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The British Columbia Federationist Nov 20, 1914

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THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
IlNDUSTRIAL UNITY     & flNOTH.
OFFICIAL PAPER:  VANOOUVER TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL AND B. C. FEDERATION OF LABOR.
VANCOUVER, B. C, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20,1914
4^ POLITICAL UNITT: YICTOST!
(^aSfSS?1)   $1.50 PER YEAB
government Is Really
Blame for the
Disaster
to
Attorney i General Bowser
And Legal Partners
May Explain
ns IRE OF
Labor Daily Newspaper of
Twenty rf our Pages to
Start New Year   .
Non-Unionists To Be Paid
Non-union Wages Is
Government Policy
By J. H. MoVETY.
i Ordinarily The Federationist does
not bother to discuss In its columns the
intricacies of modern finance or the
methods of •Xhlgh" financiers, but in
the case of the Dominion Trust company, in the failure of which so many
unions, union members and working
people generally have lost their small
savings, a deviation from the rule Ib
probably warranted.
Were the Directors Decoys?
With, a board' of directors composed
largely of pious church pillars, met
'chosen for the express purpose of lead-
ng the unsophisticated to believe that
;he company was'a solid as the rock of
3'braltar, the few facts so far divulged
n connection with the winding up of
the company's office lead the average
citizen to believe that the majority of
the directors were merely decoys or
that they were fully aware of the actions of the managing director, and
lonsequently equally responsible with
lim for the state of affairs now exist-
ng. In fairness, it must be admitted
thai the directors were all heavy investors themselves and that many of
hem will be ruined along with those
rho entrusted their funds to the care
if the company.
Who is Responsible.?
What was the cause of the failure t
"/ho are the chartered accountants
rho were required to certify to the eor-
eotness of. tbe accounts and to warn
he shareholders of practices that the
lousiderod unsound f Where was the
iovernment inspeetor of trust companies who was given suoh wide powers
Vnder the new trust company legislation
gassed at the last session of the legislature at the instruction of the attorney-general f
Answering the questions in their
rder, it appears now as though the
lepositors and trust funds of the company were used by Arnold, the managing director ih making loans to him-
elf and his friend Alvensleben for
heir private speculations—That the
lairs of Alvensleben became involved
nd further loans we're made to him
|j> protect what he had already bor
Ipwed. Then the war, with the practical exile of Alvensleben, completely
kilned him and left the trust company
[noble to call in the loans when it most
seded the assistance.
Where Were the Auditors?
Unless these disastrous loans were
lade since the last annual statement
the oompany was prepared it would
tpear as though chartered accountants
e but little protection to shareholders
id depositors and that in this case
ey were completely under the dominant of the managing director. While
e board of directors may provisional-
appoint auditors, it cannot discharge
lem except by consent of the share-
alders to whom notice of the intention
i change auditors must be given in
riting and the auditors must also be
itified in writing so that they may
ipear and show why they are being
scharged if the directors do not care
, give tbe true reasons. It will be
Ben, then, that auditors need never be
a fear of losing their work through
tilure to carry out the wishes of the
rectors. It may be that the auditors
: this case have a good explanation
id if so the sooner it is made the bet-
tr for their professional reputations.
Bowser on the Job.
Oreat promise was held ont by the
Ion. Mr. Bowser about the safeguards
o be thrown around the operations of
rust companies by his new act, and
he new inspector appointed thereun-
er. And where are the safeguards
towf Where was the supervision that
ras to protect the working man, the
ridow and the orphan whose savings
rere deposited or whose estate was in
he hands of tuis company acting as
ixecutorsf And now it is Bald that
he learned attorney-general is going to
top trust companies accepting deposits,
rhich will no doubt strengthen his posi-
ion with the banks.
Oovernment Responsible.
There is no doubt that the publicity
ivon the new trust company act by
he government resulted in an increase
f confidence in trust companies gener*
fly and did drive some of the smaller
ry out of the business beoause of their
lability to furnish the heavy deposit
squired by tbe government. If the
eople were led to expect safeguards
nd inspection and the safeguards were
ot provided or the inspection exerted, and money was lost thereby, it
ems a reasonable expectation that the
ivernment would make good any loss
Lffered by depositors who though their
terests were secured by the new aot.
Impartiality Expected
Does the attorney-general intend to
nke a searching inquiry into the af-
Irs of this company   to   determine
hether there Ib criminal responsibility
the part of the directors for permit-
ig the embezzlement of trust funds*
jd if it should be found to bo trfe
11 he stretch out the mighty arm of
e law and seize the big malefactors
th the same speed and expedition
th which he pursues the small thief t
ill he prosecute as rigorously as he
1 in the case of the minersin Vnncou-
r island t  Will those charged be held
jail without boll for two or three
|mths  und  forced to live  on jail
nil   Maybe the connection between
Dominion Trust company and Bow-
„ Reid   ond   Wallbrldge,  the   com-
ky's solicitors, may assist the nttor-
(•'general in arriving at a decision t
[-'ull of hope and trust in tho strong
i of British "justice" as typified in
attorney-general,  a   grand   oppor*
lity here presents ItBelf to ehow the
•oubtlng Thomases" how he fearless-
exercises impartiality.   Will ho actl
Special Australian Correspondence.
SYDNEY, N. B. W, Oet. 23.—While
we have a great number out of work
here, the government are doing all they
can to handle the situation. The federal labor government, since it got into
power last month, have been working
at express speed to have legislation
passed to take over a vigorous works'
policy to absorb the surplus unemployment. We have the most of our unemployed on half time, which at the present time is better than no work at all.
To give you an idea of what we nre
doing, I' might say that in this state
of N. B. W. the labor premier announced in his budget speech the other
night that so far the country had not
suffered as a result of the war. He
said the government waa going to pass
a further income* tax assessment and a
motor car tax to keep the public works
policy going. This iB a good Btart, and
it means that the brunt of the taxation
is to fall on those beat able to bear it
at thiB time.
New Labor Daily.
The machinery for our new labor
daily newspaper is now being installed,
The big Hoe press is capable of running
36,000 copies of a 24-page paper an
hour. We are having two of these machines installed—giving an output ot
72,000 an hour. Our circulation will be
the biggest ln Australia, and we are
starting in a large way—24 pages. Owing to delay in shipment of machinery
we do not expect to commence publication till February.
Non-union Wsges for Non-unionists.
Since the commonwealth decided
once and for all at the last Australian
federal elections that the question of
preference to unionists was to be adopted by the government, the plute in
Australia hns been strangely quiet.
The government, for its part, have not
been slow in carrying out its mandate,
by giving instructions that unionists
are to hove preference over non-unionists. The N. S. Wales state labor government has gone further than this, and
while it lis autliBrized tlarnnioniBts
are to have preference to non-unionists,
it has also authorized that if non-union
men ore employed they are to be employed at non-union wages—that is,
wages that were ruling at the time before the unions got any increases in
their pays.
Last week the government of New
South Wales hod notices Bet ont at the
works that if there were any scab-men
found on the premises at the end of the
week, they were to get scab wages, and
that the present union rates of wages
would only go to the. men'who were
bono fide members of the trades organizations. This of course raised the ire.
of the few plute men in the N. S. W.
state parliament, and one of them asked the minister of worka if it waa a
fact that he hod issued notices to thiB
effect. The minister's reply was ea
follows;
Minister of Works' Reply.
"It is a fact that some time ogo, I
informed the officers of my deportment
that it waa the desire of t|e ministry
that all workmen employed by the government Bhould be members of the trade
organizations proper to their callings,
I went further by adding, that while
we gave preference to such unionists,
no pressure wns to be brought to bear
upon any man who had, or alleged thot
they had, conscientious objections to
joining the unions! but if ony workman chose to remain outside the union
he was to be paid ot the rote of wages
ruling prior to the Increase won by the
union, under the award.
"If a man has nny objection to join
tho union he con accept the wages ruling before the union went to the trouble and expense of obtaining on award
securing increased rates of pay. Men
outside the unions will not bo allowed
to benefit by the results obtained
through the expenditure of time and
money on the part of members of the
unions."
When this is brought in force, not
only in the government, but also in the
outside industrial fields we will httvo
settled the trouble of scabbery. By
granting preference to unionists, the
people at the ballot box are making
this posslblo within o comparatively
short space of time.
IN EUROPE'S HUMAN
HOUSE Or SLAUGHTER
I have ..t least one cose in my records where wounded men were
tnrown olive into the flames of a burning house. Looking down my notes,
and those only mode from authenticated cases, see only drunken orgies of
lust and blood in which women are
locked ln rooms after being separated
from their husbands and fathers and
maddenod soldiery let loose upon
them; the burning to death of a body
of wounded men in . a church which,
though flying the Bed Cross wns deliberately bombarded; fiendish assault's
upon children; the mutilation of the
dead on the field of bottle; and
through it all the smell of charred flesh
and rotting bodies, which is summed
np in the words of on English soldier:
"The woods nro full of rotting bodies.
We crawled into them to escape the
hell of fire outside them—we went bock
to the open because we couldn't face
the stench," Nor would you understand If you were there to see theBe
things. L say to you that this wor has
made Europe bo beastly—so deadened—
that these things seem the natural occurences of every day.—Shaw Desmond,
British socialist writer.
Of all institutions, there la not one which exercises a more powerful influence upon the upblic mind
than the press.   Hence, every association of men 'ot
women having in view the propogatlon of the idee
which brought them together, regards the   printed
word es of flnt Importance,   They want a paper off
their own ln order, as they believe, to give their idee]
a better chance of becoming known.   In a country
like Canada, that wut la more keenly felt than in
older and settled countries, like England, fer instance.
The daily press of this country—particularly in the,!
weat—ll * singularly one-Bided affair.   It has ne bigness or dignity about it, to make it "public" ln tne"
large sense of the word.   Iti leek of distinctiveness
and individuality, gives lt * uniform mediocrity ofj
tone, in pitiful contrast to the Journals of a hundred;
and fifty yeara ego, when the flght for press freedom:
waa being waged agalnat Ignorant conservatism.   It
- has the "grocer mind," ui looks ont on the world;
ud all that happens therein, through the spectacle*,
of trade,
[t speaks in bombastic terms about "the great
blood-bought liberties of the British people." Bnt
when one of them la assailed, lt la useless to look te
the ordinary dally newipaper to champion lt The
psychology of the mob mind Ib lta dally guide, as it
goes along hud'in hud with the "damned com-,
pound compact liberal majority" as Ibsen calls it.
Sham patriotism, sham politics, sham economics, sham
anything ud everything Juat so long as it paya, because it pleases those who ere either too lazy or toe
stupid to be able to think thlnga out for themielvei;
It la one of the propi brought to the support of u
age robbed of ltt self-reliuce by a civiliiatton which
saps the mental vitality of men. The "mu ln the
street," would rather bave hli thought! ud opinions
laid on nil doorstep daily for fifty cute a month, thu
go to the trouble of thinking ud forming them for
himself, from his own observation ud nil contact
with the views of hli fellows. Thi remit of all thli
is, that any newipaper which sets ont to swim agalnit
the stream, and to go the opposite way to the crowd.
has'a task before lt u difficult ai itl work il necessary.
The Federatlonist Is one of nob, ud so Is overy
other newspaper whieh is trying to item the tide ef
cut end Indifference which threatens te rfamp the
fundamental thingi of life, Iti claim to being ef that
claw ll not * modest one, for modesty is only • hindrance to a Journal attempting such a talk. Ihe consideration given to working elan Intereiti by the rest
of the press is sufficient reaion for that To excuie
lt would only be Introducing Uriah Hup where there
Is no scope fer bis talents. The reason fer inch a
paper justifies itself ln face ef the conspiracy ef alienee In the preu ef the dty, whu matten of vital
material Interest te the worken conflict with theee
of powerful aggregations of corporate flnuce.
Ai u instance typical of muy, during ell the
protracted negotiations between the itreet railway
men and the B. O, Electric Railway company, not
one word about the matten ln dispute appeared in
uy other paper thu this. That, ln ipite of the fact'
that once or twice lt appeared to be certain that a'
, strike would take place, and the dty car nrvlce be
disorganized, If such a thing had happened, the lint
thing the public would have heard about It, would
have been ln the form of lusty condemnation of the
carmen. Then would have been publicity galore in
that cue.
What waa true of the atreet car trouble, li equally
true of every other working clau question of e limllar
Und. .The only paper In the dty through which publicity cu be obtained ll The Federationist. .Like
moit other thingi which hen been established long
enough to be looked upon al u institution, lte value
may not alwaya be apparent. But If lt was not here,
the working-class point of view would stud but little
chance of flndlng expression elsewhere. It doei not
make any attempt to tnat the daily bnad problem
of lta readen aa matter fer academic discussion of
abstract Issues. Its object is to be as hunum as the
common mu, ud to preient the labor point of view
with reapect to everyday happenings.
J. W. W.
LABORCOUNCILHELDLABOR DAY GACA
SESSION LAST
ff NIK
The Council Decides Not to
Work with Civic Reform League
Twenty-fifth Anniversary
WUl Be Celebrated
Next Meeting
HELPING I
More Than Seven Hundred
WorKless Women and
Girls Register.
League's Effort to Grapple
with Appalling Problem
Relieving Many Cases.
The Women's Employment. League
held their weekly meeting laBt Wednesday morning, and a report was presented of tbe registration up to date, as follows:,
Registered.
Stenographers 125
Office assistants. ...   30
Bookkeepers and stenographers    18.
Phone operators. . .     3
Waitresses    15
Chamber maids      6
Cooks     10
Housekeepers    16
Nurse maids      5
Generals 197
TalloresBes   and   Garment workers. .. 108
Dressmakers..        13
Trained nurses    14
Laundresses      8
Stares    20
Married women registered 123
tered 123
Gonernl 197
Helped.
31
12
10
2'
74
51
4
7
Unemployed.
74
500
711
When the oldest daughter marries,
the rest of the famfly manage to got
along comfortably without any boss.
Total 711
Out of the nbovo number about 100
have been placed in positions as domes-
tie help. Several have received mcnl
tickets and financial assistance.
Tho ronl work of the Woman's Em
ployment Leoguo begun on Noycmbor
0th, when somo sixty girls and women
wore put to work at tho nuking of
dolls, toys, otc., in the premisos opened
recently at No._ 1027 Robson Street.
The sixty women woro pnid $3.50 for
three days' work, that number has
slnco boen increased to 10U- and will
ugnin be raised to 150.
Sinco the work started it has boen
found necessary to turn two sitting
rooms and four bedrooms into work
rooms. Work is proceeding in the most
satisfactory manner , making dolls,
dressing dolls, painting dolls' needs and
faccB, making dolls houses and models
of Belgian and French houBes.
Ono very satisfactory feature is nn
ordqr of 1200 housewives, and 1200
hold-alls, to bo made for the next contingent of soldiers to leave Vancouver.
Twolve garment workers are doing this
work nnd if other orders from another
source materialize they will be kept
working for tho next six weeks, or until Christmas.
Dressmaking, alterations, and sewing
of every kind is being done on the promises, nnd last though not by any
means tho least important item, is the
making of Christmas puddings, orders
for which nre rapidly coming in..
There is no doubt that if tho wort-
continues as well as it is going at present the enterprise will be n huge
success.
ROM POWELL
Output of Modern  Plant
Reaches 150 to 200 Tons
Newsprint per Day.
Papermakers Have a 100
per Cent. Union with
About 60 Members.
Mo Oharge.
"What Is the charge!" nskod the
magistrate.   "Nuthin' 't oil," snickered the prisoner ot the bar; "thls's on
me."
Most of a n
with his holr.
illusions disappear
Powell Biver, B. C, is a thriving community of somo 1,500 people, all engaged, directly or indirectly, in the pro-,
dnction of newsprint paper, from a
modern plant operated by the Powell
Biver Paper Co. Some three years ogo
the present company took over the
wreck of a provious concern and present conditions indicate that the officials know their business. The output
just now reaches between 150 end 200
tons por day and this will be increased
as soon as further equipment iB added.
The company seems to have a reody
sole for its product, and its market
extends to Vancouver, Victoria, Seattle,
San Francisco und othor cities on this
continent, while consignments are alao
billed to Australia, New Zealand and
South America. Powell Biver is about
05 miles from Vancouver, situated on
the mainland, across from the north
end of Texada Island, some six hours
sail.
While the policy of company ownership and control of the townsite is general it must bo admitted that it is the
best of a bad system, The working
conditions generally are not too bod
and the wages will compare favorably
with other points in British Columbia.
The Paper Makers' union, No. 142,
with a membership of about 60, is tho
only labor organization established
there as yet, and it seems to be getting
aloag firstrate with the company. The
officers havo arranged for a series of
educational meetings to be held under
their auspices during the coming winter, the first of which was addressed by
B. P. Pettipiece last Sunday ofternoon.
Miss Helen Gutteridge will probobly
be the speaker at the next meeting.
Why War Is Possible.
A united workingmen's movement
against war promises more than any
other woapon. Wnrs come about because tho forces of militarism are organized to tho Inst dogreo, subordinating the will of the individual to tho will
behind the machine. War spirit, which
nriscs quickly enough when tho first
blood is shed, cun bo deliberately manufactured by means of this machine.
The war organization can bo successfully opposed only by another organization ns fnr-renebing nnd as determined. No workingmnn, of himself,
can stop a war; in Europe he cannot
even refuse to fight. But if the individual workingmen know that ho had
bohind him two million brothers sworn
to the same docision, ho would stand
firm, and no .power on earth could force
him to the shambles.—Son Francisco
Bulletin.
Foiled the Robbers.
When nn Alameda girl was in a train
hold-up the othor day, she foiled tho
robbers by hiding hnr money. Sho put
it on the floor, nnd not whero you
thought sho put it.
Will Keep Better Oompuy
Judge—Now, sir, you nro discharged,
but I ndvlBO you to keep away from bod
company.    Young   Man—Thank   you;
sir.   You won't see me here again.
TROUBLES NOT
YET
Wholesale Deportations if
the Federal Troops
Are Withdrawn
Hundreds of Gunmen Join
Militia—Ludlow May
Be Repeated
[Special Correspondence.]
DENVEB, Col., Nov. 17.—Word has
been received at the headquarters oi
the United Mine Workers in this city
that if the federal troops are withdrawn before George Carlson becomes
governor on January 1st, and before a
settlement is made in the coal strike,
that every Btrike leader who has been
active in the coal miners' struggle will
be deported. This information comes
from apparently reliable sources and
bears out the original programme of
the C. F, and I. announced soon after
the primaries.
Rockefeller's Contribution.
At that time it was stated that the
Bockefeller interests had dumped $100,-
000 into the campaign fund of the
"drys" and likewise paid $60,000 to a
Denver newspaper to have it support
Carlson. Bockefeller never donated any
money unless he was sure of double returns, and it was announced that
Carlson had promised the C. F. and I.
to begin wholesale deportations aB Boon
as ho took office as well aB to hang
several leaders of the strikers.
Carlson's statement several days ago
thot there would be "no more trouble"
in the strike district may or may not be
it forecast of these attempted whole'
sale deportations.
Gunmen in Mllltla
Lieutenant-governor Fitzgnrrnld is
credited with a statement that the federal troops will be withdrawn gradually. There are now 529 gunmen recruited into the militia in the strike district.
They aro fully armed and waiting for
tho federals to bo withdrawn so ''they
can clean out thoso red necks.'' In addition, the operators have shipped sev*
en machine guns into the strike district,
nccording to reports, and are attempting to buy arms and ammunition in
large quantities in Denver. If the federal troops are withdrawn before a set
tlement of the strike is affected or be
fore CarlBon tnkes ofllce another Lud-
low massacre seems almost certain.
Old-time Vancouver Labor
Unionist Sends Hia
Impressions
Fifty    Thousand    People
Present at Labor Day
Celebration
A good attendance of delegates was
present when the Trades' and Labor
council was colled to order by Presl.
dent J. H. MoVety at 8 o'clock list
night.. Delegate Trotter reported ._
the work of the Social Service council,
and expressed the opinion thnt the labor movement would be well-advised to
co-operate with the council in several
branches of its work.
Delegate Harrison reported for the
parliamentary committee in respect to
plans for going into the next municipal campaign. The chief item of the
report dealt with the request made in
person by Ur. Porteons Jack of the
Civic Reform league, that the council
should hold a meeting jointly with the
league December llth or 12th. The
council decided on the recommendation
of the committee, to write the Civic
Reform league declining their request.
Delegate Miss Gutteridge reported
for the Women's Employment league.
She stated that although the league was
dealing with no less than 700 coses of
destitute women, there was still a large
number, of cases whieh they eould not
handle for lack nf means. More details
of her report are dealt with in the special article appearing elsewhere in these
columns over the initials of Miss Gutteridge.
President's Report.
President MoVety left the chair to
report on his work on the civic relief
committee. Before doing so, he sold
that J. J. Taylor of Ladysmith, .who
was imprisoned in conneotlon with the
disturbances there last summer, had
visited him and asked tbat he convey
the thanks of Mr. Taylor to the council
for its efforts to secure his release.
President McVety stated that the re
lief committee were developing a plan
to prevent over-lapping and to make it
certain that all cases got .relief. Ho
stated that many of the families 'of
men who had enlisted were so hard up
that relief had to be given to tbem at
once.
Union Reports
Bakers reported that  there was
move on foot in the city to reduce their
Railway carmen said that C. P. R.
Were laying off more men.
Printers had about 250 members in
town, of whom 105 wero working
Musicians reported conditions very
slack. Tbere was a possibility that
they might move their headquarters into the Labor Tomple.
Cooks and Waiters still regarded Allen's cafe and cafeteria as unfair to
them. Union men were patronising
both houses and in few of the number
of union cooks and waiters unemployed
this should not be.
Bartenders again appoaled to ■ union
men to insist on their label.
'Bakers in answer to a question said
that Brewer'b bread was union made.
25th Anniversary Celebration.
The next meeting of the council
December 3rd will bo an opon one to
celebrate the 25th year of the council's
life. On that occasion, all old officers
nnd delegates who can attend will be
invited to be present. An effort is to
be made to hnve Mr. Joseph Dixon, tho
first president of the council in the
chair, supported by past and present
officers.
Tho gathering will bo held in the
largo hall of the Labor Temple, and n
committee hns been appointed to plan
some entertainment to add to tho pleas
ure of tho occasion.
Thot council decided to protest to tho
city council ngninst the proposal to
close hotel bars at 6 p. m. each evening. It wns pointed out that such action on the part of the city would not
touch tho bars of clubs. The opinion
wns expressed that the move camo from
the small business men who felt thnt
they would benefit sb'ghtly in trade if
tho city adopted the plan. Delegated
Walker, McVety and Dunn woro appointed a committeo to nppenr before
tho city couneil regarding this matter.
LATEST PEOM MEXICO.
.the
R. A. RIGG AT A.F. of L.
Defines the International Policy
of the Congress
In the courso of his address as fraternal delegato from tho Trados and
Labor Congress of Canada to tho Convention of tho A. F. of L. in Philadelphia last week, R. A. Rigg said, " Tho
Trades and Labor Congress of Cnnada
stands four-square for the principal of
international trade unionism, and tho
sophistrlos, the subtle, deceptive influences which employers of labor and ruling bodies bring to bear upon us is nn
endeavor to separato us in order, that
thoy may fleece and exploit ub more
effectively. We have noticed thnt so
far as the patriotic Canadian employer
is concerned, his patriotism evnporotes
when it comes to o matter of a strike.
Thon he himeelf is very oagor and very
glad to fall back upon an appeal to
those organizations of strikebreaking
thugs which are recruited in this country for tho purpose of booting into subjection the workorfl of tho United
Stntos and Canada when they seek to
promoto their own interests."
Zapata Administration .Banishes
Priests from tha Country.
Special to Tho Federatlonist. .
SAN FRANCISCO, Col., Nov. 17.—
Tho results of tho Mexican workors' revolution havo beon witnessed by the
people of Ban Francisco. Two hundred
Catholic priosts have reaehod the city
from Mexican ports. Thoy wore expelled from Guadulujra by Governor
Manuel Diogucz, who under tho government of Diaz, was a miner agitator.
Tho priests nro prohibited from ro.
turning to Mexico under deoth penalty.
Thoy refused to do usoful work for the
community when Govornor Dioguez told
them thnt, sinco tho revolution was victorious, no priost would be allowed to
livo without producing.
A completo Bweop of tho Cntholic
priosts is contemplated by the revolutionists throughout Mexico.
Zapata is in full accord with the policy nnd tho Mexican people at large are
awnkoning to tho fact of tho significance of tho acts of tho Catholic
clergy, thot used to be o powerful force
in yearn past.
L. H. Burnham for 'Frisco.
L. H. Burnham, well-known in local
union circleB as tho sometime secretary-
treasurer of tho U. B. of Carpenters
nnd Joiners, and who recently tried
fnrming in Saskatchewan, wob a visitor to the Federationist last Friday
before loaving for Snn Franscisco. As
one roaidont hero n few yenrs ngo,
ho wns astounded nt tho change in conditions. He Bold tbo bottom seemed to
have dropped out.
Ubor day, or "Sight-hours day, ta
more commonly known in Australia, if
celebrated on the flrat Monday of October, exactly oaa month later than tto
day recognized on tha American continent. The tradea unionists of Sydney
turned out in numbers far superior to
previous yeara to demonstrate their
strength and solidarity.
Commencing from tha town hall, tto
route of the procession waa through
some of tha principal streets, and Hyda
park to the agricultural grounds, Moon
park, about, two miles distant, A
force of fifty policemen controlled ths
trafflc (all the street cars being
stopped) and maintained an uninte?
rupted avenue throughout tto Una oi
march.
The professional musicians' band tt
sixty performer! lad th* way immtdi-
ately in front of the eight-hour committee's banner; then, marching on
foot, were the prime minister, members
of the federal and atate ministerial,
membera of the commonwealth aid
New South Wales parliaments, and pw
pie prominent in the labor movement.
Then come tha members of 22 trada
unions with their banners and emblems.
'li? ali ^v*1™' J1"" J>"*1« Played continuously throughout the march, on* at
the airs moat popular being "IVo %
t-V.J'il t0 {iV1»rtryV Seveat?
beautiful banners (some of whieh cost
several hundred pouada) depicting th*
emblems of the various organizations,
were displayed by the 22 union* tto*
took part in the proceedings.
A great number of crafts exhibited
floats, produced articles or article* in
the process of production. For in.
stance, under a motto of "Australia*
Tweeds for Australian People,'13
played by the Tailora' union; waa a*
attractive lorry on which was built a
design in Australian wool. In front af
this posed a giant about twelve feat
in height, clad in a tweed ault, whilst
on either aide of him were two In*
large-horned sheep.
A very interesting exhibit wu that
pf the Eveleigh. Loensiotive depart'-
ment, giving the hiatory of the various
means of transportation in thla country
from the beginning, when the swagmen
hod to traverse miles with loada oa
their backs, down through the period
of the coaehes to the present doy.
The carpenters displayed some bank
fixtures; the tilolnyers, covings, dadoes,
inscriptions, etc.; the railway and
tramway employees, new snd old styles
of technical working, whioh would
rather strike the eye of men trained in
that particular line of industry. Between fifteen nnd twenty thousand unionists took part in the procession,
whilst thousands upon thousands of
enthusiastic people lined the entire
route.
In the afternoon sports were held in
tho Agricultural grounds, when upward*
of fifty thousand people wore present.
The weother was warm, but not unpleasantly so, and as a large and comprehensive programme was presented,
a good afternoon's aport waa enjoyed.
Tickets for ndmittonce have been on
sole here for several months ot one shilling each, 25 per cent, of which goes
towards an art union drawing, tOO
prizes being given, the first this year
being a diamond tiara, valued at £850:
second, value £459; third, £300, and
BO Oil.
Tim surplus funis derived from the
solo of tickets go to the Trades Hull
lissr.elation, to be used for tho purpose
nf building oddltions to the Trod'*
hall, the maintenance of tho library,
otc. Every year an nverage of £0,000
is raised by this menns, five per cent,
c' wiich goes to tin library f md. As
iuo who took pa.'i in the process'.i.i on
Eight Hours day, I could not but ri-ol-
izo the possibilities of labor iu tha
Land of tbe Southern Cross. Lat.?r iiri,
with tho requisition if a moro in-itue
Itncwlft'ge of thi/ cnuntry, its \.o_ !■.•
mill il, ways, I will forward ti T!i»
Fiiditrnllnnist hchio ot' rany impro-iv.ms
if the lub.,r nirVetti'nt in Austrnlitr
PliOH J.'MoEWHJT.
Sidney, N. £-. W., Oct. 10, 1014.
PARLIAMENTARY    COMMITTEE.
Well   Attended   Meeting   Wednesday
Evening Hear Reports.
Encournging reports wero received at
a well attended meeting of the parliamentary committeo of tho Trndos nnd
Labor Council on Wedncsduy evoning,
from the various wnrd sub-committees
having in hand the problem of securing
aldermnnic material for the forthcoming municipal elections. Communications referred to the committeo at last
meeting of the central lubor body wero
read nnd acted upon, and other routine
business dispoiicd of. The pnrlinmontnry
committee will continue to meet nt
Room 10, Labor Tomple, evory Wednesday evening until nfter election day.
f.oenl unions, irrespective of thoir am-
lintions, nro urgently invited to elect
representntives to attend the meetings.
R. A. RIGG ON PEACE
Tho lfn.uro of tho addresses of fra
tornnl delegates to tho convention of
the American Fodoration of Labor lost
week was that of R. A. Rigg, secretary
nf Winnipeg Trndes and Labor council
nnd frntcrnnl delegate from the Tradea
and Labor Congress of Cnnnda. In the
course of his address he made a fervent
plea for united action of some sort
looking to an ending of tho war. Continuing, ho said that the spirit of brotherhood is engendered among the workers of the world and thot indicotes that
tho timo when sooret diplomacies will
cause us to fly ot eaeh other's throat*
is passing. PAGE TWO
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Interest allowed at hlfhaat
current r»t*
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INCORPORATED 1Mi
Paid-up Capital
Reeerve 	
T*tal A***t* • •
•lilt
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th* account, and your
bualneaa will ba w*l-
oom* be It large or
■mall
FOURTEEN BRANCHES IN
VANCOUVER
he it
Publlf-hed every  Friday morning  by the
B. c. Federationlit, Ltd.
R. Parm Pettipiece Manager
J. W. WilkinBon Editor
Directors:    Jas.     Campbell,    president;
H. McVety,    secretary-treasurer;    H.
Gibb; 0. J. Kelly; R. P. Pettlpleoe
Office: Room 217, Labor Tempi*
Tel.  Exchange Sey. 7495.
Subscription: $1.60 per year; In Vancouver
City, 92.00; to unions subscribing
in a body, $1.00
REPRESENTATVES
New Weatminster..  ."W. E. Maiden, Box 034
Prince Rupert W. E. Denning, Box 631
Victoria A. S. Wells, Box 1538
Affiliated with the Western Labor Preia
Association.
'Unity of Labor; the hope of th* world.'
TOIDAY NOVEMBEB 20, 1914
dropped   by
OUT OF THE
MOUTHS OF
BABES, ETO.
THE
MCOirORATED
1855
BANK OF
TORONTO
I  Capital and Raaorv* |11,17M7*
WAGE-EARNERS
keep your eavlnge In th* Bank
•f Toronto, and watoh your d*-
Eoalta and lntereat added by th*
ank grow to a moit desirable
bank balance. Th* flnanclal
strength of thl* long-oatab-
llehed, wtll-oonduoted Inititutlon enaurea nftty for your
money, and you will receive
•vary court**?, and yr ur ao-
count cartful attention.
Aaaata ..
Dapoelt*
141,000,1100
Main Ofllc*—
4M HASTINGS ST. WIST
(Near Richard*)
Branoh**—
Car. Haatinga and Carrall (ta.
Naw Wa*tmln*t*r
Vlotoria
Merritt
British Columbia
LAND
Splendid opportunities in Mixed
Farming, Dairying, Stock and
Poultry. Britlah Columbia
Grants Preemptions of 160 acrea
to Actual Settlers—
Free
TEBMS—Residence on the land
for at leaat three years; improvements to the extent of $5 per
acre; bringing under cultivation
at least five aeres.
For ffurther information apply to
DEPUTY M2NIBTEB OF
LANDS, VICTORIA, B.O.
SECRETARY, BUREAU OF
PROVINCIAL INFORMATION,
VICTORIA, B.O.
ABOBBRS WORKING on
the Central Park extension of the China creek
sewer, have had their wagea
the contractors—
Messrs. Hodgson,
King and McPhe
Ian brothers —
from $3 to $2,40
per day. This has
brought forth a
protest, because the specifications were supposed to call
for a $3 wage. There is nothing
new in a firm of contractors seeking to wriggle out of paying the
wages they are supposed to pay,
But one of them—Mr. King—
who must be the bright boy of
the family, brings forward a
very naive argument to support
their case. It sounds so ingenuous that we ahould be genuinely
disappointed to hear that he did
not wear a neat little black velvet sailor suit with a spotless
white laee-work collar to harmonize with his guileless argument.
•      •      •      •
This is what he is reported tb
have said, by the faithful scribe
who interviewed him on behalf
of the "Provinoe."
As proof that the reduction was warranted, Mr.
King says that no labor
trouble has occurred since
notice was given, no men
having left from that cause
and no strikes being threatened.
The real reason why no labor
trouble has occurred—and Mr.
King knows it—is that Central
Park and the whole of South
Vancouver, is full of men with
wives and children literally des
titute and starving. By this we
mean that they are actually
wanting bread and boots and
clothing, for we know whereof we speak. Men from that district have enlisted with the deliberate purpose of having their
families cared for by the War
Belief committee, Because they
have had no wirk for months,
and have no prospects of getting
any. It is that condition which
is making these men swallow the
impositions of the contractors.
And it is that condition which
the contractors have taken ad
vantage of to force the wagei
down so as to send the profits
up. The strength of the contractor is derived from the empty stomachs of women and children. They do not scorn to take
advantage of that. But if impudent hypocrisy can be made to
furnish an excuse to cover the
real reason they are glad to
use it,
FBIDAY.. .'. ..NOVEMBEB 20, 191
ing if  such
adopted.
a  course is to  be
It seems to us that an expert
sewer cleaner is far more important to the general social welfare
than some of the barnacles which
have fastened themselves on to
the civic pay roll in late years.
As long as their salaries could be
preserved at the cost of reducing
the common laborers' wages to a
dry bread level, no word was
heard from them. Now they are
well to the front with arguments
galore about the price of living.
But they might just as well swallow the pill. The outlook is decidedly chilly for them, with the
hatchet abroad in the land on all
sides. The'present administration will not save tthem. And
certainly if that office-hungry aggregation which calls itself the
Civic Reform league climbs into
the city hall next January, they
may fare even worse than a reduction in salaries. Meantime, they
shew the real color of their so-
called patriotism by announcing
that they will no longer make contributions to the fund for maintaining the wives and children of
those gone to the war, some of
whom went because that was the
only way of saving their families
from starvation during this winter.
UNION
RESISTS
SLUMP
THE WOES
OF THE
HIOHER-UPS
»ALARY REDUCTIONS FOR
► all civic officials, as announced at ■ last Monday
night's meeting of the city council, has caused quite a consternation among the
more highly paid
employees of the
oity. Men who
have had nice fat
pay envelopes for
years seem to be the ones making
the most complaint. During boom
times they received substantial
increases, altogether out of proportion to those made in the
wages of city workmen. When
the wage of the latter was put up
to $3 for eight hours it was considered a big step, but now, with
half time the rule all round, they
make a monthly wage of $33, and
it will take a good deal of argument to shew why officials on $100
per month and upwards—a long
way up some of them—Bhould not
bear some of the cost of economiz-
B.O. MUNICIPAL BONDS
FOR SAFETY, STABILITY
AND ATTRACTIVE INCOME.
\ps2iy
Municipal Bonds tre exposed to the criticism of every ftnsnclsl
Journs], yet lt Is noticeable that B. O. Municipal Bonds, although
they yield large returna, have never been adversely criticised.
Buy from a responsible Company that has carefully scrutinised
the Investment. ,
We offer selected Bonds In amounts from $100 np to yield
fl%% to 1% that are unquestioned and the prices right.
Canadian Financiers Hoist Company
HEAD OFFICE 630 HASTINGS ST. VV.     VANCOUVER. B.C.
Patrick Donnelly-General Mmnjen
A  FAVORITE' ARGUMENT
of some academic   economists, and a, following who
are mentally either to indolent or
ill-equipped to observe and think
and     form     an
opinion   of   their
own, is that wages
cannot possibly
avoid falling when
the labor  market
is over-supplied.   The contention
is upheld in all sincerity by many
of those who believe that the labor union is of no economic value.
It is also seized upon as a plausible excuse by some, to avoid payment of dues, and other obligations incidental to membership in
a labor union.   The contention is
true where workers   are not or:
ganized.   It is partly true where
they are partly   organized.   But
where they are 100 per cent. or.
ganizedr-or thereabouts—it is not
true.   That percentage, if maintained, can and does keep wages
up in face of unemployment.
*.'    •      •      •
The Typographical union here
and throughout Canada, is an instance of this.   With practically
every printer in the union, wages
have not   fallen   in   that trade.
Nearly every other union has suffered reductions, but the printers
have not, although a larger portion of their members are out of
work than ever before in this city.
The  well-high  perfect organization among the printers enables
them  to  help  the  unemployed
member by financing his journey
to some other locality where there
is a demand for printers.   Many
believe the printers are clannish
and exclusive, all of whieh may or
may not be true. But the point is,
that their weekly wage envelopes
are proof  that  with a high en-,
ough degree of organization the
price of the particular commodity
known as a printer ean be maintained in face of a falling demand
for that commodity.   The practical value of labor organization is
too obvious for them to believe
that the day of the labor union is
over.
at all. Particularly if they were
working women with an intelligent grasp of the real and underlying cause of war. All the commercial prestige in the world
would not weigh as much with
them as the lives of their children.
Women bear children. Men only
kill them. Wherein lies all the
difference.
OONE OF THE MOST democratic of countries is "Finland, which is politically so
far ahead of Canada that it has
women members of Paliament.
And to prove that
WHERBTHE democracy and
FINDLANDER8 {;U*tu*;e «° £,an,d *
OOME FROM hanf Vt_aaA
awards prizes of
$300, $450, $600
and $1,200 every year to the most
gifted of its citizens in arts and
letters.
•       •       a       •
Recently it bestowed a pension
of $1,000 a year on its leading
composer, Jean Sibellius, and
while that sort of thing is done in
other lands, the Finns, who are
only a small nation, trampled under the iron heel of Russia, do it
with an enthusiasm the biggest
and best-off nations cannot match.
Russia's assurance to Finland that
in return for her support in the
war she will be given more freedom in matters of self-government is no more than the impudent mockery of a tyrant too
busy elsewhere.
o
WOMEN
WORKERS
IN ENGLAND
This league
workers   in
THOSE   WHO   THINK  the
cradle and the cook-stove
are the beginning and the
end   of   woman's   possibilities,
must be getting a shock just now
which  will   open
women *eir       Wt-it
IN WAB * ey   Bre  not  t0°
AND PEACE tWAfe en-*™*-
ed with barnacles
of stupidity. In.
France practically all the men
but the very oldest are either in
the war, or preparing to go
there. But the national services
of that country, outside the war
area, are not at a standstill.' Railways, postal service, street cars,
industrial plants, agriculture,
hospitals, and a hundred and one
other activities, are still being
maintained. Women are doing
it all, and from accounts of'
travellers are doing it well, too,
in spite of the supercillious contentions of those who claim that
women have no aptitude for anything outside the four walls of a
house.
•      •      •      •
To read of the way in which
big hospitals "manned" entirely
by women, aro handling thousands of wounded a week, must
be disturbing to those conservative old saw-bones who have resisted the entry of women into
the. profession on the ground
that they were not suitable for
such work. And the same with
respect to every one of the manifold activities into which women
have been foroed by the misfortune of war. If women are suitable to oarry the burdens of the
war, what logical reason is there
why they should not have their
public say in times of peace, be
it politically or otherwise t Indeed the chances are all in their
favor that, with wider political
powers in peace times, wars would
RGANIZATION OF the women workers  in England
took place a little over SO
years ago.  It was a trades union
organization and was the   direct
forerunner of the
Women's Protecting   and    Provident league formed by Miss Emma
Smith    in    1871.
vas  principally for
printing and allied
trades, and was chiefly for insurance against sickness.   It   seems
strange to read that the leaders of
the movement at the time, and for
some years after its inception, disclaimed all desire to control or influence* legislation,  In 1886, however,   Clementine  Black,   Lady.
Dilke   and   Gertrude   Tuckwell
came actively forward in the management of affairs, and the scope
of the organization was materially
increased.   The National Federation of   Women   Workers   was
formed in 1906.
• V • .- •
Speaking just prior to the outbreak of war Miss Mary Mac-
arthur said that women's *work
was badly paid beeause women
workers were badly organized,
and women workers were badly
organizd because they were badly
paid. That it was, in fact, a vicious circle.. In England two-
thirds of the girls between the
ages of 15 and 20 ire wage earners; more than half of those between the ages of 20 and 25, and
one-third of those between the
ages of 25 and. 35 also work for
payment. Ten per cent, of the
married women and 30 per cent.
of the widows'work for money.
• t      •      •
In England 36 per oent. of the
women workers are domestic servants; 15 per cent, are in the
clothing trade; 14 per eent. in textile work; 10 per cent, in food,
tobacco, drink and lodging-house
employment; 7 per cent, among
the professional classes; and 2 1-2
per cent, follow commercial careers. . With this army of women
workers $3.25 is the average
weekly wage, while one-fifth of
them get less than $2.50 per week,
career in deference to the call of
a higher duty.
The Dominion Trust company!
It did.   Now it wishes it hadn't.
The flrst thing the Rockefeller
investigation board should inves-
tigate is Rockefeller.
No one is more zealous for national honor than the man who
wants to sell armor plate.
Many a poor slave who, for the
flrst time in his life became a
property owner during the boom,
is now beginning to develop
very definite views about "the
risks of capital."
We are continually hearing of
inventions whioh will revolutionize warfare. They all amount to
filing the tiger's tee.th a little
sharper. One of these days, perhaps, it will occur to somebody
that the easiest and least expensive plan would be to pull the teeth
out.
It is announced that the Colorado Fuel & Iron company paid no
dividend this year. The gross
earnings of the company, as
shown at the annual meeting of
the corporation officials, Rockefeller's figureheads in Denver,
decreased 50 per cent, compared
to the previous year. "Gross
earnings" is about right.
We hear much in these days
about the break-down of the supposed international working-class
understanding, But when all the
hard and cynical things have been
said .on that score, it at least presents as edifying and creditable a
figure as the churches do in connection with the conditions in Europe to-day.
Vancouver school trustees are
insistent that the children shall be
gathered round the flag-pole every Monday and Friday to sing
patriotic songs. It would be a
good thing if they shewed the
same insistence in finding out how
many children come to school
these mornings without breakfast. Also how many have to stay
away from school because they
have no boots.
PROVINCIAL UNIONS
B. C. FEDERATION OP LABOB-
Meets ln annual convention ln January. Executive officers, 1914-15:' President, A. Watchman; vlce-preaidenta, W.
P. Dunn, Job. H. McVety, G. H. Fraser,
J. W. Gray, H. Knudson, J. J. Taylor, B.
Simmons. Seoretary-treasurer, A. S,
WellB, Box 1638, Victoria,  B. C.   .
NEW WESTMINSTER,  B. C.
NEW WESTMINSTER TRADES AMD LABOR  Council—Meets  every seeond and
fourth Wednesday at 8 p. m. in Labor hall.
Preildent, H, Knudson; flnanolal aeeretary,
R. A. Stoney; general aeeretary, W. B,
Maiden. P. O, Box 084. The nubile ia in*
vited to attend. t
PLUMBERS AND STEAMPITTERS' LOOAL
No. 495—Meeta every aeoond and fourth
mmtq of month tn Laoor ball, 7:80 p. m,
Preaident, D. Webster; necretary, A. McLaren.    P. O. Box -066, New Weatmiutar,
VICTORIA, B. C.
VICTORIA TRADES AND LABOR OOUNOIL—Meeta firat and third Wedneaday,
Labor hall, 781 Johnston atreet, at 8 p. m.
President A. 8. Wells; aeeretary, Thos. t.
Mathlson, Box 802, Victoria, B. O.
KIMBERLEY MINERS' UNION, NO. 100,
Western Federation of Miners—Meets
Sunday evenlnga ln Union hall. Preaident,
Alex. Wilson; secretary-treasurer, J. W.
Stewart, Klmberley. B. 0.        .
VANCOUVER UNIONS
TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL
Meeta flrat and third Thursdays. Ex
cutlve board: Jas. H. MoVety, president
Frank Estinghauser, vice-president; Oeo
Bartley,   general   seoretary,   210   Labo
Temple;  Miss H. Gutteridge, treasurer
Fred A.  Hoover, statistician: sergean
at-arms,   John   Sully:   G.  Curnock,
Knowles, W. R. Trotter, trustees.
LABOR TEMPLE COMPANY, LTD-
„ Dlieotors: Fred. A. Hoover, J. H
McVety, Jamea Brown, Edward Lothian
James Campbell, J. W. Wilkinson, R. i
Pettlplece, John MoMlllan, Murdoch Mc
Kensle, F. Blumberg, H. H. Free
Managing Dlreotor, J. H. MoVety, Root
ALLIED   PRINTING  TRADES    COUN
OIL.—Meets second Monday In th
!"°ntlU,  Jf™^*1""!''  G*0'  Mowat:  secre
tary, F. R. Fleming, P.O. Box 66,
BAKEBS' AND CONFECTIONERS' LOOAI
No. 46—Meeta eecond sn
fourth Saturdays at 7:8
p. m. Preaident, H. 8. Lei
worthy; corresponding so
retary, R. J. Adams: bas
nesa agent, J. Blaok. no:
330 UTmr Tempi" *
BARBERS'    LOCAL   No.    120.—MEET
„ m"*°?Rj.iT,,,fdV in eaoh """>"> »•
ft "ll  p,r,e»l'l''"it. 3. Bruce: reecorder,
E. Herrltt; secretary-buslncss agent,
u'n,S!rk,1a!;t' fiVf at, Labor temple
Hours: 11 to 1; 6 to 7 p.m.
BARTENDERS'   LOCAL   No.  676,-OFl
lice, Room 101 Ltbor Temple. Meat
flrat Sunday of each month. Preslden
F. F. Lavlgne; flnanclal aeoretary, Be,
W. Curnook, Room 101, Labor Templ*^
BRICKLAYERS' AND MASONS'
" ' and Srd T
President,
—Meets every Iat and Srd tfuesdi
> 907. President, Jat
apondlng aeoretary, w.
68; flnan--■
8  p.m.,  Room "807.
Haalett; correspond.... „„,.„„,,„  ,
Dagnall, Box SS; flnanolal aeoretary, 1
R. Brown; bualneaa agent, W. s. Ba
nail, Room 218. ■
BROTHERHOOD   OP   BOILEB    MAKER
and Iron Ship   Builders   and   Help.!
of Amerlcs, Vanoouver   Lodge   No.   161-
Meeta  Brat  and   third  Mondaya,   S       ^^
Preaident, P. Bsrolsy,   8S8   Cordova
seoretary, A. Fraaer, list Hows street.
In the heart ol ihe retail district.
nreprpol and modem in every respect.    	
unexcelled European plan, $ I to $3 per day.
FREE AUTO BUS MEETS ALL TRAINS. Omed ass*
ba The Provindil Holda Company, Limited.
HOWARD I SHfEHAM. Ma
The American Federation of
Labor, at its convention which
has closed this week,-went on record as opposing war. It was
supposed to be speaking on behalf
of its 2,000,000 membership. In
similar fashion have the great industrial and political organizations of European workers recorded themselves for the past twenty
years. Now they are killing eaeh
other. There is something wrong
which will require more than mere
resolutions to set right.
The destroyers of the architectural beauties of Louvain and
Rheims have been lustily con
demned. Compare their work
with that of the builders of the
great manufacturing towns of
Britain. Think of the Black
Country, Sheffield, Leeds, the cotton towns of Lancashire, the cast
end of London, and many other
industrial centers. Which of these
two is the greater violation of artistic sense? A dispassionate
judge, with the necessary technical and aesthetic knowledge
would find his job a somewhat embarrassing one. There is something paradoxical about a civilization which tolerates the slum
land-lord, the rack-renter and the
tenement blook, railing against
the destruction of ancient architecture.
The civic reform league—or
whatever it is that mob of motley
municipal misfits call themselves
would have been minus at least
one parson if he could have landed the job of relief officer which
has just been created. Assiduous
lobbying and numerous broad
hints that he would not think of
running for the mayoralty if he
got the job, killed his chances of
support in a quarter where he felt
such hints would prompt a deBire
to trade the job in return for possible opposition definitely withdrawn. If his flock could have
heard the opinions expressed by
him on that occasion, with respeot
to his ministry, some of them
might have experienced a change
of heart towards the gentleman,
— who doubtless, like so many ott
be less frequent, and perhaps not | ers, is sacrificing a most brilliant
More evidence of hard timeB:
Boston, Nov. 2.—The executioner at the Charlestown
State's Prison has   notified
the warden that on account of
hard times, he will reduce his
price for electrocuting condemned prisoners.   It is believed that he is not seeking
to   stimulate   business,   but
rather to preclude his substitution by a cheaper man.
Why not an executioners' union?   Are the hangmen afraid of
the electrocutors infringing their
jurisdiction claim?
Says the News-Advertiser of
last Tuesday:
The news that the heir to
the Throne had been permitted to carry out the royal tra-
' dition as an army leader has
been received with great satisfaction by the newspapers,
' which express the belief that
it will stimulate recruiting.
No such stimulus to enlistment
will be needed here as long as unemployment is as rampant as it is
now. Men who are dead broke,
who have applied for enlistment
and been informed that no more
men are required, are visiting the
Labor Temple daily asking for ad.
vice and information as to chanoes
of obtaining employment,
Joe Martin—ex very nearly everything that a politician can be
—says he would like to know
what the labor organizations
think of him as a candidate for
the mayoralty. There is a slang
term used to describe the effervescent enthusiasm of the inexperienced. It is known as "going
off at half-cock." Our gushing
days are over and we think it preferable to adopt the plan of Joe's
late chief and "wait and see."
All in good time, if it appears
that there is any considerable
number of people in the city who
take him seriously, we will endeavor to express an opinion of
Joe's political merits. But this is
not the psychological moment.
Call again later, Joe.  ■
Phone: Fairmont 810
Patterson & Chandler
Manufacturer! of '
MONUMENTS
Vaults, Curbing, Etc
Ofllce and Worka:
Cor. 16th Ave. and Main St.
Branoh Ofllce: '40th A Fraaer Avea.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
City Auction ud Commission Co.
Cash paid for homes and suites
of furniture or Auction arranged.
Satisfaction seersnteed. prompt
settlements.
ARTHUR B. BBfOHElT
Smyths and Granville Streeta
Phona Say. 107*
SOUTH WELLDTOTON
80BEENED LUMP
COAL
$6.5o
In ION LOIS, DOTAL LIMITS
Phona" Seymour 8930
60S PBNDBE STEEET
DOMINION FUEL CO.
COOKS, WAITERS AND WAITBES8B
Union—Meeta flrat Frldav in eaeh mont
8:80 p. m., Ubor Temple. W. E. Walks
bualneaa representative. Offlee: Eoom SO:
Ubor Temple. Hours: 9 a. m. te 10:80:
to 3:30 and 5 p. m. to 6:00 p. m.   Com
§entent   help   furnished   on   snort    notioi
hone Sey. 8414.
DISTRICT    COUNCIL
meets in room
OF   CARPENTER
Ubor Temple, i
ond and fourth Thursday of eaeh month.
Preaident, 0. H. Hsrdy; secretary
---"■ treMarW[. Wi T> Taylor.   "
P. L. Barrett; iressnrar, w. T. Tsvlor.
osl No. 317 meets   flrat   and   third   Hon
day of eseh month, and Local 8047 mssl
flrst snd third Tuosdsy of each month.     ^^
ELECTRICAL WORKERS, LOOAL NO. II
.. —-nests room 801, Ubor Temple, ever
Mondsy, 8 p. m. Presldsnt, Dave Plat
vicepres ldent, II. Sander: rseordlng a*
retsrr, Roy Elgsr, Ubor Temple; flnsnell
secretary and business agent, E. E. Morrlaoi
room 307, Ubor Temple.
ELECTRICAL WORKERS, LOOAL NC
.... i2l. 'Im'-"" Men)—Meeta flnt an
third Mondaya of each month. Room 101
8 p. m. Preaident, H. R. Van sickle: ri
mrdlng secretary, J. M. Campbell; hue
ness agent, F. L. Eatlnghausen, Room lOf
HODOARRIERS, BUILDING AND OOMHOl
.v. ^Sfl™"' J"''"*'! No- «8—Meets flrst anl
third Friday ot saeh month, Labor Tamphl
Presldsnt, Oeorge Gibson; sserstary, Osorn
Hsrrlaon, room 330, Labor Temple. All Ian
orers Invited to meeting.
MACHINISTS, NO. 183—MEET8 SEOON
. ind I?urlh rtiar* «• • P. B. President]
A. R. Towler; recording sserstary, *f
flnanolal sserstary, J. H. MoVotl
Brookes;
MOVING PICTURE OPERATORS, Lol
, est 848 I. A. T. 8. E.—Meets flnt SutT
day of eseh month, Ubor Ted
pie, I p.m. President H. C. Roddan:
retary-treaaurer, L. B. Goodman; .—
cording aeeretary. A, O. Hansen; bus!
ness agent, G. R. Hamilton. offld
Room 100, Loo Bldg.   Tel. Sey. 8045.
MUSICIANS' MUTUAL PROTBCTIV
Union, Looal No. 141, A. F. of M.J
Meeta. sscond Sunday of eaoh montll
noma 38-80, Williams Building, 418 GraM
vllle atreet. ■ Preaident, J. Bowyer; vlcl
president, F. English: seoretary, H.
Braafleld; treaaurer, W. Fowler.
OPERATIVE
TIONAL
Meets   every
PLASTERERS'     INTERNj
ASSOCIATION,   No.   S3 ■
flrst   and   third . Wsdnssdt
MTNAKD'S LINIMENT CURES
DIPHTHERIA
COLUMBIA
OPTICAL PARLORS
Urns P. Mcintosh
Eyesight Specialist
ui oianville mttr
Seymaur 7071
SYNOPSIS OF COAL MINING RIQU-
LATIONS
Coal mining rlghta of tha Dominion,
In Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,
the Tukon Territory, the Northwest Territories and in a portion of tha Province
of Britlah Columbia, may ba leased for
t term ef twenty-one years at an annual
rental of tl an aore. Not more than
'1,860 urea will ba leased te one appll-
-ant.
Applications for leaae muat bo made by
tho applicant In person to tha Agent or
Sub-Agent ot the dlstriot In which tha
rlghta applied for ara situated.
In surveyed territory the hu	
aectione, or legal aubdlvla
*    »-
be
yed territory the land must he
  by aectione, or legal subdivisions of ssouons, and In unaurveyed  ter
rltory   the tract  applied   ...  .
staked by tha applicant himself.
Bach application muat be aocompanlsd
by a fee of IS, whloh will be refunded If
the rlghta applied tor are not available,
but not otherwise. A royalty shall be
paid on the merchantable output of the
mine at tha rate of Ave centa per ton.
The penon operating the mine shall
furnish the Agent with sworn returns
accounting for tha full quantity of merchantable ooal mined and pay the royalty thereon.   If the ooal mining rlghta
are  not  being operated,  auch'returna
ahould be furnished at leaat once a year.
belnt
-_ a y<
The lease will Include the coal mining
rlghta only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available
surfaos rlghta may be considered necessary for tne working of the mine at the
rate of 110 an acre.
For full Information application ahould
be made to the Seoretary of the Department of the Interior, Ottawa, or to any
Agent or Sub-Agent of Dominion Lands.
W. H. CORT,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N. B.—Unauthorised publication ot this
advertlsemen' will not be paid for—30680
In the month in room 801, Labor Temp?
Preaident, A. Hurry: oolnspondlng seorstar
P. Sumpter, 1880 Twenty-thlrd avenue esa
flnanclal secretary, D. Seott, 677 Slehai
Btreet; treaaurer,   L.   Tyson.
PAINTERS',. PAPERHANGERS', ANl
Decorators', Local 191—Meets eve*
Thursday, 7.80 p.m. President, H. Granl
flnanclal secretary, J. Freckleton, lOl
Comox street; recording secretary, 1
Dowding, 881 Howe atreet. Buelnel
agent, James Train, Room 803, Labi
Temple.	
PATTERN    MAKERS'    .LEAGUE
NORTH AMERICA.—Vancouver _.,
vicinity. Branch meets 1st and 3rd Prl
days at Labor Temple, room 108, RobeiL
C. Bampson, Pres., 747 Dunlevy Ave!
Jos, G. Lyon, flnanolal secretary, 17f
Grant atreet; J. Campbell, according aeo]
retary, 4668 Argyle atreet.	
STEREOTYPERS' AND BLECTROT.
era' Union, No. 88, of Vancouver l
Vlotoria—Meeta   second   Wednesday
eaoh month, 4 p. m., Labor Temple. ~
dent. Chu, Bayley; recording eecr
A. Birnle, co. "Newo Advertiser."
BTREET AND ELECTRIC RAILWAf
Employees, Pioneer Division No, 10.
—Meets Labor Temple aecond and fourn
Wednesdaya at 3 p.m., and first an/
third Wednesdays, 8 p.m. Presided
W. H. Cottrell; recording sscretarl
Albsrt V. Lofting, 2661 Trinity street
flnanclal secretary and business agenfl
Fred. A. Hoover, 2409 Clark Drive.
STEAM  ENGINEERS,   INTERNATIONj
al Looal 187—Meeta every Wednesday
I p. m„ room 204, Lahor Temple. Flnan*!
clal secretary, B. Prendergut, room 816,f
TAILORS'   INDUSTRIAL   UNION
ternatlonal). Local No. ITS-
(IN|
Meeting!
held first Tuesday In each month, 8 p. ml
Preaident, Miss H. Gutteridge; recon"
seoretary, C. MoDonald, Boi 101; tl
clal sec., K, Paterson, P. O. Bos 608.
THEATRICAL STAGE EMPLOYEES. LOl
CAL No. 116—Meets sscond Sunday ol
eseh month at room 304, Ubor Templo!
President, H, Bpesrs; recording aeoretsryl
Geo. W. Allln, P. O. Boi 711, Vancouver.
TYPOORAPHIOAL    UNION,    NO.    136-
Meeta last Sunday at saeh month at L
i.   Preaident, R, P, Pettlplece; vlospresU
 i W. 8. Molsgsr: aeerolary-trouunr, "■
H. Neelanda, P. 0. Boi 66.
Phone Yonr Printing Order
 —TO	
SEYMOUR 4490
More Light and Better Light for
the Home
USB TUNGSTEN LAMPS.
Thla lo idvlsad at th* Tungsten Lamp gives three tlmea the
•mount of light of • carbon limp on tho tame consumption of
current.
USE CONTINUOUS WISE DRAWN FILAMENT LAMPS.
This typo Is th* only class of Tungsten Lamp you (hould un. Don't
fall to aak for It whan you buy Tungsten*. It boar* th* urn* relation to othtr typee of Tungstens a* doe* tl]* beat grid* of steel to
WE CARRY AT OUR SALESROOMS A PULL LINE OF THE
BEST TYPE OP TUN08TEN LAMPS AS NOTED ABOVE. OUR
PRICES ARE EXCEPTIONALLY LOW WHEN THE HIOH STAND-
ARD OF OUR LAMPS la CONSIDERED.
A*k our olark to demonstrate tor you th* difference between
Tungeten and Carbon Lamp using th* ume amount sf currant
Cattail ud
Hastings Stteel
B.C. ELECTRIC
tl-WOaariUaSt.
Neat Davie (T-iDAt.. ;."' ;.NOVEMBEB 20, 1914
WlblA PEIJERATIONIST
DAVID 8PENCER, LTD.
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
Stanfield's Uuderwear and
Spencer's Prices
STANFIELD'S NATURAL WOOL UNDERWEAR—Medium weight,
elastic rib; a very popular line—
Sises to *S  ,  11.91
Siaea 11 to 50   .....§1.76
Combinations, aises to 43     18.60
STANFIELD'S LOOSER UNDERWEAR—Hesvy grey.    Sises to U
.,;..;.. ;.  fi.S6
STANFIELD'S HEAVT WEIGHT NATURAL LLAMA WOOL UNDERWEAR—Per Garment ,   61.78
STANFIELD'S CREAM LLAMA WOOL ELASTIC BIB UNDERWEAR—Hesvy weight.   Per garment      88.00
Combinations  '.  $6.00
STANFIELD'S FULL WEIGHT NATURAL WOOL UNDERWEAR—
     .. 61.60
Combinations. -18.00
STANFIELD'S    HEAVT    LOGGER    UNDERWEAR—Bias    Lsbel
     81.T8
STANFIELD'S BLACK LABEL—Hesvy weight, pure wool underwear  88,00
STANFIELD'S SILK AND WOOL UNDERWEAR-Orsam, msdltun
weight.   Per garment  .. 68.00
Combinations  $6.00
STANFIELD'S HEAVT WEIGHT WOOL UNDERWEAR—Bed label
11.10
3,00
David Spencer Limited
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
VANCOUVER
City Market
MAIN STREET
APPLES
Are now at their best and cheapest. Ybur choice of
No. 1 Apples at $1.00 per Box. Cooking Apples all
varieties very low prices.
POTATOES
Potatoes are now at their best for winter storing. Highland, well graded, 85 cents per Sack.
DRESSED POULTRY
Prices are very low this season, also butter and eggs
Auction Sales are Held
Every Tuesday and Friday* at 10 a.m.
SPECIALS EVERY SATURDAY
T"«DC   i'6_}\  MARK
- ■>£"i"- -
Braids
Best
Coffee
Did You Get Yours
This Morning?
BRAID'S
BEST
COFFEE
WM TURNER
906 Granville St
Neat la lh* Marital
-DEALER IN-
New and second-hand China, Crockery, Furniture,
Hardware and Stoves. Furniture moving and shipping. Telephone us when you have furniture for
sale. Highest prices paid.  .
TELEPHONE SEYMOUR 3745
26% OFF ALL TRUSSES THIS MONTH
RED STAR DRUG STORE.
I Cordova Street West . Vancouver, B. 0.
Further the Hems Indastry Movsnsnt by haviai
Ibis label appear ea yonr printed natter.. It stands
(er feed workmanship, food dtlsensalp, decent
wanes and tbe np-eulMUf ef tbe amy.
allied nnmro tbadhs
Composed et Tjpempnical Oolon, Web Prosimsa's Union Printing Pressmen's Dnlon,_Prsis Asslstantt' Onlon^ Btsrsotjpsrs' and mectrotjpers' Union,
nana  wuawi, x-naa a»u.««um    wu.v«,  Hn..
Bookbinders' Union, Pnoto-eniravors' Union.
I Do Not Practice "Hurry-up" Dentistry
Ths Mouth
and tht
Health
Tht HiW
SUntUrd.Butk
Bldf;. Richards
ud HMtinp
Sseond floor
Bntiueo
Bom 918
Phono 807.
4.6.7.9
■VI
TWBNTT-nVB PER CENT. PISCOTOT TO ALL UNION
MEN OB THBIB FAMZLIBB
"The Last Word
  ln Dentistry"
"HUBBT-TTP," "cut-rate," and ilipihod dentlitry It
distasteful, to toy ihe lent, to people of refinement. In iuch
tn important matter at letting the mouth In proper condition
to prepare the food for the ttomaoh. onr the highest skill,
the most Improved methodi and the belt materials ihould be
eontldtred.
ONLY the moit coniclentloui cire and tho moit iclentlflo
methodi are employed In my offlee. Mr "Nature Teeth" art
worthy luetwiiore tb Nature's own. My gaarantv la plain
and sincere. I charge nothing for nomination and advloo. Before 1 established my own ofiet X waa In demand at tht high-
eat salary aa a ikllled operator.
"TOU SUITER BO PAW" OUABAMTBBD
I HEREBY GUARANTEE that all dental work
performed by mo will ba absolutely palnltaa. If tht
•lightest twinge of pain ll tzperteneed by tht patient no money need be paid to me, or It any haa
been paid it wUl bt Instantly refunded by me.
I furfer guarantee that all erown or bridge work
or fllling will remain ln llrit-olaii condition for m
Serlod of TEN YEARS. If any of my work beeomea
■teeth* during that Umt I will replace It tbioluttly
FREE or CHARGE
Dr. HALL, 'The Modern Dentist"
T
Big Committee Appointed
to Arrange for Civic
Election Campaign
All the Reports Show No
Better Prospects for
the Unemployed
New Westminster, Nov. H.—Begular
meeting of New Westminster Tradea
and Labor oouncll held with Pres. H.
Knudsen in the chair. Minutes of
previous meeting adopted with amend,
ment to Del. Yates', statement as to
wages paid on Oreat Northern depot
being 16%cents per hour, instead of 16
cents, and of Del. Cropley's statement
as to increase of wages of men on the
Heaps' Engineering Co.'s plant being
from SO to 70oents. per day instead of
those amounts as wages per hour.
Communications—From Typo. Union,
No. 122 urging unionists to write to the
Kellogg Co. at Battle Creek, Mich.,
urging them to have the union label
placed on their printing. On motion
of Del. Jardine it waa referred to the
local unions and the secretary'was in-
structed to the Kellog people. From
Independent Labor Party of Hamilton,
Ont., seeking funds for political .campaign.   Filed.
Credentials—For   A.   J.   Oxenbury,
Typos vice H. Gibb, resigned. Beoeived
and delegate obligated and seated.
Committee .Reports.
Del. Maiden reported as impromptu
delegate to the Progressive asociation,
giving figures of building work in the
city and conditions in general.   Filed.
Special Committee—Del. Stoney favored a civic campaign committee and
entertainment committee be joined together and call for a general meeting
of organised and unorganized labor to
inaugurate a civic campaign.
Report received and recommendation
adopted, the following being named as
the committees Stoney, Typos; Dodd,
Street Bailway Employes; Feeney,
Cigarmakers; J. B. flynn, Engineers;
J. W. Hunter, sinters; Jameson, Bartenders; Lewis, Pumbers; Parlett, Barbers; Cropley, Moulders; Pratt, Electrical Workers; Matthews, U. B. of
Carpenters; Sell, Brewery Workers; Breacher, Musicians; Bogers, Hod
Carriers; Ivlson, Timber Workers.
Grievance Committee—Del. Stoney
said his committee had not seen fit to
take up the matter of tbe Brewery
Workera and the Bartenders as they
did not think they should but in. Report received and committee commended for the stand taken. '
Reports from Unions: Typos—Another cut, losing one delegate, H. W.
Smith; otherwise about the same.
Plumbers—Dull. Bartenders—Five or
six out of work and some half time.
Cigarmakers-1—No improvement; one
shop laid off last week some working;
now working those laid off last time.
U. B. of Carpenters—No improve-
ment. Browery Workers—Pretty quiet;
two men working full time, two men
working full time, the rest two days a
week. Moulders—Pretty bad; about
a third of the men in the olty working.
Painters—Getting a day here and there.
Who's doing the painting on the Boyal
bank? Engineers — No improvement.
Electrical WorkerB—About all working.
Street Bailway Employees—No change
in the past three weeks. Hod-carriers—
Little doing; about two men working.
New Business
Letter from Bartenders, saying that
their delegate had merely asked a question in the counoll, and had not made a
charge relative to the head brewer superintending construction of a building
at the brewery and thus perhaps keeping a carpenter out of a job; From
the Brewery Workers, protesting
against the action of the council referring the bnrten/ers statement to the
grievance committee, and requesting
the council to reconsider the action, On
motion of Dels. Cropley-Flynn, the action was unanimously rescinded and the
entire ma'tter disposed of. The secretary to notify the parties to that effect.
Dels. Stoney-Maiden—That the T.
and L. council endorse the action of
Aid. Dodd in urging the city counoll to
go into the ooal business and sell it
at cost unless the price here be lowered
to the same as Vancouver. Carried.
Del. Stoney—Notice of motion to
amend constitution bo that ni action
may be taken by the council on charges
against a member of any union until
such union has been given a chance to
defend itself.
Oood and Welfare.
Del. Cropley objected to an article
appearing in the British Columbian,
taking exception to tlie, report as to
Us remarks. He refuted statements as
to wages paid on Heaps company's
plant. He had referred to unorganised
i laborers and not to organiaed labor.
ae had taken up the matter aa to organized labor and had had their wages
raised from 50 to 75-cents per day, as
result of complaints he hod received.
This was the result of organized effort,
ue objected to the statement that he
wanted certain matters taken before
the city council. He did not advocate
the city couneil trying to take charge
of private enterprises. He urged the
reporters to be more accurate.
"Wei
A TEW OFFICE LETTER
EXCERPTS.
MINARD'S LINIMENT CURES
COLDS, ETO.
T, B. CUTHBERTSON & Oo.
Men's Hatters and Outfitters
Three Stores
BERRY BROS.
Agents for
Cleveland Cycles
Tht Bicycle with tha Reputation.
Foil lint of Aoooiaorltt.
Repairs promptly aitcattd.
035 HASTINGS ST. EAST
Phont Highland 896
PANTAGES
Unequalled Vaudeville Means
PANTAQIS  VAUDEVILLE
THRU SHOWS DAILY
MS, 7.J0, S.IS    Seaaen'a Prices!
Matinee, 1Bc; evenings, Ho., tie.
^s»ss^
Union
AND
Porter
 -    Or America JO**
^8k
_mw^-\\m%m_lUai-m\
READINO BOOM.
"... There are many Vancouver
painters in thia district just now; most
of them are managing to secure a meal
ticket at leaat. . . . Enclose herewith
p. o. order for tlM tor renewal. Wish-
ing The Fed. continued and- greater success, I am . ,."—S. Staples, Oakland,
Cal.
"... Enclose price of subscription
for ensuing year. It is scarcely necessary for me to Bay that I am in
hearty accord with your editorial views
on almost all, questions you discuss.
Tour paper should be widely rend by
working men, especially here in Eastern Canada, where European traditions
die hard. I hope and believe that the
present war will-Anally result in breaking suoh leading strings of superstition
as the 'divine right of kings,' a landed
aristocracy and other delusions . that
have cost the human family bo muoh
fruitless suffering. I hope to see a republican Europe emerge from the -existing    carnage."—N.   S,   Moncton,
"Enclosed find p. o. order for *6 from
Silverton Miners' union for yearly subscription for six copies of The B. C.
Federationist"—A. S. MeP., Silverton,
B. 0.
"... I'notice that several labor and
socialist papers are being compelled to
close their doors owing to this damnable
war in Europe, but I trust that the old
Fed. will be able, to tide the crisis over,
although I realize only too well that it
is only by herculean efforts will you be
able to keep the pot boiling this winter. ..."—H. J. MoE., Sydney, N. S, W.
WORE OF LABOB PRESS
A. P. of L. Exeouttve Committee Reports Thereon.
The report of the executive committee of the American Federation of Labor, now in convention at Philadelphia,
Pa., Bays of the labor press of this continent: "The labor press has been the
champion of the workers—the masses
of our people; to speak the right word
At the right time for those bowed by
heavy burdens and weary hearts—the
victims of injustice, heedlessness, greed
and brutality; those whose cause did
not have popular favor. Many of those
who have ungrudgingly given the toil
of heart and mind to the labor press
have found reward only in the consciousness of worthy work worthily
done.
Many a weary hour goes into the preparation of the news columns and the
editorials of each issue. The difficulties are discouraging, but the labor editor knows that overy bit of truth, however small or fragmentary, that he Ib
able to inject into the thought material of the public is an entering wedge
to blast away prejudice and misrepresentations. Every effort helps the ultimate purpose—the freedom and the
welfare of humanity.
The labor press has a great work to
perform. ItB business Ib to get before
the people the real news of life—the
truths about living and working. The
metropolitan press is largely a commercial undertaking—for it living and
working' are newspaper materials for
stories that appeal to popular interests.
For the labor press the point is to
make truths about living nnd working
known to everyone: These truths have
power to move men and governments.
The labor press must have support
ond opportunity to accomplish ito purpose. Everyone loyal to the cause of
labor Bhould feel the duty developing
upon him to support financially and
morally the labor press that has done
so much for the cause end can be enabled to do infinitely more."
REOINA LABOB TEMPLE
Unemployed Working In Retain for
Shares
Unemployed unionists of Regina are
working on their new Lnbor Temple,
The Trades hall is being utilized during
the day time ns a carpenters' shop.
Members of tho Carpenters' union are
now buBy making frames and finishing
lumber in preparation for tho building,
which is expected to be ready for occupation before the end of the year.
The bnHcmont hns been dug out, nnd
the footings laid for building. Brick-
laying would hnve started beforo this,
but it has been necessary to wait for
tho brick. Tho labor on the building is
being paid for by the oompany in
shares so that evory man who works
on the job is getting an equivalent for
his labor.
A slight alteration was made in the
original plan which provided for two
halls, one 47x24 nnd one 28x15. The
change was mado in the shape of the
roof, which was originally to have been
a flat one. It will now be a gable roof
and will enable the company to provide
a club room for recreation and rending,
the size of the room being 47x20 feet.
The new hall will be a big improvement on anything the union men in the
city have used in the past, and the directors are to be congratulated on the
progress which has taken place under
their administration.
Mill-workers Reduced.
A delegation of workmen from the
Small & Bucklln's Lumber Mills, New
Westminster, waited on the city oouncll of that city last Monday night to
complain of their wages. The men
claim that their wages had been cut
several times during the past year and
that they are now offered as low as
♦1.15 for a ten-hour day. Some of the
men refused to work for this wage. The
council referred the matter to the labor
and finance committees.
VICTORIA MEIK
OF UNEMPLOYED
LAST SUNDAY
Pres. Watchman, and Sec.-
Treas. Wells of B.C.
P. of L. Spoke.
Government Denounced for
Its Callous Attitude
and Inactivity.
Helped Himself to tha Furniture
"Please, sir," said the maid of the
house, "there is a gentleman here to
see you on business." "Tell him to
take a chair." "0, he's already taken
them all and now he's after the table.
He's from the installment house/'
The unemployed in Vlotoria held a
masB meeting on Sunday, November
IS, in the Variety theatre, at which
there was a good attendance.
A. S. Wells, chairman of the committee presided, and reported to ths,
meeting the work whioh had been done
by the committee, giving brieflly tbe
history ot the movement snd the different proposals which hsd been submitted to the civic and provincial authorities fer the amelorimting of the distress in the city.. He stated thst the
committee had done all that was possible for them to do, unless the unemployed were prepared to do something
for themselves,
A. Watchman then addressed the
meeting , and said in part that while
all Were ready to lay the blame for present conditions on someone else, the
civic authorities blaming the provincial
government and the government blaming the .civic administration or the federal government and the workers blaming all of them, yet the final responsibility rested on the workers themselves.
They could not complain if they did net
get that sympethie support from the
governing bodies which the seriousness
of unemployment warranted, because
they had listened to political promises
and returned men who showed no appreciation of the needs of the people.
It waa not much good advocating eating apples, as the "Dominion department
of trade and1 commerce was doing, if
there would not be some more substantial food offered. Many of them were
living on a single meal a day, and they
wanted to know when there woe to be
a change in conditions. He did not
favor physical force, because that was
ridiculous, and the policy of lunatics,
nor did he advocate hunger parades
because the workers had paraded their
needa too often and had been scorned,
but he urged them to ask and demand
food and not suffer in silence. The
government had promised that they
would assist when the oity could not
cope with the situation, and the time
had arrived when it was necessary for
them to test the reliability of these promises.
George Oliver condemmed the government for giving away the public resources of the province "*to speculators,
and said they must bring home to the
ministry that the time of retribution
was at hand.
On the motion of J. L. Martin a resolution calling on the provincial government to resign as an admission of
failure to meet the situation was adopted unanimously.
It was further decided to ask the
mayor and industrial commissioner to
establish an unemployed fund, the list
of subscriptions to be headed by the
*50 contribution of B. F. Oreen, M.P.
A committee of 12 members, with
power to add to their numbers, wes appointed to 'carry on the work of the
league.
Detroit Street Esllwsymen.
Detroit, Nov. 15.—The Amalgamated
Association of Street and Electric
Railway Employees of America has
212 agreements with as many corporations. The last report of the general
executive board shows that out of eleven strikes, only one was lost. Another
encouraging feature is the statement
that only $13,735 had been paid out in
strike and lock-out benefits during the
six months covered, by the report, tnd
that during the same time over 8,000
new members had been enrolled. Large
numbers of controversies have been
settled either by mediation or arbitration.
MINABD'S LINIMENT CURES
DISTEMPER.
"Everything: But
the Girl" for Your
New Home
At Prlcea and terms to salt
roar pocket-book.
Onr Stook of
FURNITURE
must  be  Hen to  be  appreciated.
Call In aad look ll orar.
Hastings Furniture Co.
Limited
41  HASTINOS STREET WEST
CENTER & HANNA, Ltd
UNDERTAKERS
Refined Service
104* GEORGIA STRUT
One Blook west of Court House.
Uae  of  Modern  Chapel  and
Funeral  Parlors   free   to  all
Patrons
HARRON BROS.
FUNERAL  DIRECTOR* AND
EMBALMERS
Vancouver—Office and Chapel,
1034 Oranvllle St., Phone Sey. StSS.
North Vancouver — Offlce and
Chapel, 122—Bixth St. West, Phone
134.
Mr. Union Man
Are you eating Union-made Bread, are you
helping to maintain the Union Standard of living by
using goods produced by Union Labort
BREWER'S XL BREAD
has the Union Label on every loaf, and in quality
and flavor it is unexcelled.
Phone Highland 573 and we will call at your
house.
BREWER'S XL BAKERY,
Corner 4th Avenue uid Commercial Street
HEALTH Is more to tt desired and is of mote vital Importance te tka
well-being ud hsppinsso of ths individual thsn great riches. Poor
teeth soobst or later mean poor health. To to healthy ws mut has*
ths power to tstlmlltte on food. Before lt ess to stilsiHsted, tt MSI
to thoroughly digested, before It osa to digested tt oust to thom * *
masUfated, sad before lt csn be assMsjted toe nasi hsve good I
with whioh te mssttgite.
Owing to tho stringency of ths mosey market I un offering to do dental'
work st very moderate prices
SUverfffling. $100
Phtinite filling.. •••••••    2 00
Gold Crowns or Porcelaine Crowns.    SOO
Bridge-work, per tooth     5 00
Plates..       ..   10 09
Dr. BRETT ANDERSON
Phone Seymour SMI Offlee:  101 Bank of Ottawa MltUng
WHITE STAR ?=
Portland, He.
rroa Portland
Dee.   1st
Dee.   Mk
Dee. llth
Halifax
lijrnpool
.  ...88. "Arable"—16,000 Tons
.88.  "ZKELAND"—12,000 Tou
  8B. VADEBLAND"—12,000 Tone
88. "Arable," 11,000 tons, /ooo laet low; sanies m. class eabta CW eat
third elsas pssaensera. SB. "Zealand," 12,000; 88. "Vatorlsad," 12,000, carry
Srat, seeond and third, class, operating nnder tbe British PUf •
Oaaadlu facile Tourist Hoeplif Can M HaUTax operated In cennooHs. wtth
livwpool
1«,000 teas.
Ilea Halifax
. Dec.   Srd..
Dec.   ett.
Dee, llth.
WHITE STAB UNS
QnMaUtown
Cedrlc" Deo. eth. New 88.' "Lapland,"
Dee. loth.—88. "Baltic/'
AMERICAN LIMB Liverpool
mnn thi amuioa* flao
FAIT BXP1BSS on CLASS OABIaT (S) SOVIOI 1S.00O-TOV STBAlOtS
Dee. 12th.—88. "61. Paul,"      Dee. 10th.—88. "Mew Tork."'
New Tork
Dee. 2nd.—88.
New Tork
PRIVATE GREETING CARDS MUST BE
ORDERED NOW FOR ENGLISH MAILS
•XMAS OOODS ABBIVINa BVBBT DAT
ALL LINES NOW BHNO SHOWN
Thomson Stationery Co., Ltd.
  vancouvwi ae.
ISTAiLISHID IM
HI HASTING* STRUT WIST
■1ST IN THI WUT
WeL.1
• Proprietor
EUROPEAN FLAN        Prefetch A. EasHala, Manager
HOTEL EMPRESS ■
BBrsiSBr" 235 Hstlinp St E, Vsncower, B. C. SS«WGKS
Hot and Cold Water la
BveryKoom. ISO Rooms
Connected with Baths.
PENDER HOTEL »_>&££•&*
111 FBHPBB SIMM v71W Balfftt SS'SS A
HOTEL REGENT Absolutely Fireproof.   Local and Lonr-Dlstance
nuiDunuuuni  Phone In every Room.Cafe In connection. Ratea
$1.00 per day up.     Attractive Rates to Permanent Guests.
Oottlnibam A Beatty, Proprietors  US Bastlafi Street last
»^=Bg^^gg I       '       Mil..      B^M—^^^—   m
THE POPULAR PRICED, EUROPEAN PLAN   L
HOTEL RITZ   [
VICTORIA, B.C.
FORT ST., AT DOUGLAS
RATES 75e, $1.00, $1.26, $1.50, $2.00
0. J. LOVE JOT, MOR. FREE AUTO BUS
CO., LIMITED
SHOE
MANUFACTURERS
We manufacture every kind of
work shoe, sod specialize is lines
'or minen, railroad cooitrucbon,
togging, etc
VANCOUVER   -   -   B.C
ameweoaaecitLLr rom
xorn a r.miv rntoe
WSSSirnlfi      'MaaaaanmautamiA
mmmst mmmm mm
VANCOUVER  S C
When You Want a
First-Class Beer
—ONE THAT TOU CAN'T BEAT AT ANY PBIOB, UT ANT
COUNTRY, OET BEEB WITH THIB LABEL ON. FINN, HZ
r oh nr ty obntb, "~
BBEWBD AND BOTTLED IN VANOOUYEB BT
VANCOUVER BREWERIES, ltd. PAGE FOUR
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
FBIDAT.. ..  . .NOVEMBEB 80, IBM
WINTER
UNDERWEAR SALE
For Women and
Men
NOWON!
These Values We Are
Offering Are At Cost
And Less
Buy Now
and Save
M 3iirBuisotfsBau(fompam,
\__.  ^)    ' mtamsmw  tat*     imewri aamiota, ataat* aattmty— J
GEORGIA AND GRANVILLE STREETS
MOUNT PLEASANT HEADQUARTERS
For Hardware, Stovei and Rangei—
_ very-thing for the Kitchen
W. R. OWEN & MORRISON      \
Phone Fair. 4*7 3887 Main Btreet
TO READERS OF THE B. C. FEDERATIONIST
I have under formation a Oompany for the purpoie of
breeding Silver Blaok Foxei in captivity in British Columbia.
This industry, after careful investigation in Baitern Canada
and the world's Fur-buying centres, impresses me with iti
almost unlimited pouibilitiei. We already have our Ranch
in going order and have a very fine itock of Foxes, obtained
under mart favorable condition!.
Our company will not be widely advertiied ai but a few
shares will be available to the General Public
If you are intereited drop me a line to Revelstoke, and
X will see that you get a Prospectus when ready.
Very small sums can be inverted.
W. W. LEFEAUX,
(late of Labor Temple Building.) Revelstoke, B. 0.
COAL!!
WHICH WILL YOU
SUPPORT ?
g
The Company which sells
AMERICAN
*   COAL
and Employe
Oriental Labor
The Company which sells
BRITISH COLUMBIA
OOAL
and Employs
White Labor
Fifteen Yean in Vancouver Ooal Trade
WELLINGTON AND COMOX COAL
WHITE LABOR ONLY
MACDONALD MARPOLE CO., Ltd.
Nicholson's Gin
is perfectly pure and palatable
IT'S REFRESHING
AND INVIGORATING
TRY IT FOR YOUR STOMACH'S SAKE.
WILL DO YOU GOOD.
ALL RELIABLE DEALERS SELL IT
BF
B.C.
Where Everything Is at a
Standstill So Far as
Work Is Concerned
The Writer Takes a Trip
Over Grand Trunk
Pacific Railway
[Special Correspondence.]
PRINCE RUPERT, B. C., Nov. 17.—
To the breadwinners of Vancouver and
sister cities—likewise those who have
neither kith nor kin dependent upon
them—who anticipate hie-ing themselves with their blankets to the northern interior of B. C, with a view to
bettering themselveB for the winter,
we would say—"Don'tl"
Prince Rupert is at a standstill as
regards the artisan or laborer. The
few jobs available here on oity or government work from time to time are
reserved for the faithful of the party.
At Pacific, 119 miles east of Rupert,
a small amount of work Ib being performed on the 0. T. P. round-house, and,
with the exception of teams, a scarcity
of which prevailed for a week or so,
the work is being done by "floaters."
Old Hazelton, two miles off railroad,
is dead, being so since the advent of
the railroad. Practically the only excuse for its existence being that the
government offices are situated there
and is a prospectors' outfitting point.
At South Hazelton there is nothing;
one or two large empty buildings stand
as monuments to commemorate the
blasted hopes of a coterie of real es-
taters.
New Hazelton, at which point,is situated the hospital, lies a few minutes
further east by train—alive, that's all,
its inhabitants discussing with an occasional visitor from the Old Town the
relative merits of "jack-rabbit—fried
or boiled."
Smithers Reached
Smlthers, a passenger divisional
point, is the next town east. Here
things loom up a little as regards a
future city. At this point a 12-stall
round-house, 214 feet from center to
center, Ib being erected. About 25 or
30 men are at work—five on pile-driver,
six carpenters and 15 laborers. Carpenters receive 40 cents an hour and
work 10 hours a day; laborers, 20 cents,
10 hours. Strange to Bay, the firm—a
Winnipeg one—find no difficulty in securing laboring men at these figures.
For teams, they pay but $6 a day—man,
wagon and two horses. For this sum
they put in 10 hours and are expected
to take but 30 minutes to feed self and
team. The government for similar work
pays $10, with an hour off for lunch.
The picture show at Smithers is having a hard time of it, likewise the four
Chinese laundries. Two pool halls are
breaking even, having cut aU ways to
do so. Four restaurants are existing
in hopes of better times coming. In
fact, they are the most optimistic of
any business concerns in the north. The
one bank, following the inspector's
visit, recently tightened up its screws,
and it is just quite possible that it may
still use a wrench before the year Ib
out to see if things can be made still
tighter. The hotel is doing pretty well.
Stage nothing. Wood dealers' season
has not commenced. Snow fell for the
first time on November 4th.
The tinsmith iB idle. Rooming houses
not making enough to pay the rent.
Grocerers charge top figures for tea,
flour and the necessities of life.
In a few instances at a couple of
Elaces along the line a hint to the police
aB secured for a business man or mechanic a little cash from those who
would do a bunt out of the country.
At Aldermere, 10 miles further east,
nothing doing—only one barber remains. '
From Prince Oeorge, where there was
a small building boom during the lait
few months, there Ib beginning to drift
in a few to Smithers and way points in
search of work. When questioned as to
where they are bound for, they tell you
Alaska.
Several notable discoveries have been
made in this country in a mineral line
this year, but a shortage of capital,
combined with a deplorable lack of
trails to the several districts, precludes
all possibilities of anything being done
as regards their systematic development.
Unfortunately the owners hold their
property so long, deprive themselves
of so much, and put so much faith in
tbe assay value of a choice specimen,
that when an offer is made by a representative of say $100,000 they order
him off the property and demand
$150,000 . They fall to recognize that
unless it is free milling it is a company
proposition and not for a poor man.
Eggs from Edmonton (small), 40c.
a dozen ; butter, 45c.—a large quantity
finding a ready market. Prices in local
lumber are still around $30 a thousand
for poor stuff. Few good teams are in
the valley—crowbait prevailing at
prices around $350 to $450. The best
price paid of late by butchers for local
pork was 17y0c dressed ; potatoes,
IVjc per lb.; hay $12 a ton; local eggs,
50c; rabbits (from Indians), 15-25c.
each; grouso, 50c. brace; round steak,
30c. per pound; pork and mutton same
price; lemons 30e. per dozen; applea
(good) from Wenatchee 40c. per dozen;
cabbage, 15c. On the whole, root crops
havo done well this year, although the
local market is 'ft limited one . Hogs,
it is believed will ultimately be the
main stock raised in the Valley.
On all sides whenever one discusses
tho cost of living, people will exclaim:
"Back to the land for mine." Comparing prices of necessities and wages obtaining 20 years ago nt Winnipeg,
Man., when Icelanders wero emigrating to the west, one wonders what the
average7 working man of to-day is made
of. He seems to have his backbone
whore his elbow is. Yet at the roundhouse to-day they work for 20 cents an
hour and pay 50 cents a meal and 25
to 50 cents for a bed. Five men working on tho ballast train work for 20
cents an hour and consider that they
made something, because they worked
sixteen hours during tho day, and pay
$5.50 a weok for board and free bunk.
Railroad watchmen employed to
guard bridges have to supply their own
outfit, comprising tent, stove, blankets
and grub for a day of 12 hours. Preference given to those who havo own
Reports to hand from vicinity of Edmonton and Dunvegan on railroad work
give figures of $1.75 a day   as   top
wages. Llllooet, Soda Creek, Quesnel
and Fort George are dead as regards
labor. The P. G. and E. paying $1.75
a day and soaking the men top prices
for tobacco, soap, etc., which is 25
cents each for 10 cents value.
Everything taken into consideration,
the farmers to-day pay the best wages
to laborera, being $50 and board.. In
the,northern interior of B. C, as well
as in Alberta, Saskatchewan and the
dry belt, government laborers get $3.75
for nine hours, and board at cost—divided equally amounting approximately
to 70 cents a day per man.
Workingmen, keep away from the
northern interior of British Columbia.
—unless you have a "pull" with the
government or "stand in" with the
contractors.
FIREMEN'S DILEMMA
A Reminiscence of the Year Nineteen
Hundred and Eleven.
The civic firemen are complaining
bitterly about the cut which is being
made in their wages. Their caso is
one of peculiar interest to organized labor. In order to appreciate the matter properly, it will be necessary to go
into a little history. The wages which
the firemen ore getting now were made
possible by the assistance rendered to
them by the Trades and Labor couneil.
As far back as the beginning of 1911,
the firemen began to agitate among
themselves for increased wages. The
assistance of the council was requested,
and the work of actual organization
was started March 8th, with the aid
of the council. In less than a week,
95 out of 104 men eligible, had joined
the new union. At the meeting of the
Trades and Labor council held April
6th, 1911, credentials for two delegates
from the new firemen's union were received. The delegates wore N. Henderson and N. Lee.' They wore also present at the next meeting. That was the
beginning and the end of the firemen's
connection with organized labor. The
new union had caused something akin
to panic among civic officials and fire
underwriters. Firemen were called on
to the "carpet" by the fire chief, and
requested to disband their union. Finally a committee consisting of the
mayor and two aldermen went over to
argue with them. None of those
Bchemes worked. But at last the civic
authorities agreed to give the increased wages, providing the firemen
would abandon their union and sever
connection with organized labor. They
did so, and got their increased wages.
The episode closed at that, but the
present agitation recalls the incident
which left a distinctly nasty taste behind it.
TRADE UNION  DIRECTORY
Allied Printing Trades Council—F, R.
Fleming, P. O. Box BS.
Bakers—J. Blaok, Room 210, Labor
Temple.
Barbers—C. F. Burkhart, Room SOI, Labor Temple.
Bartenders—Geo. W. Curnoch, Room
208, Labor Temple.
Blacksmiths — Malcolm Porter, View
Hill P. O.
Bookbinders—Geo, Mowat, SIB Dunlevy
avenue.
Boilermakers—A. Fraser. 1161 Howe St.
Brewery Workers—Frank Graham, 2268
12th Avenue West
Bricklayers—William 8. Dagnall, Room
216, Labor Temple.
Brotherhood of Carpenten District Council—F, L. Bsrratt, Room 209, Lsbor Temple.
Hod Carriers, Builder" and common Laborers—Georgo Herriion, Room 220, Lsbor Temple,
ClguriimkuiH—Robt J. Craig, care Kurts
Cigar Factory, 72 Water street.
Cookn, Walters. Waitress™ — W. E.
Walker, Room 206, Lsbor Temple.
Electrical Workers (outside)—E. H. Morrison, Rot-m 207, Labor Temple.
Electrical Workers Onsidej— Room 207;
F. L. Estinghausen, .
Engineers—E. Prendergut, Room 216, Labor Temple.
Granite Cutters—Edward Hurry, Columbia Hotel.
Garment Workers—Mils McRae, Labor
Temple.
Horseshoers — A. C. MaoArthur, City
Heights. B.C.
Lstteroarrlers—Robt. Wight, Dlstriot tl.
Lathers—Victor R. Mldgley,- Box  1044.
Loco. Firemen and Engineers—Jamee
Patrick, 1183 Homer street.
Loco. Engineers—A. E. Solloway, 10S8
Pacific.   Tel. Bey. 8871L.
Longshoremen—Geo. Thomas, 146 Alexander Street
Machinists—J. H. MoVety, Room 211,
Labor Temple.
Musicians—H. J. Brasfleld, Rooms 29-30,
Williams Bldg., 418 Granville street
Marbleworkers—Frank Hall, Janes Road,
Molders—D. Brown, 642 Broadway West.
Moving Picture Operators—L. E. Goodman, Room 100, Loo Building.
Painters—J. Train, Room 803, Labor
Temple.
Plumbers—Room 218 Labor Temnle.
Pressmen—P. D. Edward, Labor Temple.
Plasterers—John James Cornish, 1808
Eleventh Ave. East.
Pattern Makers—J. Campbell, 4860 Argyle Street.
Quarry Workers—James Hepburn, ears
Columbia Hotel.
Railway Conductors—G. W. Hatch, 711
Beatty street
Railroad Trainmen—A E. McCorvllle,
Box 248.
Railway Carmen—A, Robb, 420 Nelson
Street.
WNABD'8 LXNIM?NT OUBEB
GARGET IN OOWS.
PHONE SEYMOTO 0086
\\tttLS/IV(>
BUSINESS
AS USUAL
RENTS  COLLECTED
Principal and Interest
on Agreements for Sale,
Interest on Mortgages,
Etc., Collected
SPECIAL
FACILITIES
Very Moderate Charges
Prompt Settlement
DOW FRASER TRUST CO.
122 Hastings St. West.
Vancouvtr, anil McKay Station,
Burnaby, B.C.
Cloaa at 1 o'clock Saturday.
cx-uiuutitj Union—Cor. Main and Haatinga.
Structural   Iron   Workers—W.   L.   yui.,
Koom *08, Labor Temple.
aiiiiibvuiuia—jamea Kuyburn. P. O. Box
1047.
tiiieuL Metal Workers—H. C. Dougan, Mo.
5, Fifteenth Ave. West
Street Hallway Employees—A. V. Lofting, 2636 Trinity Street.
Stereotypers—w. Bayley, care Province,
Cliy.
Telegraphers—E. B. Pepp,ln, Box 433.
Trades and Labor Council—Oeo. Bartley,
Hoom ulu Labor Temple.
Typographical—H. Neelanda, Box 6fl.
Tailors—0.  McDonald,  Box 508.
Theatrical Stage Employees—Geo. W. Allln.
Box TH.
Tllelayers and Helpers—Evan Thomas,
Labor Temple.
upholsterers—A. Duthle. 1083 Homer Bt.
MINARD'S LINIMENT CO.,  LIMITED.
Sirs,—I bsve used year MINARD'S LINIMENT for the peat 25 yean and whilat I
hsve occasionally ueed other liniments I can
BBfely say that I have never used any eqaal
to yours.
If rubbed between the hands and inhaled
frequently, lt will never fail to care a cold in
the head ln twenty-four boars.
It la alao the cBat for brulaea, apraina, etc.
Yours truly,
J. Q. LESLIE.
Dartmouth,
We are now prepared to accept
orders for delivery of our
Washed Nut Coal
$5 PER TON
Delivered
Thia coal, beeause of its price,
is by no means a small sice, inferior nut eoal, but high grade,
large sized WASHED NUT
COAL for kitchen use
We know what thia coal will
do, having sold it in Victoria
for a number of years We are
therefore'prepared to atand 'behind it and guarantee that it will
give you as good a kitchen Sre as
any high-priced coal you are now
using. If you uae wood, we
guarantee that it will give you a
cleaner, quicker'and more economical kitchen fire than either
cord or mill wood.
Do not take our word for it,
but try it on our'money back
guarantee.
KIRK & CO.
929 MAIN STREET
"86 Years In Victoria."
Seymour 1441
Special
Edison
Phonograph
Outfit, No. 10
$46.80
Outfit Includes eablnet of Famed Osk
beautifully finished, hinged wrer,
very latest hornless type of phono*
graph, giving the purest tonal quality,
new type diamond pointed reproducer.
Powerful spring motor perfectly ad*
justed and regulated. Removable
front and top. Outfit Includes 12 four-
minute Blue Amherol (indestructible)
records of your own selection. Terms
..6.80 cash, balance at the rate of
16.00 per month.
THE
KENT
PIANO CO. Ltd.
SS8 GRANVILLE ST.
J. N. HARVEY'S
4th Anniversary
Clothing
Sale
OPENS SATURDAY
MORNING
JUST FOUR YEABS ago thia week we took over the Johnson-Kerfoot
tt Oo. Olothing Business. Eaeh year we bave marked the Anniversary
with a Big Genuine Bargain Giving Bala, until now, ttu people look
forward to thia as tha Olothing Event of the Season. Be on band Saturday, TBE OPENING DAT.
OVERCOAT BARGAINS
10 OVEBOOATS In Medium Weight
Tweed Begular up to 116,50
ANNIVEESABT SALE PRICE....
$6.65
15   WINTER   WEIGHT,   Convertible
Collars, Tweed Overcoata, Regular
Price up to 122.50.	
4th Anniversary Sale Price, Only
$9.85
8 OVEBOOATS, in Medium and Dark
Tweed, Convertible Collars, Regular
up to $25	
4th ANNIVERSARY PRICE ONLY.
$12.85
19 OVERCOATS, a choice lot, all weU
Tailored, good colorings, regular up
to 130 	
4th Anniversary Sale Price, only...
$14.85
39 EXTRA  CHOICE  OVERCOATS,
Regular up to 135 ,J_	
4th Anniversary Sale Price, only ...
$19.85
The Bargain Prlcea extend to every department,  Everything for Men
and Boya except the Hats.
LOOK FOB THE BIG RED ARROW SIGN,
N. HARVEY, Ltd.
125-127 Hastings St. West
PRESIDENT
SUSPENDER
NONE - SO   EASY
MADE IN CANADA
Take that Watoh to Appltby, 80S
Pender Watt, Cor. Pender and
Richards, (or nlgh-claaa watoh,
dock and Jewellery repairs. All
cleaning and mainspring! Jobs
guaranteed for 12 months.
FALL HATS
THE LATEST STYLES AND
NOVELTIES IN
MEN'S HATS ln BOBSALINO,
HAWES, STETSON
and other high-grade makes
PRICES:
$2.50 to $5.
Clubb& Stewart i
LIMITED
309-315 Hastings Street West.
Tel. Bey. 702
Named Shoes we frequently made ia Non-
Union Factories—Do Not Buy Any Shoe
no matter what lta name, unless lt bears a
plain and readable Impression or this stamp. ■
AU shoss without ths Unton Stamp an
alwaya Non-Union.
BOOT A SHOE WORKERS' UNION
IM Summer Street, Boston, Haaa.
J. F. Tobln, Free.   C. L. Blaine, Sec-Trees.
Los Angeles, Cal., Labor Temple, the only building of Its kind squalling Vaneouvar Labor Temple on the Oonttnei
•"-

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