don't Blame
The
Hindoo
For Sending Hit
Money Home
to India
You are as bad as he if you don't demand goods made
in British Columbia. Every time you buy imported
paints and varnishes you send your money out of
B.C.
KEEP YOUR MONEY HERE
AND GIVE A BROTHER
WORKMAN A JOB-
HE NEEDS IT!
Ask for Paints and Varnishes made by
BRITISH AMERICA PAINT
COMPANY, Limited
Victoria   Vancouver   Calgary
Edmonton
_J PAGE SIX
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST.
FRIDAY. .V.., JULY 24, 191
WHAT CUSTOMERS SAY OF
BUCK
Vancouver, July 9th, 1914
Messrs. Wm. J. McMaster & Sons, Ltd.,
Vancouver, B. C.
Gentlemen: We arc having a continually growing demand for
your "Mac's Mogul" and "Buck Brand" overalls, also your shirts.
The Union Label, particularly on your negligee shirts (The
Master Brand), in addition to the fit and quality of the goods, make
them our best sellers.
Your "Buck Brand" Work Shirts arc the best values I have ever
seen, both for the merchant and the man that wears them. I wouldn't
be without them.
Yours truly,
(Signed) CAMPBELL & GRIFFIN.
(Copy)
WM. J. McMASTER & SONS, LTD,
W. B. THOMAS, Manager Director.
AUTO RACES
AT
MINORU PARK
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
TETZLAFF, CARLSON, HUGHES
and other Famous Drivers
' Special trains leave Granville Street Station at 12
and 12.30, and every 15 minutes until 2 p.m.
New West Manufacturing Co., Ltd.
MANUFACTURERS OF
FURNACES, STOVES .nd RANGES
Union men, ask for our Stoves and Furnaces.    We
are the only union manufacturers of same
in Vancouver.
2102—llth Avenue West    VANCOUVER, B. 0.
Phone Bay. 248.
GO W,TH THE BUNCH to the
BRUNSWICK POOL ROOMS
JULY (CLEARANCE
OF ALL SUMMER MERCHANDISE
r\ UR THIRD annual July Clearance Sale is in
'**•' full swing. Sensational bargain features in all
summer wearing apparel for women, children and
infants. See all of our big show windows for daily
snaps. Saunter through our cool, day-light store,
the most pleasant shopping centre in Vancouver.
P. 8.— We are agents for the famous Standard Patterns, 10 and 16
cents each.
f HAS. B. PERKINC
\af    1058-64 GRANVILLE ST., VANCOUVER, B.C.    1^
CAXTON OLUB
Entertainment—Lecture by
J. Francis Bursill
The excitement on the watorfront
on Tuesday night attracted many
people who would doubtless liave attended the concert and lecture given
under the auspices of the Caxton Club
(printers' apprentices). The Hindu
question has had a disturbing influence altogether, for it took away the
gentleman who helps Mr. J. Francis
Bursill with a lantern and the substitute—or deputy—found had a lantern
hardly adequate for such a large hall.
Still the evening was pleasantly and
profitably passed and the attendance
was satisfactory. Mr. Thomas Weedon
proved immensely popular as vocalist
and pianist. Miss E. Crane danced
with vivacious grace. Mr. Jules
Dahlager proved a clever cartoonist,
Mr. W. S. Campbell sang "When the
Ebb Tide Flows" and "Thora" admirably. Mr. H. Cowan was a genial
chairman and Mr. George Bartley
waxed eloquent in moving a vote of
thanks to speaker and entertainers.
Mr. J. Francis Burslll, the well known
newspaper man, known as "Felix
Penne," gave an interesting—suggestive—address, illustrated by lantern
slides. It was not a lecture, but a
"gossip," and several passages should
set the young apprentices reading—
and thinking! The speaker, who was
a "printer's devil" over 50 years ago,
contrasted the conditions of the printer's workshop of his early days with
the improved conditions brought
about by trade unions and combinations for "betterment." He urged
young printers to read up the history
of their trade, the lives of famous
printers and to study well printed
books: there were now beautiful examples in the Carnegie library. After
showing pictures of the early "block"
books, "Felix Penne" went on to speak
of WJlllam Caxton, "the father of
English printing," who brought up as
a mercer, "took to" writing and printing and by setting up his press ln
Westminster Abbey laid the foundation of learning—and of liberty. The
improvements in the press by Earl
Stanhope, by Cope, Hopkins, Kaenig
and others were briefly touched on
and Mr. Burslll claimed for the Times
the first application of steam to the
printing press. Steam now is largely
superseded by electricity, All who
know the speaker know him to be
fond of "artistic" printing and not the
least interesting portion of his address were the passages devoted to
Willam Blare, Maclise, Walter Crane
aand others who, anticipating and cooperating with William Morris,
brought about the formation of a
school of "art printers" ot which this
continent has had many Illustrious
examples, notably De Vlnne.
The brief address, the excellent
slides whetted the appetite for more
and all were glad to hear from the
speaker that later on in the year,
when the dark evenings are more
adapted for Caxton gossip, he will return to the subject, and with a better
lantern, show beautiful examples of
ancient and modern printers' work.
Let us here say that Mr. Douglas, the
olty librarian, Mr. Alfred Buckley, on
the library staff, and others believe
with Mr. Bursill that this city must
look more in the future to its technical Industries and they are ever ready
to eo-operate with Mr. Bursill in placing before the young craftsmen good
examples of printing, bookbinding
and illustrations.
Later on ln the year it would be a
good thing to arrange some holiday
afternoon for a party of twelve or
fifteen apprentices to visit the Carnegie Library with Mr. Burslll as
guide. We are sure he will accept
that position, and an examination of
beautiful books from the Kelmscott
press and beautiful bindings by Bed
ford, Revlere and others can be made
very Interesting.
VOTES FOR WOMEN
By MRS. .7. A. CLARKE
MINARD'S LINIMENT
CURES DANDRUFF
If you are one
who doesn't know
the wonders oi the Blue Amberol
played on an Edison Cylinder
Phonograph. Let us show you
what you are mining. We've
been in business a long time, Mr.
Reader. No one knows the
talking machine line better than
we do. We've watched the
Edison develop until to-day wc
unhesitatingly claim it to be the
most perfect on the market today. You'll not lose anything
by hearing it. We'll arrange
terms to suit.
THE
KENT
PIANO CO. Ltd.
SS8 GRANVILLE ST.
Berry Bros.
Agenti foi
CLEVELAND
CYCLES
The Bloycle with th* Reputation
Full   Unt   of   aecMiorlM
Repairs promptly executed
635 HASTINGS ST. EAST
Phone Highland 895
The regular monthly meeting of the
Pioneer Political Equality league was
held last Friday in room 302, Empire
building. Many Important matters
were dealt with. The league discussed the possibility of a strong union of the leagues of Vancouver and
vicinity and went on record as favoring same.
The members of the Cedar Cottage
Political Equality league spent a very
enjoyable day last week when they
went on a picnic to Gibson's Landing.
The Mount Pleasant Suffrage league
will hold its regular meeting Friday
night, July 24th, in A. 0. F. hall, corner of Main street and Tenth avenue.
The public is invited.
The argument that suffrage tends
to kill motherhood was clearly dls
approved the other day at the liberal
picnic when two of the leading suffragists in British Columbia, Mrs. Ralph
Smith and Mrs. (Dr.) MoConkey, were
called upon to act as judges in the
baby show. These two ladies, with
the assistance of Dr. Christie, not only
judged about 60 babies, but handled
the affair ln such a way that the show
was quite a success.
Suffrage Debate
At the debate on Woman Suffrage,
held un<"er the auspices of the liberals
of ward v. on Thursday last, in Leo
hall, the decision was given in favor
cf votes for women.
Mr. Cook, speaking for suffrage,
said that the right of ivomen to vote
was founded on justice and equity.
In the past might and power had kept
woman out of all activity except that
which man permitted. Even in repro
duction woman performed the greater
part. Woman was human as well as
man, and just as able to heai- her
share of the world's work as man, but
man had dominated and forced woman
into inferior positions. For the sake
of humanity woman should be given
access to all great questions. She
should be allowed to dolve, work, and
solve. With an education and given
political equality, woman would
broaden out and get a national outlook beneficial to all concerned. At
the present time tbe state is losing
the service ot one-half of the intellect
of the nation. Women do not serve
ln the army, neither do men bear
children.
Mr. Strain, speaking for the nega
tive, said: "Do women want the
vote?" He only knew two women
who really wanted the vote. Will they
exercise the franchise? Several countries had given the vote, but he had
not heard of any great exodus to those
countries on account of better condi
tions. Women already had too much
to do. Conditions in Colorado showed
that the vote had not done much to
help women. In that state the women took clubs to flght with ln the
miners' struggle. Why did tbey not
use the vote instead? Women did
not know enough. In fact, some women did not even know enough to
chew gum properly. He had watched
several women in the street car and
they contorted their faces hideously.
The other two speakers brought out
several important points. The leader
of the affirmative summed up by saying that lt was not a moral, religious,
or. educational question, but one of
pure justice. Therefore, women should
have votes.
Women In Colorado
When Mother Jones was ln the city
of Vancouver she told about the nine
teen women and children ln the great
strike district in Colorado who had
been burned to death by the thugs
employed by Rockefeller. She claimed
the women of Colorado who had the
vote, had not lifted a Snger in protest. Herein Mother Jones was
wrong. The women of Colorado not
only protested, but demanded that the
bloodshed be stopped. It was the delegation of one thousand women voters
who demanded that the state militia
be called off, that federal troops be
brought ln, and that the governor,
who had the power, take over the
mines, tf necessary, and see that the
men be given a square deal. The governor at first refused, but wben he
found the women firm he sent the
telegram that brought the federals.
Ot eourse, the presence of the federal
troops does not mean that a cure of
the economlo conditions existing ln
Colorado has been effected. However,
eonditlons have been made temporarily better, and some good may come
out of the aciton on the part of the
women.
Value of Movies
The American National Woman Suf ■
rage association has decided to bave a
series of slides made ot suffrage cartoons. These cartoons are to be run
off between rolls. These slides will
first be used ln the six states hoping
to get suffrage amendments through
in November. The national association is well organized and is taking
advantage of every possible means to
bring the matter of votes for women
before the people. A prise of $25 is
also offered to the person writing the
best suffrage story for the movies.
Anyone may enter the contest. Lately
quite a number of anti-suffrage plays
are appearing in our local picture
shows. The women who believe ln
votes for women and who attend these
shows should ask the management to
help the cause by not,putting these
features on. One or two managers
have been approached and have pro-
mlsed this.
Anti's and Colorado
The anti-suffragists seem to have a
favorite pick at the state of Colorado.
Whenever there is an argument on
the question, Colorado, Is a suffrage
state, gets a great share of abuse, and
yet this state Is really a banner state.
Suffrage was granted in 1893, and in
less than six years women got through
over thirty-two laws directly affecting
women and children—laws that should
have been on the statute books years
before. Some of the laws are: Equal
guardianship, raising the age of protection to girls to 18, eight hours for
women, compulsory education between 8 and 10 (with exceptions) giving women equal property rights.
These and many more laws went Into
effect. The chief claim of the anti's
is that the capital, Denver, Is a very
wicked city. They forget that Denver is the center of a great mining
country into which the men of the
surrounding country come to havo
their so-called "good times;" that the
women In tbls western city are still
In the minority and that therefore
laws are still man-made.
STRIKE VOTE
Favorable by B. 0. Federation of Labor
Following is the roll call vote on
referendum on general strike taken at
special convention of the British Columbia Federation of Labor, held at
Vancouver, B. C, July 13-15, 1914.
New Westminster   ,
For Agnst
Steam  Engineers—J.R.FIynn..
St. Ry. Emp.—A. E. Duncan.. —
St. Ry. Emp.—W. Yates  —
T. & L. Council—H. Knudson. 1
T. & L. Council—H. Glbbs.... —
Elec.   Workers—W.. Eskin.... —
Painters—A.  Jorgeson      1
Victoria
U. B. of Carp.—A. Watchman 1 .
U. B. of Carp.—G.L. Dykeman 1
A. S. U. B. of C.—A. S. Wells —
A. S. TJ. B. of a—Mathieson. —
Pro. Laborers—J. L. Martin,. —
St Ry. Rmiv-W. H. Gibson.. —
Stm. Engineers—J. E. Peacock —
B'hooii painters—P.  Harvey..   1
Plumbers- Anderson    —
Stage Employees—B. Day .... 1
T. & L. Council—P. Fisher... 1
T.  & L.  Council—C. Slvertz.. —
Longshoremen—G.   Paget     1
Clgarmakers—A.   Ross       1
Machinists—A   Horbergor   .... —
Vancouver
Steam  Engineers—L.  Dawson    1
Moulders—C.   Cropley       1
Jour'men Tailors—McDonald.. 1
St. Ry. Emp.—W. H. Cottrell. 1
St.  Ry.  Emp.—W.  Murray....   1
St. Ry. Emp.—W. Klrby  —
St. Ry. Emp.—A. V. Lofting.. —
St.  Ry.   Emp.—J.  James —
St,  Ry.  Emp.—R.  Rigby    —
U. B. Carp.~-J. H. McEwen...   1
U.  B.   Corp.—C.  Howe —
U. B. of Carp.—W. Foxcroft. —
U.*B. of Carp.—G. H. Hardy.. —
U. B. of Carp.—J. Davidson.. 1
U. B. of Carp.—A. McDonald. —
Marble Workers—J. McManus. —
B'hood Painters—H. Grand ..1
Bldg. Laborers—G. Kllpatrlck 1
Op Plasterers—A If,  Hurry  ... —
plumbers—W.   Mundell   —
Trades Coun.—W. F. Dunn... —
Trades Coun,—F. A. Hoover.. —
Longshoremen—H. Hannlng . 1
Longshoremen—G. Thomas ... 1
Letter Carriers—J. B. Metcalf 1
Letter Carriers—F. Knowles. —
Elec. Wrkrs. (Out)—H. Jones 1
Elec. Wrkrs. (Out)—H. Hogan —
EI. Wrkrs.   (In)—Estinghausen —
Barbers—C. F. Burkhart  —
Typo.—R.   H.   Neelands    —
Typo.-J. E. Wilton   —
Typo.—Geo.   Bartley    —
Photo  Eng.—A.  F.   Porter —
Marble Cut. Hlprs.—Cassels.. —
Pattern Makers—R. Sampson. —
Machinists—J. H. McVety ... —
Bartenders—G. W. Curnock .. —
Bartenders—A.  Lees    —
Bartenders—H.  Davles    —
Sht. Metal Wrkrs.—Hamilton. —
Mov. Pic. Op.—F. E. Goodman —
Stm.   Engineers—W.   Cherry.. —
Lathers—V.   Mldgley    —
Cooks & Wait—W. E. Walker —
News Writers—O. P. Merrill.. —
South Wellington
TJ. M.-W.—D. Todd      1
U. M. W.—H. O. Connell     1
U. M. W.—W. Head     1
Cumberland
U.  M.  W.—J.  Naylor      1
U. M. W.—A. Goodwin      I
V. M. W.—R. Foster .....\... 1
Dlst. 28 U. M. W.—McAllister   1
Ladyimlth
U. M. W.—G. Pettigrew      1
U.  M.  W.—W.  Bauld      1
U.  M.  W.—W.  Brown       1
U. M. W.—D. McKenzle     1
U.  M.  W.—Jfts.  Currle       1
Dlst 28 U. M. W.—T Doherty   1
Nanalmo
Typographical—J.  Gilbert    —
U. B. Carp.—J. Kerr     1
U. M. W.—J. Cochrane     1
U. M. W.—J. S. Robertson....   1
U. M. W.—W. A. Rose    1
U. M. W.—F. John     1
U. M. W.—T. J. Shenton    1
U. M. W.—R. MofTatt    1
TJ. M. W.—C. Pattlnson     1
Hedley, B. C.
W. P. of M.—D. Sanders ....   1
Sointula
U.  M. W.—B. Karrio     1
Fernle
U. M. W.—W. Hilton   —
TJ. M. W.—H. Martin  —
Dlst. 18 U.  M. W.—D. Rees.. —
Greenwood
W. P. of M.—W. Philips  ....   1
Sandon
W. F. of M.—Af. Shilland ....   1
Phoenix
Dlst. 6 W. F. M.—H. Elsmore   1
1
PATRONIZE "FEDERATIONIST" AD-
VERTISBRS, AND TELL THEM WHY.
$400.00 in Cash
Given Away
TO THE ONE WHO  DRAWS
THE LUCKY NUMBER
1 Chance for Every $5 Purchase
Made in Either of Onr Store,
IT'S ECONOMY AND WISDOM
TO WEAR GOOD CLOTHES
You know yourself tbat you -.re
Influenced by tbe clothes others
wear. Just so, tbey are Influenced ln their judgment ot you
by the clothes you wear.
It's economy and common
sense to wear really good
clothes, for, as you well know,
one good suit will outwear and
out-look two "cheap" ones.
TRY ONE OF OUR $25 8UITS.
HT REFORM
WARDROBES
333 HASTINGS ST. and ROGERS
BLDG., GRANVILLE ST.
PhoM Sey. 221
D.j or Ni|H
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
and EMBALMERS
520 Rictirdi St.        Vuumr, B. C.
COTTON'S WEEKLY — Best
Socialist propaganda paper ln
Canada. Price 50 cents per
year; In clubs of four, 26 cents
for 40 weeki.
Address, COWANSVILLE, F.Q.
Tak. tbat Watoh to Appleby, MM
Pandtr Wot* Cor. Pender and
Hlcliartls, for nlgh-class watch,
clock and Jewellery repairs. Alt
cleaning and mainsprings Jobs
guaranteed for 12 months.
DOLL HOSPITAL
Bring your broken Dollies and get
them made like new
DOLL  HOSPITAL
MILLAR A C0E    120 H«tii|i St. W.
The Safety of the
Wives and Children
Your dependents are a large part of your joy in life, and you
would grieve if they siLTered hurt. The law is not always
equitable If left to its own devices. Provide for the proper distribution of your estate, so that your dearest dependents may
not'be despoiled.
Everything can be very simply arranged.   One good plan is to
appoint a corporation of good standing and wide flnanclal experience aB your Executor.
Sec us about this '
Canadian Financiers Trust Company
HEAD OFFICE 839 HASTINGS ST. W.     VANCOUVER.. B.C.
Patrick Donnelly-General Manager	
REMARKABLE
PRICE
REDUCTION
Fashion-Craft
CLOTHES
300 Suits which have lost their running mates will be put on Sale
SATURDAY MORNING
FOR
EACH
THESE 8UIT8 ARE FASHION-CRAFT MAKE, AND WERE
MADE SPECIALLY FOR THOS. FOSTER A CO., LTD., TO MEET
THE DEMANDS OF OUR DISCRIMINATING TRADE. THE
NAME 18 YOUR GUARANTEE OF QUALITY.
Thos. Foster & Co., Ltd.
514 GRANVILLE STREET
Keep the Children Healthy
by sending them out In the freih air these flne dayi. There's nothing better for keeping them exercised than wheeled goodi.
Our stock of WHEELBARROWS, AUTOMOBILES, EXPRESS WAOONS,
PERAMBULATORS, IRISH MAILS, ROWING WAOONS, VELOCIPEDES,
SIDEWALK SULKIES, li easily the fineit and moit comprehensive In the
city and the prices are right.
Thomson Stationery Co., Ltd.
925 HASTINGS STREET WEST
BEST IN THE WEST
VANCOUVER, ■. 0.
ESTADLISHED IIM
AN UNPARALLELED RECORD
WE HAVE BEEN MAKING SOAP IN VICTORIA FOR SI
YEARS AND HAVE NEVER EMPLOYED ANY ASIATICS. NOTHING BUT 8KILLED HELP AND PUREST MATERIALS ARE
USED IN THE MANUFACTURE OF
WHITE
SWAN
SOAP
W. J. PENDRAY A SONS
Limited.
VICTORIA
VANCOUVER

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