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The British Columbia Federationist Nov 13, 1914

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THE BRITISH COLUMBIA
IINDUSTRIAL UNITY:   £ lBNGTH„
OFFICIAL PAPER:   VANCOUVER TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL AND B. C. FEDERATION OF LABOR.
POLITICAL ONITT: TIOTOSII
ISIXTH YEAR, / o. 188
h
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 13,1914
/In Vancouver
V. Cltv. not ;
$1.50 PER YEAR
IIH llifl HAS
ml
PLENTY
Zapata's Men Cultivate the
Thousands of Acres Formerly Wasted.
Peons Are Fed, Clothed and
Housed Better Than
Ever Before.
The articles on the Mexican situation, which ue appearing at Intervals in The Federatlonist, are
not aecond hand information,
Ther ut supplied to this paper hr
the presa service which haa teen
established hr the Zapata forces
ln southern Mexico. It is for the
purpose of giving reliable and authentic Information regarding the.
real condition of affairs in that
part of the counter which is controlled hr the thousands of emut
dpated peons who are behind rf
pats. Cartful perusal of the ordl-
narr newspapers, shews verr plainly tbat there la a concerted scheme
afoot to prevent the public learning
anything about the only part of the
Mexican revolution which Is of real
Interest from a working claaa
standpoint. The Federationlit hu
been fortunate enough to be able
to establish direct connections with
the Zapata agents, and auch news
appeara in these columns from
time to Ume dealing with Mexico
can be relied upon. Our service
covering this Held of news Is exclusive ln Canada.
The Situation of Mexico.
j    [Special to The Federationist.]
SAN FRANCISCO,  Cal.,  Nov. 9.-^
Workers coming from Mexico report
torn practical knowledge that the' poo-
tie were never so well off as ther are
It the present time.   This   year   has
fielded a harvest the like of which
■as never seen in Mexico.   As far as
he eye can reach in the plain and for
undreds of miles beyond 'in every dl-
iction there are great fields of corn
hat equals anything ever Been in Kan-.
|as, Iowa or North Dakota.   The cotton
yielding' more pounds to the acre
fian in the black lands of Texas.   As
result there are more hogs running
Iround than ever, before and they sira-
Ily dropping with   fat.   The   people
Sre happy and seemingly contented, and
Ire all blessing the revolution for pro-
kcing these results.
[.Asked how the workers accounted for
||is prosperity, they said:   "The poo-
are ploughing land to which they
[»vo no government title!   They have
nply taken possession of the mighty
States owned by fugitive land owners.
^aey have through the revolution con-
Icated millions of acres.  For instance,
the state of Chihuahua, one man,
juis Terrazes, owned one half of the
■tiro state, and held the people, in ab-
lluto peonage, until the Mexican revo-
ptionists ran him out,' and made him
I refugee in the United States.   All of
Iat land is now being used and oceu.
tied and made to produce hundreds of
Millions of dollars of wealth that form-
ly lay vacant, with no sign of life ex-
Bpt an occasional buzzard flying over
in response to the scent of a dead
limal.
As a result, the Mexican workers are
d as never before; they are waxing
t and healthy and happy; they are
ting food such as their fathers never
reamed of tasting. The worker has no
mt to pay, no debts to meet, no credit
> ask for. He is living on his land and
rorklng for use, not for proflt. The
irmer is living in a communistic way.
hey exchange their horses and tools
nd are happy,
Emilinno Zapata, the southern revo-
ntlonlst, is ready to settle the owner-
hip of the land that the workers are
sing and occupying, declaring the
hole land of the republic of Mexico
ublic property of the people, and ab-
lishing tho principle of private proper-
v in land that rules in other countries,
Ihe former owners of the land have
ift Mexico, and have resigned sll hope
t getting the land baok that was to a
reat extent stolen by the monopolists
given to them by former dictator
iaz, Zapata and the principle revo-
itionlsts are willing that the people
ratinue to farm land in a communistic
ay.
As far as the political conditions are
in Mexico, every thing tends to
low that the people are willing to get
for ever of the reformers, such as
Krranza, Villa, Giitlerrex and the oth
Js. Carranza has left Mexico City,
■ilia is advancing to the capital, and
le ex-federals are trying to aide with
le last one, who is nothing but a tool
1 the hands of the millionaire family
1 the Maderos,
|SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., Nov. linos Ramos, a former   Mexican   em-
byee of tho Mexican-Tramways com.
Iny of Mexico City, the Mackenzie
Id Mann property confiscated by the
lrrnnza government, has been appoint-
I general manager of the tramways
Item.  The lines of tho company form
net work over the entire federal dis-
tt of Mexico, extending for nearly
1 miles and carrying millions of pass,
rers monthly.
rhe principal ex-owners of the pro-
Ity are Canadian, English, French
Tl Belgian capitalists. .The protests
he by ambassadors and foreign mln.
Its against the confiscation of tram-
were answered by Mr. Fabela,
of the country by the foreign capitalists.-
The socialistic leaders that were lately with Caransa, took the stand that
the public utilities should be confiscated for the people. The Mexican people are ready to flght with any intruder
who wishes to defend the "property"
of the capitalists of Canada, England,
France and Belgium, already expelled
'from Mexico.
MINERS' PAPER CHANGED.
Well-known Labor Journal To Ba Printed In Thnt Languages.
The executive officers.of the United
Mine Workers of America announce
that beginning December let, the official publication of the organisation1 will
be changed from its present form of an
eight-page paper to a weekly magazine
of 32 pages and printed in English,
Italian and Slavish.
The change is the result of a decision
reached at the conventlon-^f the mine-
workers in Indianapolis last February.
Since tho removal of the United Mine
WorkerB' headquarters to larger quarters in the Merchants' National Bank
building,'Indianapolis, the department
which has charge of the journal has
been enlarged, and will be able to'more
easily carry on the publication ,of the
new journal.
■ .
Buffalo Building Tradea Strike
Three thousand building trades
workers are on strike in Buffalo as a
result of a lockout of eighty structural
iron workers on several of the school
buildings of that city. The Employers'
association had attempted to discriminate against the iron workera in an
attempt to inaugurate the open shop
and wore met by a general walkout of
all the building trades in the cltjs The
men\re confident of an early viotory.
Unions Asked to Assist in
. Financing Compensation
Propaganda Work.
Most Trades Report Many
Members Are on Unemployed list.
-Tho
■HOTLY. RECOLLECTION
A day or two after the capture
of the German fortress of Tsing
Tau, it was announced in the local
papers that the Japanese of Vanoouver and hereabouts would
celebrate the occasion by a procession. This was followed a few
days afterwards, hy the statement
that the proposed rejoicing would
be postponed, until some larger
victory of the allied forces whioh
would justify a more general celebration. It sounded very naive,
but td those who thought it over,
it bore a strong suggestion of official pressure at work from the
back. The authorities do not forget the last procession of Japan-
ese, and particularly what followed. In the fall of 1907, about
7,000 of them paraded on the occasion of the visit of Prince Pu-
shimi. The people of the oity were
staggered at the number which
turned out. The feeling did not
die,down. On the contrary it increased, and a short while after,
tho riots against Orientals took
place. True that to-day Japan is
"our ally," but—well, supposing
we say that in this matter the city
authorities have decided to be on
the safe side, and let it go at that.
BARBERS HEAR REPORT
LABOR TEMPLE READING ROOM
A Number bf Additions Made to the
Library—More Books Needed.
The * Labor Temple Club room haa
leu further improved this week
through the addition of a largo quantity of books which are intended to furnish the nucleus of a library for the use
of tho membera of organizations meeting in the building. . The books were
purchased by the Library committee of
the Trades and Labor council with
funds subscribed by a number of affiliated organizations, and include a very
excellent history of the world, 25 volumes, Tolstoi's and Maine's works,.and
some miscellaneous books by various
authors. While ' hard times prevent
many unions from contributing to the
library fund of the labor council, thero
are no doubt many unionists who have
books of particular '.interest to members of the working!'class that would
be serving a bettor purpose in the club
room than lying in some trunk or.box
where they usually go after being read
by the owners, The icommittee will be
glad to receive audi acknowledge any
books readers of 'The Federationist
may oare to contribute for the general
use of the club.-members. In addition
to billiard, pool and card tables, the
club subscribes for all of- the daily papers, provides writing materials, a
piano and a general retreat where
members may spend wet days, evenings;
and Sundaya, and tha only requisite for
membership is a paw up card in one
of the unions. A hearty invitation is
extended to members to take advantage of the conveniences provided,
CALGARY MUNICIPAL ELECTIONS
Union Labor Will Hive Six Candidates
in the Field.
Organized labor ln Calgary is preparing to contest municipal offices at the
forthcoming elections. James Rae, of
the United Brotherhood of Carpenters,
and B. Tallon, of the Machinists union,
will stand for aldermen.
Alex. Boss, president of Alberta Federation of Labor, and W. L. Webster,
from the Stone-cutters' union, will contest two seats on the board of school
trustees.
For seats on the hospital board, W.
L. Dyson, of the Electrical Workers'
union, and F. H. Bagley, of the Musicians''union, have been nominated. A
vigorous campaign is to be made in
their, behalf, and an effort'will be made,
through the wellorganized campaign
committee, to enlist the support of everyone of the 5,000 or more members
of organized labor in that city.
A committee is appointed to arrange
for financing the campaign, and every
Industrial Conditions Still
Very Quiet in the
Royal City.
Strong Effort Being Made
to Maintain a Decent
Standard of Living.
VICTORIA. B. 0., Nov. 11,
Victoria Trades and Labor Council held
its regular meeting ou Wednesday 4th
inst. The resignation of the secretary,
Delegate T. MathCBon, being read,- it
was necessary to appoint one. Del. Turner, Carpenters, and Del. Aldridge,
Letter Carriers, being the only nominations, on a. vote being put it was
found to be a tie. On the second voting it recorded 11 to 6 in favor of Del.
Aldridge, .who was eleoted. .
It was moved that tho resignation of
Del. Matheson be accepted with regret.
Credentials from the United Brewery
Workers and Boilermakers were received and delegates seated.
A report was received from the Barbers that the question of interviewing
the civic authorities witS. referenoe to
general closing of non-union and
Chinese barber shops on holidays was
being dealt with and they would advise
Dels. Wells and Day of tho date arranged.
All trades reported a great number
of men idle, With the exception of Stage
Employees, Machinists Barbers, Boilermakers, Longshoremen and Tramway
employees, who reported trade fair.
Tramway Employees also reported
that the B. C. Electric were likely to
reduce the number of cars and would
tend to reduce number of employees.
Del. Day, plumbers, moved, and it
was duly seconded, that the secretary
write to the bartenders,   asking   that union in the oity will be asked to con-
they deal with the question of the em- tribute to the campaign fund.   Several
Dtltgates Must Cany Five Union Labels at Convention
The regular meeting of the Barbers'
union held last Tuesday night was well
attended) to hear the report of Qeorge
Isaacs, their delegate to the recent convention of the International union. The
report dealt ably with all the Important
business of the convention, and received a standing vote of unanimous approval.
Barbers' "Union Shop" cards have
been put into the Waverley hotel and
0. Fenton'a shop in the Balmoral pool
room, 140 Hastings street east.
Bro. L. Matheson was married Ooto-
ber 31st to Miss Annie Carson, at the
Swedish church. Bro. J. W. Porter had
a call from the stork October 29th.
Bro. E. Loucks was favored by the
same visitor November 9th—a. boy in
each case.
One decision of the international convention, which might very well be
copied by other unions. No delegate
will be eligible to a seat at future conventions of the barbers unless he has at
least five union labels on his various
articles of olothing.
*      Bartenders Raise Wages.
The Bartenders' union of Boston hns
raised the wages of its 1,200 members
$3 a week, The new scale is for $21 a
weok instead of *18 for a 60-hour work
week. The agreement between the union and employers Is for four years, to
take effect on the flrst Monday ln January. Sundaya and holidays the bartenders will receive (5 a day with 50
cents an hour overtime. The union
agrees to suspend any member who
leaves his position before his regular
time and without permission, while the
employers agree to employ only members of labor unions about their places
of business.
Bricklayers' and Masons' Union, No. 1
Bro. James Isbister, residing at 2166
Charles street, died on Sunday, Nov.
8th, after a brief illness; and was
buried in. Mountain View cemetery on
Nov. 10th, The deceased was born in
Scotland, and was 52 years of age. He
resided in St. Louis, Mo., for a number
of years, and oame to this city about
two years ago. He had been a member of the- B. M. and P. I. U. for a
number of years and waa greatly respected. No. 1, B. C, extends its sincere sympathy to tho widow and also
to the aged father still residing in
Scotland.and now over 90 years of
age.  .
Central Labor, Body Meeting
It is the-duty of every union in Vanoouver to affiliate with the Trades and
°, ...... „..»....v„ „j .».. .„„„.., Labor oounoil.   It is* dearly tho duty
Mexican foreign minister, who msde of those unions already afflliated to
statement that the Mexican work-' send its full quota of delegates to (very
had made possible the construction * meeting. The council meets the flrst
;he lines with their libor, and that and third Thuraday of each month,
lican workers were conducting the The next meeting takes place Thurs-
ilng of the cars with their labor day, Nov. 19th, and every delegate
the profits were being taken out ihould be preient.
ployment of Chinese in bars, asking for
their removal and the places filled with
white men.
Brother Elmer's Caae.
The letter from Vancouver Trades
and Labor council re Brother Elmer's
case was taken* up by the president.
Del. Wells spoke strongly on this and
stated that Bro. Elmer waa simply giving information to the members who
had asked for particulars in his local,
and he felt a strong regret that the
Victoria locals should allow the matter
to drop.
The painters' delegate considered
that the -action was outrageous that a
man should not be allowed to give information in his local.
A long discussion followed Del.
Wells, Bro. Watchman being allowed
the floor. Beckett, Scholes, Day and
others wont fully into the question.
Del. Day moved, and it was duly seconded, that the Michel local be requested to send all the information relating to this and that the matter be
brought up and fully gone into.
Workmen's Compensation.
Del. Wells spoke on the question of
the Workmen's Compensation act, mentioning that the cost of propaganda
work would entail a large expense.
That the B. C. Federation funds would
not allow it to deal with this. Vancouver Trades and Labor council had decided to grant $50 with a request that
the B. C. Federation committee make a
general appeal to central bodies.
Del. Sivertz, letter-carriers, considered that all central bodies should assist
and although financially things were
bad, a grant should be made.
Del. Day moved that $15 be placed
at the disposal of the committee, and
if funds allowed to be increased later,
stating that this was most important
and being'in the interest of all locals,
should bo given all tbe help they eould
give it, there being no seconder a motion was put to refer it to the finance
committee. Del Fhilbrooke, of the
painters, moved an amendment, .that
overy local be asked to contribute one
dollar towards the fund, this would
then get aU locals Interested.
Del. Wells stated ho would prefer
central bodies dealing with it.
The amendment carried and tho secretary was Instructed to write to all
locals.
B. 0. Federattonlst
Ton' o 'clock having struck Del. Day
asked for extention of timo for ten
minutes. The presidont allowed same.
He said ho wished to bring up the mat*
ter of the B. C. Federationist, and the
lack of Interest attending same.
He believed that a labor paper should
and would be baoked up if run on lines
to please the various locals. Although
he strongly disagreed with many things
which appeared in Tho Federationist,
still they were the views of men who
had an opinion and the right to express them, but no paper could succeed
if it only allowed- one view; he believed
that the paper should be extended and
some one in Victoria take it up and
extend its pages.
Local unions were composed of all
and various opinions, and if they were
allowed expression there would be interest taken and the paper would, succeed. He hoped that Dels. Wells and
Watchman would go into the question,
and although he differed from these
two delegates, he was prepared to take
all the hits they could give and would
always take them In the Tight spirit.
Del. Watchman said he would bring
the matter forward.
The ten minutes being up Dol. Wolls
was just getting interested—motion to
adjourn was called and carried.
Labor Temple Olub Tournament.
W. A. Alexander.' in charge of tho
Labor Temple club pool room, announces that another interesting billiard tournamont is being pulled off, in
whloh a number of contestants are taking part. Lovers of this fascinating
pastime will thus be afforded an excellent opportunity to while away tho long
evenings at this time ot year,
unions have already made assurances
that the necessary money will be forthcoming.
PARLIAMENTARY COMMITTEE
Now Meeting Every Wednesday—Will
Announce Programme Shortly
# At last Wednesday evening's, regular meeting of tho parliamentary committee of Vanconvw TradeB and Labor
council there was -a good attendance.
Reports of ward sub-committees were
received and discussed. In ward VH.
the candidature of A. F. Lofting, recording secretary of the Street Rallwaymen's union, was endorsed, and the
committee authorized to -proceed with
a public meeting at as early a date as
possible. The committee is meeting every Wednesday evening and hopes, to
be able to announce its programme
early next month.
How Tramps Are Made,
"The man is not blamed for his ultimate decision not to work; he has
been so close to starvation while at
work and no further from it when beating the country over' for a job that,
naturally, he accepts the lines of least
resistance and decides not to worki
When a man cannot keep over ten
cents ahead of starvation when he
works there is a great incentive to drop
back to the wholly dependent class and
live upon society. There isn't much to
independence 'that lives within one
sandwich of the poor house."
California Labor and Capital Punishment. '
The fifteenth annual convention of
the California State Federation of Labor has instructed its executive officers
to introduce at the next session'of the
legislature a bill to abolish capital punishment, the convention pledging unanimously its support to the movement to
forever do away in the state of California with "legalized murder."
CALGARY'S LEGACY
The real conditions in Calgary
are bringing the people of that
city down to solid earth again in
the rudest fashion after the orgy
of land and oil booms. The Daily
Herald makes no disguise of the
situation in its issue of November
7th when it says:
All this talk of "baok to
the land" from municipal,
government and other experts, is very pretty as an academic proposition, but it will
never provide bread and butter., with clothing and shelter,
for the thousands of unemployed and indigent people of
the west over the winter season. . . . Probably the best
they will be- able to offer
when the pinch comes is charity (they can do no more'and
the dare not do less), and to
many people who will, from
force of necessity, be compelled to accept the doles'
thus handed out the experience will be horrible.
What is said there ahout Alberta, is equally true of British' Columbia, for the plain reason that
it is due to the same cause. Incidentally there is a wealth of
significance in that parenthetic
"they can do no more, and they
dare not do less."
NEW WESTMINSTER, B. C. -
Regular meeting of the New West,
minster Trades and Labor council held,
with President Knudsen in the chair.
Credentials received from International
Union of 'Steam and Operating Engjp-
eers, local No. 643, for F. L. Hunt/and
T. W. Perser, vice Robert Lee and Ernest Gill, resigned, and delegates seated. Communication from Tramways In*
spector Rae of Vancouver,-in re B. C.
E. R. lines violating regulations; filed.
From city council re courthouse work;
filed for reference. From Musicians'
Mutual Protective union, local 654; referred to new business.
Officers Reports.
President Huudsen reported that
Manager Keith of the Dominion Trust
company could do nothing regarding
plumbing and ateamfitting, as the matter was handled in Vancouver. It was
the same with regard to the Boyai
Bank of Canada, but the manager said
he would write to Burr & Anderson,
who had the steamfitting, to get them
te employ local labor, while James Mac-
Murphy, a local man, had the plumbing.
The matter should have been taken up
sooner.   Now too late.   Received.
Report! from Unions.
Typos.—Expect another cut in staff
of tho Columbian, but no change so far.
"■ Plumbers—About the same. Their
charter-calls for steamfltters, gas fitters
and helpers, but the work is'not the
same, quiet; one man out of work.
Bartenders—Same as last meeting.
Cigarmakers—Same as last meeting.
Carpenters—No improvement.
Musicians—Pretty quiet.
Molders—Only two men working; no
improvement.
Painters—Nothing doing; two -men
got two days this week.
Timber Workers—No change.
S. and O. Engineers—About tbe
same; no improvement.
Electrical Workers—Pretty good; all
hands working.
Street Railway Employees — About
the 'same as last week; forty section
hands on short time, about five days per
week.
New Business.
Delegate Hunt stated that the brewers at the New Westminster brewery
allowed tho head brewer to superintend
the work on the new building, and he
did not, think it waB right, as it perhaps kept a carpenter out of work.
President Knudsen refused to accept
a motion to refer the matter to the
grievance committee, stating that it
wns the custom for unions to exhaust
overyTecourse to settle the matter before the T. and L. council- took it up.
Delegate Flynn appealed from the decision of the chair, and the chair was
not sustained by a vote of 7 to 11, so
the matter was referred to the grievance committee.
Communication from Musicians — On
statement from the MuslcianB* delegate
that the Royal theatre was now -fair,
the communication was ordered
ceived and flled.
Motion thnt tho secretary notify
Delegate Sells to call a meeting of the
municipal committee as soon as possible
ot a date to be set by the secretary,
for the purpose of electing a chairmon,
was carried.
Questions by Members
Delegate Tates—Did carpenters know
what rate of pay was on Heaps' engin.
eering works across the rivert Delegate Matthews did not know, as lt was
sub-contracted from one end to the other. Delegate Ivison said a timber
worker wont to work there as soon as
wages in the shingle mills were cut,
Delegate Yates said a street railway
carpenter was offered 20 cants per hour
to work there. He strongly objected to
tho rate of pay there and on some other
jobs in town; also that the employment
of Asiatics nt a low rnto of wages as
tending to lower tho living wngo
Workmen on the now 0. N.' depot re
ceived as low as 16 cents per hour.
YntcsSmith—That tho TradeB and
Labor council go on record as being opposed to the rate of wages being paid
on the 0. N. depot and nt tho Heaps
company's construction work.   Carried.
Dclcgnto Croploy—Asked Delegate
Dodd if thero was a fair wage clause in
city contracts. Dodd—There is not.
Croploy-s-Will Delegate Dodd bo prepared to ask for fair wago clause in
publlo work called for by contractt
Dodd—Thero is no fair wngo clauso in
city contracts, but thero is a scale of
wages that contractors must pay. Delegate Croploy—Fair wago clause meanB
that pay is baBed on wages paid to organized labor. Men from Vancouver
offered to work on the Heaps plant for
from 16 cents to 20 Cents per hour, but
as a result of conference he had with
Manager Schaake wages to men were
Increased to 50 and 70 cents per hour.
He wished Delegate Dodd to see if ho
could not prevent such conditions in his
position. Public men want .employers
to keep men fully employed and not re-
duco.wages, and the city council should
adopt a resolution along the same lines.
Delegate Dodd—Delegate Cropley did
not understand him. All city employees
got tt or more per day on all work.
Outside of city work ho had nothing to
Bay. A Bcale was set in overy city contract and thoy aro fair, as thoy wero
set by committees of tho T. and L. council. No city in tho country wns ai
strong aa Now Wostminatcr in thiB respect. Delegate Cropicy — The city
council grants leases of city property
and there is no safe-guard as to what
labor lessees shall employ. Tho T. and
L. council must devise ways and
moans to prevent this end maintain a
high standard of living.
Question by Delegato Stoney elicited
the information that there would not be
a meeting of Mr. T. Turnbull'• bond
committee unless that gentleman called
one. Delegate Lewis asked if it were
necessary to be affiliated with the B. 0.
Federation of Labor in order to be affiliated with the T. and L. connell, and
President Knudsen said "No."
flood snd Welfare.
Delegate Dodd brought up ihe matter
of unemployment, saying there were at
least 500 men in the city idle, too big a
problem for the elty to handle, and
other citieswere just aa bad. He favor-
•ther cities were just aa bti. He favof-
to a question by Delegate Cropley if
there were any civic improvement work
really necessary hold up for lack of
funds, he said it was t hard question
to answer, but S400,000 or $600,000
worth of bonds remained unsold, which
If disposed of would mean' more' work.
Dels. Yates, Jardlne and Matthews favored some action being taken and on
motion of Del. Yates tho Couneil decided to ask the Provincial Oovernment
to' take immediate action to clear lands,
and to ask the Dominion and Provincial
members to get busy along the same
lines. Del. Stoney said he felt certain
tho legislature would.act on the workmen's compensation this winter. He
announced that the civic voters' list
closed at Saturday noon. "Upon his
motion a oommlttee of Ave was selected
to report at the next meeting on some
form of entertainment for the benefit
of union members ih distress. Commit,
tee—Stoney, Feeney, Flynn asd Hun
ter.
On motion of Delegate Feeney the
council decided to request the British
war department to retain the canteen
at the Canadian soldiers' encampment,
as the W. C. T. U. was trying to have
it abolished.
Receipts—Bartenders, $4.50; molders,
$3; musicians, $9; painters, |3; U. B.
carpenters, $4.60,
Adjourned at 10:15.
IBUND WBS
THE WAB AND AFTER
The imperial parliament opened
in session again last Wednesday.
The King's speech dealt solely
with the war. It spoke of the
boundless .resources of the empire,
and of the determination of the
government to use those reserves
to the limit which would exhaust
all possible opposition. Glowing
tribute was paid to the bravery,
self-sacrifice, and endurance of
the men who are fighting on ses
and land. For what they have
done, are doing, and have still to
do, it was one sustained volume of
praise. More and yet more men
would'be needed. The o'er flowing cup of sacrifice must be filled
again and yet again. Such a declaration had heen expected and
that part of it came as no surprise.
But in all that telling of the. people what was expected of them,
and to be done by them, there was
not one word of what would be
done for them and theirs whom
they left behind. No mention of
adequate and self-respecting payments to women and children, to
cover family wants in that interim
of agony between the going and
coming—perhaps never coming
again—of the bread-winner. No
mention of pensions sufficient to
maintain war-broken men outside
of workhouses, or to prevent them
becoming a burden to relatives
and friends ill able to support
them.. No mention of using the
limitless wealth of'the nation for
such ends. When this war has receded far enough into history to
enable a true perspective of it to
be seen, the miserable stinginess
and parsimonious patriotism of
the rich and super-rich in respect
to these things will be seen more
clearly.
CAXTON APPRENTICES' OLUB
Junior Printers Hold Regular Meeting
List Night—Officer Resigns.
The regular bi-monthly meeting of
tho Caxton Apprentices' (printers) club
was hold lust night in the central
school house. President A. E. Laing
occupied the chair and Secretary W.
C. Pettipiece was also at his post. After routine work had been disposed of
a general discussion took place as to
the future meetings of the club. It was
pointed out that all the boys must meet
without fall to keep posted regarding
the buslnesB, tnlks, etc. To this end it
waB decided that meeting notices will
bo sent out regularly to the membors
so thnt tbey will ha\f> no oxcuso of mistaking tho night of meeting. Advisory
Presidont L. E. Dennison owing to the
fact thnt ho has enlisted ln the army,
tondored his resignation, which was accepted with the regrets of the members.
Another will bo chosen at tho next
meoting which takes placo on Thursday, Nov. 20th.
PASS MINERS IDLE.
President Phillips Says OondlUoni Deplorable.
W. L. Phillips,'president of distric;
18, U. M. W. A., in a letter thiB week
to Tho Federationist, says: "Tho industrial conditions of theh Crow's Nest
Pass are doplornble, many of the mines
at Coal Creek did not work a day last
month. This month promisos to bo a
little bettor, but up to the present they
hnve not commenced working. Wishes
galore for tho continued success of The
Federatlonist."
Coal Companies Ignore All
Their Promises and
Agreements
Germans and Austrians Are
Retained.—Miners Told
To Go To War
NANAIMO, B. 0., Nov. lt.-Oa th*
19th of August, 1914, the miners of
Vincouver iiland called off their itrike
by accepting a proposition which aame
through the good offices of Sir Richard
McBride, premier of British Columbia.
That proposition, which hu been pufe
lllhed In the labor press, stated specifically that all former employen who desired work would be reinstated before
any new men were employed.
Tho proposition being submitted by
ir Richard McBride, wo wen under
the impression that the operators would
at least make an honest effort to carry
•ame into effect. Now aa to the actual
condltlona existing, and the methods
jsed by the operators, although we hav*
the loltmn promise from the premier,
that ell the power and influence he
eould command would bo used to compel
the operaton to enforce the clauses of
laid proposition.
There are at present over one hundred men working here who have com*
in since the settlement, and have been
employed contrary to the arrangement.
Also fifty Japs and Chinamen, making
a total of one hundred and fifty. At
present the Canadian Collieries and tha
Western Fuel company have only reinstated about two hundred of their former employees, leaving about fifteen
hundred miners with their families atlll
out of employment and who are actually
facing starvation.
_ *>■« £««"l« Coast Coal company at
South Wellington ia tho only company
that is earring ont the agreement
without discrimination, but there are
atlll seventy of their former employees
not yet reinstated. And while we havs
continually protested against tha Austrians and Germans who were shinned
in during the strike that are atiU w£k!
ing for these companies, and aa far at
we can learn there is nothing beini
done by the authoritiei to remove
them.
The facta In-thla case will bear out
some of the statements made at the
Tradea and Labor Congress at St. John,
N. B., to the effect that governments
were only the pliant tools of corporations and compelled to do their bidding/
Another faotor that our men have to
contend with, is a taunt from petty
bosses of some of tho companies to the
effect that there is lots of work at the
front.
This method may appeal to some aa
a meana of serving their country, but
God help the country which haa to rely
upon such methods.
. Taking these facts into consideration, '
as representatives of the Vanconver
Island miners, wt appeal to the organized labor movement and other wofk-
ing mon, to stay away from Vancouver
Island this coming "inter unless they
wish to come into a localiay where
there is starvation existing.
ROBT. FOSTER,
President,
john McAllister^
Sec.-Treas,
District No. 28, United Mine Workeri
of America.
i Brothers In Brace
I lvcnrd a very moving story at tho
Press 'Club this afternoon; if it iB not
true it very easily could be, ond I give
it for what it Ib worth. At tho battle
of tho Aisno a German soldier ran his
buyonot through tho body of a Britisher,- ob his victim fell backwards tho
German stooped over him for a moment
to assure himself that ho wns dead. As
lin did so he burst into tears. It sol)-
scqucntly tuijned out that both men
wero member* of tho Solvation Army,
nnd that at trio recent Salvation Army
World Conferanco, bold in London, tho
Gcrmnn wns billeted for a fortnight on
tho man he had just killed.—Dally Citizen.
TYPO. AMENDMENTS.
Three of Four propositions Submitted ,
Endorsed by Referendum.
Belbw is given the result of the vote
on tho four amendmenta to the lawa of
the International Typographical union
submitted to the membership under
date of September 1,1914:
First proposition—To increase the
per capita tax five cents per month for
the purpose of extonding tho Union
Printers' Home and for tho support
thereof. For, 14,814; against, 18,309.
Lost.
Second proposition—To provide for
tho' election of one delegato to the
Trades and Labor congress of Canada.
For, 21,234; against, 11,299—mnjority
In favor, 9,035.
Third proposition—To Incrcaso the
executive council from throe to five
mombora by making tho first and third
vice-presidents members of thot body,
For, 21,230; ngnlnst, 11,311—mnjoriti
in favor, 9,019.
Fourth proposition—To add to thl
priority low a proviso giving local un
ions tho right to make such regulations
governing tho fllling of situations and
tho disposal of extra work bs is deemed
necossary to meet local conditions. For,
19,242; against, 13,529—majority in favor, 5,713,
A FEW OFFICE LETTER
EXCERPTS.
'. . . I am sorry to havo kept you
waiting so long for tho enclosed sub.,
but it hns been vory quiet hero during
the year. I must congratulate yon on
controlling such nn excellent paper as
The Fed. Ib. Best wishes and succobs."
—T. H. P., Saskatoon, Sask.
'. . . Kindly continue Bonding Tho
Fed. along. Can't settlo just at present, as wo aro still feeding on McBride's 'courage and confidence,' and
not many of our mon are getting back
to work. All tho business seems to
bo going to China nnd Jap town, whilo
tho white merchants nre being pushed
to tho wall."—Comberland, B. 0.
To Deal with Unemployed Problem
Rev. A. E. Cooko of tho Kitsllano
Congregational church, corner of Eleventh and Trafalgar, has chosen as hii
subjoct for next Sunday evening:
"Truo Patriotism, or the Tragedy of
the Unemployed." Service begins at
7:30 p. m.  Visitors cordially invited. PAGE TWO
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
FRIDAY .NOVEMBER 18, 1914]
THE
MOLSONS
BANK
Capital and Reaerve, - $8,800,000
IS Branches In Canada
A general basklnl business transacted.
Savings Department
Interest allowed at highest
current rate
East End Branch
110 HA8TINQ8 STREET EAST
A. W. Jarvls, Manager
INCORPORATED 18SI
Paid-up Capital
Reeerve 	
Total Aieits • •
• 111.
12,800,000
WE ALLOW INTEREST ON DEPOSITS IN OUR
SAVINGS
DEPARTMENT
THE nCOBOIATED
BANK QF
TORONTO
Capital and Reeerve t11,17M7l
WAGE-EARNERS
knp your savings In the Bank
Of Toronto, and watch your deposits and Interest added by the
bank grew to a moit desirable
bank balance. The flnanolal
strength of thie long-eetab-
llihid, well-eenducted Institution ensures safety fer your
money, and you will receive
•very eourteey, and yf ur ae-
oount careful attention.
Depoelt!
141.000,000
Main Offlee-
4M HASTINOS ST. WEST
(Near Rleharde)
Branches—
Ctr. Hastings and Carrall Its.
Nsw Westminster
Victoria
Merritt
British Columbia
LAND
Splendid opportunities tn Mixed
Farming, Dairying, Stock and
Poultry. British Columbia
Orants Pre-emptions of 160 acres
to Actual Settler*—
TERMS—Residence on thl land
aVr at least three yean; Improvements to the extent of SS per
acre; bringing under cultivation
at least live acres.
For furtner information apply to
DEPUTY MINISTER OF
LANDS, VICTORIA, B.O.
SECRETARY, BUREAU OF
PROVINCIAL INFORMATION,
VICTORIA, B.C.
Published every Friday morning by the
B. C. Federatlonist, Ltd.
... fcarm Pottlpleco Manager
J. W. Wllklnaon Editor
Directors:   Jaa.    Campbell,    president;    J.
H. McVety,    aecretary-treSBUrer;    H.
Gibb; O. J. Kelly; E.-P. Pettlpleoe
IBtraiilST
Office: Room 217, Labor Temple
Tel.  Exchange Sey. 7495.
Subscription: $1.60 per year; In Vancouver
City, 12.00; to unions subscribing
in a body. 11.00
" REPRESENTATVES
New Westmlnater..  .W. E. Maiden, Box 934
Prince Rupert **
Victoria..   ..
..W. E. Denning, Box 5S1
■ .A. 8. Wells, Box 1588
Afflliated with the Western Labor Presl
Association.
'Unity of Labor; the hope of ths world.'
FRIDAY NOVEMBER 13, 1914
RIFLES
FOR THE
POLICE
WE LOOK WITH suspicion
on the proposal to
arm 250 of the city police
with rifles. The plan as suggested
to the Police Commissioners, and
adopted by them,
is supposed to be
for the purpose of
quelling possible
disturbances started by aliens. That
explanation has not satisfied a
great many people in' the city, besides those associated with the labor movement or who may be in
sympathy with it. Thoughtful
folk are connecting it with the exceptional number of unemployed
workmen who are now in Vancouver. It is well known that there
are a few thousand men, women
and children here, on the very
verge of destitution and starvation. Not "aliens" either, but
citizens.
Composed by Rouget de Lisle
amid the'turmoil of the French revolution of 1792, it was sung by
the men from Marseilles as they
entered Paris in July of that year.
Under the restoration and the second empire it was forbidden, but
with the downfall of Napoleon
III. j|t the time of the Franco-
Prussian war, it again became the
national song of the French. Under a government of financiers
and men of commerce, it has become quite "respectable." But
deep down in the national heart of
France it has a grip strong and
firm enough to outlive the patronage of the French bourgeolse.
* * * *
For the mass of the common
folk of France—the men who are
now fighting, and dying by the
thousand—it is the voice of their
historic dead speaking again.
So far as the school authorities
are concerned, while Hr. Hicks,
the supervisor of singing, is willing to discourage the use of Beethoven's music, which has no political significance, but because it
is German, he is apparently quite
willing that the children shall sing
the Marseillaise. If the children
evince as much curiosity about its
origin and meaning as they are
said to have- done about Beethoven, it should be interesting to
hear the explanations given to
them. Mr. Duke is doubtless in
earnest with his protest. But we
think-his objection is due to the
fact that tlie Marseillaise is sung
by socialists all the world over,
and not because the modern
French soldier sings it aB a battle-
song.
As long as human endurance can
prevail they will starve more- or
less in silence. But there is an
uncomfortable feeling in some
quarters, that this proposed additional arming of the police is
due to the fact that trouble is expected when the pinch of cold
adds its sting to the present poverty. We do not believe that
Chief MacLennan wants to see
his men armed with loaded rifles
facing starving citizens. But it
might come about that he would
find himself in the same kind of
position that he was as assistant
chief in 1912—the time of the free
speech disturbances. There might
be a change of mayor next January, and if a combination came in
like ex-Mayor Findlay and ex-
Commissioners Williamson and
Leek, then Chief McLennan would
be at their orders. Up to now,
there has been no sign of trouble
from alien residents, and no suggestion that there will be any.
Nothing definite of that kind appears to have been brought before
the commissioners when this proposal was made. Among those
who know what' conditions are,
andl who think things over carefully, there seems to be an ulterior
purpose behind it all, which bodes
no good.
TO SING, OR NOT TO SING,
that's the question which is
vexing the minds of school
board officers Just now.  Whether
'tis nobler in the mind to suffer
the  slings  and
m DUKE AHD arrows  °/ °ut"
_:  " rageous fortune
THE MAK- which made
SEILLAISE Beet hoven a
German, or to
take up arms against a sea of
trouble and cut hitji off the list, is
a matter they find very difficult
to decide. With the claims of Art
on one side, and the clamor of
those who know little or nothing
about it on the other, life for our
educational mentors must be a
perplexing business just now.
Mr. Tom Duke, the well-known
school trustee and Orange leader,
has discovered that the Marseillaise is being sung by the children
in the oity schools, out of consideration for the fact that the
French are the allies of the British in the war.
*      •      •      •
This aroused him to strenuous
protest at last Monday night's
meeting of the trustees. He stated
in the plainest and most unequivocal of language that upon no
consideration wss he prepared to
sanction the children being allowed to sing such a song. The position must be distinctly embarrassing for one of Mr. Duke's way of
thinking. The Marseillaise is one
of the most widely-known revolutionary songs  ever written,
I
THE CASE
OF THE
ITALIANS
TAL I AN LABORERS who
have been extensively employed on city work, have
been laid off in considerable numbers during the past few months,
That they are feeling the pinch of
their position, like
thousands of others, is apparent
from the delegation which visited the city hall
last Tuesday to request financial
relief. There is no occasion to
rub it in, but there is no blinking
the fact that the Italian laborers
have been one of the most difficult
problems which the labor movement in this city have had to face,
When times were busy and large
numbers of them were on sewer
and other work, all efforts to persuade them to organize along yrith
other city laborers in the Civic
Employees' union were a failure,
•      •      •      •
The city engineer, and other
officials around that time, ue
them as a tool to offset the efforts
of the union to improve Wages and
conditions. Investigation shewed
them to be very clannish. Many
of them were Calabrians, and
worked under the padrone system
so popular with that class of Itali-
ians, One of their number, who
could speak English and who was
alround more astute than the rest,
would contract or undertake to
supply a gang for any job where
they might be required. In return for that he received a proportion of their earnings as commission for his part of the 'transaction. ' They would have
nothing to do with the labor
movement, and were encouraged
in that by the city officials acting
through gang foremen. Now they
have served the purpose they
were used for, those same officials
do not need to bother about them.
In their difficulty they turn to the
Trades and Labor Council. That
body has already more than it can
do to look after those who have
been associated with it for years.
A
THE
WAY IT
WORKS OUT
at $4,000, they still made a very
useful margin out of the deal. No
labor man would ever have voted
in support of recommending such
a proposition. • It takes your typical lip-service patriot to barter
away public powers in that fashion.
D1
EAN INGE IS AN eminent
English divine, also a very
gloomy one, who ean wax
immensely  lugubrious when his
reverend dumpiness feels inclined
that Way. Preaoh-
THE LIVING   in& >n Westmins-
TfflAn Aim     ter    Abbey  0Ile
DEAD AND     Sunday    recent.
DEAD LIVIN,0 ly, he voiced it as
his opinion that
Mammon was master of the world
to-day, and the crash of the warring nations had drowned the
voice of the gentle Christ with his
message of peace and goodwill to
men. He was fearful that before
the end of the war the sacred fane
in which he stood might share the
fate of Rheims and Louvain. His
apprehension was purely academic and chiefly centered on the
venerable relics around him in
that Valhalla of Britain's exalted
dead.
•      •      •      •
The ancient abbey is a wonderful example of the work of the
craftsmen who chiselled and
planed, in the days of long ago, before the blessings of speeding-up
and the Taylor system made a
workman's life the endless round
of pleasure which it is now—if he
can find a job. But there are other things in the ancient and royal
city of Westminster besides that,
Within stone-throw and calling
distance of the abbey are
some of the worst slums of
Europe, where thousands of
"these my little ones"—and as
many of these my big ones—live
and work, and wilt away into the
social garbage which slinks
through existence in the back
streets and alleys of the mighty
city. And unless London has suffered a sea change during the last
few years, there are whole blocks
of tenements and flats—the rents
of which are paid out of the avails
of prostitution—almost under the
shadow of the ancient pile. Per-
haps if the war reaches the abbey
it will sweep some of those places
away too. But if it does not'they
will likely remain so far as the
bishops are concerned. They cannot see them. The abbey walls are
very thick, and the saintly figures
in the stained glass windows prevent one from seeing from within
what is outside.
ORADLE
OF THE
SUPERMAN
7
B.O. MUNICIPAL BONDS
FOR SAFETT, STABILITY
AHD ATTRACTIVE INCOME.
Municipal Bonds an exported to lh* criticism of every financial
•Journal, yet It la noticeable that B. O. Municipal Bonds, although
they yield large returns, have never been adversely orltlolied.
Buy from a responsible Company that haa carefully aoratlnlied
the Investment.
We offer aeleoted Bonda in amount! from |100 np to yield
t1f_% to 7% that are unquestioned and the prion right.
Canadian Financiers Trust Company
HEAD OFFICE 839 HASTINGS ST. W.     VANCOUVER, B.C.
Patrick Donnelly - General Mai
PEW WEEKS AGO, the
Vanoouver Board of Trade
expelled a member for saying that it would be good for the
citizens of Canada if this country
were to be made
a part of the United States. The
controvcr s y
which led to the
expulsion of the
offending member, was an amusing illustration of the way in
which men who are supposed to be
big enough to figure in public life
can be led to regard such silly
statements as matters for serious
consideration. Men of that type
climb to the housetops to proclaim
their super-patriotic sentiments to
the world at large. But they
would not scorn to chase an
American from one end of the eity
to the other, if they thought that
by so doing they could make a
proflt by selling him a piece of the
British Empire.
•      •      •      •
The way these things work out
was demonstrated in a practical
way at the city council meeting
last Monday night, In February
1913 the voters, on the recommendation of the council, granted
a 30 years' franchise to a couple
of oompany promoters. They secured the right to open , up the
streets and lay pipes and wires to
supply heat and power to those
desiring such services. Having
got their franchise tney sold it for
$12,500 to a San Francisco corporation. It did not cost them a
cent beyond the preliminary costs
of promotion, such as plans and
legal fees. Putting those expenses
INCHESTING FIGURES dealing with manufacture of war
munitions, are contained) in
the latest report of the 1
chamber of commerce in Germany
relating to the
Krupp works.
From that it
learned that in the
^^^^^^ business year of
1912-13 the Essen
cast steel works contained about
8,500 machine tools, 12 rolling
mills, 164 steam hammers, 122 hydraulic presses, 439 steam boilers,
534 power engines aggregating
77,000'horse-power, 3,740 electro,
motors of together 68,000 horsepower,'and 1,259 cranes, etc., having a total carrying capacity of
12,800,000 kilogrammes.
.*•      a,     •    ■ a
The firm's own eoal mines produced 2,903,000 tons of coal. Of
this quantity the Essen cast steel
works alone consumed some 1,-
000,000 tons, while the total consumption of the various Krupp
works'amounted to 1,530,000 tons
of eoal, 1,558,000 tons of coke, and
40,000 tons of briquettes. Their
waterworks, three in number, supplied altogether 16,227,864 cubic
meters of water, while an add!
tional 2,888,257 cubic meters were
taken from the Essen city water
works, so that the Essen works'
total consumption of water
amounted to not less than 19,116,-
121 cubic meters.   •
• •      •      •
The Krupp Arm's gasworks supplied 15,800,000 cubic meters of
gas for lighting 1,497 street lamps
and 21,318 burners in buildings.
The seven electricity works of the
Essen cast steel works comprise
seven power stations, six sub-stations, and 16 transformer stations,
and supply current for 2,880 arc
lamps, 39,500 incandescent lamps,
and 3,740 electro-motors, while in
1912-13 the total kilowatt-hours
amounted to 71,000,000 in round
figures.
• •      •      •
On January 1, 1913, the total
number of persons employed by
the firm of Krupp was 79,647, distributed as "follows: The Essen
oast steel works and gunnery trial
grounds 41,460; the Rheinhausen
Frederick Alfred works, 8,273;
the Annen steel works, 1,198; the
Gruson works at Madgeburg-
Buckau, 9,423; the Germania shipbuilding yard at Kiel, 7,017; coal
mines, 10,814; the middle Rhenish
iron works, 951; and the various
iron, mines, 4,949. Karl Leibk-
necht proved in the Reichstag
that some of the biggest shareholders in this gigantio murder
faotorywere the military junkers
and War lords. * War for them,
like their fellow war mongers in
other countries, means good business.
That next international socialist congress should be something,
the like unto whieh has never been
seen or heard of before.
Victoria Builders' Exchange
has announced that it will reduce
wages 10 to 20 per cent. The unions might just as well announce a
raise of that amount. As things
arein Victoria, the matter will
likely go to the ultimate arbiter
of wages when jobs are few and
workers are many. His'name is
Hunger, the age-long ally of
builders' exehanges and such like
bodies.
EIMBERLET MINERS' UNION, NO. 100,
Western Federation of Miners—Meets
Sunday evenings in Union tall. 'President,
Alex. Wilson; aecretary-treaaurer, J. W.
Btewart, Klmberley, B. 0.	
Oak Bay council, Victoria, announces that laborers' wages will
be reduced from $3 to $2.50 per
day.   The reason given is, to en-)
able available work to be distributed over a larger  number   of
men. This is. how it is to be done:
The engineer has Deen instructed to reduce the number of men employed (if over
150)   in the  two following
ways:   Firstly by discharging  wherever  possible   employees who are not residents
of the municipality, and secondly, by dismissing unmarried employees should need
arise
The scheme simply means a
straight cut in wages. Just that
and no more. '
The story is quietly going the
rounds among those who know,
about a little plan of economy on
the part of, the B. C. Electric
Railway company. Orders were
issued that all switch lamps on
suburban lines—with the exception of a few in eonstant use-
were to be done away with, thus
saving cost of oil and attention.
This was done. However, it must
have got to the notice of the government inspector, for the company received orders from that
quarter to replace the lights,
whioh it did. They say, the official
from whom the order came is very
keen where financial matters are
concerned, but knows no more
about the technical side of the
company's business than an average shareholder. The incident
may make a little more work for
lamp attendants, but it will not
increase the worries of the Claims-
Agent's, department.
MINARD'S LINIMENT CURES
DIPHTHERIA
"Everything But
the Girl" for Your
New Home
.   '      At Prices and terns to salt
^ yent pocket-book.
Onr Stook of
FURNITURE
must be  leen  to  be  appreciated.
OaU ia and look tt over.
Hastings Furniture Co.
(1 HASTINOS STREET WEST
Take that Watch to Appleby, SOS,
Vendor West, Cor. Pender snd'
Richards, for nlgh-class watch,
clock and Jewellery repairs. AU
cleaning and mainsprings Jobs
guaranteed for It months.
We are now prepared to accept.
orders ior delivery of our
Washed Nut Coal
$5 PER TON
Delivered
This ooal, because of its price,
is by no means a small site, interior nut coal, but Ugh grade,
large sited WASHED NUT
COAL for kitchen ute
We know what this coal will
do, having sold it in Victoria
for a number of years We are
therefore prepared to stand behind it and guarantee that lt will
give you as good a kitchen nre aa
any high-priced eoal yon are now
using. If you use wood,, we
guarantee that it will give you a
cleaner, quicker and more economical kitchen fire than, either
cord or mill wood.
Do not take our word for It,
.but try it on our money back
guarantee.
KIRK & CO.
829 MAIN STREET    -
"26 Tens In victoria,"
Seymour Ull
MINERS' UNIONS
SANDON MINERS' UNION, NO. 81,
Western Federation of Minera—Meeta
every Saturday in the Miuera' Union ball.
Address all communications to tbe Secretary,
Drawer "K.," Sandon, B. O.
PROVINCIAL UNIONS
B. C. FEDERATION OP LABOR—
Meets in annual convention In January, : Executive offlcen, 1914-16: President, A. Watchman; vice-presidents, W.
F. Dunn, Jas. H. McVety, a. H. Fraser,
J. W. Oray, H. Knudson, J. J. Taylor, B.
Simmons. Secretary-treaaurer, .A. S.
Wells, Box 1638, Victoria,  B. C.
NIW WESTMINSTER, B.C.
NEW WEHTMfNSTWTlUDES~ANI) LA-
BOR Counoll—Meets every aecond' and
fourth Wednesday at 8 p. nt. In Labor ball.
President, H. Knudson; flnanclal secretary,
R. A. Stoney; general secretary, W. ft.
Maiden. P. 0. Box 984. Tbe public Is Invited to attend.
PLUMBERS AND STBAMPITTERS' LOOAL
No. 485—Meets every second and fourth
Friday of month ln Lauor aal), 7:80 p. m.
President, D. Webster; secretary, A. Me*
Laren. P. O. Box 850, New Westmlnater,
B. O.
VICTORIA, ■• O.
VICTORIA TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL—Meets flrst and third Wednesday,
Labor hall, 781 Johnston street, at 8 p. tn.
President A. 8. Wills; aeoretary, Thot. F.
Mathlson, Box 802, Victoria, B. O.
HEADQUARTERV
_W>
In ihe heart of ihe retail disbitL
Ireprool ami modem In eveiy reapect.
unexcelled.  European plan, $1 to $3 per day.
FREE AUTO BUS MEETS ALL TRAINS.  Omm
opcraltd by  The Pronndal  Hoteb  Company, tin
HOWARD I SHEEHM Plata
m&*r—"Wm
PRE5IDENT
5U5PENDER
NONE   SO  EASY
Each pah
U-MogftfoulIyGnniite-rl
Doalmsrstrsajrasspaadass
MADE IN CANADA
SYNOPSIS  OF  COAL   MINING   REGULATIONS
.Coal mining rights of tha Dominion,
In Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta,
the Yukon Territory, tha Northwest Territories and In a portion of tha Province
of Brltlih Columbia, may ba leaaed for
a term ef twenty-one years at an annual
rental of 41 *n aore. Net more than
2,660 acres will be leased to one applicant.
Applications for lease muat be made by
the applicant ln person to the Agent or
Sub-Agent of the district ln which the
rlghta applied for are altuated.   '
In surveyed territory the land must be
described by sections, or legal subdivisions of eectfons, and In uniurveyed territory the tract applied for ihall be
staked by the applicant hlmielf.
Eaoh application muit be acoompanled
by a fee of $8, whloh will be refunded If
the righto applied for are not available,
but not otherwise. A royalty shall be
paid on the merchantable output of the
mine at the rate of Ave cents per ton.
The person operating the mine shall
furnish the Agent with sworn returni
accounting for the full quantity of merchantable eoal mined and pay the royalty thereon. If the ooal mining right!
are not being operated, such returni
ihould be furnished at least onee a year.
The leaae will Include the ooal mining
right! only, but the* lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available
surface rlghta may be considered nece*
tary for the working of the mine at tha
rate of 110 an aore.
For full Information application ihould
be made to the Secretary of the Department of the Interior, Ottawa, or to any
Agant or Sub-Agent of Dominion Landa,
W. H. CORY,
Deputy Mlnliter of the Interior.
N. B.—Unauthorised nubile  "
•dvarttaemea* win not
horised publication of thli
-    t be paid for-IHK.
ORGANIZED  LABOB  EVERYWHERE
This Is Our New UNION LABEL
If yoa believe ln and stand for Work*
log Class Solidarity and really want to
assist the Clothing Workera organiie,
you will recognlie thla label and demand
it from your tailor, merchant and dealers. ■ *
Ask for It-mint on It
■        Phone: Fairmont 810
Patterson* Chandler
Manufacturers of
MONUMENTS.
Vaults, Curbing, Etc.
Offlce and Works:
Cor. 16th Ave, ud Main Bt.
Branch Offlce: 40th A Fraser Avee. 41
VANCOUVER, B.C.
City Auction uid Commission Co.
Oaah paid for houaea and anltaa
of   fnrmtur, or Auction arranged.
. Satisfaction    su.rant.ed,    prompt
Battlements.
ABTHDB I. BBTOHX8T
Smyth, and QranrlUa Streeta
Phone 1st. Otis
VANCOUVER UNIONS I
TRADES AND LABOR COUNCIL ._
Meets flrst and third Thursdays. Exe-1
cutlve board: Jas. H. McVety, president;!
Frank Eetlnghauser, vice-president; Geo.J
Bartley, general secretary, 210 Laborf
Templet Miss H. Gutteridge, treasurer;!
Fred A. Hoover, statistician; sergeant-1
at-arms, John Sully; G. Curnock. F.l
Knowles, W. R, Trotter, trustees.
LABOR   TEMPLE    COMPANY,   LTD.-
■ Directors:   Fred.   A.   Hoover,  J,   	
MoVety, James Brown, Edward Lothlan.l
James Campbell, J. W. Wilkinson, R, P
Pettlpleoe, John McMillan, Murdoch McKensle.    F.    Blumberg,    H.-   H.    Free.!
Managing Director, J. H. McVety, Roomi]
211. ™
ALLIED PRINTING TRADES COUN-L
CIL.—Meets second Monday ln thai
month. President, Geo, Mowat; secre-f
tary, F. R. Fleming, P.O, Box 66.
BAKERS' AND CONFECTIONERS' LOOALB
ao. 48—Meets second andT
fourth Saturday! at 7:80L
p. m. President, B. O. Lee<l
worthy; corresponding aea-l
retary, R. J. Adams; bnsffL
ness agent, J, Black, rooibl
820 Labor Temple. tf
BARTENDERS' LOCAL No. 67«.-OF*-k
flee, Room 108 Labor Temple. Meetn
flnt Sunday of eaoh month. Presidents
F. F. Lavlgne; flnanclal seoretary, (Horn
W. Curnook, Room 20S, Labor Temple.   ™
I COOKS, WAITERS AND WAITRESSES
I       Union—-Meets flrst Friday In eaoh month,
8:80 p. m., Labor Temple.   W. E. Walker.
business representative.    Offlce:   Room SOS,
Labor Temple, Houra: 9 a. m. to 10:80; I
I to 5:80 and 8 p. m. to 0:00 p. m.    Com-
peflfat   help   famished   on   short    notice!
Phone Sey. 84U.
DISTRICT    COUNCIL   OF   CARPENTER^
meets ln room 300, Labor Temple, set
ond and. fourth Thursday of eaoh month, im
p. m. President, 0. H. Hardy; secretary,!
F. L. Barrett; treasurer, W. T, Taylor. Lol
cal No, SIT meeta flrst and third Mon<|
day of each month, and Looal 8647 i
flrst and third Tuesday of each month.
ELECTRICAL WORKERS, LOCAL NO!
621' (Inside Men)—Meets first an*
third Mondays of each month. Room 20KB
I p. in. -President, H. R, Van Sickle; refl
cording aeoretary, J. M. Campbell; buiM
ness agent, F. L. Estinghausen, Room SOTf
BARBERS'    LOCAL    No.    120.-MEETS*
aecond Tueaday In eaoh month 8.8
n.   President, J. Bruce; reecorder,
_. Herrltt; secretary-business agent,   __
F. Burkhart, Room 208, Labor   Temple.1
Hours: 11 to 1; 6 to 7 p.m.
BRICKLAYERS' AND MASONS\ NO,  a.
—Meets every let and 3rd Tuesday,!
8   p.m.,  Room  307..   President,   Jame#J
Haslett; corresponding secretary, W, i
Dagnall, Box 63; financial aeoretary, F.l
R. Brown; business agent, W. S. Dag-I
noil    Pi»m   91* "
nail, Room 216.
BROTHERHOOD   OF   BOILER    MAKERSI
and Iron Ship   Builders   and   Helpertl
of America, Vancouver   Lodge   No.   ltfl—J
Meeta   flrst   and    third   Mondays,   8   p. l
President, F. Barclay,   868   Cordova   Kai
secretary, A, Fraser, 1161 Howe street.
ELECTRICAL WORKERS, LOCAL NO. 21 __
—Meets room 801, Labor Temple, everyS
Monday, 8 p. m. President, Dave Flnkf
vlce-pres ldent, M. Sander; recording aeejL
retary, Roy Elgar, Labor Temple; Anurias]
secretary ind business agent, E, H. Morriionfl
room 207, Labor Temple.
H0D0ARRIER8, BUILDING AND COMMOlfl
Laborers' onion, No. 66—Meets flrst snfl
third Friday of each month, Lsbor TempleB
President, George Gibson; secretary, OeorgH
Harrison, room 390, Labor Temple. All lanf
orera invited to meeting.
MACHINISTS.  NO.   183—MEETS  SECONfl
and fourth Fridys at 8 p. m.   President^
A.   R.    Towler;    recording   aeeretary.    *_
Brookes; flnanclal aeeretary, 3- w. MaVrfiJ
MOVING   PICTURE   OPERATORS. Lol
cal 848 I. A. T. S. E.—Meeta flrat So
day     ef     each     month,     Labor     Teh,
pie, 8 p.m.   President H. C. Roddan; sec.
retary-treasurer,   L.   E.   Goodman;   re'
cording secretary, A. O. Hansen; bus!
nasi agent,  G.   R.   Hamilton.       Offli
Room 100, Loo Bldg.   Tel. Sey. 3046.
MUSICIANS'*  MUTUAL   PROTECTIVE
Union, Local No. 146, A. F. of M.-9
Keeta seoond Sunday   of   eaoh monthi
roomi S9-30, Williams Building, 418 Granl
villa atreet.    Preeldent, J. Bowyer; vlw
tresident,  F.  English;  seoretary,  H.
iraifleld; treaaurer, W. Fowler
OPERATIVE    PLASTERERS'   < INTERN?
TIONAL     ASSOCIATION,   No.    80 4
Meets   every   flrat   and   third   Wednesday
In  the  month In room 801, Labor Templets
President, A. Hurry; coirespondlng leeretantH
F. Sumpter, 1680 Twenty-third avenue tur
flnanclal secretary, D.  Soott,  677 Rlcba:
street; treasurer,   L.   Tyson
PAINTERS',. PAPERHANGERS'. ANfl
Decorators', Local 138—Meeta evenr^
Thuraday, 7.80 p.m. President, H. Granl
flnanclal aeoretary, J. Freckleton, 10l
Comox itreet; recording secretary, r
Dowding, US Howe itreet. Buslnei
agent. Jamas Train, Room 303, Labi
Temple.
PATTERN MAKERS' .LEAGUE .0]
NORTH AMERICA.—Vancouver '
vicinity. Branoh meeta 1st and 3rd .-.
days at Labor Temple, room 805, Robt
C. Sampson, Pres., 747 Dunlevy Avi
Joa. G, Lyon, flnanolal secretary, 27!
Grant street; J. Campbell, leoordlng lei
retary, 4868 Afrgyle itreet.
STEREOTTPBRB* AND ELECTROTTFB
era' Union, No. 88, of Vanoouver anr
Vlotoria—Meet! seoond Wedneaday
eaeh month, 4 p. m„ Labor Temple, Pm—
dent, Chu. Bayley; recording ueretarjB
A. Birnle, co. "News Advertfter."
STREET  AND   ELECTRIC  RAILWAY
• Employee!, Pioneer Division No. 10r
—Meets Labor Temple aecond and fourtl
Wedneadaya at 2 p.m.,   and   first   t\__
thlrd  Wednesdays,  8  p.m.      PreitdenS
W.   H.   Cottrell;   recording   lecretarlj
Albert V. Lofting, 2661 Trinity streel
financial secretary and business agena
Fred. A. Hoover, 2409 Clark Drive.
STEAM  ENGINEERS,   INTERNATIONJ
al Looal 387—Meeta every Wedneidai
S p.m., room 104, Labor Temple. Finan-I
clal secretary, B. Prendergaat, room 31I.J
TAILORS'   INDUSTRIAL   UNION   (INB
ternatlonal). Local No. 178-MeetlngP
held first Tuesday In eaoh month, 8 p. m,
President, Mln H. Gutteridge; record Ind
•ecretary, C. McDonald, Box (01:  In
olal sec., K. Patewon, P. O. Box 503.
THEATRICAL   STAGE   EMPLOYEES,  LO<|
CAL No, 118—MeeU second Sunday oq
each month at room 304, Labor Temple!
President, H, Spears; recording secretary]
Geo. W, Allln, P. O. Box 711, Vanoouver. "
TYPOGRAPHICAL    UNION,    NO,    SSO -
Meeta laat Bnaday ef each month at L
p. m. President, R. P. Pettlplece; vloe-pmU
dent, W. 8. Metsger: secretary-treasurer,
H. Neelanda, P. 0. Bos I"
: 06.
Phone Your Printing Order
 TO—•	
SEYMOUR 4490
More Light and Better Light for
the Home
USE TUNGSTEN LAMPS.
Thlt Is advised at tha Tungtttn Lamp glvaa thret timet tht
amount of light of a oarbon lamp on tha itmt consumption of
current, -.
USE CONTINUOUS WIRE DRAWN FILAMENT LAMPS.
Thlt typo It tha only data of Tungtttn Lamp you ahduld utt. Don't
fall to atk for It when you buy Tungtttnt. Jt beara tht tamt relation to other typaa of Tungtttnt at dota tht but grade of ateel to
WE CARRY AT OUR SALESROOMS A FULL LINE OF THE
BEST TYPE OF TUNOSTEN LAMPS AS NOTED ABOVE, OUR
PRICES ARE EXCEPTIONALLY LOW WHEN THE HIGH STANDARD OF OUR LAMPS IS CONSIDERED.
Aek our clerk to damonttratt for you tht difference between a
Tungeten and Carbon Lamp ueln'g tha aama amount of current
Canallaad
Haatiata Stnat
B.C. ELECTRIC
M38Gia.nll.Sl. |
Nana Dana ^rmmumu^^momMm}.
DAT..... .NOVEMBER 13, 1914
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
PAGE THREE
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
TO THE MAN WHO PUTS HIS TRUST
IN STANFIELD'S UNDERWEAR WE
GIVE ONE LAST WORD OF ADVICE
Don't pay any mor. than tha prlcea thla store qaotea. We we
the largeet diatrlbutora of thla underwear In the west, and we know
that our prices cannot be beaten In (heir entirety, although yon Aay
flnd an balance here and there when a very amall quantity ia aold
at a cut price for advertising/purposea.
STANFIELD'S NATURAL WOOL UHDEBWEAH—Medium wellht,
elaatlo rib; a very popular line—
Sises to tt   91.29
SlaeaaitoSO 11.76
Combinations, aiaea to 42   ,.- .12.60
STANFIELD'S LOGGER UNDERWEAR—Heavy (ny.    Biiea to 44
STANFIELD'S'HEAVY WEIOHT NATURAL* LLAMA WOOL UNDERWEAR—Per Garment *...'. |1.7<
STANFIELD'S CREAM  LLAMA WOOL ELASTIC RIB UNDER.
WEAR—Heavy weight.   Fer garment     11.00
Combinations ,   18.00
STANFIELD'S FULL WEIOHT NATURAL WOOL UNDERWEAR—
  91.90
Comblnatlona   ' ,'.., 18.00
STANFIELD'S HEAVT LOGGER UNDERWEAR—Blue Label
 11.76
STANFIELD'S BLACK LABEL—Heavy weight, pure wool under.
wear at  11.00
STANFIELD'S SILK AND WOOL UNDERWEAR—Oream, medium
weight.   Fer garment 88.00
Comblnatlona 14.00
STANFIELD'S HEAVT WEIOHT WOOL UNDERWEAR—Red label
JIM
8,00
David Spencer Limited
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
DAVID SPENCER, LTD.
SUPPORT HOME INDUSTRIES.
John McMillan, Manager.
T«ADC   l'tf_)\   MflH,<
Braids
Best
Coffee
„   *"1 KHAIIJH 1°',,,
Did You Get Yours
This Morning?
BRAID'S
BEST
COFFEE
WM TURNER
906 Granville St
Nut to tba Market
-DEALER IN-
New and second-hand China, Crockery, Furniture,
Hardware and Stoves. Furniture moving and shipping. Telephone us when you have furniture for
sale. Highest prices paid. '
TELEPHONE SEYMOUR 374S
NEW ENGLAND HOTEL     "• 8"""»Uf «"'■
Rooms elegantly furnished, classed with the best  Low rates.
25% OFF ALL TRUSSES THIS MONTH
RED STAR DRUG STORE.
63 Cordova Street West ' Vancouver, B. O.
Further tb. Home Inluatrjr MoT.rn.nt br baling
tbla label appear on mar printed matter.. It attnla
(or good wertananablp, good dtlaanablp, decant
wagea anl ti. up-building of tbt dty.
ALLIED FB-MTim TRADES
Ion  Printing Pren-
■ ictrotypara' Union,
Oompoaad of Typographical Union, Wab Praaaman'a Union, Frlntln
n'a Union, Praaa Aaalatanta' UnlonJ Staraotppera' and Elactrotjrpara1
okblndera' Union, Photo-engravera' union.
TWENTY-FIVE PER OENT. DISCOUNT TO ALL UNIOH
HEN OR THEIR FAMILIES
I Do Not Practice "Hurry-up" Dentistry ?££?
Tho Mouth
ud tb*
"HUBBY-TIP," "cut-rite," ud slipshod dentistry li
distasteful, to say the least, to people of refinement. In suoh
an important .matter as setting the month In proper condition
to prepare the food for the stomach, omy the highest skill,
the most Improved methoda and tbe best materials ihould be
considered.
ONLY tbe most eonioientioui oare ind the moit lelentlflo
methods are employed In my offlee.   My "Nature Teeth" are
worthy successors to Nature*! own.    uy guarantee Is plain
.   .* - ^ ...<— *._ -*._i_..i__ —j -*-«!«. fee-
SUndMd.Bunlt
Bldg.. Richard*
•nd Button
Second Floor
HntWBW
BtomSU
Phone flay.
i.e.7.9
and sincere. I charge nothing for elimination tnd advice,
fore I established my own office I wm In demand tt the h
est siliry is a skilled operator.
"YOU SUPPER MO PAHT" OUABAXTEED
X HEBEBY GUARANTEE that til dentil work
performed by me will be absolutely pilnless. If the
■lightest twinge of pain Is experienced by the st*
tlent no money need be paid to me, or if tny' hu
been paid lt will be Inetantly refunded by me.
I furter gutrintee thit ill crown or bridge work
or filling will remtin tn first-class condition for t
period of TSN YEARS.   If tny of my work becomes
"     - *      I will      * 	
defective during thtt Umt I
FREE OP CHARGE
111 replice it -absolutely
TROTTER'S REPORT
0FT.ANDLC.0FC.
Conclusion of Report Made
at Last Meeting of Cen-
tral Labor Body.
Reviews Proceedings of the
Congress at Recent St
John Convention.
VANCOUVER
City Market
MAIN STREET
Auction Sales are Held
Every Tuesday and Friday, at 10 a.m.
Private sales are held daily when you can
purchase in any quantity.
OUB SALESMEN ABB ALWAYS AT
YOUR SERVICE. CWOD DELIVERY
AT    LOWEST    POSSIBLE    BATES'
Saturday h Our Special Day for Snapi.
See the Producers' Stalls in Front of the Market as Well as the
Inside Displays.
Everything sold in the Market is produced
in British Columbia.
[Continued from Lut Week'a Issue]
Executive Offlcera' Report.
The executive coiincil's report contains matter of considerable interest to
the wage-earner. The industrial conditions in the dominion are reviewed.
They recount the presentation of the
claims for legislation last year and the
case presented for the workers during
the last special session of the legislature. Some apace ia devoted to the
queatlon of the preaent war. The council among other things expresses the
opinion that:
"When the histtoy of this appalling
conflict comes to be written oae feature which will shine aa long aa the
world lasts, was the common opposition
to thia war among the working classes
of the different countries. ' The labor
movement all over the world almost
alone, the one stout advocate of common sense and peaceful methods of settling these disputes. There cannot be
any doubt that this force, a product of
the unity of interest of the workers the
world over, will gather an impetus
from the lessons of this struggle, whioh
will make it for the firat time in history
the dominating force is the world. Institutions which have been on trial for
years utterly failed to stem the return
to barbaric methods in aettling disputes.
"The present situation of the working classes industrially, and the awful
struggle proceeding in Europe, whieh is
felt in every corner of the world, is a
standing indictment of the managing
of great nations of people, by a ruling
class whose ideas of government are
incapable of dealing with modern civilization problems. . f';
"The eduoation of the last twenty
years particularly, the growth of the
working class movement both in the
trade unions and on the political field
has gone too far to be seriously damaged by even a conflict of this description. Out of thiB struggle the workers
will eome more than ever convinced of
the truth of the principles they stand
for, ahd the necessity of world-wide co-
operation both industrially and politically for their own salvation and well-
being in society. The great ^growth of
the working class movement' in Germany was after the last war with
France. War lords seemed to have lost
sight of that fact. The same reflex
movement in the working class it is safe
to say will follow this war."
The committee urges that special at-
tion be given to amendment to the Lemieux act and the obtaining of old age
pensions. Technical education, labor
victories in municipal elections, the Island miner's strike and immigration
are other matters dealt with in this re.
port.
Secretary-Treasurer's Beport
It was fully expected that the adverse conditions, which have resulted in
considerable reduction in the ranks of
the tradea unions in the Dominion,
would be reflected in the report of the
secretary-treasurer. There is, therefore,
room for congratulation when the total
membership waB revealed at 80,094, as
compared with 80,801 of the previous
year, or a decrease of only 707. The
financial report showed an income from
all sources for the past year of $14,-
317.00, which added to last year's balance of $9,360.05, gives a total of ♦23,-
713.14. The expenditure for the year
amounted to $12,762.10, leaving a Usance of 410,951.04, an increase on last
j. | year fs balance of over (1,500. Ia thia
~ j connection it may be stated that on the
motion of the secretary-treasurer a sum
of (10,000 will be placed aa a reserve
fund to be drawn upon only in ease of
emergency for legislative purposes..,
New Afflliatioiu.
presB its satisfaction in noting that the
workers on the Pacific Coaat are alive
to the situation and would draw the
In connection with both membership' ^!Z,^\"J^-^j!!iJsHj^.
roll and finances, it is to be noted that '»«o*-a ""toil subject _adof ted »y_ the
since the'secretary-treasurer'b report
was compiled, the International Brotherhood of Maintenance of Way Employees have decided to reaffiliate their
American Federation of Labor and'recorded in that report.
"Having   regard   to  the increasing
number   of   illiterate   peoples   from
membership in Canada, which now Southern and EnBteru Europe who have
stands at about 5,600. Your.delegate, United States and Canada, and believ-
acting aB Trades Congress representa-, &"*" that conditions in Europe will still
tive at their recent convention in further increase this most undesirable
Winnipeg, waa able to give thia assur-, immigration, your committee favors
ance. Another gain haa been the re- tho introduction of a literary teat,
turn of the'Beid-Hurphy faction of the so that all immigrants shall be re-
electrical workers in Canada to the quired to be able to read and .write in
original body, whioh action will again some language or tongue, and that the
place this organization on the roll of executive committee be instructed to
MINARD'S LINIMENT CURES
GARGET IN COWS
T. B. CUTHBERTSON & Oo.
Men's Hatters and Outfitters
Three Stores
BERRY BROS.
Agenta for
Cleveland Cycles
The Bicycle with tha Reputation,
run Una of Accessories.
Bepaire promptly executed.
63S HASTINGSST. EAST
Phone Highland 885
,ff
PANTAGES
Unequalled Vaudeville. Meana
PANTAOES   VAUDEVILLE
THREE SHOWS DAILY
2.W, 7.20, 9.19     Seaaon'a  Prlcea:
Matinee, IScl Evenlnga, ,19c, Ho.
■Vl
Dr. HALL, "The Modem Dentist"
^l^ltoh^
_ . Or America	
COfWItHt STMOI MMKHMimmO IPOS
COLUMBIA
OPTICAL PARLORS
Lome?. M Intoah
Eyesight Specialist
619 GRANVILLE HUR
Seymour 7679
SPEND TOUR SPARE TIME IM
THB LABOR TBIIPLB FREE
READING ROOM.
the Tradea and Labor Congreaa, Still
another gain is that of the Canadian
membershrip of the Journeymen Barbers' International Union, whose r%
cent convention at Indianapolis was
visited by your delegate as Congress
representative. This affiliation brings
the number of international affiliations
up to 47 and adds another 1100 to the
membership roll.
Immigration.
The executive this year adopted the
policy of appointing a special committee on emigration at the same time
as other committees. This facilitated
a proper consideration of this subject,
and eventually, on the report of this
committee, a whole session was devoted to its discussion. Tour delegate
found himself appointed to both credential and immigration committees
and acted as chairman of both.
The recommendations of the immigration committee, whloh evoked
lengthy discussion, were, with slight
amendment, adopted as follows:
"Gentlemen—Tour committee has
given consideration to that section of
the officers' reports which deals with
immigration and wishes to concur in
the statements there made, after hearing the evidence submitted in support
of same. With a. view of placing the
questions dealt with properly before
the eonvention your committee presents
the following, resolution:
"Whereaa the Trades and Labor
Congress of Canada has repeatedly
drawn attention to the evils arising
from the expoitation of immigrants
from the otyer countries of Europe and
Asia and has used every possible occasion to point out what the ultimate
results of .a continuance of the present
system would be not only to the workers already in Candada but to those
immigrants themselves who are unfortunately misled in such large numbers
aa to the possibilities of obtaining the
employment in Canada of which they
are in search; and, wnereas, this Congress is of the belief that the present
deplorable condition of thousands ot
workers iu every section of Canada is
a direct result of the present system ot
inducing immigration to the Dominion;
and is further of the belief that the
immigration department of the federal
government and the various agencies,
federal and provincial, now in Great
Britain and on the European continent
by the issuing of alluring advertisements and the endorsatlon of various
advertising schemes, are largely responsible for the misoonceptlon as to
the amount of employment available in
the Dominion of Canada;
"Be it resolved that this Congress,
in convention assembled, expresses its
opinion that the time is past for the
payment of bonuses or for the granting ot assisted passages to the Dominion of Canada; that the immigra-.
tion department of the government
should cease to endorse the wild and
inaccurate statements made in special
advertising issued through the newspapers of the older countries by placing advertisements in special supplements or other publications encouraging immigration and thereby setting
the seal of the Canadian government
upon all the articles contained therein;
and is further of the opinion that the
present system ot deriding and making
adverse personal references through the
press to the writers of many honest
expressions of opinion regarding Canadian conditions, is not ln any way consistent with dignity of a responsible
government and the executive committee is hereby instructed to bring
this matter to the attention ot the
government as one deserving ot censure.
"Tour committee took into consideration the large number of sufferers from the conditions referred to and
desires to recommend that while the
Trades and Labor Congress of Canada
is emphatically opposed to the establishment of provincial labor exchanges,
that trades and labor councils be instructed to press for legislation establishing free municipal labor bureaus in
every large centre for the purpose of
registering the unemployed men and
women workers; the abolition of all
private agencies; and the provision by
the government, municipal, provincial
and federal, of publlo work to which
such labor may be applied.
"Believing that the Urge number of
irresponsible societies and agencies promoting immigration to Canada are
more concerned in getting rid of an
alleged surplus of labor in the older
countries than they are of supplying
the genuine needs of the Dominion,
your committee recommends that steps
be taken to curtail the operations of
Buch societies and that the governments, provincial nnd federal, be requested to disassociate themselves from
all such enterprises instead of bonuslng
them and making grants to them from
upblic funds.
"Your committeo 18 nisofof opinion
that a complete change of methods is
necessary if immigration in the future
is to be controlled effectively and efficiently. At present each society engaged in the business is a law unto
itself and follows its own particular
method and idea. The committee favors tho establishment of a central
board as a department of the Imperial
government, to which a representative
of each Dominion might be added, such
board to have complete control of all
emigration from the Britlah Isles, all
agencies being compelled to take a license from this board, which license
could be revoked by the same authority
if in its judgment it was desirable to
terminate the activities of any agency.
The committee draws attention to the
continual influx of Asiatics to Canada,
especially of Chinese and Japanese,
and recommends that the Congress reiterate its previous opinion that exclusion of all Asiatics is desirable. The
committee also expresses satisfaction
that Manitoba and Saskatchewan have
adopted a law protecting white girls
by prohibiting their employment by
Orientals and urges that provincial
executives be instructed to seek similar
legislation in other provinces.
. '"The report of the delegate to the
Western Labor Immigration Conference appearing on page 32 of Officers'
Reports was considered by the committee. There can be little doubt that
the opening of the Panama canal will
increase the intensity of the immigration problem by throwing the Pacific
ports open to European passenger shipping and the committee desires to ex-
prepare and submit to the government
a bill covering thi^ proposition."
■fraternal Delegatea.
Owing to the decision Oof the British Tradea Congress against the holding of el convention thia year,. thli
necessarily carried with it the postponement of an exchange of fraternal
delegatea, and the Britlah fraternal waa
missing this year from the Congress
platform, while Alphonse Verville retains the position of fraternal delegate
to the next British Congreaa whenever
it ia held.
Two, fraternal delegatea were preaent, Mortimer M. Donahue, from
Butte. Montana, repreientlng the
American Federation of Labor, and
Leonora O'Reilly, of New Tork, from
the Women's Tradea Union League of
America. Both of theae delegate!
"made good" and fulfilled their mission admirably. Some of the expressions of Delegate Donahue, coming
from the A. P. of L. delegate, were distinctly refreshing, as for instance: "If
the workeri would be free they muit
■trike their own blow;" and that
"nothing short of securing for the
workers the full value of the product
of their toll would satisfy organised labor." At another point, without knowing it, he repeated the Pettipiece war
slogan, that "as tho capitalists of the
world were to blame for all the wan,
they might very well be left to do their
own fighting."
Crothen sad the Unsn   '"""*
Interest at each session of the convention never flagged, but Thursday's
sessions prodnoed the highest tension.
Minister of Labor Crothen addressed
the gathering at the morning session of
that day and delivered the usual set
epeeeh for such occasions, with one
variation. That variation was an1 attempt to evoke applauae by appeala to
what still passes among politicians as
patriotism. It is distinctly to the credit
of the delegation that, although every
effort known to the platform waa expended in the attempt, the eonvention
remained silent and even frigid, If
the feelings of the delegates could have
been analysed it would have been found
that they were not without pity for the
speaker as he painfully labored hia lubject to a change.'
It wai at this session that the faulty
adminiatratlon of the "fair wages'*
regulations wai debated and Mr. Crothen wai kept busy replying to questions. The hottest fire came from the
delegates from the Welland canal dlitrlet.' The minister in reply drew a
word picture of a discontented farmer
all of whose orops had been a success
exeept a quarter-acre of turnips whioh
had rotted. "Evidently," he stated,
"there is a quarter-acre of turnips on
the Welland canal."
Some Credit must be given to the
man who could stand up on the defensive under such a fire as was this year
dlreeted against the administration of
the Labor department, bnt the afternoon session! brought the climax, when
the platform was taken by Messrs. Farrington and Foster, representing the
Vancouver Island minen,
Foster recounted the history of the
strike, which is well-known to the members of this council, taking care to
bring in all the negotiations with Labor
department. Farrington followed with
one of the most telling speeches that
the Trades Congress has ever listened
to. The presence on the same platform of the Minister of Labor added a
zest to the scathing denunciation of
government intrigue. When Farrington was through, the interest in 'what
Mr. Crothers might say in reply wai
manifest in every face. The long story
of dodging; of side-tracking, of thinly-
veiled antipathy, had been laid right
at the feet at the Minister of Labor in
an unmistakable manner. In the morning the mask of suavity had been
slightly lifted at times but in reply tb
Farrington it was completely laid aside
and the man Crothers stood out in hii
real character aa an enemy of effective
organization and the apologist for those
whose chief desire is to stamp out
trades unionism.
Mr. Crothen admitted having received a letter from Foster stating conditions on the island and asking for information as to procedure in obtaining
the services of the department, that
he had written promising to deal with
the matter immediately and that nothing was done for eight months. With
a smile and without a blush the Minis-
(Continued on page four.)
MINARD'S LINIMENT CURES
DI8TEMPER
CENTER & HANNA, Ltd.
UNDERTAKERS
Refined Service
1041 GEORGIA STREET
One Blook weat of Court House.
Uae  of Modern  Chapel and
Funeral  Parlors  free  to all
Patrona
PkeaeSey. 221 Day er Night
Nunn, Thomson & Clegg
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
and EMBALMERS
526 Klcharia St.        Vaaceevor, B. C.
HARRON BROS.
FUNERAL   niRECTORS  AND
EM.!ALMERS
Vancouver—Offlce and Chapel,
1034 Qranvllle St., Phone Sey. 3486.
North Vancouver — Offlce and
Chapel, 122—Sixth St. Weat, Phone
134.
DarANIsMCu.
Pfcoa.tWr.S43
PeHea.ACk.iael
2MIOiaa.aU. St.
MACK BROS.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS tad
EMBALMERS
Vancouver Britlah Columbia
Mr. Union Man
Are you eating Union-made Bread, are you
helping to maintain the Union Standard of living bf
using goods produced by Union Labor f
BREWER'S XL BREAD
has the Union Label on every loaf, and in quality
and flavor it is unexcelled.
Phone ^Highland 573 and we will call at your
house.
BREWER'S XL BAKERY,
Corner 4th Avenue and Commercial Street
HEALTH is mote to te desired and Is of more vital importance to tke
well-being tM —jolmn of the Individual tban greet riches. Poor
teeth sooner ot later oen poor health. .To he healthy we meet have
the power to aastallate our food. Befote tt cen ba aariailated, lt mtat
oo thoroughly digested, Mon lt can be digested It nest be tbofouUr
mattlgated, sad before It eta be mattlgttoA job. mart htve good teeth
with whieh to mtstlctte.
Owing to the itrlngency of the money market I am offering to do dentel
work at very moderate prion
SilverfiHing.     $100
PlatfaiitefiBbif.     2 00
Gold Crowns or Porcelaine Crowns.    5 00
Bridge-work, per tooth..     5 00
Plates.. .V    10 00
,    Dr. BRETT ANDERSON
Phone Seymour ssn
Offlee:  101 Bank of Ottawa BnUdtag
WHITE STAR ^r/JRVICHARGESr
Portland, He.
flea Portion*
Deo.   1st
Dee.   5th
Dee. latt
88. "Arable,1
third claaa
(tea HeWax
Dee.   Sri.,
Dee.   tlk...
Dee. l!th....
Halifax
Urerpool
..88. "Arable"—19,000 Teal
88. "Meiaatle"—19,000 Tou
88. "Iceland"—19,000 Haas
arable," 19,000 ton.7 000 feet'leii,° eaVriee oieei.ee eabin'jll) aad
paaaangwa.   88. "Hegentlo," 16,000 tou, aad 88. "Eeelasd, 19,000
 , carry flrat, aeeond and third elaaa naaaeaeara.
Special Taariat BloMlnf Cars to Ealltai, operated In connection with these
satllaf from Vancouver, 8. _ and Seattle, Wn.
WHITE STAB LINB
Hew Tork Queenstown Urerpool
Nov. S5tk—88. • Adriatic."      Dee. Sad—88. "Oediie."
Dee. 9th—New 88. "Lapland," 10.000 tona.
New Tork AMERICAN LINI Urerpool
TODBB TBI AKEBIOAW PLAO
ran nxrtiss orra olass oabdi io suvioi it.ooo-To> stbakbb*
Nov. 99th—88. "Philadelphia."       Dee. ISth—SSl'-St. Paul."
OonoWa OBcaa:   9I» Second Awnao. Seome.
PRIVATE GREETING CARDS MUST BE
ORDERED NOW FOR ENGLISH HAILS
'XMAS OOODS AERIVINO BVHBT DAT
ALL LINKS HOW BMNO SHOWN
Thomson Stationery Co., Ltd.
_  VANCOUVWI, B.C.
BSTABUBHBD tett
ttt HASTINOS STREET WBOT
BEST JN THI WEBT
LyteLI
EUROPEAN PLAN
HOTEL EMPRESS ■
P«d«fcla A. battt. Haw,
Hot and Cold Water ia
Every Room. 150 Rooms
Connected with Bathe.
raar- 235 hm-j^ st. l, vibco™, b. c. aaa-aaa I
PENDER HOTEL
91S PHDBB STBBBT WEST
_ New, Modem, PM-Claa.
Steam Heated, Eleelrle Idjhhd
Telephone Seymour 1999
Bale. 91.50 per Dap aad Dp
HOTEL REGENT Absolutely Fireproof. Looal and Lon(-Dlitance
HUIEili anuEUli Phone ln Every Room.Cafe In Connection SS«i
91.00 per day up.     Attractive Rates to Permanent Oueati ™'"
Ootttatbam a Beatty. Proprietors 	
THE POPULAB PRICED, EUROPEAN PLAN
HOTEL RITZ
VICTORIA, B.C.
FORT ST., AT DOUGLAS
RATES 75b, $1.00, $1.26, $1.60, $2.00
0. J. LOVEJOT, MOR. FREE AUTO BUS
J. LECKIE CO., LIMITED
SHOE
MANUFACTURERS
We manufacture every kind of
work ahoe. and specialize in liaco
'or minen, reiboad conirrucrj'on,
ofging, etc.
VANCOUVER  •  .   B.C
When You Want a
First-Class Beer
—ONE THAT TOU CAN'T BEAT AT ANT FBIOE, TN ANT n
COUNTRY, OET BEER WITH THIS LABEL ON, PINTS, UX H
FOB nr TY OENTB. """   *"
BEEWED AND BOTTLED IN VANOOUVER BT
VANCOUVER BREWERIES, Ltd.
■ I   ■ I PAGE FOUR
.THE BRITISH COLUMBIA FEDERATIONIST
FRIDAY NOVEMBER 13, I
Special for To-Morrow!s
Shoppers Only
MEN'S FALL SUITS
Worth up to
$27.50
Saturday's Price.
$8.75
They are high grade Suits, cut in single-breasted
style, and hand-tailored from imported tweeds, worsteds and navy serges. Only 30 suits to sell at this
price, representing odd sizes and broken lines of our
highest grade stocks, which can be relied upon to
give excellent satisfaction.
Sizes range as follows:
34  35  36  37  38  39  40  42  44
"232955774
I
Actual Values to tfjQ *7C
$27.50 Snap Price . CpOe I O
Mlip5udsotfsBau(fornpanjj. fiSt
\__   .    ^J .. ______\    __        I"11" '  1-WW.IWilt teilMllliWIl _\_~\J
GEORGIA AND GRANVILLE STREETS
JOHNSTON & SALSBURY
The Hardwaremen
SUCCESSORS TO
McTAGGART & MOSCROP
We carry a complete line of MECHANICS' GQODS, including SANDS' LEVELS. FRISCO MASONS' TAPE.
STANLEY'S PLANES. LEVELS. *tc. STAR-
REITS FINE TOOLS. SIMONDS* SAWS, CORBIN
LOCKS. SETS.
PHONE SEYMOUR (34 46  HA8TING8 ST.  EAST
THL CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
Capita
.119,009,000        Rut.
,.911,909,090
Main Offlee: Corner Hastings and Granville Streets, Vanoouver.
CITY BRANCHES
HASTINOS anl CAMBIE...
BAST UND	
COMMERCIAL DRIVE 	
FAIRVIBW	
MOUNT PLEASANT	
KITSILANO	
POWELL STREET —
SOUTH HILL 	
LOCATION
 Cer. Haatinga ana Cambie Streets.
......Cor. Pender and Main Streeta.
 ..Cor. Flrat Avenue and Commercial Drive,
—Cor. Sixth Avenue Oft Oranvllle Street
.......Cor. Elihth Avenue and Main Street
—Cor. Fourth Avenue and Tew Street.
 Cor. Victoria Drive and Powell Street
.......Cor. Forty-fourth Avenue aad Fraaer Road.
Also North Vanoouver Branch, cor.   Lonedale Ave.  end   Esplanade.
COAL!!
WHICH WILL YOU
SUPPORT ?
The Company whioh sells
BRITISH COLUMBIA
OOAL
«.■■
The Company which sells
AMERICAN
OOAL
and Employs
White Labor
and Employs
Oriental Labor
Fifteen Tears in Vancouver Coal Trade
.WELLINGTON AND COMOX COAL
WHITE LABOR ONLY
MACDONALD MARPOLE CO., Ltd.
437 Seymour Street Phone Sey. 210
Named Shoes are frequently made in Nob-*
Union Factories—Do Not Boy Any Shoe
no matter what Its name, unless It bears a
plain and readable Impression or tbls stamp.
AU sboes without tbe Union Stamp sre
always Non-Union.
BOOT A SHOE WORKERS' UNION
348 Bummer Street, Boston, Mus.
J. F. Tobto, Pros.   0. L. Blaine, Soo.-Treas.
When purchaalng ready-made
clothing, overalle, aprona, etc., alwaya na that thla labal la aewad In
or on i
M*PS5Tg<3RBetP
WORKERS UNiON/ ___*
BOOTS
UD
UNIOIWSrAMP
THIS LABEL
IB A GUARANTEE   THAT
LEATHER
OOODS  ARE
MADE   UNDER
FAIR  CONDITIONS
ADDING TO VANCOUVER'S PAYROLL.
The above cut will give Federationist readers some idea of the growth of Leekie's shoe factory from a modest
beginning only a few years ago. It is located on the corner of Cambie and Water streets. Over 100 men are now employed in the operating department and at present many of them are working overtime on an order whieh has been
received by Mr. Leckie for 9,800 pairs of shoes for the army. In fact the pay roll last month was the largest in the
history of the faotory. If the present increase continues,.there should soon be ample room for a live local of the International Boot and Shoe Workers-1 International union. In the past, the firm has specialized in loggers' boots, but now
a variety of styles are,being manufactured that compare more than favorably with boots and shoes imported from the
United States and elsewhere. ■ ;
TROTTER'S REPORT
OFT.&LCOFC.
CONVENTION
(Continued from page 3)
ter of Labor said that he "had simply
forgotten all about it."
His reply to Farrington was a repetition of what haB already appeared in
Hansard in connection with this ease
and was chiefly a running comment on
a letter of Farrington's which appeared
in the Mine Workers' Journal. The
subject mater of the letter and its
meaning may have been twisted to suit
the Minister's views when ho used it
ln the House of Commons, but no such
thing was possible at the Trades Congress, and as passage after passage of
the supposedly iniquitous letter was
applauded by the delegates, the Minister of Labor was clearly disconcerted,
and must have realized long before he
was finished that, in common parlance,
he was simply "making a fool of him<
aelf."
Farrington, in closing his address,
had, amid the applause of the delegates,
declared that although temporary victory, such as it waB, rested with the
coal magnates and their allies the
Minister. of Labor and other government officials, tUat the itrike would be
fought all over again until the United
Mine WorkerB of America had succeeded in establishing decent working
conditions in the mines of Vancouver
Island. Replying to this the Minister
ol Labor, concluding his remarks, mustered up all the venom at his command
and stated that "so far aB the miners-*
Btrike on Vancouver island waB concerned, it was .dead, dead, dead. All
that remained to be done was to pronounce upon it the usual words of ashes
to ashes and dust to dust.*"
There may have been, somewhere,
someone who could at that moment be
proud of the Canadian minister of labor, but he could not be found at the
tradeB congress convention, and there is
doubt whether he could be found in the
Canadian cabinet. Perhaps it is not a
far-fetched belief that Thomas Crothers, M. P., sang his swan song at the
1914 convention of the Trades and Labor congresB.
So that there could be no doubt as to
the attitude of the congress on this
question Delegate Rigg, of Winnipeg,
submitted the following, resolution
which was adopted unanimously:
"WhereaB — Th« convention has
heard the Vancouver island strike situation presented by Brothers Robert
Foster, president of the Vancouver island miners, and Frank Farrington, representing the international union.
United Mine WorkerB of America, and
have heard Minister of Labor Crothers
defend the position of the department
in connection therewith; therefore be it
"Resolved—That the members of the
Trades and Labor congress of Canada,
as represented by its delegates assembled at the St..John convention, approve in the strongest terms the efforts
of the Vancouver island miners to improve their conditions of labor, first by
arbitration, then by striking, and be it
further ,
"Resolved—That we commend the
miners for having affiliated with the U.
M. W. of A., and urge them to continue
their affiliation f and be lt still further
"Resolved—That we condemn the
minister of labor for having failed to
use impartially the great power of his
office to bring about on equitable settlement of the Vancouver island strike."
Elections.
Probably no delegate was more anxious when the time for elections came
than tho delegate of this council, especially seeing that The Federationist had
announce that I could not return home
unless Vancouver was the next convention city. Opposition to this was in evidence all week, but was lacking in de*
finiteness of aim, as no other place was
really placed in the field until tho last
day. Windsor, Ottawa, Berlin aid St.
Catherines was eventually nominated.
As usual tho extreme west found strong
allies in the extreme east, and Vancouver won by a vote of 67 as against 42
for St. Catherines.
Tho officers were all re-elected for another term on the executive council, and j
Delegate Bigg, of Winnipeg, was elected as fraternal delegate to the American Federation of Labor convention in
Philadelphia, received 80 votes against
36 for Delegate Lodge of Ottawa.
From the assurances given by numbers of delegates at the St. John convention and at other places visited by
your delegate, it is practically certain
that there is a very general desire to
visit the trades congress convention
next year in Vancouver, and with anything like average conditions there
should be a large gathering on the Pacific coast next September. It is perhaps just as well that Vancouver
Trades and Labor council Bhould know
that these people are coming with large
expectations, and that there is some record as to receptions which will have to
be equalled if not surpassed.. Respectfully submitted,      W. R. TROTTER.
TRADB  UNION  DIRECTORY
Allied Printing Trades Counoll—P. R
Fleming, P. O. Box M.
Bakers—J. Black, Room ISO, labor
Temple,
Barbers—C. F. Burkhart, Room 101, Labor Temple.
Bartenders—-Geo. W, Curnoch, Room
108, Labor Temple),
Blacksmiths — Malcolm Porter, View
Hill P. O.
Bookbinders—Oeo. Mowat, BIS  Dunlevy
avenue.
Boilermakers—A Fraser. 1161 Hows St.
Brewery  Workers—Frank  Graham, 2268
12th Avenue West
Bricklayers—William 8. Dagnall, Room
216, Labor Temple.
Brotherhood of Carpentera Dlstriot Council—Jas. Bltcon, Room 202, Labor
Temple.
Hod Carriers, Builders and Common Laborers—John Sully, Room 220, Labor
Temple.
Clgarmakers—Robt J. Craig, ean Kurts
Cigar Factory, 72 Water Street
Cooks, Watters, Waitresses — W. E.
Walker, Room 203, Labor Temple.
Electrical Workers (outside)—W. F.
Dunn, Room 207, Labor Temple.
Electrical Workera (Inside)—Room 297;
F. L. Estinghausen.
Engineers—L. Dawson, Room 216, Labor
Temple,
Granite Cutters—Edward Hurry, Columbia Hotel.
Garment Workera—Miss McRae, Labor
Temple.
Glassworkers—Charles Roberts, Labor
Temple,
Ground men's Union (I. B. E. W.)—R.
McBaln, care of B. C. B. R.
Horseshoers — A. C. MacArthur, City
Heights, B.C,
Ltttercarrlers—Robt Wight District 22.
Lathers—Victor R.  Mldgley, Box  1044.
Loco, Firemen and Engineers—James
Patrick, 1188 Homer atreet.
Loco. Engineer.*—A. E, Solloway, 1022
Pacific.   Tel. Sey. 8671L.
Longshoremen—Geo, Thomas, 141 Alexander Street
Machinists—J. H. McVety, Room 211,
Labor Temple.
Miners, w. F. of M.—R. p. Pettlplece,
Room 217, Labor Temple.
Musicians—H, J. Brasfleld, Rooms 29-80,
Williams Bldg., 418 Oranvllle atreet.
Marbleworkers—Frank Hall, Janes Road,
B. C.
Molders—D.,Brown, 642 Broadway West.
Moving Picture Operators—L, E, Goodman, Room 100, Loo Building.
Photo Engravers—A. Kraft Dominion
Ennraving Co., Empire Block.
Painters—J. Train, Room 808, Labor
Temple.
Plumbers—Room 218 Labor Temple.
Pressmen-P. D. Edward, Labor Temple,
Plasterers—John James Cornish, 1801
Eleventh Ave. East.
Pattern Makers—J. Campbell, 4869 Argyle Street.
vuarhr Workers—Jamee Hepburn, ears
Columbia Hotel,
Railway Conductors—0. W, Hatch, 711
Beatty street
Railroad Trainmen—A. E. McCorvlIlt,
Box 248.
Railway Carmen—A. Robb, 420 Nelson
Btreet. ,
Seamen's Union—Cor. Main and Hastings.
Structural Iron Workers—W. L. Tula,
Room 80S, Labor Temple,
b ton ecutters—James Rayburn, P. O, Box
1047.
Sheet Metal Workers—H. C. Dougan, No.
6, Fifteenth Ave. West.
Street Railway Employeea—A. V. Lofting, 2686 Trinity Street
Stereotypers—W. Bayley, care Province,
City.
Telegraphers—E. B. Peppln, Box 482,
Tradee and Labor Counoll—Oeo, Bartley,
Room 210 Labor Temple.
Typographical—H.  Neelands, Box 66.
Tailors—C. McDonald, Box E02.
Theatrical     Stage     Employees—Gordon
Martin, 687 Prior street
Tllelayers   and   Helpers—Evan Thomas,
Labor Temple.
Upholsterers—A. Duthle. 1068 Homer St,
MINARD'S   LINIMENT   CURE8
COLD8, ETC.
FALL HATS
THE LATEST STYLES AND
NOVELTIES IN
MEN'S HATS In BORSAUNO,
HAWES, STETSON
and other high-grade makes
PRICES:
$2.50 to $5.
Clubb& Stewart
LIMITED
309-315 Hastings Street West.
Tel. Ber. 70S
TO READERS OF THE B. C. FEDERATIONIST
I have under formation a Oompany for tbe purpoie of
breeding Silver Black Foxei in captivity in Britieh Columbia.
This industry, after careful investigation in Eastern Canada
and the world'e Pur-buying centres, impresses me with its
almost unlimited possibilities. We already have our Ranch
in going order and have a very fine stock of Foxes, obtained
under most favorable conditions,
Our oompany will not be widely advertised as but a few
shares will be available to the General Public.
.   If you are interested drop me a line to Revelstoke, and
I will see that you get a Prospectus when ready.
Very small sums oan be invested.
W. W. LEFEAUX,
(Late of Labor Temple Building.) Revelstoke, B. 0.
$5 Down and $5 per Month
■-   No Interest—No Taxes
Secures You a Choice 10-Acre Farm
Cell er write tt once fer fell particular, of thl. eholee .crew, eltutte Is
the he»rt ef the Bell. Cool, end Llllooet Dletrleta. Open meadow-like land
evltehle for mixed faming, chicken renohlng or hot raising. Soil > rich ailty
loam. Plenty of good water, the land lying on, river and lake. Good road,
telegraph and telephone comnnleatlon right to the property, will have railroad communication with Vancouver in a ahort time.   Price only 130 per acre.
3.1. EAKDJ * CO.
SOS Holden Building
16 Haatinga Street East
Vancouver, B. C.
Phone Seymour 8888
Name,
Addreaa.
PHONE SEYMOUR 9086
:0&$(HC£
BUSINESS
AS USUAL
RENTS  COLLECTED
Principal and Interest
on Agreements for Sale,
Interest on Mortgages,
Etc., Collected
SPECIAL
FACILITIES
Very Moderate Charges
Prompt Settlement
DOW FRASER TRuA CO.
122 Hastings St. West.
Vancouver, and McKay Station,
Burnaby, B.C.
Clot, at 1 o'clock Saturday.
Special
Edison
Phonograph
Outfit, No. 10
$46.80
Outfit Includes cabinet of Famed Oik
beautifully finished, hinged cover,
very latest hornless type of phono*
graph, giving the purest tonal quality,
new type diamond pointed reproducer.
Powerful spring motor perfectly adjusted and regulated. Removable
front and top. Outfit includes 13 four*
minute Blue Amberol (indestructible)
records of your own selection. Terms
. .0.80 cash, balance tt the rate of
15.00 per month.
THE
KENT
PIANO GO. Ltd.
558 GRANVILLE ST.
MOUNT PLEASANT HEADQUARTERS
For Hardware, Stoves and Ranges— '
Everything for the Kitchen
W. R. OWEN & MORRISON
Phone Fair. 447 2387 Main Street
Minard's Liniment Co., Limited.
Gentlemen,—Last winter I received great
benefit from the use of MINARD'S LINIMENT In a severe attack of LaGrlppe, and
I have frequently proved It to be very effect*
Ive lo eases of Inflammation,
Tours,
V. A. HUTCHINSON
Phone Seymour 9288
WESTERN CANADA LIQUOR CO.
Lee R. Barkley, Agent
137 WATER STREET

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